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Sample records for photosynthetic membrane expression

  1. Phosphorylation stoichiometry determination in plant photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Ingelsson, Björn; Fristedt, Rikard; Turkina, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes different strategies for the study of phosphorylation dynamics and stoichiometry in photosynthetic membranes. Detailed procedures for the detection, large-scale identification, and quantification of phosphorylated proteins optimized for plant thylakoid proteins are given. PMID:25930698

  2. Photosynthetic gene expression in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Berry, James O; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Zielinski, Amy M; Mure, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Within the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, photosynthesis converts light into biological energy, fueling the assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide into biologically useful molecules. Two major steps, photosynthetic electron transport and the Calvin-Benson cycle, require many gene products encoded from chloroplast as well as nuclear genomes. The expression of genes in both cellular compartments is highly dynamic and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Light is the primary environmental determinant of photosynthetic gene expression. Working through photoreceptors such as phytochrome, light regulates photosynthetic genes at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Other processes that affect photosynthetic gene expression include photosynthetic activity, development, and biotic and abiotic stress. Anterograde (from nucleus to chloroplast) and retrograde (from chloroplast to nucleus) signaling insures the highly coordinated expression of the many photosynthetic genes between these different compartments. Anterograde signaling incorporates nuclear-encoded transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators, such as sigma factors and RNA-binding proteins, respectively. Retrograde signaling utilizes photosynthetic processes such as photosynthetic electron transport and redox signaling to influence the expression of photosynthetic genes in the nucleus. The basic C3 photosynthetic pathway serves as the default form used by most of the plant species on earth. High temperature and water stress associated with arid environments have led to the development of specialized C4 and CAM photosynthesis, which evolved as modifications of the basic default expression program. The goal of this article is to explain and summarize the many gene expression and regulatory processes that work together to support photosynthetic function in plants.

  3. A Model for Prediction of Heat Stability of Photosynthetic Membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous study has revealed a positive correlation between heat-induced damage to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoid membranes) and chlorophyll loss. In this study, we exploited this correlation and developed a model for prediction of thermal damage to thylakoids. Prediction is based on estimat...

  4. Fluctuating Two-State Light Harvesting in a Photosynthetic Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Duohai; Hu, Dehong; Liu, Ruchuan; Zeng, Xiaohua; Kaplan, Samuel; Lu, H. Peter

    2007-06-28

    How light is converted into chemical energy in a natural photosynthetic system is of great interest in energy sciences. Using single-molecule and single-vesicle fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, we have observed fluctuating inter-molecular protein energy transfers in the photosynthetic membranes of R. sphaeroides. Our results suggest that there are dynamic coupled and non-coupled states in the light-harvesting protein assembly.

  5. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion.

  6. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  7. Addition of lipid to the photosynthetic membrane: effects on membrane structure and energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experiments in which the lipid composition of the photosynthetic membrane has been altered by the addition of lipid from a defined source under experimental conditions. Liposomes prepared by sonication are mixed with purified photosynthetic membranes obtained from spinach chloroplasts and are taken through cycles of freezing and thawing. Several lines of evidence, including gel electrophoresis and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, indicate that an actual addition of lipid has taken place. Structural analysis by freeze-fracture shows that intramembrane particles are widely separated after the addition of large amounts of lipid, with one exception: large hexagonal lattices of particles appear in some regions of the membrane. These lattices are identical in appearance with lattices formed from a single purified component of the membrane known as chlorophyll-protein complex II. The suggestion that the presence of such lattices in lipid-enriched membranes reflects a profound rearrangement of photosynthetic structures has been confirmed by analysis of the fluorescence emission spectra of natural and lipid- enriched membranes. Specifically, lipid addition in each of the cases we have studied results in the apparent detachment of chlorophyll- protein complex II from photosynthetic reaction centers. It is concluded that specific arrangements of components in the photosynthetic membrane, necessary for the normal functioning of the membrane in the light reaction of photosynthesis, can be regulated to a large extent by the lipid content of the membrane. PMID:7298712

  8. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  9. Environmentally modulated phosphorylation and dynamics of proteins in photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Vener, Alexander V

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in vectorial proteomics of protein domains exposed to the surface of photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of plants and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii allowed mapping of in vivo phosphorylation sites in integral and peripheral membrane proteins. In plants, significant changes of thylakoid protein phosphorylation are observed in response to stress, particularly in photosystem II under high light or high temperature stress. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation in the algae is much more responsive to the ambient redox and light conditions, as well as to CO(2) availability. The light-dependent multiple and differential phosphorylation of CP29 linker protein in the green algae is suggested to control photosynthetic state transitions and uncoupling of light harvesting proteins from photosystem II under high light. The similar role for regulation of the dynamic distribution of light harvesting proteins in plants is proposed for the TSP9 protein, which together with other recently discovered peripheral proteins undergoes specific environment- and redox-dependent phosphorylation at the thylakoid surface. This review focuses on the environmentally modulated reversible phosphorylation of thylakoid proteins related to their membrane dynamics and affinity towards particular photosynthetic protein complexes. PMID:17184728

  10. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum. PMID:26536265

  11. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum.

  12. A novel plant protein undergoing light-induced phosphorylation and release from the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Carlberg, Inger; Hansson, Maria; Kieselbach, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang P.; Andersson, Bertil; Vener, Alexander V.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of a phosphoprotein with a relative electrophoretic mobility of 12 kDa have been unknown during two decades of studies on redox-dependent protein phosphorylation in plant photosynthetic membranes. Digestion of this protein from spinach thylakoid membranes with trypsin and subsequent tandem nanospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the peptides revealed a protein sequence that did not correspond to any previously known protein. Sequencing of the corresponding cDNA uncovered a gene for a precursor protein with a transit peptide followed by a strongly basic mature protein with a molecular mass of 8,640 Da. Genes encoding homologous proteins were found on chromosome 3 of Arabidopsis and rice as well as in ESTs from 20 different plant species, but not from any other organisms. The protein can be released from the membrane with high salt and is also partially released in response to light-induced phosphorylation of thylakoids, in contrast to all other known thylakoid phosphoproteins, which are integral to the membrane. On the basis of its properties, this plant-specific protein is named thylakoid soluble phosphoprotein of 9 kDa (TSP9). Mass spectrometric analyses revealed the existence of non-, mono-, di-, and triphosphorylated forms of TSP9 and phosphorylation of three distinct threonine residues in the central part of the protein. The phosphorylation and release of TSP9 from the photosynthetic membrane on illumination favor participation of this basic protein in cell signaling and regulation of plant gene expression in response to changing light conditions. PMID:12524456

  13. A novel plant protein undergoing light-induced phosphorylation and release from the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, Inger; Hansson, Maria; Kieselbach, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Andersson, Bertil; Vener, Alexander V

    2003-01-21

    The characteristics of a phosphoprotein with a relative electrophoretic mobility of 12 kDa have been unknown during two decades of studies on redox-dependent protein phosphorylation in plant photosynthetic membranes. Digestion of this protein from spinach thylakoid membranes with trypsin and subsequent tandem nanospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the peptides revealed a protein sequence that did not correspond to any previously known protein. Sequencing of the corresponding cDNA uncovered a gene for a precursor protein with a transit peptide followed by a strongly basic mature protein with a molecular mass of 8,640 Da. Genes encoding homologous proteins were found on chromosome 3 of Arabidopsis and rice as well as in ESTs from 20 different plant species, but not from any other organisms. The protein can be released from the membrane with high salt and is also partially released in response to light-induced phosphorylation of thylakoids, in contrast to all other known thylakoid phosphoproteins, which are integral to the membrane. On the basis of its properties, this plant-specific protein is named thylakoid soluble phosphoprotein of 9 kDa (TSP9). Mass spectrometric analyses revealed the existence of non-, mono-, di-, and triphosphorylated forms of TSP9 and phosphorylation of three distinct threonine residues in the central part of the protein. The phosphorylation and release of TSP9 from the photosynthetic membrane on illumination favor participation of this basic protein in cell signaling and regulation of plant gene expression in response to changing light conditions. PMID:12524456

  14. Revealing Linear Aggregates of Light Harvesting Antenna Proteins in Photosynthetic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Zeng, Xiaohua; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Rajapaksha, Suneth; Kaplan, Samuel; Lu, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    How light energy is harvested in a natural photosynthetic membrane through energy transfer is closely related to the stoichiometry and arrangement of light harvesting antenna proteins in the membrane. The specific photosynthetic architecture facilitates a rapid and efficient energy transfer among the light harvesting proteins (LH2 and LH1) and to the reaction center. Here we report the identification of linear aggregates of light harvesting proteins, LH2, in the photosynthetic membranes under ambient conditions by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and spectroscopic analysis. Our results suggest that the light harvesting protein, LH2, can exist as linear aggregates of 4±2 proteins in the photosynthetic membranes and that the protein distributions are highly heterogeneous. In the photosynthetic membranes examined in our measurements, the ratio of the aggregated to the non-aggregated LH2 proteins is about 3:1 to 5:1 depending on the intensity of the illumination used during sample incubation and on the bacterial species. AFM images further identify that the LH2 proteins in the linear aggregates are monotonically tilted at an angle 4°±2° from the plane of the photosynthetic membranes. The aggregates result in red-shifted absorption and emission spectra that are measured using various mutant membranes, including an LH2 knock-out, LH1 knock-out, and LH2 at different population densities. Measuring the fluorescence lifetimes of purified LH2 and LH2 in membranes, we have observed that the LH2 proteins in membranes exhibit biexponential lifetime decays whereas the purified LH2 proteins gave single exponential lifetime decays. We attribute that the two lifetime components originate from the existence of both aggregated and non-aggregated LH2 proteins in the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:19572507

  15. Effect of Chlamydomonas plastid terminal oxidase 1 expressed in tobacco on photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Streb, Peter; Cornic, Gabriel; Perreau, François; Kruk, Jerzy; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase PTOX is a plastohydroquinone:oxygen oxidoreductase that is important for carotenoid biosynthesis and plastid development. Its role in photosynthesis is controversially discussed. Under a number of abiotic stress conditions, the protein level of PTOX increases. PTOX is thought to act as a safety valve under high light protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage. However, transformants with high PTOX level were reported to suffer from photoinhibition. To analyze the effect of PTOX on the photosynthetic electron transport, tobacco expressing PTOX-1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1) was studied by chlorophyll fluorescence, thermoluminescence, P700 absorption kinetics and CO2 assimilation. Cr-PTOX1 was shown to compete very efficiently with the photosynthetic electron transport for PQH2 . High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed that the PQ pool was highly oxidized in the transformant. Immunoblots showed that, in the wild-type, PTOX was associated with the thylakoid membrane only at a relatively alkaline pH value while it was detached from the membrane at neutral pH. We present a model proposing that PTOX associates with the membrane and oxidizes PQH2 only when the oxidation of PQH2 by the cytochrome b6 f complex is limiting forward electron transport due to a high proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane.

  16. Effect of Chlamydomonas plastid terminal oxidase 1 expressed in tobacco on photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Streb, Peter; Cornic, Gabriel; Perreau, François; Kruk, Jerzy; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase PTOX is a plastohydroquinone:oxygen oxidoreductase that is important for carotenoid biosynthesis and plastid development. Its role in photosynthesis is controversially discussed. Under a number of abiotic stress conditions, the protein level of PTOX increases. PTOX is thought to act as a safety valve under high light protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage. However, transformants with high PTOX level were reported to suffer from photoinhibition. To analyze the effect of PTOX on the photosynthetic electron transport, tobacco expressing PTOX-1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1) was studied by chlorophyll fluorescence, thermoluminescence, P700 absorption kinetics and CO2 assimilation. Cr-PTOX1 was shown to compete very efficiently with the photosynthetic electron transport for PQH2 . High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed that the PQ pool was highly oxidized in the transformant. Immunoblots showed that, in the wild-type, PTOX was associated with the thylakoid membrane only at a relatively alkaline pH value while it was detached from the membrane at neutral pH. We present a model proposing that PTOX associates with the membrane and oxidizes PQH2 only when the oxidation of PQH2 by the cytochrome b6 f complex is limiting forward electron transport due to a high proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. PMID:26663146

  17. VIPP1 Has a Disordered C-Terminal Tail Necessary for Protecting Photosynthetic Membranes against Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingang; Kondo, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of biomembranes is vital to living organisms. In bacteria, PspA is considered to act as repairing damaged membrane by forming large supercomplexes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Vulnerable to oxidative stress, photosynthetic organisms also contain a PspA ortholog called VIPP1, which has an additional C-terminal tail (Vc). In this study, Vc was shown to coincide with an intrinsically disordered region, and the role of VIPP1 in membrane protection against stress was investigated. We visualized VIPP1 by fusing it to GFP (VIPP1-GFP that fully complemented lethal vipp1 mutations), and investigated its behavior in vivo with live imaging. The intrinsically disordered nature of Vc enabled VIPP1 to form what appeared to be functional particles along envelopes, whereas the deletion of Vc caused excessive association of the VIPP1 particles, preventing their active movement for membrane protection. Expression of VIPP1 lacking Vc complemented vipp1 mutation, but exhibited sensitivity to heat shock stress. Conversely, transgenic plants over-expressing VIPP1 showed enhanced tolerance against heat shock, suggesting that Vc negatively regulates VIPP1 particle association and acts in maintaining membrane integrity. Our data thus indicate that VIPP1 is involved in the maintenance of photosynthetic membranes. During evolution, chloroplasts have acquired enhanced tolerance against membrane stress by incorporating a disordered C-terminal tail into VIPP1. PMID:27208228

  18. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C₃ or C₄), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress.

  19. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants, especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C3 or C4), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  20. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C₃ or C₄), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  1. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  2. Isolation of detergent-resistant membranes from plant photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic tissues.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Salazar, Laura; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Enríquez-Arredondo, Consuelo; Vázquez-Vázquez, Christian; González de la Vara, Luis E; Gavilanes-Ruíz, Marina

    2011-10-15

    Microdomains, or lipid rafts, are transient membrane regions enriched in sphingolipids and sterols that have only recently, but intensively, been studied in plants. In this work, we report a detailed, easy-to-follow, and fast procedure to isolate detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) from purified plasma membranes (PMs) that was used to obtain DRMs from Phaseolus vulgaris and Nicotiana tabacum leaves and germinating Zea mays embryos. Characterized according to yield, ultrastructure, and sterol composition, these DRM preparations showed similarities to analogous preparations from other eukaryotic cells. Isolation of DRMs from germinating maize embryos reveals the presence of microdomains at very early developmental stages of plants.

  3. Photosynthetic bacteria production from food processing wastewater in sequencing batch and membrane photo-bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2012-01-01

    Application of photosynthetic process could be highly efficient and surpass anaerobic treatment in releasing less greenhouse gas and odor while the biomass produced can be utilized. The combination of photosynthetic process with membrane separation is possibly effective for water reclamation and biomass production. In this study, cultivation of mixed culture photosynthetic bacteria from food processing wastewater was investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) supplied with infrared light. Both photo-bioreactors were operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days. Higher MLSS concentration achieved in the MBR through complete retention of biomass resulted in a slightly improved performance. When the system was operated with MLSS controlled by occasional sludge withdrawal, total biomass production of MBR and SBR photo-bioreactor was almost equal. However, 64.5% of total biomass production was washed out with the effluent in SBR system. Consequently, the higher biomass could be recovered for utilization in MBR. PMID:22258682

  4. State of Brassica rapa photosynthetic membranes in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Adamchuk, N I; Guikema, J A; Jialo, S; Hilaire, E

    2002-07-01

    The structural characteristics of the photosynthetic apparatus of Brassica rapa plants grown on board the space shuttle Columbia (STS-87) for 15 days were examined using the methods of transmission electron microscopy and statistic programme STAT. Maintaining of the same growth conditions for control plants was realized with great accuracy using the Orbiter Environmental simulator in Kennedy Space Center. A grana number per a medial section 1.8 times decreased in microgravity. Considerable changes were also revealed in the grana structure in microgravity in comparison with th ground control, namely: 1/a greater diversity in the thylakoid length with granae and 2/ lateral shifting of the thylakoids lateral shifting of the thylakoids relative one to another. The previous mentioned pheomenon was found for 64% of the invested granae. Shifting of the thylakoids in the granae in microgravity led to increasing of the grana thylakoid surface exposed to a stroma. In addition, the volume of stromal thylakoids increased. The peculiarities in the photosynthetic apparatus structure in microgravity are supposed to be an evidence of decreasing in the light harvesting complex amount of photosystem II (PSII).

  5. Inelastic neutron scattering study of light-induced dynamics of a photosynthetic membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, A.; Stoeckli, A.

    2010-01-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering was employed to study photoeffects on the molecular dynamics of membranes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The main photoactive parts of this biomolecular system are the chlorophyll molecules whose dynamics were found to be affected under illumination by visible light in a twofold manner. First, vibrational modes are excited at energies of 12(2) and 88(21) cm{sup -1}. Second, a partial 'freezing' of rotational modes is observed at energies of 1.2(3) and 2.9(5) cm{sup -1}. These results are attributed to a possible coupling between molecular motions and particular mechanisms in the photosynthetic process.

  6. Biogenesis of cytochrome b6 in photosynthetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Wollman, Francis-André

    2009-01-01

    In chloroplasts, binding of a c′-heme to cytochrome b6 on the stromal side of the thylakoid membranes requires a specific mechanism distinct from the one at work for c-heme binding to cytochromes f and c6 on the lumenal side of membranes. Here, we show that the major protein components of this pathway, the CCBs, are bona fide transmembrane proteins. We demonstrate their association in a series of hetero-oligomeric complexes, some of which interact transiently with cytochrome b6 in the process of heme delivery to the apoprotein. In addition, we provide preliminary evidence for functional assembly of cytochrome b6f complexes even in the absence of c′-heme binding to cytochrome b6. Finally, we present a sequential model for apo- to holo-cytochrome b6 maturation integrated within the assembly pathway of b6f complexes in the thylakoid membranes. PMID:19564403

  7. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  8. Simple Colorimetric Determination of the Manganese Content in Photosynthetic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Seibert, M.

    2009-01-01

    The functional Mn content of intact photosystem II membrane fragments was measured as 4.06 {+-} 0.13 Mn/reaction center when determined using a simple, sensitive colorimetric assay that will also work with thylakoids and core complexes. This procedure requires minimal sample material, does not need expensive assay equipment, requires four simple steps, and only takes 20-30 min to perform. These include (a) removal of the adventitious Mn ions by CaCl{sub 2} treatment of the membranes, (b) extraction of the Mn from the O{sub 2}-evolving complex with hydrochloric acid, (c) purification of the extract by centrifugation followed by filtration of the supernatant through an Acrodisc syringe filter (0.2 {micro}m nylon membrane), and (d) colorimetric determination of Mn in the extract using the reaction of the chromogenic agent, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, with previously oxidized Mn(II) cations carried out at high pH. The colorimetric assay itself has been used previously by Serrat (Mikrochim Acta 129:77-80, 1998) for assaying Mn concentrations in sea water and drinking water.

  9. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  10. Entropy and biological systems: experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-01-01

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg(2+)-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl₂ with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components. PMID:24561561

  11. Entropy and biological systems: Experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-02-01

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg2+-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl2 with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components.

  12. Photoproduction of hydrogen by membranes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J D; Olson, J M

    1980-01-01

    Photoproduction of H/sub 2/ from ascorbate by unit-membrane vesicles from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum was achieved with a system containing gramicidin D, tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, methyl viologen, dithioerythritol, Clostridium hydrogenase, and an oxygen-scavenging mixture of glucose, glucose oxidase, ethanol, and catalase. Maximum quantum yield was less than one percent. Half maximum rate of H/sub 2/ production occurred at a white-light intensity of approximately 0.15 cm/sup -2/. The reaction was inhibited completely by 0.3% sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, 1% Triton X-100, or preheating the vesicles at 100/sup 0/C for 5 minutes. Low concentrations (0.01 and 0.05%) of Triton X-100 about doubled the reaction rate.

  13. Data supporting the absence of FNR dynamic photosynthetic membrane recruitment in trol mutants.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Lea; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2016-06-01

    In photosynthesis, the flavoenzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) catalyses the final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+), which is considered as the main pathway of high-energy electron partitioning in chloroplasts (DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03999.x[1], DOI: 10.1038/srep10085[2]). Different detergents and pH treatments of photosynthetic membranes isolated from the Arabidopsis wild-type (WT) and the loss-of-function mutants of the thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL (trol), pre-acclimated to either dark, growth-light, or high-light conditions, were used to probe the strength of FNR-membrane associations. Detergents β-DM (decyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) or β-DDM (n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) were used to test the stability of FNR binding to the thylakoid membranes, and to assess different membrane domains containing FNR. Further, the extraction conditions mimicked pH status of chloroplast stroma during changing light regimes. Plants without TROL are incapable of the dynamic FNR recruitment to the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:26977444

  14. Data supporting the absence of FNR dynamic photosynthetic membrane recruitment in trol mutants

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Lea; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    In photosynthesis, the flavoenzyme ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) catalyses the final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+, which is considered as the main pathway of high-energy electron partitioning in chloroplasts (DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03999.x[1], DOI: 10.1038/srep10085[2]). Different detergents and pH treatments of photosynthetic membranes isolated from the Arabidopsis wild-type (WT) and the loss-of-function mutants of the thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL (trol), pre-acclimated to either dark, growth-light, or high-light conditions, were used to probe the strength of FNR-membrane associations. Detergents β-DM (decyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) or β-DDM (n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) were used to test the stability of FNR binding to the thylakoid membranes, and to assess different membrane domains containing FNR. Further, the extraction conditions mimicked pH status of chloroplast stroma during changing light regimes. Plants without TROL are incapable of the dynamic FNR recruitment to the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:26977444

  15. Interface for Light-Driven Electron Transfer by Photosynthetic Complexes Across Block Copolymer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Liangju; Olson, Tien L; Lin, Su; Flores, Marco; Jiang, Yunjiang; Zheng, Wan; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Liang, Hongjun

    2014-03-01

    Incorporation of membrane proteins into nanodevices to mediate recognition and transport in a collective and scalable fashion remains a challenging problem. We demonstrate how nanoscale photovoltaics could be designed using robust synthetic nanomembranes with incorporated photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Specifically, RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides are reconstituted spontaneously into rationally designed polybutadiene membranes to form hierarchically organized proteopolymer membrane arrays via a charge-interaction-directed reconstitution mechanism. Once incorporated, the RCs are fully active for prolonged periods based upon a variety of spectroscopic measurements, underscoring preservation of their 3D pigment configuration critical for light-driven charge transfer. This result provides a strategy to construct solar conversion devices using structurally versatile proteopolymer membranes with integrated RC functions to harvest broad regions of the solar spectrum. PMID:26274068

  16. Energy Transfer Dynamics in an RC-LH1-PufX Tubular Photosynthetic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hsin, Jen; Strümpfer, Johan; Sener, Melih; Qian, Pu; Hunter, C. Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Light absorption and the subsequent transfer of excitation energy are the first two steps of the photosynthetic process, carried out by protein-bound pigments, mainly bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), in photosynthetic bacteria. BChls are anchored in light-harvesting (LH) complexes, such as light-harvesting complex I (LH1), which directly associates with the reaction center (RC), forming the RC-LH1 core complex. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, RC-LH1 core complexes contain an additional protein, PufX, and assemble into dimeric RC-LH1-PufX core complexes. In the absence of light-harvesting complexes II, the former complexes can aggregate into a helically ordered tubular photosynthetic membrane. We examined the excitation transfer dynamics in a single RC-LH1-PufX core complex dimer using the hierarchical equations of motion for dissipative quantum dynamics that accurately, yet computationally costly, treat the coupling between BChls and their protein environment. A widely employed description, generalized Förster theory, was also used to calculate the transfer rates of the same excitonic system in order to verify the accuracy of this computationally cheap method. Additionally, in light of the structural uncertainties in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides RC-LH1-PufX core complex, geometrical alterations were introduced in the BChl organization. It is shown that the energy transfer dynamics is not affected by the considered changes in the BChl organization, and that generalized Förster theory provides accurate transfer rates. An all-atom model for a tubular photosynthetic membrane is then constructed on the basis of electron microscopy data, and the overall energy transfer properties of this membrane are computed. PMID:21152381

  17. Atomic-level structural and functional model of a bacterial photosynthetic membrane vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Şener, Melih K.; Olsen, John D.; Hunter, C. Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple photosynthetic bacteria consists of a network of bacteriochlorophyll–protein complexes that absorb solar energy for eventual conversion to ATP. Because of its remarkable simplicity, the PSU can serve as a prototype for studies of cellular organelles. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides the PSU forms spherical invaginations of the inner membrane, ≈70 nm in diameter, composed mostly of light-harvesting complexes, LH1 and LH2, and reaction centers (RCs). Atomic force microscopy studies of the intracytoplasmic membrane have revealed the overall spatial organization of the PSU. In the present study these atomic force microscopy data were used to construct three-dimensional models of an entire membrane vesicle at the atomic level by using the known structure of the LH2 complex and a structural model of the dimeric RC–LH1 complex. Two models depict vesicles consisting of 9 or 18 dimeric RC–LH1 complexes and 144 or 101 LH2 complexes, representing a total of 3,879 or 4,464 bacteriochlorophylls, respectively. The in silico reconstructions permit a detailed description of light absorption and electronic excitation migration, including computation of a 50-ps excitation lifetime and a 95% quantum efficiency for one of the model membranes, and demonstration of excitation sharing within the closely packed RC–LH1 dimer arrays. PMID:17895378

  18. Differential stability of photosynthetic membranes and fatty acid composition at elevated temperature in Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Almeyda, E.; Thomé, P. E.; El Hafidi, M.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by increasing surface seawater temperatures resulting from climate change. Reef-building corals symbiotic with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium experience dramatic reductions in algal densities when exposed to temperatures above the long-term local summer average, leading to a phenomenon called coral bleaching. Although the temperature-dependent loss in photosynthetic function of the algal symbionts has been widely recognized as one of the early events leading to coral bleaching, there is considerable debate regarding the actual damage site. We have tested the relative thermal stability and composition of membranes in Symbiodinium exposed to high temperature. Our results show that melting curves of photosynthetic membranes from different symbiotic dinoflagellates substantiate a species-specific sensitivity to high temperature, while variations in fatty acid composition under high temperature rather suggest a complex process in which various modifications in lipid composition may be involved. Our results do not support the role of unsaturation of fatty acids of the thylakoid membrane as being mechanistically involved in bleaching nor as being a dependable tool for the diagnosis of thermal susceptibility of symbiotic reef corals.

  19. Energy transfer in light-adapted photosynthetic membranes: from active to saturated photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fassioli, Francesca; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra; Scheuring, Simon; Sturgis, James N; Johnson, Neil F

    2009-11-01

    In bacterial photosynthesis light-harvesting complexes, LH2 and LH1 absorb sunlight energy and deliver it to reaction centers (RCs) with extraordinarily high efficiency. Submolecular resolution images have revealed that both the LH2:LH1 ratio, and the architecture of the photosynthetic membrane itself, adapt to light intensity. We investigate the functional implications of structural adaptations in the energy transfer performance in natural in vivo low- and high-light-adapted membrane architectures of Rhodospirillum photometricum. A model is presented to describe excitation migration across the full range of light intensities that cover states from active photosynthesis, where all RCs are available for charge separation, to saturated photosynthesis where all RCs are unavailable. Our study outlines three key findings. First, there is a critical light-energy density, below which the low-light adapted membrane is more efficient at absorbing photons and generating a charge separation at RCs, than the high-light-adapted membrane. Second, connectivity of core complexes is similar in both membranes, suggesting that, despite different growth conditions, a preferred transfer pathway is through core-core contacts. Third, there may be minimal subareas on the membrane which, containing the same LH2:LH1 ratio, behave as minimal functional units as far as excitation transfer efficiency is concerned.

  20. Picosecond fluorescence of simple photosynthetic membranes: Evidence of spectral inhomogeneity and directed energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullerits, Tōnu; Freiberg, Arvi

    1991-01-01

    The picosecond time-domain singlet excitation transfer and trapping kinetics in photosynthetic membranes in case of low excitation intensities is studied by numerical integration of the appropriate master equation. The essential features of our two-dimensional-lattice random walk model are spectral heterogeneity of the light-harvesting antenna, inclusion of temperature effects, nonabsolute excitation trap, correlation between spectral and spatial parameters. A reasonably good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence decay kinetics for purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is achieved only by assuming relatively large spectral inhomogeneity. From this comparison the average excitation lifetime on the lattice site is estimated to be 5-8 ps at the effective nearest neighbour lattice distance of 32 Å. If the model is correct, the relatively slow hopping rate determines that excitation transfer and trapping in R. rubrum at active photosynthesis conditions is a diffusion-limited process. The invariably present spectral disorder of photosynthetic systems promoting directed energy transfer serves for higher light-utilizing efficiency.

  1. Photosynthetic solar cell using nanostructured proton exchange membrane for microbial biofilm prevention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Oh, Hwa Jin; Bai, Seoung Jae; Song, Young Seok

    2014-06-24

    Unwanted biofilm formation has a detrimental effect on bioelectrical energy harvesting in microbial cells. This issue still needs to be solved for higher power and longer durability and could be resolved with the help of nanoengineering in designing and manufacturing. Here, we demonstrate a photosynthetic solar cell (PSC) that contains a nanostructure to prevent the formation of biofilm by micro-organisms. Nanostructures were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography, where a film heater array system was introduced to precisely control the local wall temperature. To understand the heat and mass transfer phenomena behind the manufacturing and energy harvesting processes of PSC, we carried out a numerical simulation and experimental measurements. It revealed that the nanostructures developed on the proton exchange membrane enable PSC to produce enhanced output power due to the retarded microbial attachment on the Nafion membrane. We anticipate that this strategy can provide a pathway where PSC can ensure more renewable, sustainable, and efficient energy harvesting performance.

  2. A Protein Phosphorylation Threshold for Functional Stacking of Plant Photosynthetic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Granath, Pontus; Vener, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation of photosystem II (PSII) proteins affects macroscopic structure of thylakoid photosynthetic membranes in chloroplasts of the model plant Arabidopsis. In this study, light-scattering spectroscopy revealed that stacking of thylakoids isolated from wild type Arabidopsis and the mutant lacking STN7 protein kinase was highly influenced by cation (Mg++) concentrations. The stacking of thylakoids from the stn8 and stn7stn8 mutants, deficient in STN8 kinase and consequently in light-dependent phosphorylation of PSII, was increased even in the absence of Mg++. Additional PSII protein phosphorylation in wild type plants exposed to high light enhanced Mg++-dependence of thylakoid stacking. Protein phosphorylation in the plant leaves was analyzed during day, night and prolonged darkness using three independent techniques: immunoblotting with anti-phosphothreonine antibodies; Diamond ProQ phosphoprotein staining; and quantitative mass spectrometry of peptides released from the thylakoid membranes by trypsin. All assays revealed dark/night-induced increase in phosphorylation of the 43 kDa chlorophyll-binding protein CP43, which compensated for decrease in phosphorylation of the other PSII proteins in wild type and stn7, but not in the stn8 and stn7stn8 mutants. Quantitative mass spectrometry determined that every PSII in wild type and stn7 contained on average 2.5±0.1 or 1.4±0.1 phosphoryl groups during day or night, correspondingly, while less than every second PSII had a phosphoryl group in stn8 and stn7stn8. It is postulated that functional cation-dependent stacking of plant thylakoid membranes requires at least one phosphoryl group per PSII, and increased phosphorylation of PSII in plants exposed to high light enhances stacking dynamics of the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:20532038

  3. Phosphorylation of Photosystem II Controls Functional Macroscopic Folding of Photosynthetic Membranes in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Willig, Adrian; Granath, Pontus; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rochaix, Jean-David; Vener, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in plants contain highly folded membrane layers enriched in photosystem II, which uses light energy to oxidize water and produce oxygen. The sunlight also causes quantitative phosphorylation of major photosystem II proteins. Analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana stn7xstn8 double mutant deficient in thylakoid protein kinases STN7 and STN8 revealed light-independent phosphorylation of PsbH protein and greatly reduced N-terminal phosphorylation of D2 protein. The stn7xstn8 and stn8 mutants deficient in light-induced phosphorylation of photosystem II had increased thylakoid membrane folding compared with wild-type and stn7 plants. Significant enhancement in the size of stacked thylakoid membranes in stn7xstn8 and stn8 accelerated gravity-driven sedimentation of isolated thylakoids and was observed directly in plant leaves by transmission electron microscopy. Increased membrane folding, caused by the loss of light-induced protein phosphorylation, obstructed lateral migration of the photosystem II reaction center protein D1 and of processing protease FtsH between the stacked and unstacked membrane domains, suppressing turnover of damaged D1 in the leaves exposed to high light. These findings show that the high level of photosystem II phosphorylation in plants is required for adjustment of macroscopic folding of large photosynthetic membranes modulating lateral mobility of membrane proteins and sustained photosynthetic activity. PMID:20028840

  4. PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membrane by coarse-grained simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Pao, Chun-Wei; Smit, Berend

    2015-03-12

    Green plant photosystem II (PSII) and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) in the stacked grana regions of thylakoid membranes can self-organize into various PSII-LHCII supercomplexes with crystalline or fluid-like supramolecular structures to adjust themselves with external stimuli such as high/low light and temperatures, rendering tunable solar light absorption spectrum and photosynthesis efficiencies. However, the mechanisms controlling the PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations remain elusive. In this work, we constructed a coarse-grained (CG) model of the thylakoid membrane including lipid molecules and a PSII-LHCII supercomplex considering association/dissociation of moderately bound-LHCIIs. The CG interaction between CG beads were constructed based on electron microscope (EM) experimental results, and we were able to simulate the PSII-LHCII supramolecular organization of a 500 × 500 nm(2) thylakoid membrane, which is compatible with experiments. Our CGMD simulations can successfully reproduce order structures of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes under various protein packing fractions, free-LHCII:PSII ratios, and temperatures, thereby providing insights into mechanisms leading to PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membranes.

  5. Photosynthetic membrane topography: quantitative in situ localization of photosystems I and II.

    PubMed

    Mustardy, L; Cunningham, F X; Gantt, E

    1992-11-01

    An immunolabeling approach was developed for quantitative in situ labeling of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII). Photosynthetic membranes from the phycobilisome-containing red alga Porphyridium cruentum were isolated from cells in which different photosystem compositions were predetermined by growing cells in green light (GL) or red light (RL). Based on phycobilisome densities per membrane area of 390 per m2 (GL) and 450 per m2 (RL) and the PSI reaction center (P700) and PSII reaction center (QA) content, the photosystem densities per m2 of membrane were calculated to be 2520 PSI in GL and 1580 in RL and 630 PSII in GL and 1890 in RL. PSI was detected in the membranes with 10-nm Au particles conjugated to affinity-purified anti-PSI, and PSII was detected with 15-nm Au particles conjugated to anti-PSII. Distribution of Au particles appeared relatively uniform, and the degree of labeling was consistent with the calculated photosystem densities. However, the absolute numbers of Au-labeled sites were lower than would be obtained if all reaction center monomers were labeled. Specific labeling of PSI was 25% in GL and RL membranes, and PSII labeling was 33% in GL but only 17% in RL membranes. An IgG-Au particle is larger than a monomer of either photosystem and could shield several closely packed photosystems. We suggest that clustering of photosystems exists and that the cluster size of PSI is the same in GL and RL cells, but the PSII cluster size is 2 times greater in RL than in GL cells. Such variations may reflect changes in functional domains whereby increased clustering can maximize the cooperativity between the photosystems, resulting in enhancement of the quantum yield.

  6. Gain and loss of photosynthetic membranes during plastid differentiation in the shoot apex of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Charuvi, Dana; Kiss, Vladimir; Nevo, Reinat; Shimoni, Eyal; Adam, Zach; Reich, Ziv

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts of higher plants develop from proplastids, which are undifferentiated plastids that lack photosynthetic (thylakoid) membranes. In flowering plants, the proplastid-chloroplast transition takes place at the shoot apex, which consists of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the flanking leaf primordia. It has been believed that the SAM contains only proplastids and that these become chloroplasts only in the primordial leaves. Here, we show that plastids of the SAM are neither homogeneous nor necessarily null. Rather, their developmental state varies with the specific region and/or layer of the SAM in which they are found. Plastids throughout the L1 and L3 layers of the SAM possess fairly developed thylakoid networks. However, many of these plastids eventually lose their thylakoids during leaf maturation. By contrast, plastids at the central, stem cell-harboring region of the L2 layer of the SAM lack thylakoid membranes; these appear only at the periphery, near the leaf primordia. Thus, plastids in the SAM undergo distinct differentiation processes that, depending on their lineage and position, lead to either development or loss of thylakoid membranes. These processes continue along the course of leaf maturation.

  7. Repressible chloroplast gene expression in Chlamydomonas: a new tool for the study of the photosynthetic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Dinc, Emine; Ramundo, Silvia; Croce, Roberta; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2014-09-01

    A repressible/inducible chloroplast gene expression system has been used to conditionally inhibit chloroplast protein synthesis in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This system allows one to follow the fate of photosystem II and photosystem I and their antennae upon cessation of chloroplast translation. The main results are that the levels of the PSI core proteins decrease at a slower rate than those of PSII. Amongst the light-harvesting complexes, the decrease of CP26 proceeds at the same rate as for the PSII core proteins whereas it is significantly slower for CP29, and for the antenna complexes of PSI this rate is comprised between that of CP26 and CP29. In marked contrast, the components of trimeric LHCII, the major PSII antenna, persist for several days upon inhibition of chloroplast translation. This system offers new possibilities for investigating the biosynthesis and turnover of individual photosynthetic complexes in the thylakoid membranes. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  8. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  9. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  10. Assessment of the requirement for aquaporins in the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts to sustain photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Beebo, Azeez; Mathai, John C; Schoefs, Benoît; Spetea, Cornelia

    2013-07-11

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms use sunlight energy to oxidize water to molecular oxygen. This process is mediated by the photosystem II complex at the lumenal side of the thylakoid membrane. Most research efforts have been dedicated to understanding the mechanism behind the unique water oxidation reactions, whereas the delivery pathways for water molecules into the thylakoid lumen have not yet been studied. The most common mechanisms for water transport are simple diffusion and diffusion facilitated by specialized channel proteins named aquaporins. Calculations using published data for plant chloroplasts indicate that aquaporins are not necessary to sustain water supply into the thylakoid lumen at steady state photosynthetic rates. Yet, arguments for their presence in the plant thylakoid membrane and beneficial action are presented. PMID:23732702

  11. Orientation of chlorophylls within chloroplasts as shown by optical and electrochromic properties of the photosynthetic membrane.

    PubMed

    Paillotin, G; Breton, J

    1977-04-01

    The effects on the optical properties of photosynthetic membranes caused by several types of chlorophyll differing in resonance frequency and in spatial disposition are theoretically analyzed. Using a method of moments and the linear dichroism spectrum of the lamellae, we evaluated the mean angle (phi) between the transition moment of each chlorophyll and the normal to the lamellae. We have confirmed that at about 695 nm the transition moment is in the plane of the lamellae, and outside it for chlorophyll b (phi approximately 48.6 degrees). By integrating over frequency the absorption variations affected by ionophores, we show that they may be ascribed to a Stark effect, and we analyze the dependence of this effect on the orientation of the chlorophylls. From this dependence and the degree of polarization of the Stark effect, we calculate the spatial fluctuations of the angle phi. The calculation shows that a definite value of phi corresponds to each resonance frequency of chlorophyl a found in vivo. This proves that the chlorophylls a are not oriented partly random. For chlorophylls b, on the other hand, phi may fluctuate by some 10 degrees about its mean value. The structural consequences of these results are discussed. PMID:851575

  12. Light-driven production of ATP catalysed by F0F1-ATP synthase in an artificial photosynthetic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg-Yfrach, Gali; Rigaud, Jean-Louis; Durantini, Edgardo N.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.

    1998-04-01

    Energy-transducing membranes of living organisms couple spontaneous to non-spontaneous processes through the intermediacy of protonmotive force (p.m.f.) - an imbalance in electrochemical potential of protons across the membrane. In most organisms, p.m.f. is generated by redox reactions that are either photochemically driven, such as those in photosynthetic reaction centres, or intrinsically spontaneous, such as those of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Transmembrane proteins (such as the cytochromes and complexes I, III and IV in the electron-transport chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane) couple the redox reactions to proton translocation, thereby conserving a fraction of the redox chemical potential as p.m.f. Many transducer proteins couple p.m.f. to the performance of biochemical work, such as biochemical synthesis and mechanical and transport processes. Recently, an artificial photosynthetic membrane was reported in which a photocyclic process was used to transport protons across a liposomal membrane, resulting in acidification of the liposome's internal volume. If significant p.m.f. is generated in this system, then incorporating an appropriate transducer into the liposomal bilayer should make it possible to drive a non-spontaneous chemical process. Here we report the incorporation of FOF1-ATP synthase into liposomes containing the components of the proton-pumping photocycle. Irradiation of this artificial membrane with visible light results in the uncoupler- and inhibitor-sensitive synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) against an ATP chemical potential of ~12kcalmol-1, with a quantum yield of more than 7%. This system mimics the process by which photosynthetic bacteria convert light energy into ATP chemical potential.

  13. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  14. State of manganese in the photosynthetic apparatus. 2. X-ray absorption edge studies on manganese in photosynthetic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J. A.; Goodin, D. B.; Wydrzynski, T.; Robertson, A. S.; Klein, M. P.

    1981-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the Manganese K-edge are presented for spinach chloroplasts, and chloroplasts which have been Tris treated and hence unable to evolve oxygen. A significant change in the electronic environment of manganese is observed and is attributed to the release of manganese from the thylakoid membranes with a concomitant change in oxidation state. A correlation of the K-edge energy, defined as the energy at the first inflection point, with coordination charge has been established for a number of manganese compounds of known structure and oxidation state. In this study, comparison of the manganese K-edge energies of the chloroplast samples with the reference compounds places the average oxidation state of the chloroplasts between 2+ and 3+. Using the edge spectra for Tris treated membranes which were osmotically shocked to remove the released manganese, difference edge spectra were synthesized to approximate the active pool of manganese. Coordination charge predictions for this fraction are consistent with an average resting oxidation state higher than 2+. The shape at the edge is also indicative of heterogeneity of the manganese site, of low symmetry, or both.

  15. Heterologous expression of Arabidopsis phytochrome B in transgenic potato influences photosynthetic performance and tuber development

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, A.; Herold, M.; Lenk, I.; Gatz, C. . Albrecht von Haller Inst. fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften); Quail, P.H. )

    1999-05-01

    Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants expressing Arabidopsis phytochrome B were characterized morphologically and physiologically under white light in a greenhouse to explore their potential for improved photosynthesis and higher tuber yields. As expected, overexpression of functional phytochrome B caused pleiotropic effects such as semidwarfism, decreased apical dominance, a higher number of smaller but thicker leaves, and increased pigmentation. Because of increased numbers of chloroplasts in elongated palisade cells, photosynthesis per leaf area and in each individual plant increased. In addition, photosynthesis was less sensitive to photoinactivation under prolonged light stress. The beginning of senescence was not delayed, but deceleration of chlorophyll degradation extended the lifetime of photosynthetically active plants. Both the higher photosynthetic performance and the longer lifespan of the transgenic plants allowed greater biomass production, resulting in extended underground organs with increased tuber yields.

  16. Organic carbon recovery and photosynthetic bacteria population in an anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor treating food processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2013-08-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) were cultivated by food industry wastewater in the anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor. Organic removal and biomass production and characteristics were accomplished via an explicit examination of the long term performance of the photo-bioreactor fed with real wastewater. With the support of infra-red light transmitting filter, PNSB could survive and maintain in the system even under the continual fluctuations of influent wastewater characteristics. The average BOD and COD removal efficiencies were found at the moderate range of 51% and 58%, respectively. Observed photosynthetic biomass yield was 0.6g dried solid/g BOD with crude protein content of 0.41 g/g dried solid. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic analysis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed the presence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and significant changes in the photosynthetic bacterial community within the system. PMID:23489563

  17. Organic carbon recovery and photosynthetic bacteria population in an anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor treating food processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2013-08-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) were cultivated by food industry wastewater in the anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor. Organic removal and biomass production and characteristics were accomplished via an explicit examination of the long term performance of the photo-bioreactor fed with real wastewater. With the support of infra-red light transmitting filter, PNSB could survive and maintain in the system even under the continual fluctuations of influent wastewater characteristics. The average BOD and COD removal efficiencies were found at the moderate range of 51% and 58%, respectively. Observed photosynthetic biomass yield was 0.6g dried solid/g BOD with crude protein content of 0.41 g/g dried solid. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic analysis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed the presence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and significant changes in the photosynthetic bacterial community within the system.

  18. cDNA cloning, expression levels and gene mapping of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic ferredoxin genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Venegas-Calerón, M; Zambelli, A; Ruiz-López, N; Youssar, L; León, A; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    Fatty acid desaturation in plastids and chloroplasts depends on the electron-donor activity of ferredoxins. Using degenerate oligonucleotides designed from known photosynthetic and heterotrophic plant ferredoxin sequences, two full-length ferredoxin cDNAs were cloned from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves and developing seeds, HaFd1 and HaFd2, homologous to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic ferredoxins, respectively. Based on these cDNAs, the respective genomic sequences were obtained and the presence of DNA polymorphisms was investigated. Complete sequencing of the HaFd1 and HaFd2 genes in different lines indicated the presence of two haplotypes for HaFd2 and their alignment showed that sequence polymorphisms are restricted to the 5'-NTR intron. In addition, specific DNA markers for the HaFd1 and HaFd2 genes were developed that enabled the genes to be mapped. Accordingly, the HaFd1 locus maps to linkage group 10 of the public sunflower map, while the HaFd2 locus maps to linkage group 11. Both ferredoxins display different spatial-temporal patterns of expression. While HaFd2 is expressed at similar levels in all tissues tested (leaves, stem, roots, cotyledons and developing seeds), HaFd1 is more strongly expressed in green tissues than in all the other tissues tested. Both photosynthetic- and heterotrophic-ferredoxins are present in sunflower seeds and may contribute to fatty acid desaturation during oil accumulation. Nevertheless, the levels of HaFd2 expression during seed formation are distinct in lines that only varied in the HaFd2 haplotypes they expressed.

  19. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Kehoe, David M

    2013-10-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are critical for collecting energy from sunlight and providing it to photosynthetic reaction centers. Their abundance and composition are tightly regulated to maintain efficient photosynthesis in changing light conditions. Many cyanobacteria alter their light-harvesting antennae in response to changes in ambient light-color conditions through the process of chromatic acclimation. The control of green light induction (Cgi) pathway is a light-color-sensing system that controls the expression of photosynthetic genes during chromatic acclimation, and while some evidence suggests that it operates via transcription attenuation, the components of this pathway have not been identified. We provide evidence that translation initiation factor 3 (IF3), an essential component of the prokaryotic translation initiation machinery that binds the 30S subunit and blocks premature association with the 50S subunit, is part of the control of green light induction pathway. Light regulation of gene expression has not been previously described for any translation initiation factor. Surprisingly, deletion of the IF3-encoding gene infCa was not lethal in the filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, and its genome was found to contain a second, redundant, highly divergent infC gene which, when deleted, had no effect on photosynthetic gene expression. Either gene could complement an Escherichia coli infC mutant and thus both encode bona fide IF3s. Analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome databases established that multiple infC genes are present in the genomes of diverse groups of bacteria and land plants, most of which do not undergo chromatic acclimation. This suggests that IF3 may have repeatedly evolved important roles in the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  20. Organization and expression of photosynthesis genes and operons in anoxygenic photosynthetic proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Liotenberg, Sylviane; Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Picaud, Martine; Reiss-Husson, Françoise; Astier, Chantal; Ouchane, Soufian

    2008-09-01

    Genes belonging to the same metabolic route are usually organized in operons in microbial genomes. For instance, most genes involved in photosynthesis were found clustered and organized in operons in photosynthetic Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. The discovery of Gammaproteobacteria with a conserved photosynthetic gene cluster revives the questions on the role and the maintenance of such organization in proteobacteria. In this paper, we report the analysis of the structure and expression of the 14 kb cluster (crtEF-bchCXYZ-pufBALMC-crtADC) in the photosynthetic betaproteobacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus, with the purpose of understanding the reasons and the biological constraints that might have led to the clustering of photosynthesis genes. The genetic analyses are substantiated by reverse transcription-PCR data which reveal the presence of a transcript encompassing the 14 genes and provide evidence of a polycistronic 'super-operon' organization starting at crtE and ending 14 kb downstream at the crtC gene. Furthermore, genetic analyses suggest that one of the selection pressures that may have driven and maintained the photosynthesis operons/super-operons in proteobacteria could very likely be the coexpression and regulation of the clustered genes/operon.

  1. Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. I. Regulation of activity during light-induced membrane hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akiko; Okazaki, Yoshiji; Takagi, Shingo

    2002-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, red, blue, or blue plus far-red light induced a typical membrane hyperpolarization, whereas far-red light alone had little effect. Both N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a potent inhibitor of H+-ATPase, and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, an uncoupler, produced a considerable membrane depolarization in the dark-adapted cells and a complete suppression of the light-induced hyperpolarization. Although 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, did not affect the membrane potential in darkness, it completely inhibited the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. In vivo illumination of the leaves with red light caused a substantial decrease in the Km for ATP, not only of the vanadate-sensitive ATP-hydrolyzing activity in leaf homogenate, but also of the ATP-dependent H+-transporting activity in plasma membrane (PM) vesicles isolated from the leaves by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning methods. The effects of red light were negated by the presence of DCMU during illumination. In vivo illumination with far-red light had no effect on the Km for ATP of H+-transporting activity. These results strongly suggest that an electrogenic component in the membrane potential of the mesophyll cell is generated by the PM H+-ATPase, and that photosynthesis-dependent modulation of the enzymatic activity of the PM H+-ATPase is involved in the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. PMID:11941462

  2. Impact of UV-B irradiation on photosynthetic performance and chloroplast membrane components in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Lidon, F C; Ramalho, J C

    2011-09-01

    The impact of UV-B radiation on photosynthetic related parameters was studied in Oryza sativa L. cv. Safari plants, after an UV-B irradiation performed 1h per day for 7days (between 8 and 14days after germination) with a ten narrow-band (λ 311nm) that resulted in a total biological effective UV-B (UVB(BE)) of 2.975kJm(-2)day(-1) and a total of 20.825kJm(-2). Gas exchange measurements were severely affected, showing reductions higher than 80% in net photosynthesis (P(n)), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity (A(max)), 1day after the end of the 7-days UV-B treatment. Similarly, several fluorescence parameters (F(o), F(v)/F(m), Fv'/Fm', ϕ(e), q(P) and q(E)) and thylakoid electron transport (involving both photosystems) were also severely reduced. Concomitantly, a decline of xanthophylls, carotenes, Chl a, Chl (a+b) and Chl (a/b) values was accompanied by the increase of the lipoperoxidation level in chloroplast membranes, altogether reflecting a loss of protection against oxidative stress. Seven days after of the end of UV-B treatment, most fluorescence parameters recovered, but in P(n), A(max), thylakoid electron transport rates, Chl a and lipid classes, as well as the level of lipoperoxidation, the impacts were even stronger than immediately after the end of stress, denoting a clear loss of performance of photosynthetic structures. However, only a moderate impact on total lipids was observed, accompanied by some changes in the relative weight of the major chloroplast membrane lipid classes, with emphasis on the decrease of MGDG and the increase of phospholipids. That suggested an ability to de novo lipid synthesis allowing qualitative changes in the lipid matrix. Notably, the leaves developed after the end of UV-B irradiation showed a much lower impact, with significantly decreased values only in P(n) and g(s), rises in several fluorescence parameters, thylakoid electron transport, photosynthetic pigments (xanthophylls and chls) and DEPS, while lipid

  3. Multivariate curve resolution of rapid-scan FTIR difference spectra of quinone photoreduction in bacterial photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, L; Mezzetti, A; Ruckebusch, C; Huvenne, J-P; de Juan, A

    2007-03-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres and membranes are systems of particular interest and are often taken as models to investigate the molecular mechanisms of selected bioenergetic reactions. In this work, a multivariate curve resolution by alternating least squares procedure is detailed for resolution of time-resolved difference FTIR spectra probing the evolution of quinone reduction in photosynthetic membranes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides under photoexcitation. For this purpose, different data sets were acquired in the same time range and spectroscopic domain under slightly different experimental conditions. To enable resolution and provide meaningful results the different data sets were arranged in an augmented matrix. This strategy enabled recovery of three different species despite rank-deficiency conditions. It also results in better definition (identity and evolution) of the contributions. From the resolved spectra, the species have been attributed to: 1. the formation of ubiquinol, more precisely the disappearance of Q/appearance of QH(2); 2. conformational change of the protein in the surrounding biological medium; 3. oxidation of diaminodurene, a redox mediator. Because, moreover, results obtained from augmented data sets strategies enable quantitative and qualitative interpretation of concentration profiles, other effects, for example the consequence of repeated light excitation of the same sample, choice of illumination power, or the number of spectra accumulated could be compared and discussed.

  4. Expression, purification, and crystallisationof membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Bernadette

    Approximately, 29,000 protein structures are deposited in the Protein Databank (January 2005), but only about 90 of which are independent membrane protein structures. This represents a significant increase in knowledge compared with a matter of only 5 years ago when a mere handful of membrane protein structures were available. Despite the advances, our understanding of the structure-function relationships and mechanism of action of many membrane proteins is still lacking. This is particularly true of many of the more clinically relevant membrane proteins, such as the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The GPCRs regulate cellular responses to a wide range of biologically active molecules including hormones and drugs and are thus important targets for therapeutic intervention in a number of disease states. However, the increasing number of membrane protein structures has provided a critical mass of information which has yielded a more rational approach to the process of obtaining diffraction quality crystals. It is the different stages of this process; expression, solubilisation, purification, and crystallisation that will be covered in this lecture.

  5. Successful expression of heterologous egfp gene in the mitochondria of a photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangli; Zhao, Zhonglin; Wu, Zhihua; Fan, Zhun; Chen, Jun; Wu, Jinxia; Li, Jiancheng

    2011-09-01

    The efficient expression of exogenous gene in mitochondria of photosynthetic organism has been an insurmountable problem. In this study, the pBsLPNCG was constructed by inserting the egfp gene into a site between TERMINVREP-Left repeats and the cob gene in a fragment of mitochondrial DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-124 and introduced into the mitochondria of respiratory deficient dum-1 mutation of C. reinhardtii CC-2654. Sequencing and DNA Southern analyses revealed that egfp gene had been integrated into the mitochondrial genome of transgenic algae as expected and no other copy of egfp existed in their nucleic genome. Both the fluorescence detection and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of eGFP protein in the transgenic algae; it indicated that the egfp gene was successfully expressed in the mitochondria of C. reinhardtii. PMID:21664493

  6. Atomic Detail Visualization of Photosynthetic Membranes with GPU-Accelerated Ray Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Vandivort, Kirby L.; Barragan, Angela; Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; Ribeiro, João V.; Isralewitz, Barry; Liu, Bo; Goh, Boon Chong; Phillips, James C.; MacGregor-Chatwin, Craig; Johnson, Matthew P.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    The cellular process responsible for providing energy for most life on Earth, namely photosynthetic light-harvesting, requires the cooperation of hundreds of proteins across an organelle, involving length and time scales spanning several orders of magnitude over quantum and classical regimes. Simulation and visualization of this fundamental energy conversion process pose many unique methodological and computational challenges. We present, in two accompanying movies, light-harvesting in the photosynthetic apparatus found in purple bacteria, the so-called chromatophore. The movies are the culmination of three decades of modeling efforts, featuring the collaboration of theoretical, experimental, and computational scientists. We describe the techniques that were used to build, simulate, analyze, and visualize the structures shown in the movies, and we highlight cases where scientific needs spurred the development of new parallel algorithms that efficiently harness GPU accelerators and petascale computers. PMID:27274603

  7. [Effects of exogenous salicylic acid on membrane lipid peroxidation and photosynthetic characteristics of Cucumis sativus seedlings under drought stress].

    PubMed

    Hao, Jing-Hong; Yi, Yang; Shang, Qing-Mao; Dong, Chun-Juan; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2012-03-01

    To approach the related mechanisms of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) in improving plant drought-resistance, this paper studied the effects of applying exogenous SA to the rhizosphere on the plant growth, membrane lipid peroxidation, proline accumulation, water use efficiency, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings under drought stresses (60% and 50% of saturated water capacity). Applying SA relieved the inhibitory effects of drought stress on plant growth, Pn, and water use efficiency, decreased membrane lipid peroxidation, and promoted proline accumulation. Meanwhile, the SA decreased the decrements of the maximum photochemical efficiency of PS II, actual photochemical efficiency of PS II, potential activity of PS II, effective photochemical efficiency of PS II, and photochemical quenching coefficient under drought stress significantly, and limited the increase of non-photochemical quenching coefficient. All the results suggested that applying exogenous SA could alleviate the oxidation damage of cell membrane resulted from the drought-caused membrane lipid peroxidation, improve the Pn by increasing PS II activity to benefit water utilization, enhance the regulation capability of osmosis to decrease water loss and increase water use efficiency, and thereby, improve the plant drought-resistance.

  8. Photosynthetic membrane-less microbial fuel cells to enhance microalgal biomass concentration.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the net increase in microalgal biomass concentration induced by photosynthetic microbial fuel cells (PMFC). The experiment was conducted on six lab-scale PMFC constituted by an anodic chamber simulating an anaerobic digester connected to a cathodic chamber consisting of a mixed algae consortia culture. Three PMFC were operated at closed circuit (PMFC(+)) whereas three PMFC were left unconnected as control (PMFC(-)). PMFC(+) produced a higher amount of carbon dioxide as a product of the organic matter oxidation that resulted in 1.5-3 times higher biomass concentration at the cathode compartment when compared to PMFC(-).

  9. Ionic liquids effects on the permeability of photosynthetic membranes probed by the electrochromic shift of endogenous carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, Marco; Malferrari, Danilo; Francia, Francesco; Galletti, Paola; Tagliavini, Emilio; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are promising materials exploited as solvents and media in many innovative applications, some already used at the industrial scale. The chemical structure and physicochemical properties of ILs can differ significantly according to the specific applications for which they have been synthesized. As a consequence, their interaction with biological entities and toxicity can vary substantially. To select highly effective and minimally harmful ILs, these properties need to be investigated. Here we use the so called chromatophores--protein-phospholipid membrane vesicles obtained from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides--to assess the effects of imidazolinium and pyrrolidinium ILs, with chloride or dicyanamide as counter anions, on the ionic permeability of a native biological membrane. The extent and modalities by which these ILs affect the ionic conductivity can be studied in chromatophores by analyzing the electrochromic response of endogenous carotenoids, acting as an intramembrane voltmeter at the molecular level. We show that chromatophores represent an in vitro experimental model suitable to probe permeability changes induced in cell membranes by ILs differing in chemical nature, degree of oxygenation of the cationic moiety and counter anion.

  10. Gain and Loss of Photosynthetic Membranes during Plastid Differentiation in the Shoot Apex of Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Charuvi, Dana; Kiss, Vladimir; Nevo, Reinat; Shimoni, Eyal; Adam, Zach; Reich, Ziv

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts of higher plants develop from proplastids, which are undifferentiated plastids that lack photosynthetic (thylakoid) membranes. In flowering plants, the proplastid-chloroplast transition takes place at the shoot apex, which consists of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the flanking leaf primordia. It has been believed that the SAM contains only proplastids and that these become chloroplasts only in the primordial leaves. Here, we show that plastids of the SAM are neither homogeneous nor necessarily null. Rather, their developmental state varies with the specific region and/or layer of the SAM in which they are found. Plastids throughout the L1 and L3 layers of the SAM possess fairly developed thylakoid networks. However, many of these plastids eventually lose their thylakoids during leaf maturation. By contrast, plastids at the central, stem cell–harboring region of the L2 layer of the SAM lack thylakoid membranes; these appear only at the periphery, near the leaf primordia. Thus, plastids in the SAM undergo distinct differentiation processes that, depending on their lineage and position, lead to either development or loss of thylakoid membranes. These processes continue along the course of leaf maturation. PMID:22438022

  11. Kinetic model of primary energy transfer and trapping in photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Pullerits, T; Freiberg, A

    1992-10-01

    The picosecond time-domain incoherent singlet excitation transfer and trapping kinetics in core antenna of photosynthetic bacteria are studied in case of low excitation intensities by numerical integration of the appropriate master equation in a wide temperature range of 4-300 K. The essential features of our two-dimensional-lattice model are as follows: Förster excitation transfer theory, spectral heterogeneity of both the light-harvesting antenna and the reaction center, treatment of temperature effects through temperature dependence of spectral bands, inclusion of inner structure of the trap, and transition dipole moment orientation. The fluorescence kinetics is analyzed in terms of distributions of various kinetic components, and the influence of different inhomogeneities (orientational, spectral) is studied.A reasonably good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence decay kinetics for purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is achieved at high temperatures by assuming relatively large antenna spectral inhomogeneity: 20 nm at the whole bandwidth of 40 nm. The mean residence time in the antenna lattice site (it is assumed to be the aggregate of four bacteriochlorophyll a molecules bound to proteins) is estimated to be approximately 12 ps. At 4 K only qualitative agreement between model and experiment is gained. The failure of quantitative fitting is perhaps due to the lack of knowledge about the real structure of antenna or local heating and cooling effects not taken into account. PMID:19431849

  12. Suppression of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Roots Is Required for Sustained Root Growth under Phosphate Deficiency1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun; Yu, Haopeng; Tian, Caihuan; Zhou, Wenkun; Li, Chuanyou; Jiao, Yuling; Liu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Plants cope with inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiencies in their environment by adjusting their developmental programs and metabolic activities. For Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the developmental responses include the inhibition of primary root growth and the enhanced formation of lateral roots and root hairs. Pi deficiency also inhibits photosynthesis by suppressing the expression of photosynthetic genes. Early studies showed that photosynthetic gene expression was also suppressed in Pi-deficient roots, a nonphotosynthetic organ; however, the biological relevance of this phenomenon remains unknown. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, hypersensitive to Pi starvation7 (hps7), that is hypersensitive to Pi deficiency; the hypersensitivity includes an increased inhibition of root growth. HPS7 encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. Accumulation of HPS7 proteins in root tips is enhanced by Pi deficiency. Comparative RNA sequencing analyses indicated that the expression of many photosynthetic genes is activated in roots of hps7. Under Pi deficiency, the expression of photosynthetic genes in hps7 is further increased, which leads to enhanced accumulation of chlorophyll, starch, and sucrose. Pi-deficient hps7 roots also produce a high level of reactive oxygen species. Previous research showed that the overexpression of GOLDEN-like (GLK) transcription factors in transgenic Arabidopsis activates photosynthesis in roots. The GLK overexpressing (GLK OX) lines also exhibit increased inhibition of root growth under Pi deficiency. The increased inhibition of root growth in hps7 and GLK OX lines by Pi deficiency was completely reversed by growing the plants in the dark. Based on these results, we propose that suppression of photosynthetic gene expression is required for sustained root growth under Pi deficiency. PMID:24868033

  13. Localisation of the subunits of the photosynthetic reaction centers in the chromatophore membrane of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Zürrer, H; Snozzi, M; Hanselmann, K; Bachofen, R

    1977-05-11

    Reaction centers were isolated with the detergent lauryl dimethyl amine oxide from chromatophore membranes of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The subunit composition of these reaction centers is similar to the one obtained from Rhodopseudomonas spheroides: three subunits with the molecular weights of 21 000, 24 000 and 29 000. Reaction centers prepared from chromatophores labeled with 131I were heavely labeled in their large subunit (H). The smaller subunits (L and M) contained only little label. Sonication during labeling yielded a slightly higher incorporation of 131I in subunit H compared to the smaller ones. It is concluded that the H protein is largely exposed at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane but might also be accessible for iodination on the inside of the membrane while the L and M proteins are almost completely embedded in the membrane. Iodination of spheroplasts results in only a slight binding of 131I to chromatophores and reaction centers.

  14. Post-expression strategies for structural investigations of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Currently, membrane proteins only comprise 1.5% of the protein data bank and, thus, still remain a challenge for structural biologists. Expression, stabilization in membrane mimics (e.g. detergent), heterogeneity (conformational and chemical), and crystallization in the presence of a membrane mimic are four major bottlenecks encountered. In response, several post-expression protein modifications have been utilized to facilitate structure determination of membrane proteins. This review highlights four approaches: limited proteolysis, deglycosylation, cysteine alkylation, and lysine methylation. Combined these approaches have facilitated the structure determination of more than 40 membrane proteins and, therefore, are a useful addition to the membrane protein structural biologist's toolkit.

  15. Evolutionary origins, molecular cloning and expression of carotenoid hydroxylases in eukaryotic photosynthetic algae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthophylls, oxygenated derivatives of carotenes, play critical roles in photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants. Although the xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway of algae is largely unknown, it is of particular interest because they have a very complicated evolutionary history. Carotenoid hydroxylase (CHY) is an important protein that plays essential roles in xanthophylls biosynthesis. With the availability of 18 sequenced algal genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of chy genes and explored their distribution, structure, evolution, origins, and expression. Results Overall 60 putative chy genes were identified and classified into two major subfamilies (bch and cyp97) according to their domain structures. Genes in the bch subfamily were found in 10 green algae and 1 red alga, but absent in other algae. In the phylogenetic tree, bch genes of green algae and higher plants share a common ancestor and are of non-cyanobacterial origin, whereas that of red algae is of cyanobacteria. The homologs of cyp97a/c genes were widespread only in green algae, while cyp97b paralogs were seen in most of algae. Phylogenetic analysis on cyp97 genes supported the hypothesis that cyp97b is an ancient gene originated before the formation of extant algal groups. The cyp97a gene is more closely related to cyp97c in evolution than to cyp97b. The two cyp97 genes were isolated from the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis, and transcriptional expression profiles of chy genes were observed under high light stress of different wavelength. Conclusions Green algae received a β-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway from host organisms. Although red algae inherited the pathway from cyanobacteria during primary endosymbiosis, it remains unclear in Chromalveolates. The α-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway is a common feature in green algae and higher plants. The origination of cyp97a/c is most likely due to gene duplication before divergence of

  16. Quantitative local photosynthetic flux measurements at isolated chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kim; Martin, Sophie; Robinson, Colin; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-07-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) offers a fast and quantitative method to measure local fluxes within photosynthesis. In particular, we have measured the flux of oxygen and ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6(4-)), from the artificial electron acceptor ferricyanide (Fe(CN)6(3-)), using a stationary ultramicroelectrode at chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes (sourced from chloroplasts). Oxygen generation at films of chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes was detected directly during photosynthesis, but in the case of thylakoid membranes, this switched to sustained oxygen consumption at longer illumination times. An initial oxygen concentration spike was detected over both chloroplast and thylakoid membrane films, and the kinetics of the oxygen generation were extracted by fitting the experimental data to a finite element method (FEM) simulation. In contrast to previous work, the oxygen generation spike was attributed to the limited size of the plastoquinone pool, a key component in the linear electron transport pathway and a contributing factor in photoinhibition. Finally, the mobile nature of the SECM probe, and its high spatial resolution, also allowed us to detect ferrocyanide produced from a single thylakoid membrane. These results further demonstrate the power of SECM for localized flux measurements in biological processes, in this case photosynthesis, and that the high time resolution, combined with FEM simulations, allows the elucidation of quantitative kinetic information.

  17. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I0), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm−3). The I0 decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I0 or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  18. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I₀), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm(-3)). The I₀ decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I₀ or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  19. Photosynthetic Membranes of Synechocystis or Plants Convert Sunlight to Photocurrent through Different Pathways due to Different Architectures.

    PubMed

    Pinhassi, Roy I; Kallmann, Dan; Saper, Gadiel; Larom, Shirley; Linkov, Artyom; Boulouis, Alix; Schöttler, Mark-Aurel; Bock, Ralph; Rothschild, Avner; Adir, Noam; Schuster, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes contain the redox active complexes catalyzing the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae and plants. Crude thylakoid membranes or purified photosystems from different organisms have previously been utilized for generation of electrical power and/or fuels. Here we investigate the electron transferability from thylakoid preparations from plants or the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. We show that upon illumination, crude Synechocystis thylakoids can reduce cytochrome c. In addition, this crude preparation can transfer electrons to a graphite electrode, producing an unmediated photocurrent of 15 μA/cm2. Photocurrent could be obtained in the presence of the PSII inhibitor DCMU, indicating that the source of electrons is QA, the primary Photosystem II acceptor. In contrast, thylakoids purified from plants could not reduce cyt c, nor produced a photocurrent in the photocell in the presence of DCMU. The production of significant photocurrent (100 μA/cm2) from plant thylakoids required the addition of the soluble electron mediator DCBQ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that use of crude thylakoids from the D1-K238E mutant in Synechocystis resulted in improved electron transferability, increasing the direct photocurrent to 35 μA/cm2. Applying the analogous mutation to tobacco plants did not achieve an equivalent effect. While electron abstraction from crude thylakoids of cyanobacteria or plants is feasible, we conclude that the site of the abstraction of the electrons from the thylakoids, the architecture of the thylakoid preparations influence the site of the electron abstraction, as well as the transfer pathway to the electrode. This dictates the use of different strategies for production of sustainable electrical current from photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria or higher plants.

  20. Photosynthetic Membranes of Synechocystis or Plants Convert Sunlight to Photocurrent through Different Pathways due to Different Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Pinhassi, Roy I.; Larom, Shirley; Linkov, Artyom; Boulouis, Alix; Schöttler, Mark-Aurel; Bock, Ralph; Rothschild, Avner; Adir, Noam; Schuster, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes contain the redox active complexes catalyzing the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae and plants. Crude thylakoid membranes or purified photosystems from different organisms have previously been utilized for generation of electrical power and/or fuels. Here we investigate the electron transferability from thylakoid preparations from plants or the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. We show that upon illumination, crude Synechocystis thylakoids can reduce cytochrome c. In addition, this crude preparation can transfer electrons to a graphite electrode, producing an unmediated photocurrent of 15 μA/cm2. Photocurrent could be obtained in the presence of the PSII inhibitor DCMU, indicating that the source of electrons is QA, the primary Photosystem II acceptor. In contrast, thylakoids purified from plants could not reduce cyt c, nor produced a photocurrent in the photocell in the presence of DCMU. The production of significant photocurrent (100 μA/cm2) from plant thylakoids required the addition of the soluble electron mediator DCBQ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that use of crude thylakoids from the D1-K238E mutant in Synechocystis resulted in improved electron transferability, increasing the direct photocurrent to 35 μA/cm2. Applying the analogous mutation to tobacco plants did not achieve an equivalent effect. While electron abstraction from crude thylakoids of cyanobacteria or plants is feasible, we conclude that the site of the abstraction of the electrons from the thylakoids, the architecture of the thylakoid preparations influence the site of the electron abstraction, as well as the transfer pathway to the electrode. This dictates the use of different strategies for production of sustainable electrical current from photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria or higher plants. PMID:25915422

  1. Integration of energy and electron transfer processes in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; Olsen, John D.; Sener, Melih; Jackson, Philip J.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Qian, Pu; Dickman, Mark J.; Leggett, Graham J.; Schulten, Klaus; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts absorbed solar energy to a protonmotive force, which drives ATP synthesis. The membrane network of chlorophyll–protein complexes responsible for light absorption, photochemistry and quinol (QH2) production has been mapped in the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides using atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the membrane location of the cytochrome bc1 (cytbc1) complexes that oxidise QH2 to quinone (Q) to generate a protonmotive force is unknown. We labelled cytbc1 complexes with gold nanobeads, each attached by a Histidine10 (His10)-tag to the C-terminus of cytc1. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained chromatophore vesicles showed that the majority of the cytbc1 complexes occur as dimers in the membrane. The cytbc1 complexes appeared to be adjacent to reaction centre light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) complexes, consistent with AFM topographs of a gold-labelled membrane. His-tagged cytbc1 complexes were retrieved from chromatophores partially solubilised by detergent; RC-LH1-PufX complexes tended to co-purify with cytbc1, whereas LH2 complexes became detached, consistent with clusters of cytbc1 complexes close to RC-LH1-PufX arrays, but not with a fixed, stoichiometric cytbc1-RC-LH1-PufX supercomplex. This information was combined with a quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the RC, cytbc1, ATP synthase, cytaa3 and cytcbb3 membrane protein complexes, to construct an atomic-level model of a chromatophore vesicle comprising 67 LH2 complexes, 11 LH1-RC-PufX dimers & 2 RC-LH1-PufX monomers, 4 cytbc1 dimers and 2 ATP synthases. Simulation of the interconnected energy, electron and proton transfer processes showed a half-maximal ATP turnover rate for a light intensity equivalent to only 1% of bright sunlight. Thus, the photosystem architecture of the chromatophore is optimised for growth at low light intensities. PMID:24530865

  2. Tracking energy transfer between light harvesting complex 2 and 1 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low illumination.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Henry, Sarah; Polli, Dario; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H P; Hoseinkhani, Sajjad; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2012-01-31

    Energy transfer (ET) between B850 and B875 molecules in light harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1/RC (reaction center) complexes has been investigated in membranes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown under high- and low-light conditions. In these bacteria, illumination intensity during growth strongly affects the type of LH2 complexes synthesized, their optical spectra, and their amount of energetic disorder. We used a specially built femtosecond spectrometer, combining tunable narrowband pump with broadband white-light probe pulses, together with an analytical method based on derivative spectroscopy for disentangling the congested transient absorption spectra of LH1 and LH2 complexes. This procedure allows real-time tracking of the forward (LH2 → LH1) and backward (LH2←LH1) ET processes and unambiguous determination of the corresponding rate constants. In low-light grown samples, we measured lower ET rates in both directions with respect to high-light ones, which is explained by reduced spectral overlap between B850 and B875 due to partial redistribution of oscillator strength into a higher energetic exciton transition. We find that the low-light adaptation in R. palustris leads to a reduced elementary backward ET rate, in accordance with the low probability of two simultaneous excitations reaching the same LH1/RC complex under weak illumination. Our study suggests that backward ET is not just an inevitable consequence of vectorial ET with small energetic offsets, but is in fact actively managed by photosynthetic bacteria.

  3. The design and synthesis of artificial photosynthetic antennas, reaction centres and membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, T A; Moore, A L; Gust, D

    2002-01-01

    Artificial antenna systems and reaction centres synthesized in our laboratory are used to illustrate that structural and thermodynamic factors controlling energy and electron transfer in these constructs can be modified to optimize performance. Artificial reaction centres have been incorporated into liposomal membranes where they convert light energy to vectorial redox potential. This redox potential drives a Mitchellian, quinone-based, proton-transporting redox loop that generates a Deltamu H(+) of ca. 4.4 kcal mol(-1) comprising DeltapH ca. 2.1 and Deltapsi ca. 70 mV. In liposomes containing CF(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, this system drives ATP synthesis against an ATP chemical potential similar to that observed in natural systems. PMID:12437888

  4. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy.

  5. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy. PMID:27362979

  6. The isolation and characterization of a new iron-sulfur protein from photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Malkin, R; Aparicio, P J; Arnon, D I

    1974-06-01

    A new iron-sulfur protein, distinct from the soluble chloroplast ferredoxin, was isolated from chloroplast membranes. The isolated protein, purified to homogeneity, had a molecular weight of about 8000 and 4 atoms of iron and 4 inorganic sulfides per mole. Its absorption spectrum had a broad absorbance band in the 400 nm region, a shoulder at approximately 310 nm, and a peak around 280 nm. The absorbance ratio A(400) to A(280) was 0.55. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum (measured at 12 degrees K) of the reduced protein was similar to that of other reduced iron-sulfur proteins, showing a major resonance line at g = 1.94. The isolated protein, when photoreduced by spinach chloroplasts, can in turn transfer electrons to mammalian cytochrome c. However, the photoreduced protein cannot replace soluble ferredoxin in NADP(+) reduction because of its apparent inability to interact with the chloroplast enzyme, ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase. The relation of the isolated iron-sulfur protein to the bound ferredoxin that acts as the primary electron acceptor in Photosystem I is discussed.

  7. Advancing Rhodobacter sphaeroides as a platform for expression of functional membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Erbakan, Mustafa; Curtis, Brandon S; Nixon, B Tracy; Kumar, Manish; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-11-01

    Membrane protein overexpression is often hindered by toxic effects on the expression host, limiting achievable volumetric productivity. Moreover, protein structure and function may be impaired due to inclusion body formation and proteolytic degradation. To address these challenges, we employed the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides for expression of challenging membrane proteins including human aquaporin 9 (hAQP9), human tight junction protein occludin (Occ), Escherichia coli toxin peptide GhoT, cellulose synthase enzyme complex (BcsAB) of R. sphaeroides and cytochrome-cy (Cyt-cy) from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Titers of 47 mg/L for Cyt-cy, 7.5 mg/L for Occ, 1.5 mg/L for BcsAB and 0.5 mg/L for hAQP9 were achieved from affinity purification. While purification of GhoT was not successful, transformants displayed a distinct growth phenotype that correlated with GhoT expression. We also evaluated the functionality of these proteins by performing water transport studies for hAQP9, peroxidase activity for cytochrome-cy, and in vitro cellulose synthesis activity assay for BcsAB. While previous studies with Rhodobacter have utilized oxygen-limited semi-aerobic growth for membrane protein expression, substantial titer improvements are achieved as a result of a 3-fold increase in biomass yield using the anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth regime, which utilizes the strong native puc promoter. This versatile platform is shown to enable recovery of a wide variety of difficult-to-express membrane proteins in functional form.

  8. Tracking energy transfer between light harvesting complex 2 and 1 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low illumination

    PubMed Central

    Lüer, Larry; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Henry, Sarah; Polli, Dario; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H. P.; Hoseinkhani, Sajjad; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Energy transfer (ET) between B850 and B875 molecules in light harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1/RC (reaction center) complexes has been investigated in membranes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown under high- and low-light conditions. In these bacteria, illumination intensity during growth strongly affects the type of LH2 complexes synthesized, their optical spectra, and their amount of energetic disorder. We used a specially built femtosecond spectrometer, combining tunable narrowband pump with broadband white-light probe pulses, together with an analytical method based on derivative spectroscopy for disentangling the congested transient absorption spectra of LH1 and LH2 complexes. This procedure allows real-time tracking of the forward (LH2 → LH1) and backward (LH2←LH1) ET processes and unambiguous determination of the corresponding rate constants. In low-light grown samples, we measured lower ET rates in both directions with respect to high-light ones, which is explained by reduced spectral overlap between B850 and B875 due to partial redistribution of oscillator strength into a higher energetic exciton transition. We find that the low-light adaptation in R. palustris leads to a reduced elementary backward ET rate, in accordance with the low probability of two simultaneous excitations reaching the same LH1/RC complex under weak illumination. Our study suggests that backward ET is not just an inevitable consequence of vectorial ET with small energetic offsets, but is in fact actively managed by photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:22307601

  9. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  10. Incorporation of Photosynthetic Reaction Centers in the Membrane of Human Cells: Toward a New Tool for Optical Control of Cell Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pennisi, Cristian P.; Jensen, Poul Erik; Zachar, Vladimir; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The Photosystem I (PSI) reaction center is a photosynthetic membrane complex in which light-induced charge separation is accompanied by the generation of an electric potential. It has been recently proposed as a means to confer light sensitivity to cells possessing voltage-activated ion channels, but the feasibility of heterologous incorporation has not been demonstrated. In this work, methods of delivery and detection of PSI in the membrane of human cells are presented. Purified fractions of PSI were reconstituted in proteoliposomes that were used as vehicles for the membrane incorporation. A fluorescent impermeable dye was entrapped in the vesicles to qualitatively analyze the nature of the vesicle cell interaction. After incorporation, the localization and orientation of the complexes in the membrane was studied using immuno-fluorescence microscopy. The results showed complexes oriented as in native membranes, which were randomly distributed in clusters over the entire surface of the cell. Additionally, analysis of cell viability showed that the incorporation process does not damage the cell membrane. Taken together, the results of this work suggest that the mammalian cellular membrane is a reasonable environment for the incorporation of PSI complexes, which opens the possibility of using these molecular photovoltaic structures for optical control of cell activity.

  11. Thrombospondin expression in myofibers stabilizes muscle membranes

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoutte, Davy; Schips, Tobias G; Kwong, Jennifer Q; Davis, Jennifer; Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Brody, Matthew J; Sargent, Michelle A; Kanisicak, Onur; Yi, Hong; Gao, Quan Q; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Volk, Talila; McNally, Elizabeth M; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly sensitive to mutations in genes that participate in membrane stability and cellular attachment, which often leads to muscular dystrophy. Here we show that Thrombospondin-4 (Thbs4) regulates skeletal muscle integrity and its susceptibility to muscular dystrophy through organization of membrane attachment complexes. Loss of the Thbs4 gene causes spontaneous dystrophic changes with aging and accelerates disease in 2 mouse models of muscular dystrophy, while overexpression of mouse Thbs4 is protective and mitigates dystrophic disease. In the myofiber, Thbs4 selectively enhances vesicular trafficking of dystrophin-glycoprotein and integrin attachment complexes to stabilize the sarcolemma. In agreement, muscle-specific overexpression of Drosophila Tsp or mouse Thbs4 rescues a Drosophila model of muscular dystrophy with augmented membrane residence of βPS integrin. This functional conservation emphasizes the fundamental importance of Thbs’ as regulators of cellular attachment and membrane stability and identifies Thbs4 as a potential therapeutic target for muscular dystrophy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17589.001 PMID:27669143

  12. Clade-Specific Quantitative Analysis of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Prochlorococcus

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Casado, Marta; Caballero, Gemma; Zinser, Erik R.; Dachs, Jordi; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Newly designed primers targeting rbcL (CO2 fixation), psbA (photosystem II) and rnpB (reference) genes were used in qRT-PCR assays to assess the photosynthetic capability of natural communities of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth and a major contributor to primary production in oligotrophic oceans. After optimizing sample collection methodology, we analyzed a total of 62 stations from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation (including Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans) at three different depths. Sequence and quantitative analyses of the corresponding amplicons showed the presence of high-light (HL) and low-light (LL) Prochlorococcus clades in essentially all 182 samples, with a largely uniform stratification of LL and HL sequences. Synechococcus cross-amplifications were detected by the taxon-specific melting temperatures of the amplicons. Laboratory exposure of Prochlorococcus MED4 (HL) and MIT9313 (LL) strains to organic pollutants (PAHs and organochlorine compounds) showed a decrease of rbcL transcript abundances, and of the rbcL to psbA ratios for both strains. We propose this technique as a convenient assay to evaluate effects of environmental stressors, including pollution, on the oceanic Prochlorococcus photosynthetic function. PMID:26244890

  13. Clade-Specific Quantitative Analysis of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Prochlorococcus.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Casado, Marta; Caballero, Gemma; Zinser, Erik R; Dachs, Jordi; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Newly designed primers targeting rbcL (CO2 fixation), psbA (photosystem II) and rnpB (reference) genes were used in qRT-PCR assays to assess the photosynthetic capability of natural communities of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth and a major contributor to primary production in oligotrophic oceans. After optimizing sample collection methodology, we analyzed a total of 62 stations from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation (including Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans) at three different depths. Sequence and quantitative analyses of the corresponding amplicons showed the presence of high-light (HL) and low-light (LL) Prochlorococcus clades in essentially all 182 samples, with a largely uniform stratification of LL and HL sequences. Synechococcus cross-amplifications were detected by the taxon-specific melting temperatures of the amplicons. Laboratory exposure of Prochlorococcus MED4 (HL) and MIT9313 (LL) strains to organic pollutants (PAHs and organochlorine compounds) showed a decrease of rbcL transcript abundances, and of the rbcL to psbA ratios for both strains. We propose this technique as a convenient assay to evaluate effects of environmental stressors, including pollution, on the oceanic Prochlorococcus photosynthetic function.

  14. Clade-Specific Quantitative Analysis of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Prochlorococcus.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Casado, Marta; Caballero, Gemma; Zinser, Erik R; Dachs, Jordi; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Newly designed primers targeting rbcL (CO2 fixation), psbA (photosystem II) and rnpB (reference) genes were used in qRT-PCR assays to assess the photosynthetic capability of natural communities of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth and a major contributor to primary production in oligotrophic oceans. After optimizing sample collection methodology, we analyzed a total of 62 stations from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation (including Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans) at three different depths. Sequence and quantitative analyses of the corresponding amplicons showed the presence of high-light (HL) and low-light (LL) Prochlorococcus clades in essentially all 182 samples, with a largely uniform stratification of LL and HL sequences. Synechococcus cross-amplifications were detected by the taxon-specific melting temperatures of the amplicons. Laboratory exposure of Prochlorococcus MED4 (HL) and MIT9313 (LL) strains to organic pollutants (PAHs and organochlorine compounds) showed a decrease of rbcL transcript abundances, and of the rbcL to psbA ratios for both strains. We propose this technique as a convenient assay to evaluate effects of environmental stressors, including pollution, on the oceanic Prochlorococcus photosynthetic function. PMID:26244890

  15. Brassinosteroids promote photosynthesis and growth by enhancing activation of Rubisco and expression of photosynthetic genes in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Jian; Huang, Li-Feng; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Mao, Wei-Hua; Shi, Kai; Wu, Jian-Xiang; Asami, Tadao; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2009-11-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a new group of plant growth substances that promote plant growth and productivity. We showed in this study that improved growth of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants after treatment with 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), an active BR, was associated with increased CO(2) assimilation and quantum yield of PSII (Phi(PSII)). Treatment of brassinazole (Brz), a specific inhibitor for BR biosynthesis, reduced plant growth and at the same time decreased CO(2) assimilation and Phi(PSII). Thus, the growth-promoting activity of BRs can be, at least partly, attributed to enhanced plant photosynthesis. To understand how BRs enhance photosynthesis, we have analyzed the effects of EBR and Brz on a number of photosynthetic parameters and their affecting factors, including the contents and activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Northern and Western blotting demonstrated that EBR upregulated, while Brz downregulated, the expressions of rbcL, rbcS and other photosynthetic genes. In addition, EBR had a positive effect on the activation of Rubisco based on increased maximum Rubisco carboxylation rates (V (c,max)), total Rubisco activity and, to a greater extent, initial Rubisco activity. The accumulation patterns of Rubisco activase (RCA) based on immunogold-labeling experiments suggested a role of RCA in BR-regulated activation state of Rubisco. Enhanced expression of genes encoding other Calvin cycle genes after EBR treatment may also play a positive role in RuBP regeneration (J (max)), thereby increasing maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco (V (c,max)). Thus, BRs promote photosynthesis and growth by positively regulating synthesis and activation of a variety of photosynthetic enzymes including Rubisco in cucumber.

  16. Short-term UV-B radiation affects photosynthetic performance and antioxidant gene expression in highbush blueberry leaves.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Acevedo, Patricio; Loyola, Rodrigo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Alberdi, Miren; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2016-10-01

    The impact of increased artificial UV-B radiation on photosynthetic performance, antioxidant and SOD activities and molecular antioxidant metabolism responses in leaves of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Brigitta and Bluegold) genotypes was studied. Plants were grown in a solid substrate and exposed to 0, 0.07, 0.12 and 0.19 W m(-2) of biologically-effective UV-B irradiance for 0-72 h. Our findings show that net photosynthesis (Pn) decreased significantly in Bluegold, accompanied by a reduction in the effective quantum yield (ФPSII) and electron transport rate (ETR), especially at the highest UV-B irradiation. On the other hand, Brigitta showed a better photosynthetic performance, as well as a clear increment in the antioxidant activity response that could be associated with increased superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) in the early hours of induced UV-B stress in all treatments. At the molecular level, the expression of the three antioxidant genes evaluated in both genotypes had a similar tendency. However, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) expression was significantly increased (6-fold) in Bluegold compared to Brigitta. Thus, the reduction of Pn concomitant with a lower photochemical performance and a reduced response of antioxidant metabolism suggest that the Bluegold genotype is more sensitive to UV-B radiation, while Brigitta appears to tolerate better moderate UV-B irradiance in a short-term experiment. PMID:27343876

  17. Short-term UV-B radiation affects photosynthetic performance and antioxidant gene expression in highbush blueberry leaves.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Acevedo, Patricio; Loyola, Rodrigo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Alberdi, Miren; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2016-10-01

    The impact of increased artificial UV-B radiation on photosynthetic performance, antioxidant and SOD activities and molecular antioxidant metabolism responses in leaves of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Brigitta and Bluegold) genotypes was studied. Plants were grown in a solid substrate and exposed to 0, 0.07, 0.12 and 0.19 W m(-2) of biologically-effective UV-B irradiance for 0-72 h. Our findings show that net photosynthesis (Pn) decreased significantly in Bluegold, accompanied by a reduction in the effective quantum yield (ФPSII) and electron transport rate (ETR), especially at the highest UV-B irradiation. On the other hand, Brigitta showed a better photosynthetic performance, as well as a clear increment in the antioxidant activity response that could be associated with increased superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) in the early hours of induced UV-B stress in all treatments. At the molecular level, the expression of the three antioxidant genes evaluated in both genotypes had a similar tendency. However, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) expression was significantly increased (6-fold) in Bluegold compared to Brigitta. Thus, the reduction of Pn concomitant with a lower photochemical performance and a reduced response of antioxidant metabolism suggest that the Bluegold genotype is more sensitive to UV-B radiation, while Brigitta appears to tolerate better moderate UV-B irradiance in a short-term experiment.

  18. Influence of heat stress on leaf ultrastructure, photosynthetic performance, and ascorbate peroxidase gene expression of two pear cultivars (Pyrus pyrifolia)*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-feng; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Guo-qin; Hussain, Sayed; Teng, Yuan-wen

    2013-01-01

    Plants encounter a variety of stresses in natural environments. One-year-old pot-grown trees of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai cv. Cuiguan and Wonhwang) were exposed to two heat stress regimes. Under constant short-term heat stress, chloroplasts and mitochondria were visibly damaged. Relative chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were significantly decreased, which indicated that the leaf photosynthetic capability declined. Under chronic heat stress, mesophyll cell ultrastructure was not obviously damaged, but leaf photosynthetic capability was still restrained. As chronic heat stress was a simulation of the natural environment in summer, further study of the responses under this stress regime was undertaken. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was increased in ‘Cuiguan’, but not in ‘Wonhwang’. Inducible expression of PpAPX genes in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts and peroxisomes was consistent with increased APX activity in ‘Cuiguan’, whereas only weak induction of PpAPX genes was observed in ‘Wonhwang’. The isoenzymes cytosolic APX1 (cAPX1) and stromal APX (sAPX) were confirmed to be localized in the cytoplasm and chloroplasts, respectively. PMID:24302708

  19. Influence of heat stress on leaf ultrastructure, photosynthetic performance, and ascorbate peroxidase gene expression of two pear cultivars (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-feng; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Guo-qin; Hussain, Sayed; Teng, Yuan-wen

    2013-12-01

    Plants encounter a variety of stresses in natural environments. One-year-old pot-grown trees of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai cv. Cuiguan and Wonhwang) were exposed to two heat stress regimes. Under constant short-term heat stress, chloroplasts and mitochondria were visibly damaged. Relative chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were significantly decreased, which indicated that the leaf photosynthetic capability declined. Under chronic heat stress, mesophyll cell ultrastructure was not obviously damaged, but leaf photosynthetic capability was still restrained. As chronic heat stress was a simulation of the natural environment in summer, further study of the responses under this stress regime was undertaken. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was increased in 'Cuiguan', but not in 'Wonhwang'. Inducible expression of PpAPX genes in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts and peroxisomes was consistent with increased APX activity in 'Cuiguan', whereas only weak induction of PpAPX genes was observed in 'Wonhwang'. The isoenzymes cytosolic APX1 (cAPX1) and stromal APX (sAPX) were confirmed to be localized in the cytoplasm and chloroplasts, respectively.

  20. Effects of exogenous spermidine on photosynthetic capacity and expression of Calvin cycle genes in salt-stressed cucumber seedlings.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sheng; Chen, Lifang; Lu, Wei; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong; Yuan, Yinhui; Li, Jun

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) on growth, photosynthesis and expression of the Calvin cycle-related genes in cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L.) exposed to NaCl stress. Salt stress reduced net photosynthetic rates (PN), actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII) and inhibited plant growth. Application of exogenous Spd to salinized nutrient solution alleviated salinity-induced the inhibition of plant growth, together with an increase in PN and ΦPSII. Salinity markedly reduced the maximum carboxylase activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Vcmax), the maximal velocity of RuBP regeneration (Jmax), triose-phosphate utilization capacity (TPU) and carboxylation efficiency (CE). Spd alleviated the negative effects on CO2 assimilation induced by salt stress. Moreover, Spd significantly increased the activities and contents of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase (ALD; aldolase) in the salt-stressed cucumber leaves. On the other hand, salinity up-regulated the transcriptional levels of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RCA), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribrokinase (PRK) and down-regulated the transcriptional levels of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (RbcL), ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS), ALD, triose-3-phosphate isomerase (TPI), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate phosphatase (FBPase) and 3-phosphoglyceric acid kinase (PGK). However, Spd application to salt-stressed plant roots counteracted salinity-induced mRNA expression changes in most of the above-mentioned genes. These results suggest that Spd could improve photosynthetic capacity through regulating gene expression and activity of key enzymes for CO2 fixation, thus confers tolerance to salinity on cucumber plants.

  1. hcf5, a nuclear photosynthetic electron transport mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with a pleiotropic effect on chloroplast gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Dinkins, R D; Bandaranayake, H; Baeza, L; Griffiths, A J; Green, B R

    1997-01-01

    A photosynthetic mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, hcf5, was isolated by screening M2 seedlings for high chlorophyll fluorescence. Thylakoid morphology was strikingly abnormal, with large grana stacks and almost no stroma lamellae. Fluorescence induction kinetics, activity assays, and immunoblotting showed that photosystem II was absent. Polypeptides of the photosystem I complex, the Cyt b6/f complex, coupling factor, and the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were also severely depleted. However, the nuclear-encoded chlorophyll a/b light-harvesting complex polypeptides were unaffected. The rbcL transcript was present at very low levels, the pattern of transcripts from the polycistronic psbB-psbH-petB-petD operon was abnormal, and the mature psbH message was almost completely lacking. This suggests that the hcf5 locus may encode a product required for the correct expression of several chloroplast genes. PMID:9112766

  2. Light-harvesting mutants show differential gene expression upon shift to high light as a consequence of photosynthetic redox and reactive oxygen species metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Gollan, Peter J; Mekala, Nageswara Rao; Isojärvi, Janne; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-04-19

    The amount of light energy that is harvested and directed to the photosynthetic machinery is regulated in order to control the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leaf tissues. ROS have important roles as signalling factors that instigate and mediate a range of cellular responses, suggesting that the mechanisms regulating light-harvesting and photosynthetic energy transduction also affect cell signalling. In this study, we exposed wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis and mutants impaired in the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting (stn7, tap38 and npq4) to transient high light (HL) stress in order to study the role of these mechanisms for up- and downregulation of gene expression under HL stress. The mutants, all of which have disturbed regulation of excitation energy transfer and distribution, responded to transient HL treatment with surprising similarity to the WT in terms of general 'abiotic stress-regulated' genes associated with hydrogen peroxide and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid signalling. However, we identified distinct expression profiles in each genotype with respect to induction of singlet oxygen and jasmonic acid-dependent responses. The results of this study suggest that the control of excitation energy transfer interacts with hormonal regulation. Furthermore, the photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes appear to operate as receptors that sense the energetic balance between the photosynthetic light reactions and downstream metabolism.

  3. Aquaporin-1 Expression in Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy and in Epiretinal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Motulsky, Elie; Salik, Dany; Janssens, Xavier; Pion, Bart; Dufrane, Rebecca; Chaput, Florence; Bolaky, Nargis; Gregoire, Françoise; Caspers, Laure; Perret, Jason; Willermain, François

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is involved in cell migration and proliferation; therefore, the purpose of the study was to investigate its expression in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and epiretinal membranes (ERM). Methods. 19 membranes from PVR and ERM were collected following eye surgery. AQP1 mRNA and protein expressions were determined by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence in the membranes from PVR and ERM. Results. AQP1 mRNA and protein were expressed in both PVR and ERM as shown by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence. AQP1 protein expression was heterogeneous among and between PVR and ERM and colocalized with alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). There were a higher percentage of cells coexpressing AQP1 and αSMA than AQP1 and GFAP. GFAP and αSMA did not colocalize. Conclusion. Our data show for the first time AQP1 expression in both PVR and ERM. AQP1 is expressed mostly by the αSMA-positive cells, presumably myofibroblasts, but also by GFAP-positive cells, assumed to be glial cells. These original findings warrant further functional investigations aiming at studying the potential role of AQP1 in cell migration and proliferation occurring during the development of PVR and ERM. PMID:24688444

  4. Dephosphorylation of Photosystem II Reaction Center Proteins in Plant Photosynthetic Membranes as an Immediate Response to Abrupt Elevation of Temperature1

    PubMed Central

    Rokka, Anne; Aro, Eva-Mari; Herrmann, Reinhold G.; Andersson, Bertil; Vener, Alexander V.

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic studies of protein dephosphorylation in photosynthetic thylakoid membranes revealed specifically accelerated dephosphorylation of photosystem II (PSII) core proteins at elevated temperatures. Raising the temperature from 22°C to 42°C resulted in a more than 10-fold increase in the dephosphorylation rates of the PSII reaction center proteins D1 and D2 and of the chlorophyll a binding protein CP43 in isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea) thylakoids. In contrast the dephosphorylation rates of the light harvesting protein complex and the 9-kD protein of the PSII (PsbH) were accelerated only 2- to 3-fold. The use of a phospho-threonine antibody to measure in vivo phosphorylation levels in spinach leaves revealed a more than 20-fold acceleration in D1, D2, and CP43 dephosphorylation induced by abrupt elevation of temperature, but no increase in light harvesting protein complex dephosphorylation. This rapid dephosphorylation is catalyzed by a PSII-specific, intrinsic membrane protein phosphatase. Phosphatase assays, using intact thylakoids, solubilized membranes, and the isolated enzyme, revealed that the temperature-induced lateral migration of PSII to the stroma-exposed thylakoids only partially contributed to the rapid increase in the dephosphorylation rate. Significant activation of the phosphatase coincided with the temperature-induced release of TLP40 from the membrane into thylakoid lumen. TLP40 is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, which acts as a regulatory subunit of the membrane phosphatase. Thus dissociation of TLP40 caused by an abrupt elevation in temperature and activation of the membrane protein phosphatase are suggested to trigger accelerated repair of photodamaged PSII and to operate as possible early signals initiating other heat shock responses in chloroplasts. PMID:10938368

  5. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Asmar, A; Barrett-Jolley, R; Werner, A; Kelly, R; Stacey, M

    2016-04-01

    Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca(2+) activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  6. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  7. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced. PMID:27485335

  8. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced.

  9. [Impacts of suboptimal temperature and low light intensity on the activities and gene expression of photosynthetic enzymes in cucumber seedling leaves].

    PubMed

    Bi, Huan-Gai; Wang, Mei-Ling; Jiang, Zhen-Sheng; Dong, Xu-Bing; Ai, Xi-Zhen

    2011-11-01

    Taking the cucumber cultivar 'Jinyou 3' as test material, this paper studied the variations of the mRNA expression and activities of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA), and transketolase (TK) in cucumber seedling leaves under suboptimal temperature and low light intensity (ST+LL). In the treatment of ST+LL, the leaf area and the dry mass per plant decreased remarkably, compared with the control. On the early days of ST+LL treatment, the gene expression of Rubisco rbcL and rbcS, FBPase, GAPDH, FBA, and TK declined markedly, the activities of the enzymes except TK obviously weakened, and the photosynthetic rate (P(n)) decreased rapidly. 3 days later, the gene expression of Rubisco rbcL and rbcS and the initial activity of Rubisco showed a continuous decrease but the decrement was obviously lesser, the total activity of Rubisco and the activities and gene expression of FBPase, GAPDH, FBA, and TK had an increasing trend, and the P(n) ascended simultaneously. When the treating time exceeded 6 days, the gene expression and the activities of Rubisco and FBPase tended to be constant, while those of the other enzymes as well as the P(n) presented a decreasing trend. These results suggested that the decline of the gene expression and activities of the photosynthetic enzymes in cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature and low light intensity was the important reason which led to the decrease of P(n). The adaptation of photosynthetic apparatus in cucumber seedlings to suboptimal temperature and low light intensity was related to the activation mechanisms of photosynthetic enzymes.

  10. Expression of major photosynthetic and salt-resistance genes in invasive reed lineages grown under elevated CO2 and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Franziska; Lambertini, Carla; Nielsen, Mette W; Radutoiu, Simona; Brix, Hans

    2014-01-01

    It is important to investigate the molecular causes of the variation in ecologically important traits to fully understand phenotypic responses to climate change. In the Mississippi River Delta, two distinct, sympatric invasive lineages of common reed (Phragmites australis) are known to differ in several ecophysiological characteristics and are expected to become more salt resistant due to increasing atmospheric CO2 and temperature. We investigated whether different patterns of gene expression can explain their ecophysiological differences and increased vigor under future climatic conditions. We compared the transcript abundance of photosynthetic genes of the Calvin cycle (Rubisco small subunit, RbcS; Phosphoglycerate kinase, PGK; Phosphoribulokinase, PRK), genes related with salt transport (Na+/H+ antiporter, PhaNHA) and oxidative stress response genes (Manganese Superoxide dismutase, MnSOD; Glutathione peroxidase, GPX), and the total aboveground biomass production between two genotypes representing the two lineages. The two genotypes (Delta-type, Mediterranean lineage, and EU-type, Eurasian lineage) were grown under an ambient and a future climate scenario with simultaneously elevated CO2 and temperature, and under two different soil salinities (0‰ or 20‰). We found neither differences in the aboveground biomass production nor the transcript abundances of the two genotypes, but soil salinity significantly affected all the investigated parameters, often interacting with the climatic conditions. At 20‰ salinity, most genes were higher expressed in the future than in the ambient climatic conditions. Higher transcription of the genes suggests higher abundance of the protein they code for, and consequently increased photosynthate production, improved stress responses, and salt exclusion. Therefore, the higher expression of these genes most likely contributed to the significantly ameliorated salinity impact on the aboveground biomass production of both P

  11. Applications of nylon membrane arrays to gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Cox, J M

    2001-04-01

    Gene expression analyses by hybridization of probes derived from mRNA to cDNA targets arrayed on a nylon membranes have been performed with increasing frequency and success over the last decade. While the initial costs of generating arrays are moderately high, they are now available commercially as complete packages which include the membranes and associated image analysis software for acquisition and processing of the data. Arrays can be used to generate information concerning the expression of mRNA from cells treated with various agents or from different tissues, e.g. comparing diseased with normal controls. To date, many groups, including immunologists, have used this technology to examine gene expression within their area of biological interest. The main characteristic of these systems is the large amount of data generated, since the expression of many thousands of genes are measured in parallel. The main practical issues are sensitivity of detection, reproducibility, comparability with other systems (e.g. Northern blots) and processing of data. Some of the significant applications of nylon array technology to date are reviewed in this chapter, and with these issues in mind, we include a discussion of our own experiences in this area.

  12. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells]. Progress report, February 15, 1990--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  13. Photosynthetic proteins for technological applications.

    PubMed

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Pace, Emanuela

    2005-05-01

    Photosynthetic proteins are a source of biological material well-suited to technological applications. They exhibit light-induced electron transfer across lipid membranes that can be exploited for the construction of photo-optical electrical devices. The structure and function of photosynthetic proteins differ across the photosynthetic evolutionary scale, allowing for their application in a range of technologies. Here we provide a general description of the basic and technical research in this sector and an overview of biochips and biosensors based on photochemical activity that have been developed for the bioassay of pollutants.

  14. Bioengineering of photosynthetic membranes. Requirement of magnesium for the conversion of chlorophyllide a to chlorophyll a during the greening of etiochloroplasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, H.; Rebeiz, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The massive conversion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) and the massive conversion of chlorophyllide a (Chlide a) to chlorophyll a (Chl a) are two essential conditions for the ALA-dependent assembly of photosynthetic membranes in vitro. In this work, the authors describe the development of a cell-free system capable of the forementioned biosynthetic activities at rates higher than in vivo, for the first 2 h of dark-incubation. The cell-free system consisted of 1) etiochloroplasts prepared from kinetin and gibberellic-acid-pretreated cucumber cotyledons, and 2) cofactors and additives described elsewhere and which are needed for the massive conversion of ALA to Pchlide, 3) high concentrations of ATP, MgCl/sub 2/, and an isoprenol alcohol such as phytol, were required for the massive conversion of Chlide a to Chl a. An absolute and novel requirement of Mg/sup 2 +/ for the conversion of Chlide a to Chl a was also demonstrated. In addition to the role of phytol as a substrate for the conversion of Chlide a to Chl a, the data suggested that this alcohol may also be involved in the regulation of the reactions between ALA and Pchlide. It is proposed that during greening, the conversion of Chlide a to Chl a may follow different biosynthetic rates, having different substrate and cofactor requirements, depending on the stage of plastid development.

  15. Elevated neutrophil membrane expression of proteinase 3 is dependent upon CD177 expression

    PubMed Central

    Abdgawad, M; Gunnarsson, L; Bengtsson, A A; Geborek, P; Nilsson, L; Segelmark, M; Hellmark, T

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is a major autoantigen in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV), and the proportion of neutrophils expressing PR3 on their membrane (mPR3+) is increased in AASV. We have shown recently that mPR3 and CD177 are expressed on the same cells in healthy individuals. In this study we try to elucidate mechanisms behind the increased mPR3 expression in AASV and its relationship to CD177. All neutrophils in all individuals were either double-positive or double-negative for mPR3 and CD177. The proportion of double-positive neutrophils was increased significantly in AASV and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The proportion of mPR3+/CD177+ cells was not correlated to general inflammation, renal function, age, sex, drug treatment and levels of circulating PR3. AASV patients had normal levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Pro-PR3 was found to constitute 10% of circulating PR3 but none of the mPR3. We found increased mRNA levels of both PR3 and CD177 in AASV, but they did not correlate with the proportion of double-positive cells. In cells sorted based on membrane expression, CD177–mRNA was several-fold higher in mPR3+ cells. When exogenous PR3 was added to CD177-transfected U937 cells, only CD177+ cells bound PR3 to their membrane. In conclusion, the increased membrane expression of PR3 found in AASV is not linked directly to circulating PR3 or PR3 gene transcription, but is dependent upon CD177 expression and correlated with the transcription of the CD177 gene. PMID:20491791

  16. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli.

  17. Hydrogen sulphide enhances photosynthesis through promoting chloroplast biogenesis, photosynthetic enzyme expression, and thiol redox modification in Spinacia oleracea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Wang, Wen-Hua; Zheng, Chen-Juan; Lin, Guang-Hui; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is emerging as a potential messenger molecule involved in modulation of physiological processes in animals and plants. In this report, the role of H(2)S in modulating photosynthesis of Spinacia oleracea seedlings was investigated. The main results are as follows. (i) NaHS, a donor of H(2)S, was found to increase the chlorophyll content in leaves. (ii) Seedlings treated with different concentrations of NaHS for 30 d exhibited a significant increase in seedling growth, soluble protein content, and photosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with 100 μM NaHS being the optimal concentration. (iii) The number of grana lamellae stacking into the functional chloroplasts was also markedly increased by treatment with the optimal NaHS concentration. (iv) The light saturation point (Lsp), maximum net photosynthetic rate (Pmax), carboxylation efficiency (CE), and maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)) reached their maximal values, whereas the light compensation point (Lcp) and dark respiration (Rd) decreased significantly under the optimal NaHS concentration. (v) The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBISCO) and the protein expression of the RuBISCO large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) were also significantly enhanced by NaHS. (vi) The total thiol content, glutathione and cysteine levels, internal concentration of H(2)S, and O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase and L-cysteine desulphydrase activities were increased to some extent, suggesting that NaHS also induced the activity of thiol redox modification. (vii) Further studies using quantitative real-time PCR showed that the gene encoding the RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), ferredoxin thioredoxin reductase (FTR), ferredoxin (FRX), thioredoxin m (TRX-m), thioredoxin f (TRX-f), NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH), and O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OAS) were up-regulated, but genes encoding serine acetyltransferase (SERAT), glycolate oxidase (GYX), and cytochrome

  18. Expression of plasma membrane receptor genes during megakaryocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sijie; Wang, Wenjing; Latchman, Yvette; Gao, Dayong; Aronow, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Megakaryocyte (MK) development is critically informed by plasma membrane-localized receptors that integrate a multiplicity of environmental cues. Given that the current understanding about receptors and ligands involved in megakaryocytopoiesis is based on single targets, we performed a genome-wide search to identify a plasma membrane receptome for developing MKs. We identified 40 transmembrane receptor genes as being upregulated during MK development. Seven of the 40 receptor-associated genes were selected to validate the dataset. These genes included: interleukin-9 receptor (IL9R), transforming growth factor, β receptor II (TGFBR2), interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R), colony stimulating factor-2 receptor-beta (CSFR2B), adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR2), thrombin receptor (F2R), and interleukin-21 receptor (IL21R). RNA and protein analyses confirmed their expression in primary human MKs. Matched ligands to IL9R, TGFBR2, IL4R, CSFR2B, and ADIPOR2 affected megakaryocytopoiesis. IL9 was unique in its ability to increase the number of MKs formed. In contrast, MK colony formation was inhibited by adiponectin, TGF-β, IL4, and GM-CSF. The thrombin-F2R axis affected platelet function, but not MK development, while IL21 had no apparent detectable effects. ADP-induced platelet aggregation was suppressed by IL9, TGF-β, IL4, and adiponectin. Overall, six of seven of the plasma membrane receptors were confirmed to have functional roles in MK and platelet biology. Also, results show for the first time that adiponectin plays a regulatory role in MK development. Together these data support a strong likelihood that the 40 transmembrane genes identified as being upregulated during MK development will be an important resource to the research community for deciphering the complex repertoire of environmental cues regulating megakaryocytopoiesis and/or platelet function. PMID:23321270

  19. Expression of photosynthetic genes is distinctly different between chloroplasts and amyloplasts in the liquid-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    PubMed

    Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Kobayashi, H; Akazawa, T

    1990-10-01

    A nonphotosynthetic, white-wild cell line of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) contains amyloplasts as the only kind of plastid, whereas a photosynthetically competent green variant cell line contains only chloroplasts. Transcripts of both nuclear and plastid genes for photosynthetic components in the white cells were not detectable in contrast to those in the green cells. To investigate the limiting step (s) behind these diminished levels of transcripts, we have performed in vivo pulse-chase labeling of RNA in both cell types. These studies indicated that the rates of incorporation of [3H]uridine and nucleotide pool sizes were indistinguishable between the two cell lines. Transcripts of certain nuclear (rbcS, cab, psbO) and plastid (rbcL) genes in the white cell were not detectable. We infer from these data that transcriptional regulation entails an important role in controlling photosynthetic RNA levels. Related analyses exploiting plastid run-on transcription have provided supporting evidence that the transcription of the amyloplast genome in the white cell is greatly suppressed in contrast to that of the chloroplast genome in the green cell. The results support a model of selective suppression of photosynthesis genes in nonphotosynthetic higher plant cells, and indicate that gene expression in such a system is primarily controlled at the transcriptional level.

  20. An integrated study of photochemical function and expression of a key photochemical gene (psbA) in photosynthetic communities of Lake Bonney (McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Kong, Weidong; Li, Wei; Romancova, Ingrid; Prášil, Ondřej; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2014-08-01

    Lake Bonney is one of several permanently ice-covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, which maintain the only year-round biological activity on the Antarctic continent. Vertically stratified populations of autotrophic microorganisms occupying the water columns are adapted to numerous extreme conditions, including very low light, hypersalinity, ultra-oligotrophy and low temperatures. In this study, we integrated molecular biology, microscopy, flow cytometry, and functional photochemical analyses of the photosynthetic communities residing in the east and west basins of dry valley Lake Bonney. Diversity and abundance of the psbA gene encoding a major protein of the photosystem II reaction center were monitored during the seasonal transition between Antarctic summer (24-h daylight) to winter (24-h darkness). Vertical trends through the photic zone in psbA abundance (DNA and mRNA) closely matched that of primary production in both lobes. Seasonal trends in psbA transcripts differed between the two lobes, with psbA expression in the west basin exhibiting a transient rise in early Fall. Last, using spectroscopic and flow cytometric analyses, we provide the first evidence that the Lake Bonney photosynthetic community is dominated by picophytoplankton that possess photosynthetic apparatus adapted to extreme shade.

  1. Vaccinia virus virion membrane biogenesis protein A11 associates with viral membranes in a manner that requires the expression of another membrane biogenesis protein, A6.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; Meng, Xiangzhi; Yan, Bo; Rose, Lloyd; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2012-10-01

    A group of vaccinia virus (VACV) proteins, including A11, L2, and A6, are required for biogenesis of the primary envelope of VACV, specifically, for the acquisition of viral membrane precursors. However, the interconnection among these proteins is unknown and, with the exception of L2, the connection of these proteins with membranes is also unknown. In this study, prompted by the findings that A6 coprecipitated A11 and that the cellular distribution of A11 was dramatically altered by repression of A6 expression, we studied the localization of A11 in cells by using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analysis. A11 was found to associate with membranes and colocalize with virion membrane proteins in viral replication factories during normal VACV replication. A11 partitioned almost equally between the detergent and aqueous phases upon Triton X-114 phase separation, demonstrating an intrinsic affinity with lipids. However, in the absence of infection or VACV late protein synthesis, A11 did not associate with cellular membranes. Furthermore, when A6 expression was repressed, A11 did not colocalize with any viral membrane proteins or associate with membranes. In contrast, when virion envelope formation was blocked at a later step by repression of A14 expression or by rifampin treatment, A11 colocalized with virion membrane proteins in the factories. Altogether, our data showed that A11 associates with viral membranes during VACV replication, and this association requires A6 expression. This study provides a physical connection between A11 and viral membranes and suggests that A6 regulates A11 membrane association.

  2. Photosynthetic units.

    PubMed

    Schmid, G H; Gaffron, H

    1968-08-01

    Leaf tissues of aurea mutants of tobacco and Lespedeza have been shown to have higher photosynthetic capacity per molecule of chlorophyll, a higher saturation intensity, a simpler lamellar structure, and the same quantum yield as their dark green parents. Here we report on the values of photosynthetic units for both types of plants and some algae. The unit has been assumed to be about as uniform and steady in the plant world as the quantum efficiency. The number on which all theoretical discussions have been based so far is 2400 per O(2) evolved or CO(2) reduced. With dark green plants and algae our determinations of units by means of 40 microsec flashes superimposed on a steady rate of background photosynthesis at 900 ergs cm(-2) sec(-1) of red light yielded mostly numbers between 2000 and 2700. However, the photosynthetic unit turned out to be very variable, even in these objects. In aurea mutants the unit was distinctly smaller, averaging 600 chl/CO(2). By choosing the right combination of colors for flash and background light, units as low as 300 chl/CO(2) or 40 chl/e(-) could be measured consistently. We found five well-defined groups of units composed of multiples of its smallest member. These new findings are discussed in terms of structural entities that double or divide under the influence of far-red light.

  3. Expression of the minor isoform pea ferredoxin in tobacco alters photosynthetic electron partitioning and enhances cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Nicolás E; Ceccoli, Romina D; Vía, María V Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T

    2013-02-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms. PMID:23370717

  4. Expression of the minor isoform pea ferredoxin in tobacco alters photosynthetic electron partitioning and enhances cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Nicolás E; Ceccoli, Romina D; Vía, María V Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T

    2013-02-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms.

  5. Expression of the Minor Isoform Pea Ferredoxin in Tobacco Alters Photosynthetic Electron Partitioning and Enhances Cyclic Electron Flow1[W

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Nicolás E.; Ceccoli, Romina D.; Vía, María V. Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F.; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T.

    2013-01-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms. PMID:23370717

  6. High-yield membrane protein expression from E. coli using an engineered outer membrane protein F fusion.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin-Chuan; Si, William; Baker, Deidre L; Berger, Bryan W

    2013-04-01

    Obtaining high yields of membrane proteins necessary to perform detailed structural study is difficult due to poor solubility and variability in yields from heterologous expression systems. To address this issue, an Escherichia coli-based membrane protein overexpression system utilizing an engineered bacterial outer membrane protein F (pOmpF) fusion has been developed. Full-length human receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) was expressed using pOmpF, solubilized in FC15 and purified to homogeneity. Using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, purified full-length RAMP1 is composed of approximately 90% α-helix, and retains its solubility and structure in FC15 over a wide range of temperatures (20-60°C). Thus, our approach provides a useful, complementary approach to achieve high-yield, full-length membrane protein overexpression for biophysical studies.

  7. Expression Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins by Fusion to Fluorescent Reporters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Järvinen, Valtteri; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Owens, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The production of recombinant integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to their relatively low levels of expression. To address this problem, screening strategies have been developed to identify the optimal membrane sequence and expression host for protein production. A common approach is to genetically fuse the membrane protein to a fluorescent reporter, typically Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) enabling expression levels, localization and detergent solubilisation to be assessed. Initially developed for screening the heterologous expression of bacterial membrane proteins in Escherichia coli, the method has been extended to eukaryotic hosts, including insect and mammalian cells. Overall, GFP-based expression screening has made a major impact on the number of membrane protein structures that have been determined in the last few years. PMID:27553231

  8. The history of photosynthetic thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Vass, Imre

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental discovery of photosynthetis research in the 1950s was the detection of thermally stimulated light emission from preilluminated photosynthetic material [Arnold W and Sherwood H (1957) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 43: 105-114]. This phenomenon, called thermoluminescence (TL), is characteristic of a wide range of materials (minerals, semiconductors, inorganic and organic crystals, and complex biological systems), which share the ability of storing radiant energy in thermally stabilized trap states. The original discovery of TL in dried chloroplasts later proved to be a phenomenon common to all photosynthetic organisms: photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants, which can be observed in isolated membrane particles, intact chloroplasts and unicellular organisms, and whole leaves. Following the initial observations considerable effort has been devoted to the identification and characterization of photosynthetic TL components. This work has firmly established the participation of various oxidation states of the water-oxidizing complex, the redox-active tyrosines, and the quinone electron acceptors of Photosystem II (PS II) in the generation of photosynthetic glow curves. Since TL characteristics are very sensitive to subtle changes in the redox properties of the involved electron transport components, the TL method has become a powerful tool in probing a wide range of PS II redox reactions and their modifications by environmental stress effects. Here, the main milestones of research in photosynthetic TL are covered until the present day. PMID:16228589

  9. Analysis of Porphyra Membrane Transporters Demonstrates Gene Transfer among Photosynthetic Eukaryotes and Numerous Sodium-Coupled Transport Systems1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Zäuner, Simone; Wheeler, Glen; Grossman, Arthur R.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Blouin, Nicolas A.; Zhuang, Yunyun; Benning, Christoph; Berg, Gry Mine; Yarish, Charles; Eriksen, Renée L.; Klein, Anita S.; Lin, Senjie; Levine, Ira; Brawley, Susan H.; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-01-01

    Membrane transporters play a central role in many cellular processes that rely on the movement of ions and organic molecules between the environment and the cell, and between cellular compartments. Transporters have been well characterized in plants and green algae, but little is known about transporters or their evolutionary histories in the red algae. Here we examined 482 expressed sequence tag contigs that encode putative membrane transporters in the economically important red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta). These contigs are part of a comprehensive transcriptome dataset from Porphyra umbilicalis and Porphyra purpurea. Using phylogenomics, we identified 30 trees that support the expected monophyly of red and green algae/plants (i.e. the Plantae hypothesis) and 19 expressed sequence tag contigs that show evidence of endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer involving stramenopiles. The majority (77%) of analyzed contigs encode transporters with unresolved phylogenies, demonstrating the difficulty in resolving the evolutionary history of genes. We observed molecular features of many sodium-coupled transport systems in marine algae, and the potential for coregulation of Porphyra transporter genes that are associated with fatty acid biosynthesis and intracellular lipid trafficking. Although both the tissue-specific and subcellular locations of the encoded proteins require further investigation, our study provides red algal gene candidates associated with transport functions and novel insights into the biology and evolution of these transporters. PMID:22337920

  10. Snorkel: an epitope tagging system for measuring the surface expression of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael; Stafford, Lewis J; Onisk, Dale; Joaquim, Tony; Tobb, Alhagie; Goldman, Larissa; Fancy, David; Stave, James; Chambers, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Tags are widely used to monitor a protein's expression level, interactions, protein trafficking, and localization. Membrane proteins are often tagged in their extracellular domains to allow discrimination between protein in the plasma membrane from that in internal pools. Multipass membrane proteins offer special challenges for inserting a tag since the extracellular regions are often composed of small loops and thus inserting an epitope tag risks perturbing the structure, function, or location of the membrane protein. We have developed a novel tagging system called snorkel where a transmembrane domain followed by a tag is appended to the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the membrane protein. In this way the tag is displayed extracellularly, but structurally separate from the membrane protein. We have tested the snorkel tag system on a diverse panel of membrane proteins including GPCRs and ion channels and demonstrated that it reliably allows for monitoring of the surface expression.

  11. Over-expression of gsh1 in the cytosol affects the photosynthetic apparatus and improves the performance of transgenic poplars on heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies of transgenic poplars over-expressing the genes gsh1 and gsh2 encoding γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS) and glutathione synthetase, respectively, provided detailed information on regulation of GSH synthesis, enzymes activities and mRNA expression. In this experiment, we studied quantitative parameters of leaves, assimilating tissues, cells and chloroplasts, mesophyll resistance for CO(2) diffusion, chlorophyll and carbohydrate content in wild-type poplar and transgenic plants over-expressing gsh1 in the cytosol after 3 years of growth in relatively clean (control) or heavy metal-contaminated soil in the field. Over-expression of gsh1 in the cytosol led to a twofold increase of intrafoliar GSH concentration and influenced the photosynthetic apparatus at different levels of organisation, i.e., leaves, photosynthetic cells and chloroplasts. At the control site, transgenic poplars had a twofold smaller total leaf area per plant and a 1.6-fold leaf area per leaf compared to wild-type controls. Annual aboveground biomass gain was reduced by 50% in the transgenic plants. The reduction of leaf area of the transformants was accompanied by a significant decline in total cell number per leaf, indicating suppression of cell division. Over-expression of γ-ECS in the cytosol also caused changes in mesophyll structure, i.e., a 20% decrease in cell and chloroplast number per leaf area, but also an enhanced volume share of chloroplasts and intercellular airspaces in the leaves. Transgenic and wild poplars did not exhibit differences in chlorophyll and carotenoid content of leaves, but transformants had 1.3-fold fewer soluble carbohydrates. Cultivation on contaminated soil caused a reduction of palisade cell volume and chloroplast number, both per cell and leaf area, in wild-type plants but not in transformants. Biomass accumulation of wild-type poplars decreased in contaminated soil by more than 30-fold, whereas transformants showed a twofold decrease

  12. Functional expression of mammalian receptors and membrane channels in different cells.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Nora; Duckely, Myriam; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Egan, Terrance M; Oksche, Alexander; Konopka, James B; Lüthi, Anita; Engel, Andreas; Werten, Paul J L

    2007-08-01

    In native tissues, the majority of medically important membrane proteins is only present at low concentrations, making their overexpression in recombinant systems a prerequisite for structural studies. Here, we explore the commonly used eukaryotic expression systems-yeast, baculovirus/insect cells (Sf9) and Semliki Forest Virus (SFV)/mammalian cells-for the expression of seven different eukaryotic membrane proteins from a variety of protein families. The expression levels, quality, biological activity, localization and solubility of all expressed proteins are compared in order to identify the advantages of one system over the other. SFV-transfected mammalian cell lines provide the closest to native environment for the expression of mammalian membrane proteins, and they exhibited the best overall performance. But depending on the protein, baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells performed almost as well as mammalian cells. The lowest expression levels for the proteins tested here were obtained in yeast.

  13. Cell-free Expression and In Meso Crystallisation of an Integral Membrane Kinase for Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Tasadaque Ali; Haberstock, Stefan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank; Caffrey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins are key elements in cell physiology and drug targeting, but getting a high-resolution structure by crystallographic means is still enormously challenging. Novel strategies are in big demand to facilitate the structure determination process that will ultimately hasten the day when sequence information alone can provide a 3-dimensional model. Cell-free or in vitro expression enables rapid access to large quantities of high quality membrane proteins suitable for an array of applications. Despite its impressive efficiency, to date only two membrane proteins produced by the in vitro approach have yielded crystal structures. Here, we have analysed synergies of cell-free expression and crystallisation in lipidic mesophases for generating an X-ray structure of the integral membrane enzyme diacylglycerol kinase to 2.28 Å resolution. The quality of cellular and cell-free expressed kinase samples have been evaluated systematically by comparing i) spectroscopic properties, ii) purity and oligomer formation, iii) lipid content and iv) functionality. DgkA is the first membrane enzyme crystallised based on cell-free expression. The study provides a basic standard for the crystallisation of cell-free expressed membrane proteins and the methods detailed here should prove generally useful and contribute to accelerating the pace at which membrane protein structures are solved. PMID:25012698

  14. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  15. A Link between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Stephen S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M; Galimidi, Rachel P; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-08-23

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels vary widely and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  16. A Link Between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMP) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels widely vary and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  17. Differential expression profile of membrane proteins in L-02 cells exposed to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Huang, Aibo; Lin, Sheng; Yang, Xifei; Yang, Linqing; Zhou, Li; Huang, Haiyan; Wu, Desheng; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a halogenated organic solvent widely used in industries, is known to cause severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms underlying TCE hepatotoxicity are still not well understood. It is predicted that membrane proteins are responsible for key biological functions, and recent studies have revealed that TCE exposure can induce abnormal levels of membrane proteins in body fluids and cultured cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the TCE-induced alterations of membrane proteins profiles in human hepatic L-02 liver cells. A comparative membrane proteomics analysis was performed in combination with two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 15 proteins were identified as differentially expressed (4 upregulated and 11 downregulated) between TCE-treated cells and normal controls. Among this, 14 of them are suggested as membrane-associated proteins by their transmembrane domain and/or subcellular location. Furthermore, the differential expression of β subunit of adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATP5B) and prolyl 4-hydroxylase, β polypeptide (P4HB) were verified by Western blot analysis in TCE-treated L-02 cells. Our work not only reveals the association between TCE exposure and altered expression of membrane proteins but also provides a novel strategy to discover membrane biomarkers and elucidate the potential mechanisms involving with membrane proteins response to chemical-induced toxic effect.

  18. Expression patterns of genes encoding plasma membrane aquaporins during fruit development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Ren; Li, Dianbo; Xu, Fengfeng; Sun, Qianqian; Zhao, Bin; Mao, Ai-Jun; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels precisely regulating water movement through cell membranes in most living organisms. Despite the advances in the physiology of fruit development, their participation during fruit development in cucumber still barely understood. In this paper, the expressions of 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) were analyzed during cucumber fruit development in our work. Based on the homology search with known PIPs from rice, Arabidopsis and strawberry, 12 cucumber PIP genes subfamily members were identified. Cellular localization assays indicated that CsPIPs were localized in the plasma membrane. The qRT-PCR analysis of CsPIPs showed that 12 CsPIPs were differentially expressed during fruit development. These results suggest that 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (CsPIPs) play very important roles in cucumber life cycle and the data generated will be helpful in understanding their precise roles during fruit development in cucumber.

  19. Photosynthetic reaction center functionalized nano-composite films: effective strategies for probing and exploiting the photo-induced electron transfer of photosensitive membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidong; Xu, Jingjing; Liu, Baohong; Kong, Jilie

    2007-02-15

    Photosynthetic reaction center (RC), a robust transmembrane pigment-protein complex, works as the crucial component participating the primary event of the photo-electrochemical conversion in bacteria. Sparked by the high photo-induced charge separation yield (ca. 100%) of RC, great interests have been aroused to fabricate versatile RC-functionalized nano-composite films for exploring the initial photosynthetic electron transfer (ET) of RC, and thus exploiting well-designed bio-photoelectric converters. In this review, we classify and summarize the current status about the concepts and methods of constructing RC-immobilized nano-composite films or devices for probing the photo-induced ET, and applying to novel bioelectronics if it is possible.

  20. High-throughput Cloning and Expression of Integral Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Recently, several structural genomics centers have been established and a remarkable number of three-dimensional structures of soluble proteins have been solved. For membrane proteins, the number of structures solved has been significantly trailing those for their soluble counterparts, not least because over-expression and purification of membrane proteins is a much more arduous process. By using high throughput technologies, a large number of membrane protein targets can be screened simultaneously and a greater number of expression and purification conditions can be employed, leading to a higher probability of successfully determining the structure of membrane proteins. This unit describes the cloning, expression and screening of membrane proteins using high throughput methodologies developed in our laboratory. Basic Protocol 1 deals with the cloning of inserts into expression vectors by ligation-independent cloning. Basic Protocol 2 describes the expression and purification of the target proteins on a miniscale. Lastly, for the targets that express at the miniscale, basic protocols 3 and 4 outline the methods employed for the expression and purification of targets at the midi-scale, as well as a procedure for detergent screening and identification of detergent(s) in which the target protein is stable. PMID:24510647

  1. Heat-shock protein expression on the membrane of T cells undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, F; Piselli, P; Vendetti, S; Bach, S; Amendola, A; Placido, R; Colizzi, V

    1996-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (hsp) represent a highly conserved family of proteins, normally localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, whose expression is induced in situations involving cell stress. This paper reports the unusual translocation of hsp to the cell membrane of T cells undergoing apoptosis. We observed that glucocorticosteroid-induced thymocyte death is associated to the surface expression of hsp 60 and hsp 70 in a discrete fraction of apoptotic cells. hsp surface expression is closely related to a thymic subset of immature CD3low/- T cells. The expression of surface hsp 60 appears early after treatment with dexamethasone (3 hr) whereas the membrane expression of hsp 70 follows different kinetics and peaks later. Morphological analysis of the hsp+ apoptotic cells suggest that this subset represents late-stage apoptotic cells at their minimal volume before fragmentation into apoptotic bodies. Membrane expression of hsp is also associated with apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AIDS patients cultured in vitro. Altogether, we show that a discrete fraction of cells undergoing apoptosis expresses membrane hsp 60 and hsp 70, supporting the hypothesis that apoptosis causes a radical alteration in the expression of cell surface molecules. Surface hsp expressed during apoptosis may constitute a novel immune-context able to generate packages of self- and exogenous antigens, originating from degradation of altered cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8707351

  2. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings.

  3. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings. PMID:25087500

  4. Screening for lipid requirements of membrane proteins by combining cell-free expression with nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (CF) protein expression has emerged as one of the most efficient production platforms for membrane proteins. Central bottlenecks prevalent in conventional cell-based expression systems such as mistargeting, inclusion body formation, degradation as well as product toxicity can be addressed by taking advantage of the reduced complexity of CF expression systems. However, the open accessibility of CF reactions offers the possibility to design customized artificial expression environments by supplying synthetic hydrophobic compounds such as micelles or membranes of defined composition. The open nature of CF systems therefore generally allows systematic screening approaches for the identification of efficient cotranslational solubilization environments of membrane proteins. Synergies exist in particular with the recently developed nanodisc (ND) technology enabling the synthesis of stable and highly soluble particles containing membrane discs of defined composition. Specific types of lipids frequently modulate folding, stability, and activity of integrated membrane proteins. One recently reported example are phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide (MraY) translocases that catalyze a crucial step in bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis making them interesting as future drug targets. Production of functionally active MraY homologues from most human pathogens in conventional cellular production systems was so far not successful due to their obviously strict lipid dependency for functionally folding. We demonstrate that the combination of CF expression with ND technologies is an efficient strategy for the production of folded MraY translocases, and we present a general protocol for the rapid screening of lipid specificities of membrane proteins. PMID:25857790

  5. Prominent Expression of Xenobiotic Efflux Transporters in Mouse Extraembryonic Fetal Membranes Compared to Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Cui, Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2008-01-01

    Fetal exposure to xenobiotics can be restricted by transporters at the interface between maternal and fetal circulation. Previous work identified transporters in the placenta, however, less is known about the presence of these transporters in the fetal membranes (i.e., yolk sac and amniotic membranes). The purpose of this study was to quantify mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic transporters in mouse placenta and fetal membranes during mid- to late-gestation. Concepti (placenta and fetal membranes, gestation day 11) or placenta and fetal membranes (gestation days 14 and 17) were collected from pregnant mice and analyzed for expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps), multidrug resistance proteins (Mdr), multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (Mate), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps). Maternal liver and kidneys were also collected at day 14 for mRNA and immunohistochemical analysis. mRNA expression of Mrp, Mdr, Bcrp, Mate-1, Oatp isoforms was detected at day 11. The uptake carriers Oatp2a1, 3a1, 4a1, and 5a1 showed placenta-predominant expression. At days 14 and 17, fetal membranes expressed higher mRNA levels of the efflux transporters Mrp2 (7-fold), Mrp4 (5-fold), Mrp5 (3-fold), Mrp6 (12-fold), Bcrp (2-fold), and Mate-1 (7-fold) compared to placenta. Western blot of Mrp2, Mrp4, Mrp6, and Bcrp confirmed higher expression in fetal membranes. Immunostaining revealed apical (Mrp2 and Bcrp) and basolateral (Mrp4, 5, and 6) cellular localization in epithelial cells of the yolk sac. In conclusion, xenobiotic transporters in the fetal membranes may provide an additional route to protect the fetus against endogenous chemicals and xenobiotics. PMID:18566041

  6. Genetic selection system for improving recombinant membrane protein expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Massey-Gendel, Elizabeth; Zhao, Anni; Boulting, Gabriella; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Balamotis, Michael A; Seligman, Len M; Nakamoto, Robert K; Bowie, James U

    2009-01-01

    A major barrier to the physical characterization and structure determination of membrane proteins is low yield in recombinant expression. To address this problem, we have designed a selection strategy to isolate mutant strains of Escherichia coli that improve the expression of a targeted membrane protein. In this method, the coding sequence of the membrane protein of interest is fused to a C-terminal selectable marker, so that the production of the selectable marker and survival on selective media is linked to expression of the targeted membrane protein. Thus, mutant strains with improved expression properties can be directly selected. We also introduce a rapid method for curing isolated strains of the plasmids used during the selection process, in which the plasmids are removed by in vivo digestion with the homing endonuclease I-CreI. We tested this selection system on a rhomboid family protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv1337) and were able to isolate mutants, which we call EXP strains, with up to 75-fold increased expression. The EXP strains also improve the expression of other membrane proteins that were not the target of selection, in one case roughly 90-fold. PMID:19165721

  7. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  8. Green Fluorescent Protein-based Expression Screening of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Louise E.; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  9. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  10. Conformational Antibody Binding to a Native, Cell-Free Expressed GPCR in Block Copolymer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    de Hoog, Hans-Peter M.; Lin JieRong, Esther M.; Banerjee, Sourabh; Décaillot, Fabien M.; Nallani, Madhavan

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a key role in physiological processes and are attractive drug targets. Their biophysical characterization is, however, highly challenging because of their innate instability outside a stabilizing membrane and the difficulty of finding a suitable expression system. We here show the cell-free expression of a GPCR, CXCR4, and its direct embedding in diblock copolymer membranes. The polymer-stabilized CXCR4 is readily immobilized onto biosensor chips for label-free binding analysis. Kinetic characterization using a conformationally sensitive antibody shows the receptor to exist in the correctly folded conformation, showing binding behaviour that is commensurate with heterologously expressed CXCR4. PMID:25329156

  11. Advanced method for high-throughput expression of mutated eukaryotic membrane proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keisuke; Sugawara, Taishi; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Tokuda, Natsuko; Kurokawa, Azusa; Misaka, Takumi; Makyio, Hisayoshi; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Nomura, Norimichi; Murata, Takeshi; Abe, Keiko; Iwata, So

    2008-07-11

    Crystallization of eukaryotic membrane proteins is a challenging, iterative process. The protein of interest is often modified in an attempt to improve crystallization and diffraction results. To accelerate this process, we took advantage of a GFP-fusion yeast expression system that uses PCR to direct homologous recombination and gene cloning. We explored the possibility of employing more than one PCR fragment to introduce various mutations in a single step, and found that when up to five PCR fragments were co-transformed into yeast, the recombination frequency was maintained as the number of fragments was increased. All transformants expressed the model membrane protein, while the resulting plasmid from each clone contained the designed mutations only. Thus, we have demonstrated a technique allowing the expression of mutant membrane proteins within 5 days, combining a GFP-fusion expression system and yeast homologous recombination.

  12. Selective Methyl Labeling of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins Using Cell-Free Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of membrane proteins and other large proteins with NMR relies increasingly on perdeuteration combined with incorporation of specifically protonated amino acid moieties, such as methyl groups of isoleucines, valines, or leucines. The resulting proton dilution reduces dipolar broadening producing sharper resonance lines, ameliorates spectral crowding, and enables measuring of crucial distances between and to methyl groups. While incorporation of specific methyl labeling is now well established for bacterial expression using suitable precursors, corresponding methods are still lacking for cell-free expression, which is often the only choice for producing labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins in mg quantities. Here we show that we can express methyl-labeled human integral membrane proteins cost-effectively by cell-free expression based of crude hydrolyzed ILV-labeled OmpX inclusion bodies. These are obtained in Escherichia coli with very high quantity and represent an optimal intermediate to channel ILV precursors into the eukaryotic proteins. PMID:24937763

  13. Expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes after injection of human brain membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia

    2002-10-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is a very powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins, e.g., messenger RNA extracted from the brain and injected into oocytes leads to the synthesis and membrane incorporation of many types of functional receptors and ion channels, and membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques injected into oocytes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and Cl channels. This approach was developed further to transplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from human brain cells to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membranes isolated from the temporal neocortex of a patient, operated for intractable epilepsy, were injected into oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired functional neurotransmitter receptors to -aminobutyric acid, -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, and glycine. These receptors were also expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the temporal neocortex of the same patient. All of this makes the Xenopus oocyte a more useful model than it already is for studies of the structure and function of many human membrane proteins and opens the way to novel pathophysiological investigations of some human brain disorders.

  14. A Guide to Transient Expression of Membrane Proteins in HEK-293 Cells for Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Esau, Luke; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells are commonly used as host for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins not least because they have a high transfection efficiency and faithfully translate and process proteins. In addition, their cell size, morphology and division rate, and low expression of native channels are traits that are particularly attractive for current-voltage measurements. Nevertheless, the heterologous expression of complex membrane proteins such as receptors and ion channels for biological characterization and in particular for single-cell applications such as electrophysiology remains a challenge. Expression of functional proteins depends largely on careful step-by-step optimization that includes the design of expression vectors with suitable identification tags, as well as the selection of transfection methods and detection parameters appropriate for the application. Here, we use the heterologous expression of a plant potassium channel, the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ channel, AtGORK (At5G37500) in HEK-293 cells as an example, to evaluate commonly used transfection reagents and fluorescent detection methods, and provide a detailed methodology for optimized transient transfection and expression of membrane proteins for in vivo studies in general and for single-cell applications in particular. This optimized protocol will facilitate the physiological and cellular characterization of complex membrane proteins. PMID:27486406

  15. A Guide to Transient Expression of Membrane Proteins in HEK-293 Cells for Functional Characterization.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Esau, Luke; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells are commonly used as host for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins not least because they have a high transfection efficiency and faithfully translate and process proteins. In addition, their cell size, morphology and division rate, and low expression of native channels are traits that are particularly attractive for current-voltage measurements. Nevertheless, the heterologous expression of complex membrane proteins such as receptors and ion channels for biological characterization and in particular for single-cell applications such as electrophysiology remains a challenge. Expression of functional proteins depends largely on careful step-by-step optimization that includes the design of expression vectors with suitable identification tags, as well as the selection of transfection methods and detection parameters appropriate for the application. Here, we use the heterologous expression of a plant potassium channel, the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K(+) channel, AtGORK (At5G37500) in HEK-293 cells as an example, to evaluate commonly used transfection reagents and fluorescent detection methods, and provide a detailed methodology for optimized transient transfection and expression of membrane proteins for in vivo studies in general and for single-cell applications in particular. This optimized protocol will facilitate the physiological and cellular characterization of complex membrane proteins. PMID:27486406

  16. Time-dependent changes in antioxidative enzyme expression and photosynthetic activity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells under acute exposure to cadmium and anthracene.

    PubMed

    Aksmann, Anna; Pokora, Wojciech; Baścik-Remisiewicz, Agnieszka; Dettlaff-Pokora, Agnieszka; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Dziadziuszko, Małgorzata; Tukaj, Zbigniew

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals (HM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the freshwater environment at concentrations that can be hazardous to the biota. Among HMs and PAHs, cadmium (Cd) and anthracene (ANT) are the most prevalent and toxic ones. The response of Chlamydomonas cells to Cd and ANT at concentrations that markedly reduced the growth of algal population was investigated in this study. At such concentrations, both cadmium and anthracene were recognized as oxidative stress inducers, since high concentration of H2O2 in treated cultures was observed. Therefore, as a part of the "molecular phase" of the cell response to this stress, we examined the time-dependent expression of genes encoding the main antioxidative enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), as well as the activity of these enzymes in cells, with special attention paid to chloroplastic and mitochondrial isoforms of SOD. To characterize the cell response at the "physiological level", we examined the photosynthetic activity of stressed cells via analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence in vivo. In contrast to standard ecotoxicity studies in which the growth end-points are usually determined, herein we present time-dependent changes in algal cell response to Cd- and ANT-induced stress. The most significant effect(s) of the toxicants on photosynthetic activity was observed in the 6th hour, when strong depression of PI parameter value, an over 50 percent reduction of the active reaction center fraction (RC0) and a 3-fold increase in non-photochemical energy dissipation (DI0/RC) were noted. At the same time, the increase (up to 2.5-fold) in mRNA transcript of SOD and CAT genes, followed by the enhancement in the enzyme activity was observed. The high expression of the Msd 3 gene in treated Chlamydomonas cells probably complements the partial loss of chloroplast Fe-SOD and APX activity, while catalase and Mn-SOD 5 seem to be the major enzymes responsible for

  17. Time-dependent changes in antioxidative enzyme expression and photosynthetic activity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells under acute exposure to cadmium and anthracene.

    PubMed

    Aksmann, Anna; Pokora, Wojciech; Baścik-Remisiewicz, Agnieszka; Dettlaff-Pokora, Agnieszka; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Dziadziuszko, Małgorzata; Tukaj, Zbigniew

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals (HM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the freshwater environment at concentrations that can be hazardous to the biota. Among HMs and PAHs, cadmium (Cd) and anthracene (ANT) are the most prevalent and toxic ones. The response of Chlamydomonas cells to Cd and ANT at concentrations that markedly reduced the growth of algal population was investigated in this study. At such concentrations, both cadmium and anthracene were recognized as oxidative stress inducers, since high concentration of H2O2 in treated cultures was observed. Therefore, as a part of the "molecular phase" of the cell response to this stress, we examined the time-dependent expression of genes encoding the main antioxidative enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), as well as the activity of these enzymes in cells, with special attention paid to chloroplastic and mitochondrial isoforms of SOD. To characterize the cell response at the "physiological level", we examined the photosynthetic activity of stressed cells via analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence in vivo. In contrast to standard ecotoxicity studies in which the growth end-points are usually determined, herein we present time-dependent changes in algal cell response to Cd- and ANT-induced stress. The most significant effect(s) of the toxicants on photosynthetic activity was observed in the 6th hour, when strong depression of PI parameter value, an over 50 percent reduction of the active reaction center fraction (RC0) and a 3-fold increase in non-photochemical energy dissipation (DI0/RC) were noted. At the same time, the increase (up to 2.5-fold) in mRNA transcript of SOD and CAT genes, followed by the enhancement in the enzyme activity was observed. The high expression of the Msd 3 gene in treated Chlamydomonas cells probably complements the partial loss of chloroplast Fe-SOD and APX activity, while catalase and Mn-SOD 5 seem to be the major enzymes responsible for

  18. Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. II. Presence of putative isogenes and a protein equipped with a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akiko; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Takagi, Shingo

    2002-04-01

    In vitro treatment with trypsin of plasma membrane (PM) vesicles isolated from the leaves of Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, an aquatic monocot, produced a marked decrease in the Km for ATP and an increase in the Vmax of H+-transporting activity. Concomitantly, the removal of 8 kDa of the C-terminal domain from the 94-kDa PM H+-ATPase was confirmed by immunoblotting using different kinds of polyclonal antibody. Three partial clones of putative PM H+-ATPase genes (Vga1, 2, and 3) were isolated from leaves by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Northern blotting analysis revealed that the expression level of Vga3 was high and that of the other two genes was much lower. The H+-transporting activity of PM vesicles was substantially suppressed in the presence of inorganic phosphate (Pi), which has been supposed to be a noncompetitive inhibitor of the PM H+-ATPase, coincident with an increase in the Km for ATP and a decrease in the Vmax. After treatment of the isolated PM vesicles with trypsin, the inhibitory effect of Pi was no longer evident. This result indicates that Pi inhibited the activity through the C-terminal autoinhibitory domain of the PM H+-ATPase. Furthermore, Pi increased the Km for ATP of the H+-transporting activity in the PM vesicles isolated from both dark-adapted and red-light-irradiated leaves. The results suggest that regulation of the Km for ATP through the operation of photosynthesis is independent of regulation through the cytoplasmic level of Pi. PMID:11941463

  19. Combining in Vitro Folding with Cell Free Protein Synthesis for Membrane Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Hein, Christopher; Hoffmann, Beate; Matulef, Kimberly; Bernhard, Frank; Dötsch, Volker; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2016-08-01

    Cell free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a promising methodology for protein expression. While polypeptide production is very reliable and efficient using CFPS, the correct cotranslational folding of membrane proteins during CFPS is still a challenge. In this contribution, we describe a two-step protocol in which the integral membrane protein is initially expressed by CFPS as a precipitate followed by an in vitro folding procedure using lipid vesicles for converting the protein precipitate to the correctly folded protein. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach for the K(+) channels KcsA and MVP and the amino acid transporter LeuT. We determine the crystal structure of the KcsA channel obtained by CFPS and in vitro folding to show the structural similarity to the cellular expressed KcsA channel and to establish the feasibility of using this two-step approach for membrane protein production for structural studies. Our studies show that the correct folding of these membrane proteins with complex topologies can take place in vitro without the involvement of the cellular machinery for membrane protein biogenesis. This indicates that the folding instructions for these complex membrane proteins are contained entirely within the protein sequence. PMID:27384110

  20. DIP: a member of the MIP family of membrane proteins that is expressed in mature seeds and dark-grown seedlings of Antirrhinum majus.

    PubMed

    Culianez-Macia, F A; Martin, C

    1993-10-01

    DiP, a gene from Antirrhinum majus, which encodes a protein with striking homology to other integral membrane proteins, was cloned. The gene was specifically expressed in mature seeds and during seedling germination, particularly in cotyledons of seedlings grown in the dark. The deduced product, called DiP, for dark intrinsic protein, shows strong homology with the MIP family of channel transporters which include; the bovine major intrinsic protein (MIP), the Escherichia coli glycerol facilitator (GIpF), the peribacteroid nodulin-26 (Nod26), and the tonoplast protein from kidney bean (TIP). DiP is most similar to other plant members of this family, and in particular to the tobacco protein TobRB7 which is expressed specifically in roots. However, the expression pattern of diP suggests that its product is functionally more similar to the tonoplast intrinsic protein from kidney bean since it is most highly expressed in the cotyledons of germinating seedlings, before the cells undergo expansion growth and become photosynthetic.

  1. Differential gene expression in skeletal muscle cells after membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Juretić, Nevenka; Urzúa, Ulises; Munroe, David J; Jaimovich, Enrique; Riveros, Nora

    2007-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue with a remarkable capacity to adapt itself to challenges imposed by contractile activity. Adaptive response, that include hypertrophy and activation of oxidative mechanisms have been associated with transient changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. To define the set of genes regulated by a depolarizing stimulus, we used 22 K mouse oligonucleotide microarrays. Total RNA from C2C12 myotubes was obtained at 2, 4, 18, and 24 h after high K+ stimulation. cDNA from control and depolarized samples was labeled with cyanine 3 or 5 dyes prior to microarray hybridization. Loess normalization followed by statistical analysis resulted in 423 differentially expressed genes using an unadjusted P-value < or = 0.01 as cut off. Depolarization affects transcriptional activity of a limited number of genes, mainly associated with metabolism, cell communication and response to stress. A number of genes related to Ca2+ signaling pathways are induced at 4 h, reinforcing the potential role of Ca2+ in early steps of signal transduction that leads to gene expression. Significant changes in the expression of molecules involved in muscle cell structure were observed; K+-depolarization increased Tnni1 and Acta1 mRNA levels in both differentiated C2C12 and rat skeletal muscle cells in primary culture. Of these two, depolarization induced slow Ca2+ transients appear to have a role only in the regulation of Tnni1 transcriptional activity. We suggest that depolarization induced expression of a small set of genes may underlie Ca2+ dependent plasticity of skeletal muscle cells. PMID:17146758

  2. Comparison of Gene Expression Profile of Epiretinal Membranes Obtained from Eyes with Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy to That of Secondary Epiretinal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Asato, Ryo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakama, Takahito; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Nakao, Shintaro; Sassa, Yukio; Enaida, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yuji; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi; Kono, Toshihiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2013-01-01

    Background Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a destructive complication of retinal detachment and vitreoretinal surgery which can lead to severe vision reduction by tractional retinal detachments. The purpose of this study was to determine the gene expression profile of epiretinal membranes (ERMs) associated with a PVR (PVR-ERM) and to compare it to the expression profile of less-aggressive secondary ERMs. Methodology/Principal Findings A PCR-amplified complementary DNA (cDNA) library was constructed using the RNAs isolated from ERMs obtained during vitrectomy. The sequence from the 5′ end was obtained for randomly selected clones and used to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We obtained 1116 nonredundant clusters representing individual genes expressed in PVR-ERMs, and 799 clusters representing the genes expressed in secondary ERMs. The transcriptome of the PVR-ERMs was subdivided by functional subsets of genes related to metabolism, cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, signaling, and other functions, by FatiGo analysis. The genes highly expressed in PVR-ERMs were compared to those expressed in the secondary ERMs, and these were subdivided by cell adhesion, proliferation, and other functions. Querying 10 cell adhesion-related genes against the STRING database yielded 70 possible physical relationships to other genes/proteins, which included an additional 60 genes that were not detected in the PVR-ERM library. Of these, soluble CD44 and soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 were significantly increased in the vitreous of patients with PVR. Conclusions/Significance Our results support an earlier hypothesis that a PVR-ERM, even from genomic points of view, is an aberrant form of wound healing response. Genes preferentially expressed in PVR-ERMs may play an important role in the progression of PVR and could be served as therapeutic targets. PMID:23372684

  3. In-Situ Observation of Membrane Protein Folding during Cell-Free Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fitter, Jörg; Büldt, Georg; Heberle, Joachim; Schlesinger, Ramona; Ataka, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Proper insertion, folding and assembly of functional proteins in biological membranes are key processes to warrant activity of a living cell. Here, we present a novel approach to trace folding and insertion of a nascent membrane protein leaving the ribosome and penetrating the bilayer. Surface Enhanced IR Absorption Spectroscopy selectively monitored insertion and folding of membrane proteins during cell-free expression in a label-free and non-invasive manner. Protein synthesis was performed in an optical cell containing a prism covered with a thin gold film with nanodiscs on top, providing an artificial lipid bilayer for folding. In a pilot experiment, the folding pathway of bacteriorhodopsin via various secondary and tertiary structures was visualized. Thus, a methodology is established with which the folding reaction of other more complex membrane proteins can be observed during protein biosynthesis (in situ and in operando) at molecular resolution. PMID:26978519

  4. Role of the mar-sox-rob regulon in regulating outer membrane porin expression.

    PubMed

    Chubiz, Lon M; Rao, Christopher V

    2011-05-01

    Multiple factors control the expression of the outer membrane porins OmpF and OmpC in Escherichia coli. In this work, we investigated the role of the mar-sox-rob regulon in regulating outer membrane porin expression in response to salicylate. We provide both genetic and physiological evidence that MarA and Rob can independently activate micF transcription in response to salicylate, leading to reduced OmpF expression. MarA was also found to repress OmpF expression through a MicF-independent pathway. In the case of OmpC, we found that its transcription was moderately increased in response to salicylate. However, this increase was independent of MarA and Rob. Finally, we found that the reduction in OmpF expression in a tolC mutant is due primarily to Rob. Collectively, this work further clarifies the coordinated role of MarA and Rob in regulating the expression of the outer membrane porins.

  5. Identification and expression of NEU3, a novel human sialidase associated to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Monti, E; Bassi, M T; Papini, N; Riboni, M; Manzoni, M; Venerando, B; Croci, G; Preti, A; Ballabio, A; Tettamanti, G; Borsani, G

    2000-01-01

    Several mammalian sialidases have been described so far, suggesting the existence of numerous polypeptides with different tissue distributions, subcellular localizations and substrate specificities. Among these enzymes, plasma-membrane-associated sialidase(s) have a pivotal role in modulating the ganglioside content of the lipid bilayer, suggesting their involvement in the complex mechanisms governing cell-surface biological functions. Here we describe the identification and expression of a human plasma-membrane-associated sialidase, NEU3, isolated starting from an expressed sequence tag (EST) clone. The cDNA for this sialidase encodes a 428-residue protein containing a putative transmembrane helix, a YRIP (single-letter amino acid codes) motif and three Asp boxes characteristic of sialidases. The polypeptide shows high sequence identity (78%) with the membrane-associated sialidase recently purified and cloned from Bos taurus. Northern blot analysis showed a wide pattern of expression of the gene, in both adult and fetal human tissues. Transient expression in COS7 cells permitted the detection of a sialidase activity with high activity towards ganglioside substrates at a pH optimum of 3.8. Immunofluorescence staining of the transfected COS7 cells demonstrated the protein's localization in the plasma membrane. PMID:10861246

  6. Tissue specificity of a baculovirus expressed, basement membrane-degrading protease in larvae of Heliothis virescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease from flesh fly Sarcophaga peregrina, which digests components of the basement membrane during insect metamorphosis. A recombinant baculovirus (AcMLF9.ScathL) expressing ScathL kills larvae of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, significantly faste...

  7. Regulatory RNAs in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Matthias; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory RNAs play versatile roles in bacteria in the coordination of gene expression during various physiological processes, especially during stress adaptation. Photosynthetic bacteria use sunlight as their major energy source. Therefore, they are particularly vulnerable to the damaging effects of excess light or UV irradiation. In addition, like all bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria must adapt to limiting nutrient concentrations and abiotic and biotic stress factors. Transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of potential regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) in model cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and in environmentally relevant genera such as Trichodesmium, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Some sRNAs have been shown to actually contain μORFs and encode short proteins. Examples include the 40-amino-acid product of the sml0013 gene, which encodes the NdhP subunit of the NDH1 complex. In contrast, the functional characterization of the non-coding sRNA PsrR1 revealed that the 131 nt long sRNA controls photosynthetic functions by targeting multiple mRNAs, providing a paradigm for sRNA functions in photosynthetic bacteria. We suggest that actuatons comprise a new class of genetic elements in which an sRNA gene is inserted upstream of a coding region to modify or enable transcription of that region.

  8. Expression and regulation of progestin membrane receptors in the rat corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zailong; Stocco, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Despite evidence strongly supporting progesterone's autocrine actions in the rat corpus luteum (CL), classical progesterone receptors (PR) have not been detected in this gland. Alternatively, in several other systems, progestins have been reported to activate nongenomic pathways via putative progestin membrane receptors (PMRs). The aim of this investigation was to determine whether rat CL membranes bind progestins and contain PMR homologs and whether these proteins are expressed during CL development in a manner that parallels luteal function. We found that luteal cell membranes specifically bind progesterone. Low levels of progesterone and 20alpha-dihydroprogesterone decreased binding of [(3)H]progesterone, whereas androstenedione, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, and pregnenolone were less potent. Other steroids, including corticosterone, mifepristone, and estradiol, were ineffective. We found that the rat CL expresses five genes previously postulated to encode for putative PMRs: PMRalpha, PMRbeta, PMRgamma, PR membrane component 1 (PRMC1), and Rda288. Pmralpha, Pmrgamma, and Prmc1 transcripts rose steadily during pregnancy whereas Pmrbeta and Rda288 remained constant. Just before parturition, concomitant with falling progesterone levels, Pmralpha, Pmrbeta, and Prmc1 decreased. Luteal PMRalpha and PRMC1 protein levels were lower in samples taken at the end of pregnancy compared with midpregnancy samples. Ergocriptine, which inhibits the secretion of prolactin, the primary luteotrophic hormone in the rat CL, reduced Pmralpha, Pmrbeta, and Prmc1 expression significantly. Ergocriptine effects were prevented by coadministration of prolactin. These findings provide evidence for the expression and regulation of putative membrane-bound progestin-binding proteins in the rat CL, a tissue that does not express detectable levels of nuclear progesterone receptors. PMID:16123161

  9. 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-induced alteration in leaf photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, respiration and membrane damage in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under high night temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High night temperature (HNT) can induce ethylene-triggered reactive oxygen species production, which can cause premature leaf senescence and membrane damage, thereby affecting production, consumption and transfer of photosynthates, and yield. The 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can competitively bind w...

  10. Plasma membrane CFTR regulates RANTES expression via its C-terminal PDZ-interacting motif.

    PubMed

    Estell, Kim; Braunstein, Gavin; Tucker, Torry; Varga, Karoly; Collawn, James F; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2003-01-01

    Despite the identification of 1,000 mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene product CFTR, there remains discordance between CFTR genotype and lung disease phenotype. The study of CFTR, therefore, has expanded beyond its chloride channel activity into other possible functions, such as its role as a regulator of gene expression. Findings indicate that CFTR plays a role in the expression of RANTES in airway epithelia. RANTES is a chemokine that has been implicated in the regulation of mucosal immunity and the pathogenesis of airway inflammatory diseases. Results demonstrate that CFTR triggers RANTES expression via a mechanism that is independent of CFTR's chloride channel activity. Neither pharmacological inhibition of CFTR nor activation of alternative chloride channels, including hClC-2, modulated RANTES expression. Through the use of CFTR disease-associated and truncation mutants, experiments suggest that CFTR-mediated transcription factor activation and RANTES expression require (i) insertion of CFTR into the plasma membrane and (ii) an intact CFTR C-terminal PDZ-interacting domain. Expression of constructs encoding wild-type or dominant-negative forms of the PDZ-binding protein EBP50 suggests that EBP50 may be involved in CFTR-dependent RANTES expression. Together, these data suggest that CFTR modulates gene expression in airway epithelial cells while located in a macromolecular signaling complex at the plasma membrane. PMID:12509457

  11. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  12. Small-Scale Screening to Large-Scale Over-Expression of Human Membrane Proteins for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarika; Saha, Sukanya; Thamminana, Sobrahani; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein structural studies are frequently hampered by poor expression. The low natural abundance of these proteins implies a need for utilizing different heterologous expression systems. E. coli and yeast are commonly used expression systems due to rapid cell growth at high cell density, economical production, and ease of manipulation. Here we report a simplified, systematically developed robust strategy from small-scale screening to large-scale over-expression of human integral membrane proteins in the mammalian expression system for structural studies. This methodology streamlines small-scale screening of several different constructs utilizing fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) towards optimization of buffer, additives, and detergents for achieving stability and homogeneity. This is followed by the generation of stable clonal cell lines expressing desired constructs, and lastly large-scale expression for crystallization. These techniques are designed to rapidly advance the structural studies of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins including that of human membrane proteins. PMID:27485338

  13. Altered decorin and Smad expression in human fetal membranes in PPROM.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Casie E; Roumimper, Hailey; Tucker, Richard; Lechner, Beatrice E

    2014-11-01

    Humans with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a subtype of which is caused by abnormal decorin expression, are at increased risk of preterm birth due to preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes (PPROM). In the mouse model, the absence of decorin leads to fetal membrane abnormalities, preterm birth, and dysregulation of decorin's downstream pathway components, including the transcription factor p-Smad-2. However, the role of decorin and p-Smad-2 in idiopathic human PPROM is unknown. Fetal membranes from 20-25 pregnancies per group were obtained as a cross-sectional sample of births at one institution between January 2010 and December 2012. The groups were term, preterm without PPROM, and preterm with PPROM. Immunohistochemical analysis of fetal membranes was performed for decorin and p-Smad-2 using localization and quantification assessment. Decorin expression is developmentally regulated in fetal membranes and is decreased in preterm birth with PPROM compared to preterm birth without PPROM. In preterm with PPROM samples, the presence of infection is associated with significant decorin downregulation compared to preterm with PPROM samples without infection. The preterm with PPROM group exhibited decreased p-Smad-2 staining compared to both the term controls and the preterm-without-PPROM group. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of decorin and its downstream pathway component p-Smad-2 occurs in fetal membranes during the second trimester in pathological pregnancies, thus supporting a role for decorin and p-Smad-2 in the pathophysiology of fetal membranes and adverse pregnancy outcomes. These findings may lead to the discovery of new targets for the diagnosis and treatment of PPROM.

  14. Expression of SPARC during development of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane: evidence for regulated proteolysis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Iruela-Arispe, M L; Lane, T F; Redmond, D; Reilly, M; Bolender, R P; Kavanagh, T J; Sage, E H

    1995-01-01

    SPARC is a secreted glycoprotein that has been shown to disrupt focal adhesions and to regulate the proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, peptides resulting from the proteolysis of SPARC exhibit angiogenic activity. Here we describe the temporal synthesis, turnover, and angiogenic potential of SPARC in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed specific expression of SPARC protein in endothelial cells, and significantly higher levels of SPARC were observed in smaller newly formed blood vessels in comparison to larger, developmentally older vessels. SPARC mRNA was detected at the earliest stages of chorioallantoic membrane morphogenesis and reached maximal levels at day 13 of embryonic development. Interestingly, steady-state levels of SPARC mRNA did not correlate directly with protein accumulation; moreover, the protein appeared to undergo limited degradation during days 10-15. Incubation of [125I]-SPARC with chorioallantoic membranes of different developmental ages confirmed that extracellular proteolysis occurred during days 9-15, but not at later stages (e.g., days 17-21). Comparison of peptides produced by incubation with chorioallantoic membranes with those generated by plasmin showed an identical pattern of proteolysis. Plasmin activity was present throughout development, and in situ zymography identified sites of plasminogen activator activity that corresponded to areas exhibiting high levels of SPARC expression. Synthetic peptides from a plasmin-sensitive region of SPARC, between amino acids 113-130, stimulated angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane in a dose-dependent manner; in contrast, intact SPARC was inactive in similar assays. We have shown that SPARC is expressed in endothelial cells of newly formed blood vessels in a manner that is both temporally and spatially restricted. Between days 9 and 15 of chorioallantoic membrane development, the protein undergoes proteolytic cleavage that

  15. Cloning of immunodominant membrane protein genes of phytoplasmas and their in planta expression.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Ishii, Yoshiko; Hoshi, Ayaka; Maejima, Kensaku; Jung, Hee-Young; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2009-04-01

    Phytoplasmas are plant pathogenic bacteria that cause devastating yield losses in diverse crops worldwide. Although the understanding of the pathogen biology is important in agriculture, the inability to culture phytoplasmas has hindered their full characterization. Previous studies demonstrated that immunodominant membrane proteins could be classified into three types, immunodominant membrane protein (Imp), immunodominant membrane protein A (IdpA), and antigenic membrane protein (Amp), and they are nonhomologous to each other. Here, cloning and sequencing of imp-containing genomic fragments were performed for several groups of phytoplasma including the aster yellows and rice yellow dwarf groups, for which an imp sequence has not previously been reported. Sequence comparison analysis revealed that Imps are highly variable among phytoplasmas, and clear positive selection was observed in several Imps, suggesting that Imp has important roles in host-phytoplasma interactions. As onion yellows (OY) phytoplasma was known to have Amp as the immunodominant membrane protein, the protein accumulation level of Imp in planta was measured compared with that of Amp. The resulting accumulation of Imp was calculated as approximately one-tenth that of Amp, being consistent with the immunodominant property of Amp in OY. It is suggested that an ancestral type of immunodominant membrane protein could be Imp, and subsequently the expression level of Amp or IdpA is increased in several phytoplasma groups. PMID:19222574

  16. Developmental expression and molecular cloning of REMP, a novel retinal epithelial membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Philp, N; Chu, P; Pan, T C; Zhang, R Z; Chu, M L; Stark, K; Boettiger, D; Yoon, H; Kieber-Emmons, T

    1995-07-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), like other transport epithelia, has a polarized distribution of membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. The establishment of a polarized phenotype is an essential step in the differentiation of the RPE and the development and maintenance of visual function. Using a monoclonal antibody (MAb 3C4) we have identified a novel membrane protein that is uniquely expressed in chick RPE. We have referred to this protein as REMP for retinal epithelial membrane protein. In these studies we characterized the expression and distribution of this protein during embryonic development and determined its primary structure by cDNA cloning. The developmental expression of REMP was examined by immunocytochemical localization. REMP was first detected in the chick RPE at Embryonic Day 5 (E5) in both apical and basolateral membranes. By E14 the distribution of REMP was restricted to the basolateral surface of the RPE cells. Biochemical fractionation and surface labeling of RPE cells suggested that REMP was an integral protein. The gene encoding REMP was isolated from an E15 chick RPE cDNA library, cloned into lambda gt11, and screened with MAb 3C4. The cDNA was sequenced and found to contain one 1350-bp open reading frame encoding for a 450-amino-acid protein. The deduced amino-acid sequence of REMP shares 32.9% identity with MCT1, a monocarboxylate transporter (Garcia, Goldstein, Pathak, Anderson, and Brown, Cell, 76, 865-873, 1994). By Northern blot analysis, REMP mRNA was detected only in RPE cells. There was an increase in the expression REMP transcript during development but when RPE cells were grown in primary culture the expression of REMP was turned off. The unique expression of REMP in the RPE in vivo would suggest a role for this protein in development and maintenance of normal retinal function.

  17. [Eukaryotic Expression and Immunogenic Research of Recombination Ebola Virus Membrane Protein Gp-Fc].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Ren; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Xuan; Hou, Mieling; An, Lina; Zhu, Ying; Cao, Yuxi; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We used 293 cells to express the recombinant membrane protein of the Ebola virus. Then, the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein was studied by immunized BALB/c mice. According to the codon use frequency of humans, the gene encoding the extracellular domain of the Ebola virus membrane protein was optimized, synthesized, and inserted into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pXG-Fc to construct the human IgG Fc and Ebola GP fusion protein expression plasmid pXG-modGP-Fc. To achieve expression, the fusion protein expression vector was transfected into high-density 293 cells using transient transfection technology. The recombinant protein was purified by protein A affinity chromatography. BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified fusion protein, and serum antibody titers evaluated by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Purification and analyses of the protein revealed that the eukaryotic expression vector could express the recombinant protein GP-Fc effectively, and that the recombinant protein in the supernatant of the cell culture was present as a dimer. After immunization with the purified recombinant protein, a high titer of antigen-specific IgG could be detected in the serum of immunized mice by indirect ELISA, showing that the recombinant protein had good immunogenicity. These data suggest that we obtained a recombinant protein with good immunogenicity. Our study is the basis for development of a vaccine against the Ebola virus and for screening of monoclonal antibodies.

  18. Screening and large-scale expression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, April; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Wang, Kevin H.; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Claxton, Derek P.; Baconguis, Isabelle; Althoff, Thorsten; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins are often hampered by difficulties in over-expression of the candidate molecule. Baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells (BacMam), although a powerful method to heterologously express membrane proteins, can be cumbersome for screening and expression of multiple constructs. We therefore developed plasmid Eric Gouaux (pEG) BacMam, a vector optimized for use in screening assays, as well as for efficient production of baculovirus and robust expression of the target protein. In this protocol we show how to use small-scale transient transfection and fluorescence-detection, size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) experiments using a GFP-His8 tagged candidate protein to screen for monodispersity and expression level. Once promising candidates are identified, we describe how to generate baculovirus, transduce HEK293S GnTI− (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I-negative) cells in suspension culture, and over-express the candidate protein. We have used these methods to prepare pure samples of chicken acid-sensing ion channel 1a (cASIC1) and Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl), for X-ray crystallography, demonstrating how to rapidly and efficiently screen hundreds of constructs and accomplish large-scale expression in 4-6 weeks. PMID:25299155

  19. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  20. Expression of OmpATb is dependent on small membrane proteins in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Brust, Belinda; Kremer, Laurent; Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice

    2011-11-01

    Small membrane proteins emerge as a novel class of regulatory molecules in bacteria. Experiments carried out in Mycobacterium bovis BCG indicate that the ompATb gene (Rv0899), encoding a major outer membrane protein, is organized in operon with Rv0900 and Rv0901, encoding two small proteins with a predicted transmembrane domain. Fractioning experiment confirmed the association of Rv0901 with the membrane fraction. To investigate the role of Rv0900 and Rv0901 in M. bovis BCG, we have constructed a strain deleted for the whole operon as well as complemented strains carrying a deletion of Rv0900 or a frameshift mutation in either Rv0900 or Rv0901. Importantly, mutations in Rv0900 and/or Rv0901 strongly altered OmpATb expression, demonstrating that Rv0900 and Rv0901 play a regulatory role, which appears to occur at a post-transcriptional level. PMID:21802366

  1. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  2. [The relationship between expression of basement membrane in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and cervical lymph node metastasis].

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Shen, Z; Liu, S; Qian, Z

    1997-01-01

    Fifty seven cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were studied by immunohistochemical ABC method using type IV collagen and laminin antibody to investigate the relationship between expression and distribution of basement membrane in oral SCC and clinicopathologic characteristics and cervical lymph node metastasis. The distribution of basement membrane of oral SCC was discontinuous and in some cases the membranes disappeared. There was highly significant correlation between the staining patterns together with histologic differentiation degrees and cervical lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). These indicate that the expression of baasement membrane in oral SCC may be a useful parameter for evaluation of tumor histologic differentiation and tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:9868026

  3. Channel forming outer membrane porin protein in halophile: expressed as a soluble form in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Furukawa, Masafumi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2013-03-01

    We have previously found that the N-terminal sequence of the outer membrane protein from moderate halophile is similar to the sequence of the well-known pore forming porin proteins from other Gram-negative bacteria. This highly expressed outer membrane protein was purified from Halomonas sp. 40 and reconstituted into liposome. It showed a permeability activity in the liposome swelling assay. Based on the N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of this major outer membrane, we have cloned here the porin gene, hopP (halophilic outer membrane protein), from Halomonas sp. 40. The hopP gene encodes the porin precursor comprising 366 amino acid residues that include a 21 amino acid signal peptide. Mature porin (345 amino acids, 37,611 Da) is a highly acidic protein, just as is so for many halophilic proteins and was soluble when expressed in Escherichia coli with N-terminal His-tag. Purified recombinant His-porin was soluble even after heat-treatment at 95 °C for 5 min in the absence of salt. Circular dichroism analysis of His-porin showed conversion into a β-sheet rich structure by the addition of NaCl at 0.9-2.7 M.

  4. Rat basophilic leukemia cells express syntaxin-3 and VAMP-7 in granule membranes.

    PubMed

    Hibi, T; Hirashima, N; Nakanishi, M

    2000-04-29

    In neuronal cells, it is generally agreed that SNARE proteins underlie the release of neurotransmitter. It is controversial, however, whether they also work functionally in the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells because the expression of SNARE proteins has not been confirmed and the degranulation is not inhibited by tetanus toxin which cleaves one of SNARE proteins, VAMP-2. We investigated the expression and the localization of SNARE proteins including VAMP-7 which is insensitive to tetanus toxin. RT-PCR analysis showed the existence of SNARE proteins, including syntaxin-2, -3, -4, SNAP-23, VAMP-2, and VAMP-7. Experiments using GFP-conjugated proteins revealed that VAMP-7 was localized only in granule membranes, whereas syntaxin-3 was in both the plasma and granule membranes. Upon antigen stimulation, these proteins in granule membranes moved to the cell surface due to the fusion of granules with the plasma membrane. The results suggest the involvement of SNARE proteins in the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells.

  5. Process for photosynthetically splitting water

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-01-28

    In one form of the invention, hydrogen is produced by providing a reactor containing a body of water. The water contains photolytic material, i.e., photoactive material containing a hydrogen-catalyst. The interior of the reactor is isolated from atmosphere and includes a volume for receiving gases evolved from the body of water. The photolytic material is exposed to light to effect photosynthetic splitting of the water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. The gas-receiving volume is continuously evacuated by pumping to promote evolution of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen into that volume and to withdraw them therefrom. In another form of the invention, separation of the hydrogen and oxygen is effected by selectively diffusing the hydrogen through a heated semipermeable membrane in a separation zone while maintaining across the zone a magnetic field gradient biasing the oxygen away from the membrane. In a third form of the invention, the withdrawn gas is contacted with a membrane blocking flow of water vapor to the region for effecting recovery of the hydrogen. In a fourth embodiment, the invention comprises a process for selectively recovering hydrogen from a gas mixture comprising hydrogen and oxygen. The process is conducted in a separation zone and comprises contacting the mixture with a semipermeable membrane effecting selective diffusion of hydrogen while maintaining across the zone a magnetic field gradient effecting movement of oxygen in a direction away from the membrane.

  6. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  7. Tangled evolutionary processes with commonality and diversity in plastidial glycolipid synthesis in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koichi; Nobusawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Tei; Madoka, Yuka; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, the photosynthetic membrane constitutes a scaffold for light-harvesting complexes and photosynthetic reaction centers. Three kinds of glycolipids, namely monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, constitute approximately 80-90% of photosynthetic membrane lipids and are well conserved from tiny cyanobacteria to the leaves of huge trees. These glycolipids perform a wide variety of functions beyond biological membrane formation. In particular, the capability of adaptation to harsh environments through regulation of membrane glycolipid composition is essential for healthy growth and development of photosynthetic organisms. The genome analysis and functional genetics of the model seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana have yielded many new findings concerning the biosynthesis, regulation, and functions of glycolipids. Nevertheless, it remains to be clarified how the complex biosynthetic pathways and well-organized functions of glycolipids evolved in early and primitive photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, to yield modern photosynthetic organisms like land plants. Recently, genome data for many photosynthetic organisms have been made available as the fruit of the rapid development of sequencing technology. We also have reported the draft genome sequence of the charophyte alga Klebsormidium flaccidum, which is an intermediate organism between green algae and land plants. Here, we performed a comprehensive phylogenic analysis of glycolipid biosynthesis genes in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms including K. flaccidum. Based on the results together with membrane lipid analysis of this alga, we discuss the evolution of glycolipid synthesis in photosynthetic organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  8. Tangled evolutionary processes with commonality and diversity in plastidial glycolipid synthesis in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koichi; Nobusawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Tei; Madoka, Yuka; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, the photosynthetic membrane constitutes a scaffold for light-harvesting complexes and photosynthetic reaction centers. Three kinds of glycolipids, namely monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, constitute approximately 80-90% of photosynthetic membrane lipids and are well conserved from tiny cyanobacteria to the leaves of huge trees. These glycolipids perform a wide variety of functions beyond biological membrane formation. In particular, the capability of adaptation to harsh environments through regulation of membrane glycolipid composition is essential for healthy growth and development of photosynthetic organisms. The genome analysis and functional genetics of the model seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana have yielded many new findings concerning the biosynthesis, regulation, and functions of glycolipids. Nevertheless, it remains to be clarified how the complex biosynthetic pathways and well-organized functions of glycolipids evolved in early and primitive photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, to yield modern photosynthetic organisms like land plants. Recently, genome data for many photosynthetic organisms have been made available as the fruit of the rapid development of sequencing technology. We also have reported the draft genome sequence of the charophyte alga Klebsormidium flaccidum, which is an intermediate organism between green algae and land plants. Here, we performed a comprehensive phylogenic analysis of glycolipid biosynthesis genes in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms including K. flaccidum. Based on the results together with membrane lipid analysis of this alga, we discuss the evolution of glycolipid synthesis in photosynthetic organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27108062

  9. Tetracyclines increase lipid phosphate phosphatase expression on plasma membranes and turnover of plasma lysophosphatidate.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Yuan Y; Dewald, Jay; Curtis, Jonathan M; Brindley, David N

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are important bioactive lipids, which signal through G-protein-coupled receptors to stimulate cell growth and survival. The lysophosphatidate and S1P signals are terminated partly by degradation through three broad-specificity lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) on the cell surface. Significantly, the expression of LPP1 and LPP3 is decreased in many cancers, and this increases the impact of lysophosphatidate and S1P signaling. However, relatively little is known about the physiological or pharmacological regulation of the expression of the different LPPs. We now show that treating several malignant and nonmalignant cell lines with 1 μg/ml tetracycline, doxycycline, or minocycline significantly increased the extracellular degradation of lysophosphatidate. S1P degradation was also increased in cells that expressed high LPP3 activity. These results depended on an increase in the stabilities of the three LPPs and increased expression on the plasma membrane. We tested the physiological significance of these results and showed that treating rats with doxycycline accelerated the clearance of lysophosphatidate, but not S1P, from the circulation. However, administering 100 mg/kg/day doxycycline to mice decreased plasma concentrations of lysophosphatidate and S1P. This study demonstrates a completely new property of tetracyclines in increasing the plasma membrane expression of the LPPs.

  10. Expression of membrane glycoproteins in normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rayter, Z. ); McIlhinney, R. ); Gusterson, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Con A acceptor glycoproteins were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and {sup 125}I-Con A overlay in three squamous carcinoma cell lines and compared with those in the simian virus (SV40)-transformed keratinocyte cell line SVK-14 and in normal keratinocytes. The majority of the glycoproteins identified by this technique were expressed at similar levels in all of the cells examined, independent of the culture conditions used. A cell surface glycoprotein gp34 was increased in the tumor cells compared with normal keratinocytes and expression varied with the culture density. Another glycoprotein, gp21, was found to be increased in expression in normal keratinocytes and stratified hyperconfluent cultures of squamous carcinoma cell lines. This paper describes the potential of this technique to identify membrane glycoproteins which may be expressed as a function of proliferation or differentiation.

  11. Rab4GTPase modulates CFTR function by impairing channel expression at plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Sunil K. . E-mail: ssaxena@stevens.edu; Kaur, Simarna; George, Constantine

    2006-03-03

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive disorder, is caused by the disruption of biosynthesis or the function of a membrane cAMP-activated chloride channel, CFTR. CFTR regulatory mechanisms include recruitment of channel proteins to the cell surface from intracellular pools and by protein-protein interactions. Rab proteins are small GTPases involved in regulated trafficking controlling vesicle docking and fusion. Rab4 controls recycling events from endosome to the plasma membrane, fusion, and degradation. The colorectal cell line HT-29 natively expresses CFTR and responds to cAMP stimulation with an increase in CFTR-mediated currents. Rab4 over-expression in HT-29 cells inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated CFTR-mediated currents. GTPase-deficient Rab4Q67L and GDP locked Rab4S22N both inhibit channel activity, which appears characteristically different. Active status of Rab4 was confirmed by GTP overlay assay, while its expression was verified by Western blotting. The pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Rab4 physically interacts with CFTR through protein-protein interaction. Biotinylation with cell impermeant NHS-Sulfo-SS-Biotin implies that Rab4 impairs CFTR expression at cell surface. The enhanced cytosolic CFTR indicates that Rab4 expression restrains CFTR appearance at the cell membrane. The study suggests that Rab4 regulates the channel through multiple mechanisms that include protein-protein interaction, GTP/GDP exchange, and channel protein trafficking. We propose that Rab4 is a dynamic molecule with a significant role in CFTR function.

  12. Gene Expression Pattern of Cells From Inflamed and Normal Areas of Osteoarthritis Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cécile; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulàlia; Vergés, Josep; Munaut, Carine; Noël, Agnès; Henrotin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the gene expression patterns of synovial cells from inflamed or normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane obtained from the same patient with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods At the time of total knee replacement, synovial tissues were obtained from 12 patients with knee OA. The inflammation status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and classified as normal/reactive or inflamed. Biopsy samples were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on normal/reactive and inflamed areas. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results We identified 896 genes that were differentially expressed between normal/reactive and inflamed areas. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling, and angiogenesis. In the inflammation network, the genes TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. The genes MMP3, MMP9, CTSH (cathepsin H), and CTSS (cathepsin S) were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, while the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme gene was HAS1. In the Wnt signaling pathway, the genes for Wnt-5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 were up-regulated, while the gene FZD2 and the gene for Dkk-3 were down-regulated. Finally, STC1, which codes for a protein involved in angiogenesis, was identified as the most up-regulated gene in inflamed compared with normal/reactive areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify different expression patterns between 2 areas of the synovial membrane from the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets of treatment. PMID:24757147

  13. A membrane-bound Fas decoy receptor expressed by human thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M; Keir, M; McCune, J M

    2000-03-17

    Human thymocytes at several stages of maturation express Fas, yet resist apoptosis induction through its ligation. A proximal step in apoptotic signaling through Fas is implicated in this resistance, as these cells undergo normal levels of apoptosis induction after exposure to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We studied the Fas receptors expressed in human thymocytes to search for mechanisms of receptor-mediated inhibition of Fas signaling in these cells. We describe here a unique, membrane-bound form of Fas receptor that contained a complete extracellular domain of Fas but that lacked a death domain due to alternative splicing of exon 7. This Fas decoy receptor (FDR) was shown to have nearly wild-type ability to bind native human Fas ligand and was expressed predominantly at the plasma membrane. Unlike soluble forms of Fas receptor, FDR dominantly inhibited apoptosis induction by Fas ligand in transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Titration of FDR in Fas-expressing cells suggests that FDR may operate through the formation of mixed receptor complexes. FDR also dominantly inhibited Fas-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells. In mixing experiments with wild-type Fas, FDR was capable of inhibiting death signaling at molar ratios less than 0.5, and this relative level of FDR:wild type message was observed in at least some thymocytes tested. The data suggest that Fas signal pathways in primary human cells may be regulated by expression of a membrane-bound decoy receptor, analogous to the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis by decoy receptors.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes.

  15. Purification of Human and Mammalian Membrane Proteins Expressed in Xenopus laevis Frog Oocytes for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Boggavarapu, Rajendra; Hirschi, Stephan; Harder, Daniel; Meury, Marcel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Bergeron, Marc J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the isolation of recombinant human and mammalian membrane proteins expressed in Xenopus laevis frog oocytes for structural studies. The cDNA-derived cRNA of the desired genes is injected into several hundreds of oocytes, which are incubated for several days to allow protein expression. Recombinant proteins are then purified via affinity chromatography. The novelty of this method comes from the design of a plasmid that produces multi-tagged proteins and, most importantly, the development of a protocol for efficiently discarding lipids, phospholipids, and lipoproteins from the oocyte egg yolk, which represent the major contaminants in protein purifications. Thus, the high protein purity and good yield obtained from this method allows protein structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of single detergent-solubilized protein particles and of 2D crystals of membrane protein embedded in lipid bilayers. Additionally, a radiotracer assay for functional analysis of the expressed target proteins in oocytes is described. Overall, this method is a valuable option for structural studies of mammalian and particularly human proteins, for which other expression systems often fail. PMID:27485339

  16. Expression patterns of five polymorphic membrane proteins during the Chlamydia abortus developmental cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wheelhouse, Nick; Sait, Michelle; Wilson, Kim; Aitchison, Kevin; McLean, Kevin; Smith, David G.E.; Longbottom, David

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) belonging to the Type V autotransporter protein family play an important role in the pathogenesis of Chlamydia abortus (C. abortus; formerly Chlamydophila abortus) infection. In a previous study we demonstrated the expression of all the pmps at the transcriptional level. The purpose of this study was to measure the number of Pmp positive inclusions throughout the C. abortus developmental cycle to investigate heterogeneity in expression patterns. McCoy cells were infected with C. abortus and analysed for Pmp expression over a 72 h period by fluorescent immunocytochemistry. Pmp18D could be detected at all analysed time points, and could only be accurately quantified from 36 hpi while Pmp10G positive inclusions could be visualised from 36 hpi. Expression of Pmps 13G, 16G and 17G could only be visualised later in the cycle and within less than half of visualised inclusions. These results indicate that while expression of specific Pmps is constitutive (Pmp18D), the pattern of expression of other Pmps is more variable. This suggests that different members of the Pmp family may play different roles within the developmental cycle of the organism, with some (Pmps10G and 18D) having roles throughout the cycle, while the heterogeneity of expression of others may aid in antigenic variation. PMID:22776512

  17. Oxygen concentration inside a functioning photosynthetic cell.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in solitary form could have evolved ∼2.8 billion years ago without special mechanisms to protect them against reactive oxygen species. These mechanisms instead could have been developed during the following ∼500 million years while the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was slowly rising. Excess oxygen concentrations within individual cells of the apomorphic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus are 0.064 and 0.25 μM, respectively. These numbers suggest that intramembrane and intracellular proteins in isolated oxygenic photosynthetic cells are not subjected to excessively high oxygen levels. The situation is different for closely packed colonies of photosynthetic cells. Calculations show that the excess concentration within colonies that are ∼40 μm or larger in diameter can be comparable to the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water, suggesting that species forming colonies require protection against reactive oxygen species even in the absence of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere.

  18. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus of this project is the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms known as Heliobacteria. These organisms are the only known photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reaction centers suggest that they might be the decendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes have been isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii. The absorption and fluorescence properties of membranes and reaction centers are almost identical, suggesting that a single pigment-protein complex serves as both antenna and reaction center. Experiments in progress include sequence determination of the 48,000 Mr reaction center protein, and evolutionary comparisons with other reaction center proteins.

  19. G-protein. alpha. -subunit expression, myristoylation, and membrane association in COS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mumby, S.M.; Gilman, A.G. ); Heukeroth, R.O.; Gordon, J.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Myristolyation of seven different {alpha} subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) was examined by expressing these proteins in monkey kidney COS cells. Metabolic labeling studies of cells transfected with cytomegalovirus-based expression vectors indicated that ({sup 3}H)myristate was incorporated into {alpha}{sub i1}, {alpha}{sub i2}, {alpha}{sub i3}, {alpha}{sub 0}, and {alpha}{sub 1}, and {alpha}{sub z} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits. The role of myristoylation in the association of {alpha} subunits with membranes was analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis and by substitution of myristate with a less hydrophobic analog, 10-(propoxy)decanoate (11-oxamyristate). Myristoylation of {alpha}{sub 0} was blocked when an alanine residue was substituted for its amino-terminal glycine, as was association of the protein with membranes. Substitution of the myristoyl group with 11-oxamyristate affected the cellular distribution of a subset of acylated {alpha} subunits. The results are consistent with a model wherein the hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the bilayer permits continued association of the protein with the plasma membrane when G-protein {alpha} subunits dissociated from {beta}{gamma}.

  20. Expression of the axonal membrane glycoprotein M6a is regulated by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ben; Fuchs, Eberhard; Flügge, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that chronic stress changes dendrites, spines and modulates expression of synaptic molecules. These effects all may impair information transfer between neurons. The present study shows that chronic stress also regulates expression of M6a, a glycoprotein which is localised in axonal membranes. We have previously demonstrated that M6a is a component of glutamatergic axons. The present data reveal that it is the splice variant M6a-Ib, not M6a-Ia, which is strongly expressed in the brain. Chronic stress in male rats (3 weeks daily restraint) has regional effects: quantitative in situ hybridization demonstrated that M6a-Ib mRNA in dentate gyrus granule neurons and in CA3 pyramidal neurons is downregulated, whereas M6a-Ib mRNA in the medial prefrontal cortex is upregulated by chronic stress. This is the first study showing that expression of an axonal membrane molecule is differentially affected by stress in a region-dependent manner. Therefore, one may speculate that diminished expression of the glycoprotein in the hippocampus leads to altered output in the corresponding cortical projection areas. Enhanced M6a-Ib expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (in areas prelimbic and infralimbic cortex) might be interpreted as a compensatory mechanism in response to changes in axonal projections from the hippocampus. Our findings provide evidence that in addition to alterations in dendrites and spines chronic stress also changes the integrity of axons and may thus impair information transfer even between distant brain regions. PMID:19180239

  1. Progesterone, Inflammatory Cytokine (TNF-α), and Oxidative Stress (H2O2) Regulate Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Expression in Fetal Membrane Cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Murtha, Amy P; Feng, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is an important novel mediator of progesterone (P4) function in fetal membrane cells. We demonstrated previously that PGRMC1 is differentially expressed in fetal membranes among pregnancy subjects and diminished in preterm premature rupture of membrane subjects. In the current study, we aim to elucidate whether PGRMC1 expression is regulated by P4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and H2O2 in fetal membrane cells. Primary cultured membrane cells were serum starved for 24 hours followed by treatments of P4, 17 hydroxyprogesterone caproate, and medroxyprogesterone 17 acetate (MPA) at 10(-7) mol/L with ethanol as vehicle control; TNF-α at 10, 20, and 50 ng/mL with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as control; and H2O2 at 10 and 100 μmol/L with culture media as control for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of PGRMC1 was quantified using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. We found that PGRMC1 protein expression was regulated by MPA, TNF-α, and H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. This regulation is also specific to the type of cell (amnion, chorion, or decidua). The upregulation of PGRMC1 by MPA might be mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) demonstrated using amnion and chorion cells model with GR knockdown by specific small interfering RNA transfection. The mRNA expression of PGRMC1 was decreased by H2O2 (100 μmol/L) treatment in amnion cells, which might ultimately result in downregulation of PGRMC1 protein as our data demonstrated. None of other treatments changed PGRMC1 mRNA level in these cells. We conclude that these stimuli act as regulatory factors of PGRMC1 in a cell-specific manner. PMID:26919974

  2. Expression and Characterization of a Mycoplasma genitalium Glycosyltransferase in Membrane Glycolipid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Eduardo; Martínez, Núria; Planas, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasmas contain glycoglycerolipids in their plasma membrane as key structural components involved in bilayer properties and stability. A membrane-associated glycosyltransferase (GT), GT MG517, has been identified in Mycoplasma genitalium, which sequentially produces monoglycosyl- and diglycosyldiacylglycerols. When recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was functional in vivo and yielded membrane glycolipids from which Glcβ1,6GlcβDAG was identified as the main product. A chaperone co-expression system and extraction with CHAPS detergent afforded soluble protein that was purified by affinity chromatography. GT MG517 transfers glucosyl and galactosyl residues from UDP-Glc and UDP-Gal to dioleoylglycerol (DOG) acceptor to form the corresponding β-glycosyl-DOG, which then acts as acceptor to give β-diglycosyl-DOG products. The enzyme (GT2 family) follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. kcat is about 5-fold higher for UDP-Gal with either DOG or monoglucosyldioleoylglycerol acceptors, but it shows better binding for UDP-Glc than UDP-Gal, as reflected by the lower Km, which results in similar kcat/Km values for both donors. Although sequentially adding glycosyl residues with β-1,6 connectivity, the first glycosyltransferase activity (to DOG) is about 1 order of magnitude higher than the second (to monoglucosyldioleoylglycerol). Because the ratio between the non-bilayer-forming monoglycosyldiacylglycerols and the bilayer-prone diglycosyldiacylglycerols contributes to regulate the properties of the plasma membrane, both synthase activities are probably regulated. Dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (anionic phospholipid) activates the enzyme, kcat linearly increasing with dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol concentration. GT MG517 is shown to be encoded by an essential gene, and the addition of GT inhibitors results in cell growth inhibition. It is proposed that glycolipid synthases are potential targets for drug discovery against infections by mycoplasmas. PMID

  3. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control.

  4. Expression of an Arabidopsis plasma membrane aquaporin in Dictyostelium results in hypoosmotic sensitivity and developmental abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, F; Loomis, W F; Chrispeels, M J

    1997-06-10

    The rd28 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a water channel protein, or aquaporin, of the plasma membrane. A construct in which transcription of the rd28 cDNA is controlled by the Dictyostelium actin15 promoter was transformed into Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Transformants contained RD28 protein in their plasma membranes. When shifted to a low-osmotic-strength buffer, cells expressing rd28 swelled rapidly and burst, indicating that the plant aquaporin allowed rapid water entry in the amoebae. The rate of osmotic lysis was a function of the osmotic pressure of the buffer. We also selected transformants in which the expression of the rd28 cDNA is driven by the promoter of the prespore cotB gene. These transformants accumulated rd28 mRNA uniquely in prespore cells. In low-osmotic-strength buffer, the cotB::rd28 cells aggregated and formed normally proportioned slugs but failed to form normal fruiting bodies. The number of spores was reduced 20-fold, and the stalks of the fruiting bodies were abnormally short. The consequences of expressing RD28 in prespore cells could be partially overcome by increasing the osmolarity of the medium. Under these conditions, the cotB::rd28 cells formed fruiting bodies of more normal appearance, and the number of viable spores increased slightly. Because prespore cells have to shrink and dehydrate to form spores, it was not unexpected that expression of an aquaporin would disrupt this process, but it was surprising to find that stalk differentiation was also affected by expression of rd28 in prespore cells. It appears that osmotic stress on prespore cells alters their ability to signal terminal differentiation in prestalk cells. The results provide independent confirmation that plant aquaporins can function in the cells of other organisms, and that D. discoideum can be used to study the properties of these water channels.

  5. Enhanced expression of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein by a recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J P; Hampson, I N; Heinrich, H W; Mackett, M; Arrand, J R

    1989-05-01

    The complete coding sequence of the Epstein-Barr virus strain B95-8 latent membrane protein (LMP) was cloned using a Raji cell cDNA library and genomic B95-8 DNA. The clone was characterized by sequencing and then used to make a recombinant vaccinia virus. This virus (VLMP) was shown to express a relatively high level of LMP in an authentic fashion. Antisera raised in rabbits against VLMP were shown to react with B95-8 LMP as well as cross-reacting with a 50K cellular protein.

  6. A Conserved Motif in the Membrane Proximal C-Terminal Tail of Human Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Affects Plasma Membrane Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Shults, Crystal A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the functional role of a conserved motif, F(x)6LL, in the membrane proximal C-tail of the human muscarinic M1 (hM1) receptor. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, several different point mutations were introduced into the C-tail sequence 423FRDTFRLLL431. Wild-type and mutant hM1 receptors were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and the amount of plasma membrane-expressed receptor was determined by use of intact, whole-cell [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding assays. The plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors possessing either L430A or L431A or both point mutations was significantly reduced compared with the wild type. The hM1 receptor possessing a L430A/L431A double-point mutation was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and atropine treatment caused the redistribution of the mutant receptor from the ER to the plasma membrane. Atropine treatment also caused an increase in the maximal response and potency of carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis elicited by the L430A/L431A mutant. The effect of atropine on the L430A/L431A receptor mutant suggests that L430 and L431 play a role in folding hM1 receptors, which is necessary for exit from the ER. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we also identified amino acid residues at the base of transmembrane-spanning domain 1 (TM1), V46 and L47, that, when mutated, reduce the plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors in an atropine-reversible manner. Overall, these mutagenesis data show that amino acid residues in the membrane-proximal C-tail and base of TM1 are necessary for hM1 receptors to achieve a transport-competent state. PMID:19841475

  7. Gene Expression Analysis of the Irrigation Solution Samples Collected during Vitrectomy for Idiopathic Epiretinal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Myojin, Sayaka; Yoshida, Shigeo; Takeda, Atsunobu; Murakami, Yusuke; Kawano, Yoichi; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analysis of gene expression in idiopathic epiretinal membranes (iERMs) may help elucidate ERM formation and its pathology. Here, we conducted a case-control study, in order to determine the expression levels of cytokines and other genes in eyes with macular hole (MH) or iERM. Methods Twenty eyes, obtained from seven male and 13 female patients, were included in the study. The average age of the study subjects was 69.1 ± 7.67 years, and 15 eyes had iERM, while five eyes had MH. Irrigation solution samples were collected during vitrectomy, centrifuged, and the levels of cytokine and other mRNAs in the sediment were assessed using real-time PCR. The expression level of 11 cytokine genes, four transcription factor genes, two cytoskeletal genes, and genes encoding two extracellular matrix proteins in eyes with MH or iERM were determined and compared. Results The expression levels of interleukin 6 (IL6), tumor growth factor B2 (TGFB2), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL1), v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and tenascin C (TNC) were significantly higher in eyes with iERM than in eyes with MH. The expression of these genes was not associated with the preoperative visual acuity of the investigated patients. Conclusions The obtained results indicate that real-time PCR analysis of irrigation solution samples collected during vitrectomy can help assess the expression levels of several genes, and that iERM is associated with the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and the genes expressed during angiogenesis and wound healing process (IL6, TGFB2, VEGFA, CXCL1, RELA, GFAP, and TNC). PMID:27736918

  8. Rearrangement and expression of endogenous immunoglobulin genes occur in many murine B cells expressing transgenic membrane IgM.

    PubMed

    Stall, A M; Kroese, F G; Gadus, F T; Sieckmann, D G; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1988-05-01

    Transgenic mice carrying immunoglobulin genes coding for mu heavy chain and kappa light chain have been used to study the mechanisms involved in allelic and isotypic exclusion. We report here that individual cells from transgenic mice carrying a functionally rearranged mu heavy chain gene (capable of generating both membrane and secreted forms of IgM) can rearrange an endogenous mu heavy chain gene and simultaneously produce both transgenic and endogenous IgM. These "double-producing" cells express both endogenous and transgenic IgM in the cytoplasm (detected by immunohistology) and on the cell surface (detected by multiparameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis). In addition, they secrete mixed IgM molecules containing both transgenic and endogenous mu heavy chains (detected in serum by radioimmune assay). The transgenic mice studied also have relatively large numbers of cells that produce endogenous immunoglobulin in the absence of detectable transgenic immunoglobulin ("endogenous-only cells"). The mechanisms that generate double-producing cells and endogenous-only cells appear to be under genetic control because the frequencies of these B-cell populations are characteristic for a given transgenic line. Thus, our findings indicate that more is involved in triggering allelic exclusion than the simple presence or absence of membrane mu heavy chains (as has been previously postulated).

  9. Increased aquaporin 1 and 5 membrane expression in the lens epithelium of cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Barandika, Olatz; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Anasagasti, Ander; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Llarena, Irantzu; Bascaran, Lucia; Alberdi, Txomin; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Mendicute, Javier; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In this work we have analyzed the expression levels of the main aquaporins (AQPs) expressed in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) using 112 samples from patients treated with cataract surgery and 36 samples from individuals treated with refractive surgery, with transparent lenses as controls. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the main AQP, representing 64.1% of total AQPs in HLECs, with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) representing 35.9% in controls. A similar proportion of each AQP in cataract was found. Although no differences were found at the mRNA level compared to controls, a significant 1.65-fold increase (p=0.001) in AQP1protein expression was observed in HLECs from cataract patients, with the highest differences being found for nuclear cataracts (2.1-fold increase; p<0.001). A similar trend was found for AQP5 (1.47-fold increase), although the difference was not significant (p=0.161). Moreover we have shown increased membrane AQP5 protein expression in HLECs of patients with cataracts. No association of AQP1 or AQP5 expression levels with age or sex was observed in either group. Our results suggest regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 at the post-translational level and support previous observations on the implication of AQP1 and 5 in maintenance of lens transparency in animal models. Our results likely reflect a compensatory response of the crystalline lens to delay cataract formation by increasing the water removal rate.

  10. Increased aquaporin 1 and 5 membrane expression in the lens epithelium of cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Barandika, Olatz; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Anasagasti, Ander; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Llarena, Irantzu; Bascaran, Lucia; Alberdi, Txomin; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Mendicute, Javier; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In this work we have analyzed the expression levels of the main aquaporins (AQPs) expressed in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) using 112 samples from patients treated with cataract surgery and 36 samples from individuals treated with refractive surgery, with transparent lenses as controls. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the main AQP, representing 64.1% of total AQPs in HLECs, with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) representing 35.9% in controls. A similar proportion of each AQP in cataract was found. Although no differences were found at the mRNA level compared to controls, a significant 1.65-fold increase (p=0.001) in AQP1protein expression was observed in HLECs from cataract patients, with the highest differences being found for nuclear cataracts (2.1-fold increase; p<0.001). A similar trend was found for AQP5 (1.47-fold increase), although the difference was not significant (p=0.161). Moreover we have shown increased membrane AQP5 protein expression in HLECs of patients with cataracts. No association of AQP1 or AQP5 expression levels with age or sex was observed in either group. Our results suggest regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 at the post-translational level and support previous observations on the implication of AQP1 and 5 in maintenance of lens transparency in animal models. Our results likely reflect a compensatory response of the crystalline lens to delay cataract formation by increasing the water removal rate. PMID:27497833

  11. Expression and translocation of the chlamydial major outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dascher, C; Roll, D; Bavoil, P M

    1993-12-01

    The entire gene encoding the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from Chlamydia psittaci strain GPIC has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A tightly regulated T7 promoter is used to control expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Upon induction of expression, the precursor (pre-MOMP) is synthesized in the cell. This is followed by the appearance of a lower molecular weight protein that comigrates with mature MOMP from chlamydial elementary bodies by both one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. When E. coli cells expressing MOMP are converted to spheroplasts and subjected to protease treatment, MOMP is quantitatively degraded while cytoplasmic pre-MOMP is protected from degradation. Whole cells subjected to the same protease treatment show no degradation of MOMP. Furthermore, MOMP is not detected in surface-labeling experiments using several MOMP-specific antibodies. These data indicate that pre-MOMP is translocated to the periplasmic space and processed but is not surface exposed in E. coli. Expression of MOMP in this system causes a significant reduction in cell viability. In addition, coexpression in E. coli of MOMP or a MOMP-PhoA fusion with various chaperone proteins does not alter the level of MOMP translocation.

  12. Microsomal membrane proteome of low grade diffuse astrocytomas: Differentially expressed proteins and candidate surveillance biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Polisetty, Ravindra Varma; Gautam, Poonam; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh; Gowda, Harsha; Renu, Durairaj; Shivakumar, Bhadravathi Marigowda; Lakshmikantha, Akhila; Mariswamappa, Kiran; Ankathi, Praveen; Purohit, Aniruddh K.; Uppin, Megha S.; Sundaram, Challa; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse astrocytoma (DA; WHO grade II) is a low-grade, primary brain neoplasm with high potential of recurrence as higher grade malignant form. We have analyzed differentially expressed membrane proteins from these tumors, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 2803 proteins were identified, 340 of them differentially expressed with minimum of 2 fold change and based on ≥2 unique peptides. Bioinformatics analysis of this dataset also revealed important molecular networks and pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, mTOR signaling pathway being a major pathway identified. Comparison of 340 differentially expressed proteins with the transcript data from Grade II diffuse astrocytomas reported earlier, revealed about 190 of the proteins correlate in their trends in expression. Considering progressive and recurrent nature of these tumors, we have mapped the differentially expressed proteins for their secretory potential, integrated the resulting list with similar list of proteins from anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO Grade III) tumors and provide a panel of proteins along with their proteotypic peptides, as a resource that would be useful for investigation as circulatory plasma markers for post-treatment surveillance of DA patients. PMID:27246909

  13. Naegleria fowleri amoebae express a membrane-associated calcium-independent phospholipase A(2).

    PubMed

    Barbour, S E; Marciano-Cabral, F

    2001-02-26

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba, is the causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Previous reports have demonstrated that N. fowleri expresses one or more forms of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) and that a secreted form of this enzyme is involved in pathogenesis. However, the molecular nature of these phospholipases remains largely unknown. This study was initiated to determine whether N. fowleri expresses analogs of the well-characterized PLA(2)s that are expressed by mammalian macrophages. Amoeba cell homogenates contain a PLA(2) activity that hydrolyzes the substrate that is preferred by the 85 kDa calcium-dependent cytosolic PLA(2), cPLA(2). However, unlike the cPLA(2) enzyme in macrophages, this activity is largely calcium-independent, is constitutively associated with membranes and shows only a modest preference for phospholipids that contain arachidonate. The amoeba PLA(2) activity is sensitive to inhibitors that block the activities of cPLA(2)-alpha and the 80 kDa calcium-independent PLA(2), iPLA(2), that are expressed by mammalian cells. One of these compounds, methylarachidonyl fluorophosphonate, partially inhibits the constitutive release of [(3)H]arachidonic acid from pre-labeled amoebae. Together, these data suggest that N. fowleri expresses a constitutively active calcium-independent PLA(2) that may play a role in the basal phospholipid metabolism of these cells.

  14. [Analysis of membrane expression of the CD63 human basophil activation marker. Applications to allergologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Sainte-Laudy, J; Vallon, C; Guérin, J C

    1994-06-01

    On the basis of the CD 63 bi-modal expression on the membrane of activated basophils, we set up a flow cytometric method for the analysis of human basophils activation by an anti-IgE and anti-CD 63 double labelling. We demonstrated that the statistical characteristics of the percentages of activation obtained by an anti-IgE stimulation allowed the use of this method for pharmacological studies. The percentages of activation were of the same order of magnitude than those obtained by histamine release. CD 63 expression was also observed for a low affinity allergen such as the sulfonyl-HSA conjugate used for sulfites hypersensibility diagnosis, healthy donors being negative. This method, which can be automatized may represent an interesting candidate in the field of hapten hypersensitivity which lacks of reliable diagnostical methods. PMID:7524523

  15. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower.

  16. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower. PMID:27441825

  17. Expression and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins in stomatal complexes of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Robert B; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Cohen, David; Chevalier, Adrien S; Uehlein, Norbert; Hachez, Charles; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Le Thiec, Didier; Chaumont, François

    2014-10-01

    Stomata, the microscopic pores on the surface of the aerial parts of plants, are bordered by two specialized cells, known as guard cells, which control the stomatal aperture according to endogenous and environmental signals. Like most movements occurring in plants, the opening and closing of stomata are based on hydraulic forces. During opening, the activation of plasma membrane and tonoplast transporters results in solute accumulation in the guard cells. To re-establish the perturbed osmotic equilibrium, water follows the solutes into the cells, leading to their swelling. Numerous studies have contributed to the understanding of the mechanism and regulation of stomatal movements. However, despite the importance of transmembrane water flow during this process, only a few studies have provided evidence for the involvement of water channels, called aquaporins. Here, we microdissected Zea mays stomatal complexes and showed that members of the aquaporin plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are expressed in these complexes and that their mRNA expression generally follows a diurnal pattern. The substrate specificity of two of the expressed ZmPIPs, ZmPIP1;5 and ZmPIP1;6, was investigated by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and yeast cells. Our data show that both isoforms facilitate transmembrane water diffusion in the presence of the ZmPIP2;1 isoform. In addition, both display CO2 permeability comparable to that of the CO2 diffusion facilitator NtAQP1. These data indicate that ZmPIPs may have various physiological roles in stomatal complexes.

  18. Differential expression of microRNAs with progression of gestation and inflammation in the human chorioamniotic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, Daniel; Romero, Roberto; Pineles, Beth L.; Tarca, Adi L.; Kim, Yeon Mee; Draghici, Sorin; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Kim, Jung-Sun; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Hassan, Sonia; Espinoza, Jimmy; Kim, Chong Jai

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in chorioamniotic membranes with advancing gestation, labor, and inflammation. Study design Expression profiles of 157 miRNAs in the chorioamniotic membranes were obtained from patients in the following groups: 1) term not in labor (n=10); 2) term in labor (n=10); 3) preterm labor with histologic chorioamnionitis (n=9); and 4) without histologic chorioamnionitis (n=10). Results More than 95% of the miRNAs screened were expressed. Gestational age-dependent changes in expression were observed for 13 miRNAs. No differences in miRNA expression were observed between women without labor and women in labor. Membranes with chorioamnionitis displayed increased expression of miR-223 and miR-338. Gene Ontology analysis of genes targeted by differentially expressed miRNAs revealed enrichment for specific biological process categories. Conclusion Chorioamniotic membranes with advancing gestational age and chorioamnionitis are associated with the differential expression of a subset of miRNAs. PMID:17826424

  19. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Peng; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankyrin and band 3 are not required for erythroblasts enucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ankyrin does not affect erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of band 3 influences erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. -- Abstract: During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  20. Potassium-dependent changes in the expression of membrane-associated proteins in barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, M.; Kulpa, J.; Siddiqi, M.Y.; Glass, A.D.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Halcyon) seedlings which has been grown in full strength complete inorganic nutrient media (containing 6 millimolar K{sup +}) had high internal K{sup +} concentrations and low values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx when influx was measured from solutions containing 100 micromolar K{sup +}. Transfer of these plants to solutions lacking K{sup +} resulted in significant reductions of root and shoot K{sup +} concentrations and values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx increased by greater than 10-fold within 3 days. When plants treated in this way were returned to complete solutions, containing K{sup +}, the changes induced by K{sup +} deprivation were reversed. Parallel studies of microsomal membranes by means of SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the expression of a group of polypeptides increased or decreased in parallel with changes of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx. Most prominent of these were 45 and 34 kilodalton polypeptides which specifically responded to K{sup +} status of the barley plants; their expression was not enhanced by N or P deprivation. The 45 kilodalton polypeptide was susceptible to degradation by a membrane associated protease when microsomes were washing in buffer containing 0.2 millimolar PMSF. This loss was prevented by increasing PMSF concentration to 2 millimolar.

  1. Estrogens Induce Expression of Membrane-Associated Estrogen Receptor α Isoforms in Lactotropes

    PubMed Central

    Zárate, Sandra; Jaita, Gabriela; Ferraris, Jimena; Eijo, Guadalupe; Magri, María L.; Pisera, Daniel; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens are key to anterior pituitary function, stimulating hormone release and controlling cell fate to achieve pituitary dynamic adaptation to changing physiological conditions. In addition to their classical mechanism of action through intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), estrogens exert rapid actions via cell membrane-localized ERs (mERs). We previously showed that E2 exerts a rapid pro-apoptotic action in anterior pituitary cells, especially in lactotropes and somatotropes, through activation of mERs. In the present study, we examined the involvement of mERα in the rapid pro-apoptotic action of estradiol by TUNEL in primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized rats using a cell-impermeable E2 conjugate (E2-BSA) and an ERα selective antagonist (MPP dihydrochloride). We studied mERα expression during the estrous cycle and its regulation by gonadal steroids in vivo by flow cytometry. We identified ERα variants in the plasma membrane of anterior pituitary cells during the estrous cycle and studied E2 regulation of these mERα variants in vitro by surface biotinylation and Western Blot. E2-BSA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by MPP in total anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes. In cycling rats, we detected a higher number of lactotropes and a lower number of somatotropes expressing mERα at proestrus than at diestrus. Acute E2 treatment increased the percentage of mERα-expressing lactotropes whereas it decreased the percentage of mERα-expressing somatotropes. We detected three mERα isoforms of 66, 39 and 22 kDa. Expression of mERα66 and mERα39 was higher at proestrus than at diestrus, and short-term E2 incubation increased expression of these two mERα variants. Our results indicate that the rapid apoptotic action exerted by E2 in lactotropes depends on mERα, probably full-length ERα and/or a 39 kDa ERα variant. Expression and activation of mERα variants in lactotropes could be one of the mechanisms through which E2

  2. The Effects of Cold Acclimation on Photosynthetic Apparatus and the Expression of COR14b in Four Genotypes of Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Contrasting in their Tolerance to Freezing and High-light Treatment in Cold Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rapacz, Marcin; Wolanin, Barbara; Hura, Katarzyna; Tyrka, MirosŁaw

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Cold acclimation modifies the balance of the energy absorbed and metabolized in the dark processes of photosynthesis, which may affect the expression of cold-regulated (COR) genes. At the same time, a gradual acclimation to the relatively high light conditions is observed, thereby minimizing the potential for photo-oxidative damage. As a result, the resistance to photoinhibition in the cold has often been identified as a trait closely related to freezing tolerance. Using four barley genotypes that differentially express both traits, the effect of cold acclimation on freezing tolerance and high-light tolerance was studied together with the expression of COR14b, one of the best-characterized barley COR genes. Methods Plants were cold acclimated for 2 weeks at 2 °C. Freezing tolerance was studied by means of electrolyte leakage. Changes in photosynthetic apparatus and high-light tolerance were monitored by means of chlorophyll fluorescence. Accumulation of COR14b and some proteins important in photosynthetic acclimation to cold were studied with western analysis. COR14b transcript accumulation during cold acclimation was assessed with real-time PCR. Key Results Cold acclimation increased both freezing tolerance and high-light tolerance, especially when plants were treated with high light after non-lethal freezing. In all plants, cold acclimation triggered the increase in photosynthetic capacity during high-light treatment. In two plants that were characterized by higher high-light tolerance but lower freezing tolerance, higher accumulation of COR14b transcript and protein was observed after 7 d and 14 d of cold acclimation, while a higher transient induction of COR14b expression was observed in freezing-tolerant plants during the first day of cold acclimation. High-light tolerant plants were also characterized with a higher level of PsbS accumulation and more efficient dissipation of excess light energy. Conclusions Accumulation of COR14b in

  3. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-01-27

    During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. PMID:27347675

  5. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. PMID:27347675

  6. Over-expressing the C3 photosynthesis cycle enzyme Sedoheptulose-1-7 Bisphosphatase improves photosynthetic carbon gain and yield under fully open air CO2 fumigation (FACE)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biochemical models predict that photosynthesis in C3 plants is most frequently limited by the slower of two processes, the maximum capacity of the enzyme Rubisco to carboxylate RuBP (Vc,max), or the regeneration of RuBP via electron transport (J). At current atmospheric [CO2] levels Rubisco is not saturated; consequently, elevating [CO2] increases the velocity of carboxylation and inhibits the competing oxygenation reaction which is also catalyzed by Rubisco. In the future, leaf photosynthesis (A) should be increasingly limited by RuBP regeneration, as [CO2] is predicted to exceed 550 ppm by 2050. The C3 cycle enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7 bisphosphatase (SBPase, EC 3.1.3.17) has been shown to exert strong metabolic control over RuBP regeneration at light saturation. Results We tested the hypothesis that tobacco transformed to overexpressing SBPase will exhibit greater stimulation of A than wild type (WT) tobacco when grown under field conditions at elevated [CO2] (585 ppm) under fully open air fumigation. Growth under elevated [CO2] stimulated instantaneous A and the diurnal photosynthetic integral (A') more in transformants than WT. There was evidence of photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO2] via downregulation of Vc,max in both WT and transformants. Nevertheless, greater carbon assimilation and electron transport rates (J and Jmax) for transformants led to greater yield increases than WT at elevated [CO2] compared to ambient grown plants. Conclusion These results provide proof of concept that increasing content and activity of a single photosynthesis enzyme can enhance carbon assimilation and yield of C3 crops grown at [CO2] expected by the middle of the 21st century. PMID:21884586

  7. Nitric oxide synthase expression, enzyme activity and NO production during angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Pipili-Synetos, Eva; Kritikou, Sosanna; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Athanassiadou, Aglaia; Flordellis, C; Maragoudakis, M E

    2000-01-01

    In order to elucidate further the role of nitric oxide (NO) as an endogenous antiangiogenic mediator, mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), enzyme activity and production of NO were determined in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), an in vivo model of angiogenesis. In this model, maximum angiogenesis is reached between days 9–12 of chick embryo development. After that period, vascular density remains constant. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression, determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR), increased from the 8th day reaching a maximum (70% increase) at days 10–11. NO synthase activity, determined as citrulline formation in the presence of calcium, also increased from day 8 reaching a maximum around day 10 (100% increase). Similar results were obtained in the absence of calcium suggesting that the NOS determined was the inducible form. Nitric oxide production, determined as nitrites, increased from day 8 reaching a maximum around day 10 (64% increase) and remaining stable at day 13. Finally, the bacterial lipopolysaccharide LPS (which activates transcriptionally iNOS), inhibited dose dependently angiogenesis in the CAM. These results in connection with previous findings from this laboratory, showing that NO inhibits angiogenesis in the CAM, suggest that increases in iNOS expression, enzyme activity and NO production closely parallel the progression of angiogenesis in the CAM, thus providing an endogenous brake to control this process. PMID:10694222

  8. α(1D)-Adrenergic receptors constitutive activity and reduced expression at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    García-Sáinz, J Adolfo; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Medina, Luz Del Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors are a heterogeneous family of the G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the actions of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Adrenergic receptors comprise three subfamilies (α(1), α(2), and β, with three members each) and the α(1D)-adrenergic receptor is one of the members of the α(1) subfamily with some interesting traits. The α(1D)-adrenergic receptor is difficult to express, seems predominantly located intracellularly, and exhibits constitutive activity. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the conditions and procedures used to determine changes in intracellular free calcium concentration which has been instrumental to define the constitutive activity of these receptors. Taking advantage of the fact that truncation of the first 79 amino acids of α(1D)-adrenergic receptors markedly increased their membrane expression, we were able to show that constitutive activity is present in receptors truncated at the amino and carboxyl termini, which indicates that such domains are dispensable for this action. Constitutive activity could be observed in cells expressing either the rat or human α(1D)-adrenergic receptor orthologs. Such constitutive activity has been observed in native rat arteries and we will discuss the possible functional implications that it might have in the regulation of blood pressure.

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of basement membrane proteins of verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Carrozzo, Marco; Pagano, Marco; Broccoletti, Roberto; Scully, Crispian; Gandolfo, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is an extremely invasive tumour of stratified squamous epithelium that spreads throughout degradation of the basement membrane (BM) and extra-cellular matrix. Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a rare low-grade variant of oral SCC that penetrates into the subepithelial connective tissue. It also has a different clinical behaviour from classical oral SCC. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of laminin, laminin-5, collagen IV and fibronectin in VC, severe epithelial dysplasia (SED) and SCC in order to analyse if the pattern of these molecules expression contributes to the differences in the biological behaviour of these diseases. The staining pattern of laminin was less intensive in SCC compared with SED and VC, and collagen IV expression was increased in VC compared with SED. Discontinuities of laminin, collagen IV and fibronectin were more evident in SED than in VC. This study indicates that VC has a biological behaviour different from SED or SCC, observable by immunohistochemistry in the BM zone.

  10. Heterologous expression of tulip petal plasma membrane aquaporins in Pichia pastoris for water channel analysis.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Water channels formed by aquaporins (AQPs) play an important role in the control of water homeostasis in individual cells and in multicellular organisms. Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) constitute a subclass of plant AQPs. TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2 from tulip petals are members of the PIP family. In this study, we overexpressed TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2 in Pichia pastoris and monitored their water channel activity (WCA) either by an in vivo spheroplast-bursting assay performed after hypo-osmotic shock or by growth assay. Osmolarity, pH, and inhibitors of AQPs, protein kinases (PKs), and protein phosphatases (PPs) affect the WCA of heterologous AQPs in this expression system. The WCA of TgPIP2;2-expressing spheroplasts was affected by inhibitors of PKs and PPs, which indicates that the water channel of this homologue is regulated by phosphorylation in P. pastoris. From the results reported herein, we suggest that P. pastoris can be employed as a heterologous expression system to assay the WCA of PIPs and to monitor the AQP-mediated channel gating mechanism, and it can be developed to screen inhibitors/effectors of PIPs.

  11. Expression and hormonal regulation of membrane progesterone receptors in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Valadez-Cosmes, Paulina; Germán-Castelán, Liliana; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A; Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    Progesterone (P) participates in the regulation of the growth of several tumors, including astrocytomas, the most common and malignant human brain tumors. It has been reported that P induces astrocytomas growth in part by its interaction with its intracellular receptors (PR). Recently, it has been reported that membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) are expressed in ovarian and breast cancer cells, and that P could exert some actions through these receptors, however, it is unknown whether mPRs are expressed in astrocytomas. In this work, U251 and U87 cell lines derived from human astrocytomas grade IV were used to study the expression, localization and hormonal regulation of three mPRs subtypes. Using RT-qPCR and Western blot techniques, we found that mPRα and mPRβ are clearly expressed at mRNA and protein levels in astrocytoma cells whereas mPRγ was barely expressed in these cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed that mPRα and mPRβ were mainly located in the cell surface. Flow cytometry assays demonstrated that in U251 and U87 cells, mPRβ is expressed by a higher percentage of both permeabilized and non-permeabilized cells as compared with mPRα. The percentage of cells expressing mPRγ was very low. P and estradiol (E) (10, 100 nM and 1 μM) decreased mPRα protein content at 12 h. In contrast, both P (100 nM and 1 μM) and E (10 and 100 nM) increased mPRβ content. Finally, by in silico analysis, we identified that mPRα, mPRβ and mPRγ promoters contain several progesterone and estrogen response elements. Our results indicate that mPRs are expressed in human astrocytoma cells, exhibiting a differential regulation by E and P. These data suggest that some P actions in astrocytoma cells may be mediated by mPRs. PMID:26275946

  12. Regulation of leptin expression by 17beta-estradiol in human placental cells involves membrane associated estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Yésica P; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Dueñas, José L; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor; Varone, Cecilia L

    2012-04-01

    The placenta produces a wide number of molecules that play essential roles in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. In this context, leptin has emerged as an important player in reproduction. The synthesis of leptin in normal trophoblastic cells is regulated by different endogenous biochemical agents, but the regulation of placental leptin expression is still poorly understood. We have previously reported that 17β-estradiol (E(2)) up-regulates placental leptin expression. To improve the understanding of estrogen receptor mechanisms in regulating leptin gene expression, in the current study we examined the effect of membrane-constrained E(2) conjugate, E-BSA, on leptin expression in human placental cells. We have found that leptin expression was induced by E-BSA both in BeWo cells and human placental explants, suggesting that E(2) also exerts its effects through membrane receptors. Moreover E-BSA rapidly activated different MAPKs and AKT pathways, and these pathways were involved in E(2) induced placental leptin expression. On the other hand we demonstrated the presence of ERα associated to the plasma membrane of BeWo cells. We showed that E(2) genomic and nongenomic actions could be mediated by ERα. Supporting this idea, the downregulation of ERα level through a specific siRNA, decreased E-BSA effects on leptin expression. Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the mechanisms whereby E(2) regulates leptin expression in placenta and support the importance of leptin in placental physiology.

  13. Low plasma membrane expression of the miltefosine transport complex renders Leishmania braziliensis refractory to the drug.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Carvalho, Luís; Pérez-Victoria, F Javier; Gamarro, Francisco; Castanys, Santiago

    2009-04-01

    Miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine, MLF) is the first oral drug with recognized efficacy against both visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, some clinical studies have suggested that MLF shows significantly less efficiency against the cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis. In this work, we have determined the cellular and molecular basis for the natural MLF resistance observed in L. braziliensis. Four independent L. braziliensis clinical isolates showed a marked decrease in MLF sensitivity that was due to their inability to internalize the drug. MLF internalization in the highly sensitive L. donovani species requires at least two proteins in the plasma membrane, LdMT, a P-type ATPase involved in phospholipid translocation, and its beta subunit, LdRos3. Strikingly, L. braziliensis parasites showed highly reduced levels of this MLF translocation machinery at the plasma membrane, mainly because of the low expression levels of the beta subunit, LbRos3. Overexpression of LbRos3 induces increased MLF sensitivity not only in L. braziliensis promastigotes but also in intracellular amastigotes. These results further highlight the importance of the MLF translocation machinery in determining MLF potency and point toward the development of protocols to routinely monitor MLF susceptibility in geographic areas where L. braziliensis might be prevalent. PMID:19188379

  14. Targeting LSCs through membrane antigens selectively or preferentially expressed on these cells.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana; Testa, Ugo

    2015-12-01

    Studies of xenotransplantation of bone marrow and blood cells of AML patients have supported the existence of rare leukemic stem cells, able to initiate and maintain the leukemic process and bearing the typical leukemic abnormalities. LSCs possess self-renewal capacity and are responsible for the growth of the more differentiated leukemic progeny in the bone marrow and in the blood. These cells are more resistant than bulk leukemic cells to anti-leukemic drugs, thus survive to treatment and are, at a large extent, responsible for leukemia relapse. During the last two decades, considerable progresses have been made in the understanding of the peculiar cellular and molecular properties of LSCs. In this context, particularly relevant was the discovery of several membrane markers, selectively or preferentially expressed on LSCs. These membrane markers offer now unique opportunities to identify LSCs and to distinguish them from normal HSCs, to monitor the response of the various anti-leukemic treatments at the level of the LSC compartment, to identify relevant therapeutic targets. Concerning this last point, the most promising therapeutic targets are CD33 and CD123.

  15. Membrane Systems in Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with highly differentiated membrane systems. In addition to a Gram-negative-type cell envelope with plasma membrane and outer membrane separated by a periplasmic space, cyanobacteria have an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the fully functional electron transfer chains of photosynthesis and respiration reside. The presence of different membrane systems lends these cells a unique complexity among bacteria. Cyanobacteria must be able to reorganize the membranes, synthesize new membrane lipids, and properly target proteins to the correct membrane system. The outer membrane, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes each have specialized roles in the cyanobacterial cell. Understanding the organization, functionality, protein composition and dynamics of the membrane systems remains a great challenge in cyanobacterial cell biology.

  16. The role of putrescine in the regulation of proteins and fatty acids of thylakoid membranes under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Sheng; Yuan, Yinghui; Chen, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Wenhua; Tang, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Min; Guo, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines can alleviate the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth by regulating photosynthetic efficiency. However, little information is available to explain the specific mechanisms underlying the contribution of polyamines to salt tolerance of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we investigated the role of putrescine (Put) on the photosynthetic apparatus of cucumber seedlings under salt stress. We found that NaCl stress resulted in severe ion toxicity and oxidative stress in cucumber chloroplasts. In addition, salinity caused a significant increase in the saturated fatty acid contents of thylakoid membranes. Put altered unsaturated fatty acid content, thereby alleviating the disintegration of thylakoid grana lamellae and reducing the number of plastoglobuli in thylakoid membranes. BN-PAGE revealed Put up-regulated the expression of ATP synthase, CP47, D1, Qb, and psbA proteins and down-regulated CP24, D2, and LHCII type III in NaCl-stressed thylakoid membranes. qRT-PCR analysis of gene expression was used to compare transcript and protein accumulation among 10 candidate proteins. For five of these proteins, induced transcript accumulation was consistent with the pattern of induced protein accumulation. Our results suggest that Put regulates protein expression at transcriptional and translational levels by increasing endogenous polyamines levels in thylakoid membranes, which may stabilise photosynthetic apparatus under salt stress. PMID:26435404

  17. The role of putrescine in the regulation of proteins and fatty acids of thylakoid membranes under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sheng; Yuan, Yinghui; Chen, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Wenhua; Tang, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Min; Guo, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines can alleviate the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth by regulating photosynthetic efficiency. However, little information is available to explain the specific mechanisms underlying the contribution of polyamines to salt tolerance of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we investigated the role of putrescine (Put) on the photosynthetic apparatus of cucumber seedlings under salt stress. We found that NaCl stress resulted in severe ion toxicity and oxidative stress in cucumber chloroplasts. In addition, salinity caused a significant increase in the saturated fatty acid contents of thylakoid membranes. Put altered unsaturated fatty acid content, thereby alleviating the disintegration of thylakoid grana lamellae and reducing the number of plastoglobuli in thylakoid membranes. BN-PAGE revealed Put up-regulated the expression of ATP synthase, CP47, D1, Qb, and psbA proteins and down-regulated CP24, D2, and LHCII type III in NaCl-stressed thylakoid membranes. qRT-PCR analysis of gene expression was used to compare transcript and protein accumulation among 10 candidate proteins. For five of these proteins, induced transcript accumulation was consistent with the pattern of induced protein accumulation. Our results suggest that Put regulates protein expression at transcriptional and translational levels by increasing endogenous polyamines levels in thylakoid membranes, which may stabilise photosynthetic apparatus under salt stress. PMID:26435404

  18. Efficiency of Membrane Protein Expression Following Infection with Recombinant Adenovirus of Polarized Non-Transformed Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia; Blenkinsop, Timothy A; Stern, Jeffrey H; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of exogenous proteins facilitates studies of molecular mechanisms and utility for transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture. Here, we compared expression of the membrane protein β5 integrin-GFP (β5-GFP) in two recently established models of differentiated human RPE, adult RPE stem cell-derived RPE and primary fetal RPE, upon infection with recombinant adenovirus or transfection with DNA in liposomes. We varied viral titer and duration of virus incubation and examined β5-GFP and the tight junction marker ZO-1 in manipulated cells by confocal microscopy. Fewer than 5 % of cells expressed β5-GFP after liposome-mediated transfection. The percentage of cells with detectable β5-GFP exceeded 90 % after adenovirus infection for as little as 1 h. Decreasing virus titer two-fold did not alter the fraction of cells expressing β5-GFP but increased variability of β5-GFP level among cells. In cells with low expression levels, β5-GFP localized mostly to the apical plasma membrane like endogenous αvβ5 integrin. In cells with high expression levels, β5-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in addition to the apical surface suggesting accumulation in trafficking compartments. Altogether, adenovirus delivery yields efficient exogenous membrane protein expression of correct polarity in differentiated human RPE cells in culture. PMID:26427482

  19. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) expression in murine retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Arul K.; Mysona, Barbara A.; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Tawfik, Amany; Sanders, A.; Markand, Shanu; Zorrilla, Eric; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Bollinger, Kathryn E.; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sigma receptor 1 (σR1) and 2 (σR2) are thought to be two distinct proteins which share the ability to bind multiple ligands, several of which are common to both receptors. Whether σR1 and σR2 share overlapping biological functions is unknown. Recently, progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) was shown to contain the putative σR2 binding site. PGRMC1 has not been studied in retina. We hypothesize that biological interactions between σR1 and PGRMC1 will be evidenced by compensatory upregulation of PGRMC1 in σR1−/− mice. Methods Immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting methods were used to analyze expression of PGRMC1 in wild type mouse retina. Tissues from σR1−/− mice were used to investigate whether a biological interaction exists between σR1 and PGRMC1. Results In the eye, PGRMC1 is expressed in corneal epithelium, lens, ciliary body epithelium, and retina. In retina, PGRMC1 is present in Müller cells and retinal pigment epithelium. This expression pattern is similar, but not identical to σR1. PGRMC1 protein levels in neural retina and eye cup from σR1−/− mice did not differ from wild type mice. Nonocular tissues, lung, heart, and kidney showed similar Pgrmc1 gene expression in wild type and σR1−/− mice. In contrast, liver, brain and intestine showed increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in σR1−/− mice. Conclusion Despite potential biological overlap, deletion of σR1 did not result in a compensatory change in PGRMC1 protein levels in σR1−/− mouse retina. Increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in organs with high lipid content such as liver, brain, and intestine indicate a possible tissue specific interaction between σR1 and PGRMC1. The current studies establish the presence of PGRMC1 in retina and lay the foundation for analysis of its biological function. PMID:26642738

  20. Divergent fates of P- and E-selectins after their expression on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, M; Koedam, J A; Wagner, D D

    1993-01-01

    P-selectin and E-selectin are related adhesion receptors for monocytes and neutrophils that are expressed by stimulated endothelial cells. P-selectin is stored in Weibel-Palade bodies, and it reaches the plasma membrane after exocytosis of these granules. E-selectin is not stored, and its synthesis is induced by cytokines. We studied the fate of the two proteins after their surface expression by following the intracellular routing of internalized antibodies to the selectins. By immunofluorescent staining, P-selectin antibody was first seen in endosomes, then in the Golgi region, and finally in Weibel-Palade bodies. In contrast, the E-selectin antibody was detected only in endosomes and lysosomes. Subcellular fractionation of cells after 4 h chase confirmed the localization of P-selectin antibody in storage granules and of the E-selectin antibody in lysosomes. In AtT-20 cells, a mouse pituitary cell line, transfected with P- or E-selectin, only P-selectin was delivered to the endogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone storage granules after endocytosis. Deletion of the cytoplasmic domain abolished internalization. In summary, after a brief surface exposure, internalized E-selectin is degraded in the lysosomes, whereas P-selectin returns to the storage granules from where it can be reused. Images PMID:7694691

  1. [Expression of Epstein-Barr virus membrane antigen in CHO cell].

    PubMed

    Ye, P; Li, Y; Gu, S

    1998-12-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pCMV/MA, was generated by isolating the Epstein-Barr Virus(EBV) membrane antigen(MA) gene with anchor sequence removed from pSV40/MA and cloning it into pcDNA3, with MA gene and Neomycin gene under the control of CMV promoter and SV40 promoter respectively. CHO cells were transfected with pCMV/MA using liposome and then grown in DMEM medium in the presence of G418. Two clones highly expressing MA were obtained. EBV-MA was purified from the medium of CHO cells by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Western-blot showed that the molecular weight of proteins expressed were about 340 kD and 220 kD. It could specifically react with anti-MA monoclonal antibody in indirect immunofluorescent and immunodot assay. The yield of MA was estimated to be 1.9 micrograms/ml per day by SDS-PAGE scanning and Lowry methods. The optimal culture condition of the CHO cells was to use medium supplemented with 10% serum until 80% cell confluence, then with 2%-5% serum and collected medium continually. The genetic stability of the cells was confirmed by freeze--revival and culture without G418. The purified MA was used to immunize mice and the geometric mean titer of the specific antibody was 1:180, while the positive rate of antibody was 100%.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane lipoprotein I gene: molecular cloning, sequence, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, M; Barron, C; Schweizer, A; von Specht, B U; Domdey, H

    1989-01-01

    Lipoprotein I (OprI) is one of the major proteins of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Like porin protein F (OprF), it is a vaccine candidate because it antigenically cross-reacts with all serotype strains of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme. Since lipoprotein I was expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of its own promoter, we were able to isolate the gene by screening a lambda EMBL3 phage library with a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against lipoprotein I. The monocistronic OprI mRNA encodes a precursor protein of 83 amino acid residues including a signal peptide of 19 residues. The mature protein has a molecular weight of 6,950, not including bound glycerol and lipid. Although the amino acid sequences of protein I of P. aeruginosa and Braun's lipoprotein of E. coli differ considerably (only 30.1% identical amino acid residues), peptidoglycan in E. coli, are identical. Using lipoprotein I expressed in E. coli, it can now be tested whether this protein alone, without P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide contaminations, has a protective effect against P. aeruginosa infections. Images PMID:2502533

  3. Induced expression of neuronal membrane attack complex and cell death by Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y; Sullivan, T; Lee, C M; Meri, S; Shiosaki, K; Lin, C W

    1998-06-15

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) and complement-derived membrane attack complex (MAC) are co-localized in senile plaques of brains from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. But the relationship between A beta and complement activation is unclear. We have used human neurotypic cells, differentiated SH-SY5Y, as a model system to examine regulation of neuronal MAC expression and cell death by A beta. We demonstrated that mRNAs (C1q, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8 and C9) and proteins (C1q, C3 and C9) for the major components of the classical complement cascade are present in the SH-SY5Y neurotypic cells, indicating that neuronal cells can synthesize the necessary proteins required for MAC formation. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies showed the A beta-induced neuronal MAC expression on the SH-SY5Y cells after CD59 was removed by PIPLC or blocked by anti-CD59 antibody. Meanwhile, increased A beta-induced neuronal cell death was observed following treatment with anti-CD59. Taken together, these results suggest that A beta activates neuronal complement cascade to induce MAC, and a deficiency of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, e.g., CD59, may increase the vulnerability of neurons to complement-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:9689469

  4. PTK6/BRK is expressed in the normal mammary gland and activated at the plasma membrane in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Maoyu; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Wang, Zebin; Wiley, Elizabeth L; Gann, Peter H; Khan, Seema A; Banerji, Nilanjana; McDonald, William; Asztalos, Szilard; Pham, Thao N D; Tonetti, Debra A; Tyner, Angela L

    2014-08-15

    Protein Tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6/BRK) is overexpressed in the majority of human breast tumors and breast tumor cell lines. It is also expressed in normal epithelial linings of the gastrointestinal tract, skin, and prostate. To date, expression of PTK6 has not been extensively examined in the normal human mammary gland. We detected PTK6 mRNA and protein expression in the immortalized normal MCF-10A human mammary gland epithelial cell line, and examined PTK6 expression and activation in a normal human breast tissue microarray, as well as in human breast tumors. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 342 in the PTK6 activation loop corresponds with its activation. Similar to findings in the prostate, we detect nuclear and cytoplasmic PTK6 in normal mammary gland epithelial cells, but no phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 342. However, in human breast tumors, striking PTK6 expression and phosphorylation of tyrosine 342 is observed at the plasma membrane. PTK6 is expressed in the normal human mammary gland, but does not appear to be active and may have kinase-independent functions that are distinct from its cancer promoting activities at the membrane. Understanding consequences of PTK6 activation at the plasma membrane may have implications for developing novel targeted therapies against this kinase.

  5. Inhibition of laminin alpha 1-chain expression leads to alteration of basement membrane assembly and cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The expression of the constituent alpha 1 chain of laminin-1, a major component of basement membranes, is markedly regulated during development and differentiation. We have designed an antisense RNA strategy to analyze the direct involvement of the alpha 1 chain in laminin assembly, basement membrane formation, and cell differentiation. We report that the absence of alpha 1-chain expression, resulting from the stable transfection of the human colonic cancer Caco2 cells with an eukaryotic expression vector comprising a cDNA fragment of the alpha 1 chain inserted in an antisense orientation, led to (a) an incorrect secretion of the two other constituent chains of laminin-1, the beta 1/gamma 1 chains, (b) the lack of basement membrane assembly when Caco2-deficient cells were cultured on top of fibroblasts, assessed by the absence of collagen IV and nidogen deposition, and (c) changes in the structural polarity of cells accompanied by the inhibition of an apical digestive enzyme, sucrase-isomaltase. The results demonstrate that the alpha 1 chain is required for secretion of laminin-1 and for the assembly of basement membrane network. Furthermore, expression of the laminin alpha 1-chain gene may be a regulatory element in determining cell differentiation. PMID:8609173

  6. WY14,643, a PPARα ligand, attenuates expression of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    PubMed Central

    Archer, D C; Frkanec, J T; Cromwell, J; Clopton, P; Cunard, R

    2007-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands are medications used to treat hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis. Increasing evidence suggests that these agents are immunosuppressive. In the following studies we demonstrate that WY14,643, a PPARα ligand, attenuates expression of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (AGBMD). C57BL/6 mice were fed 0·05% WY14,643 or control food and immunized with the non-collagenous domain of the α3 chain of Type IV collagen [α3(IV) NC1] in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). WY14,643 reduced proteinuria and greatly improved glomerular and tubulo-interstitial lesions. However, the PPARα ligand did not alter the extent of IgG-binding to the GBM. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the prominent tubulo-interstitial infiltrates in the control-fed mice consisted predominately of F4/80+ macrophages and WY14,643-feeding decreased significantly the number of renal macrophages. The synthetic PPARα ligand also reduced significantly expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2. Sera from mice immunized with AGBMD were also evaluated for antigen-specific IgGs. There was a significant increase in the IgG1 : IgG2c ratio and a decline in the intrarenal and splenocyte interferon (IFN)-γ mRNA expression in the WY14,643-fed mice, suggesting that the PPARα ligand could skew the immune response to a less inflammatory T helper 2-type of response. These studies suggest that PPARα ligands may be a novel treatment for inflammatory renal disease. PMID:17888025

  7. Loss of membranous VEGFR1 expression is associated with an adverse phenotype and shortened survival in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lebok, Patrick; Huber, Julia; Burandt, Eike-Christian; Lebeau, Annette; Marx, Andreas Holger; Terracciano, Luigi; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Jänicke, Fritz; Müller, Volkmar; Paluchowski, Peter; Geist, Stefan; Wilke, Christian; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Quaas, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in tumor growth and progression, which is controlled by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and their receptors (VEGFRs). In order to better understand the prevalence and prognostic value of VEGFR1 expression in breast cancer, a tissue microarray containing >2,100 breast cancer specimens, with clinical follow-up data, was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using an antibody directed against the membrane-bound full-length receptor protein. The results demonstrated that membranous VEGFR1 staining was detected in all (5 of 5) normal breast specimens. In carcinoma specimens, membranous staining was negative in 3.1%, weak in 6.3%, moderate in 10.9%, and strong in 79.7% of the 1,630 interpretable tissues. Strong staining was significantly associated with estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor expression, but was inversely associated with advanced tumor stage (P=0.0431), high Bloom-Richardson-Ellis Score for Breast Cancer grade and low Ki67 labeling index (both P<0.0001). Cancers with moderate to strong (high) VEGFR1 expression were associated with significantly improved overall survival, as compared with tumors exhibiting negative or weak (low) expression (P=0.0015). This association was also detected in the subset of nodal-positive cancers (P=0.0018), and in the subset of 185 patients who had received tamoxifen as the sole therapy (P=0.001). In conclusion, these data indicated that membrane-bound VEGFR1 is frequently expressed in normal and cancerous breast epithelium. In addition, reduced or lost VEGFR1 expression may serve as a marker for poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, who might not optimally benefit from endocrine therapy. PMID:27357606

  8. Defective membrane expression of human growth hormone (GH) receptor causes Laron-type GH insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duquesnoy, P; Sobrier, M L; Amselem, S; Goossens, M

    1991-01-01

    Mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene can cause growth hormone (GH) resistance. Given the sequence homology between the extracellular domain of the GHR and a soluble GH-binding protein (GH-BP), it is remarkable that GH-BP binding activity is absent from the serum of patients with Laron-type GH insensitivity, a hereditary form of severe dwarfism. We have previously identified a mutation within the extracellular domain of this receptor, replacing phenylalanine by serine at position 96 of the mature protein, in a patient with Laron syndrome. We have now investigated the effect of this Phe----Ser substitution on hormone binding activity by expressing the total human GHR cDNA and mutant form in eukaryotic cells. The wild-type protein expressed was able to bind GH but no plasma membrane binding was detectable on cells transfected with the mutant cDNA; this was also the case of cells transfected with a Phe96----Ala mutant cDNA, suggesting that the lack of binding activity is not due to a posttranslational modification of serine. Examination of the variant proteins in subcellular fractions revealed the presence of specific GH binding activity in the lysosomal fraction, whereas immunofluorescence studies located mutant proteins in the cytosol. Our findings suggest that these mutant GHRs fail to follow the correct intracellular transport pathway and underline the potential importance of this phenylalanine residue, which is conserved among the GH, prolactin, and erythropoietin receptors that belong to the same cytokine receptor superfamily. Images PMID:1719554

  9. Prostate-specific membrane antigen expression in tumor-associated vasculature of breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, Alla Gabriella; Varma, Sonal; Greenwood, Eleni A; Christos, Paul J; Chao, K S Clifford; Liu, He; Bander, Neil H; Shin, Sandra J

    2014-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in the tumor-associated neovasculature of multiple solid tumor types including breast cancers. However, thus far, the number of cases studied from some tumor types has been limited. In this study, we set out to assess PSMA expression in the tumor-associated vasculature associated with invasive breast carcinomas in a sizable cohort of patients. One hundred and six patients with AJCC stage 0-IV breast cancer were identified. Ninety-two of these patients had primary breast cancer [invasive breast carcinoma with or without co-existing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (74) or DCIS alone (18)]. In addition, 14 patients with breast cancer metastases to the brain were identified. Immunohistochemical staining for PSMA and CD31 was performed on parallel representative tumor sections in each case. Tumor-associated vascular endothelial cell PSMA immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively assessed based on two parameters: overall percent of endothelial positivity and staining intensity. PSMA expression for tumor-associated vascular endothelial cells was scored 0 if there was no detectable PSMA expression, 1 if PSMA staining was detectable in 5-50%, and 2 if PSMA expression was positive in >50% of microvessels. CD 31 staining was concurrently reviewed to confirm the presence of vasculature in each case. Tumor-associated vasculature was PSMA-positive in 68/92 (74%) of primary breast cancers and in 14/14 (100%) of breast cancers metastatic to brain. PSMA was not detected in normal breast tissue or carcinoma cells. All but 2 cases (98%) showed absence of PSMA expression in normal breast tissue-associated vasculature. The 10-year overall survival was 88.7% (95% CI = 80.0%, 93.8%) in patients without brain metastases. When overall survival (OS) was stratified based on PSMA score group, patients with PSMA scores of 0, 1, and 2 had 10-year OS of 95.8%, 96.0%, and 79.7%, respectively (p = 0.12). When PSMA scores

  10. Identification, sequencing and expression of an integral membrane protein of the trans-Golgi network (TGN38).

    PubMed Central

    Luzio, J P; Brake, B; Banting, G; Howell, K E; Braghetta, P; Stanley, K K

    1990-01-01

    Organelle-specific integral membrane proteins were identified by a novel strategy which gives rise to monospecific antibodies to these proteins as well as to the cDNA clones encoding them. A cDNA expression library was screened with a polyclonal antiserum raised against Triton X-114-extracted organelle proteins and clones were then grouped using antibodies affinity-purified on individual fusion proteins. The identification, molecular cloning and sequencing are described of a type 1 membrane protein (TGN38) which is located specifically in the trans-Golgi network. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2204342

  11. Lessons from an α-Helical Membrane Enzyme: Expression, Purification, and Detergent Optimization for Biophysical and Structural Characterization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Kalyoncu, Sibel; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2016-01-01

    This chapter outlines the protocol developed in our lab to produce a multipass α-helical membrane protein. We present our work flow, from ortholog selection to protein purification, including molecular biology for plasmid construction, protein expression in E. coli, membrane isolation and detergent solubilization, protein purification and tag removal, biophysical assessment of protein stability in different detergents, and detergent concentration determination using thin-layer chromatography. We focus on results from our ongoing work with intramembrane aspartyl proteases from archaeal organisms. PMID:27485343

  12. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    PubMed

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Talib Hassan, Almosawy; Das, Gobind; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Tadepally, Lakshmikanth; Matteucci, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; Mesuraca, Maria; Scumaci, Domenica; Gentile, Francesco; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Ammendolia, Antonio; Gallo, Adriana; Kärre, Klas; Cuda, Giovanni; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1), indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  13. Expression of progesterone receptor membrane component-1 in bovine reproductive system during estrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, A.M.; Corbani, D.; Lodde, V.; Tessaro, I.; Franciosi, F.; Peluso, J.J.; Modina, S.

    2011-01-01

    Several reports suggest the participation of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) in progesterone signaling in the reproductive system. This study aimed at investigating the presence and localization of PGRMC1 in bovine ovary, oviduct and uterus, during the follicular and luteal phases of the estrous cycle. In the ovary, PGRMC1 has been detected in surface germinal epithelium, granulosa cells, theca cells and in the germinal vesicle of the oocytes at all stages of folliculogenesis. In the corpus luteum the expression of PGRMC1 was influenced by the stage of the estrous cycle. In the oviducts and in the uterus horns, PGRMC1 was immunolocalized in the luminal epithelium, in the muscle layer cells and in the endothelial cells. In the uterus, PGRMC1 was intensely localized also in the glandular endometrium. However, in the oviducts and in the uterus horns, the localization of PGRMC1 was independent on the stage of the estrous cycle and on whether evaluating the ipsilateral or the contralateral organ. In conclusion, the present immunohistochemical study showed that PGRMC1 is located in various compartments of the bovine female reproductive organs. With the exception of the corpora lutea, PGRMC1 localization showed similar pattern during different stages of the estrous cycle. PMID:22073374

  14. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  15. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Talib Hassan, Almosawy; Das, Gobind; Tadepally, Lakshmikanth; Matteucci, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; Mesuraca, Maria; Scumaci, Domenica; Gentile, Francesco; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Ammendolia, Antonio; Gallo, Adriana; Kärre, Klas; Cuda, Giovanni; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition. PMID:25541692

  16. Isoform-Specific Up-Regulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+ATPase Expression During Colon and Gastric Cancer Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ribiczey, Polett; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Filoteo, Adelaida G.; Penniston, John T.; Enouf, Jocelyne; Enyedi, Ágnes; Papp, Béla; Kovács, Tünde

    2007-01-01

    Summary In this work we demonstrate a differentiation-induced up-regulation of the expression of plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase (PMCA) isoforms being present in various gastric/colon cancer cell types. We found PMCA1b as the major isoform in non-differentiated cancer cell lines, whereas the expression level of PMCA4b was significantly lower. Cell differentiation initiated with short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and trichostatin A, or spontaneous differentiation of post-confluent cell cultures resulted in a marked induction of PMCA4b expression, while only moderately increased PMCA1b levels. Up-regulation of PMCA4b expression was demonstrated both at the protein and mRNA levels, and closely correlated with the induction of established differentiation markers. In contrast, the expression level of the Na+/K+-ATPase or that of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase 2 protein did not change significantly under these conditions. In membrane vesicles obtained from SCFA-treated gastric/colon cancer cells a marked increase in the PMCA-dependent Ca2+ transport activity was observed, indicating a general increase of PMCA function during the differentiation of these cancer cells. Because various PMCA isoforms display distinct functional characteristics, we suggest that up-regulated PMCA expression, together with a major switch in PMCA isoform pattern may significantly contribute to the differentiation of gastric/colon cancer cells. The analysis of PMCA expression may provide a new diagnostic tool for monitoring the tumor phenotype. PMID:17433436

  17. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D

    2015-12-15

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40mM K(+), or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity.

  18. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-12-19

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b(6)f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I.

  19. Up-regulation of stomatin expression by hypoxia and glucocorticoid stabilizes membrane-associated actin in alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Cheng; Cai, Hao-Yu; Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Liang-Nian; Yin, Li-Juan; Cao, Dong-Mei; Diao, Fei; Li, Yi-Dong; Lu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Stomatin is an important lipid raft-associated protein which interacts with membrane proteins and plays a role in the membrane organization. However, it is unknown whether it is involved in the response to hypoxia and glucocorticoid (GC) in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). In this study we found that hypoxia and dexamethasone (dex), a synthetic GC not only up-regulated the expression of stomatin alone, but also imposed additive effect on the expression of stomatin in A549 cells, primary AEC and lung of rats. Then we investigated whether hypoxia and dex transcriptionally up-regulated the expression of stomatin by reporter gene assay, and found that dex, but not hypoxia could increase the activity of a stomatin promoter-driven reporter gene. Further deletion and mutational studies demonstrated that a GC response element (GRE) within the promoter region mainly contributed to the induction of stomatin by dex. Moreover, we found that hypoxia exposure did not affect membrane-associated actin, but decreased actin in cytoplasm in A549 cells. Inhibiting stomatin expression by stomatin siRNA significantly decreased dense of peripheral actin ring in hypoxia or dex treated A549 cells. Taken all together, these data indicated that dex and/or hypoxia significantly up-regulated the expression of stomatin in vivo and in vitro, which could stabilize membrane-associated actin in AEC. We suppose that the up-regulation of stomatin by hypoxia and dex may enhance the barrier function of alveolar epithelia and mediate the adaptive role of GC to hypoxia. PMID:23672602

  20. Cell Membrane Expression of Cardiac Sodium Channel Nav1.5 Is Modulated by α-Actinin-2 Interaction†

    PubMed Central

    Ziane, Rahima; Huang, Hai; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Beggs, Alan H.; Levesque, Georges; Chahine, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 plays a critical role in heart excitability and conduction. The molecular mechanism that underlies the expression of Nav1.5 at the cell membrane is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that cytoskeleton proteins can be involved in the regulation of cell surface expression and localization of several ion channels. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify Nav1.5-associated proteins that may be involved in channel function and expression. We identified α-actinin-2 as an interacting partner of the cytoplasmic loop connecting domains III and IV of Nav1.5 (Nav1.5/LIII–IV). Co-immunoprecipitation and His6 pull-down assays confirmed the physical association between Nav1.5 and α-actinin-2 and showed that the spectrin-like repeat domain is essential for binding of α-actinin-2 to Nav1.5. Patch-clamp studies revealed that the interaction with α-actinin-2 increases sodium channel density without changing their gating properties. Consistent with these findings, coexpression of α-actinin-2 and Nav1.5 in tsA201 cells led to an increase in the level of expression of Nav1.5 at the cell membrane as determined by cell surface biotinylation. Lastly, immunostaining experiments showed that α-actinin-2 was colocalized with Nav1.5 along the Z-lines and in the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that α-actinin-2, which is known to regulate the functional expression of the potassium channels, may play a role in anchoring Nav1.5 to the membrane by connecting the channel to the actin cytoskeleton network. PMID:19943616

  1. Membrane-attached Cytokines Expressed by mRNA Electroporation Act as Potent T-Cell Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Weinstein-Marom, Hadas; Pato, Aviad; Levin, Noam; Susid, Keren; Itzhaki, Orit; Besser, Michal J; Peretz, Tamar; Margalit, Alon; Lotem, Michal; Gross, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are widely explored in different adoptive cell therapy protocols for enhancing survival and function of the transferred T cells, but their systemic administration is often associated with severe toxicity which limits their clinical use. To confine cytokine availability to the therapeutic T cells, we expressed 3 key cytokines, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-15, as integral T-cell membrane proteins. To prevent permanent activation of growth signaling pathways, we delivered these genes to T cells through mRNA electroporation. The engineered cytokines could be detected on the surface of mRNA-transfected cells and binding to their cell-surface receptors mainly occurred in cis. The 3 human cytokines supported the ex vivo growth of activated human CD8 and CD4 T cells for at least 6 days posttransfection, comparably to high-dose soluble IL-2. Similarly, membrane IL-2, membrane IL-12, and, to a lesser extent, membrane IL-15, were comparable with their soluble counterparts in supporting proliferation of splenic mouse CD8 T cells. Following electroporation of human CD8 T cells and antimelanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, membrane cytokines synergized with constitutively active toll-like receptor 4 in inducing interferon-γ secretion. Efficient cooperation with TLR4 was also evident in the upregulation of the activation molecules CD25, CD69, CD137 (4-1BB), and CD134 (OX40). Taken together, membrane cytokines expressed through mRNA transfection emerge as effective tools for enhancing T-cell proliferation and function and may have potential use in adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26849075

  2. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  3. The Photosynthetic Cycle

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, Melvin

    1955-03-21

    A cyclic sequence of transformations, including the carboxylation of RuDP (ribulose diphosphate) and its re-formation, has been deduced as the route for the creation of reduced carbon compounds in photosynthetic organisms. With the demonstration of RuDP as substrate for the carboxylation in a cell-free system, each of the reactions has now been carried out independently in vitro. Further purification of this last enzyme system has confirmed the deduction that the carboxylation of RuDP leads directly to the two molecules of PGA (phosphoglyceric acid) involving an internal dismutation and suggesting the name "carboxydismutase" for the enzyme. As a consequence of this knowledge of each of the steps in the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} reduction cycle, it is possible to define the reagent requirements to maintain it. The net requirement for the reduction of one molecule of CO{sub 2} is four equivalents of [H]and three molecules of ATP (adenine triphosphate). These must ultimately be supplied by the photochemical reaction. Some possible ways in which this may be accomplished are discussed.

  4. Bioinspired hollow semiconductor nanospheres as photosynthetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianhua; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhang, Mingwen; Antonietti, Markus; Fu, Xianzhi; Wang, Xinchen

    2012-10-01

    Natural photosynthesis occurs in the thylakoid membrane where functional proteins and electron carriers are precisely arranged to efficiently convert sunlight into a chemical potential between the two membrane sides, via charge separation and electron transport chains, for use in oxygen generation and CO2 fixation. These light-harvesting complexes and cofactors have been actively mimicked using dyes, semiconductors and catalytic nanoparticles. However, the photosynthetic scaffold that optimizes both the capture and distribution of light and separates both the oxidative and reductive species has been mimicked much less often, especially using polymer substances. Here we report the synthesis of hollow nanospheres sized in the optical range and made of a robust semiconductor, melon or carbon-nitride polymer. These hollow nanospheres are shown to function as both light-harvesting antennae and nanostructured scaffolds that improve photoredox catalysis, which was determined to have a 7.5% apparent quantum yield via a hydrogen-generation assay.

  5. Overcoming the toxicity of membrane peptide expression in bacteria by upstream insertion of Asp-Pro sequence.

    PubMed

    Montigny, Cédric; Penin, François; Lethias, Claire; Falson, Pierre

    2004-01-28

    Transmembrane (TM) peptides often induce toxic effects when expressed in bacteria, probably due to membrane destabilization. We report here that in the case of the TM domains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope proteins, which are both particularly toxic for the bacteria, the insertion of the Asp-Pro (DP) sequence dramatically reduced their toxicities and promoted their expressions when produced as glutathione S-transferase (GST) GST-DP-TM chimeras. Subcellular fractionation showed that these chimeras co-sediment with the membrane fraction and contain active GST that could be solubilized with a mild detergent. Surprisingly, immuno-gold electron microscopy clearly showed that such chimeras are not localized in the membrane but in the cytosol. We thus postulate that they likely form proteo-lipidic aggregates, which prevent the bacteria from toxicity by sequestering the TM part of the chimeras. The reduction of toxicity in the presence of the Asp-Pro sequence is possibly due to Asp's negative charge that probably disadvantages the binding of the TM peptides to the membrane. In addition, the structural features of Pro residue could promote the formation of chimera aggregates. PMID:14757220

  6. A proteomic study reveals novel insights into the diversity of aquaporin forms expressed in the plasma membrane of plant roots.

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Véronique; Vinh, Joëlle; Pflieger, Delphine; Sommerer, Nicolas; Maurel, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    Aquaporins are channel proteins that facilitate the diffusion of water across cell membranes. The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes 35 full-length aquaporin homologues. Thirteen of them belong to the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily and predominantly sit at the plasma membrane (PM). In the present work we combine separations of membrane proteins (by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis) with identification by MS (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight and electrospray-ionization tandem MS) to take an inventory of aquaporin isoforms expressed in the PM of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the expression of five PIPs (PIP1;1, PIP1;5, PIP2;1, PIP2;2 and PIP2;7) in the root PM and suggests the presence of at least three other PIP isoforms. In addition, we show that the same PIP isoform can be present under several forms with distinct isoelectric points. More specifically, we identify phosphorylated aquaporins in the PIP1 and PIP2 subgroups and suggest the existence of other post-translational modifications. Their identification should provide clues to reveal novel molecular mechanisms for aquaporin regulation. PMID:12678916

  7. Isotopically Labeled Expression in E. coli, Purification, and Refolding of the Full Ectodomain of the Influenza Virus Membrane Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Spencer, Ryan M.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods to produce an isotopically labeled 23 kDa viral membrane protein with purified yield of 20 mg/L of E. coli shake flask culture. This yield is sufficient for NMR structural studies and the protein production methods are simple, straightforward, and rapid and likely applicable to other recombinant membrane proteins expressed in E. coli. The target FHA2 protein is the full ectodomain construct of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein which catalyzes fusion between the viral and the cellular endosomal membranes during infection. The high yield of FHA2 was achieved by: (1) initial growth in rich medium to A600 ~ 8 followed by a switch to minimal medium and induction of protein expression; and (2) obtaining protein both from purification of the detergent-soluble lysate and from solubilization, purification, and refolding of inclusion bodies. The high cell density was achieved after optimization of pH, oxygenation, and carbon source and concentration, and the refolding protocol was optimized using circular dichroism spectroscopy. For a single residue of membrane-associated FHA2 that was obtained from purification and refolding of inclusion bodies, native conformation was verified by the 13CO chemical shift measured using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:18640277

  8. Peptide-Conjugated Gold Nanoprobe: Intrinsic Nanozyme-Linked Immunsorbant Assay of Integrin Expression Level on Cell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Liu, Meiqing; Ma, Guifu; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Lina; Yuan, Qing; Gao, Fuping; Liu, Ru; Zhai, Jiao; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang; Gao, Xueyun

    2015-11-24

    Precisely quantifying the membrane protein expression level on cell surfaces is of vital importance for early cancer diagnosis and efficient treatment. We demonstrate that gold nanoparticle bioconjugated by a rationally designed peptide as nanoprobe possesses selective labeling and accurate quantification capacity of integrin GPIIb/IIIa on the human erythroleukemia cell line. Through selective recognition and marking of integrin, two-photon photoluminescence of the nanoprobe is exploited for direct observation of protein spatial distribution on cell membrane. More importantly, utilizing intrinsic enzyme-like catalysis property of the nanoprobe, the expression level of integrin on human erythroleukemia cells can be quantitatively counted in an amplified and reliable colorimetric assay without cell lysis and protein extraction process. In addition, the analysis of the correlation between the gold nanoparticle and the membrane protein via relevant inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement verifies the reliability of the new analytical method. It is anticipated that this facile and efficient strategy holds a great promise for a rapid, precise, and reliable quantification of interested functional membrane proteins on the cell surface.

  9. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  10. A Novel R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor BpMYB106 of Birch (Betula platyphylla) Confers Increased Photosynthesis and Growth Rate through Up-regulating Photosynthetic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenguang; Li, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    We isolated a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BpMYB106, which regulates photosynthesis in birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.). BpMYB106 mainly expresses in the leaf and shoot tip of birch, and its protein is localized in the nucleus. We further fused isolated a 1588 bp promoter of BpMYB106 and analyzed it by PLACE, which showed some cis-acting elements related to photosynthesis. BpMYB106 promoter β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusion studies gene, the result, showed the GUS reporter gene in transgenic birch with BpMYB106 promoter showed strong activities in shoot tip, cotyledon margins, and mature leaf trichomes. The overexpression of BpMYB106 in birch resulted in significantly increased trichome density, net photosynthetic rate, and growth rate as compared with the wild-type birch. RNA-Seq profiling revealed the upregulation of several photosynthesis-related genes in the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in the leaves of transgenic plants. Yeast one-hybrid analysis, coupled with transient assay in tobacco, revealed that BpMYB106 binds a MYB binding site MYB2 in differentially expressed gene promoters. Thus, BpMYB106 may directly activate the expression of a range of photosynthesis related genes through interacting with the MYB2 element in their promoters. Our study demonstrating the overexpression of BpMYB106—a R2R3-MYB transcription factor—upregulates the genes of the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways to improve photosynthesis. PMID:27047502

  11. A Novel R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor BpMYB106 of Birch (Betula platyphylla) Confers Increased Photosynthesis and Growth Rate through Up-regulating Photosynthetic Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenguang; Li, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    We isolated a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BpMYB106, which regulates photosynthesis in birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.). BpMYB106 mainly expresses in the leaf and shoot tip of birch, and its protein is localized in the nucleus. We further fused isolated a 1588 bp promoter of BpMYB106 and analyzed it by PLACE, which showed some cis-acting elements related to photosynthesis. BpMYB106 promoter β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusion studies gene, the result, showed the GUS reporter gene in transgenic birch with BpMYB106 promoter showed strong activities in shoot tip, cotyledon margins, and mature leaf trichomes. The overexpression of BpMYB106 in birch resulted in significantly increased trichome density, net photosynthetic rate, and growth rate as compared with the wild-type birch. RNA-Seq profiling revealed the upregulation of several photosynthesis-related genes in the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in the leaves of transgenic plants. Yeast one-hybrid analysis, coupled with transient assay in tobacco, revealed that BpMYB106 binds a MYB binding site MYB2 in differentially expressed gene promoters. Thus, BpMYB106 may directly activate the expression of a range of photosynthesis related genes through interacting with the MYB2 element in their promoters. Our study demonstrating the overexpression of BpMYB106-a R2R3-MYB transcription factor-upregulates the genes of the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways to improve photosynthesis. PMID:27047502

  12. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy. PMID:26474040

  13. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy.

  14. A gene-fusion strategy for stoichiometric and co-localized expression of light-gated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; Terpitz, Ulrich; Legrum, Barbara; Gökbuget, Deniz; Boyden, Edward S; Bamann, Christian; Wood, Phillip G; Bamberg, Ernst

    2011-12-01

    The precise co-localization and stoichiometric expression of two different light-gated membrane proteins can vastly improve the physiological usefulness of optogenetics for the modulation of cell excitability with light. Here we present a gene-fusion strategy for the stable 1:1 expression of any two microbial rhodopsins in a single polypeptide chain. By joining the excitatory channelrhodopsin-2 with the inhibitory ion pumps halorhodopsin or bacteriorhodopsin, we demonstrate light-regulated quantitative bi-directional control of the membrane potential in HEK293 cells and neurons in vitro. We also present synergistic rhodopsin combinations of channelrhodopsin-2 with Volvox carteri channelrhodopsin-1 or slow channelrhodopsin-2 mutants, to achieve enhanced spectral or kinetic properties, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our fusion strategy to determine ion-turnovers of as yet uncharacterized rhodopsins, exemplified for archaerhodopsin and CatCh, or to correct pump cycles, exemplified for halorhodopsin. PMID:22056675

  15. Over-expression and localization of a host protein on the membrane of Cryptosporidium parvum infected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Lin; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheoran, Abhineet S; Manque, Patricio A; Buck, Gregory A; Widmer, Giovanni

    2009-11-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium includes several species of intestinal protozoan parasites which multiply in intestinal epithelial cells. The impact of this infection on the transcriptome of cultured host cells was investigated using DNA microarray hybridizations. The expression of 14 genes found to be consistently up- or down-regulated in infected cell monolayers was validated with RT PCR. Using immunofluorescence we examined the expression of Protease Activated Receptor-2, which is encoded by one of the up-regulated genes. In infected cells this receptor localized to the host cell membrane which covers the intracellular trophozoites and meronts. This observation indicates that the composition of the host cell membrane is affected by the developing trophozoite, a phenomenon which has not been described previously.

  16. Over-expression and localization of a host protein on the membrane of Cryptosporidium parvum infected epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Lin; Serrano, Myrna G.; Sheoran, Abhineet S.; Manque, Patricio A.; Buck, Gregory A.; Widmer, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium includes several species of intestinal protozoan parasites which multiply in intestinal epithelial cells. The impact of this infection on the transcriptome of cultured host cells was investigated using DNA microarray hybridizations. The expression of 14 genes found to be consistently up- or down-regulated in infected cell monolayers was validated with RT PCR. Using immunofluorescence we examined the expression of Protease Activated Receptor-2, which is encoded by one of the up-regulated genes. In infected cells this receptor localized to the host cell membrane which covers intracellular trophozoites and meronts. This observation indicates that the composition of the host cell membrane is affected by the developing trophozoite, a phenomenon which has not been described previously. PMID:19631240

  17. Functional expression, purification, characterization, and membrane reconstitution of non-structural protein 2 from hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure; Paul, David; Jirasko, Vlastimil; Montserret, Roland; Lacabanne, Denis; Molle, Jennifer; Badillo, Aurélie; Boukadida, Célia; Georgeault, Sonia; Roingeard, Philippe; Martin, Annette; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2015-12-01

    Non-structural protein 2 (NS2) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an integral membrane protein that contains a cysteine protease and that plays a central organizing role in assembly of infectious progeny virions. While the crystal structure of the protease domain has been solved, the NS2 full-length form remains biochemically and structurally uncharacterized because recombinant NS2 could not be prepared in sufficient quantities from cell-based systems. We show here that functional NS2 in the context of the NS2-NS3pro precursor protein, ensuring NS2-NS3 cleavage, can be efficiently expressed by using a wheat germ cell-free expression system. In this same system, we subsequently successfully produce and purify milligram amounts of a detergent-solubilized form of full-length NS2 exhibiting the expected secondary structure content. Furthermore, immuno-electron microscopy analyses of reconstituted proteoliposomes demonstrate NS2 association with model membranes.

  18. Reduced plasma membrane surface expression of GLAST mediates decreased glutamate regulation in the aged striatum.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin; Salvatore, Michael F; Pomerleau, Francois; Apparsundaram, Subbu; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2007-11-01

    Extracellular L-glutamate poses a severe excitotoxic threat to neurons and glia when unregulated, therefore low synaptic levels of this neurotransmitter must be maintained via a rapid and robust transport system. A recent study from our laboratory showed a reduced glutamate uptake rate in the striatum of the aged Fischer 344 (F344) rat, yet the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. The current study utilized in vivo electrochemical recordings, immunoblotting and biotinylation in young (6 months), late-middle aged (18 months) and aged (24 months) F344 rats to elucidate the potential role that glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST, and EAAC1) may play in this mechanism. Here we show that the time necessary to clear glutamate from the late-middle aged and aged striatum is significantly prolonged in comparison to the young striatum. In addition, an analysis of various sub-regions of the striatum revealed a marked dorsoventral gradient in terms of glutamate clearance times in the aged striatum, a phenomenon which was not present in the striatum of the animals of the remaining age groups. We also found that the decreased glutamate clearance time observed in the late-middle aged and aged rats is not due to a decrease in the production of total transporter protein among these three transporters. Rather, a significant reduction in the amount of GLAST expressed on the plasma membrane surface in the aged animals (approximately 55% when compared to young rats) may contribute to this phenomenon. These age-related alterations in extracellular l-glutamate regulation may be key contributors to the increased susceptibility of the aged brain to excitotoxic insults such as stroke and hypoxia.

  19. The MICA-129Met/Val dimorphism affects plasma membrane expression and shedding of the NKG2D ligand MICA.

    PubMed

    Isernhagen, Antje; Schilling, Daniela; Monecke, Sebastian; Shah, Pranali; Elsner, Leslie; Walter, Lutz; Multhoff, Gabriele; Dressel, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    The MHC class I chain-related molecule A (MICA) is a ligand for the activating natural killer (NK) cell receptor NKG2D. A polymorphism causing a valine to methionine exchange at position 129 affects binding to NKG2D, cytotoxicity, interferon-γ release by NK cells and activation of CD8(+) T cells. It is known that tumors can escape NKG2D-mediated immune surveillance by proteolytic shedding of MICA. Therefore, we investigated whether this polymorphism affects plasma membrane expression (pmMICA) and shedding of MICA. Expression of pmMICA was higher in a panel of tumor (n = 16, P = 0.0699) and melanoma cell lines (n = 13, P = 0.0429) carrying the MICA-129Val/Val genotype. MICA-129Val homozygous melanoma cell lines released more soluble MICA (sMICA) by shedding (P = 0.0015). MICA-129Met or MICA-129Val isoforms differing only in this amino acid were expressed in the MICA-negative melanoma cell line Malme, and clones with similar pmMICA expression intensity were selected. The MICA-129Met clones released more sMICA (P = 0.0006), and a higher proportion of the MICA-129Met than the MICA-129Val variant was retained in intracellular compartments (P = 0.0199). The MICA-129Met clones also expressed more MICA messenger RNA (P = 0.0047). The latter phenotype was also observed in mouse L cells transfected with the MICA expression constructs (P = 0.0212). In conclusion, the MICA-129Met/Val dimorphism affects the expression density of MICA on the plasma membrane. More of the MICA-129Met variants were retained intracellularly. If expressed at the cell surface, the MICA-129Met isoform was more susceptible to shedding. Both processes appear to limit the cell surface expression of MICA-129Met variants that have a high binding avidity to NKG2D.

  20. Sequence and expression of the chicken membrane-associated phospholipases A1 alpha (LIPH) and beta (LIPI).

    PubMed

    Hesse, Manuela; Willscher, Edith; Schmiedel, Benjamin J; Posch, Stefan; Golbik, Ralph P; Staege, Martin S

    2012-01-01

    Cancer/testis antigens (CTA) are a heterogeneous group of antigens that are expressed preferentially in tumor cells and testis. Based on this definition the human membrane-associated phospholipase A1 beta (lipase family member I, LIPI) has been identified as CTA. The high homology of LIPI and the membrane-associated phospholipase A1 alpha (lipase family member H, LIPH) suggests that both genes are derived from a common ancestor by gene duplication. In contrast to human LIPI, human LIPH is expressed in several tissues. LIPI sequences have only been identified in mammals. Here, we describe the identification of LIPI in non-mammalian vertebrates. Based on the conserved genomic organization of LIPI and LIPH we identified sequences for both lipases in birds and fishes. In all vertebrates the LIPI locus is neighbored by a member of the RNA binding motif (RBM) family, RBM11. By sequencing of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction products we determined the sequences of LIPI and LIPH messenger RNA from broilers. We found that the sequence homology between LIPI and LIPH is much higher in non-mammalian species than in mammals. In addition, we found broad expression of LIPI in broilers, resembling the expression profile of LIPH. Our data suggest that LIPI is a CTA only in mammalian species and that the unique sequence features of the mammalian LIPI/RBM11 locus have evolved together with the CTA-like expression pattern of LIPI.

  1. Expression of the moss PpLEA4-20 gene in rice enhances membrane protection and client proteins stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Deng, Dandan; Chen, Xi; Wu, Baomei; Hu, Ke; Qiu, Tianhang; Cui, Suxia; Huang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Green vegetative tissues of the moss Physcomitrella patens possess a powerful ability to tolerate severe drought stress. Proteomics analysis have revealed that a large number of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins were key players in the drought tolerance of the photosynthetic tissues. PpLEA4-20, a member of the moss LEA protein family, was selected for further function study using an ectopic expression method in rice. Through molecular identification via PCR, southern blotting and TAIL-PCR, we demonstrated that the PpLEA4-20 gene was transformed and inserted into a non-encoded region in chromosome 4 of rice and expressed stably in transgenic rice. Unexpectedly, PpLEA4-20 protein emerged as two high-expressed spots on 2-D gels generated from transgenic rice, suggesting that PpLEA4-20 proteins are complete compatible and might be modified in rice. Both growth and physiological analysis showed that seedlings of transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice displayed altered phenotypes and tolerance to salt. In addition, electrolyte leakage was reduced in transgenic PpLEA4-20 compared to wild type under stress conditions. Anti-aggregation analysis found that the PpLEA4-20 protein expressed in rice remained soluble at high temperature and in addition to some native proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice. Based on Nano LC MS/MS analysis, we identified several proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice of increased heat-stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of PpLEA4-20 in salt tolerance and stabilization of client proteins. PMID:25791479

  2. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Khadeer, M A; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2014-04-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN-229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN-229)) and (CMAC(LN-229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns were characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs. 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs. 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs. 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of eight compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN-229) column and decreased it (-5%) on the NMAC(LN-229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences.

  3. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  4. Restoration of caveolin-1 expression suppresses growth, membrane-type-4 metalloproteinase expression and metastasis-associated activities in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nimri, Lili; Barak, Hossei; Graeve, Lutz; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-11-01

    Caveolin-1 (cav-1) and flotillin-1 are two major structural proteins associated with lipid rafts in mammalian cells. The membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs) are expressed at the cell surface, hydrolyze extracellular matrix, and play an important role in cancer cell migration and metastasis. Expression of cav-1, flotillin-1, and MT4-MMP in lysates and lipid rafts of LS174T and HM-7 colon cancer cells was determined. The impact of restoration of cav-1 expression on proliferation, adhesion, motility in vitro, and growth of implanted tumors in vivo was characterized. Cav-1 is not expressed in lipid rafts of the highly metastatic colon cancer cell line (HM-7), but expressed in cytosolic fractions of the parental lower metastatic cell line (LS174T). In contrast, MT4-MMP was expressed in lipid rafts of HM-7 cells but not in LS174T cells. Overexpression of cav-1 in HM-7 cells down-regulate proliferation, viability, wound closure, adhesion to laminin, invasion, and development of filopodial and lamellipodial structures in a dose-dependent manner. Cav-1 positive HM-7 clones ceased to express MT4-MMP in their lipid rafts. Comparative proteomic analyses of lipid rafts from cav-1 positive and cav-1 negative cells demonstrated de novo expression of flotillin-1 only on the cells expressing cav-1. Xenografting control cells devoid of cav-1 in nude mice induced development of bigger tumors expressing higher levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen as compared to mice injected with cells expressing the highest cav-1 levels. We conclude that cav-1 orchestrates and reorganize several proteins in lipid rafts, activities directly associated with reduced tumorigenic and metastatic ability of colon cancer cells.

  5. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  6. Clinorotation affects mesophyll photosynthetic cells in leaves of pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Adamchuk, N I

    1998-07-01

    Experiments with autotrophs in altered gravity condition have a grate significant for development of space biology. The main results of investigation in the photosynthetic apparatus state under microgravity condition have based on the experiments with maturity plants and their differentiated cells. The structural and functional organization of photosynthetic cells in seedlings is poor understandable still. Along with chloroplasts preserving a native membrane system in palisade parenchyma cells of the 29-day pea plant leaves in microgravity, chloroplasts with fribly packed or damaged granae, whose thylakoids appeared as vesicles with an electrontransparent content, were also observed. The investigation of preceding process induced these effects have a sense. That is why, the goal of our experiments was to perform the study of a structural organization of the photosynthetic cells of 3-d pair of pea seedlings leaves under the influence of clinorotation.

  7. Cytokinin membrane receptors participate in regulation of plastid genome expression in the skotomorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, A S; Danilova, M N; Kudryakova, N V; Soloviev, A A; Kusnetsov, V V

    2016-07-01

    Analysis by real-time PCR of single and double insertion mutants of A. thaliana with inactivated cytokinin receptor genes showed that the level of transcripts of some of plastid genes during skotomorphogenesis depended on the state of functionally active receptor AHK3. The cytokinin-regulated plastid encoded genes involved the housekeeping genes (rpoB and accD) and the genes for photosynthetic proteins (ndhA, psbA, atpB, and psaA). However, the absence of hormone activation of plastid encoded genes engaged in the translation of plastid proteins, rRNA (rrn16), and tRNA (trnE), indirectly indicate the disruption of the synthesis of chloroplast proteins in the dark. PMID:27599515

  8. Photosynthetic approaches to chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shuchi H; Atsumi, Shota

    2013-12-01

    National interest and environmental advocates encourage alternatives to petroleum-based products. Besides biofuels, many other valuable chemicals used in every-day life are petroleum derivatives or require petroleum for their production. A plausible alternative to production using petroleum for chemical production is to harvest the abundant carbon dioxide resources in the environment to produce valuable hydrocarbons. Currently, efforts are being made to utilize a natural biological system, photosynthetic microorganisms, to perform this task. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attractive to use for biochemical production because they utilize economical resources for survival: sunlight and carbon dioxide. This review examines the various compounds produced by photosynthetic microorganisms.

  9. Cloning and expression of a second photoreceptor-specific membrane retina guanylyl cyclase (RetGC), RetGC-2.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D G; Dizhoor, A M; Liu, K; Gu, Q; Spencer, M; Laura, R; Lu, L; Hurley, J B

    1995-01-01

    One of the membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), RetGC, is expressed predominantly in photoreceptors. No extracellular ligand has been described for RetGC, but it is sensitive to activation by a soluble 24-kDa protein (p24) and is inhibited by Ca2+. This enzyme is, therefore, thought to play a role in resynthesizing cGMP for photoreceptor recovery or adaptation. By screening a human retinal cDNA library at low stringency with the cytoplasmic domains from four cyclases, we cloned cDNAs encoding a membrane CG that is most closely related to RetGC. We have named this GC RetGC-2, and now term the initially described RetGC RetGC-1. By in situ hybridization, mRNA encoding RetGC-2 is found only in the outer nuclear layer and inner segments of photoreceptor cells. By using synthetic peptide antiserum specific for each RetGC subtype, RetGC-2 can be distinguished from RetGC-1 as a slightly smaller protein in immunoblots of bovine rod outer segments. Membrane GC activity of recombinant RetGC-2 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells is stimulated by the activator p24 and is inhibited by Ca2+ with an EC50 value of 50-100 nM. Our data reveal a previously unappreciated diversity of photoreceptor GCs. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777544

  10. Protein Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone ERP-57 Decreases Plasma Membrane Expression of the Human GnRH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yánez, Rodrigo Ayala; Conn, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Retention of misfolded proteins by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a quality control mechanism involving the participation of endogenous chaperones such as calnexin (CANX) which interact and restrict plasma membrane expression of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), a G protein coupled receptor. CANX also interacts with ERP-57, a thiol oxidoreductase chaperone present in the ER. CANX along with ERP-57, promotes the formation of disulfide bond bridges in nascent proteins. The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR) is stabilized by two disulfide bond bridges (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196), that, when broken, its expression at plasma membrane decreases. To determine if the presence of chaperones CANX and ERP-57 exert an influence over membrane routing and second messenger activation, we assessed the effect of various mutants including those with broken bridges (Cys→Ala) along with the wild type hGnRHR. The effect of chaperones on mutants was insignificant, whereas the overexpression of ERP-57 led to a wild type hGnRHR retention which was further enhanced by cotransfection with CANX cDNA disclosing receptor retention by ERP-57 augmented by CANX, suggesting a quality control mechanism. PMID:20029959

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Membrane Protein Expression from Phenotypically Diverse Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Demonstrates Host-Specific Adaptations.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Karthik Shantharam; Pascovici, Dana; Penesyan, Anahit; Goel, Apurv; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Paulsen, Ian T; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, nosocomial, highly adaptable opportunistic pathogen especially prevalent in immuno-compromised cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The bacterial cell surface proteins are important contributors to virulence, yet the membrane subproteomes of phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa strains are poorly characterized. We carried out mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis of the membrane proteins of three novel P. aeruginosa strains isolated from the sputum of CF patients and compared protein expression to the widely used laboratory strain, PAO1. Microbes were grown in planktonic growth condition using minimal M9 media, and a defined synthetic lung nutrient mimicking medium (SCFM) limited passaging. Two-dimensional LC-MS/MS using iTRAQ labeling enabled quantitative comparisons among 3171 and 2442 proteins from the minimal M9 medium and in the SCFM, respectively. The CF isolates showed marked differences in membrane protein expression in comparison with PAO1 including up-regulation of drug resistance proteins (MexY, MexB, MexC) and down-regulation of chemotaxis and aerotaxis proteins (PA1561, PctA, PctB) and motility and adhesion proteins (FliK, FlgE, FliD, PilJ). Phenotypic analysis using adhesion, motility, and drug susceptibility assays confirmed the proteomics findings. These results provide evidence of host-specific microevolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung and shed light on the adaptation strategies used by CF pathogens. PMID:27246823

  12. The human gonadotropin releasing hormone type I receptor is a functional intracellular GPCR expressed on the nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Re, Michelle; Pampillo, Macarena; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; McArdle, Craig A; Millar, Robert P; Conn, P Michael; Gobeil, Fernand; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Babwah, Andy V

    2010-07-08

    The mammalian type I gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) is a structurally unique G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that lacks cytoplasmic tail sequences and displays inefficient plasma membrane expression (PME). Compared to its murine counterparts, the primate type I receptor is inefficiently folded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leading to a further reduction in PME. The decrease in PME and concomitant increase in intracellular localization of the mammalian GnRH-RI led us to characterize the spatial distribution of the human and mouse GnRH receptors in two human cell lines, HEK 293 and HTR-8/SVneo. In both human cell lines we found the receptors were expressed in the cytoplasm and were associated with the ER and nuclear membrane. A molecular analysis of the receptor protein sequence led us to identify a putative monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the first intracellular loop of GnRH-RI. Surprisingly, however, neither the deletion of the NLS nor the addition of the Xenopus GnRH-R cytoplasmic tail sequences to the human receptor altered its spatial distribution. Finally, we demonstrate that GnRH treatment of nuclei isolated from HEK 293 cells expressing exogenous GnRH-RI triggers a significant increase in the acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3, thereby revealing that the nuclear-localized receptor is functional. Based on our findings, we conclude that the mammalian GnRH-RI is an intracellular GPCR that is expressed on the nuclear membrane. This major and novel discovery causes us to reassess the signaling potential of this physiologically and clinically important receptor.

  13. Maximum photosynthetic efficiency of biomass growth: a criticism of some measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.K.; Pirt, S.J.

    1982-02-01

    The yield of biomass produced in a photosynthetic culture is an expression of the photosynthetic efficiency. Microbial cells consume energy for both growth and for maintenance. The bioenergetics of Chlorella cultures and the maximum growth yields obtained by various researchers are examined in this paper.

  14. Differentially Expressed in Chondrocytes 2 (DEC2) Increases the Expression of IL-1β and Is Abundantly Present in Synovial Membrane in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Juri; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Hynninen, Joel; Mandelin, Jami

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have altered circadian rhythm of circulating serum cortisol, melatonin and IL-6, as well as disturbance in the expression of clock genes ARNTL2 and NPAS2. In humans, TNFα increases the expression ARNTL2 and NPAS2 but paradoxically suppresses clock output genes DPB and PER3. Our objective was to investigate the expression of direct clock suppressors DEC1 and DEC2 (BHLHE 40 and 41 proteins) in response to TNFα and investigate their role during inflammation. Methods Cultured primary fibroblasts were stimulated with TNFα. Effects on DEC2 were studied using RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence staining. The role of NF-κB in DEC2 increase was analyzed using IKK-2 specific inhibitor IMD-0354. Cloned DEC2 was transfected into HEK293 cells to study its effects on gene expression. Transfections into primary human fibroblasts were used to confirm the results. The presence of DEC2 was analyzed in (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) synovial membranes by immunohistochemistry. Results TNFα increased DEC2 mRNA and DEC2 was mainly detected at nuclei after the stimulus. The effects of TNFα on DEC2 expression were mediated via NF-κB. Overexpression, siRNA and promoter activity studies disclosed that DEC2 directly regulates IL-1β, in both HEK293 cells and primary human fibroblasts. DEC2 was increased in synovial membrane in RA compared to OA. Conclusion Not only ARNTL2 and NPAS2 but also DEC2 is regulated by TNFα in human fibroblasts. NF-κB mediates the effect on DEC2, which upregulates IL-1β. Circadian clock has a direct effect on inflammation in human fibroblasts. PMID:26710124

  15. Expression of a plasma membrane proteolipid during differentiation of neuronal and glial cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Shea, T B; Fischer, I; Sapirstein, V

    1986-09-01

    Plasma membrane proteolipid protein (PM-PLP) synthesis was examined in embryonic rat neurons and neonatal rat glial cells during differentiation in culture. Glial cultures were treated with 1 mM N6, O2, dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) following confluency to induce differentiation, which resulted in the elaboration of long cellular processes. However, no changes in the biosynthetic level of PM-PLP was observed during the differentiation of these cells. Neurons differentiated spontaneously in culture, forming cellular aggregates immediately following plating and elaborating a network of neurites over 7 days. The differentiation of neurons was accompanied by a seven-fold increase in PM-PLP synthesis with increases in biosynthetic increase in PM-PLP synthesis with increases in biosynthetic rate observed between days 1 and 3 and between days 3 and 7 in culture. Ultrastructural examination of neurons indicated that the Golgi apparatus was also developing during this period of time, with an increase in both the number of lamellae and generation of vesicles. The transport of PM-PLP to the plasma membrane was therefore examined in neurons at day 7 in culture by pulse labeling experiments with monensin and colchicine. Monensin (1 microM) was found to inhibit the appearance of radiolabeled PM-PLP in the plasma membrane by 63%, indicating that a functional Golgi apparatus is required for transport of PM-PLP to its target membrane. Colchicine (125 microM) also inhibited the appearance of newly synthesized PM-PLP in the plasma membrane by greater than 40%, suggesting that microtubules may also be required for PM-PLP transport to the plasma membrane. PMID:3016181

  16. GlnD Is Essential for NifA Activation, NtrB/NtrC-Regulated Gene Expression, and Posttranslational Regulation of Nitrogenase Activity in the Photosynthetic, Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaoping; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Roberts, Gary P.

    2005-01-01

    GlnD is a bifunctional uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme and is thought to be the primary sensor of nitrogen status in the cell. It plays an important role in nitrogen assimilation and metabolism by reversibly regulating the modification of PII proteins, which in turn regulate a variety of other proteins. We report here the characterization of glnD mutants from the photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum and the analysis of the roles of GlnD in the regulation of nitrogen fixation. Unlike glnD mutations in Azotobacter vinelandii and some other bacteria, glnD deletion mutations are not lethal in R. rubrum. Such mutants grew well in minimal medium with glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, although they grew slowly with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source (MN medium) and were unable to fix N2. The slow growth in MN medium is apparently due to low glutamine synthetase activity, because a ΔglnD strain with an altered glutamine synthetase that cannot be adenylylated can grow well in MN medium. Various mutation and complementation studies were used to show that the critical uridylyltransferase activity of GlnD is localized to the N-terminal region. Mutants with intermediate levels of uridylyltransferase activity are differentially defective in nif gene expression, the posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase, and NtrB/NtrC function, indicating the complexity of the physiological role of GlnD. These results have implications for the interpretation of results obtained with GlnD in many other organisms. PMID:15687189

  17. Quantitative transporter proteomics by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: addressing methodologic issues of plasma membrane isolation and expression-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vineet; Prasad, Bhagwat; Patilea, Gabriela; Gupta, Anshul; Salphati, Laurent; Evers, Raymond; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2015-02-01

    To predict transporter-mediated drug disposition using physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, one approach is to measure transport activity and relate it to protein expression levels in cell lines (overexpressing the transporter) and then scale these to via in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). This approach makes two major assumptions. First, that the expression of the transporter is predominantly in the plasma membrane. Second, that there is a linear correlation between expression level and activity of the transporter protein. The present study was conducted to test these two assumptions. We evaluated two commercially available kits that claimed to separate plasma membrane from other cell membranes. The Qiagen Qproteome kit yielded very little protein in the fraction purported to be the plasma membrane. The Abcam Phase Separation kit enriched the plasma membrane but did not separate it from other intracellular membranes. For the Abcam method, the expression level of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1/2B1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) proteins in all subcellular fractions isolated from cells or human liver tissue tracked that of Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase. Assuming that Na⁺-K⁺ ATPase is predominantly located in the plasma membrane, these data suggest that the transporters measured are also primarily located in the plasma membrane. Using short hairpin RNA, we created clones of cell lines with varying degrees of OATP1B1 or BCRP expression level. In these clones, transport activity of OATP1B1 or BCRP was highly correlated with protein expression level (r² > 0.9). These data support the use of transporter expression level data and activity data from transporter overexpressing cell lines for IVIVE of transporter-mediated disposition of drugs.

  18. Alternative processing of H-2Dd pre-mRNAs results in membrane expression of differentially phosphorylated protein products.

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, J; Boyd, L F; Maloy, W L; Coligan, J E; Margulies, D H

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct mRNA species encoding the mouse major histocompatibility antigen H-2Dd have been identified in BALB/c spleen cells as well as in cultured cell lines expressing this cell surface glycoprotein. The alternate transcripts of H-2Dd arise from either removal or inclusion of exon VII (encoding I2) during pre-mRNA processing. The relative levels of each kind of H-2Dd transcript varied considerably between different cell types, and in all cells examined both forms of alloantigen were expressed on the cell membrane. Antigen derived from both types of transcript reacted with H-2Dd-specific monoclonal antibodies, whereas only protein lacking the 13 amino acids of I2 reacted with a specific antiserum raised against a predicted exon VI/VIII fusion peptide. Those H-2Dd proteins translated from full length, but not smaller, transcripts were phosphorylated in resting and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated BALB/c spleen cells, suggesting that the major site of in vivo phosphorylation is within the highly conserved sequence encoded by exon VII. Thus alternative splicing of pre-mRNA transcripts is a mechanism which leads to membrane expression of two forms of H-2Dd, one of which lacks a major site of phosphorylation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3640710

  19. Differential Expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium of Membrane-Associated Proteins Relevant to Lignin Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Shary, Semarjit; Kapich, Alexander N.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Cullen, Dan; Hammel, Ken

    2008-10-02

    Fungal lignin-degrading systems must include membrane-associated proteins that participate in diverse processes such as uptake and oxidation of lignin fragments, secretion of ligninolytic secondary metabolites, and defense of the mycelium against ligninolytic oxidants. Despite their importance, little is known about the nature or regulation of these membrane-associated components. We grew the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium on cellulose or glucose as the carbon source and monitored the mineralization of a 14C-labeled synthetic lignin by these cultures to assess their ligninolytic competence. The results showed that the cellulose-grown cultures were ligninolytic, whereas the glucose-grown ones were not. We isolated microsomal membrane fractions from both types of culture and analyzed tryptic digests of them by shotgun liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Comparison of the results against the predicted P. chrysosporium proteome showed that a catalase (Joint Genome Institute P. chrysosporium protein I.D. 124398), an alcohol oxidase (126879), two transporters (137220 and 132234), and two cytochrome P450s (5011 and 8912) were up-regulated under ligninolytic conditions. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays showed that RNA transcripts encoding all of these proteins were also up-regulated in ligninolytic cultures. Catalase 124398, alcohol oxidase 126879, and transporter 137220 were found in a proteomic analysis of partially purified plasma membranes from ligninolytic P. chrysosporium, and are therefore most likely associated with the outer envelope of the fungus.

  20. LLC-PK sub 1 cells express Na sup + -lactate cotransport in apical membranes after confluency

    SciTech Connect

    Poustis-Delpont, C.; Mengual, R.; Sudaka, P. )

    1988-12-01

    L-({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was characterized in LLC-PK{sub 1} cell apical membrane vesicles obtained by intensive culture on microcarrier beads. The apical membrane preparation technique involved MgCl{sub 2} precipitation. Na{sup +}-dependent L-({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was present only after confluency; its appearance paralleled the subcellular localization of aminopeptidase in apical membranes. L-({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was Na{sup +}-dependent and electrogenic. Only the Na{sup +}-dependent component of L({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was saturable with one family of independent carriers. The apparent affinity constant was 1.1 {plus minus} 0.25 mM and the apparent maximal velocity was 29 {plus minus} 3 nmol{center dot}mg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}. The Na{sup +}-lactate cotransport stoichiometry was 2 Na{sup +} for 1 lactate. The specificity of the L-lactate transport system was compatible with that of the monocarboxylic acid pathway described previously brush-border membranes of kidney cortex and discrete from the tricarboxylic acid carrier, the D-glucose transporter, and the general pathway for anions. The LLC-PK{sub 1} cell line appears to be a useful tool for study of the regulation of L-lactate uptake and biosynthesis of the renal monocarboxylic acid transporter.

  1. Direct interaction with filamins modulates the stability and plasma membrane expression of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Thelin, William R.; Chen, Yun; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sallee, Jennifer L.; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Jacobson, Ken; Stutts, M. Jackson; Milgram, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel on the apical membrane of epithelia is well established. However, the processes by which CFTR is regulated on the cell surface are not clear. Here we report the identification of a protein-protein interaction between CFTR and the cytoskeletal filamin proteins. Using proteomic approaches, we identified filamins as proteins that associate with the extreme CFTR N terminus. Furthermore, we identified a disease-causing missense mutation in CFTR, serine 13 to phenylalanine (S13F), which disrupted this interaction. In cells, filamins tethered plasma membrane CFTR to the underlying actin network. This interaction stabilized CFTR at the cell surface and regulated the plasma membrane dynamics and confinement of the channel. In the absence of filamin binding, CFTR was internalized from the cell surface, where it prematurely accumulated in lysosomes and was ultimately degraded. Our data demonstrate what we believe to be a previously unrecognized role for the CFTR N terminus in the regulation of the plasma membrane stability and metabolic stability of CFTR. In addition, we elucidate the molecular defect associated with the S13F mutation. PMID:17235394

  2. Developmental changes in milk fat globule membrane proteome expression during the transition from colostrum to milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shotgun Proteomics, using amine-reactive isobaric tags (iTRAQ) was used to quantify protein changes in milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) that were isolated from day 1 colostrum and compared to MFGM from day 7 milk. Eight Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 4 cow sample pools for a s...

  3. Angiotensin II induces membrane trafficking of natively expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels in hypothalamic 4B cells.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashwini; Bachelor, Martha; Park, Yong H; Carreno, Flavia R; Nedungadi, T Prashant; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid family type 4 (TRPV4) channels are expressed in central neuroendocrine neurons and have been shown to be polymodal in other systems. We previously reported that in the rodent, a model of dilutional hyponatremia associated with hepatic cirrhosis, TRPV4 expression is increased in lipid rafts from the hypothalamus and that this effect may be angiotensin dependent. In this study, we utilized the immortalized neuroendocrine rat hypothalamic 4B cell line to more directly test the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) on TRPV4 expression and function. Our results demonstrate the expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) transcripts, for sex-determining region Y (SRY) (male genotype), arginine vasopressin (AVP), TRPV4, and ANG II type 1a and 1b receptor in 4B cells. After a 1-h incubation in ANG II (100 nM), 4B cells showed increased TRPV4 abundance in the plasma membrane fraction, and this effect was prevented by the ANG II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan (1 μM) and by a Src kinase inhibitor PP2 (10 μM). Ratiometric calcium imaging experiments demonstrated that ANG II incubation potentiated TRPV4 agonist (GSK 1016790A, 20 nM)-induced calcium influx (control 18.4 ± 2.8% n = 5 and ANG II 80.5 ± 2.4% n = 5). This ANG II-induced increase in calcium influx was also blocked by 1 μM losartan and 10 μM PP2 (losartan 26.4 ± 3.8% n = 5 and PP2 19.7 ± 3.9% n = 5). Our data suggests that ANG II can increase TRPV4 channel membrane expression in 4B cells through its action on AT1R involving a Src kinase pathway. PMID:25080500

  4. Micromachined microbial and photosynthetic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Mu; Lam, Kien B.; Lin, Liwei

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents two types of fuel cells: a miniature microbial fuel cell (µMFC) and a miniature photosynthetic electrochemical cell (µPEC). A bulk micromachining process is used to fabricate the fuel cells, and the prototype has an active proton exchange membrane area of 1 cm2. Two different micro-organisms are used as biocatalysts in the anode: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) is used to catalyze glucose and (2) Phylum Cyanophyta (blue-green algae) is used to produce electrons by a photosynthetic reaction under light. In the dark, the µPEC continues to generate power using the glucose produced under light. In the cathode, potassium ferricyanide is used to accept electrons and electric power is produced by the overall redox reactions. The bio-electrical responses of µMFCs and µPECs are characterized with the open-circuit potential measured at an average value of 300-500 mV. Under a 10 ohm load, the power density is measured as 2.3 nW cm-2 and 0.04 nW cm-2 for µMFCs and µPECs, respectively.

  5. Differential expression of the enzymatic system controlling synthesis, metabolism, and transport of PGF2 alpha in human fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Breuiller-Fouché, Michelle; Leroy, Marie-Josèphe; Dubois, Olivier; Reinaud, Pierrette; Chissey, Audrey; Qi, Hong; Germain, Guy; Fortier, Michel A; Charpigny, Gilles

    2010-07-01

    The present study investigated the expression of genes and proteins associated with PGF2alpha biosynthesis, catabolism, and transport in matched amnion and choriodecidua of human term placenta. The concentration of PGF2alpha within fetal membranes depends on the balance between complex enzymatic systems responsible for, respectively, its synthesis-by prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) family, AKR1C3 and AKR1B1-and its catabolic inactivation-through hydroxy-prostaglandin-dehydrogenase (HPGD). We observed that AKR1C3 shows equal basal expression (mRNA and protein) in choriodecidua and amnion but that AKR1B1 exhibits preferential expression in the choriodecidua. Expression of HPGD and solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 2A1 (SLCO2A1) was found primarily in the choriodecidua. We also evaluated whether an inflammatory environment induced by the gram-negative bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affects expression of each candidate enzymes. The amnion responded to LPS with a small but significant decrease of AKR1B1 mRNA expression. In contrast, we found a significant increase in PTGS2 and AKR1C3 mRNA expression in choriodecidua after LPS challenge, but such regulation was confirmed only at protein levels for PTGS2 and not for AKR1C3. Our results suggest that the choriodecidua appears to be the main tissue, which expresses maximally all the components (synthesis, degradation, and transport) controlling PGF2alpha levels. PMID:20357271

  6. Reduced expression of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 and collapsin response mediator protein 1 promotes death of spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, M P; Li, H; Jain, M R; Giraud, S N; Nicot, A B; Ratnayake, A; Heary, R F; Elkabes, S

    2010-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying neuronal pathology and death in the spinal cord (SC) during inflammation remain elusive. We previously showed the important role of plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) in the survival of SC neurons, in vitro. We also postulated that a decrease in PMCA2 expression could cause neuronal death during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. The current studies were undertaken to define the specific contribution of PMCA2 to degeneration of SC neurons, the effectors downstream to PMCA2 mediating neuronal death and the triggers that reduce PMCA2 expression. We report that knockdown of PMCA2 in SC neurons decreases collapsin response mediator protein 1 (CRMP1) levels. This is followed by cell death. Silencing of CRMP1 expression also leads to neuronal loss. Kainic acid reduces both PMCA2 and CRMP1 levels and induces neuronal death. Administration of an alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist, at onset or peak of EAE, restores the decreased PMCA2 and CRMP1 levels to control values and ameliorates clinical deficits. Thus, our data link the reduction in PMCA2 expression with perturbations in the expression of CRMP1 and the ensuing death of SC neurons. This represents an additional mechanism underlying AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity with relevance to neurodegeneration in EAE. PMID:20489728

  7. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer-membrane protein OmpL32

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Pinne, Marija; Haake, David A.; Zuerner, Richard L.; Frank, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer-membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immune response. In this study, 2D gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS identified a Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 protein, corresponding to ORF LIC11848, which undergoes extensive and differential methylation of glutamic acid residues. Immunofluorescence microscopy implicated LIC11848 as a surface-exposed outer-membrane protein, prompting the designation OmpL32. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of golden Syrian hamster liver and kidney sections revealed expression of OmpL32 during colonization of these organs. Identification of methylated surface-exposed outer-membrane proteins, such as OmpL32, provides a foundation for delineating the role of this post-translational modification in leptospiral virulence. PMID:22174381

  8. Structural basis of photosynthetic water-splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jian-Ren; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2013-12-10

    Photosynthetic water-splitting takes place in photosystem II (PSII), a membrane protein complex consisting of 20 subunits with an overall molecular mass of 350 kDa. The light-induced water-splitting reaction catalyzed by PSII not only converts light energy into biologically useful chemical energy, but also provides us with oxygen indispensible for sustaining oxygenic life on the earth. We have solved the structure of PSII at a 1.9 Å resolution, from which, the detailed structure of the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5}-cluster, the catalytic center for water-splitting, became clear. Based on the structure of PSII at the atomic resolution, possible mechanism of light-induced water-splitting was discussed.

  9. Photosynthetic Machineries in Nano-Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, László; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Hajdu, Kata; Giotta, Livia; Dorogi, Márta; Milano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres are membrane-spanning proteins, found in several classes of autotroph organisms, where a photoinduced charge separation and stabilization takes place with a quantum efficiency close to unity. The protein remains stable and fully functional also when extracted and purified in detergents thereby biotechnological applications are possible, for example, assembling it in nano-structures or in optoelectronic systems. Several types of bionanocomposite materials have been assembled by using reaction centres and different carrier matrices for different purposes in the field of light energy conversion (e.g., photovoltaics) or biosensing (e.g., for specific detection of pesticides). In this review we will summarize the current status of knowledge, the kinds of applications available and the difficulties to be overcome in the different applications. We will also show possible research directions for the close future in this specific field. PMID:24678673

  10. Photosynthetic machineries in nano-systems.

    PubMed

    Nagy, László; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Hajdu, Kata; Giotta, Livia; Dorogi, Márta; Milano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres are membrane-spanning proteins, found in several classes of autotroph organisms, where a photoinduced charge separation and stabilization takes place with a quantum efficiency close to unity. The protein remains stable and fully functional also when extracted and purified in detergents thereby biotechnological applications are possible, for example, assembling it in nano-structures or in optoelectronic systems. Several types of bionanocomposite materials have been assembled by using reaction centres and different carrier matrices for different purposes in the field of light energy conversion (e.g., photovoltaics) or biosensing (e.g., for specific detection of pesticides). In this review we will summarize the current status of knowledge, the kinds of applications available and the difficulties to be overcome in the different applications. We will also show possible research directions for the close future in this specific field.

  11. Differential allocation to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic nitrogen fractions among native and invasive species.

    PubMed

    Funk, Jennifer L; Glenwinkel, Lori A; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the "high-return" end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids.

  12. Differential Allocation to Photosynthetic and Non-Photosynthetic Nitrogen Fractions among Native and Invasive Species

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L.; Glenwinkel, Lori A.; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the “high-return” end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids. PMID:23700483

  13. Heterologous expression of a membrane-spanning auxin importer: implications for functional analyses of auxin transporters.

    PubMed

    Carrier, David John; Abu Bakar, Norliza Tendot; Lawler, Karen; Dorrian, James Matthew; Haider, Ameena; Bennett, Malcolm John; Kerr, Ian Derek

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical studies of plant auxin transporters in vivo are made difficult by the presence of multiple auxin transporters and auxin-interacting proteins. Furthermore, the expression level of most such transporters in plants is likely to be too low for purification and downstream functional analysis. Heterologous expression systems should address both of these issues. We have examined a number of such systems for their efficiency in expressing AUX1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. We find that a eukaryotic system based upon infection of insect cells with recombinant baculovirus provides a high level, easily scalable expression system capable of delivering a functional assay for AUX1. Furthermore, a transient transfection system in mammalian cells enables localization of AUX1 and AUX1-mediated transport of auxin to be investigated. In contrast, we were unable to utilise P. pastoris or L. lactis expression systems to reliably express AUX1.

  14. Role of membrane glycerolipids in photosynthesis, thylakoid biogenesis and chloroplast development.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The lipid bilayer of the thylakoid membrane in plant chloroplasts and cyanobacterial cells is predominantly composed of four unique lipid classes; monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). MGDG and DGDG are uncharged galactolipids that constitute the bulk of thylakoid membrane lipids and provide a lipid bilayer matrix for photosynthetic complexes as the main constituents. The glycolipid SQDG and phospholipid PG are anionic lipids with a negative charge on their head groups. SQDG and PG substitute for each other to maintain the amount of total anionic lipids in the thylakoid membrane, with PG having indispensable functions in photosynthesis. In addition to biochemical studies, extensive analyses of mutants deficient in thylakoid lipids have revealed important roles of these lipids in photosynthesis and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. Moreover, recent studies of Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that thylakoid lipid biosynthesis triggers the expression of photosynthesis-associated genes in both the nucleus and plastids and activates the formation of photosynthetic machineries and chloroplast development. Meanwhile, galactolipid biosynthesis is regulated in response to chloroplast functionality and lipid metabolism at transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review summarizes the roles of thylakoid lipids with their biosynthetic pathways in plants and discusses the coordinated regulation of thylakoid lipid biosynthesis with the development of photosynthetic machinery during chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:27114097

  15. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxPhi domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1(NL4.3) compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  16. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the Yxx{phi} domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1{sub NL4.3} compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and

  17. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals

    PubMed Central

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. PMID:27083698

  18. Biological activity, membrane-targeting modification, and crystallization of soluble human decay accelerating factor expressed in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennifer; Lukacik, Petra; Esser, Dirk; Steward, Michael; Giddings, Naomi; Bright, Jeremy R.; Fritchley, Sarah J.; Morgan, B. Paul; Lea, Susan M.; Smith, Geoffrey P.; Smith, Richard A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) is a glycophosphatidyl inositol-anchored glycoprotein that regulates the activity of C3 and C5 convertases. In addition to understanding the mechanism of complement inhibition by DAF through structural studies, there is also an interest in the possible therapeutic potential of the molecule. In this report we describe the cloning, expression in Escherichia coli, isolation and membrane-targeting modification of the four short consensus repeat domains of soluble human DAF with an additional C-terminal cysteine residue to permit site-specific modification. The purified refolded recombinant protein was active against both classical and alternative pathway assays of complement activation and had similar biological activity to soluble human DAF expressed in Pichia pastoris. Modification with a membrane-localizing peptide restored cell binding and gave a large increase in antihemolytic potency. These data suggested that the recombinant DAF was correctly folded and suitable for structural studies as well as being the basis for a DAF-derived therapeutic. Crystals of the E. coli-derived protein were obtained and diffracted to 2.2 Å, thus permitting the first detailed X-ray crystallography studies on a functionally active human complement regulator protein with direct therapeutic potential. PMID:15322283

  19. Three nuclear and two membrane estrogen receptors in basal teleosts, Anguilla sp.: Identification, evolutionary history and differential expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Rousseau, Karine; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    Estrogens interact with classical intracellular nuclear receptors (ESR), and with G-coupled membrane receptors (GPER). In the eel, we identified three nuclear (ESR1, ESR2a, ESR2b) and two membrane (GPERa, GPERb) estrogen receptors. Duplicated ESR2 and GPER were also retrieved in most extant teleosts. Phylogeny and synteny analyses suggest that they result from teleost whole genome duplication (3R). In contrast to conserved 3R-duplicated ESR2 and GPER, one of 3R-duplicated ESR1 has been lost shortly after teleost emergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed that the five receptors are all widely expressed in the eel, but with differential patterns of tissue expression and regulation. ESR1 only is consistently up-regulated in vivo in female eel BPG-liver axis during induced sexual maturation, and also up-regulated in vitro by estradiol in eel hepatocyte primary cultures. This first comparative study of the five teleost estradiol receptors provides bases for future investigations on differential roles that may have contributed to the conservation of multiple estrogen receptors.

  20. Role of plasma membrane lipid composition on cellular homeostasis: learning from cell line models expressing fatty acid desaturases

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, María S.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A.; Finarelli, Gabriela S.; Montanaro, Mauro A.; Prieto, Eduardo D.; Rimoldi, Omar J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence has suggested that plasma membrane (PM)-associated signaling and hence cell metabolism and viability depend on lipid composition and organization. The aim of the present work is to develop a cell model to study the endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effect on PM properties and analyze its influence on cholesterol (Chol) homeostasis. We have previously shown that by using a cell line over-expressing stearoyl-CoA-desaturase, membrane composition and organization coordinate cellular pathways involved in Chol efflux and cell viability by different mechanisms. Now, we expanded our studies to a cell model over-expressing both Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases, which resulted in a permanently higher PUFA content in PM. Furthermore, this cell line showed increased PM fluidity, Chol storage, and mitochondrial activity. In addition, human apolipoprotein A-I-mediated Chol removal was less efficient in these cells than in the corresponding control. Taken together, our results suggested that the cell functionality is preserved by regulating PM organization and Chol exportation and homeostasis. PMID:24473084

  1. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. PMID:27083698

  2. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis.

  3. Low water potentials affect expression of genes encoding vegetative storage proteins and plasma membrane proton ATPase in soybean.

    PubMed

    Surowy, T K; Boyer, J S

    1991-02-01

    We have examined growth, water status and gene expression in dark-grown soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) seedlings in response to water deficit (low water potentials) during the first days following germination. The genes encoded the plasma membrane proton ATPase and two proteins of 28 kDa and 31 kDa putatively involved in vegetative storage. Water potentials of stems and roots decreased when 2-day-old seedlings were transferred to water-saturated air. Stem growth was inhibited immediately. Root growth continued at control rates for one day and then was totally inhibited when the normal root-stem water potential gradient was reversed. Expression of mRNA for the 28 kDa and 31 kDa proteins, measured independently using specific 3'-end probes, occurred about equally in stems. However, only the mRNA for the 31 kDa protein was detected in roots and at a lower abundance than in stems. Low water potentials increased the mRNA only for the 28 kDa protein in stems and the 31 kDa protein in roots. This differential expression followed the inhibition of stem growth but preceded the inhibition of root growth. The expression of the message for the ATPase, measured using a probe synthesized from a partial oat ATPase clone, was low in stems and roots but there was a 6-fold increase at low water potentials in roots. The increase followed the inhibition of root growth. This appears to be the first instance of regulation of ATPase gene expression in plants and the first demonstration of differential expression of the 28 kDa, 31 kDa, and ATPase messages. The correlation with the differential growth responses of the stems and roots raises the possibility that the differential gene expression could be involved in the growth response to low water potentials.

  4. Human Renal Normal, Tumoral, and Cancer Stem Cells Express Membrane-Bound Interleukin-15 Isoforms Displaying Different Functions1

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Gallerne, Cindy; Romei, Cristina; Le Coz, Vincent; Gangemi, Rosaria; Khawam, Krystel; Devocelle, Aurore; Gu, Yanhong; Bruno, Stefania; Ferrini, Silvano; Chouaib, Salem; Eid, Pierre; Azzarone, Bruno; Giron-Michel, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal interleukin-15 (IL-15) participates to renal pathophysiology, but the role of its different membrane-bound isoforms remains to be elucidated. In this study, we reassess the biology of membrane-bound IL-15 (mb-IL-15) isoforms by comparing primary cultures of human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) to peritumoral (ptumTEC), tumoral (RCC), and cancer stem cells (CSC/CD105+). RPTEC express a 14 to 16 kDa mb-IL-15, whose existence has been assumed but never formally demonstrated and likely represents the isoform anchored at the cell membrane through the IL-15 receptor α (IL-15Rα) chain, because it is sensitive to acidic treatment and is not competent to deliver a reverse signal. By contrast, ptumTEC, RCC, and CSC express a novel N-hyperglycosylated, short-lived transmembrane mb-IL-15 (tmb-IL-15) isoform around 27 kDa, resistant to acidic shock, delivering a reverse signal in response to its soluble receptor (sIL-15Rα). This reverse signal triggers the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin in ptumTEC and RCC but not in CSC/CD105+, where it promotes survival. Indeed, through the AKT pathway, tmb-IL-15 protects CSC/CD105+ from non-programmed cell death induced by serum starvation. Finally, both mb-IL-15 and tmb-IL-15 are sensitive to metalloproteases, and the cleaved tmb-IL-15 (25 kDa) displays a powerful anti-apoptotic effect on human hematopoietic cells. Overall, our data indicate that both mb-IL-15 and tmb-IL-15 isoforms play a complex role in renal pathophysiology downregulating E-cadherin and favoring cell survival. Moreover, “apparently normal” ptumTEC cells, sharing different properties with RCC, could contribute to organize an enlarged peritumoral “preneoplastic” environment committed to favor tumor progression. PMID:26152359

  5. Recombinant expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of the transmembrane and membrane proximal domains of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen; Kessans, Sarah A; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Lee, Ho-Hsien; Meador, Lydia R; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G; Mor, Tsafrir S; Fromme, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 associates noncovalently with the surface subunit (gp120) and together they play essential roles in viral mucosal transmission and infection of target cells. The membrane proximal region (MPR) of gp41 is highly conserved and contains epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies. The transmembrane (TM) domain of gp41 not only anchors the envelope glycoprotein complex in the viral membrane but also dynamically affects the interactions of the MPR with the membrane. While high-resolution X-ray structures of some segments of the MPR were solved in the past, they represent the post-fusion forms. Structural information on the TM domain of gp41 is scant and at low resolution. Here we describe the design, expression and purification of a protein construct that includes MPR and the transmembrane domain of gp41 (MPR-TMTEV-6His), which reacts with the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 and thereby may represent an immunologically relevant conformation mimicking a prehairpin intermediate of gp41. The expression level of MPR-TMTEV-6His was improved by fusion to the C-terminus of Mistic protein, yielding ∼1 mg of pure protein per liter. The isolated MPR-TMTEV-6His protein was biophysically characterized and is a monodisperse candidate for crystallization. This work will enable further investigation into the structure of MPR-TMTEV-6His, which will be important for the structure-based design of a mucosal vaccine against HIV-1. PMID:25155369

  6. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Akano, T.; Fukatsu, K.; Miyasaka, H. |

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen is a clean energy alternative to the fossil fuels, the main source of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a stable system for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen using photosynthetic microorganisms. Our system consists of the following three stages: (1) Photosynthetic starch accumulation in green microalgae (400 L x2); (2) Dark anaerobic fermentation of the algal starch biomass to produce hydrogen and organic compounds (155 L x2); and (3) Further conversion of the organic compounds to produce hydrogen using photosynthetic bacteria (three types of reactors, parallel plate, raceway, and tubular). We constructed a test plant of this process at Nankoh power plant of Kansai Electric Power Company in Osaka, Japan, and carried out a series of tests using CO{sub 2} obtained from a chemical absorption pilot-plant. The photobiological hydrogen production process used a combination of a marine alga, Chlamydomonas sp. MGA 161 and marine photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas sp. W-1S. The dark anaerobic fermentation of algal starch biomass was also investigated. Sustained and stable starch accumulation, starch degradation in the algal cell, and hydrogen production from algal fermentation and photosynthetic bacteria in the light were demonstrated during several experiments. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Functions of tocopherols in the cells of plants and other photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Mokrosnop, V M

    2014-01-01

    Tocopherol synthesis has only been observed in photosynthetic organisms (plants, algae and some cyanobacteria). Tocopherol is synthesized in the inner membrane of chloroplasts and distributed between chloroplast membranes, thylakoids and plastoglobules. Physiological significance of tocopherols for human and animal is well-studied, but relatively little is known about their function in plant organisms. Among the best characterized functions oftocopherols in cells is their ability to scavenge and quench reactive oxygen species and fat-soluble by-products of oxidative stress. There are the data on the participation of different mechanisms of α-tocopherol action in protecting photosystem II (PS II) from photoinhibition both by deactivation of singlet oxygen produced by PSII and by reduction of proton permeability of thylakoid membranes, leading to acidification of lumen under high light conditions and activation of violaxanthin de-epoxidase. Additional biological activity of tocopherols, independent of its antioxidant functions have been demonstrated. Basic mechanisms for these effects are connected with the modulation of signal transduction pathways by specific tocopherols and, in some instances, by transcriptional activation of gene expression.

  8. Thylakoid membrane function in heterocysts.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Ann; Cardona, Tanai

    2016-03-01

    Multicellular cyanobacteria form different cell types in response to environmental stimuli. Under nitrogen limiting conditions a fraction of the vegetative cells in the filament differentiate into heterocysts. Heterocysts are specialized in atmospheric nitrogen fixation and differentiation involves drastic morphological changes on the cellular level, such as reorganization of the thylakoid membranes and differential expression of thylakoid membrane proteins. Heterocysts uphold a microoxic environment to avoid inactivation of nitrogenase by developing an extra polysaccharide layer that limits air diffusion into the heterocyst and by upregulating heterocyst-specific respiratory enzymes. In this review article, we summarize what is known about the thylakoid membrane in heterocysts and compare its function with that of the vegetative cells. We emphasize the role of photosynthetic electron transport in providing the required amounts of ATP and reductants to the nitrogenase enzyme. In the light of recent high-throughput proteomic and transcriptomic data, as well as recently discovered electron transfer pathways in cyanobacteria, our aim is to broaden current views of the bioenergetics of heterocysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26545609

  9. Expression patterns of progesterone receptor membrane components 1 and 2 in endometria from women with and without endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Kristen; Tinnemore, Deborah; Huff, Seth; Hoffer, Zachary S; Burney, Richard O; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2014-02-01

    Endometriosis is a hormone-dependent inflammatory condition associated with pain and infertility. A growing body of evidence supports attenuated secretory-phase progesterone responsiveness in women with this disease. Herein, we compare the expression of progesterone receptor membrane components (PGRMC) 1 and 2 in eutopic endometrium from 11 women with laparoscopically and/or histologically proven stage III/IV endometriosis and 23 disease-free women. Menstrual cycle phase was determined using a combination of reported cycle day, serum hormone profile, and endometrial histologic dating. The PGRMC-1 (fold change -3.3; P < .05) and PGRMC-2 (fold-change -8.8; P < .05) gene expression were significantly downregulated in secretory phase, eutopic endometrium from women with endometriosis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated decreased PGRMC-1 and PGRMC-2 protein expression in the secretory phase endometrial stroma cells of women with endometriosis. Consistent with the preclinical work of others, our results reflect downregulation of endometrial PGRMC-1 and PGRMC-2 expression in secretory phase endometrium from women with advanced stage endometriosis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of attenuated progesterone action in endometriosis has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  10. p161, a murine membrane protein expressed on mast cells and some macrophages, is mouse CD13/aminopeptidase N.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Kinzer, C A; Paul, W E

    1996-09-15

    pl6l is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on mast cells and on activated macrophages but on few if any other cells of hematopoietic lineages. Its lack of expression on basophils makes it useful to distinguish mast cells from basophils and aids in the analysis of mast cells and their precursors. p161 was purified from the mast cell line CFTL-12 by affinity chromatography and subjected to limited proteolysis. The sequences of the resultant peptides indicated that p161 is homologous with rat and human CD13/aminopeptidase N. Using oligonucleotide primers derived from rat CD13 cDNA, a mouse cDNA was obtained. Its deduced amino acid sequence displays 87% identity with rat CD13 and 76 % identity with human CD13. Expression of the mouse cDNA in M12 cells, which are p161 negative, renders these cells positive for staining with the monoclonal anti-p161 Ab, K-1. Furthermore, a mAb raised against partially purified mouse intestinal aminopeptidase N specifically blocked the binding of K-1 to both CFTL-12 cells and the transfected M12 cells. These results strongly indicate that mouse p161 is CD13/aminopeptidase N. Northern blot analysis shows that p161 mRNA is most abundantly expressed in the intestinal tract and kidney and is present in liver, lymph node, spleen, and brain.

  11. Arsenic biomethylation by photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Rensing, Christopher; Rosen, Barry P.; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous element that is widespread in the environment and causes numerous health problems. Biomethylation of As has implications for its mobility and toxicity. Photosynthetic organisms may play a significant role in As geochemical cycling by methylating it to different As species, but little is known about the mechanisms of methylation. Methylated As species have been found in many photosynthetic organisms, and several arsenite S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) methyltransferases have been characterized in cyanobacteria and algae. However, higher plants may not have the ability to methylate As. Instead, methylated arsenicals in plants probably originate from microorganisms in soils and the rhizosphere. Here, we propose possible approaches for developing ‘smart’ photosynthetic organisms with an enhanced and sensitive biomethylation capacity for bioremediation and safer food. PMID:22257759

  12. Aluminum stress response in rice: effects on membrane lipid composition and expression of lipid biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Van-Biet; Repellin, Anne; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Pham-Thi, Anh-Thu

    2012-11-01

    The presence of aluminum (Al) in acidic soils is a major abiotic stress limiting the production of cultivated plants. Cell membranes are the main targets of environmental stresses and there is growing evidence for the involvement of membrane lipids in plant adaptation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-long effects of Al on membrane lipid content and composition in the roots and shoots of rice plants grown under hydroponic conditions. Four rice cultivars were compared: two acknowledged as Al-resistant (Koshihikari) and Al-sensitive (Kasalath), respectively, and two Vietnamese cultivars, OM6073 and OM1490. Al treatment inhibited root and shoot growth in the sensitive cultivars and the observed changes in root and shoot lipid and fatty acid composition revealed patterns associated with Al sensitivity: larger decreases in lipid content and decreases in fatty acid unsaturation. In the roots, phospholipids, and particularly phosphatidylcholine (PC), decreased dramatically in the susceptible cultivars whereas the amount of lipid classes remained unchanged in the tolerant ones. In the shoots, the glycolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol as well as PC were mostly affected by Al treatment in the susceptible varieties. mRNA accumulation corresponding to genes coding for galactolipid synthases, enzymes of the PC and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthetic pathways and fatty acid desaturases correlated well with changes in lipid contents in roots and partly explained lipid changes in leaves. The results suggested that the capacity to maintain the proper functioning of some lipid biosynthetic activities and hence the stability of lipid composition may help the rice plant to withstand Al stress.

  13. Expression of membrane-type 1, 2, and 3 matrix metalloproteinases messenger RNA in ovarian carcinoma cells in serous effusions.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Goldberg, I; Berner, A; Nesland, J M; Givant-Horwitz, V; Bryne, M; Risberg, B; Kristensen, G B; Tropé, C G; Kopolovic, J; Reich, R

    2001-04-01

    We studied the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, membrane-type (MT)1-MMP, MT2-MMP, and MT3-MMP in 43 malignant pleural and peritoneal effusions using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cellular localization of MT1-MMP in 66 effusion specimens and 85 corresponding primary and metastatic tumors using messenger RNA (mRNA) in situ hybridization (ISH). In 43 effusions, MMP-2 mRNA was detected in 37, MT1-MMP in 25, and MT2-MMP in 32. Expression of MT1-MMP and MT2-MMP was found in 21 specimens; in 16 MT-MMP-positive specimens, mRNA for only 1 of 2 enzymes was expressed. MT3-MMP mRNA was not detected. High levels of MMP-2 mRNA were detected more often in effusions with high MT1-MMP and/or MT2-MMP mRNA expression. Using ISH, MT1-MMP mRNA was localized to cancer cells in 27 of 58 malignant effusions; focal signals were detected in mesothelial cells in 7 of 42. MT1-MMP was localized to tumor cells in 32 of 85 primary and metastatic solid lesions, and stromal cells expressed MT1-MMP in 3. Tumor cell MT1-MMP expression in effusion specimens did not differ from primary or metastatic lesions. MT-MMP expression in tumor cells in effusions showed no association with effusion site or tumor type using ISH and RT-PCR. PMID:11293899

  14. Human catechol-O-methyltransferase: Cloning and expression of the membrane-associated form

    SciTech Connect

    Bertocci, B.; Miggiano, V.; Da Prada, M.; Dembic, Z.; Lahm, H.W.; Malherbe, P. )

    1991-02-15

    A cDNA clone for human catechol-O-methyltransferase was isolated from a human hepatoma cell line (Hep G2) cDNA library by hybridization screening with a porcine cDNA probe. The cDNA clone was sequenced and found to have an insert of 1226 nucleotides. The deduced primary structure of hCOMT is composed of 271 amino acid residues with the predicted molecular mass of 30 kDa. At its N terminus it has a hydrophobic segment of 21 amino acid residues that may be responsible for insertion of hCOMT into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The primary structure of hCOMT exhibits high homology to the porcine partial cDNA sequence (93%). The deduced amino acid sequence contains two tryptic peptide sequences (T-22, T-33) found in porcine liver catechol-O-methyltransferase (CEMT). The coding region of hCOMT cDNA was placed under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter to transfect human kidney 293 cells. The recombinant hCOMT was shown by immunoblot analysis to be mainly associated with the membrane fraction. RNA blot analysis revealed one COMT mRNA transcript of 1.4 kilobases in Hep G2 poly(A){sup +} RNA.

  15. Protection of the Photosynthetic Apparatus from Extreme Dehydration and Oxidative Stress in Seedlings of Transgenic Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Personat, José-María; Tejedor-Cano, Javier; Lindahl, Marika; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio; Jordano, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A genetic program that in sunflower seeds is activated by Heat Shock transcription Factor A9 (HaHSFA9) has been analyzed in transgenic tobacco seedlings. The ectopic overexpression of the HSFA9 program protected photosynthetic membranes, which resisted extreme dehydration and oxidative stress conditions. In contrast, heat acclimation of seedlings induced thermotolerance but not resistance to the harsh stress conditions employed. The HSFA9 program was found to include the expression of plastidial small Heat Shock Proteins that accumulate only at lower abundance in heat-stressed vegetative organs. Photosystem II (PSII) maximum quantum yield was higher for transgenic seedlings than for non-transgenic seedlings, after either stress treatment. Furthermore, protection of both PSII and Photosystem I (PSI) membrane protein complexes was observed in the transgenic seedlings, leading to their survival after the stress treatments. It was also shown that the plastidial D1 protein, a labile component of the PSII reaction center, and the PSI core protein PsaB were shielded from oxidative damage and degradation. We infer that natural expression of the HSFA9 program during embryogenesis may protect seed pro-plastids from developmental desiccation. PMID:23227265

  16. Expression, purification and characterization of the human membrane transporter protein OATP2B1 from Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Tschantz, William R; Pfeifer, Nathan D; Meade, Caryl Lane; Wang, Leyu; Lanzetti, Anthony; Kamath, Ajith V; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Hashim, Muhammed F

    2008-02-01

    OATP2B1 is an important member of the organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP) family and is implicated in the intestinal and hepatic disposition of endo- and xenobiotics. The purpose of this work was to produce a highly purified protein for use as a reference standard for quantification of OATP2B1 in human tissue and in vitro assay systems. Here, we report the successful expression, purification and characterization of OATP2B1 in a heterologous expression system. Protein expressed by the Sf9-baculovirus expression system is functionally active as demonstrated by saturable uptake kinetics with a K(m) of 5.9+/-0.76 microM for estrone-3-sulfate. OATP2B1 was extracted from Sf9-membranes with ABS-14-4 detergent and purified using a one-step FLAG-tag purification method. Yield of OATP2B1 from Sf9 cells was 1.1mg per liter of culture, for a final recovery of 1.8%. SDS-PAGE resolution and Western blot of purified protein displayed multiple banding of OATP2B1-specific protein, which was thoroughly investigated to confirm homogeneity of the sample. C-terminal FLAG-tag purification and immunoblot detection, together with N-terminal sequencing, confirmed the presence of only full-length protein. Treatment with endoglycosidases had little effect on the migration pattern in SDS-PAGE, suggesting that multiple banding was not due to different glycosylation states of the protein. Amino acid analysis further confirmed the homogeneity of the protein with a calculated extinction coefficient of 80,387 cm(-1) M(-1). Physical, biochemical and functional characterization show that purified human OATP2B1 is pure, homogeneous and appropriate for use as a standard to quantitate expression of OATP2B1 in in vitro systems and tissue samples.

  17. Growth temperature alters Salmonella Enteritidis heat/acid resistance, membrane lipid composition and stress/virulence related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Khoo, Wei Jie; Zheng, Qianwang; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-02-17

    The influence of growth temperature (10, 25, 37, and 42 °C) on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in simulated gastric fluid (SGF; pH=2.0) and during heat treatment (54, 56, 58, and 60 °C), on the membrane fatty acid composition, as well as on stress-/virulence-related gene expression was studied. Cells incubated at temperatures lower or higher than 37 °C did not increase their acid resistance, with the maximum D-value of 3.07 min in cells grown at 37 °C; while those incubated at higher temperature increased their heat resistance, with the maximum D60 °C-values of 1.4 min in cells grown at 42 °C. A decrease in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids was observed as the growth temperature increased. Compared to the control cells grown at 37 °C, the expression of rpoS was 16.5- and 14.4-fold higher in cells cultivated at 10 and 25 °C, respectively; while the expression of rpoH was 2.9-fold higher in those cultivated at 42 °C. The increased expression of stress response gene rpoH and the decreased ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids correlated with the greater heat resistance of bacteria grown at 42 °C; while the decreased expression of stress response gene rpoS at 42 °C might contribute to the decrease in acid resistance. Virulence related genes-spvR, hilA, avrA-were induced in cells cultivated at 42 °C, except sefA which was induced in the control cells. This study indicates that environmental temperature may affect the virulence potential of S. Enteritidis, thus temperature should be well controlled during food storage.

  18. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Karina J.; Tsykin, Anna; Giles, Keith M.; Sladic, Rosemary T.; Epis, Michael R.; Ganss, Ruth; Goodall, Gregory J.; Leedman, Peter J.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a

  19. Control of erythroid differentiation: asynchronous expression of the anion transporter and the peripheral components of the membrane skeleton in AEV- and S13-transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Chicken erythroblasts transformed with avian erythroblastosis virus or S13 virus provide suitable model systems with which to analyze the maturation of immature erythroblasts into erythrocytes. The transformed cells are blocked in differentiation at around the colony-forming unit- erythroid stage of development but can be induced to differentiate in vitro. Analysis of the expression and assembly of components of the membrane skeleton indicates that these cells simultaneously synthesize alpha-spectrin, beta-spectrin, ankyrin, and protein 4.1 at levels that are comparable to those of mature erythroblasts. However, they do not express any detectable amounts of anion transporter. The peripheral membrane skeleton components assemble transiently and are subsequently rapidly catabolized, resulting in 20-40-fold lower steady-state levels than are found in maturing erythrocytes. Upon spontaneous or chemically induced terminal differentiation of these cells expression of the anion transporter is initiated with a concommitant increase in the steady- state levels of the peripheral membrane-skeletal components. These results suggest that during erythropoiesis, expression of the peripheral components of the membrane skeleton is initiated earlier than that of the anion transporter. Furthermore, they point a key role for the anion transporter in conferring long-term stability to the assembled erythroid membrane skeleton during terminal differentiation. PMID:2946700

  20. Photosynthetic reaction centers in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Schiffer, M. )

    1990-07-30

    The photochemistry of photosynthesis begins in complexes called reaction centers. These have become model systems to study the fundamental process by which plants and bacteria convert and store solar energy as chemical free energy. In green plants, photosynthesis occurs in two systems, each of which contains a different reaction center, working in series. In one, known as photosystem 1, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP[sup +]) is reduced to NADPH for use in a series of dark reactions called the Calvin cycle, named for Nobel Laureate Melvin Calvin, by which carbon dioxide is converted into useful fuels such as carbohydrates and sugars. In the other half of the photosynthetic machinery of green plants, called photosystem 2, water is oxidized to produce molecular oxygen. A different form of photosynthesis occurs in photosynthetic bacteria, which typically live at the bottom of ponds and feed on organic debris. Two main types of photosynthetic bacteria exist: purple and green. Neither type liberates oxygen from water. Instead, the bacteria feed on organic media or inorganic materials, such as sulfides, which are easier to reduce or oxidize than carbon dioxide or water. Perhaps in consequence, their photosynthetic machinery is simpler than that of green, oxygen-evolving plants and their primary photochemistry is better understood.

  1. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Zeth, Kornelius; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials.

  2. The membrane skeleton in Paramecium: Molecular characterization of a novel epiplasmin family and preliminary GFP expression results.

    PubMed

    Pomel, Sébastien; Diogon, Marie; Bouchard, Philippe; Pradel, Lydie; Ravet, Viviane; Coffe, Gérard; Viguès, Bernard

    2006-02-01

    Previous attempts to identify the membrane skeleton of Paramecium cells have revealed a protein pattern that is both complex and specific. The most prominent structural elements, epiplasmic scales, are centered around ciliary units and are closely apposed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner alveolar membrane. We sought to characterize epiplasmic scale proteins (epiplasmins) at the molecular level. PCR approaches enabled the cloning and sequencing of two closely related genes by amplifications of sequences from a macronuclear genomic library. Using these two genes (EPI-1 and EPI-2), we have contributed to the annotation of the Paramecium tetraurelia macronuclear genome and identified 39 additional (paralogous) sequences. Two orthologous sequences were found in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome. Structural analysis of the 43 sequences indicates that the hallmark of this new multigenic family is a 79 aa domain flanked by two Q-, P- and V-rich stretches of sequence that are much more variable in amino-acid composition. Such features clearly distinguish members of the multigenic family from epiplasmic proteins previously sequenced in other ciliates. The expression of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-tagged epiplasmin showed significant labeling of epiplasmic scales as well as oral structures. We expect that the GFP construct described herein will prove to be a useful tool for comparative subcellular localization of different putative epiplasmins in Paramecium. PMID:16427359

  3. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorB

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Mikio; Iverson, Tina M.

    2010-01-28

    The Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorB was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified from inclusion bodies by denaturation in urea followed by refolding in buffered LDAO on a size-exclusion column. PorB has been crystallized in three different crystal forms: C222, R32 and P6{sub 3}. The C222 crystal form may contain either one or two PorB monomers in the asymmetric unit, while both the R32 and P6{sub 3} crystal forms contained one PorB monomer in the asymmetric unit. Of the three, the P6{sub 3} crystal form had the best diffraction quality, yielding data extending to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution.

  4. Expression of S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha fetoprotein in normal salivary glands and primary salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Günhan, O; Evren, G; Demiriz, M; Can, C; Celasun, B; Finci, R

    1992-12-01

    The distribution of S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha fetoprotein was studied in 38 primary salivary gland tumors. S-100 protein, a useful marker of myoepithelial cells, was demonstrated in some benign tumors. Carcinoembryonic antigen expression was consistently positive in adenoid cystic carcinoma. Demonstration of epithelial membrane antigen helped to confirm the epithelial nature of some neoplastic cells. Alpha fetoprotein was not expressed in any of the cases examined. No correlation was found between immunopositivity and tumor behavior in the present series.

  5. Sulfated galactans from Gracilaria fisheri bind to shrimp haemocyte membrane proteins and stimulate the expression of immune genes.

    PubMed

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that sulfated galactans (SG) from Gracilaria fisheri (G. fisheri) exhibit immunostimulant activity in shrimp. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that SG stimulates signaling molecules of the immune response of shrimp by binding to receptors on the host cell membrane. Accordingly, we evaluated the ability of SG to bind to shrimp haemocytes and showed that SG bound to the shrimp haemocyte membrane (SHM), potentially to specific receptors. Furthermore, this binding was associated with an activation of immune response genes of shrimp. Data from confocal laser scanning micrographs revealed that FITC-labeled SG bound to haemocytes. Far western blot analysis demonstrated that SHM peptides, with molecular sizes of 13, 14, 15, 17, and 25 kDa, were associated with SG. Peptide sequence analysis of the isolated bands using LC-MS/MS and NCBI blast search revealed the identity of the 13, 14, and 17 kDa peptides as lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP). SG induced the expression of immune related genes and downstream signaling mediators of LGBP including IMD, IKKs, NF-κB, antimicrobial peptides (crustin and PEN-4), the antiviral immunity (dicer), and proPO system (proPO-I and proPO-II). A LGBP neutralizing assay with anti-LGBP antibody indicated a decrease in SG-induced expression of LGBP downstream signaling mediators and the immune related genes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the SG-stimulated immune activity in haemocytes is mediated, in part, through the LGBP, and IMD-NF-κB pathway.

  6. A novel meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine with constitutive expression of FetA: A phase I clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Marsay, L.; Dold, C.; Green, C.A.; Rollier, C.S.; Norheim, G.; Sadarangani, M.; Shanyinde, M.; Brehony, C.; Thompson, A.J.; Sanders, H.; Chan, H.; Haworth, K.; Derrick, J.P.; Feavers, I.M.; Maiden, M.C.; Pollard, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines are used against outbreaks of capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) caused by strains expressing particular PorA outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Ferric enterobactin receptor (FetA) is another variable OMP that induces type-specific bactericidal antibodies, and the combination of judiciously chosen PorA and FetA variants in vaccine formulations is a potential approach to broaden protection of such vaccines. Methods The OMV vaccine MenPF-1 was generated by genetically modifying N. meningitidis strain 44/76 to constitutively express FetA. Three doses of 25 μg or 50 μg of MenPF-1 were delivered intra-muscularly to 52 healthy adults. Results MenPF-1 was safe and well tolerated. Immunogenicity was measured by serum bactericidal assay (SBA) against wild-type and isogenic mutant strains. After 3 doses, the proportion of volunteers with SBA titres ≥1:4 (the putative protective titre) was 98% for the wild-type strain, and 77% for the strain 44/76 FetAonPorAoff compared to 51% in the strain 44/76 FetAoffPorAoff, demonstrating that vaccination with MenPF-1 simultaneously induced FetA and PorA bactericidal antibodies. Conclusion This study provides a proof-of-concept for generating bactericidal antibodies against FetA after OMV vaccination in humans. Prevalence-based choice of PorA and FetA types can be used to formulate a vaccine for broad protection against MenB disease. PMID:25982025

  7. The Regulation of Photosynthetic Structure and Function during Nitrogen Deprivation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Matthew T.; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Lucker, Ben F.; Park, Jeong-Jin; Wang, Hongxia; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Holguin, F. Omar; Disbrow, Bradley; Schaub, Tanner; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Kramer, David M.; Gang, David R.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of carbon storage compounds by many unicellular algae after nutrient deprivation occurs despite declines in their photosynthetic apparatus. To understand the regulation and roles of photosynthesis during this potentially bioenergetically valuable process, we analyzed photosynthetic structure and function after nitrogen deprivation in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and lipid profiling and microscopic time course data were combined with multiple measures of photosynthetic function. Levels of transcripts and proteins of photosystems I and II and most antenna genes fell with differing trajectories; thylakoid membrane lipid levels decreased, while their proportions remained similar and thylakoid membrane organization appeared to be preserved. Cellular chlorophyll (Chl) content decreased more than 2-fold within 24 h, and we conclude from transcript protein and 13C labeling rates that Chl synthesis was down-regulated both pre- and posttranslationally and that Chl levels fell because of a rapid cessation in synthesis and dilution by cellular growth rather than because of degradation. Photosynthetically driven oxygen production and the efficiency of photosystem II as well as P700+ reduction and electrochromic shift kinetics all decreased over the time course, without evidence of substantial energy overflow. The results also indicate that linear electron flow fell approximately 15% more than cyclic flow over the first 24 h. Comparing Calvin-Benson cycle transcript and enzyme levels with changes in photosynthetic 13CO2 incorporation rates also pointed to a coordinated multilevel down-regulation of photosynthetic fluxes during starch synthesis before the induction of high triacylglycerol accumulation rates. PMID:25489023

  8. Extracellular and Luminal pH Regulation by Vacuolar H+-ATPase Isoform Expression and Targeting to the Plasma Membrane and Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Howell, Gareth J.; Phillips, Clair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Harrison, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) activity of tumor cells is a major factor in control of cytoplasmic and extracellular pH and metastatic potential, but the isoforms involved and the factors governing plasma membrane recruitment remain uncertain. Here, we examined expression, distribution, and activity of V-ATPase isoforms in invasive prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) cells. Isoforms 1 and 3 were the most highly expressed forms of membrane subunit a, with a1 and a3 the dominant plasma membrane isoforms. Correlation between plasma membrane V-ATPase activity and invasiveness was limited, but RNAi knockdown of either a isoform did slow cell proliferation and inhibit invasion in vitro. Isoform a1 was recruited to the cell surface from the early endosome-recycling complex pathway, its knockdown arresting transferrin receptor recycling. Isoform a3 was associated with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Both a isoforms associated with accessory protein Ac45, knockdown of which stalled transit of a1 and transferrin-transferrin receptor, decreased proton efflux, and reduced cell growth and invasiveness; this latter effect was at least partly due to decreased delivery of the membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MMP-14 to the plasma membrane. These data indicate that in prostatic carcinoma cells, a1 and a3 isoform populations predominate in different compartments where they maintain different luminal pH. Ac45 plays a central role in navigating the V-ATPase to the plasma membrane, and hence it is an important factor in expression of the invasive phenotype. PMID:26912656

  9. The significance of the increased expression of phosphorylated MeCP2 in the membranes from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiaohui; Guo, Haoyi; Zhao, Zhaoxia; Li, Yun Sui; Chen, Guoming

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of expression of phosphorylated methyl-CpG binding protein 2-Ser421 (MeCP2-S421) and VEGF in the membranes of patients with PDR. We examined the expression of phospho-MeCP2-S80, S421, VEGF and PEDF in surgically excised PDR membranes from 33 patients with diabetes, and idiopathic epiretinal membranes from 11 patients without diabetes, using immunohistochemistry and western blot. The colocalization of MeCP2-S421 with VEGF, PEDF, CD31, GFAP and αSMA was revealed by fluorescent double labeling. The effect of CoCl2 and knock down MeCP2 using specific siRNA on the expression of MeCP2 and VEGF were analyzed in HUCAC cells by Western blot. We found that phospho-MeCP2-S421 was significantly increased in the membranes from the patients with PDR compared with the specimens from patients without diabetes (P < 0.01). The expression of phospho-MeCP2-S421 was much stronger than that of phospho-MeCP2-S80 in the PDR membranes. Double labeling showed that the high phospho-MeCP2-S421 expression was associated with strong expression of VEGF, but not PEDF. Further, phospho-MeCP2-S421 and VEGF were increased by the stimulation of CoCl2 and knock down MeCP2 inhibited the expression of VEGF. Our result suggests that phospho-MeCP2-S421 might involve in the pathogenesis of PDR. PMID:27616658

  10. The significance of the increased expression of phosphorylated MeCP2 in the membranes from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiaohui; Guo, Haoyi; Zhao, Zhaoxia; Li, Yun Sui; Chen, Guoming

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of expression of phosphorylated methyl-CpG binding protein 2-Ser421 (MeCP2-S421) and VEGF in the membranes of patients with PDR. We examined the expression of phospho-MeCP2-S80, S421, VEGF and PEDF in surgically excised PDR membranes from 33 patients with diabetes, and idiopathic epiretinal membranes from 11 patients without diabetes, using immunohistochemistry and western blot. The colocalization of MeCP2-S421 with VEGF, PEDF, CD31, GFAP and αSMA was revealed by fluorescent double labeling. The effect of CoCl2 and knock down MeCP2 using specific siRNA on the expression of MeCP2 and VEGF were analyzed in HUCAC cells by Western blot. We found that phospho-MeCP2-S421 was significantly increased in the membranes from the patients with PDR compared with the specimens from patients without diabetes (P < 0.01). The expression of phospho-MeCP2-S421 was much stronger than that of phospho-MeCP2-S80 in the PDR membranes. Double labeling showed that the high phospho-MeCP2-S421 expression was associated with strong expression of VEGF, but not PEDF. Further, phospho-MeCP2-S421 and VEGF were increased by the stimulation of CoCl2 and knock down MeCP2 inhibited the expression of VEGF. Our result suggests that phospho-MeCP2-S421 might involve in the pathogenesis of PDR. PMID:27616658

  11. Fluorescent probe for high-throughput screening of membrane protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Backmark, A E; Olivier, N; Snijder, A; Gordon, E; Dekker, N; Ferguson, A D

    2013-01-01

    Screening of protein variants requires specific detection methods to assay protein levels and stability in crude mixtures. Many strategies apply fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to qualitatively monitor expression, stability, and monodispersity. However, GFP fusion proteins have several important disadvantages; including false-positives, protein aggregation after proteolytic removal of GFP, and reductions in protein yields without the GFP fusion. Here we describe a FSEC screening strategy based on a fluorescent multivalent NTA probe that interacts with polyhistidine-tags on target proteins. This method overcomes the limitations of GFP fusion proteins, and can be used to rank protein production based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. Domain boundaries of the human G-protein coupled adenosine A2a receptor were readily identified from crude detergent-extracts of a library of construct variants transiently produced in suspension-adapted HEK293-6E cells. Well expressing clones of MraY, an important bacterial infection target, could be identified from a library of 24 orthologs. This probe provides a highly sensitive tool to detect target proteins to expression levels down to 0.02 mg/L in crude lysate, and requires minimal amounts of cell culture. PMID:23776061

  12. Expression of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Plasma Membrane Transporter-1 in Monkey and Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Giovanni; Rickman, Dennis W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the expression pattern of the predominant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 in Old World monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human retina. Methods GAT-1 was localized in retinal sections by using immunohistochemical techniques with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Double-labeling studies were performed with the GAT-1 antibody using antibodies to GABA, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the bipolar cell marker Mab115A10. Results The pattern of GAT-1 immunostaining was similar in human and monkey retinas. Numerous small immunoreactive somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and were present rarely in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of all retinal regions. Medium GAT-1 somata were in the ganglion cell layer in the parafoveal and peripheral retinal regions. GAT-1 fibers were densely distributed throughout the IPL. Varicose processes, originating from both the IPL and somata in the INL, arborized in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), forming a sparse network in all retinal regions, except the fovea. Sparsely occurring GAT-1 processes were in the nerve fiber layer in parafoveal regions and near the optic nerve head but not in the optic nerve. In the INL, 99% of the GAT-1 somata contained GABA, and 66% of the GABA immunoreactive somata expressed GAT-1. GAT-1 immunoreactivity was in all VIP-containing cells, but it was absent in TH-immunoreactive amacrine cells and in Mab115A10 immunoreactive bipolar cells. Conclusions GAT-1 in primate retinas is expressed by amacrine and displaced amacrine cells. The predominant expression of GAT-1 in the inner retina is consistent with the idea that GABA transporters influence neurotransmission and thus participate in visual information processing in the retina. PMID:16565409

  13. The effect of amniotic membrane stem cells as donor nucleus on gene expression in reconstructed bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Hassan; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Shams-Esfandabadi, Naser; Afzali, Azita; Ahmadi, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming of a differentiated cell in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a major concern in cloning procedures. Indeed, the nucleus of the donor cell often fails to express the genes which are a prerequisite for normal early embryo development. This study was aimed to evaluate the developmental competence and the expression pattern of some reprogramming related genes in bovine cloned embryos reconstructed with amniotic membrane stem cells (AMSCs) in comparison with those reconstructed with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and adult fibroblasts (AF) as well as with in vitro fertilized (IVF) oocytes. In vitro matured abattoir-derived oocytes were considered as recipients and a hand-made cloning technique was employed for oocyte enucleation and nuclear transfer (NT) procedures. The expression pattern of genes involved in self-renewal and pluripotency (POU5F1, SOX2, NANOG), imprinting (IGF2, IGF2R), DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3A), histone deacetylation (HDAC2), and apoptosis (BAX, BCL2) were evaluated in NT and IVF derived embryos. Despite the insignificant difference in cleavage rate between reconstructed and IVF oocytes, the blastocyst rate in the IVF group was higher than that of other groups. Among reconstructed oocytes, a higher blastocysts rate was observed in MSC-NT and AMSCs-NT derived embryos that were significantly higher than AF-NT derived ones. There were more similarities in the expression pattern of pluripotency and epigenetic modification genes between MSC-NT and IVF derived blastocysts compared with other groups. In conclusion, considering developmental competence, AMSCs, as alternative donors in SCNT procedure, like MSCs, were prone to have more advantage compared with AF. PMID:27389982

  14. Targeted Proteomic Quantitation of the Absolute Expression and Turnover of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in the Apical Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Deficient chloride transport through cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) causes lethal complications in CF patients. CF is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease, which is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene; thus, CFTR mutants can serve as primary targets for drugs to modulate and rescue the ion channel’s function. The first step of drug modulation is to increase the expression of CFTR in the apical plasma membrane (PM); thus, accurate measurement of CFTR in the PM is desired. This work reports a tandem enrichment strategy to prepare PM CFTR and uses a stable isotope labeled CFTR sample as the quantitation reference to measure the absolute amount of apical PM expression of CFTR in CFBE 41o- cells. It was found that CFBE 41o- cells expressing wild-type CFTR (wtCFTR), when cultured on plates, had 2.9 ng of the protein in the apical PM per million cells; this represented 10% of the total CFTR found in the cells. When these cells were polarized on filters, the apical PM expression of CFTR increased to 14%. Turnover of CFTR in the apical PM of baby hamster kidney cells overexpressing wtCFTR (BHK-wtCFTR) was also quantified by targeted proteomics based on multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry; wtCFTR had a half-life of 29.0 ± 2.5 h in the apical PM. This represents the first direct measurement of CFTR turnover using stable isotopes. The absolute quantitation and turnover measurements of CFTR in the apical PM can significantly facilitate understanding the disease mechanism of CF and thus the development of new disease-modifying drugs. Absolute CFTR quantitation allows for direct result comparisons among analyses, analysts, and laboratories and will greatly amplify the overall outcome of CF research and therapy. PMID:25227318

  15. Ion antiport accelerates photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light environments

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Ute; Carrillo, L. Ruby; Venema, Kees; Pavlovic, Lazar; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Kornfeld, Ari; Jahns, Peter; Berry, Joseph A.; Kramer, David M.; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Many photosynthetic organisms globally, including crops, forests and algae, must grow in environments where the availability of light energy fluctuates dramatically. How photosynthesis maintains high efficiency despite such fluctuations in its energy source remains poorly understood. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana K+ efflux antiporter (KEA3) is critical for high photosynthetic efficiency under fluctuating light. On a shift from dark to low light, or high to low light, kea3 mutants show prolonged dissipation of absorbed light energy as heat. KEA3 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and allows proton efflux from the thylakoid lumen by proton/potassium antiport. KEA3’s activity accelerates the downregulation of pH-dependent energy dissipation after transitions to low light, leading to faster recovery of high photosystem II quantum efficiency and increased CO2 assimilation. Our results reveal a mechanism that increases the efficiency of photosynthesis under fluctuating light. PMID:25451040

  16. Ion antiport accelerates photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light environments.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Ute; Carrillo, L Ruby; Venema, Kees; Pavlovic, Lazar; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Kornfeld, Ari; Jahns, Peter; Berry, Joseph A; Kramer, David M; Jonikas, Martin C

    2014-11-13

    Many photosynthetic organisms globally, including crops, forests and algae, must grow in environments where the availability of light energy fluctuates dramatically. How photosynthesis maintains high efficiency despite such fluctuations in its energy source remains poorly understood. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana K(+) efflux antiporter (KEA3) is critical for high photosynthetic efficiency under fluctuating light. On a shift from dark to low light, or high to low light, kea3 mutants show prolonged dissipation of absorbed light energy as heat. KEA3 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and allows proton efflux from the thylakoid lumen by proton/potassium antiport. KEA3's activity accelerates the downregulation of pH-dependent energy dissipation after transitions to low light, leading to faster recovery of high photosystem II quantum efficiency and increased CO2 assimilation. Our results reveal a mechanism that increases the efficiency of photosynthesis under fluctuating light.

  17. Influence of thermal light correlations on photosynthetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mendoza, Adriana; Manrique, Pedro; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Johnson, Neil F.; Rodríguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis

    2014-03-01

    The thermal light from the sun is characterized by both classical and quantum mechanical correlations. These correlations have left a fingerprint on the natural harvesting structures developed through five billion years of evolutionary pressure, specially in photosynthetic organisms. In this work, based upon previous extensive studies of spatio-temporal correlations of light fields, we hypothesize that structures involving photosensitive pigments like those present in purple bacteria vesicles emerge as an evolutionary response to the different properties of incident light. By using burstiness and memory as measures that quantify higher moments of the photon arrival statistics, we generate photon-time traces. They are used to simulate absorption on detectors spatially extended over regions comparable to these light fields coherence length. Finally, we provide some insights into the connection between these photo-statistical features with the photosynthetic membrane architecture and the lights' spatial correlation. Facultad de Ciencias Uniandes.

  18. C4 photosynthetic machinery: insights from maize chloroplast proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Chen, Sixue; Dai, Shaojun

    2013-01-01

    C4 plants exhibit much higher CO2 assimilation rates than C{}3 plants under certain conditions. The specialized differentiation of mesophyll cell and bundle sheath cell type chloroplasts is unique to C4 plants and improves photosynthetic efficiency. Maize (Zea mays) is an important crop and model with C4 photosynthetic machinery. 2DE and high-throughput quantitative proteomics approaches (e.g., isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation and shotgun proteomics) have been employed to investigate maize chloroplast structure and function. These proteomics studies have provided valuable information on C4 chloroplast protein components, photosynthesis, and other metabolic mechanisms underlying chloroplast biogenesis, stromal, and membrane differentiation, as well as response to salinity, high/low temperature, and light stress. This review presents an overview of proteomics advances in maize chloroplast biology. PMID:23596450

  19. The altered photosynthetic machinery during compatible virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinzi; Cui, Hongguang; Cui, Xiaoyan; Wang, Aiming

    2016-04-01

    As an organelle only found in plant cells and some protists, the chloroplast is not only the main metabolic energy originator, but also the abiotic/biotic stress sensor and defense signal generator. For a long time, chloroplasts have been recognized as a common target by many plant viruses. Viruses may directly modify chloroplast membranes to assemble their replication complex for viral genome replication. Viruses may downregulate chloroplast-related and photosynthesis-related genes via an as yet unknown mechanism to support their infection. Viruses may also interrupt functionality of the photosynthetic machinery through protein-protein interactions. This review briefly summarizes current knowledge about modifications of the photosynthetic machinery by plant viruses, highlights the important role of chloroplasts in the infection process and discusses chloroplast-associated pathogenesis.

  20. Ion antiport accelerates photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light environments.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Ute; Carrillo, L Ruby; Venema, Kees; Pavlovic, Lazar; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Kornfeld, Ari; Jahns, Peter; Berry, Joseph A; Kramer, David M; Jonikas, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Many photosynthetic organisms globally, including crops, forests and algae, must grow in environments where the availability of light energy fluctuates dramatically. How photosynthesis maintains high efficiency despite such fluctuations in its energy source remains poorly understood. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana K(+) efflux antiporter (KEA3) is critical for high photosynthetic efficiency under fluctuating light. On a shift from dark to low light, or high to low light, kea3 mutants show prolonged dissipation of absorbed light energy as heat. KEA3 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and allows proton efflux from the thylakoid lumen by proton/potassium antiport. KEA3's activity accelerates the downregulation of pH-dependent energy dissipation after transitions to low light, leading to faster recovery of high photosystem II quantum efficiency and increased CO2 assimilation. Our results reveal a mechanism that increases the efficiency of photosynthesis under fluctuating light. PMID:25451040

  1. Pigment oligomers as natural and artificial photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Green photosynthetic bacteria contain antenna complexes known as chlorosomes. These complexes are appressed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane and function to absorb light and transfer the energy to the photochemical reaction center, where photochemical energy storage takes place. Chlorosomes differ from all other known photosynthetic antenna complexes in that the geometrical arrangement of pigments is determined primarily by pigment-pigment interactions instead of pigment-protein interactions. The bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e pigments found in chlorosomes form large oligomers with characteristic spectral properties significantly perturbed from those exhibited by monomeric pigments. Because of their close spatial interaction, the pigments are thought to be strongly coupled electronically, and many of the optical properties result from exciton interactions. This presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the chemical composition and properties of chlorosomes, the evidence for the oligomeric nature of chlorosome pigment organization and proposed structures for the oligomers, and the kinetics and mechanisms of energy transfer in chlorosomes.

  2. Human carcinomas variably express the complement inhibitory proteins CD46 (membrane cofactor protein), CD55 (decay-accelerating factor), and CD59 (protectin).

    PubMed

    Niehans, G A; Cherwitz, D L; Staley, N A; Knapp, D J; Dalmasso, A P

    1996-07-01

    Normal human tissues express membrane-associated complement inhibitory proteins that protect these tissues from damage by autologous complement. To determine whether neoplasms also express these proteins, we examined the distribution of the complement inhibitors decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CD59 (protectin), and membrane cofactor protein in frozen samples of human breast, colon, kidney, and lung carcinomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, using immunohistochemistry. All samples were also studied for deposition of C3 fragments and activated C5b-9. Differences between normal tissues and the corresponding neoplasms were often observed, with loss or gain of expression of one or more inhibitors. Ductal carcinomas of the breast showed the most variation in phenotype; some tumors expressed only one inhibitor while others expressed different combinations of two or three inhibitors. Colon carcinomas, by contrast, stained intensely for all inhibitors. Renal cell carcinomas had weak to moderate expression of one to three inhibitors, generally DAF and CD59, whereas non-small cell carcinomas of the lung usually expressed CD59 and membrane cofactor protein with variable DAF immunoreactivity. The two small cell carcinomas of the lung showed little or no staining for any inhibitor. Activated C5b-9 deposition was seen adjacent to tumor nests in a minority of carcinomas and showed no correlation with complement inhibitor expression. C3 fragment deposition was minimal. Our results demonstrate that most carcinomas, with the exception of small cell carcinomas of the lung, do express one or more complement inhibitors at a level likely to inhibit complement-mediated cellular damage. Unexpectedly, large quantities of DAF and CD59 were often observed in tumor stroma, with only limited deposition in normal connective tissue. This suggests that carcinomas may supplement the activity of membrane-associated complement inhibitors by release of soluble forms of DAF and CD59 into the

  3. Lipopolysaccharide induces nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor increases nitric oxide production in human fetal membranes in culture

    PubMed Central

    Seyffarth, Gunter; Nelson, Paul N; Dunmore, Simon J; Rodrigo, Nalinda; Murphy, Damian J; Carson, Ray J

    2004-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide may be involved in the initiation of human labour as inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to test whether platelet-activating factor and lipopolysaccharide were able to induce nitric oxide synthase expression and stimulate the production of nitric oxide in human fetal membrane explants in culture. Methods Fetal membranes were collected from Caesarean sections at term. RNA was extracted from membranes and subjected to a qualitative RT-PCR to assess the baseline expression of iNOS. Discs of fetal membranes were cultured for 24 hours in the presence of platelet-activating factor at a dose range of 0.1 nanomolar – 1 micomolar or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide. Nitric oxide production was measured via nitrite ions in the culture medium and mRNA for iNOS was detected by RT-PCR. Results Culturing the membrane discs in medium containing serum induced nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide under these conditions. When cultured without serum inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was induced by lipopolysaccharide, but not by platelet-activating factor. Conclusion Platelet-activating factor may have a role in the initiation of labour, at term or preterm, via the increased local production of nitric oxide as an inflammatory mediator. In this model of intrauterine infection, lipopolysaccharide was found to induce iNOS expression by fetal membranes, and this mechanism could be involved in preterm labour. PMID:15191613

  4. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Elisa; Argentino, Giuseppe; Beri, Ruggero; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC) and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice. Methods PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators. Results Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN) inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation) involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium) suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides. Conclusions We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum. PMID

  5. Alternate phase variation in expression of two major surface membrane proteins (MBA and UU376) of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Stiedl, Thomas; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2009-03-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum are commensals and pathogens of the human urogenital tract and of newborn infants. There are four distinct U. parvum serovars and 10 distinct U. urealyticum serovars. Both species possess a distinct immunodominant variable surface protein, the multiple banded antigen (MBA), which shows size variability among isolates as a result of changes in the number of C-terminal repeating units. Adjacent to the MBA gene (UU375) lies UU376, which was annotated as 'Ureaplasma-specific conserved hypothetical gene'. In four different strains of U. parvum serovar 3, we demonstrated expression of UU376 by Western blot analysis and phase variation between UU376, here designated Upvmp376 (Ureaplasma phase-variable membrane protein 376), and MBA after application of selective pressure with hyperimmune antisera directed against either protein. By Southern blot analysis, we found that the switch between MBA and Upvmp376 expression is associated with a DNA inversion event in which the nonrepetitive region of the MBA gene and its putative promoter region are opposed to either the repetitive region of MBA or UU376. We propose that in U. parvum serovar 3, and presumably in all U. parvum and U. urealyticum, an inversion event at specific sites effects an alternate ON/OFF switching of the genes UU375 and UU376.

  6. LOS oligosaccharide modification enhances dendritic cell responses to meningococcal native outer membrane vesicles expressing a non-toxic lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hannah E; Copland, Alastair; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Cohen, Jonathan; Brown, Jeremy; Klein, Nigel; van der Ley, Peter; Dixon, Garth

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are released by many bacteria, and contain immunogenic antigens in addition to harmful inflammatory factors, like lipopolysaccharides. Chemically detoxified OMV have been used in vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis (Nm); however, little is known about their interaction with antigen presenting cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of Nm OMV with human dendritic cells (DC) to gain further understanding of their biological activity. We engineered a novel serogroup B Nm that is unencapsulated (siaD), expresses pentacylated lipid A (lpxL1), hence conferring reduced toxicity, and expresses an lgtB oligosaccharide structure designed to target OMV to DC via DC-SIGN. We show that the lgtB moiety is critical for internalization of NOMV by DC. Furthermore, the lgtB moiety significantly enhances DC maturation, IL-10 and IL-23 production in the presence of a pentacylated lipid A. While different DC phenotypes were observed for each NOMV, this had little effect on Th1 and Th2 cell differentiation; however, lgtBsignificantly increased Th17 cell expansion in the presence of pentacylated lipid A. We believe that lpxL1/lgtB NOMV should be considered further as a vaccine vector, particularly considering the importance of lgtB in antigen uptake and further human studies on antigen-specific responses should be considered. PMID:24152255

  7. Expression of nestin, mesothelin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) in developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Josko; Forempoher, Gea; Ostojic, Ljerka; Mardesic-Brakus, Snjezana; Andjelinovic, Simun; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2011-11-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of appearance of nestin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and mesothelin proteins was immunohistochemically determined in the cells of normal developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas. Human meninges developed as two mesenchymal condensations in the head region. The simple squamous epithelium on the surface of leptomeninges developed during mesenchymal to epithelial transformation. Nestin appeared for the first time in week 7, EMA in week 8, while mesothelin appeared in week 22 of development. In the late fetal period and after birth, nestin expression decreased, whereas expression of EMA and mesothelin increased. EMA appeared in all surface epithelial cells and nodules, while mesothelin was found only in some of them. In adult meninges, all three proteins were predominantly localized in the surface epithelium and meningeal nodules. In meningothelial meningiomas (WHO grade I), EMA was detected in all tumor cells except in the endothelial cells, mesothelin characterized nests of tumor cells, while nestin was found predominantly in the walls of blood vessels. The distribution pattern of those proteins in normal meningeal and tumor cells indicates that nestin might characterize immature cells, while EMA and mesothelin appeared in maturing epithelial cells. Neoplastic transformation of these specific cell lineages contributes to the cell population in meningiomas.

  8. Ferlins Show Tissue-Specific Expression and Segregate as Plasma Membrane/Late Endosomal or Trans-Golgi/Recycling Ferlins.

    PubMed

    Redpath, Gregory M I; Sophocleous, Reece A; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-03-01

    Ferlins are a family of transmembrane-anchored vesicle fusion proteins uniquely characterized by 5-7 tandem cytoplasmic C2 domains, Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding domains that regulate vesicle fusion in the synaptotagmin family. In humans, dysferlin mutations cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) due to defective Ca(2+)-dependent, vesicle-mediated membrane repair and otoferlin mutations cause non-syndromic deafness due to defective Ca(2+)-triggered auditory neurotransmission. In this study, we describe the tissue-specific expression, subcellular localization and endocytic trafficking of the ferlin family. Studies of endosomal transit together with 3D-structured illumination microscopy reveals dysferlin and myoferlin are abundantly expressed at the PM and cycle to Rab7-positive late endosomes, supporting potential roles in the late-endosomal pathway. In contrast, Fer1L6 shows concentrated localization to a specific compartment of the trans-Golgi/recycling endosome, cycling rapidly between this compartment and the PM via Rab11 recycling endosomes. Otoferlin also shows trans-Golgi to PM cycling, with very low levels of PM otoferlin suggesting either brief PM residence, or rare incorporation of otoferlin molecules into the PM. Thus, type-I and type-II ferlins segregate as PM/late-endosomal or trans-Golgi/recycling ferlins, consistent with different ferlins mediating vesicle fusion events in specific subcellular locations.

  9. Bismuth Dimercaptopropanol (BisBAL) Inhibits the Expression of Extracellular Polysaccharides and Proteins by Brevundimonas diminuta: Implications for Membrane Microfiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Badireddy, Appala R.; Chellam, Shankararaman; Yanina, Svetlana; Gassman, Paul L.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2008-02-15

    A 2:1 molar ratio preparation of bismuth with a lipophilic dithiol (3-dimercapto-1-propanol, BAL)significantly reduced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) expression by Brevundimonas diminuta in suspended cultures at levels just below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Total polysaccharides and proteins secreted by B. diminuta decreased by approximately 95% over a 5-day period when exposed to the bismuth-BAL chelate (BisBAL) at near MIC (12 μM). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) suggested that a possible mechanism of biofilm disruption by BisBAL is the inhibition of carbohydrate Oacetylation. FTIR also revealed extensive homology between EPS samples with and without BisBAL treatment, with proteins, polysaccharides, and peptides varying predominantly only in the amount expressed. EPS secretion decreased following BisBAL treatment as verified by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Without BisBAL treatment, a slime-like EPS matrix secreted by B. diminuta resulted in biofouling and inefficient hydrodynamic backwashing of microfiltration membranes.

  10. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  11. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-21

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolutionmore » inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. We find our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. Lastly, these observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.« less

  12. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture. PMID:26790980

  13. Wheat germ cell-free expression: Two detergents with a low critical micelle concentration allow for production of soluble HCV membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure; Badillo, Aurélie; Jirasko, Vlastimil; Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Paul, David; Lancien, Loick; Moradpour, Darius; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Meier, Beat H; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to express in a soluble form. Here, we use wheat germ cell-free expression in the presence of various detergents to produce the non-structural membrane proteins 2, 4B and 5A of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). We show that lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG-3) and dodecyl octaethylene glycol ether (C12E8) detergents can yield essentially soluble membrane proteins at detergent concentrations that do not inhibit the cell-free reaction. This finding can be explained by the low critical micelle concentration (CMC) of these detergents, which keeps the monomer concentrations low while at the same time providing the necessary excess of detergent concentration above CMC required for full target protein solubilization. We estimate that a tenfold excess of detergent micelles with respect to the protein concentration is sufficient for solubilization, a number that we propose as a guideline for detergent screening assays.

  14. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  15. Characterization and expression of plasma and tonoplast membrane aquaporins in primed seed of Brassica napus during germination under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y P; Young, L; Bonham-Smith, P; Gusta, L V

    1999-07-01

    Two aquaporin genes were isolated from a cDNA library of canola (Brassica napus L.). The first aquaporin, BnPIP1 of 1094 bp, encoding a putative polypeptide of 287 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 30.4 kDa and a pI of 7.8, belongs to the family of plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIPs) aquaporins. The B. napus aquaporin showed 85-94% identity to the Arabidopsis thaliana PIPs. ABA priming of seed induced high levels of BnPIP1 transcript which remained after subsequent re-drying of the seed. The second aquaporin, Bny-TIP2 of 1020 bp, encoded a putative polypeptide of 253 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 25.8 kDa and a pI of 5.8. Bngamma-TIP2 showed 83-90% identity to gamma-TIP genes from a variety of plant species. Bngamma-TIP2 was expressed only when radicle protrusion occurred in either untreated or primed seeds. Seeds primed with PEG or ABA germinated earlier and showed a higher final percentage of germination than unprimed seed, particularly under salt and osmotic stresses at low temperature. Transcripts of both BnPIP1 and Bngamma-TIP2 genes were present earlier during germination of primed seeds than non-primed seed. From these results, we conclude that BnPIP1 is related to the water transportation required for enzymatic metabolism of storage nutrients at the early stages of canola seed germination whereas Bngamma-TIP2 expression is related to cell growth associated with radicle protrusion. Priming induced the expression of BnPIP1 but had no effect on Bngamma-TIP2.

  16. Expression of vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2)/synaptobrevin II and cellubrevin in rat skeletal muscle and in a muscle cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Volchuk, A; Mitsumoto, Y; He, L; Liu, Z; Habermann, E; Trimble, W; Klip, A

    1994-01-01

    Molecular studies have identified a family of synaptic vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs, also known as synaptobrevins) which have been implicated in synaptic vesicle docking and/or fusion with plasma membrane proteins. Here we demonstrate the expression of two members of this family, VAMP-2/synaptobrevin II and cellubrevin, in skeletal muscle, a tissue with both constitutive and regulated membrane traffic. The 18 kDa VAMP-2 polypeptide was detected in purified membrane fractions from adult skeletal muscle and from L6 myotubes in culture, demonstrating that the presence of this protein in the isolated muscle membrane fractions is not the result of contamination by ancillary tissues such as peripheral nerve. Furthermore, skeletal muscle and the muscle cell line also expressed cellubrevin, a VAMP-2 homologue of 17 kDa; which is much less abundant in brain cells. Both VAMP-2 and cellubrevin were preferentially isolated in membrane fractions rich in plasma membranes, and were less concentrated in light microsomes and other internal membrane fractions of mature muscle or muscle cells in culture. Interestingly, both VAMP-2 and cellubrevin were much more abundant in the differentiated L6 myotubes than in their precursor myoblasts, suggesting that they are required for functions of differentiated muscle cells. The identity of both polypeptides was further confirmed by their susceptibility to proteolysis by Clostridium tetanus toxin. Expression of these products was further established by the presence of mRNA transcripts of VAMP-2 and cellubrevin, but not of VAMP-1, in both skeletal muscle and L6 myotubes. In contrast, other synaptic vesicle and docking/fusion components were undetectable, such as VAMP-1, SNAP25 and syntaxin 1A/1B, as were synaptophysin and synapsin Ia/Ib, proteins which are believed to be involved in sensing the signal for neuronal exocytosis. It is concluded that VAMP-2 and cellubrevin are expressed in skeletal muscle cells and may each

  17. Quantifying reflectance anisotropy of photosynthetically active radiation in grasslands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    Quantifying the vegetative surface's reflectance anisotropy was an important part of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment, as its major objectives focused on retrieval of surface parameters from satellite-derived reflectances. The explicit remote measurements for approximating the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of photosynthetically active radiation had not been previously undertaken. In this paper the proper expression of reflectance for BRDFs for retrieval of canopy parameters is assessed.

  18. Rat mammary carcinogenesis induced by in situ expression of constitutive Raf kinase activity is prevented by tethering Raf to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Daniel R; Gould, Michael N

    2003-06-01

    Mammary carcinogenesis induced through expression of activated Raf was investigated using a model in which retroviral vectors were infused into the central ducts of rat mammary glands. This model allows efficient expression of experimental proteins in a small fraction of endogenous mammary epithelial cells in situ. We previously reported that Raf is the dominant oncogenic signaling pathway from activated Ras in rat mammary glands. We show here that mammary gland carcinogenesis is rapidly induced by the expression of c-Raf-1 kinase that is activated by N-terminal truncation (Delta-Raf). Interestingly, targeting Raf to the plasma membrane via C-terminal fusion with Ras membrane localization signals (Raf-Caax) induces Raf kinase activity that transforms 3T3 cells more frequently than Delta-Raf, yet in situ expression of Raf-Caax does not induce mammary carcinomas. To investigate these contrasting results and begin elucidating the mechanisms of Raf-induced mammary carcinogenesis, we combined both activating mutations (N-terminal truncation and C-terminal membrane localization motifs) in one Raf construct (Delta-Raf-Caax). While Delta-Raf-Caax transforms 3T3 cells more efficiently than Delta-Raf or Raf-Caax, in situ expression of Delta-Raf-Caax does not induce carcinomas in vivo, demonstrating that lipid modification on the C-terminus of Delta-Raf negates its oncogenic potential in rat mammary gland.

  19. In vivo administration of extracellular cGMP normalizes TNF-α and membrane expression of AMPA receptors in hippocampus and spatial reference memory but not IL-1β, NMDA receptors in membrane and working memory in hyperammonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Balzano, Tiziano; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-10-01

    Patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) show working memory and visuo-spatial orientation deficits. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to cognitive impairment in HE. Hyperammonemic rats show impaired spatial learning and learning ability in the Y maze. Intracerebral administration of extracellular cGMP restores learning in the Y-maze. The underlying mechanisms remain unknown. It also remains unknown whether extracellular cGMP improves neuroinflammation or restores spatial learning in hyperammonemic rats and if it affects differently reference and working memory. The aims of this work were: Spatial working and reference memory were assessed using the radial and Morris water mazes and neuroinflammation by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Membrane expression of NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits was analyzed using the BS3 crosslinker. Extracellular cGMP was administered intracerebrally using osmotic minipumps. Chronic hyperammonemia induces neuroinflammation in hippocampus, with astrocytes activation and increased IL-1β, which are associated with increased NMDA receptors membrane expression and impaired working memory. This process is not affected by extracellular cGMP. Hyperammonemia also activates microglia and increases TNF-α, alters membrane expression of AMPA receptor subunits (increased GluA1 and reduced GluA2) and impairs reference memory. All these changes are reversed by extracellular cGMP. These results show that extracellular cGMP modulates spatial reference memory but not working memory. This would be mediated by modulation of TNF-α levels and of membrane expression of GluA1 and GluA2 subunits of AMPA receptors.

  20. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  1. TREK2 Expressed Selectively in IB4-Binding C-Fiber Nociceptors Hyperpolarizes Their Membrane Potentials and Limits Spontaneous Pain

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Cristian; Djouhri, Laiche; Watkins, Roger; Berry, Carol; Bromage, Kirsty

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing/spontaneous pain behavior is associated with ongoing/spontaneous firing (SF) in adult DRG C-fiber nociceptors (Djouhri et al., 2006). Causes of this SF are not understood. We show here that conducting (sometimes called uninjured) C-nociceptors in neuropathic pain models with more hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials (Ems) have lower SF rates. Understanding the control of their Ems may therefore be important for limiting pathological pain. We report that TREK2, a leak K+ channel, is selectively expressed in IB4 binding rat C-nociceptors. These IB4+ C-neurons are ∼10 mV more hyperpolarized than IB4− C-neurons in vivo (Fang et al., 2006). TREK2 knockdown by siRNA in these neurons in culture depolarized them by ∼10 mV, suggesting that TREK2 is responsible for this ∼10 mV difference. In vivo, more hyperpolarized C-nociceptor Ems were associated with higher cytoplasmic edge-TREK2 expression (edge-TREK2). Edge-TREK2 decreased in C-neurons 7 d after axotomy, and their Ems depolarized by ∼10 mV. This again supports a contribution of TREK2 to their Ems. These relationships between (1) Em and TREK2, (2) SF rate and Em, and (3) spontaneous pain behavior and C-nociceptor SF rate suggested that TREK2 knockdown might increase spontaneous pain. After CFA-induced inflammation, spontaneous foot lifting (a measure of spontaneous pain) was (1) greater in rats with naturally lower TREK2 in ipsilateral small DRG neurons and (2) increased by siRNA-induced TREK2 knockdown in vivo. We conclude that TREK2 hyperpolarizes IB4 binding C-nociceptors and limits pathological spontaneous pain. Similar TREK2 distributions in small DRG neurons of several species suggest that these role(s) of TREK2 may be widespread. PMID:24453337

  2. Function and expression study uncovered hepatocyte plasma membrane ecto-ATP synthase as a novel player in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Federica; Giannoccaro, Caterina; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; De Luca, Elisa; Santacroce, Salvatore; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    ATP synthase, canonically mitochondrially located, is reported to be ectopically expressed on the plasma membrane outer face of several cell types. We analysed, for the first time, the expression and catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase during liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was induced in rats by two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The protein level and the ATP synthase and/or hydrolase activities of the hepatocyte ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase were analysed on freshly isolated hepatocytes and mitochondria from control, sham-operated and partial hepatectomized rats. During the priming phase of liver regeneration, 3 h after partial hepatectomy, liver mitochondria showed a marked lowering of the ATP synthase protein level that was reflected in the impairment of both ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. The ecto-ATP synthase level, in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, was decreased similarly to the level of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, associated with a lowering of the ecto-ATP hydrolase activity coupled to proton influx. Noteworthily, the ecto-ATP synthase activity coupled to proton efflux was completely inhibited in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, even in the presence of a marked intracellular acidification that would sustain it as in control and sham-operated hepatocytes. At the end of the liver regeneration, 7 days after partial hepatectomy, the level and the catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase reached the control and sham-operated values. The specific modulation of hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase catalytic activities during liver regeneration priming phase may modulate the extracellular ADP/ATP levels and/or proton influx/efflux trafficking, making hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase a candidate for a novel player in the liver regeneration process. PMID:27287557

  3. Invasion-inhibitory antibodies elicited by immunization with Plasmodium vivax apical membrane antigen-1 expressed in Pichia pastoris yeast.

    PubMed

    Vicentin, Elaine C; Françoso, Kátia S; Rocha, Mariana V; Iourtov, Dmitri; Dos Santos, Fernanda L; Kubrusly, Flávia S; Sakauchi, Maria A; Raw, Isaias; Nosten, Francois; Rénia, Laurent; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Russell, Bruce; Soares, Irene S

    2014-03-01

    In a recent vaccine trial performed with African children, immunization with a recombinant protein based on Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) conferred a significant degree of strain-specific resistance against malaria. To contribute to the efforts of generating a vaccine against Plasmodium vivax malaria, we expressed the ectodomain of P. vivax AMA-1 (PvAMA-1) as a secreted soluble protein in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Recognized by a high percentage of sera from individuals infected by P. vivax, this recombinant protein was found to have maintained its antigenicity. The immunogenicity of this protein was evaluated in mice using immunization protocols that included homologous and heterologous prime-boost strategies with plasmid DNA and recombinant protein. We used the following formulations containing different adjuvants: aluminum salts (Alum), Bordetella pertussis monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), flagellin FliC from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, saponin Quil A, or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The formulations containing the adjuvants Quil A or IFA elicited the highest IgG antibody titers. Significant antibody titers were also obtained using a formulation developed for human use containing MPLA or Alum plus MPLA. Recombinant PvAMA-1 produced under "conditions of good laboratory practice" provided a good yield, high purity, low endotoxin levels, and no microbial contaminants and reproduced the experimental immunizations. Most relevant for vaccine development was the fact that immunization with PvAMA-1 elicited invasion-inhibitory antibodies against different Asian isolates of P. vivax. Our results show that AMA-1 expressed in P. pastoris is a promising antigen for use in future preclinical and clinical studies.

  4. Function and expression study uncovered hepatocyte plasma membrane ecto-ATP synthase as a novel player in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Federica; Giannoccaro, Caterina; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; De Luca, Elisa; Santacroce, Salvatore; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    ATP synthase, canonically mitochondrially located, is reported to be ectopically expressed on the plasma membrane outer face of several cell types. We analysed, for the first time, the expression and catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase during liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was induced in rats by two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The protein level and the ATP synthase and/or hydrolase activities of the hepatocyte ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase were analysed on freshly isolated hepatocytes and mitochondria from control, sham-operated and partial hepatectomized rats. During the priming phase of liver regeneration, 3 h after partial hepatectomy, liver mitochondria showed a marked lowering of the ATP synthase protein level that was reflected in the impairment of both ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. The ecto-ATP synthase level, in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, was decreased similarly to the level of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, associated with a lowering of the ecto-ATP hydrolase activity coupled to proton influx. Noteworthily, the ecto-ATP synthase activity coupled to proton efflux was completely inhibited in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, even in the presence of a marked intracellular acidification that would sustain it as in control and sham-operated hepatocytes. At the end of the liver regeneration, 7 days after partial hepatectomy, the level and the catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase reached the control and sham-operated values. The specific modulation of hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase catalytic activities during liver regeneration priming phase may modulate the extracellular ADP/ATP levels and/or proton influx/efflux trafficking, making hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase a candidate for a novel player in the liver regeneration process.

  5. Membrane domain structures of three classes of histidine kinase receptors by cell-free expression and rapid NMR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Klammt, Christian; Hwang, Eunha; Kefala, Georgia; Okamura, Mizuki; Esquivies, Luis; Mörs, Karsten; Glaubitz, Clemens; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Jeon, Young Ho; Choe, Senyon

    2010-01-01

    NMR structural studies of membrane proteins (MP) are hampered by complications in MP expression, technical difficulties associated with the slow process of NMR spectral peak assignment, and limited distance information obtainable for transmembrane (TM) helices. To overcome the inherent challenges in the determination of MP structures, we have developed a rapid and cost-efficient strategy that combines cell-free (CF) protein synthesis, optimized combinatorial dual-isotope labeling for nearly instant resonance assignment, and fast acquisition of long-distance information using paramagnetic probes. Here we report three backbone structures for the TM domains of the three classes of Escherichia coli histidine kinase receptors (HKRs). The ArcB and QseC TM domains are both two-helical motifs, whereas the KdpD TM domain comprises a four-helical bundle with shorter second and third helices. The interhelical distances (up to 12 Å) reveal weak interactions within the TM domains of all three receptors. Determined consecutively within 8 months, these structures offer insight into the abundant and underrepresented in the Protein Data Bank class of 2–4 TM crossers and demonstrate the efficiency of our CF combinatorial dual-labeling strategy, which can be applied to solve MP structures in high numbers and at a high speed. Our results greatly expand the current knowledge of HKR structure, opening the doors to studies on their widespread and pharmaceutically important bacterial signaling mechanism. PMID:20498088

  6. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  7. Potato tuber expression of Arabidopsis WRINKLED1 increase triacylglycerol and membrane lipids while affecting central carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hofvander, Per; Ischebeck, Till; Turesson, Helle; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Feussner, Ivo; Carlsson, Anders S; Andersson, Mariette

    2016-09-01

    Tuber and root crops virtually exclusively accumulate storage products in the form of carbohydrates. An exception is yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) in which tubers have the capacity to store starch and triacylglycerols (TAG) in roughly equal amounts. This suggests that a tuber crop can efficiently handle accumulation of energy dense oil. From a nutritional as well as economic aspect, it would be of interest to utilize the high yield capacity of tuber or root crops for oil accumulation similar to yellow nutsedge. The transcription factor WRINKLED1 from Arabidopsis thaliana, which in seed embryos induce fatty acid synthesis, has been shown to be a major factor for oil accumulation. WRINKLED1 was expressed in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers to explore whether this factor could impact tuber metabolism. This study shows that a WRINKLED1 transcription factor could induce triacylglycerol accumulation in tubers of transformed potato plants grown in field (up to 12 nmol TAG/mg dry weight, 1% of dry weight) together with a large increase in polar membrane lipids. The changes in metabolism further affected starch accumulation and composition concomitant with massive increases in sugar content.

  8. Bypassing tumor-associated immune suppression with recombinant adenovirus constructs expressing membrane bound or secreted GITR-L.

    PubMed

    Calmels, Bastien; Paul, Stéphane; Futin, Nicolas; Ledoux, Catherine; Stoeckel, Fabienne; Acres, Bruce

    2005-02-01

    Recent evidence has resurrected the concept of specialized populations of T lymphocytes that are able to suppress an antigen-specific immune response. T-regulatory cells (T-reg) have been characterized as CD4+ CD25+ T cells. Previous reports describing differential gene expression analysis have shown that the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis family receptor family-related gene (GITR) is upregulated in these cells. Furthermore, antibodies specific for GITR have been shown to inhibit the T-suppressor function of CD4+ CD25+ T-reg. The ligands for both mouse and human GITR have been cloned recently. We have inserted the sequences for natural, membrane-bound GITR-ligand (GITR-L) and a truncated secreted form of GITR-L (GITR-Lsol) into the adenovirus-5 genome. Coculture experiments show that cells infected with Ad-GITR-L and supernatants from cells infected with Ad-GITR-Lsol can increase the proliferation of both CD4+ CD25- and CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 stimulation, in the presence, as well as in the absence, of CD4+ CD25+ T cells. The virus constructs were injected into growing B16 melanoma tumors. Ad-GITR-L was shown to attract infiltration with both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Both constructs were shown to inhibit tumor growth. PMID:15472713

  9. Conditional expression of apical membrane antigen 1 in Plasmodium falciparum shows it is required for erythrocyte invasion by merozoites

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Alan; Azevedo, Mauro F; Gilson, Paul R; Weiss, Greta E; O’Neill, Matthew T; Wilson, Danny W; Crabb, Brendan S; Cowman, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Summary Malaria is caused by obligate intracellular parasites, of which Plasmodium falciparum is the most lethal species. In humans, P. falciparum merozoites (invasive forms of the parasite) employ a host of parasite proteins to rapidly invade erythrocytes. One of these is the P. falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) which forms a complex with rhoptry neck proteins at the tight junction. Here, we have placed the Pfama1 gene under conditional control using dimerizable Cre recombinase (DiCre) in P. falciparum. DiCre-mediated excision of the loxP-flanked Pfama1 gene results in approximately 80% decreased expression of the protein within one intraerythrocytic growth cycle. This reduces growth by 40%, due to decreased invasion efficiency characterized by a post-invasion defect in sealing of the parasitophorous vacuole. These results show that PfAMA1 is an essential protein for merozoite invasion in P. falciparum and either directly or indirectly plays a role in resealing of the red blood cell at the posterior end of the invasion event. PMID:24571085

  10. Potato tuber expression of Arabidopsis WRINKLED1 increase triacylglycerol and membrane lipids while affecting central carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hofvander, Per; Ischebeck, Till; Turesson, Helle; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Feussner, Ivo; Carlsson, Anders S; Andersson, Mariette

    2016-09-01

    Tuber and root crops virtually exclusively accumulate storage products in the form of carbohydrates. An exception is yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) in which tubers have the capacity to store starch and triacylglycerols (TAG) in roughly equal amounts. This suggests that a tuber crop can efficiently handle accumulation of energy dense oil. From a nutritional as well as economic aspect, it would be of interest to utilize the high yield capacity of tuber or root crops for oil accumulation similar to yellow nutsedge. The transcription factor WRINKLED1 from Arabidopsis thaliana, which in seed embryos induce fatty acid synthesis, has been shown to be a major factor for oil accumulation. WRINKLED1 was expressed in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers to explore whether this factor could impact tuber metabolism. This study shows that a WRINKLED1 transcription factor could induce triacylglycerol accumulation in tubers of transformed potato plants grown in field (up to 12 nmol TAG/mg dry weight, 1% of dry weight) together with a large increase in polar membrane lipids. The changes in metabolism further affected starch accumulation and composition concomitant with massive increases in sugar content. PMID:26914183

  11. Expression of a Sensory Neuron Membrane Protein SNMP2 in Olfactory Sensilla of Codling Moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinglong; Liu, Lu; Fang, Yiqing; Feng, Jinian

    2016-08-01

    In insects, sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) are critical peripheral olfactory proteins and highly promote the sensitivity of pheromone detection. In this study, we cloned an SNMP transcript (CpomSNMP2, GenBank KU302714) from the antennae of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.) Its open reading frame is 1,575 bp and it encodes a protein with 524 amino acids. CpomSNMP2 contains two putative transmembrane domains and has a large extracellular loop. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CpomSNMP2 is clustered into the group of previously characterized lepidopteron SNMP2s. Expression levels of CpomSNMP2 were significantly higher in antennae of both males and females than in tissues from the thoraxes, abdomens, legs, and wings. CpomSNMP2 was distributed in sensilla trichodea of both males and females, but only in sensilla chaetica of males. This study provides evidence for olfactory roles of CpomSNMP2 in this moth. PMID:27329623

  12. Expression of dopamine D2 receptor in PC-12 cells and regulation of membrane conductances by dopamine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W H; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1997-10-01

    PC-12 cells depolarize during hypoxia and release dopamine. The hypoxia-induced depolarization is due to inhibition of an O2-sensitive K+ current. The role of dopamine released during hypoxia is uncertain, but it could act as an autocrine to modulate membrane conductance during hypoxia. The current study was undertaken to investigate this possibility. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis revealed that the D2 isoform of the dopamine receptor is expressed in rat PC-12 cells. Exogenously applied dopamine and the D2 agonist quinpirole elicited inhibition of a voltage-dependent K+ current (I(K)) that was prevented by sulpiride, a D2 receptor antagonist. Dopamine and quinpirole applied during hypoxia potentiated the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on I(K). We also found that quinpirole caused reversible inhibition of a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (I(Ca)) and attenuation of the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxia. Our results indicate that dopamine released from PC-12 cells during hypoxia acts via a D2 receptor to "autoregulate" I(K) and I(Ca). PMID:9357757

  13. Two promoters and two translation start sites control the expression of the Shigella flexneri outer membrane protease IcsP

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Kamneva, Olga K.; Levy, Karen M.; Labahn, Stephanie K.; Africa, Lia A.; Wing, Helen J.

    2011-01-01

    The Shigella flexneri outer membrane protease IcsP proteolytically cleaves the actin-based motility protein IcsA from the bacterial surface. The icsP gene is monocistronic and lies downstream of an unusually large intergenic region on the Shigella virulence plasmid. In silico analysis of this region predicts a second transcription start site 84 bp upstream of the first. Primer extension analyses and beta-galactosidase assays demonstrate that both transcription start sites are used. Both promoters are regulated by the Shigella virulence gene regulator VirB and both respond similarly to conditions known to influence Shigella virulence gene expression (iron concentration, pH, osmotic pressure, and phase of growth). The newly identified promoter lies upstream of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and second 5’-ATG-3’, which is in frame with the annotated icsP gene. The use of either translation start site leads to the production of IcsP capable of proteolytically cleaving IcsA. A bioinformatic scan of the Shigella genome reveals multiple occurrences of in-frame translation start sites associated with putative Shine –Dalgarno sequences, immediately upstream and downstream of annotated open reading frames. Taken together, our observations support the possibility that the use of in-frame translation start sites may generate different protein isoforms, thereby expanding the proteome encoded by bacterial genomes. PMID:21225241

  14. IM30 triggers membrane fusion in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Raoul; Heidrich, Jennifer; Saur, Michael; Schmüser, Lars; Roeters, Steven J; Hellmann, Nadja; Woutersen, Sander; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias; Markl, Jürgen; Schneider, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria is a unique internal membrane system harbouring the complexes of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain. Despite their apparent importance, little is known about the biogenesis and maintenance of thylakoid membranes. Although membrane fusion events are essential for the formation of thylakoid membranes, proteins involved in membrane fusion have yet to be identified in photosynthetic cells or organelles. Here we show that IM30, a conserved chloroplast and cyanobacterial protein of approximately 30 kDa binds as an oligomeric ring in a well-defined geometry specifically to membranes containing anionic lipids. Triggered by Mg(2+), membrane binding causes destabilization and eventually results in membrane fusion. We propose that IM30 establishes contacts between internal membrane sites and promotes fusion to enable regulated exchange of proteins and/or lipids in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:25952141

  15. Protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against dehydration stress in the resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum.

    PubMed

    Zia, Ahmad; Walker, Berkley J; Oung, Hui Min Olivia; Charuvi, Dana; Jahns, Peter; Cousins, Asaph B; Farrant, Jill M; Reich, Ziv; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The group of homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants evolved the unique capability to survive severe drought stress without dismantling the photosynthetic machinery. This implies that they developed efficient strategies to protect the leaves from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by photosynthetic side reactions. These strategies, however, are poorly understood. Here, we performed a detailed study of the photosynthetic machinery in the homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum during dehydration and upon recovery from desiccation. During dehydration and rehydration, C. pumilum deactivates and activates partial components of the photosynthetic machinery in a specific order, allowing for coordinated shutdown and subsequent reinstatement of photosynthesis. Early responses to dehydration are the closure of stomata and activation of electron transfer to oxygen accompanied by inactivation of the cytochrome b6 f complex leading to attenuation of the photosynthetic linear electron flux (LEF). The decline in LEF is paralleled by a gradual increase in cyclic electron transport to maintain ATP production. At low water contents, inactivation and supramolecular reorganization of photosystem II becomes apparent, accompanied by functional detachment of light-harvesting complexes and interrupted access to plastoquinone. This well-ordered sequence of alterations in the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes helps prepare the plant for the desiccated state and minimize ROS production.

  16. Protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against dehydration stress in the resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum.

    PubMed

    Zia, Ahmad; Walker, Berkley J; Oung, Hui Min Olivia; Charuvi, Dana; Jahns, Peter; Cousins, Asaph B; Farrant, Jill M; Reich, Ziv; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The group of homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants evolved the unique capability to survive severe drought stress without dismantling the photosynthetic machinery. This implies that they developed efficient strategies to protect the leaves from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by photosynthetic side reactions. These strategies, however, are poorly understood. Here, we performed a detailed study of the photosynthetic machinery in the homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum during dehydration and upon recovery from desiccation. During dehydration and rehydration, C. pumilum deactivates and activates partial components of the photosynthetic machinery in a specific order, allowing for coordinated shutdown and subsequent reinstatement of photosynthesis. Early responses to dehydration are the closure of stomata and activation of electron transfer to oxygen accompanied by inactivation of the cytochrome b6 f complex leading to attenuation of the photosynthetic linear electron flux (LEF). The decline in LEF is paralleled by a gradual increase in cyclic electron transport to maintain ATP production. At low water contents, inactivation and supramolecular reorganization of photosystem II becomes apparent, accompanied by functional detachment of light-harvesting complexes and interrupted access to plastoquinone. This well-ordered sequence of alterations in the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes helps prepare the plant for the desiccated state and minimize ROS production. PMID:27258321

  17. Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1994-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene

  18. Role of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 in regulating cortical parvalbumin and GABA membrane transporter 1 expression: Implications for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Allison A.; Eggan, Stephen M.; Lazarus, Matt S.; Huang, Z. Josh; Volk, David W.; Lewis, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Markers of GABA neurotransmission are altered in multiple regions of the neocortex in individuals with schizophrenia. Lower levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) mRNA and protein, which is responsible for most cortical GABA synthesis, are accompanied by lower levels of GABA membrane transporter 1 (GAT1) mRNA. These alterations are thought to be most prominent in the parvalbumin (PV)-containing subclass of interneurons, which also contain lower levels of PV mRNA. Since GAT1 and PV each reduce the availability of GABA at postsynaptic receptors, lower levels of GAT1 and PV mRNAs have been hypothesized to represent compensatory responses to an upstream reduction in cortical GABA synthesis in schizophrenia. However, such cause-and-effect hypotheses cannot be directly tested in a human illness. Consequently, we used two mouse models with reduced GAD67 expression specifically in PV neurons (PVGAD67+/−) or in all interneurons (GABAGAD67+/−) and quantified GAD67, GAT1 and PV mRNA levels using methods identical to those employed in studies of schizophrenia. Cortical levels of PV or GAT1 mRNAs were not altered in PVGAD67+/− mice during postnatal development or in adulthood. Furthermore, cellular analyses confirmed the predicted reduction in GAD67 mRNA, but failed to show a deficit in PV mRNA in these animals. Levels of PV and GAT1 mRNAs were also unaltered in GABAGAD67+/− mice. Thus, mouse lines with cortical reductions in GAD67 mRNA that match or exceed those present in schizophrenia, and that differ in the developmental timing and cell typespecificity of the GAD67 deficit, failed to provide proof-of-concept evidence that lower PV and GAT1 expression in schizophrenia are a consequence of lower GAD67 expression. Together, these findings suggest that the correlated decrements in cortical GAD67, PV and GAT1 mRNAs in schizophrenia may be a common consequence of some other upstream factor. PMID:23103418

  19. Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Genes Affect the Expression Levels of Membrane-Bound Type I and Type II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sennikov, Sergey V.; Vasilyev, Filipp F.; Lopatnikova, Julia A.; Shkaruba, Nadezhda S.; Silkov, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    The level of TNF receptors on various cells of immune system and its association with the gene polymorphism were investigated. Determining the levels of membrane-bound TNFα receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed by flow cytometry using BD QuantiBRITE calibration particles. Soluble TNFα receptor (sTNFRs) levels were determined by ELISA and genotyping was determined by PCR-RFLP. Homozygous TT individuals at SNP −609G/T TNFRI (rs4149570) showed lower levels of sTNFRI compared to GG genotype carriers. Homozygous carriers of CC genotype at SNP −1207G/C TNFRI (rs4149569) had lower expression densities of membrane-bound TNFRI on intact CD14+ monocytes compared to individuals with the GC genotype. The frequency differences in the CD3+ and CD19+ cells expressing TNFRII in relation to SNP −1709A/T TNFRII (rs652625) in healthy individuals were also determined. The genotype CC in SNP −3609C/T TNFRII (rs590368) was associated with a lower percentage of CD14+ cells expressing TNFRII compared to individuals with the CT genotype. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had no significant changes in the frequencies of genotypes. Reduced frequency was identified for the combination TNFRI −609GT + TNFRII −3609CC only. The polymorphisms in genes represent one of cell type-specific mechanisms affecting the expression levels of membrane-bound TNFα receptors and TNFα-mediated signaling. PMID:24782596

  20. Cell membrane expression of cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 is modulated by alpha-actinin-2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Rahima; Huang, Hai; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Beggs, Alan H; Levesque, Georges; Chahine, Mohamed

    2010-01-12

    Cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 plays a critical role in heart excitability and conduction. The molecular mechanism that underlies the expression of Na(v)1.5 at the cell membrane is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that cytoskeleton proteins can be involved in the regulation of cell surface expression and localization of several ion channels. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify Na(v)1.5-associated proteins that may be involved in channel function and expression. We identified alpha-actinin-2 as an interacting partner of the cytoplasmic loop connecting domains III and IV of Na(v)1.5 (Na(v)1.5/LIII-IV). Co-immunoprecipitation and His(6) pull-down assays confirmed the physical association between Na(v)1.5 and alpha-actinin-2 and showed that the spectrin-like repeat domain is essential for binding of alpha-actinin-2 to Na(v)1.5. Patch-clamp studies revealed that the interaction with alpha-actinin-2 increases sodium channel density without changing their gating properties. Consistent with these findings, coexpression of alpha-actinin-2 and Na(v)1.5 in tsA201 cells led to an increase in the level of expression of Na(v)1.5 at the cell membrane as determined by cell surface biotinylation. Lastly, immunostaining experiments showed that alpha-actinin-2 was colocalized with Na(v)1.5 along the Z-lines and in the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that alpha-actinin-2, which is known to regulate the functional expression of the potassium channels, may play a role in anchoring Na(v)1.5 to the membrane by connecting the channel to the actin cytoskeleton network.

  1. Photosynthetic and molecular markers of CO₂-mediated photosynthetic downregulation in nodulated alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Sáez, Alvaro; Erice, Gorka; Aranjuelo, Iker; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruíz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aguirreolea, Jone; Irigoyen, Juan José; Sanchez-Diaz, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    Elevated CO₂ leads to a decrease in potential net photosynthesis in long-term experiments and thus to a reduction in potential growth. This process is known as photosynthetic downregulation. There is no agreement on the definition of which parameters are the most sensitive for detecting CO₂ acclimation. In order to investigate the most sensitive photosynthetic and molecular markers of CO₂ acclimation, the effects of elevated CO₂, and associated elevated temperature were analyzed in alfalfa plants inoculated with different Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. Plants (Medicago sativa L. cv. Aragón) were grown in summer or autumn in temperature gradient greenhouses (TGG). At the end of the experiment, all plants showed acclimation in both seasons, especially under elevated summer temperatures. This was probably due to the lower nitrogen (N) availability caused by decreased N₂-fixation under higher temperatures. Photosynthesis measured at growth CO₂ concentration, rubisco in vitro activity and maximum rate of carboxylation were the most sensitive parameters for detecting downregulation. Severe acclimation was also related with decreases in leaf nitrogen content associated with declines in rubisco content (large and small subunits) and activity that resulted in a drop in photosynthesis. Despite the sensitivity of rubisco content as a marker of acclimation, it was not coordinated with gene expression, possibly due to a lag between gene transcription and protein translation.

  2. Lack of Association between Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression and Clinically Relevant Molecular or Morphologic Tumor Characteristics at the Leading Edge of Invasive Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Wardelmann, Eva; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the western world, but tumor biology and clinical course show great interindividual variation. Molecular and morphologic tumor characteristics, such as KRAS/BRAF mutation status, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, tumor growth pattern, and tumor cell budding, have been shown to be of key therapeutic and/or prognostic relevance in CRC. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-anchored zinc-binding endopeptidase that is expressed at the leading edge of various invasive carcinomas and promotes tumor cell invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between MT1-MMP expression and molecular tumor characteristics as well as morphologic features of tumor aggressiveness in a consecutive series of 79 CRC tissue samples. However, although MT1-MMP was expressed in 41/79 samples (52%), there was no significant association between MT1-MMP expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation status, MMR protein expression, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor growth pattern, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor cell budding in our sample cohort (P > 0.05). Thus, we conclude that although MT1-MMP may play a role in CRC invasion, it is not of key relevance to the current models of CRC invasion and aggressiveness. PMID:26106602

  3. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and E-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Denise L; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim V; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode "budding" is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions (AJs) is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of AJ component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another AJ component, has been more difficult to study owing to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes, and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent AJ dissolution.

  4. SGLT1 protein expression in plasma membrane of acinar cells correlates with the sympathetic outflow to salivary glands in diabetic and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Alves-Wagner, Ana B T; Burgi, Katia; Okamoto, Maristela M; Alves, Adilson S; Lima, Guilherme A; Freitas, Helayne S; Antunes, Vagner R; Machado, Ubiratan F

    2010-12-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a feature in diabetes and hypertension. We hypothesized that sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) participates in salivary dysfunctions through a sympathetic- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. In Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), diabetic WKY (WKY-D), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and diabetic SHR (SHR-D) rats, PKA/SGLT1 proteins were analyzed in parotid and submandibular glands, and the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to the glands was monitored. Basal SNA was threefold higher in SHR (P < 0.001 vs. WKY), and diabetes decreased this activity (∼50%, P < 0.05) in both WKY and SHR. The catalytic subunit of PKA and the plasma membrane SGLT1 content in acinar cells were regulated in parallel to the SNA. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic branch to salivary glands increased (∼30%, P < 0.05) PKA and SGLT1 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the observed regulations of SGLT1, revealing its location in basolateral membrane of acinar cells. Taken together, our results show highly coordinated regulation of sympathetic activity upon PKA activity and plasma membrane SGLT1 content in salivary glands. Furthermore, the present findings show that diabetic- and/or hypertensive-induced changes in the sympathetic activity correlate with changes in SGLT1 expression in basolateral membrane of acinar cells, which can participate in the salivary glands dysfunctions reported by patients with these pathologies.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide causes an increase in intestinal tight junction permeability in vitro and in vivo by inducing enterocyte membrane expression and localization of TLR-4 and CD14.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuhong; Al-Sadi, Rana; Said, Hamid M; Ma, Thomas Y

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play an essential role in the inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel disease. A defective intestinal tight junction (TJ) barrier is an important pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory conditions of the gut. Despite its importance in mediating intestinal inflammation, the physiological effects of LPS on the intestinal epithelial barrier remain unclear. The major aims of this study were to determine the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of LPS (0 to 1 ng/mL) on intestinal barrier function using an in vitro (filter-grown Caco-2 monolayers) and an in vivo (mouse intestinal perfusion) intestinal epithelial model system. LPS, at physiologically relevant concentrations (0 to 1 ng/mL), in the basolateral compartment produced a time-dependent increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability without inducing cell death. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS (0.1 mg/kg), leading to clinically relevant plasma concentrations, also caused a time-dependent increase in intestinal permeability in vivo. The LPS-induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability was mediated by an increase in enterocyte membrane TLR-4 expression and a TLR-4-dependent increase in membrane colocalization of membrane-associated protein CD14. In conclusion, these studies show for the first time that LPS causes an increase in intestinal permeability via an intracellular mechanism involving TLR-4-dependent up-regulation of CD14 membrane expression.

  6. Cell membrane fatty acid changes and desaturase expression of Saccharomyces bayanus exposed to high pressure homogenization in relation to the supplementation of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Patrignani, Francesca; Russo, Alessandra; Vannini, Lucia; Siroli, Lorenzo; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work was to study the responses of Saccharomyces bayanus cells exposed to sub-lethal high-pressure homogenization (HPH) and determine whether the plasmatic membrane can sense HPH in the presence, or absence, of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in the growth medium. Methods and Results: High-pressure homogenization damaged and caused the collapse of cell walls and membranes of a portion of cells; however, HPH did not significantly affect S. bayanus cell viability (less than 0.3 Log CFU ml-1). HPH strongly affected the membrane fatty acid (FA) composition by increasing the percentage of total UFA when compared with saturated fatty acids. The gene expression showed that the transcription of OLE1, ERG3, and ERG11 increased after HPH. The presence of exogenous UFA abolished HPH-induced effects on the OLE1 and ERG3 genes, increased the percentage of membrane lipids and decreased the expression of OLE1 and ERG3 within 30 min of treatment. Conclusion: The results suggest a key role for UFA in the microbial cell response to sub-lethal stress. In addition, these data provide insight into the molecular basis of the response of S. bayanus to this innovative technology. Significance and Impact of the Study: Elucidation of the mechanism of action for sub-lethal HPH will enable the utilization of this technology to modulate the starter performance at the industrial scale. PMID:26528258

  7. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and e-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Denise; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E.; Cotsarelis, George

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode ‘budding’ is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of adherens junction component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another adherens junction component, has been more difficult to study due to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent adherens junction dissolution. PMID:25010141

  8. Enhanced expression of the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor in glomeruli correlates with serum receptor antibodies in primary membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hoxha, Elion; Kneißler, Ursula; Stege, Gesa; Zahner, Gunther; Thiele, Ina; Panzer, Ulf; Harendza, Sigrid; Helmchen, Udo M; Stahl, Rolf A K

    2012-10-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) is the major target antigen in idiopathic membranous nephropathy with detectable autoantibodies in the serum of up to 70% of patients. In retrospective studies, the PLA2R-autoantibody titer in the serum was sometimes negative indicating their measurement alone may be inconclusive. In order to better differentiate between primary and secondary membranous nephropathy, we conducted a prospective study that included 88 patients with a histologic diagnosis of membranous nephropathy. Immunohistochemical analysis for PLA2R was faintly positive in kidneys from normal individuals and patients with various other glomerular injuries. In 61 of the 88 patients, PLA2R expression was strongly positive in glomeruli, and in 60 of these patients PLA2R autoantibodies were also detected in the serum. The 27 patients negative for serum PLA2R autoantibodies were faintly positive for PLA2R staining in glomeruli and in 15 of these patients a secondary cause was found. The remaining 12 patients have a yet undetected secondary cause of membranous nephropathy or have different glomerular antigens other than PLA2R. Thus, increased staining for PLA2R in glomeruli of renal biopsies tightly correlates with the presence of PLA2R autoantibodies in the serum and this may help discriminate between primary and secondary membranous nephropathy.

  9. Cdc42 and Actin Control Polarized Expression of TI-VAMP Vesicles to Neuronal Growth Cones and Their Fusion with the Plasma MembraneV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth. PMID:16381811

  10. Cdc42 and actin control polarized expression of TI-VAMP vesicles to neuronal growth cones and their fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth.

  11. [Photosynthetic characteristics of Gynostemma pentaphyllum under shade].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenglin; Wu, Zemin; Yao, Yongkang; Xu, Xiaoniu

    2004-11-01

    The study showed that under summer shade condition, the diurnal variation of net photosynthetic rate of Gynostemma pentaphyllum presented nontypical double apex, the first apex being 13.8 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1) at 11:00, and the diurnal net photosynthetic rate was about 176.97 micromol CO2 x m(-2), 3.1 times of that under full sunlight. There was a positive correlation between net photosynthetic rate and photon flux density (PFD), and relative humidity had a small effect on net photosynthetic rate. Under full sunlight, the typical "midday depression" of photosynthesis was observed, and the diurnal variation of net photosynthetic rate presented double apex, with the first apex being 3.0 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1) at 10:00 and the second being 1.25 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1) at 14:00. There was a positive correlation between net photosynthetic rate and relative humidity, and the latter had a strong effect on net photosynthetic rate. When PFD was higher than 700 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1), it had a negative correlation with net photosynthetic rate. Stoma conductance was the main factor affecting the transpiration rate of Gynostemma pentaphyllum. Therefore, Gynostemma pentaphyllum was a typical sciophytic plant, and light factor should be considered firstly in its cultivation. PMID:15707321

  12. The impact of α-toxin on host cell plasma membrane permeability and cytokine expression during human blood infection by CA-MRSA USA300

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Tyler K.; Pallister, Kyler B.; Zurek, Oliwia W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examines the influence of α-toxin (Hla) expression by CA-MRSA on host immune cell integrity and cytokine expression during infection of human blood. Flow cytometry analysis of human blood infected by Staphylococcus aureus PFGE type USA300 or a USA300Δhla demonstrated that Hla expression significantly increased plasma membrane permeability of human CD14+ monocytes. The increased susceptibility of human CD14+ monocytes to Hla toxicity paralleled the high cell-surface expression on these cell types of ADAM10. USA300 rapidly associated with PMNs and monocytes but not T cells following inoculation of human blood. Transcription analysis indicated a strong up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine transcription following infection of human blood by USA300 and USA300Δhla. CBAs and ELISAs determined that IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-4 are significantly up-regulated during the initial phases of human blood infection by USA300 relative to mock-infected blood but failed to distinguish any significant differences in secreted cytokine protein concentrations during infection by USA300Δhla relative to USA300. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that expression of Hla by USA300 has a significant impact on human CD14+ monocyte plasma membrane integrity but is not exclusively responsible for the proinflammatory cytokine profile induced by USA300 during the initial stages of human blood infection. PMID:24026286

  13. The impact of α-toxin on host cell plasma membrane permeability and cytokine expression during human blood infection by CA-MRSA USA300.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Tyler K; Pallister, Kyler B; Zurek, Oliwia W; Voyich, Jovanka M

    2013-11-01

    This investigation examines the influence of α-toxin (Hla) expression by CA-MRSA on host immune cell integrity and cytokine expression during infection of human blood. Flow cytometry analysis of human blood infected by Staphylococcus aureus PFGE type USA300 or a USA300Δhla demonstrated that Hla expression significantly increased plasma membrane permeability of human CD14(+) monocytes. The increased susceptibility of human CD14(+) monocytes to Hla toxicity paralleled the high cell-surface expression on these cell types of ADAM10. USA300 rapidly associated with PMNs and monocytes but not T cells following inoculation of human blood. Transcription analysis indicated a strong up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine transcription following infection of human blood by USA300 and USA300Δhla. CBAs and ELISAs determined that IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-4 are significantly up-regulated during the initial phases of human blood infection by USA300 relative to mock-infected blood but failed to distinguish any significant differences in secreted cytokine protein concentrations during infection by USA300Δhla relative to USA300. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that expression of Hla by USA300 has a significant impact on human CD14(+) monocyte plasma membrane integrity but is not exclusively responsible for the proinflammatory cytokine profile induced by USA300 during the initial stages of human blood infection.

  14. Process for photosynthetically splitting water

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved process for producing gaseous hydrogen and oxygen from water. The process is conducted in a photolytic reactor which contains a water-suspension of a photoactive material containing a hydrogen-liberating catalyst. The reactor also includes a volume for receiving gaseous hydrogen and oxygen evolved from the liquid phase. To avoid oxygen-inactivation of the catalyst, the reactor is evacuated continuously by an external pump which circulates the evolved gases through means for selectively recovering hydrogen therefrom. The pump also cools the reactor by evaporating water from the liquid phase. Preferably, product recovery is effected by selectively diffusing the hydrogen through a heated semipermeable membrane, while maintaining across the membrane a magnetic field gradient which biases the oxygen away from the heated membrane. This promotes separation, minimizes the back-reaction of hydrogen and oxygen, and protects the membrane.

  15. Switch of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Expression in the Plasma Membrane of Chondrogenic Cells Affects Cytosolic Ca2+-Oscillations and Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Fodor, János; Katona, Éva; Bartok, Adam; Oláh, Tamás; Sebe, Attila; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Zákány, Róza

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the key elements of signaling of chondroprogenitor cells at the earliest steps of differentiation may substantially improve our opportunities for the application of mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering, which is a promising approach of regenerative therapy of joint diseases. Ion channels, membrane potential and Ca2+-signaling are important regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. Our aim was to identify such plasma membrane ion channels involved in signaling during chondrogenesis, which may serve as specific molecular targets for influencing chondrogenic differentiation and ultimately cartilage formation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using patch-clamp, RT-PCR and Western-blot experiments, we found that chondrogenic cells in primary micromass cell cultures obtained from embryonic chicken limb buds expressed voltage-gated NaV1.4, KV1.1, KV1.3 and KV4.1 channels, although KV1.3 was not detectable in the plasma membrane. Tetrodotoxin (TTX), the inhibitor of NaV1.4 channels, had no effect on cartilage formation. In contrast, presence of 20 mM of the K+ channel blocker tetraethyl-ammonium (TEA) during the time-window of the final commitment of chondrogenic cells reduced KV currents (to 27±3% of control), cell proliferation (thymidine incorporation: to 39±4.4% of control), expression of cartilage-specific genes and consequently, cartilage formation (metachromasia: to 18.0±6.4% of control) and also depolarized the membrane potential (by 9.3±2.1 mV). High-frequency Ca2+-oscillations were also suppressed by 10 mM TEA (confocal microscopy: frequency to 8.5±2.6% of the control). Peak expression of TEA-sensitive KV1.1 in the plasma membrane overlapped with this period. Application of TEA to differentiated chondrocytes, mainly expressing the TEA-insensitive KV4.1 did not affect cartilage formation. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that the differentiation and proliferation of chondrogenic cells depend

  16. Construction and structural analysis of tethered lipid bilayer containing photosynthetic antenna proteins for functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa; Takeuchi, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Ryuta; Sasaki, Nobuaki; Misawa, Nobuo; Tero, Ryugo; Urisu, Tsuneo; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Hashimoto, Hideki; Nango, Mamoru

    2011-07-11

    The construction and structural analysis of a tethered planar lipid bilayer containing bacterial photosynthetic membrane proteins, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2), and light-harvesting core complex (LH1-RC) is described and establishes this system as an experimental platform for their functional analysis. The planar lipid bilayer containing LH2 and/or LH1-RC complexes was successfully formed on an avidin-immobilized coverglass via an avidin-biotin linkage. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that a smooth continuous membrane was formed there. Lateral diffusion of these membrane proteins, observed by a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), is discussed in terms of the membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC within the tethered membrane was observed by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, indicating that the tethered membrane can mimic the natural situation.

  17. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ShdA is an outer membrane fibronectin-binding protein that is expressed in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Robert A; Santos, Renato L; Keestra, A Marijke; Adams, L Garry; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2002-02-01

    The shdA gene is the only determinant known to be required for persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in the murine caecum and for efficient and prolonged shedding of the organism with the faeces. To study the biological activity of the ShdA protein, we examined its expression and binding activity. ShdA was not detected with anti-ShdA antiserum in S. Typhimurium strain ATCC14028 grown in vitro, suggesting that this protein is not expressed under standard conditions of bacterial cultivation in the laboratory. However, in mice infected with S. Typhimurium, an immunofluorescence signal detected with anti-ShdA antiserum co-localized with that generated by anti-O4 antiserum in thin sections from the caecum. Expression of the cloned shdA gene from the T7 promoter in vitro resulted in detection of ShdA in the outer membrane of S. Typhimurium and in binding of fibronectin to the bacterial surface. Binding of purified glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-ShdA fusion protein to fibronectin was dose dependent and could be partially inhibited by preincubation with antifibronectin antibodies. GST-ShdA bound to connective tissue and the basement membrane in thin sections from the murine caecum in situ. A similar labelling pattern was produced when thin sections of the murine caecum were stained with antifibronectin antiserum. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ShdA is a surface-localized, fibronectin-binding protein whose expression is induced in vivo in the murine caecum, a tissue in which a cognate receptor of this outer membrane protein is expressed. PMID:11929540

  18. Contributions of Respiratory and Photosynthetic Pathways during Growth of a Facultative Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium, Aphanocapsa 6714 1

    PubMed Central

    Der-Vartanian, Maurice; Joset-Espardellier, Francoise; Astier, Chantal

    1981-01-01

    Comparison of the growth parameters and photosynthetic capacities of cells of Aphanocapsa 6714 under various growth conditions led to the following conclusions: (a), no enzymic regulation of CO2/glucose assimilation takes place in this strain; (b), functioning of photodependent phosphorylating pathways turns off oxidative ATP synthesis; (c), no efficient regulation of pigment synthesis exists in these cells; (d), most modulations of photosynthetic activities probably occur through structural modifications of the photosynthetic membranes (a small proportion of the pigments might appear as a nonintegrated pool in the cell and be sensitive to synthesis regulation); and (e), photosystem II activity would be dependent on light intensity in a discontinuous way, the consequence of this property being the appearance of two successive exponential phases during phototrophic growth in adequate light conditions. PMID:16662036

  19. The adaptive response of lichens to mercury exposure involves changes in the photosynthetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Nicolardi, Valentina; Cai, Giampiero; Parrotta, Luigi; Puglia, Michele; Bianchi, Laura; Bini, Luca; Gaggi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Lichens are an excellent model to study the bioaccumulation of heavy metals but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms occurring during bioaccumulation. We investigated the changes of the lichen proteome during exposure to constant concentrations of mercury. We found that most of changes involves proteins of the photosynthetic pathway, such as the chloroplastic photosystem I reaction center subunit II, the oxygen-evolving protein and the chloroplastic ATP synthase β-subunit. This suggests that photosynthesis is a target of the toxic effects of mercury. These findings are also supported by changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a and b, and β-carotene). Alterations to the photosynthetic machinery also reflect on the structure of thylakoid membranes of algal cells. Response of lichens to mercury also involves stress-related proteins (such as Hsp70) but not cytoskeletal proteins. Results suggest that lichens adapt to mercury exposure by changing the metabolic production of energy.

  20. The membrane-associated progesterone-binding protein 25-Dx: expression, cellular localization and up-regulation after brain and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Guennoun, R; Meffre, D; Labombarda, F; Gonzalez, S L; Gonzalez Deniselle, M C; Stein, D G; De Nicola, A F; Schumacher, M

    2008-03-01

    Progesterone has neuroprotective effects in the injured and diseased spinal cord and after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition to intracellular progesterone receptors (PR), membrane-binding sites of progesterone may be involved in neuroprotection. A first putative membrane receptor of progesterone, distinct from the classical intracellular PR isoforms, with a single membrane-spanning domain, has been cloned from porcine liver. Homologous proteins were cloned in rats (25-Dx), mice (PGRMC1) and humans (Hpr.6). We will refer to this progesterone-binding protein as 25-Dx. The distribution and regulation of 25-Dx in the nervous system may provide some clues to its functions. In spinal cord, 25-Dx is localized in cell membranes of dorsal horn neurons and ependymal cells lining the central canal. A role of 25-Dx in mediating the protective effects of progesterone in the spinal cord is supported by the observation that its mRNA and protein are up-regulated by progesterone in dorsal horn of the injured spinal cord. In contrast, the classical intracellular PRs were down-regulated under these conditions. In brain, 25-Dx is particularly abundant in the hypothalamic area, circumventricular organs, ependymal cells of the ventricular walls, and the meninges. Interestingly, it is co-expressed with vasopressin in neurons of the paraventricular, supraoptic and retrochiasmatic nuclei. In response to TBI, 25-Dx expression is up-regulated in neurons and induced in astrocytes. The expression of 25-Dx in structures involved in cerebrospinal fluid production and osmoregulation, and its up-regulation after brain damage, point to a potentially important role of this progesterone-binding protein in the maintenance of water homeostasis after TBI. Our observations suggest that progesterone's actions may involve different signaling mechanisms depending on the pathophysiological context, and that 25-Dx may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of progesterone in the injured brain and

  1. Investigation of the role of the BAM complex and SurA chaperone in outer-membrane protein biogenesis and type III secretion system expression in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Fardini, Yann; Trotereau, Jérôme; Bottreau, Elisabeth; Souchard, Charlène; Velge, Philippe; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    In Escherichia coli, the assembly of outer-membrane proteins (OMP) requires the BAM complex and periplasmic chaperones, such as SurA or DegP. Previous work has suggested a potential link between OMP assembly and expression of the genes encoding type-III secretion systems. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the role of the different lipoproteins of the BAM complex (i.e. BamB, BamC, BamD and BamE), and the periplasmic chaperones SurA and DegP, in these two phenotypes in Salmonella. Analysis of the corresponding deletion mutants showed that, as previously described with the DeltabamB mutant, BamD, SurA and, to a lesser extent, BamE play a role in outer-membrane biogenesis in Salmonella Enteritidis, while the membrane was not notably disturbed in DeltabamC and DeltadegP mutants. Interestingly, we found that BamD is not essential in Salmonella, unlike its homologues in Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In contrast, BamD was the only protein required for full expression of T3SS-1 and flagella, as demonstrated by transcriptional analysis of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of these T3SSs. In line with this finding, bamD mutants showed a reduced secretion of effector proteins by these T3SSs, and a reduced ability to invade HT-29 cells. As DeltasurA and DeltabamE mutants had lower levels of OMPs in their outer membrane, but showed no alteration in T3SS-1 and flagella expression, these results demonstrate the absence of a systematic link between an OMP assembly defect and the downregulation of T3SSs in Salmonella; therefore, this link appears to be related to a more specific mechanism that involves at least BamB and BamD. PMID:19372159

  2. The Relationship between Anatomy and Photosynthetic Performance of Heterobaric Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Drossopoulos, Ioannis; Karabourniotis, George

    2002-01-01

    Heterobaric leaves show heterogeneous pigmentation due to the occurrence of a network of transparent areas that are created from the bundle sheaths extensions (BSEs). Image analysis showed that the percentage of photosynthetically active leaf area (Ap) of the heterobaric leaves of 31 plant species was species dependent, ranging from 91% in Malva sylvestris to only 48% in Gynerium sp. Although a significant portion of the leaf surface does not correspond to photosynthetic tissue, the photosynthetic capacity of these leaves, expressed per unit of projected area (Pmax), was not considerably affected by the size of their transparent leaf area (At). This means that the photosynthetic capacity expressed per Ap (P*max) should increase with At. Moreover, the expression of P*max could be allowing the interpretation of the photosynthetic performance in relation to some critical anatomical traits. The P*max, irrespective of plant species, correlated with the specific leaf transparent volume (λt), as well as with the transparent leaf area complexity factor (CFAt), parameters indicating the volume per unit leaf area and length/density of the transparent tissues, respectively. Moreover, both parameters increased exponentially with leaf thickness, suggesting an essential functional role of BSEs mainly in thick leaves. The results of the present study suggest that although the Ap of an heterobaric leaf is reduced, the photosynthetic performance of each areole is increased, possibly due to the light transferring capacity of BSEs. This mechanism may allow a significant increase in leaf thickness and a consequent increase of the photosynthetic capacity per unit (projected) area, offering adaptive advantages in xerothermic environments. PMID:12011354

  3. Systematically Ranking the Tightness of Membrane Association for Peripheral Membrane Proteins (PMPs)*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liyan; Ge, Haitao; Huang, Xiahe; Liu, Kehui; Zhang, Yuanya; Xu, Wu; Wang, Yingchun

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale quantitative evaluation of the tightness of membrane association for nontransmembrane proteins is important for identifying true peripheral membrane proteins with functional significance. Herein, we simultaneously ranked more than 1000 proteins of the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for their relative tightness of membrane association using a proteomic approach. Using multiple precisely ranked and experimentally verified peripheral subunits of photosynthetic protein complexes as the landmarks, we found that proteins involved in two-component signal transduction systems and transporters are overall tightly associated with the membranes, whereas the associations of ribosomal proteins are much weaker. Moreover, we found that hypothetical proteins containing the same domains generally have similar tightness. This work provided a global view of the structural organization of the membrane proteome with respect to divergent functions, and built the foundation for future investigation of the dynamic membrane proteome reorganization in response to different environmental or internal stimuli. PMID:25505158

  4. Expression of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila pecorum, and Chlamydia suis in Escherichia coli using an arabinose-inducible plasmid vector.

    PubMed

    Hoelzle, L E; Hoelzle, K; Wittenbrink, M M

    2003-10-01

    The ompA genes encoding the 40 kDa major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydophila (Ch.) abortus, Ch. pecorum, and Chlamydia (C.) suis were cloned into the arabinose-inducible plasmid vector pBADMycHis, and recombinant MOMPs (rMOMP) from the three chlamydial species were expressed at high levels in Escherichia (E.) coli. The proteins lacking the 22 aa N-terminal signal peptide were expressed as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusion bodies which were readily purified using immobilized metal-affinity chromatography. The rMOMPs including the N-terminal signal peptide were expressed and translocated as a surface-exposed immunoaccessible protein into the outer membrane of E. coli. Transformants expressing this full-length rMOMP were significantly reduced in viability. Purified native elementary bodies (EB) and rMOMPs of the three chlamydial species purified from the E. coli cytoplasm were used for immunization of rabbits. The resulting sera were analysed for their ability to recognize homologous and heterologous rMOMP and native EB. When testing rMOMP antisera against rMOMP and EB antigens, marked cross-reactivities were detected between the three species. Using EB antisera and rMOMPs as antigens, a significant species-specific reactivity was measured.

  5. Evidence that the Essential Response Regulator YycF in Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Expression of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Genes and Alters Membrane Composition†

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, M. Luz; Overweg, Karin; de la Fuente, Alicia; Reuter, Mark; Altabe, Silvia; Mulholland, Francis; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma; Wells, Jerry M.

    2005-01-01

    The YycFG two-component system, originally identified in Bacillus subtilis, is highly conserved among gram-positive bacteria with low G+C contents. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential for cell growth, but the signal to which it responds and the gene members of the regulon remain unclear. In order to investigate the role of YycFG in S. pneumoniae, we increased the expression of yycF by using a maltose-inducible vector and analyzed the genome-wide effects on transcription and protein expression during the course of yycF expression. The induction of yycF expression increased histidine kinase yycG transcript levels, suggesting an autoregulation of the yycFG operon. Evidence from both proteomic and microarray transcriptome studies as well as analyses of membrane fatty acid composition indicated that YycFG is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and in determining fatty acid chain lengths in membrane lipids. In agreement with recent transcriptome data on pneumococcal cells depleted of YycFG, we also identified several other potential members of the YycFG regulon that are required for virulence and cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:15774879

  6. Temporal pattern of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 expression in the spinal cord correlates with the course of clinical symptoms in two rodent models of autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Arnaud; Kurnellas, Michael; Elkabes, Stella

    2010-01-01

    Axonal/neuronal pathology is an important and early feature of multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We have previously reported that the levels of an important neuronal calcium pump, plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 and synaptic proteins, synapsin IIa and syntaxin 1B are decreased in the rat spinal cord at onset of acute EAE. Whether the expression of these genes is restored during neurological recovery and affected in other EAE models is currently unknown. The present study was undertaken to address these issues by use of validated multiplex quantitative real-time RT-PCR with fluoro-primers, western blot and immunocytochemistry. We report that plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 (PMCA2) transcript and protein levels return to control values during recovery from acute disease in the Lewis rat, whereas they are reduced throughout the course of chronic, non-remitting EAE in the C57Bl/6 mouse. These results indicate a close correlation between PMCA2 levels and disease course as defined by clinical scores reflecting motor deficits. Decrease in synapsin IIa expression also correlated with the onset and progression of neurological symptoms, whereas the pattern of syntaxin 1B mRNA and protein expression suggested post-transcriptional regulation. The decrease in PMCA2 transcript and protein levels and the correlation between expression and disease course in two different EAE models further highlight the importance of this calcium pump in neuronal dysfunction during inflammation. PMID:15926914

  7. Characterization of 19 Genes Encoding Membrane-Bound Fatty Acid Desaturases and their Expression Profiles in Gossypium raimondii Under Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Wei; He, Qiuling; Daud, Muhammad Khan; Chen, Jinhong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2015-01-01

    To produce unsaturated fatty acids, membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases (FADs) can be exploited to introduce double bonds into the acyl chains of fatty acids. In this study, 19 membrane-bound FAD genes were identified in Gossypium raimondii through database searches and were classified into four different subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis. All 19 membrane-bound FAD proteins shared three highly conserved histidine boxes, except for GrFAD2.1, which lost the third histidine box in the C-terminal region. In the G. raimondii genome, tandem duplication might have led to the increasing size of the FAD2 cluster in the Omega Desaturase subfamily, whereas segmental duplication appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the expansion of the Sphingolipid and Front-end Desaturase subfamilies. Gene expression analysis showed that seven membrane-bound FAD genes were significantly up-regulated and that five genes were greatly suppressed in G. raimondii leaves exposed to low temperature conditions.

  8. Characterization of 19 Genes Encoding Membrane-Bound Fatty Acid Desaturases and their Expression Profiles in Gossypium raimondii Under Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiuling; Daud, Muhammad Khan; Chen, Jinhong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2015-01-01

    To produce unsaturated fatty acids, membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases (FADs) can be exploited to introduce double bonds into the acyl chains of fatty acids. In this study, 19 membrane-bound FAD genes were identified in Gossypium raimondii through database searches and were classified into four different subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis. All 19 membrane-bound FAD proteins shared three highly conserved histidine boxes, except for GrFAD2.1, which lost the third histidine box in the C-terminal region. In the G. raimondii genome, tandem duplication might have led to the increasing size of the FAD2 cluster in the Omega Desaturase subfamily, whereas segmental duplication appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the expansion of the Sphingolipid and Front-end Desaturase subfamilies. Gene expression analysis showed that seven membrane-bound FAD genes were significantly up-regulated and that five genes were greatly suppressed in G. raimondii leaves exposed to low temperature conditions. PMID:25894196

  9. effects of natural flavonoids on photosynthetic activity and cell integrity in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haomin; Xiao, Xi; Ghadouani, Anas; Wu, Jiaping; Nie, Zeyu; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Xinhua; Shi, Jiyan

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural polyphenolic compounds produced by many aquatic plants and released in their environments. In this study, the effects of several aquatic flavonoids on cyanobacterial Microcystis aeruginosa, especially in relation to the cell growth, photosynthetic activity, cell morphology, and cell membrane integrity, were investigated. Significant growth inhibition was observed when the cyanobacteria were exposed to three flavonoids, namely, 5,4'-dihydroxyflavone (DHF), apigenin, and luteolin. Luteolin reduced the effective quantum yield, photosynthetic efficiency, and maximal electron transport rate by 70%, 59% and 44%, respectively, whereas 5,4'-DHF and apigenin slightly affected these parameters, which implies that luteolin disrupts the photosynthetic system. Moreover, 5,4'-DHF and apigenin compromised the membrane integrity, and induced membrane depolarization in 52% and 38%, and permeabilization in 30% and 44% of the cells, respectively. The 5,4'-DHF and apigenin showed more pronounced effects on M. aeruginosa morphology and membrane integrity, compared to the luteolin. These results suggest that flavonoids could have significant effects on growth and physiological functions in cyanobacterial species. PMID:25584428

  10. Hydrogen Biogeochemistry in Anaerobic and Photosynthetic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of molecular hydrogen is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, a great majority of microbial redox processes involve hydrogen as a reactant, product or potential by-product. Accordingly, the energetics (thermodynamics) of each of these processes is affected by variations in local H2 concentrations. It has long been established that this effect is important in governing microbe-microbe interactions and there are multiple demonstrations that "interspecies hydrogen transfer" can alter the products of, inhibit/stimulate, or even reverse microbial metabolic reactions. In anoxic sediments, H2 concentrations themselves are thought to be controlled by the thermodynamics of the predominant H2-consuming microbial process. In sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, this relationship quantitatively describes the co-variation of H2 concentrations with temperature (for methanogens and sulfate reducers) and with sulfate concentration (for sulfate reducers). The quantitative aspect is import= for two reasons: 1) it permits the modeling of H2-sensitive biogeochemistry, such as anaerobic methane oxidation or pathways of organic matter remineralization, as a function of environmental controls; 2) for such a relationship to be observed requires that intracellular biochemistry and bioenergetics are being directly expressed in a component of the extracellular medium. H2 could therefore be utilized a non-invasive probe of cellular energetic function in intact microbial ecosystems. Based on the latter principle we have measured down-core profiles of H2 and other relevant physico-chemical parameters in order to calculate the metabolic energy yields (DG) that support microbial metabolism in Cape Lookout Bight sediments. Methanogens in this system apparently function with energy yields significantly smaller than the minimum requirements suggested by pure

  11. Violaxanthin Cycle Pigment Contents in Potato and Tobacco Plants with Genetically Reduced Photosynthetic Capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bilger, W.; Fisahn, J.; Brummet, W.; Kossmann, J.; Willmitzer, L.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of photosynthetic activity on the light-dependent adaptation of the pool size of the violaxanthin cycle pigments (violaxanthin + antheraxanthin + zeaxanthin) was studied in leaves of wild-type and transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants. The genetically manipulated plants expressed an antisense mRNA coding for the chloroplastic fructose-bisphosphatase. Chl fluorescence quenching analysis revealed that the transformed plants exhibited a greatly impaired electron transport capacity. Light-limited and light-saturated non-photochemical quenching was strongly enhanced in the mRNA antisense potato plants. After 7 d of adaptation at various high photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFDs), the violaxanthin cycle pool size increased, with a progressive elevation in PPFD. The pool size was higher for transgenic potatoes than for wild-type plants at all PPFDs. This difference vanished when pool size was correlated with the PPFD in excess of photosynthesis, as indicated by the epoxidation state of the violaxanthin cycle. Contrasting results were obtained for tobacco; in this species, photosynthetic activity did not affect the pool size. We conclude that regulatory mechanisms exist in potato, by which photosynthetic activity can influence the violaxanthin cycle pool size. Furthermore, evidence is provided that this adaptation of the pool size may contribute to an improved photoprotection of the photosynthetic apparatus under high-light conditions. However, tobacco plants seem to regulate their pool size independently of photosynthetic activity. PMID:12228557

  12. Photosynthetic responses to phytoplasma infection in Chinese jujube.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Mengjun

    2016-08-01

    Phytoplasma is one of the most devastating plant pathogens. Jujube witches' broom (JWB) is a typical and highly fatal phytoplasma disease of Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.), which is widely cultivated in Asia. To further elucidate the mechanism of plant-phytoplasma interaction, we first compared the effects of phytoplasma infection on photosynthetic pigments and activities between a JWB-resistant cultivar (Xingguang) and a susceptible cultivar (Pozao). Total chlorophyll and carotenoid levels were significantly decreased in the susceptible cultivar at later stages of infection, but were remarkably increased in the resistant cultivar at the earlier stages. Compared to uninfected plant, a significant decrease in the main photochemical parameters (Fv/Fm, ΦPSII and qP) was recorded at the initial stages of infection in the resistant cultivar, but occurred at later stages in the susceptible cultivar. Meanwhile, the qRT-PCR results of four key photosynthesis-related genes (ZjGluTR, ZjCBP, ZjRubisco and ZjRCA2) demonstrated that the expression patterns were similar in uninfected cultivars, but up-regulated in resistant cultivar and down-regulated in the susceptible one at 12 wks after grafting inoculation. Collectively, our data indicated that the resistant cultivar 'Xingguang' undergoes a decrease in initial stage (inhibiting phytoplasma multiplication) and then a rapid enhancement of photosynthetic activity (helping jujube recovery) in response to phytoplasma infection, while the susceptible cultivar 'Pozao' displays a later decrease in photosynthetic activity. The novel photosynthetic response pattern of the resistant cultivar may contribute to its stronger immunity to phytoplasma infection, which provides new insights into plant-phytoplasma interactions.

  13. Photosynthetic capacity peaks at intermediate size in temperate deciduous trees.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sean C

    2010-05-01

    Studies of age-related changes in leaf functional biology have generally been based on dichotomous comparisons of young and mature individuals (e.g., saplings and mature canopy trees), with little data available to describe changes through the entire ontogeny of trees, particularly of broadleaf angiosperms. Leaf-level gas-exchange and morphological parameters were quantified in situ in the upper canopy of trees acclimated to high light conditions, spanning a wide range of ontogenetic stages from saplings (approximately 1 cm in stem diameter) to trees >60 cm d.b.h. and nearing their maximum lifespan, in three temperate deciduous tree species in central Ontario, Canada. Traits associated with growth performance, including leaf photosynthetic capacity (expressed on either an area, mass or leaf N basis), stomatal conductance, leaf size and leaf N content, generally showed a unimodal ('hump-shaped') pattern, with peak values at an intermediate ontogenetic stage. In contrast, leaf mass per area (LMA) and related morphological parameters (leaf thickness, leaf tissue density, leaf C content) increased monotonically with tree size, as did water-use efficiency; these monotonic relationships were well described by simple allometric functions of the form Y = aX(b). For traits showing unimodal patterns, tree size corresponding to the trait maximum differed markedly among traits: all three species showed a similar pattern in which the peak for leaf size occurred in trees approximately 2-6 cm d.b.h., followed by leaf chemical traits and photosynthetic capacity on a mass or leaf N basis and finally by photosynthetic capacity on a leaf area basis, which peaked approximately at the size of reproductive onset. It is argued that ontogenetic increases in photosynthetic capacity and related traits early in tree ontogeny are general among relatively shade-tolerant tree species that have a low capacity for leaf-level acclimation, as are declines in this set of traits late in tree ontogeny.

  14. [Effects of light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut seedling leaves].

    PubMed

    Yan, Meng-Meng; Wang, Ming-Lun; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Yue-Fu; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the effects of different light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut (Qinhua 6) seedling leaves. The results showed that, compared with natural light, blue light (445-470 nm) could significantly improve the specific leaf area (SLA), chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content of peanut seedlings. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate were higher, the intercellular CO2 content was lower, and the photosynthetic efficiency was improved significantly under blue light. Red light (610-660 nm) could improve the chlorophyll content significantly, and reduce SLA, chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content, with a lower photosynthetic efficiency than natural light. Green light (515-520 nm) and yellow light (590-595 nm) were not conducive to photosynthetic pigment accumulation of leaves, and significantly inhibited leaf photosynthesis of peanut seedlings.

  15. The 4p16.3 Parkinson Disease Risk Locus Is Associated with GAK Expression and Genes Involved with the Synaptic Vesicle Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Michael W.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Labadorf, Adam; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Myers, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified the GAK/DGKQ/IDUA region on 4p16.3 among the top three risk loci for Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the specific gene and risk mechanism are unclear. Here, we report transcripts containing the 3’ clathrin-binding domain of GAK identified by RNA deep-sequencing in post-mortem human brain tissue as having increased expression in PD. Furthermore, carriers of 4p16.3 PD GWAS risk SNPs show decreased expression of one of these transcripts, GAK25 (Gencode Transcript 009), which correlates with the expression of genes functioning in the synaptic vesicle membrane. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for GAK clathrin-binding- and J-domain transcripts’ influence on PD pathogenicity, and for a role for GAK in regulating synaptic function in PD. PMID:27508417

  16. Extracellular galectin-3 induces MMP9 expression by activating p38 MAPK pathway via lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP1).

    PubMed

    Dange, Manohar C; Agarwal, Akhil Kumar; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2015-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in matrix remodelling and thus invasion and metastasis. Extracellular galectin-3 has been shown to induce MMP9 secretion. Here, we demonstrate that galectin-3 induces MMP9 at transcript level and it is dependent on the surface levels of poly-N-acetyllactosamine (polyLacNAc). By employing signalling pathway inhibitors, MMP9 expression was shown to be induced via p38 MAP-kinase pathway. Using clones of melanoma cells expressing shRNAs to lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP1), a major carrier of polyLacNAc, surface LAMP1 was demonstrated to serve as one of the key mediators of galectin-3-induced MMP9 expression via p38 MAPK pathway.

  17. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2003-07-22

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated

  18. Progestin treatment does not affect expression of cytokines, steroid receptors, oxytocin receptor, and cyclooxygenase 2 in fetal membranes and endometrium from pony mares at parturition.

    PubMed

    Palm, F; Walter, I; Nowotny, N; Budik, S; Helmreich, M; Aurich, C

    2013-01-01

    In most mammalian species, progestins have a major function in maintaining pregnancy. In humans, the physiologic initiation of parturition bears similarities with inflammatory processes and anti-inflammatory effects of progestins have been suggested to postpone birth until term. To examine if comparable effects exist in the horse, mares were treated with the synthetic progestin altrenogest from day 280 of gestation until parturition (N = 5) or were left untreated as controls (N = 7). Tissue from the amnion (AMN), allantochorion (AC), and endometrium (EM) was collected at foaling and mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), estrogen receptor (ER) α, progesterone receptor, and oxytocin receptor (OTR) was analyzed. Leukocytes, steroid receptors, COX2, and OTR were also investigated by histology and immunohistochemistry. Expression of mRNA for IL-6 was higher in AMN and EM versus AC (P < 0.01). Expression of IL-8 was higher in AMN than AC and EM (P < 0.001). Steroid receptors and OTR were highly expressed in EM but not in AMN and AC (P < 0.001). Expression of COX2 was most pronounced in AC whereas IL expression was not upregulated in AC. No differences in mRNA expression existed between altrenogest-treated and control animals. Endometrial polymorphonuclear leukocytes were increased in altrenogest-treated mares. Epithelial cells of all tissues, except AC chorionic villi stained progesterone receptor-positive. Staining for ER was more pronounced in the amnion facing epithelium of the AC in altrenogest-treated versus control animals (P < 0.01). In conclusion, COX2 is highly expressed in the AC. The fetal membranes thus might play a role in the onset of labor in the horse. Altrenogest did not affect gene expression in the AMN, AC, and EM but had localized effects on inflammatory cells and ER expression. No anti-inflammatory effects of altrenogest in healthy, late pregnant pony mares could be detected.

  19. Expression of membrane complement regulators, CD46, CD55 and CD59, in mesothelial cells of patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Sei, Yumi; Mizuno, Masashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Imai, Masaki; Higashide, Keiko; Harris, Claire L; Sakata, Fumiko; Iguchi, Daiki; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Shoichi; Matsuo, Seiichi; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expression of membrane complement regulators (CRegs), CD46, CD55 and CD59 in human mesothelial cells, and correlated with clinical background and level of complement (C) activation products in peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids (PDF) to clarify influence of the C activation system in PD patients. Expression of CRegs was assessed on primary cultures of mesothelial cells (HPMC) harvested from PD fluid of 31 PD patients. Because expression of CD55 but not CD46 and CD59 in mesothelial cells was significantly correlated to value of dialysate-to-plasma creatinine concentration ratio (D/P Cre) (p<0.005) as an indicator of peritoneal function, we focused on analysis of CD55 expression of HPMCs in comparison with levels of C activation products in the PDF of the PD patients, and their background factors. When comparing expression of the CRegs between systemic neutrophils and HPMC, no correlation was observed, supporting that change of CRegs' expression in HPMC was independently occurring in the peritoneum. Expression of CD55 protein in HPMC was closely correlated with expression at the mRNA level (p<0.0001) and was inversely correlated with levels of sC5b-9 (p<0.05), but not C3, C4, IL6 and CA125 in the PDF. Complications of diabetes, usage of icodextrin and residual renal function were not correlated with change of CD55 expression in HPMCs. Our data show that the process of PD therapy modifies expression of CD55 on peritoneal mesothelium and triggers local C activation. These findings support efforts to modify PD therapy to limit effects on activation and regulation of the C system.

  20. High-expression β(1) adrenergic receptor/cell membrane chromatography method based on a target receptor to screen active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Xue, Hui; Wang, Xin; Yang, Qian; Song, Yanhong; Li, Xiaoni

    2014-02-01

    β-Adrenergic receptors are important targets for drug discovery. We have developed a new β1 -adrenergic receptor cell membrane chromatography (β1 AR-CMC) with offline ultra-performance LC (UPLC) and MS method for screening active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines. In this study, Chinese hamster ovary-S cells with high β1 AR expression levels were established and used to prepare a cell membrane stationary phase in a β1 AR-CMC model. The retention fractions were separated and identified by the UPLC-MS system. The screening results found that isoimperatorin from Rhizoma et Radix Notopterygii was the targeted component that could act on β1 AR in similar manner of metoprolol as a control drug. In addition, the biological effects of active component were also investigated in order to search for a new type of β1 AR antagonist. It will be a useful method for drug discovery as a leading compound resource.

  1. The lysine residue in the membrane-spanning domain of the beta chain is necessary for cell surface expression of the T cell antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The TCR is a complex receptor composed of seven polypeptide chains consisting of a ligand-binding subunit, Ti, and a putative signal- transducing subunit, CD3. Phylogenetically conserved charged amino acid residues within the membrane-spanning domains present in all seven chains of the TCR have been proposed to be important in the association between Ti and CD3. Using a Ti beta chain-deficient mutant of the cell line Jurkat, site-directed mutagenesis and transfection of Ti beta chain cDNA was performed to assess the importance of the lysine residue at position 290 within the membrane-spanning domain of the Ti beta chain to expression of the TCR complex. These studies demonstrated that the lysine residue, and not simply conservation of either basic charge or secondary structure, is important at this position. PMID:2974063

  2. Photosynthetic light reactions--an adjustable hub in basic production and plant immunity signaling.

    PubMed

    Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Tikkanen, Mikko; Durian, Guido; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetic efficiency is a key trait that influences the sustainable utilization of plants for energy and nutrition. By now, extensive research on photosynthetic processes has underscored important structural and functional relationships among photosynthetic thylakoid membrane protein complexes, and their roles in determining the productivity and stress resistance of plants. Photosystem II photoinhibition-repair cycle, for example, has arisen vital in protecting also Photosystem I against light-induced damage. Availability of highly sophisticated genetic, biochemical and biophysical tools has greatly expanded the catalog of components that carry out photoprotective functions in plants. On thylakoid membranes, these components encompass a network of overlapping systems that allow delicate regulation of linear and cyclic electron transfer pathways, balancing of excitation energy distribution between the two photosystems and dissipation of excess light energy in the antenna system as heat. An increasing number of reports indicate that the above mentioned mechanisms also mediate important functions in the regulation of biotic stress responses in plants. Particularly the handling of excitation energy in the light harvesting II antenna complexes appears central to plant immunity signaling. Comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms and regulatory cross-talk, however, still remain elusive. This review highlights the current understanding of components that regulate the function of photosynthetic light reactions and directly or indirectly also modulate disease resistance in higher plants.

  3. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niederman, Robert A.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Frank, Harry A.

    2015-02-07

    These funds were used for partial support of the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on 8-11 August, 2013, at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. This conference, held in conjunction with the 16th International Congress on Photosynthesis/St. Louis, continued a long tradition of light-harvesting satellite conferences that have been held prior to the previous six international photosynthesis congresses. In this Workshop, the basis was explored for the current interest in replacing fossil fuels with energy sources derived form direct solar radiation, coupled with light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems and how they offer a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. This was accomplished through sessions on the initial light-harvesting events in the biological conversion of solar energy to chemically stored energy forms, and how these natural photosynthetic processes serve as a guide to the development of robust bio-hybrid and artificial systems for solar energy conversion into both electricity or chemical fuels. Organized similar to a Gordon Research Conference, a lively, informal and collegial setting was established, highlighting the exchange of exciting new data and unpublished results from ongoing studies. A significant amount of time was set aside for open discussion and interactive poster sessions, with a special session devoted to oral presentations by talented students and postdoctoral fellows judged to have the best posters. This area of research has seen exceptionally rapid progress in recent years, with the availability of a number of antenna protein structures at atomic resolution, elucidation of the molecular surface architecture of native photosynthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy and the maturing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular biological techniques for the investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. The conferees

  4. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Photosynthetic Organs.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Briardo

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the dazzling diversity of colors displayed by living organisms throughout the tree of life is determined by the presence of carotenoids, which most often provide distinctive yellow, orange and red hues. These metabolites play fundamental roles in nature that extend far beyond their importance as pigments. In photosynthetic lineages, carotenoids are essential to sustain life, since they have been exploited to maximize light harvesting and protect the photosynthetic machinery from photooxidative stress. Consequently, photosynthetic organisms have evolved several mechanisms that adjust the carotenoid metabolism to efficiently cope with constantly fluctuating light environments. This chapter will focus on the current knowledge concerning the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in leaves, which are the primary photosynthetic organs of most land plants. PMID:27485221

  5. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-29

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  6. Role of NF-kappa B in cell survival and transcription of latent membrane protein 1-expressing or Epstein-Barr virus latency III-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Cahir-McFarland, Ellen D; Carter, Kara; Rosenwald, Andreas; Giltnane, Jena M; Henrickson, Sarah E; Staudt, Louis M; Kieff, Elliott

    2004-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency III infection converts B lymphocytes into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by expressing EBV nuclear and membrane proteins, EBNAs, and latent membrane proteins (LMPs), which regulate transcription through Notch and tumor necrosis factor receptor pathways. The role of NF-kappa B in LMP1 and overall EBV latency III transcriptional effects was investigated by treating LCLs with BAY11-7082 (BAY11). BAY11 rapidly and irreversibly inhibited NF-kappa B, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, induced apoptosis, and altered LCL gene expression. BAY11 effects were similar to those of an NF-kappa B inhibitor, Delta N-I kappa B alpha, in effecting decreased JNK1 expression and in microarray analyses. More than 80% of array elements that decreased with Delta N-I kappa B alpha expression decreased with BAY11 treatment. Newly identified NF-kappa B-induced, LMP1-induced, and EBV-induced genes included pleckstrin, Jun-B, c-FLIP, CIP4, and I kappa B epsilon. Of 776 significantly changed array elements, 134 were fourfold upregulated in EBV latency III, and 74 were fourfold upregulated with LMP1 expression alone, whereas only 28 were more than fourfold downregulated by EBV latency III. EBV latency III-regulated gene products mediate cell migration (EBI2, CCR7, RGS1, RANTES, MIP1 alpha, MIP1 beta, CXCR5, and RGS13), antigen presentation (major histocompatibility complex proteins and JAW1), mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (DUSP5 and p62Dok), and interferon (IFN) signaling (IFN-gamma R alpha, IRF-4, and STAT1). Comparison of EBV latency III LCL gene expression to immunoglobulin M (IgM)-stimulated B cells, germinal-center B cells, and germinal-center-derived lymphomas clustered LCLs with IgM-stimulated B cells separately from germinal-center cells or germinal-center lymphoma cells. Expression of IRF-2, AIM1, ASK1, SNF2L2, and components of IFN signaling pathways further distinguished EBV latency III-infected B cells from IgM-stimulated or

  7. Improved immunogenicity of a H44/76 group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine with over-expressed genome-derived Neisserial antigen 1870.

    PubMed

    Koeberling, Oliver; Welsch, Jo Anne; Granoff, Dan M

    2007-02-26

    A broadly protective vaccine against meningococcal group B disease is not available. We previously reported that an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine containing over-expressed genome-derived antigen (GNA) 1870 elicited broader protective antibody responses than recombinant GNA1870 or conventional OMV vaccines prepared from a strain that naturally expresses low amounts of GNA1870. Certain wildtype strains such as H44/76 naturally express larger amounts of GNA1870 and, potentially, could be used to prepare an improved OMV vaccine without genetic over-expression of the antigen. We transformed H44/76 with a shuttle vector to over-express variant 1 (v.1) GNA1870 and compared the immunogenicity in mice of OMV vaccines prepared from wildtype H44/76 (v.1), the mutant, and a recombinant v.1 GNA1870 vaccine. Mice immunized with OMV with over-expressed GNA1870 developed broader serum bactericidal and/or greater C3 deposition activity on the surface of encapsulated strains of N. meningitidis than control mice immunized with the OMV vaccine prepared from the wildtype strain, or the rGNA1870 vaccine. When a panel of group B strains from patients in California was tested, sera from mice immunized with the OMV vaccine containing over-expressed GNA1870 were bactericidal against 100% of the v.1 strains. In contrast, only 20% of isolates that expressed subvariants of the v.1 GNA1870 protein were susceptible to bactericidal activity of antibodies elicited by the rGNA1870 or conventional OMV vaccines. Thus, even a modest increase in GNA1870 expression in a strain that naturally is a high producer of GNA1870 results in an OMV vaccine that elicits broader protection against meningococcal disease.

  8. Prioritization of copper for the use in photosynthetic electron transport in developing leaves of hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Ravet, Karl; Peers, Graham; Pilon, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Plastocyanin (PC) is an essential and abundant copper (Cu) protein required for photosynthesis in higher plants. Severe copper deprivation has the potential to cause a defect in photosynthetic electron transport due to a lack in PC. The Cu-microRNAs, which are up-regulated under Cu deficiency, down-regulate the expression of target Cu proteins other than PC, cytochrome-c oxidase and the ethylene receptors. It has been proposed that this mechanism saves Cu for PC maturation. We aimed to test how hybrid poplar, a species that has capacity to rapidly expand its photosynthetically active tissue, responds to variations in Cu availability over time. Measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence after Cu depletion revealed a drastic effect on photosynthesis in hybrid poplar. The decrease in photosynthetic capacity was correlated with a reduction in PC protein levels. Compared to older leaves, PC decreased more strongly in developing leaves, which also lost more photosynthetic electron transport capacity. The effect of Cu depletion on older and more developed leaves was minor and these leaves maintained much of their photosynthetic capacity. Interestingly, upon resupply of Cu to the medium a very rapid recovery of Cu levels was seen in the younger leaves with a concomitant rise in the expression and activity of PC. In contrast, the expression of those Cu proteins, which are targets of microRNAs was under the same circumstances delayed. At the same time, Cu resupply had only minor effects on the older leaves. The data suggest a model where rapid recovery of photosynthetic capacity in younger leaves is made possible by a preferred allocation of Cu to PC in younger leaves, which is supported by Cu-microRNA expression. PMID:26089828

  9. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer membrane protein OmpL32

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immu...

  10. A dileucine motif is involved in plasma membrane expression and endocytosis of rat sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp).

    PubMed

    Stross, Claudia; Kluge, Stefanie; Weissenberger, Katrin; Winands, Elisabeth; Häussinger, Dieter; Kubitz, Ralf

    2013-11-15

    The sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) is the major uptake transporter for bile salts into liver parenchymal cells, and PKC-mediated endocytosis was shown to regulate the number of Ntcp molecules at the plasma membrane. In this study, mechanisms of Ntcp internalization were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analyses in HepG2 cells. PKC activation induced endocytosis of Ntcp from the plasma membrane by ~30%. Endocytosis of Ntcp was clathrin dependent and was followed by lysosomal degradation. A dileucine motif located in the third intracellular loop of Ntcp was essential for endocytosis but also for processing and plasma membrane targeting, suggesting a dual function of this motif for intracellular trafficking of Ntcp. Mutation of two of five potential phosphorylation sites surrounding the dileucine motif (Thr225 and Ser226) inhibited PKC-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, we could identify a motif, which is critical for Ntcp plasma membrane localization. Endocytic retrieval protects hepatocytes from elevated bile salt concentrations and is of special interest, because NTCP has been identified as a receptor for the hepatitis B and D virus.

  11. Effect of egg weight on composition, embryonic growth, and expression of amino acid transporter genes in yolk sac membranes and small intestines of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Chen, M X; Li, X G; Yan, H C; Wang, X Q; Gao, C Q

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of egg weight on the composition of the egg, the growth of the embryo, and the expression of amino acid transporter genes in the yolk sac membranes and small intestines of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia). A total of 240 fertilized eggs were collected and divided into two groups based on the weight of the eggs, light (LE) and heavy (HE). The composition of 20 eggs from each group was measured, and the remaining eggs were weighed and placed in an incubator. On embryonic days (E) 9, 11, 13, and 15 and day of hatch (DOH), 15 embryos/hatchlings from each group were measured for embryonic growth, and samples were collected. The HE had heavier yolk and albumen weights than the LE (P < 0.01). Compared with the LE, the HE had heavier yolk-free embryonic body and yolk sac weights from E13 to DOH (P < 0.05). Additionally, the HE had larger yolk sac membrane weights from E13 to E15 (P < 0.05) and had more residual yolk sac content on DOH than those of the LE (P < 0.01). The yolk absorption was greater for the HE than for the LE from E11 to E13 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the abundance of CAT2 and PepT1 mRNA in the yolk sac membranes was greater in the HE than in the LE on E13 (P < 0.05). Compared with the LE, the gene expression of EAAT2 in the intestine on E13 was greater in the HE, whereas the expression of EAAT3 was lower in the HE (P < 0.05). Taken together, our results suggest that egg weight influenced the composition of the eggs, embryonic development, and expression of amino acid transporter genes in the yolk sac membranes and small intestines of pigeon embryos.

  12. Photosynthetic oxygen evolution is not reversed at high oxygen pressures

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Derrick R. J.; Brown, Tyler S.; Ananyev, Gennady; Dismukes, G. Charles

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of elevated O2 pressure on the production of O2 by photosynthetic organisms in several species of plants, algae, and a cyanobacterium. Using a non-invasive fluorometry technique to monitor sequential turnover of the Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center as a function of O2 pressures, we showed that none of the reactions of water oxidation are affected by elevated O2 pressures up to 50-fold greater than atmospheric conditions. Thus, the terminal step of O2 release from the water oxidation complex (S4 → S0 + O2 + nH+) is not reversible in whole cells, leaves, or isolated thylakoid membranes containing PSII, in contrast to reports using detergent-extracted PSII complexes. This implies that there is no thermodynamically accessible intermediate that can be populated by preventing or reversing the O2 release step with atmospheric O2. To assess the sensitivity of PSII charge recombination to O2 pressure we quantitatively modeled the consequences of two putative perturbations to the catalytic cycle of water oxidation within the framework of the Kok model. Based on the breadth of oxygenic phototrophs examined in this study, we conclude that O2 accumulation in cells or the atmosphere does not suppress photosynthetic productivity through the reversal of water oxidation in contemporary phototrophs, and would have been unlikely to influence the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. PMID:19166323

  13. SANS Investigation of the Photosynthetic Machinery of Chloroflexus Aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Urban, Volker S; Jianzhong, Wen; Yueyong, Xin; Blankenship, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria harvest light and perform photosynthesis in low light environments, and contain specialized antenna complexes to adapt to this condition. In this report, we present studies using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate structural information about the photosynthetic apparatus, including the peripheral light harvesting chlorosome complex, the integral membrane light-harvesting B808-866 complex and the reaction center (RC) in the thermophilic green phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Using contract variation in SANS measurments, our studies suggest that the B808-866 comples is wrapped around the RC in Cfx. aurantiacus, and the overall size and conformation for the B808-866 complex of Cfx. aurantiacus is roughly comparable to the LH1 antenna complex of the purple bacteria. A similar size for the isolated B808-866 complex is also suggested via dynamic light scattering measurements. Alos, a smaller size of the RC of Cfx. aurantiacus that the RC of the purple bacteria is observed. Further, our SANS measurements indicate that the chlorosome is a lipid body with rod-like shape, and that the self-assembly of bacteriochlorophylls, the major component of the chlorosome, is lipid-like. Finally, two populations of chlorosome particles are suggested in our SANS measurements.

  14. Analysis of transcriptional regulation and tissue-specific expression of Avicennia marina Plasma Membrane Protein 3 suggests it contributes to Na(+) transport and homoeostasis in A. marina.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, Rajalakshmi; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane proteins (PMP3) play a role in cation homoeostasis. The 5' flanking sequence of stress inducible, Avicennia marina PMP3 (AmPMP3prom) was transcriptionally fused to (a) GUS or (b) GFP-AmPMP3 and analyzed in transgenic tobacco. Tissue-histochemical GUS and GFP:AmPMP3 localization are co-incident under basal and stress conditions. AmPMP3prom directed GUS activity is highest in roots. Basal transcription is conferred by a 388bp segment upstream of the translation start site. A 463bp distal enhancer in the AmPMP3prom confers enhanced expression under salinity in all tissues and also responds to increases in salinity. The effect of a central, stem-specific negative regulatory region is suppressed by the distal enhancer. The A. marina rhizosphere encounters dynamic changes in salinity at the inter-tidal interface. The complex, tissue-specific transcriptional responsiveness of AmPMP3 to salinity appears to have evolved in response to these changes. Under salinity, guard cell and phloem-specific expression of GFP:AmPMP3 is highly enhanced. Mesophyll, trichomes, bundle sheath, parenchymatous cortex and xylem parenchyma also show GFP:AmPMP3 expression. Cis-elements conferring stress, root and vascular-specific expression are enriched in the AmPMP3 promoter. Pronounced vascular-specific AmPMP3 expression suggests a role in salinity induced Na(+) transport, storage, and secretion in A. marina.

  15. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kauss, M. Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G{sub 1} to S to G{sub 2}/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G{sub 0} cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation.

  16. Plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase gene expression, protein level and activity in growing and non-growing regions of barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves.

    PubMed

    Visnovitz, Tamás; Solti, Adám; Csikós, György; Fricke, Wieland

    2012-04-01

    Plasma membrane proton ATPase (PM-H⁺-ATPase) is the key means through which plant cells energize nutrient uptake and acidify the apoplast. Both of these processes aid cell elongation; yet, it is not known how such a suspected role of the PM-H⁺-ATPase in growth is reflected through changes in its transcript level and activity in grass leaves. In the present study on leaf three of barley, the elongation zone and the emerged blade, which contained fully expanded cells were analyzed. Plasma membranes were isolated and used to assay the activity (ATPase assay) and abundance (western blotting) of PM-H⁺-ATPase protein. Expression of mRNA was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). PM-H⁺-ATPase transcript and protein level and activity differed little between growing and non-growing leaf regions when values were related to unit extracted total RNA and cell number, respectively. However, when values were related to unit surface area of plasma membrane, they were more than twice as high in growing compared with non-growing leaf tissue. It is concluded that this higher surface density of PM-H⁺-ATPase activity in growing barley leaf tissue aids apoplast acidification and cell expansion. PMID:22257033

  17. Effects of Cu deficiency on photosynthetic electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Droppa, M.; Terry, N.; Horvath, G.

    1984-04-01

    The role of copper (Cu) in photosynthetic electron transport was explored by using Cu deficiency in sugar beet as an experimental approach. Copper influenced electron transport at two sites in addition to plastocyanin. Under mild deficiency (0.84 nmol of Cu per cm/sup 2/ of leaf area), electron transport between the two photosystems (PS) is inhibited but not electron transport within PS I or PS II measured separately. The chlorophyll/plastoquinone ratio was normal in Cu-deficient plants. However, the breakpoint in the Arrhenius plot of electron transport was shifted towards a higher temperature. It is concluded that Cu is necessary to maintain the appropriate membrane fluidity to ensure the mobility of plastoquinone molecules to transfer electrons between the two photosystems. Under severe deficiency (0.22 nmol of Cu per cm/sup 2/ of leaf area) both PS II and PS I electron transports were inhibited and to the same extent. PS II electron transport activity could not be restored by adding artifical electron donors. Polypeptides with M/sub r/s of 28,000 and 13,500 were missing in Cu-deficient chloroplast membranes. In PS II particles prepared from normal chloroplasts of spinach, 2 atoms of Cu per reaction center are present. We conclude that Cu influences PS II electron transport either directly, by participation in electron transfer as a constituent of an electron carrier, or indirectly, via the polypeptide composition of the membrane in the PS II complex.

  18. Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Robert E.

    2005-06-10

    Most chlorophyll-type pigments in a photosynthetic organism function as an antenna, absorbing light and transferring excitations to a photochemical reaction center where energy storage takes place by a series of chemical reactions. The green photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by large antenna complexes known as chlorosomes, in which pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanisms of excitation transfer and regulation of this unique antenna system, including how it is integrated into the rest of the photosynthetic energy transduction apparatus. Techniques that are being used in this research include biochemical analysis, spectroscopy, microscopy, X-ray structural studies, and reconstitution from purified components. Our recent results indicate that the chlorosome baseplate structure, which is the membrane attachment site for the chlorosome to the membrane, is a unique pigmen