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Sample records for phototropin lov domain

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction anaylsis of the LOV1 domains of phototropin 1 and 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasako, Masayoshi; Hirata, Michihiro; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Oka, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tokutomi, Satoru

    2008-07-01

    Crystals of the LOV1 domains of phototropin 1 and 2 from A. thaliana were obtained which diffracted X-rays to a resolution of at least 2.1 Å. Phototropin is a blue-light receptor protein in plants that is responsible for phototropic responses, stomata opening and photo-induced relocation of chloroplasts. Higher plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana have two isoforms of phototropin: phototropin 1 and phototropin 2. Both isoforms comprise a tandem pair of blue-light-absorbing light–oxygen–voltage domains named LOV1 and LOV2 in the N-terminal half and a serine/threonine kinase domain in the C-terminal half. The LOV1 domain is thought to function as a dimerization site. In the present study, recombinant LOV1 domains of A. thaliana phototropin 1 and phototropin 2 were crystallized. The crystal of the LOV1 domain of phototropin 1 belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 64.9, c = 70.8 Å, and diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.1 Å. The crystal of the LOV1 domain of phototropin 2 belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 32.5, b = 66.5, c = 56.7 Å, β = 92.4°, and diffracted X-rays to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. In both crystals, two LOV1 domains occupied the crystallographic asymmetric unit.

  2. Light-induced movement of the LOV2 domain in an Asp720Asn mutant LOV2-kinase fragment of Arabidopsis phototropin 2.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Okajima, Koji; Iwata, Aya; Kashojiya, Sachiko; Matsui, Yuka; Tokutomi, Satoru

    2011-02-22

    Phototropin, a blue-light receptor protein of plants, triggers phototropic responses, chloroplast relocation, and opening of stomata to maximize the efficiency of photosynthesis. Phototropin is composed of two light-oxygen-voltage sensing domains (LOV1 and LOV2) that absorb blue light and a serine/theroine kinase domain responsible for light-dependent autophosphorylation leading to cellular signaling cascades. Although the light-activated LOV2 domain is primarily responsible for subsequent activation of the kinase domain, it is unclear how conformational changes in the former transmit to the latter. To understand this molecular mechanism in Arabidopsis phototropin 2, we performed small-angle X-ray scattering analysis on a fragment composed of the LOV2 and kinase domains, which contained an Asp720Asn mutation that led to an absence of ATP binding activity. The scattering data were collected up to a resolution of 25 Å. The apparent molecular weight of the fragment estimated from scattering intensities demonstrated that the fragment existed in a monomeric form in solution. The fragment exhibited photoreversible changes in the scattering profiles, and the radii of gyration under dark and blue-light irradiation conditions were 32.4 and 34.8 Å, respectively. In the dark, the molecular shape restored from the scattering profile appeared as an elongated shape of 110 Å in length and 45 Å in width. The homology modeled LOV2 and kinase domains could be fitted to the molecular shape and appeared to make slight contact. However, under blue-light irradiation, a more extended molecular shape was observed. The changes in the molecular shape and radius of gyration were interpreted as a light-dependent positional shift of the LOV2 domain of approximately 13 Å from the kinase domain. Because the region connecting the LOV2 and kinase domains was categorized as a naturally unfolded polypeptide, we propose that the light-activated LOV2 domain triggers conformational changes in the

  3. Low-temperature and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin

    SciTech Connect

    Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Stokkum, I.H.; Grondelle, Rienkvan; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T.

    2004-12-13

    The phototropins are plant blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine residue in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The spectroscopic properties of the LOV2 domain of phototropin 1 of Avena sativa (oat) have been investigated by means of low-temperature absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The low-temperature absorption spectrum of the LOV2 domain showed a fine structure around 473 nm, indicating heterogeneity in the flavin binding pocket. The fluorescence quantum yield of the flavin cofactor increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from room temperature to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K, allowing for an accurate positioning of the flavin triplet state in the LOV2 domain at 16900 cm{sup -1}. Fluorescence from the cryotrapped covalent adduct state was extremely weak, with a fluorescence spectrum showing a maximum at 440 nm. Time-resolved fluorescence experiments utilizing a synchroscan streak camera revealed a singlet-excited state lifetime of the LOV2 domain of 2.4 ns. FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed a pH-dependent lifetime ranging between 2.9 ns at pH 2.0 to 4.7 ns at pH 8.0. No spectral shifting of the flavin emission was observed in the LOV2 domain nor in FMN in aqueous solution.

  4. A base-catalyzed mechanism for dark state recovery in the Avena sativa phototropin-1 LOV2 domain.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Maxime T A; Arents, Jos C; van Grondelle, Rienk; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Kennis, John T M

    2007-03-20

    Phototropins are autophosphorylating serine/threonine kinases responsible for blue-light perception in plants; their action gives rise to phototropism, chloroplast relocation, and opening of stomatal guard cells. The kinase domain constitutes the C-terminal part of Avena sativa phototropin 1. The N-terminal part contains two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) sensing domains, LOV1 and LOV2; each binds a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) chromophore (lambdamax = 447 nm, termed D447) and forms the light-sensitive domains, of which LOV2 is the principal component. Blue-light absorption produces a covalent adduct between a very conserved nearby cysteine residue and the C(4a) atom of the FMN moiety via the triplet state of the flavin. The covalent adduct thermally decays to regenerate the D447 dark state, with a rate that may vary by several orders of magnitude between different species. We report that the imidazole base can act as a very efficient enhancer of the dark recovery of A. sativa phot1 LOV2 (AsLOV2) and some other well-characterized LOV domains. Imidazole accelerates the thermal decay of AsLOV2 by 3 orders of magnitude in the submolar concentration range, via a base-catalyzed mechanism involving base abstraction of the FMN N(5)-H adduct state and subsequent reprotonation of the reactive cysteine. The LOV2 crystal structure suggests that the imidazole molecules may act from a cavity located in the vicinity of the FMN, explaining its high efficiency, populated through a channel connecting the cavity to the protein surface. Use of pH titration and chemical inactivation by diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) suggests that histidines located at the surface of the LOV domain act as base catalysts via an as yet unidentified H-bond network, operating at a rate of (55 s)-1 at pH 8. In addition, molecular processes other than histidine-mediated base catalysis contibute significantly to the total thermal decay rate of the adduct and operate at a rate constant of (65 s)-1, leading to a

  5. Primary reactions of the LOV2 domain of phototropin studied with ultrafast mid-infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Maxime T A; Domratcheva, Tatiana; Bonetti, Cosimo; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie-Louise; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Kennis, John T M

    2009-07-08

    Phototropins, major blue-light receptors in plants, are sensitive to blue light through a pair of flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding light oxygen and voltage (LOV) domains, LOV1 and LOV2. LOV2 undergoes a photocycle involving light-driven covalent adduct formation between a conserved cysteine and the FMN C(4a) atom. Here, the primary reactions of Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 (AsLOV2) were studied using ultrafast mid-infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. The singlet excited state (S1) evolves into the triplet state (T1) with a lifetime of 1.5 ns at a yield of approximately 50%. The infrared signature of S1 is characterized by absorption bands at 1657 cm(-1), 1495-1415 cm(-1), and 1375 cm(-1). The T1 state shows infrared bands at 1657 cm(-1), 1645 cm(-1), 1491-1438 cm(-1), and 1390 cm(-1). For both electronic states, these bands are assigned principally to C=O, C=N, C-C, and C-N stretch modes. The overall downshifting of C=O and C=N bond stretch modes is consistent with an overall bond-order decrease of the conjugated isoalloxazine system upon a pi-pi* transition. The configuration interaction singles (CIS) method was used to calculate the vibrational spectra of the S1 and T1 excited pipi* states, as well as respective electronic energies, structural parameters, electronic dipole moments, and intrinsic force constants. The harmonic frequencies of S1 and T1, as calculated by the CIS method, are in satisfactory agreement with the evident band positions and intensities. On the other hand, CIS calculations of a T1 cation that was protonated at the N(5) site did not reproduce the experimental FMN T1 spectrum. We conclude that the FMN T1 state remains nonprotonated on a nanosecond timescale, which rules out an ionic mechanism for covalent adduct formation involving cysteine-N(5) proton transfer on this timescale. Finally, we observed a heterogeneous population of singly and doubly H-bonded FMN C(4)=O conformers in the dark state, with stretch frequencies at 1714

  6. Structural water cluster as a possible proton acceptor in the adduct decay reaction of oat phototropin 1 LOV2 domain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ruby H; Bogomolni, Roberto A

    2012-09-06

    LOV domains (Light, Oxygen, Voltage) are the light-sensory modules of phototropins, the blue-light photoreceptor kinases in plants, and of a wide variety of flavoproteins found in all three domains of life. These 12 kDa modules bind a flavin chromophore (FMN or FAD) noncovalently and undergo a photochemical activation in which the sulfur atom of a conserved cysteine forms an adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the flavin. The adduct breaks spontaneously in a base-catalyzed reaction involving a rate-limiting proton-transfer step, regenerating the dark state in seconds. This photocycle involves chromophore and protein structural changes that activate the C-terminal serine/threonine kinase. Previous studies (Biochemistry 2007, 46, 7016-7021) showed that decreased hydration obtained at high glycerol concentrations stabilizes the adduct state in a manner similar to that attained at low temperatures, resulting in much longer adduct decay times. This kinetic effect was attributed to an increased protein rigidity that hindered structural fluctuations necessary for the decay reaction. In this work, we studied the adduct decay kinetics of oat phototropin 1 (phot1) LOV2 at varying hydration using a specially designed chamber that allowed for measurement of UV-visible and FTIR spectra of the same samples. Therefore, we obtained LOV protein concentrations, adduct decay kinetics, and the different populations of bound water by deconvolution of the broad water absorption peak around 3500 cm(-1). A linear dependence of the adduct decay rate constant on the concentration of double and triple hydrogen-bonded waters strongly suggests that the adduct decay is a pseudo-first-order reaction in which both the adduct and the strongly bound waters are reactants. We suggest that a cluster of strongly bound water functions as the proton acceptor in the rate-limiting step of adduct decay.

  7. Photosensitivity of kinase activation by blue light involves the lifetime of a cysteinyl-flavin adduct intermediate, S390, in the photoreaction cycle of the LOV2 domain in phototropin, a plant blue light receptor.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Koji; Kashojiya, Sachiko; Tokutomi, Satoru

    2012-11-30

    Phototropin (phot) is a light-regulated protein kinase that mediates a variety of photoresponses in plants, such as phototropism, chloroplast positioning, and stomata opening. Arabidopsis has two homologues, phot1 and phot2, that share physiological functions depending on light intensity. A phot molecule has two photoreceptive light oxygen voltage-sensing domains, LOV1 and LOV2, and a Ser/Thr kinase domain. The LOV domains undergo a photocycle upon blue light (BL) stimulation, including transient adduct formation between the chromophore and a conserved cysteine (S390 intermediate) that leads to activation of the kinase. To uncover the mechanism underlying the photoactivation of the kinase, we have introduced a kinase assay system composed of a phot1 LOV2-linker-kinase polypeptide as a light-regulated kinase and its N-terminal polypeptide as an artificial substrate (Okajima, K., Matsuoka, D., and Tokutomi, S. (2011) LOV2-linker-kinase phosphorylates LOV1-containing N-terminal polypeptide substrate via photoreaction of LOV2 in Arabidopsis phototropin1. FEBS Lett. 585, 3391-3395). In the present study, we extended the assay system to phot2 and compared the photochemistry and kinase activation by BL between phot1 and phot2 to gain insight into the molecular basis for the different photosensitivities of phot1 and phot2. Photosensitivity of kinase activation by BL and the lifetime of S390 of phot1 were 10 times higher and longer, respectively, than those of phot2. This correlation was confirmed by an amino acid substitution experiment with phot1 to shorten the lifetime of S390. The present results demonstrated that the photosensitivity of kinase activation in phot involves the lifetime of S390 in LOV2, suggesting that the lifetime is one of the key factors for the different photosensitivities observed for phot1 and phot2.

  8. A C-terminal membrane association domain of phototropin 2 is necessary for chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Nagatani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), plant-specific blue light receptor kinases, mediate a range of physiological responses in Arabidopsis, including phototropism, chloroplast photorelocation movement, stomatal opening and leaf flattening. Phototropins consist of two photoreceptive domains at their N-terminus, LOV1 (light, oxygen or voltage 1) and LOV2, and a serine/threonine kinase domain at their C-terminus. Here, we determined the molecular moiety for the membrane association of phototropins using the yeast CytoTrap and Arabidopsis protoplast systems. We then examined the physiological significance of the membrane association of phototropins. This detailed study with serial deletions narrowed down the association domain to a relatively small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropin. The functional analysis of phot2 deletion mutants in the phot2-deficient Adiantum and Arabidopsis mutants revealed that the ability to mediate the chloroplast avoidance response correlated well with phot2's membrane association, especially with the Golgi apparatus. Taken together, our data suggest that a small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropins is necessary not only for membrane association but also for the physiological activities that elicit phototropin-specific responses.

  9. Photochemical properties of the flavin mononucleotide-binding domains of the phototropins from Arabidopsis, rice, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Swartz, Trevor E; Olney, Margaret A; Onodera, Akihiko; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Asamizu, Erika; Tabata, Satoshi; Kanegae, Hiromi; Takano, Makoto; Christie, John M; Nagatani, Akira; Briggs, Winslow R

    2002-06-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2, formerly designated nph1 and npl1) are blue-light receptors that mediate phototropism, blue light-induced chloroplast relocation, and blue light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Phototropins contain two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains at their N termini (LOV1 and LOV2), each a binding site for the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Their C termini contain a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. Here, we examine the kinetic properties of the LOV domains of Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2, rice (Oryza sativa) phot1 and phot2, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phot. When expressed in Escherichia coli, purified LOV domains from all phototropins examined bind FMN tightly and undergo a self-contained photocycle, characterized by fluorescence and absorption changes induced by blue light (T. Sakai, T. Kagawa, M. Kasahara, T.E. Swartz, J.M. Christie, W.R. Briggs, M. Wada, K. Okada [2001] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98: 6969-6974; M. Salomon, J.M. Christie, E. Knieb, U. Lempert, W.R. Briggs [2000] Biochemistry 39: 9401-9410). The photocycle involves the light-induced formation of a cysteinyl adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the FMN chromophore, which subsequently breaks down in darkness. In each case, the relative quantum efficiencies for the photoreaction and the rate constants for dark recovery of LOV1, LOV2, and peptides containing both LOV domains are presented. Moreover, the data obtained from full-length Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 expressed in insect cells closely resemble those obtained for the tandem LOV-domain fusion proteins expressed in E. coli. For both Arabidopsis and rice phototropins, the LOV domains of phot1 differ from those of phot2 in their reaction kinetic properties and relative quantum efficiencies. Thus, in addition to differing in amino acid sequence, the phototropins can be distinguished on the basis of the photochemical cycles of their LOV domains. The LOV domains of C. reinhardtii phot also undergo light

  10. The LOV domain: a chromophore module servicing multiple photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Winslow R

    2007-07-01

    Three different families of blue-light receptors have been characterized from higher plants: three cryptochromes, two phototropins, and the three members of the ZTL/ADO family. Phototropins and the ZTL/ADO proteins have chromophore modules, designated LOV domains, that bind flavin mononucleotide and undergo formation of a C(4a) flavin-cysteinyl adduct. All contain the highly conserved amino acid motif GXNCRFLQ. Over 90 prokaryote proteins also contain LOV domains with this motif upstream from one of several different functional groups. All of these that have been investigated to date act as photoreceptors in vitro and form the adduct upon irradiation. Four members of the class LOV-histidine kinase, one from a plant pathogen (Pseudomonas syringae), one from an animal pathogen Brucella melitensis), and two from a marine bacterium (Erythrobacter litoralis) respectively, mediate light-activated histidine phosphorylation. Decay of the adduct in darkness after a blue light pulse coincides with loss of the capacity for phosphorylation upon addition of ATP. At present, the biological role(s) of these light-sensitive proteins is under investigation.

  11. Short LOV Proteins in Methylocystis Reveal Insight into LOV Domain Photocycle Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    El-Arab, Kaley K.; Pudasaini, Ashutosh; Zoltowski, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Light Oxygen Voltage (LOV) proteins are widely used in optogenetic devices, however universal signal transduction pathways and photocycle mechanisms remain elusive. In particular, short-LOV (sLOV) proteins have been discovered in bacteria and fungi, containing only the photoresponsive LOV element without any obvious signal transduction domains. These sLOV proteins may be ideal models for LOV domain function due to their ease of study as full-length proteins. Unfortunately, characterization of such proteins remains limited to select systems. Herein, we identify a family of bacterial sLOV proteins present in Methylocystis. Sequence analysis of Methylocystis LOV proteins (McLOV) demonstrates conservation with sLOV proteins from fungal systems that employ competitive dimerization as a signaling mechanism. Cloning and characterization of McLOV proteins confirms functional dimer formation and reveal unexpected photocycle mechanisms. Specifically, some McLOV photocycles are insensitive to external bases such as imidazole, in contrast to previously characterized LOV proteins. Mutational analysis identifies a key residue that imparts insensitivity to imidazole in two McLOV homologs and affects adduct decay by two orders of magnitude. The resultant data identifies a new family of LOV proteins that indicate a universal photocycle mechanism may not be present in LOV proteins. PMID:25933162

  12. Spatiotemporal control of small GTPases with light using the LOV domain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi I; Wang, Xiaobo; He, Li; Montell, Denise; Hahn, Klaus M

    2011-01-01

    Signaling networks in living systems are coordinated through subcellular compartmentalization and precise timing of activation. These spatiotemporal aspects ensure the fidelity of signaling while contributing to the diversity and specificity of downstream events. This is studied through development of molecular tools that generate localized and precisely timed protein activity in living systems. To study the molecular events responsible for cytoskeletal changes in real time, we generated versions of Rho family GTPases whose interactions with downstream effectors is controlled by light. GTPases were grafted to the phototropin LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) domain (Huala, E., Oeller, P. W., Liscum, E., Han, I., Larsen, E., and Briggs, W. R. (1997). Arabidopsis NPH1: A protein kinase with a putative redox-sensing domain. Science278, 2120-2123.) via an alpha helix on the LOV C-terminus (Wu, Y. I., Frey, D., Lungu, O. I., Jaehrig, A., Schlichting, I., Kuhlman, B., and Hahn, K. M. (2009). A genetically encoded photoactivatable Rac controls the motility of living cells. Nature461, 104-108.). The LOV domain sterically blocked the GTPase active site until it was irradiated. Exposure to 400-500nm light caused unwinding of the helix linking the LOV domain to the GTPase, relieving steric inhibition. The change was reversible and repeatable, and the protein could be returned to its inactive state simply by turning off the light. The LOV domain incorporates a flavin as the active chromophore. This naturally occurring molecule is incorporated simply upon expression of the LOV fusion in cells or animals, permitting ready control of GTPase function in different systems. In cultured single cells, light-activated Rac leads to membrane ruffling, protrusion, and migration. In collectively migrating border cells in the Drosophila ovary, focal activation of photoactivatable Rac (PA-Rac) in a single cell is sufficient to redirect the entire group. PA-Rac in a single cell also rescues the

  13. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Song, S-H; Dick, B; Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Schiereis, T; Hegemann, P

    2005-10-03

    An absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the combined wild-type LOV1-LOV2 domain string (abbreviated LOV1/2) of phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is carried out at pH 8. A LOV1/2-MBP fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) and LOV1/2 with a His-tag at the C-terminus (LOV1/2-His) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain are investigated. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). The photo-cycle dynamics is studied by dark-state absorption and fluorescence measurement, by following the temporal absorption and emission changes under blue and violet light exposure, and by measuring the temporal absorption and fluorescence recovery after light exposure. The fluorescence quantum yield, phi(F), of the dark adapted samples is phi(F)(LOV1/2-His) approximately 0.15 and phi(F)(LOV1/2-MBP) approximately 0.17. A bi-exponential absorption recovery after light exposure with a fast (in the several 10-s range) and a slow component (in the near 10-min range) are resolved. The quantum yield of photo-adduct formation, phi(Ad), is extracted from excitation intensity dependent absorption measurements. It decreases somewhat with rising excitation intensity. The behaviour of the combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 double domains is compared with the behaviour of the separate LOV1 and LOV2 domains.

  14. Functional and topological diversity of LOV domain photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Glantz, Spencer T.; Carpenter, Eric J.; Melkonian, Michael; Boyden, Edward S.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Chow, Brian Y.

    2016-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage sensitive (LOV) flavoproteins are ubiquitous photoreceptors that mediate responses to environmental cues. Photosensory inputs are transduced into signaling outputs via structural rearrangements in sensor domains that consequently modulate the activity of an effector domain or multidomain clusters. Establishing the diversity in effector function and sensor–effector topology will inform what signaling mechanisms govern light-responsive behaviors across multiple kingdoms of life and how these signals are transduced. Here, we report the bioinformatics identification of over 6,700 candidate LOV domains (including over 4,000 previously unidentified sequences from plants and protists), and insights from their annotations for ontological function and structural arrangements. Motif analysis identified the sensors from ∼42 million ORFs, with strong statistical separation from other flavoproteins and non-LOV members of the structurally related Per-aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-Sim family. Conserved-domain analysis determined putative light-regulated function and multidomain topologies. We found that for certain effectors, sensor–effector linker length is discretized based on both phylogeny and the preservation of α-helical heptad repeats within an extended coiled-coil linker structure. This finding suggests that preserving sensor–effector orientation is a key determinant of linker length, in addition to ancestry, in LOV signaling structure–function. We found a surprisingly high prevalence of effectors with functions previously thought to be rare among LOV proteins, such as regulators of G protein signaling, and discovered several previously unidentified effectors, such as lipases. This work highlights the value of applying genomic and transcriptomic technologies to diverse organisms to capture the structural and functional variation in photosensory proteins that are vastly important in adaptation, photobiology, and

  15. Functional and topological diversity of LOV domain photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Glantz, Spencer T; Carpenter, Eric J; Melkonian, Michael; Gardner, Kevin H; Boyden, Edward S; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Chow, Brian Y

    2016-03-15

    Light-oxygen-voltage sensitive (LOV) flavoproteins are ubiquitous photoreceptors that mediate responses to environmental cues. Photosensory inputs are transduced into signaling outputs via structural rearrangements in sensor domains that consequently modulate the activity of an effector domain or multidomain clusters. Establishing the diversity in effector function and sensor-effector topology will inform what signaling mechanisms govern light-responsive behaviors across multiple kingdoms of life and how these signals are transduced. Here, we report the bioinformatics identification of over 6,700 candidate LOV domains (including over 4,000 previously unidentified sequences from plants and protists), and insights from their annotations for ontological function and structural arrangements. Motif analysis identified the sensors from ∼42 million ORFs, with strong statistical separation from other flavoproteins and non-LOV members of the structurally related Per-aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-Sim family. Conserved-domain analysis determined putative light-regulated function and multidomain topologies. We found that for certain effectors, sensor-effector linker length is discretized based on both phylogeny and the preservation of α-helical heptad repeats within an extended coiled-coil linker structure. This finding suggests that preserving sensor-effector orientation is a key determinant of linker length, in addition to ancestry, in LOV signaling structure-function. We found a surprisingly high prevalence of effectors with functions previously thought to be rare among LOV proteins, such as regulators of G protein signaling, and discovered several previously unidentified effectors, such as lipases. This work highlights the value of applying genomic and transcriptomic technologies to diverse organisms to capture the structural and functional variation in photosensory proteins that are vastly important in adaptation, photobiology, and optogenetics.

  16. Autophosphorylation, electrophoretic mobility and immunoreaction of oat phototropin 1 under UV and blue Light.

    PubMed

    Knieb, Elke; Salomon, Michael; Rüdiger, Wolfhart

    2005-01-01

    Phototropins are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors containing two flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding domains, light, oxygen and voltage (LOV)1 and LOV2, of which LOV2 is more sensitive toward light and more important for the physiological response compared with LOV1. Some physiological responses are plant phototropism, chloroplast migration and stomatal opening. Oat phototropin 1 together with light-dependent autophosphorylation shows a reduced electrophoretic mobility and reduced immunoreaction against a heterologous antiserum; both effects were suggested to be caused by phosphorylation at the same sites (M. Salomon, E. Knieb, T. von Zeppelin and W. Rudiger [2003] Biochemistry 42, 4217-4225). In this study, we show that both effects can be separated from each other: at low temperature, reduced immunoreaction preceded the mobility shift, and irradiation with UV-C light led to the mobility shift without the loss of immunoreactivity. We demonstrated that UV-C light at 280 nm, which does not match any absorption maximum of FMN, leads to autophosphorylation of phototropin. It is hypothesized that UV-C light causes differential activation of the LOV domains via energy transfer from aromatic amino acids.

  17. Kinetics of the LOV domain of ZEITLUPE determine its circadian function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pudasaini, Ashutosh; Shim, Jae Sung; Song, Young Hun; Shi, Hua; Kiba, Takatoshi; Somers, David E; Imaizumi, Takato; Zoltowski, Brian D

    2017-02-28

    A LOV (Light, Oxygen, or Voltage) domain containing blue-light photoreceptor ZEITLUPE (ZTL) directs circadian timing by degrading clock proteins in plants. Functions hinge upon allosteric differences coupled to the ZTL photocycle; however, structural and kinetic information was unavailable. Herein, we tune the ZTL photocycle over two orders of magnitude. These variants reveal that ZTL complexes with targets independent of light, but dictates enhanced protein degradation in the dark. In vivo experiments definitively show photocycle kinetics dictate the rate of clock component degradation, thereby impacting circadian period. Structural studies demonstrate that photocycle dependent activation of ZTL depends on an unusual dark-state conformation of ZTL. Crystal structures of ZTL LOV domain confirm delineation of structural and kinetic mechanisms and identify an evolutionarily selected allosteric hinge differentiating modes of PAS/LOV signal transduction. The combined biochemical, genetic and structural studies provide new mechanisms indicating how PAS/LOV proteins integrate environmental variables in complex networks.

  18. Structure of a flavin-binding plant photoreceptor domain: Insights into light-mediated signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Sean; Moffat, Keith

    2001-01-01

    Phototropin, a major blue-light receptor for phototropism in seed plants, exhibits blue-light-dependent autophosphorylation and contains two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains and a serine/threonine kinase domain. The LOV domains share homology with the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) superfamily, a diverse group of sensor proteins. Each LOV domain noncovalently binds a single FMN molecule and exhibits reversible photochemistry in vitro when expressed separately or in tandem. We have determined the crystal structure of the LOV2 domain from the phototropin segment of the chimeric fern photoreceptor phy3 to 2.7-Å resolution. The structure constitutes an FMN-binding fold that reveals how the flavin cofactor is embedded in the protein. The single LOV2 cysteine residue is located 4.2 Å from flavin atom C(4a), consistent with a model in which absorption of blue light induces formation of a covalent cysteinyl-C(4a) adduct. Residues that interact with FMN in the phototropin segment of the chimeric fern photoreceptor (phy3) LOV2 are conserved in LOV domains from phototropin of other plant species and from three proteins involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms in Arabidopsis and Neurospora. This conservation suggests that these domains exhibit the same overall fold and share a common mechanism for flavin binding and light-induced signaling. PMID:11248020

  19. Kinetics of the LOV domain of ZEITLUPE determine its circadian function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pudasaini, Ashutosh; Shim, Jae Sung; Song, Young Hun; Shi, Hua; Kiba, Takatoshi; Somers, David E; Imaizumi, Takato; Zoltowski, Brian D

    2017-01-01

    A LOV (Light, Oxygen, or Voltage) domain containing blue-light photoreceptor ZEITLUPE (ZTL) directs circadian timing by degrading clock proteins in plants. Functions hinge upon allosteric differences coupled to the ZTL photocycle; however, structural and kinetic information was unavailable. Herein, we tune the ZTL photocycle over two orders of magnitude. These variants reveal that ZTL complexes with targets independent of light, but dictates enhanced protein degradation in the dark. In vivo experiments definitively show photocycle kinetics dictate the rate of clock component degradation, thereby impacting circadian period. Structural studies demonstrate that photocycle dependent activation of ZTL depends on an unusual dark-state conformation of ZTL. Crystal structures of ZTL LOV domain confirm delineation of structural and kinetic mechanisms and identify an evolutionarily selected allosteric hinge differentiating modes of PAS/LOV signal transduction. The combined biochemical, genetic and structural studies provide new mechanisms indicating how PAS/LOV proteins integrate environmental variables in complex networks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21646.001 PMID:28244872

  20. Lighting Up Clostridium Difficile: Reporting Gene Expression Using Fluorescent Lov Domains

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Anthony M.; Jukes, Caitlin; Candlish, Denise; Irvine, June J.; Spencer, Janice; Fagan, Robert P.; Roe, Andrew J.; Christie, John M.; Fairweather, Neil F.; Douce, Gillian R.

    2016-01-01

    The uses of fluorescent reporters derived from green fluorescent protein have proved invaluable for the visualisation of biological processes in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. However, their requirement for oxygen has limited their application in obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium difficile. Fluorescent proteins derived from Light, Oxygen or Voltage sensing (LOV) domains have been shown to bridge this limitation, but their utility as translational fusions to monitor protein expression and localisation in a strict anaerobic bacterium has not been reported. Here we demonstrate the utility of phiLOV in three species of Clostridium and its application as a marker of real-time protein translation and dynamics through genetic fusion with the cell division protein, FtsZ. Time lapse microscopy of dividing cells suggests that Z ring assembly arises through the extension of the FtsZ arc starting from one point on the circumference. Furthermore, through incorporation of phiLOV into the flagella subunit, FliC, we show the potential of bacterial LOV-based fusion proteins to be successfully exported to the extracellular environment. PMID:26996606

  1. An auxilin-like J-domain protein, JAC1, regulates phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2005-09-01

    The ambient-light conditions mediate chloroplast relocation in plant cells. Under the low-light conditions, chloroplasts accumulate in the light (accumulation response), while under the high-light conditions, they avoid the light (avoidance response). In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the accumulation response is mediated by two blue-light receptors, termed phototropins (phot1 and phot2) that act redundantly, and the avoidance response is mediated by phot2 alone. A mutant, J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1 (jac1), lacks the accumulation response under weak blue light but shows a normal avoidance response under strong blue light. In dark-adapted wild-type cells, chloroplasts accumulate on the bottom of cells. Both the jac1 and phot2 mutants are defective in this chloroplast movement in darkness. Positional cloning of JAC1 reveals that this gene encodes a J-domain protein, resembling clathrin-uncoating factor auxilin at its C terminus. The amounts of JAC1 transcripts and JAC1 proteins are not regulated by light and by phototropins. A green fluorescent protein-JAC1 fusion protein showed a similar localization pattern to green fluorescent protein alone in a transient expression assay using Arabidopsis mesophyll cells and onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, suggesting that the JAC1 protein may be a soluble cytosolic protein. Together, these results suggest that JAC1 is an essential component of phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement.

  2. Blue light-induced LOV domain dimerization enhances the affinity of Aureochrome 1a for its target DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, Udo; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    The design of synthetic optogenetic tools that allow precise spatiotemporal control of biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic control has developed rapidly over the last years. Rational design of such tools requires detailed knowledge of allosteric light signaling in natural photoreceptors. To understand allosteric communication between sensor and effector domains, characterization of all relevant signaling states is required. Here, we describe the mechanism of light-dependent DNA binding of the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) transcription factor Aureochrome 1a from Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PtAu1a) and present crystal structures of a dark state LOV monomer and a fully light-adapted LOV dimer. In combination with hydrogen/deuterium-exchange, solution scattering data and DNA-binding experiments, our studies reveal a light-sensitive interaction between the LOV and basic region leucine zipper DNA-binding domain that together with LOV dimerization results in modulation of the DNA affinity of PtAu1a. We discuss the implications of these results for the design of synthetic LOV-based photosensors with application in optogenetics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11860.001 PMID:26754770

  3. First evidence for phototropin-related blue-light receptors in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Losi, Aba; Polverini, Eugenia; Quest, Benjamin; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    A prokaryotic protein, YtvA from Bacillus subtilis, was found to possess a light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain sharing high homology with the photoactive, flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding LOV domains of phototropins (phot), blue-light photoreceptors for phototropism in higher plants. Computer-based three-dimensional modeling suggests that YtvA-LOV binds FMN in a similar pocket as phot-LOVs. Recombinant YtvA indeed exhibits the same spectroscopical features and blue-light-induced photochemistry as phot-LOVs, with the reversible formation of a blue-shifted photoproduct, assigned to an FMN-cysteine thiol adduct (Thio383). By means of laser-flash photolysis and time-resolved optoacoustic experiments, we measured the quantum yield of formation for Thio383, Phi(Thio) = 0.49, and the enthalpy change, DeltaH(Thio) = 135 kJ/mol, with respect to the parent state. The formation of Thio383 is accompanied by a considerable volume contraction, DeltaV(Thio) = -13.5 ml/mol. Similar to phot-LOVs, Thio383 is formed from the decay of a red-shifted transient species, T650, within 2 micros. In both YtvA and free FMN, this transient has an enthalpy content of approximately 200 kJ/mol, and its formation is accompanied by a small contraction, DeltaV(T) approximately -1.5 ml/mol, supporting the assignment of T650 to the FMN triplet state, as suggested by spectroscopical evidences. These are the first studies indicating that phototropin-related, blue-light receptors may exist also in prokaryotes, besides constituting a steadily growing family in plants. PMID:11964249

  4. A dominant mutation in the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain vicinity impairs phototropin1 signaling in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sulabha; Kharshiing, Eros; Srinivas, Ankanagari; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Nagatani, Akira; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Bodanapu, Reddaiah; Behera, Rajendra K; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-04-01

    In higher plants, blue light (BL) phototropism is primarily controlled by the phototropins, which are also involved in stomatal movement and chloroplast relocation. These photoresponses are mediated by two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Phot1 mediates responses with higher sensitivity than phot2, and phot2 specifically mediates chloroplast avoidance and dark positioning responses. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a Nonphototropic seedling1 (Nps1) mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The mutant is impaired in low-fluence BL responses, including chloroplast accumulation and stomatal opening. Genetic analyses show that the mutant locus is dominant negative in nature. In dark-grown seedlings of the Nps1 mutant, phot1 protein accumulates at a highly reduced level relative to the wild type and lacks BL-induced autophosphorylation. The mutant harbors a single glycine-1484-to-alanine transition in the Hinge1 region of a phot1 homolog, resulting in an arginine-to-histidine substitution (R495H) in a highly conserved A'α helix proximal to the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain of the translated gene product. Significantly, the R495H substitution occurring in the Hinge1 region of PHOT1 abolishes its regulatory activity in Nps1 seedlings, thereby highlighting the functional significance of the A'α helix region in phototropic signaling of tomato.

  5. All-optical switching in plant blue light photoreceptor phototropin.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sukhdev; Kulshrestha, Kapil

    2006-12-01

    We theoretically analyze all-optical switching in the recently characterized LOV2 domain from Avena sativa (oat) phot1 phototropin, a blue-light plant photoreceptor, based on nonlinear intensity-induced excited-state absorption. The transmission of a cw probe laser beam at 660 nm corresponding to the peak absorption of the first excited L-state, through the LOV2 sample, is switched by a pulsed pump laser beam at 442 nm that corresponds to the maximum initial D state absorption. The switching characteristics have been analyzed using the rate equation approach, considering all the three intermediate states and transitions in the LOV2 photocycle. It is shown that for a given pump pulse intensity, there is an optimum pump pulsewidth for which the switching contrast is maximum. It is shown that the probe laser beam can be completely switched off (100% modulation) by the pump laser beam at 50 kW/cm2 for a concentration of 1 mM with sample thickness of 5.5 mm. The switching characteristics are sensitive to various parameters such as concentration, rate constant of L-state, peak pump intensity and pump pulse width. At typical values, the switch-off and switch-on time is 1.6 and 22.3 micros, respectively. The switching characteristics have also been used to design all-optical NOT and the universal NOR and NAND logic gates.

  6. A Dominant Mutation in the Light-Oxygen and Voltage2 Domain Vicinity Impairs Phototropin1 Signaling in Tomato1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sulabha; Kharshiing, Eros; Srinivas, Ankanagari; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Nagatani, Akira; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Bodanapu, Reddaiah; Behera, Rajendra K.; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-01-01

    In higher plants, blue light (BL) phototropism is primarily controlled by the phototropins, which are also involved in stomatal movement and chloroplast relocation. These photoresponses are mediated by two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Phot1 mediates responses with higher sensitivity than phot2, and phot2 specifically mediates chloroplast avoidance and dark positioning responses. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a Nonphototropic seedling1 (Nps1) mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The mutant is impaired in low-fluence BL responses, including chloroplast accumulation and stomatal opening. Genetic analyses show that the mutant locus is dominant negative in nature. In dark-grown seedlings of the Nps1 mutant, phot1 protein accumulates at a highly reduced level relative to the wild type and lacks BL-induced autophosphorylation. The mutant harbors a single glycine-1484-to-alanine transition in the Hinge1 region of a phot1 homolog, resulting in an arginine-to-histidine substitution (R495H) in a highly conserved A′α helix proximal to the light-oxygen and voltage2 domain of the translated gene product. Significantly, the R495H substitution occurring in the Hinge1 region of PHOT1 abolishes its regulatory activity in Nps1 seedlings, thereby highlighting the functional significance of the A′α helix region in phototropic signaling of tomato. PMID:24515830

  7. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the LOV2-domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii fused to a maltose binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Susdorf, T.; Álvarez, M.; Islam, Sh. D. M.; Hegemann, P.

    2004-07-01

    The absorption and emission behaviour of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the wild-type light, oxygen and voltage-sensitive (LOV) domain LOV2 of the photoreceptor phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is studied at pH 8. Actually a LOV2-MBP-fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain is investigated. For fresh samples stored in the dark an initial fluorescence quantum yield of φF=0.08±0.01 is determined. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). In the aqueous solutions studied approximately seven percent of the FMN molecules are not bound to the protein (free FMN in oxidized form) and about seven percent of the non-covalently bound FMN are not convertible to an adduct. Approximately two thirds of the intermediate photoproduct recovers with a time constant of 41 ± 1 s, while approximately one third recovers with a time constant of about 7 min. The photo-adduct formation is thought to proceed via singlet excited-state electron transfer and triplet formation.

  8. Switching from adduct formation to electron transfer in a light-oxygen-voltage domain containing the reactive cysteine.

    PubMed

    Magerl, Kathrin; Stambolic, Ivan; Dick, Bernhard

    2017-03-08

    LOV (light-, oxygen- or voltage-sensitive) domains act as photosensory units of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. Upon blue light excitation they undergo a photocycle via the excited triplet state of their flavin chromophore yielding the flavin-cysteinyl adduct. Adduct formation is highly conserved among all LOV domains and constitutes the primary step of LOV domain signaling. But recently, it has been shown that signal propagation can also be triggered by flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone offering new prospects for protein engineering. This, however, requires mutation of the photo-active Cys. Here, we report on LOV1 mutants of C. reinhardtii phototropin in which adduct formation is suppressed although the photo-active Cys is present. Introduction of a Tyr into the LOV core induces a proton coupled electron transfer towards the flavin chromophore. Flavin radical species are formed via either the excited flavin singlet or triplet state depending on the geometry of donor and acceptor. This photoreductive pathway resembles the photoreaction observed in other blue light photoreceptors, e.g. blue-light sensors using flavin adenine dinucleotide (BLUF) domains or cryptochromes. The ability to tune the photoreactivity of the flavin chromophore inside the LOV core has implications for the mechanism of adduct formation in the wild type and may be of use for protein engineering.

  9. Structure of a LOV protein in apo-state and implications for construction of LOV-based optical tools

    PubMed Central

    Arinkin, Vladimir; Granzin, Joachim; Röllen, Katrin; Krauss, Ulrich; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Willbold, Dieter; Batra-Safferling, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Unique features of Light-Oxygen-Voltage (LOV) proteins like relatively small size (~12–19 kDa), inherent modularity, highly-tunable photocycle and oxygen-independent fluorescence have lately been exploited for the generation of optical tools. Structures of LOV domains reported so far contain a flavin chromophore per protein molecule. Here we report two new findings on the short LOV protein W619_1-LOV from Pseudomonas putida. First, the apo-state crystal structure of W619_1-LOV at 2.5 Å resolution reveals conformational rearrangements in the secondary structure elements lining the chromophore pocket including elongation of the Fα helix, shortening of the Eα-Fα loop and partial unfolding of the Eα helix. Second, the apo W619_1-LOV protein binds both natural and structurally modified flavin chromophores. Remarkably different photophysical and photochemical properties of W619_1-LOV bound to 7-methyl-8-chloro-riboflavin (8-Cl-RF) and lumichrome imply application of these variants as novel optical tools as they offer advantages such as no adduct state formation, and a broader choice of wavelengths for in vitro studies. PMID:28211532

  10. The origin and evolution of phototropins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fay-Wei; Rothfels, Carl J.; Melkonian, Michael; Villarreal, Juan C.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Graham, Sean W.; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Mathews, Sarah; Pryer, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant phototropism, the ability to bend toward or away from light, is predominantly controlled by blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins. Although phototropins have been well-characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, their evolutionary history is largely unknown. In this study, we complete an in-depth survey of phototropin homologs across land plants and algae using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data. We show that phototropins originated in an ancestor of Viridiplantae (land plants + green algae). Phototropins repeatedly underwent independent duplications in most major land-plant lineages (mosses, lycophytes, ferns, and seed plants), but remained single-copy genes in liverworts and hornworts—an evolutionary pattern shared with another family of photoreceptors, the phytochromes. Following each major duplication event, the phototropins differentiated in parallel, resulting in two specialized, yet partially overlapping, functional forms that primarily mediate either low- or high-light responses. Our detailed phylogeny enables us to not only uncover new phototropin lineages, but also link our understanding of phototropin function in Arabidopsis with what is known in Adiantum and Physcomitrella (the major model organisms outside of flowering plants). We propose that the convergent functional divergences of phototropin paralogs likely contributed to the success of plants through time in adapting to habitats with diverse and heterogeneous light conditions. PMID:26322073

  11. Crystal Structures of Aureochrome1 LOV Suggest New Design Strategies for Optogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Devrani; Yang, Xiaojing; Moffat, Keith

    2014-10-02

    Aureochrome1, a signaling photoreceptor from a eukaryotic photosynthetic stramenopile, confers blue-light-regulated DNA binding on the organism. Its topology, in which a C-terminal LOV sensor domain is linked to an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP effector domain, contrasts with the reverse sensor-effector topology in most other known LOV-photoreceptors. How, then, is signal transmitted in Aureochrome1? The dark- and light-state crystal structures of Aureochrome1 LOV domain (AuLOV) show that its helical N- and C-terminal flanking regions are packed against the external surface of the core {beta} sheet, opposite to the FMN chromophore on the internal surface. Light-induced conformational changes occur in the quaternary structure of the AuLOV dimer and in Phe298 of the H{beta} strand in the core. The properties of AuLOV extend the applicability of LOV domains as versatile design modules that permit fusion to effector domains via either the N- or C-termini to confer blue-light sensitivity.

  12. LOV-based optogenetic devices: light-driven modules to impart photoregulated control of cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pudasaini, Ashutosh; El-Arab, Kaley K.; Zoltowski, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    The Light-Oxygen-Voltage domain family of proteins is widespread in biology where they impart sensory responses to signal transduction domains. The small, light responsive LOV modules offer a novel platform for the construction of optogenetic tools. Currently, the design and implementation of these devices is partially hindered by a lack of understanding of how light drives allosteric changes in protein conformation to activate diverse signal transduction domains. Further, divergent photocycle properties amongst LOV family members complicate construction of highly sensitive devices with fast on/off kinetics. In the present review we discuss the history of LOV domain research with primary emphasis on tuning LOV domain chemistry and signal transduction to allow for improved optogenetic tools. PMID:25988185

  13. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Hernán R; Posadas, Diana M; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2012-07-24

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum.

  14. Solving Blue Light Riddles: New Lessons from Flavin-binding LOV Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Detection of blue light (BL) via flavin-binding photoreceptors (Fl-Blues) has evolved throughout all three domains of life. Although the main BL players, that is light, oxygen and voltage (LOV), blue light sensing using flavins (BLUF) and Cry (cryptochrome) proteins, have been characterized in great detail with respect to structure and function, still several unresolved issues at different levels of complexity remain and novel unexpected findings were reported. Here, we review the most prevailing riddles of LOV-based photoreceptors, for example: the relevance of water and/or small metabolites for the dynamics of the photocycle; molecular details of light-to-signal transduction events; the interplay of BL sensing by LOV domains with other environmental stimuli, such as BL plus oxygen-mediating photodamage and its impact on microbial lifestyles; the importance of the cell or chromophore redox state in determining the fate of BL-driven reactions; the evolutionary pathways of LOV-based BL sensing and associated functions through the diverse phyla. We will discuss major novelties emerged during the last few years on these intriguing aspects of LOV proteins by presenting paradigmatic examples from prokaryotic photosensors that exhibit the largest complexity and richness in associated functions.

  15. Phosphoinositides play differential roles in regulating phototropin1- and phototropin2-mediated chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Labuz, Justyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins are UVA/blue-light receptors involved in controlling the light-dependent physiological responses which serve to optimize the photosynthetic activity of plants and promote growth. The phototropin-induced phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism has been shown to be essential for stomatal opening and phototropism. However, the role of PIs in phototropin-induced chloroplast movements remains poorly understood. The aim of this work is to determine which PI species are involved in the control of chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis and the nature of their involvement. We present the effects of the inactivation of phospholipase C (PLC), PI3-kinase (PI3K) and PI4-kinase (PI4K) on chloroplast relocations in Arabidopsis. The inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphospahte [PI(4,5)P2]-PLC pathway, using neomycin and U73122, suppressed the phot2-mediated chloroplast accumulation and avoidance responses, without affecting movement responses controlled by phot1. On the other hand, PI3K and PI4K activities are more restricted to phot1- and phot2-induced weak-light responses. The inactivation of PI3K and PI4K by wortmannin and LY294002 severely affected the weak blue-light-activated accumulation response but had little effect on the strong blue-light-activated avoidance response. The inhibitory effect observed with PI metabolism inhibitors is, at least partly, due to a disturbance in Ca(2+) ((c)) signaling. Using the transgenic aequorin system, we show that the application of these inhibitors suppresses the blue-light-induced transient Ca(2+) ((c)) rise. These results demonstrate the importance of PIs in chloroplast movements, with the PI(4,5)P2-PLC pathway involved in phot2 signaling while PI3K and PI4K are required for the phot1- and phot2-induced accumulation response. Our results suggest that these PIs modulate cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling during movements.

  16. The Drosophila BTB Domain Protein Jim Lovell Has Roles in Multiple Larval and Adult Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bjorum, Sonia M.; Simonette, Rebecca A.; Alanis, Raul; Wang, Jennifer E.; Lewis, Benjamin M.; Trejo, Michael H.; Hanson, Keith A.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Innate behaviors have their origins in the specification of neural fates during development. Within Drosophila, BTB (Bric-a-brac,Tramtrack, Broad) domain proteins such as Fruitless are known to play key roles in the neural differentiation underlying such responses. We previously identified a gene, which we have termed jim lovell (lov), encoding a BTB protein with a role in gravity responses. To understand more fully the behavioral roles of this gene we have investigated its function through several approaches. Transcript and protein expression patterns have been examined and behavioral phenotypes of new lov mutations have been characterized. Lov is a nuclear protein, suggesting a role as a transcriptional regulator, as for other BTB proteins. In late embryogenesis, Lov is expressed in many CNS and PNS neurons. An examination of the PNS expression indicates that lov functions in the late specification of several classes of sensory neurons. In particular, only two of the five abdominal lateral chordotonal neurons express Lov, predicting functional variation within this highly similar group. Surprisingly, Lov is also expressed very early in embryogenesis in ways that suggests roles in morphogenetic movements, amnioserosa function and head neurogenesis. The phenotypes of two new lov mutations that delete adjacent non-coding DNA regions are strikingly different suggesting removal of different regulatory elements. In lov47, Lov expression is lost in many embryonic neurons including the two lateral chordotonal neurons. lov47 mutant larvae show feeding and locomotor defects including spontaneous backward movement. Adult lov47 males perform aberrant courtship behavior distinguished by courtship displays that are not directed at the female. lov47 adults also show more defective negative gravitaxis than the previously isolated lov91Y mutant. In contrast, lov66 produces largely normal behavior but severe female sterility associated with ectopic lov expression in the ovary. We

  17. Glutamine Amide Flip Elicits Long Distance Allosteric Responses in the LOV Protein Vivid.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2017-03-01

    Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domains sense blue light through the photochemical formation of a cysteinyl-flavin covalent adduct. Concurrent protonation at the flavin N5 position alters the hydrogen bonding interactions of an invariant Gln residue that has been proposed to flip its amide side chain as a critical step in the propagation of conformational change. Traditional molecular dynamics (MD) and replica-exchange MD (REMD) simulations of the well-characterized LOV protein Vivid (VVD) demonstrate that the Gln182 amide indeed reorients by ∼180° in response to either adduct formation or reduction of the isoalloxazine ring to the neutral semiquinone, both of which involve N5 protonation. Free energy simulations reveal that the relative free energies of the flipped Gln conformation and the flipping barrier are significantly lower in the light-adapted state. The Gln182 flip stabilizes an important hinge-bβ region between the PAS β-sheet and the N-terminal cap helix that in turn destabilizes an N-terminal latch region against the PAS core. Release of the latch, observed both experimentally and in the simulations, is known to mediate light-induced VVD dimerization. This computational study of a LOV protein, unprecedented in its agreement with experiment, provides an atomistic view of long-range allosteric coupling in a photoreceptor.

  18. Photoactivation Reduces Side-Chain Dynamics of a LOV Photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Andreas M.; Knieps-Grünhagen, Esther; Bocola, Marco; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Zamponi, Michaela; Krauss, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    We used neutron-scattering experiments to probe the conformational dynamics of the light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) photoreceptor PpSB1-LOV from Pseudomonas putida in both the dark and light states. Global protein diffusion and internal macromolecular dynamics were measured using incoherent neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy on the picosecond to nanosecond timescales. Global protein diffusion of PpSB1-LOV is not influenced by photoactivation. Observation-time-dependent global diffusion coefficients were found, which converge on the nanosecond timescale toward diffusion coefficients determined by dynamic light scattering. Mean-square displacements of localized internal motions and effective force constants, , describing the resilience of the proteins were determined on the respective timescales. Photoactivation significantly modifies the flexibility and the resilience of PpSB1-LOV. On the fast, picosecond timescale, small changes in the mean-square displacement and are observed, which are enhanced on the slower, nanosecond timescale. Photoactivation results in a slightly larger resilience of the photoreceptor on the fast, picosecond timescale, whereas in the nanosecond range, a significantly less resilient structure of the light-state protein is observed. For a residue-resolved interpretation of the experimental neutron-scattering data, we analyzed molecular dynamics simulations of the PpSB1-LOV X-ray structure. Based on these data, it is tempting to speculate that light-induced changes in the protein result in altered side-chain mobility mostly for residues on the protruding Jα helix and on the LOV-LOV dimer interface. Our results provide strong experimental evidence that side-chain dynamics play a crucial role in photoactivation and signaling of PpSB1-LOV via modulation of conformational entropy. PMID:26958884

  19. Phototropins mediate blue and red light-induced chloroplast movements in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-07-01

    Phototropin is the blue-light receptor that mediates phototropism, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Blue and red light induce chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To study the photoreceptors for chloroplast movement in P. patens, four phototropin genes (PHOTA1, PHOTA2, PHOTB1, and PHOTB2) were isolated by screening cDNA libraries. These genes were classified into two groups (PHOTA and PHOTB) on the basis of their deduced amino acid sequences. Then phototropin disruptants were generated by homologous recombination and used for analysis of chloroplast movement. Data revealed that blue light-induced chloroplast movement was mediated by phototropins in P. patens. Both photA and photB groups were able to mediate chloroplast avoidance, as has been reported for Arabidopsis phot2, although the photA group contributed more to the response. Red light-induced chloroplast movement was also significantly reduced in photA2photB1photB2 triple disruptants. Because the primary photoreceptor for red light-induced chloroplast movement in P. patens is phytochrome, phototropins may be downstream components of phytochromes in the signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to show a function for the phototropin blue-light receptor in a response to wavelengths that it does not absorb.

  20. Structure of a Light-Activated LOV Protein Dimer That Regulates Transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Chen, Chen-Hui; Dunlap, Jay C.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Crane, Brian R.

    2012-10-25

    Light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) protein domains are present in many signaling proteins in bacteria, archaea, protists, plants, and fungi. The LOV protein VIVID (VVD) of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa enables the organism to adapt to constant or increasing amounts of light and facilitates proper entrainment of circadian rhythms. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the fully light-adapted VVD dimer and reveal the mechanism by which light-driven conformational change alters the oligomeric state of the protein. Light-induced formation of a cysteinyl-flavin adduct generated a new hydrogen bond network that released the amino (N) terminus from the protein core and restructured an acceptor pocket for binding of the N terminus on the opposite subunit of the dimer. Substitution of residues critical for the switch between the monomeric and the dimeric states of the protein had profound effects on light adaptation in Neurospora. The mechanism of dimerization of VVD provides molecular details that explain how members of a large family of photoreceptors convert light responses to alterations in protein-protein interactions.

  1. LOV Histidine Kinase Modulates the General Stress Response System and Affects the virB Operon Expression in Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Sycz, Gabriela; Carrica, Mariela Carmen; Tseng, Tong-Seung; Bogomolni, Roberto A; Briggs, Winslow R; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Paris, Gastón

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is the causative agent of the zoonotic disease brucellosis, and its success as an intracellular pathogen relies on its ability to adapt to the harsh environmental conditions that it encounters inside the host. The Brucella genome encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain upstream from the kinase, LOVHK, which plays an important role in light-regulated Brucella virulence. In this report we study the intracellular signaling pathway initiated by the light sensor LOVHK using an integrated biochemical and genetic approach. From results of bacterial two-hybrid assays and phosphotransfer experiments we demonstrate that LOVHK functionally interacts with two response regulators: PhyR and LovR, constituting a functional two-component signal-transduction system. LOVHK contributes to the activation of the General Stress Response (GSR) system in Brucella via PhyR, while LovR is proposed to be a phosphate-sink for LOVHK, decreasing its phosphorylation state. We also show that in the absence of LOVHK the expression of the virB operon is down-regulated. In conclusion, our results suggest that LOVHK positively regulates the GSR system in vivo, and has an effect on the expression of the virB operon. The proposed regulatory network suggests a similar role for LOVHK in other microorganisms.

  2. REPRESSOR OF ULTRAVIOLET-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS function allows efficient phototropin mediated ultraviolet-B phototropism in etiolated seedlings.

    PubMed

    Vanhaelewyn, Lucas; Schumacher, Paolo; Poelman, Dirk; Fankhauser, Christian; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Vandenbussche, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) light is a part of the solar radiation which has significant effects on plant morphology, even at low doses. In Arabidopsis, many of these morphological changes have been attributed to a specific UV-B receptor, UV resistance locus 8 (UVR8). Recent findings showed that next to phototropin regulated phototropism, UVR8 mediated signaling is able of inducing directional bending towards UV-B light in etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis, in a phototropin independent manner. In this study, kinetic analysis of phototropic bending was used to evaluate the relative contribution of each of these pathways in UV-B mediated phototropism. Diminishing UV-B light intensity favors the importance of phototropins. Molecular and genetic analyses suggest that UV-B is capable of inducing phototropin signaling relying on phototropin kinase activity and regulation of NPH3. Moreover, enhanced UVR8 responses in the UV-B hypersensitive rup1rup2 mutants interferes with the fast phototropin mediated phototropism. Together the data suggest that phototropins are the most important receptors for UV-B induced phototropism in etiolated seedlings, and a RUP mediated negative feedback pathway prevents UVR8 signaling to interfere with the phototropin dependent response.

  3. Diversity of bacteria in surface ice of Austre Lovénbreen glacier, Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yin-Xin; Yan, Ming; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; He, Jian-Feng; Sun, Kun; Zhang, Fang

    2013-05-01

    Two 16S rRNA gene clone libraries Cores 1U and 2U were constructed using two ice core samples collected from Austre Lovénbreen glacier in Svalbard. The two libraries yielded a total of 262 clones belonging to 59 phylotypes. Sequences fell into 10 major lineages of the domain Bacteria, including Proteobacteria (alpha, beta, gamma and delta subdivisions), Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Cyanobacteria and candidate division TM7. Among them, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria were most abundant. UniFrac data showed no significant differences in community composition between the two ice cores. A total of nineteen bacterial strains from the genera Pseudoalteromonas and Psychrobacter were isolated from the ice cores. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses revealed a close relationship between the ice core isolates and bacteria in marine environments, indicating a wide distribution of some bacterial phylotypes in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

  4. A phytochrome–phototropin light signaling complex at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jaedicke, Katharina; Lichtenthäler, Anna Lena; Meyberg, Rabea; Zeidler, Mathias; Hughes, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Phytochromes are red/far-red photochromic photoreceptors central to regulating plant development. Although they are known to enter the nucleus upon light activation and, once there, regulate transcription, this is not the complete picture. Various phytochrome effects are manifested much too rapidly to derive from changes in gene expression, whereas others seem to occur without phytochrome entering the nucleus. Phytochromes also guide directional responses to light, excluding a genetic signaling route and implying instead plasma membrane association and a direct cytoplasmic signal. However, to date, no such association has been demonstrated. Here we report that a phytochrome subpopulation indeed associates physically with another photoreceptor, phototropin, at the plasma membrane. Yeast two-hybrid methods using functional photoreceptor molecules showed that the phytochrome steering growth direction in Physcomitrella protonemata binds several phototropins specifically in the photoactivated Pfr state. Split-YFP studies in planta showed that the interaction occurs exclusively at the plasma membrane. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments provided independent confirmation of in vivo phy-phot binding. Consistent with this interaction being associated with a cellular signal, we found that phytochrome-mediated tropic responses are impaired in Physcomitrella phot− mutants. Split-YFP revealed a similar interaction between Arabidopsis phytochrome A and phototropin 1 at the plasma membrane. These associations additionally provide a functional explanation for the evolution of neochrome photoreceptors. Our results imply that the elusive phytochrome cytoplasmic signal arises through binding and coaction with phototropin at the plasma membrane. PMID:22773817

  5. Identification of ASK and clock-associated proteins as molecular partners of LKP2 (LOV kelch protein 2) in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Masahiro; Mitsui, Shunya; Hirano, Hiroshi; Takanabe, Rieko; Tokioka, Yoko; Ihara, Norihisa; Komatsu, Akihiro; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2004-09-01

    The ADO/FKF/LKP/ZTL family of proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana Heynh. have a LOV domain, an F-box motif, and a kelch repeat region. LKP2 is a member of this family and functions either within or very close to the circadian oscillator in Arabidopsis. Promoter-GUS fusion studies revealed that the LKP2 gene was highly active in rosette leaves. In CaMV 35S:LKP2-GFP plants, GFP-associated fluorescence was detected in nuclei, suggesting that LKP2 is a nuclear protein. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that LKP2 interacted with some Arabidopsis Skp1-like proteins (ASK), as do other ADO/FKF/LKP/ZTL family proteins, suggesting that LKP2 can form an SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box protein) complex that functions as a ubiquitin E3 ligase. LKP2 interacted not only with itself but also with other members of the family, LKP1 and FKF1. The two-hybrid analysis also demonstrated that LKP2 interacted with TOC1, a clock component, but not with CCA1 or LHY, negative regulators of TOC1 gene expression. The LOV domain of LKP2 was shown to be necessary and sufficient for the interaction with TOC1. An interaction between LKP2 and APRR5, a paralogue of TOC1, was also observed, but LKP2 did not interact with APRR3, APRR7, or APRR9, other paralogues of TOC1.

  6. Phototropins do not alter accumulation of evening-phased circadian transcripts under blue light

    PubMed Central

    Litthauer, Suzanne; Battle, Martin W.; Jones, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The circadian system induces rhythmic variation in a suite of biochemical and physiological processes that serve to optimise plant growth in diel cycles. To be of greatest utility, these rhythmic behaviors are coordinated with regular environmental changes such as the rising and setting of the sun. Photoreceptors, along with metabolites produced during photosynthesis, act to synchronise the internal timing mechanism with lighting cues. We have recently shown that phototropins help maintain robust rhythms of photosynthetic operating efficiency (φPSII or Fq′/Fm′) under blue light, although rhythmic accumulation of morning-phased circadian transcripts in the nucleus was unaffected. Here we report that evening-phased nuclear clock transcripts were also unaffected. We also observe that rhythms of nuclear clock transcript accumulation are maintained in phototropin mutant plants under a fluctuating lighting regime that induced a loss of Fq′/Fm′ rhythms. PMID:26653107

  7. Optical Control of Peroxisomal Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The blue-light-responsive LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin1 (AsLOV2) has been used to regulate activity and binding of diverse protein targets with light. Here, we used AsLOV2 to photocage a peroxisomal targeting sequence, allowing light regulation of peroxisomal protein import. We generated a protein tag, LOV-PTS1, that can be appended to proteins of interest to direct their import to the peroxisome with light. This method provides a means to inducibly trigger peroxisomal protein trafficking in specific cells at user-defined times. PMID:26513473

  8. The Role of Distant Mutations and Allosteric Regulation on LovD Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Osuna, Sílvia; Gao, Xue; Sawaya, Michael R.; Gilson, Lynne; Collier, Steven J.; Huisman, Gjalt W.; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; Houk, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Natural enzymes have evolved to perform their cellular functions under complex selective pressures, which often require their catalytic activities to be regulated by other proteins. We contrasted a natural enzyme, LovD, which acts on a protein-bound (LovF) acyl substrate, with a laboratory-generated variant that was transformed by directed evolution to accept instead a small free acyl thioester, and no longer requires the acyl carrier protein. The resulting 29-mutant variant is 1000-fold more efficient in the synthesis of the drug simvastatin than the wild-type LovD. This is the first non-patent report of the enzyme currently used for the manufacture of simvastatin, as well as the intermediate evolved variants. Crystal structures and microsecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed the mechanism by which the laboratory-generated mutations free LovD from dependence on protein-protein interactions. Mutations dramatically altered conformational dynamics of the catalytic residues, obviating the need for allosteric modulation by the acyl carrier LovF. PMID:24727900

  9. Chloroplast photorelocation movement mediated by phototropin family proteins in green plants.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2007-09-01

    Chloroplasts gather in areas irradiated with weak light to maximize photosynthesis (the accumulation response). They move away from areas irradiated with strong light to minimize damage of the photosynthetic apparatus (the avoidance response). The processes underlying these chloroplast movements can be divided into three parts: photoperception, signal transduction, and chloroplast movement. Photoreceptors for chloroplast movement have been identified recently in various plant species. A blue light receptor phototropin (phot) mediates chloroplast photorelocation movement in the seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris, the moss Physcomitrella patens and possibly the green alga Mougeotia scalaris. A chimeric photoreceptor between phytochrome and phototropin, neochrome (neo), was found in some advanced ferns and in the green alga M. scalaris. While the mechanism of chloroplast movement is not well understood, it is known that actin filaments play an important role in this process. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with chloroplast movement, several mutants were isolated in A. thaliana (jac1 and chup1) and the corresponding genes were cloned. In this review, recent progress in photoreceptor research into chloroplast movement in various plant species and the possible factors functioning in signal transduction or the regulation of actin filaments identified in A. thaliana is discussed.

  10. Both phototropin 1 and 2 localize on the chloroplast outer membrane with distinct localization activity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kikuchi, Shingo; Nakai, Masato; Nagatani, Akira; Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts change their position to adapt cellular activities to fluctuating environmental light conditions. Phototropins (phot1 and phot2 in Arabidopsis) are plant-specific blue light photoreceptors that perceive changes in light intensity and direction, and mediate actin-based chloroplast photorelocation movements. Both phot1 and phot2 regulate the chloroplast accumulation response, while phot2 is mostly responsible for the regulation of the avoidance response. Although it has been widely accepted that distinct intracellular localizations of phototropins are implicated in the specificity, the mechanism underlying the phot2-specific avoidance response has remained elusive. In this study, we examined the relationship of the phot2 localization pattern to the chloroplast photorelocation movement. First, the fusion of a nuclear localization signal with phot2, which effectively reduced the amount of phot2 in the cytoplasm, retained the activity for both the accumulation and avoidance responses, indicating that membrane-localized phot2 but not cytoplasmic phot2 is functional to mediate the responses. Importantly, some fractions of phot2, and of phot1 to a lesser extent, were localized on the chloroplast outer membrane. Moreover, the deletion of the C-terminal region of phot2, which was previously shown to be defective in blue light-induced Golgi localization and avoidance response, affected the localization pattern on the chloroplast outer membrane. Taken together, these results suggest that dynamic phot2 trafficking from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus and the chloroplast outer membrane might be involved in the avoidance response.

  11. Light regulation of swarming motility in Pseudomonas syringae integrates signaling pathways mediated by a bacteriophytochrome and a LOV protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; McGrane, Regina S; Beattie, Gwyn A

    2013-06-11

    The biological and regulatory roles of photosensory proteins are poorly understood for nonphotosynthetic bacteria. The foliar bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae has three photosensory protein-encoding genes that are predicted to encode the blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinase (LOV-HK) and two red/far-red-light-sensing bacteriophytochromes, BphP1 and BphP2. We provide evidence that LOV-HK and BphP1 form an integrated network that regulates swarming motility in response to multiple light wavelengths. The swarming motility of P. syringae B728a deletion mutants indicated that LOV-HK positively regulates swarming motility in response to blue light and BphP1 negatively regulates swarming motility in response to red and far-red light. BphP2 does not detectably regulate swarming motility. The histidine kinase activity of each LOV-HK and BphP1 is required for this regulation based on the loss of complementation upon mutation of residues key to their kinase activity. Surprisingly, mutants lacking both lov and bphP1 were similar in motility to a bphP1 single mutant in blue light, indicating that the loss of bphP1 is epistatic to the loss of lov and also that BphP1 unexpectedly responds to blue light. Moreover, whereas expression of bphP1 did not alter motility under blue light in a bphP1 mutant, it reduced motility in a mutant lacking lov and bphP1, demonstrating that LOV-HK positively regulates motility by suppressing negative regulation by BphP1. These results are the first to show cross talk between the LOV protein and phytochrome signaling pathways in bacteria, and the similarity of this regulatory network to that of photoreceptors in plants suggests a possible common ancestry. IMPORTANCE Photosensory proteins enable organisms to perceive and respond to light. The biological and ecological roles of these proteins in nonphotosynthetic bacteria are largely unknown. This study discovered that a blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or

  12. A wandering pathway in plant biology: from wildflowers to phototropins to bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Winslow R

    2010-01-01

    The author describes the somewhat convoluted pathway he followed from amateur taxonomy of Minnesota wildflowers to identification of the phototropin family of blue-light receptors. He also mentions individuals who were important in moving his career first into plant taxonomy, then plant development, and finally plant photobiology (and out of music). He emphasizes the many twists and turns a research career can take, including a few that lead to blind ends. He also emphasizes the oscillatory nature of his career-back and forth between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans (with occasional forays to Freiburg, Germany) and back and forth between red-light receptors and blue-light receptors. There is a short intermission in which he describes his longtime relationship with California's Henry W. Coe State Park. Finally, he relates how he followed the unlikely pathway from plant blue-light receptors to a blue-light receptor required to maximize virulence of a bacterial animal pathogen.

  13. Decoding the role of phosphoinositides in phototropin signaling involved in chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Labuz, Justyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2013-08-01

    In angiosperms, light-dependent chloroplast movements are exclusively mediated by UVA/blue light receptors - phototropins. The two photoreceptors of Arabidopsis thaliana, phot1 and phot2, have overlapping roles in the control of these movements. Experiments performed in different plant species point to the participation of phosphoinositides in blue light-controlled chloroplast relocations. Here, we report a summary of recent findings presenting the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate as well as phosphatidylinositol 3- and 4-phosphates in weak blue light-mediated (accumulation) and strong blue light-mediated (avoidance) responses of chloroplasts. The blue light-activated alterations in phosphoinositide concentration are partly responsible for cytosolic Ca (2+) changes. Ca (2+) influx from apoplast does not seem to be involved in the mechanism of movement responses. In summary, interplay between phosphoinositides and intracellular Ca (2+) regulates chloroplast redistribution in response to blue light in higher plants.

  14. Listening to Others' Voices (LOV) Project: An Empowering Strategy Incorporating Marginalized Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minsung; Ryu, Jae-Myong

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces the Listening to Others' Voices (LOV) project, an empowering strategy in geography education. This research aims to create a dataset detailing the perspectives of negatively stereotyped countries with respect to how their countries are portrayed in geography textbooks and to investigate the pedagogical effects of the LOV…

  15. Crystal structure and biochemical studies of the trans-acting polyketide enoyl reductase LovC from lovastatin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Brian D.; Nguyen, Chi; Bruegger, Joel; Smith, Peter; Xu, Wei; Ma, Suzanne; Wong, Emily; Wong, Steven; Xie, Xinkai; Li, Jesse W.-H.; Vederas, John C.; Tang, Yi; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Lovastatin is an important statin prescribed for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Biosynthesis of lovastatin uses an iterative type I polyketide synthase (PKS). LovC is a trans-acting enoyl reductase (ER) that specifically reduces three out of eight possible polyketide intermediates during lovastatin biosynthesis. Such trans-acting ERs have been reported across a variety of other fungal PKS enzymes as a strategy in nature to diversify polyketides. How LovC achieves such specificity is unknown. The 1.9-Å structure of LovC reveals that LovC possesses a medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) fold with a unique monomeric assembly. Two LovC cocrystal structures and enzymological studies help elucidate the molecular basis of LovC specificity, define stereochemistry, and identify active-site residues. Sequence alignment indicates a general applicability to trans-acting ERs of fungal PKSs, as well as their potential application to directing biosynthesis. PMID:22733743

  16. Phototropin 2 is involved in blue light-induced anthocyanin accumulation in Fragaria x ananassa fruits.

    PubMed

    Kadomura-Ishikawa, Yasuko; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Noji, Sumihare; Takahashi, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Anthocyanins are widespread, essential secondary metabolites in higher plants during color development in certain flowers and fruits. In strawberries, anthocyanins are also key contributors to fruit antioxidant capacity and nutritional value. However, the effects of different light qualities on anthocyanin accumulation in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, cv. Sachinoka) fruits remain elusive. In the present study, we showed the most efficient increase in anthocyanin content occurred by blue light irradiation. Light sensing at the molecular level was investigated by isolation of two phototropin (FaPHOT1 and FaPHOT2), two cryptochrome (FaCRY1 and FaCRY2), and two phytochrome (FaPHYA and FaPHYB) homologs. Expression analysis revealed only FaPHOT2 transcripts markedly increased depending on fruit developmental stage, and a corresponding increase in anthocyanin content was detected. FaPHOT2 knockdown resulted in decreased anthocyanin content; however, overexpression increased anthocyanin content. These findings suggested blue light induced anthocyanin accumulation, and FaPHOT2 may play a role in sensing blue light, and mediating anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruits. This is the first report to find a relationship between visible light sensing, and color development in strawberry fruits.

  17. A LOV protein modulates the physiological attributes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri relevant for host plant colonization.

    PubMed

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Alet, Analía I; Tondo, María Laura; Petrocelli, Silvana; Daurelio, Lucas D; Monzón, Jesica; Ruiz, Oscar A; Losi, Aba; Orellano, Elena G

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that an appropriate light environment is required for the establishment of efficient vegetal resistance responses in several plant-pathogen interactions. The photoreceptors implicated in such responses are mainly those belonging to the phytochrome family. Data obtained from bacterial genome sequences revealed the presence of photosensory proteins of the BLUF (Blue Light sensing Using FAD), LOV (Light, Oxygen, Voltage) and phytochrome families with no known functions. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for citrus canker. The in silico analysis of the X. axonopodis pv. citri genome sequence revealed the presence of a gene encoding a putative LOV photoreceptor, in addition to two genes encoding BLUF proteins. This suggests that blue light sensing could play a role in X. axonopodis pv. citri physiology. We obtained the recombinant Xac-LOV protein by expression in Escherichia coli and performed a spectroscopic analysis of the purified protein, which demonstrated that it has a canonical LOV photochemistry. We also constructed a mutant strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri lacking the LOV protein and found that the loss of this protein altered bacterial motility, exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. Moreover, we observed that the adhesion of the mutant strain to abiotic and biotic surfaces was significantly diminished compared to the wild-type. Finally, inoculation of orange (Citrus sinensis) leaves with the mutant strain of X. axonopodis pv. citri resulted in marked differences in the development of symptoms in plant tissues relative to the wild-type, suggesting a role for the Xac-LOV protein in the pathogenic process. Altogether, these results suggest the novel involvement of a photosensory system in the regulation of physiological attributes of a phytopathogenic bacterium. A functional blue light receptor in Xanthomonas spp. has been described for the first time, showing an important

  18. Phototropin encoded by a single-copy gene mediates chloroplast photorelocation movements in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Aino; Terai, Mika; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Wada, Masamitsu; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2014-09-01

    Blue-light-induced chloroplast photorelocation movement is observed in most land plants. Chloroplasts move toward weak-light-irradiated areas to efficiently absorb light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong-light-irradiated areas to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). The plant-specific kinase phototropin (phot) is the blue-light receptor for chloroplast movements. Although the molecular mechanisms for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been analyzed, the overall aspects of signal transduction common to land plants are still unknown. Here, we show that the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha exhibits the accumulation and avoidance responses exclusively induced by blue light as well as specific chloroplast positioning in the dark. Moreover, in silico and Southern-blot analyses revealed that the M. polymorpha genome encodes a single PHOT gene, MpPHOT, and its knockout line displayed none of the chloroplast photorelocation movements, indicating that the sole MpPHOT gene mediates all types of movement. Mpphot was localized on the plasma membrane and exhibited blue-light-dependent autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. Heterologous expression of MpPHOT rescued the defects in chloroplast movement of phot mutants in the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the seed plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These results indicate that Mpphot possesses evolutionarily conserved regulatory activities for chloroplast photorelocation movement. M. polymorpha offers a simple and versatile platform for analyzing the fundamental processes of phototropin-mediated chloroplast photorelocation movement common to land plants.

  19. Phototropins Function in High-Intensity Blue Light-Induced Hypocotyl Phototropism in Arabidopsis by Altering Cytosolic Calcium1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Yan-Liang; Qiao, Xin-Rong; Wang, Jin; Wang, Lin-Dan; Xu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), the blue light receptors in plants, regulate hypocotyl phototropism in a fluence-dependent manner. Especially under high fluence rates of blue light (HBL), the redundant function mediated by both phot1 and phot2 drastically restricts the understanding of the roles of phot2. Here, systematic analysis of phototropin-related mutants and overexpression transgenic lines revealed that HBL specifically induced a transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls and that the increase in [Ca2+]cyt was primarily attributed to phot2. Pharmacological and genetic experiments illustrated that HBL-induced Ca2+ increases were modulated differently by phot1 and phot2. Phot2 mediated the HBL-induced increase in [Ca2+]cyt mainly by an inner store-dependent Ca2+-release pathway, not by activating plasma membrane Ca2+ channels. Further analysis showed that the increase in [Ca2+]cyt was possibly responsible for HBL-induced hypocotyl phototropism. An inhibitor of auxin efflux carrier exhibited significant inhibitions of both phototropism and increases in [Ca2+]cyt, which indicates that polar auxin transport is possibly involved in HBL-induced responses. Moreover, PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1), the phototropin-related signaling element identified, interacted physically with phototropins, auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED1 and calcium-binding protein CALMODULIN4, in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and HBL-induced phototropism was impaired in pks multiple mutants, indicating the role of the PKS family in HBL-induced phototropism. Together, these results provide new insights into the functions of phototropins and highlight a potential integration point through which Ca2+ signaling-related HBL modulates hypocotyl phototropic responses. PMID:23674105

  20. Diversity of yeasts from puddles in the vicinity of midre lovénbreen glacier, arctic and bioprospecting for enzymes and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan; Bhadra, Bhaskar; Begum, Zareena; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2010-04-01

    A total of 132 yeast strains were characterised from 4 sediment samples collected from small puddles in the vicinity of Midre Lovénbreen glacier, Arctic. Based on the D1/D2 domain sequence similarity, the isolates could be categorised into 6 groups. The nearest phylogenetic neighbour of groups I to VI were identified as Cryptococcus gastricus, Cryptococcus terricolus, Rhodotorula muscorum, Mrakia psychrophila, Mrakia gelida and Rhodotorula glacialis, respectively. Strains representative of the six groups were psychrophilic and salt tolerant but varied in their ability to produce cold-active extracellular enzymes such as lipase, protease, pectinase, cellulase and amylase. C(18:1 (w9C)) and C(18:2 (w9,12C)) were the only two fatty acids common to all the yeasts and branched and (or) unsaturated fatty acids increased in yeasts growing at 8 degrees C compared to 22 degrees C, probably as an adaptation to low temperature. The present study establishes that psychrophilic yeasts are predominant in Arctic and could be used as work horses to produce cold-active enzymes and poly unsaturated fatty acids which have been implicated in low temperature adaptation and also for their use in biotechnology.

  1. Investigations on the photoregulation of chloroplast movement and leaf positioning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, In-Seob; Cho, Hae-Young; Moni, Akhi; Lee, Ah-Young; Briggs, Winslow R

    2013-01-01

    We recently investigated the roles of the phototropin 1 (PHOT1) LOV (light, oxygen or voltage) domains in mediating phototropic curvature in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings expressing either wild-type PHOT1 or PHOT1 with one or both LOV domains inactivated by a single amino acid replacement. We have now investigated the role of the PHOT1 LOV domains in chloroplast movement and in leaf positioning in response to blue light. Low fluence rate blue light is known to mediate a chloroplast accumulation response and high fluence rate blue light an avoidance response in Arabidopsis leaves. As was the case for phototropism, LOV2 of PHOT1 is essential for chloroplast accumulation and LOV1 is dispensable. PHOT1 LOV2 is also essential to maintain developing primary leaves in a horizontal position under white light from above and LOV1 is again dispensable. A red light pulse given to dark-adapted light-grown plants followed by 2 h of darkness enhances both the chloroplast accumulation response under dim blue light and the chloroplast avoidance response under strong blue light. The effect is far-red reversible. This photoreversible response is normal in a phyB null mutant but does not appear in a phyA null mutant. These results suggest that phyA mediates the enhancement, induced by a red light pulse, of blue light-induced chloroplast movements.

  2. Light-induced nuclear export reveals rapid dynamics of epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Lerner, Andrew Michael; Zimmerman, Seth Parker; Hahn, Klaus; Bear, James E; Strahl, Brian D.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We engineered a photoactivatable system for rapidly and reversibly exporting proteins from the nucleus by embedding a nuclear export signal in the LOV2 domain from phototropin 1. Fusing the chromatin modifier Bre1 to the photoswitch, we achieved light-dependent control of histone H2B monoubiquitylation in yeast, revealing fast turnover of the ubiquitin mark. Moreover, this inducible system allowed us to dynamically monitor the status of epigenetic modifications dependent on H2B ubiquitylation. PMID:27089030

  3. Optogenetics: optical control of a photoactivatable Rac in living cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in optogenetics have extended optical control of signaling to intracellular proteins, including Rac, a small G protein in the Rho family. A blue light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) domain derived from Avena sativa (oat) phototropin was fused to the N-terminus of a constitutively active mutant of Rac, via an α-helix (Jα) that is conserved among plant phototropins. The fused LOV domain occluded binding of downstream effectors to Rac in the dark. Exposure to blue light caused a conformational change of the LOV domain and unwinding of the Jα helix, relieving steric inhibition. The LOV domain incorporates a flavin as the photon-absorbing cofactor and can be activated by light in a reversible and repeatable fashion. In cultured cells, global illumination with blue light rapidly activated Rac and led to cell spreading and membrane ruffling. Localized and pulsed illumination generated a gradient of Rac activity and induced directional migration. In this chapter, we will describe the techniques in detail and present some examples of applications of using photoactivatable Rac (PA-Rac) in living cells.

  4. Lab on valve-multisyringe flow injection system (LOV-MSFIA) for fully automated uranium determination in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Avivar, Jessica; Ferrer, Laura; Casas, Montserrat; Cerdà, Víctor

    2011-06-15

    The hyphenation of lab-on-valve (LOV) and multisyringe flow analysis (MSFIA), coupled to a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC), allows the spectrophotometric determination of uranium in different types of environmental sample matrices, without any manual pre-treatment, and achieving high selectivity and sensitivity levels. On-line separation and preconcentration of uranium is carried out by means of UTEVA resin. The potential of the LOV-MSFIA makes possible the fully automation of the system by the in-line regeneration of the column. After elution, uranium(VI) is spectrophotometrically detected after reaction with arsenazo-III. The determination of levels of uranium present in environmental samples is required in order to establish an environmental control. Thus, we propose a rapid, cheap and fully automated method to determine uranium(VI) in environmental samples. The limit of detection reached is 1.9 ηg of uranium and depending on the preconcentrated volume; it results in ppt levels (10.3 ηg L(-1)). Different water sample matrices (seawater, well water, freshwater, tap water and mineral water) and a phosphogypsum sample (with natural uranium content) were satisfactorily analyzed.

  5. Penicillin-binding protein 2 is essential in wild-type Escherichia coli but not in lov or cya mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, T; Bouloc, P; Niki, H; D'Ari, R; Hiraga, S; Jaffé, A

    1989-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2), target of the beta-lactam mecillinam, is required for rod morphology and cell wall elongation in Escherichia coli. A new temperature-sensitive PBP2 allele and an in vitro-constructed insertion deletion allele were shown to be lethal in wild-type strains, establishing that the activity of this protein is essential. Mutations in the lov or cya genes, conferring mecillinam resistance, compensated for the deleterious effect of the absence of PBP2. The resulting double mutants grew as spheres. In a cya mutant lacking PBP2, the restoration of a Cya+ phenotype by addition of cyclic AMP caused lethality and a block in cell division. These results show that in wild-type cells, PBP2 is essential for growth and division. PMID:2656638

  6. Allosteric communication between DNA-binding and light-responsive domains of diatom class I aureochromes

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ankan; Herman, Elena; Serif, Manuel; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Hepp, Sebastian; Pokorny, Richard; Kroth, Peter G.; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The modular architecture of aureochrome blue light receptors, found in several algal groups including diatoms, is unique by having the LOV-type photoreceptor domain fused to the C-terminus of its putative effector, an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP module. The structural and functional understanding of aureochromes’ light-dependent signaling mechanism is limited, despite their promise as an optogenetic tool. We show that class I aureochromes 1a and 1c from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are regulated in a light-independent circadian rhythm. These aureochromes are capable to form functional homo- and heterodimers, which recognize the ACGT core sequence within the canonical ‘aureo box’, TGACGT, in a light-independent manner. The bZIP domain holds a more folded and less flexible but extended conformation in the duplex DNA-bound state. FT-IR spectroscopy in the absence and the presence of DNA shows light-dependent helix unfolding in the LOV domain, which leads to conformational changes in the bZIP region. The solution structure of DNA bound to aureochrome points to a tilted orientation that was further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. We propose that aureochrome signaling relies on an allosteric pathway from LOV to bZIP that results in conformational changes near the bZIP-DNA interface without major effects on the binding affinity. PMID:27179025

  7. The signal transducer NPH3 integrates the phototropin1 photosensor with PIN2-based polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis root phototropism.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yinglang; Jasik, Jan; Wang, Li; Hao, Huaiqing; Volkmann, Dieter; Menzel, Diedrik; Mancuso, Stefano; Baluška, František; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-02-01

    Under blue light (BL) illumination, Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow away from the light source, showing a negative phototropic response. However, the mechanism of root phototropism is still unclear. Using a noninvasive microelectrode system, we showed that the BL sensor phototropin1 (phot1), the signal transducer NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3), and the auxin efflux transporter PIN2 were essential for BL-induced auxin flux in the root apex transition zone. We also found that PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to vacuole-like compartments (VLCs) in dark-grown root epidermal and cortical cells, and phot1/NPH3 mediated a BL-initiated pathway that caused PIN2 redistribution to the plasma membrane. When dark-grown roots were exposed to brefeldin A (BFA), PIN2-GFP remained in VLCs in darkness, and BL caused PIN2-GFP disappearance from VLCs and induced PIN2-GFP-FM4-64 colocalization within enlarged compartments. In the nph3 mutant, both dark and BL BFA treatments caused the disappearance of PIN2-GFP from VLCs. However, in the phot1 mutant, PIN2-GFP remained within VLCs under both dark and BL BFA treatments, suggesting that phot1 and NPH3 play different roles in PIN2 localization. In conclusion, BL-induced root phototropism is based on the phot1/NPH3 signaling pathway, which stimulates the shootward auxin flux by modifying the subcellular targeting of PIN2 in the root apex transition zone.

  8. Phototropins but not cryptochromes mediate the blue light-specific promotion of stomatal conductance, while both enhance photosynthesis and transpiration under full sunlight.

    PubMed

    Boccalandro, Hernán E; Giordano, Carla V; Ploschuk, Edmundo L; Piccoli, Patricia N; Bottini, Rubén; Casal, Jorge J

    2012-03-01

    Leaf epidermal peels of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking either phototropins 1 and 2 (phot1 and phot2) or cryptochromes 1 and 2 (cry1 and cry2) exposed to a background of red light show severely impaired stomatal opening responses to blue light. Since phot and cry are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors, they may be involved in the perception of the blue light-specific signal that induces the aperture of the stomatal pores. In leaf epidermal peels, the blue light-specific effect saturates at low irradiances; therefore, it is considered to operate mainly under the low irradiance of dawn, dusk, or deep canopies. Conversely, we show that both phot1 phot2 and cry1 cry2 have reduced stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis, particularly under the high irradiance of full sunlight at midday. These mutants show compromised responses of stomatal conductance to irradiance. However, the effects of phot and cry on photosynthesis were largely nonstomatic. While the stomatal conductance phenotype of phot1 phot2 was blue light specific, cry1 cry2 showed reduced stomatal conductance not only in response to blue light, but also in response to red light. The levels of abscisic acid were elevated in cry1 cry2. We conclude that considering their effects at high irradiances cry and phot are critical for the control of transpiration and photosynthesis rates in the field. The effects of cry on stomatal conductance are largely indirect and involve the control of abscisic acid levels.

  9. Monitoring seasonal snow dynamics using ground based high resolution photography (Austre Lovénbreen, Svalbard, 79°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, É.; Friedt, J. M.; Tolle, F.; Griselin, M.; Martin, G.; Laffly, D.; Marlin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Arctic glaciers are reliable indicators of global climate changes. However, monitoring snow and ice dynamics in Arctic regions is challenging: some fast but key events can be missed since they are short in time but significant in the hydrological budget. In the context of long term monitoring with high temporal and spatial resolutions of the snow cover dynamics, automated digital cameras were installed around the Austre Lovénbreen glacier basin (Spitsbergen, Norway, 79°N). Despite data losses due to rough weather conditions and control electronics failure, a dataset of 2411 pictures (out of an expected 3294) was gathered over a 1 year hydrological period to assess the snow coverage of the glacier as a function of time with daily resolution. 73% of the total number of expected images was thus recorded, with gaps associated with temporary electronics or data storage failure. The six camera stations oriented so as to observe the glacier itself provide a surface coverage of 96%. Furthermore, geometric corrections of the pictures, using reference ground control points located on the glacier through GPS receivers, yield a quantitative information from initially qualitative images. Projecting the resulting mosaic of the images gathered from six cameras on a GIS allows for the precise monitoring of ice-related processes, and especially the snow coverage evolution over time. This paper summarizes our current understanding of such dynamics, based on the analysis of daily mosaics of images allowing for the observation of both long term evolution on the seasonal scale and the short term events on a weekly scale. Such results demonstrated over one typical full hydrological season (April-October 2009) that snow coverage evolves following discrete steps, either due to water precipitation or warm events, with a snow coverage ranging from 100% (april) to 37% (September).

  10. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  11. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-07-14

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light.

  12. TULIPs: tunable, light-controlled interacting protein tags for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Devin; Lin, Yuan; Wagner, Elizabeth; Hope, C Matthew; Zayner, Josiah; Antoniou, Chloe; Sosnick, Tobin R; Weiss, Eric L; Glotzer, Michael

    2012-03-04

    Naturally photoswitchable proteins offer a means of directly manipulating the formation of protein complexes that drive a diversity of cellular processes. We developed tunable light-inducible dimerization tags (TULIPs) based on a synthetic interaction between the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2) and an engineered PDZ domain (ePDZ). TULIPs can recruit proteins to diverse structures in living yeast and mammalian cells, either globally or with precise spatial control using a steerable laser. The equilibrium binding and kinetic parameters of the interaction are tunable by mutation, making TULIPs readily adaptable to signaling pathways with varying sensitivities and response times. We demonstrate the utility of TULIPs by conferring light sensitivity to functionally distinct components of the yeast mating pathway and by directing the site of cell polarization.

  13. Structural Insights into the HWE Histidine Kinase Family: The Brucella Blue Light-Activated Histidine Kinase Domain.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Jimena; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Sycz, Gabriela; Cerutti, María Laura; Berguer, Paula M; Paris, Gastón; Estrín, Darío Ariel; Martí, Marcelo Adrián; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2016-03-27

    In response to light, as part of a two-component system, the Brucella blue light-activated histidine kinase (LOV-HK) increases its autophosphorylation, modulating the virulence of this microorganism. The Brucella histidine kinase (HK) domain belongs to the HWE family, for which there is no structural information. The HWE family is exclusively present in proteobacteria and usually coupled to a wide diversity of light sensor domains. This work reports the crystal structure of the Brucella HK domain, which presents two different dimeric assemblies in the asymmetric unit: one similar to the already described canonical parallel homodimers (C) and the other, an antiparallel non-canonical (NC) dimer, each with distinct relative subdomain orientations and dimerization interfaces. Contrary to these crystallographic structures and unlike other HKs, in solution, the Brucella HK domain is monomeric and still active, showing an astonishing instability of the dimeric interface. Despite this instability, using cross-linking experiments, we show that the C dimer is the functionally relevant species. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the autophosphorylation activity occurs in cis. The different relative subdomain orientations observed for the NC and C states highlight the large conformational flexibility of the HK domain. Through the analysis of these alternative conformations by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Brucella LOV-HK.

  14. Terrimonas crocea sp. nov., isolated from the till of high Arctic glacier Midtre Lovénbreen in the West Svalbard Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong Chol; Kang, Ok Chol; Kim, Chol Myong; Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Zuobing; Wei, Ziyan; Huang, Yao; Danzeng, Wangmu; Peng, Fang

    2016-11-24

    A yellow-pigmented bacteria strain, designated M1-33108T, was isolated from the till of high Arctic glacier Midtre Lovénbreen (MLB) near Ny-Ålesund, in the West Svalbard Archipelago, Norway. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain M1-33108T belonged to the genus Terrimonas and its closest neighbor was Terrimonas arctica R9-86T with 96.12% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Strain M1-33108T was Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that lacked motility. Cells contained iso-C15:1 G, iso-C15:0, iso-C17:0 3OH, C16:0 and summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c) as its major cellular fatty acids; and menaquinone-7 as sole respiratory quinone. The polar lipid profile of strain M1-33108T consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, two unknown aminophospholipids, eight unknown aminolipids, an unknown glycolipid and three unknown polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 45.0 mol %. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain M1-33108T is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Terrimonas, for which the name Terrimonas crocea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M1-33108T (=CCTCC AB 2016103T=KCTC 52448T).

  15. Light-activated DNA binding in a designed allosteric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Devin; Moffat, Keith; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2008-09-03

    An understanding of how allostery, the conformational coupling of distant functional sites, arises in highly evolvable systems is of considerable interest in areas ranging from cell biology to protein design and signaling networks. We reasoned that the rigidity and defined geometry of an {alpha}-helical domain linker would make it effective as a conduit for allosteric signals. To test this idea, we rationally designed 12 fusions between the naturally photoactive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa phototropin 1 and the Escherichia coli trp repressor. When illuminated, one of the fusions selectively binds operator DNA and protects it from nuclease digestion. The ready success of our rational design strategy suggests that the helical 'allosteric lever arm' is a general scheme for coupling the function of two proteins.

  16. Investigations of human myosin VI targeting using optogenetically controlled cargo loading.

    PubMed

    French, Alexander R; Sosnick, Tobin R; Rock, Ronald S

    2017-02-28

    Myosins play countless critical roles in the cell, each requiring it to be activated at a specific location and time. To control myosin VI with this specificity, we created an optogenetic tool for activating myosin VI by fusing the light-sensitive Avena sativa phototropin1 LOV2 domain to a peptide from Dab2 (LOVDab), a myosin VI cargo protein. Our approach harnesses the native targeting and activation mechanism of myosin VI, allowing direct inferences on myosin VI function. LOVDab robustly recruits human full-length myosin VI to various organelles in vivo and hinders peroxisome motion in a light-controllable manner. LOVDab also activates myosin VI in an in vitro gliding filament assay. Our data suggest that protein and lipid cargoes cooperate to activate myosin VI, allowing myosin VI to integrate Ca(2+), lipid, and protein cargo signals in the cell to deploy in a site-specific manner.

  17. Structure and activity of JAC1 J-domain implicate the involvement of the cochaperone activity with HSC70 in chloroplast photorelocation movement.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takano, Akira; Kohda, Daisuke; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-12-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement towards weak light and away from strong light is essential for plants to adapt to the fluctuation of ambient light conditions. In the previous study, we showed that blue light receptor phototropins mediated blue light-induced chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis by regulating short actin filaments localized at the chloroplast periphery (cp-actin filaments) rather than actin cables in the cytoplasm. However, the signaling pathway for the chloroplast photorelocation movement is still unclear. We also identified JAC1 (J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1) as an essential component for the accumulation response and dark positioning in Arabidopsis. We recently determined the crystal structure of the J-domain of JAC1. The JAC1 J-domain has a positively charged surface, which forms a putative interface with the Hsc70 chaperone by analogy to that of bovine auxilin. Furthermore, the mutation of the highly conserved HPD motif in the JAC1 J-domain impaired the in vivo activity of JAC1. These data suggest that JAC1 cochaperone activity with HSC70 is essential for chloroplast photorelocation movement.

  18. A blue-light photoreceptor mediates the feedback regulation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petroutsos, Dimitris; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Maruyama, Shinichiro; Flori, Serena; Greiner, Andre; Magneschi, Leonardo; Cusant, Loic; Kottke, Tilman; Mittag, Maria; Hegemann, Peter; Finazzi, Giovanni; Minagawa, Jun

    2016-09-22

    In plants and algae, light serves both as the energy source for photosynthesis and a biological signal that triggers cellular responses via specific sensory photoreceptors. Red light is perceived by bilin-containing phytochromes and blue light by the flavin-containing cryptochromes and/or phototropins (PHOTs), the latter containing two photosensory light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains. Photoperception spans several orders of light intensity, ranging from far below the threshold for photosynthesis to values beyond the capacity of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Excess light may cause oxidative damage and cell death, processes prevented by enhanced thermal dissipation via high-energy quenching (qE), a key photoprotective response. Here we show the existence of a molecular link between photoreception, photosynthesis, and photoprotection in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that PHOT controls qE by inducing the expression of the qE effector protein LHCSR3 (light-harvesting complex stress-related protein 3) in high light intensities. This control requires blue-light perception by LOV domains on PHOT, LHCSR3 induction through PHOT kinase, and light dissipation in photosystem II via LHCSR3. Mutants deficient in the PHOT gene display severely reduced fitness under excessive light conditions, indicating that the sensing, utilization, and dissipation of light is a concerted process that plays a vital role in microalgal acclimation to environments of variable light intensities.

  19. Taxonomic characterization, adaptation strategies and biotechnological potential of cryophilic yeasts from ice cores of Midre Lovénbreen glacier, Svalbard, Arctic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Purnima; Tsuji, Masaharu; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Roy, Utpal; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-04-01

    Ten strains of cryophilic yeast were studied from glacier ice cores of Svalbard, Arctic. The ice melt samples contained about 3×10(3) - 1×10(4) colony forming unit (CFUs) per ml. Sequence analysis of the isolates, using D1/D2 domain identified five species of yeasts: Cryptococcus adeliensis (MLB-18 JX192655), Cryptococcus albidosimilis (MLB-19 JX192656), Cryptococcus saitoi (MLB-22 JX192659), Rhodosporidium lusitaniae (MLB-20 JX192657), and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (MLB-27 JX192664). Effect of temperature on growth of these isolates was studied. The strains are able to grow at temperatures ranging between 1 and 20°C. Screening of the cultures for amylase, cellulase, protease, lipase, urease and catalase activity were carried out indicating varying amounts of enzyme production at different temperatures. Characterization of lipase in strain Cryptococcus sp. MLB-24 was performed. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis of the cultures grown at four different temperatures (1, 4, 15, and 20°C) was also done. Decrease in temperature was reported to cause increase in concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. High amount of oleic acid accumulated with increase in temperature. These fatty acids possibly help the strains to survive in glacial ice core cold environment. The extracellular and intracellular filtrate of the cultures showed negative antifreeze protein (AFP) activity. The observations indicate that probably the isolates in the present undertaking adapt to low temperatures, by enzyme and PUFA secretion rather than by antifreeze protein secretion.

  20. Understanding the Public Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carrie

    2003-01-01

    This overview of the public domain covers: defining the public domain; figuring out if a work is protected by copyright; being sure a work is in the public domain; asserting the copyright protection and term; the Creative Commons initiative; building the Information Commons; when permission is needed for using a public domain work; and special…

  1. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  2. A Domain Analysis Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Bauhaus , a prototype CASE workstation for D-SAPS development. [ARAN88A] Guillermo F. Arango. Domain Engineering for Software Reuse. PhD thesis...34 VITA90B: Domain Analysis within the ISEC Rapid Center 48 CMU/SEI-90-SR-3 Appendix III Alphabetical by Organization/Project BAUHAUS * ALLE87A

  3. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  4. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  5. Causal Learning Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Laura E.; Gopnik, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Five studies investigated (a) children's ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of…

  6. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  7. Cross Domain Analogies for Learning Domain Theories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Example Problem and Worked Solution All problems and worked solutions used in this work were taken from the same physics textbook ( Giancoli 1991...domain theory. We close with a discussion of related work and our plans for the future. Representations and Problem Solving Representing physics ...small compared to the 30,000+ concepts and 8,000+ predicates already defined in the KB. Thus, objects, relations, and events that appear in physics

  8. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  9. Software architecture design domain

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Software architectures can provide a basis for the capture and subsequent reuse of design knowledge. The goal of software architecture is to allow the design of a system to take place at a higher level of abstraction; a level concerned with components, connections, constraints, rationale. This architectural view of software adds a new layer of abstraction to the traditional design phase of software development. It has resulted in a flurry of activity towards techniques, tools, and architectural design languages developed specifically to assist with this activity. An analysis of architectural descriptions, even though they differ in notation, shows a common set of key constructs that are present across widely varying domains. These common aspects form a core set of constructs that should belong to any ADL in order to for the language to offer the ability to specify software systems at the architectural level. This analysis also revealed a second set of constructs which served to expand the first set thereby improving the syntax and semantics. These constructs are classified according to whether they provide representation and analysis support for architectures belonging to many varying application domains (domain-independent construct class) or to a particular application domain (domain-dependent constructs). This paper presents the constructs of these two classes, their placement in the architecture design domain and shows how they may be used to classify, select, and analyze proclaimed architectural design languages (ADLs).

  10. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  11. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  12. Optimal domain decomposition strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Yonghyun; Soni, Bharat K.

    1995-01-01

    The primary interest of the authors is in the area of grid generation, in particular, optimal domain decomposition about realistic configurations. A grid generation procedure with optimal blocking strategies has been developed to generate multi-block grids for a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. The focus of this study is the domain decomposition which optimizes solution algorithm/block compatibility based on geometrical complexities as well as the physical characteristics of flow field. The progress realized in this study is summarized in this paper.

  13. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  14. The Domains of TESOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, Betty Wallace

    The domains of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) are those spheres of concern involving persons who speak languages other than English or dialects of English other than the standard. This clientele has been classified traditionally in terms of programs in English as a foreign language, English as a second language, English…

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  16. Domain Validity and Generalizability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Henry F.; Michael, William B.

    1975-01-01

    An alternative derivation of Tryon's basic formula for the coefficient of domain validity or the coefficient of generalizability developed by Cronbach, Rajaratnam, and Glaser is provided. This derivation, which is also the generalized Kuder-Richardson coefficient, requires a relatively minimal number of assumptions compared with that in previously…

  17. Magnetic domain and domain wall in Co/Pt multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, A.; Mohanty, J.

    2016-05-01

    We report systematic micromagnetic investigation of formation of magnetic domains in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer with the variation in magnetic anisotropy and stack thickness. The lowering of anisotropy makes the domain wall broader and domain formation less efficient. Domain sizeincreases with increasing thickness of the stack to minimize the stray field energy.The minimization of energy of the system due to domain formation makes the M-H loop narrower whereas, lower stack thickness results in a wider loop. The magnetization reversalin this system occurs due tothe nucleation and growth of reverse domains.

  18. Sustained accurate recording of intracellular acidification in living tissues with a photo-controllable bioluminescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Haga, Sanae; Takakura, Hideo; Ozaki, Michitaka; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2013-06-04

    Regulation of an intracellular acidic environment plays a pivotal role in biological processes and functions. However, spatiotemporal analysis of the acidification in complex tissues of living subjects persists as an important challenge. We developed a photo-inactivatable bioluminescent indicator, based on a combination of luciferase-fragment complementation and a photoreaction of a light, oxygen, and voltage domain from Avena sativa Phototropin1 (LOV2), to visualize temporally dynamic acidification in living tissue samples. Bioluminescence of the indicator diminished upon light irradiation and it recovered gradually in the dark state thereafter. The recovery rate was remarkably sensitive to pH changes but unsusceptible to fluctuation of luciferin or ATP concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging, taken as an index of the recovery rates, enabled long-time recording of acidification in apoptotic and autophagous processes in a cell population and an ischemic condition in living mice. This technology using the indicator is widely applicable to sense organelle-specific acidic changes in target biological tissues.

  19. Sustained accurate recording of intracellular acidification in living tissues with a photo-controllable bioluminescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Haga, Sanae; Takakura, Hideo; Ozaki, Michitaka; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of an intracellular acidic environment plays a pivotal role in biological processes and functions. However, spatiotemporal analysis of the acidification in complex tissues of living subjects persists as an important challenge. We developed a photo-inactivatable bioluminescent indicator, based on a combination of luciferase-fragment complementation and a photoreaction of a light, oxygen, and voltage domain from Avena sativa Phototropin1 (LOV2), to visualize temporally dynamic acidification in living tissue samples. Bioluminescence of the indicator diminished upon light irradiation and it recovered gradually in the dark state thereafter. The recovery rate was remarkably sensitive to pH changes but unsusceptible to fluctuation of luciferin or ATP concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging, taken as an index of the recovery rates, enabled long-time recording of acidification in apoptotic and autophagous processes in a cell population and an ischemic condition in living mice. This technology using the indicator is widely applicable to sense organelle-specific acidic changes in target biological tissues. PMID:23690604

  20. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  1. Field Evolution of Antiferromagnetic Domains and Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Eric E.; Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas K.

    2003-03-01

    We have used magnetron sputtered [Co(4Å)Pt(7Å)]X Co(4Å)Ru(9Å)N multiplayer films to create artificially layered antiferromagnets. In contrast to atomic antiferromagnets our model system has an antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange energy comparable to the Zeemann energy in moderate fields and allows to fine tune the relative magnitude of the different magnetic energy terms by varying the parameters X and N. With increasing X and N we observe a transition from traditionally observed sharp AF domain walls towards AF domain walls with a finite width which consist of ferromagnetic stripes, i.e. the AF domains have zero net moment whereas the domain walls carry a finite magnetic moment. Such AF domain walls have not been observed before and are a direct consequence of balancing out exchange and Zeeman energy. We also show that such domain walls are expected from theoretical energy calculations. In this contribution we study the nature and field evolution of the AF stripe domain walls by Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM). The surface sensitivity of MFM and the finite moment of the AF domain walls allow us to image AF domains as well as domain walls. We are showing first experiments to study the AF domain wall evolution in real space while applying an external field. O.H. was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via a Forschungsstipendium under the contract number HE 3286/1-1.

  2. Space Domain Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    information required to characterize a space object. Another key parameter to be considered is the frequency of observation. This sampling rate varies...useful to define the values of these parameters that approximate the current and future state of the space domain. The current catalog and network... Parameters used in estimating data needs for SDA Current Threshold Objective βmo , βimg 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb 0.1, 10Kb Number of Objects (Na , Np

  3. Swarming in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Dieter; Motsch, Sébastien; Thatcher, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Vicsek model is a prototype for the emergence of collective motion. In free space, it is characterized by a swarm of particles all moving in the same direction. Since this dynamic does not include attraction among particles, the swarm, while aligning in velocity space, has no spatial coherence. Adding specular reflection at the boundaries generates global spatial coherence of the swarms while maintaining its velocity alignment. We investigate numerically how the geometry of the domain influences the Vicsek model using three type of geometry: a channel, a disk and a rectangle. Varying the parameters of the Vicsek model (e.g. noise levels and influence horizons), we discuss the mechanisms that generate spatial coherence and show how they create new dynamical solutions of the swarming motions in these geometries. Several observables are introduced to characterize the simulated patterns (e.g. mass profile, center of mass, connectivity of the swarm).

  4. Beyond the Number Domain

    PubMed Central

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Platt, Michael L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    In a world without numbers, we would be unable to build a skyscraper, hold a national election, plan a wedding, or pay for a chicken at the market. The numerical symbols used in all these behaviors build on the approximate number system (ANS) which represents the number of discrete objects or events as a continuous mental magnitude. In this review, we first discuss evidence that the ANS bears a set of behavioral and brain signatures that are universally displayed across animal species, human cultures, and development. We then turn to the question of whether the ANS constitutes a specialized cognitive and neural domain--a question central to understanding how this system works, the nature of its evolutionary and developmental trajectory, and its physical instantiation in the brain. PMID:19131268

  5. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  6. Multifunctionalities driven by ferroic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J. C.; Huang, Y. L.; Chu, Y. H.; He, Q.

    2014-08-14

    Considerable attention has been paid to ferroic systems in pursuit of advanced applications in past decades. Most recently, the emergence and development of multiferroics, which exhibit the coexistence of different ferroic natures, has offered a new route to create functionalities in the system. In this manuscript, we step from domain engineering to explore a roadmap for discovering intriguing phenomena and multifunctionalities driven by periodic domain patters. As-grown periodic domains, offering exotic order parameters, periodic local perturbations and the capability of tailoring local spin, charge, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom, are introduced as modeling templates for fundamental studies and novel applications. We discuss related significant findings on ferroic domain, nanoscopic domain walls, and conjunct heterostructures based on the well-organized domain patterns, and end with future prospects and challenges in the field.

  7. Mapping the Moral Domain

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jesse; Nosek, Brian A.; Haidt, Jonathan; Iyer, Ravi; Koleva, Spassena; Ditto, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically-grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ) based on a theoretical model of five universally available (but variably developed) sets of moral intuitions: Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/respect, and Purity/sanctity. We present evidence for the internal and external validity of the scale and the model, and in doing so present new findings about morality: 1. Comparative model fitting of confirmatory factor analyses provides empirical justification for a five-factor structure of moral concerns. 2. Convergent/discriminant validity evidence suggests that moral concerns predict personality features and social group attitudes not previously considered morally relevant. 3. We establish pragmatic validity of the measure in providing new knowledge and research opportunities concerning demographic and cultural differences in moral intuitions. These analyses provide evidence for the usefulness of Moral Foundations Theory in simultaneously increasing the scope and sharpening the resolution of psychological views of morality. PMID:21244182

  8. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  9. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  10. Failure to Burrow and Tunnel Reveals Roles for jim lovell in the Growth and Endoreplication of the Drosophila Larval Tracheae

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Karen M.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Jim Lovell (Lov) is a putative transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (Bric- a-Brac/Tramtrack/Broad/ Pox virus and Zinc finger) domain class that is expressed in many elements of the developing larval nervous system. It has roles in innate behaviors such as larval locomotion and adult courtship. In performing tissue-specific knockdown with the Gal4-UAS system we identified a new behavioral phenotype for lov: larvae failed to burrow into their food during their growth phase and then failed to tunnel into an agarose substratum during their wandering phase. We determined that these phenotypes originate in a previously unrecognized role for lov in the tracheae. By using tracheal-specific Gal4 lines, Lov immunolocalization and a lov enhancer trap line, we established that lov is normally expressed in the tracheae from late in embryogenesis through larval life. Using an assay that monitors food burrowing, substrate tunneling and death we showed that lov tracheal knockdown results in tracheal fluid-filling, producing hypoxia that activates the aberrant behaviors and inhibits development. We investigated the role of lov in the tracheae that initiates this sequence of events. We discovered that when lov levels are reduced, the tracheal cells are smaller, more numerous and show lower levels of endopolyploidization. Together our findings indicate that Lov is necessary for tracheal endoreplicative growth and that its loss in this tissue causes loss of tracheal integrity resulting in chronic hypoxia and abnormal burrowing and tunneling behavior. PMID:27494251

  11. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  12. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  13. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  14. Phase-domain photoacoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Ruochong; Feng, Xiaohua; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Qiu, Lei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-01-01

    As one of the fastest-growing imaging modalities in recent years, photoacoustic imaging has attracted tremendous research interest for various applications including anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging. The majority of the photoacoustic imaging systems are based on the time-domain pulsed photoacoustic method, which utilizes a pulsed laser source to induce a wideband photoacoustic signal, revealing optical absorption contrast. An alternative way is the frequency-domain photoacoustic method utilizing the chirping modulation of laser intensity to achieve lower system cost. In this paper, we report another way of the photoacoustic method, called phase-domain photoacoustic sensing, which explores the phase difference between two consequent intensity-modulated laser pulse induced photoacoustic measurements to reveal the optical properties. The basic principle is introduced, modeled, and experimentally validated in this paper, which opens another potential pathway to perform photoacoustic sensing and imaging, eliminating acoustic detection variations beyond the conventional time-domain and frequency-domain photoacoustic methods.

  15. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  16. Separated matter and antimatter domains with vanishing domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.; Godunov, S.I.; Rudenko, A.S.; Tkachev, I.I. E-mail: sgodunov@itep.ru E-mail: tkachev@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2015-10-01

    We present a model of spontaneous (or dynamical) C and CP violation where it is possible to generate domains of matter and antimatter separated by cosmologically large distances. Such C(CP) violation existed only in the early universe and later it disappeared with the only trace of generated baryonic and/or antibaryonic domains. So the problem of domain walls in this model does not exist. These features are achieved through a postulated form of interaction between inflaton and a new scalar field, realizing short time C(CP) violation.

  17. Domain walls riding the wave.

    SciTech Connect

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is

  18. Mutation of domain III and domain VI in L gene conserved domain of Nipah virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalani, Siti Aishah; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2016-11-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is the etiologic agent responsible for the respiratory illness and causes fatal encephalitis in human. NiV L protein subunit is thought to be responsible for the majority of enzymatic activities involved in viral transcription and replication. The L protein which is the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase has high sequence homology among negative sense RNA viruses. In negative stranded RNA viruses, based on sequence alignment six conserved domain (domain I-IV) have been determined. Each domain is separated on variable regions that suggest the structure to consist concatenated functional domain. To directly address the roles of domains III and VI, site-directed mutations were constructed by the substitution of bases at sequences 2497, 2500, 5528 and 5532. Each mutated L gene can be used in future studies to test the ability for expression on in vitro translation.

  19. Modeling software systems by domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippolito, Richard; Lee, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The Software Architectures Engineering (SAE) Project at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has developed engineering modeling techniques that both reduce the complexity of software for domain-specific computer systems and result in systems that are easier to build and maintain. These techniques allow maximum freedom for system developers to apply their domain expertise to software. We have applied these techniques to several types of applications, including training simulators operating in real time, engineering simulators operating in non-real time, and real-time embedded computer systems. Our modeling techniques result in software that mirrors both the complexity of the application and the domain knowledge requirements. We submit that the proper measure of software complexity reflects neither the number of software component units nor the code count, but the locus of and amount of domain knowledge. As a result of using these techniques, domain knowledge is isolated by fields of engineering expertise and removed from the concern of the software engineer. In this paper, we will describe kinds of domain expertise, describe engineering by domains, and provide relevant examples of software developed for simulator applications using the techniques.

  20. Protein domain connectivity and essentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Travieso, G.

    2006-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be properly modeled as scale-free complex networks, while the lethality of proteins has been correlated with the node degrees, therefore defining a lethality-centrality rule. In this work the authors revisit this relevant problem by focusing attention not on proteins as a whole, but on their functional domains, which are ultimately responsible for their binding potential. Four networks are considered: the original protein-protein interaction network, its randomized version, and two domain networks assuming different lethality hypotheses. By using formal statistical analysis, they show that the correlation between connectivity and essentiality is higher for domains than for proteins.

  1. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  2. A Blue Light Inducible Two-Component Signal Transduction System in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato☆

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Z.; Buttani, V.; Losi, A.; Gärtner, W.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The open reading frame PSPTO2896 from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato encodes a protein of 534 amino acids showing all salient features of a blue light-driven two-component system. The N-terminal LOV (light, oxygen, voltage) domain, potentially binding a flavin chromophore, is followed by a histidine kinase (HK) motif and a response regulator (RR). The full-length protein (PST-LOV) and, separately, the RR and the LOV+HK part (PST-LOVΔRR) were heterologously expressed and functionally characterized. The two LOV proteins showed typical LOV-like spectra and photochemical reactions, with the blue light-driven, reversible formation of a covalent flavin-cysteine bond. The fluorescence changes in the lit state of full-length PST-LOV, but not in PST-LOVΔRR, indicating a direct interaction between the LOV core and the RR module. Experiments performed with radioactive ATP uncover the light-driven kinase activity. For both PST-LOV and PST-LOVΔRR, much more radioactivity is incorporated when the protein is in the lit state. Furthermore, addition of the RR domain to the fully phosphorylated PST-LOVΔRR leads to a very fast transfer of radioactivity, indicating a highly efficient HK activity and a tight interaction between PST-LOVΔRR and RR, possibly facilitated by the LOV core itself. PMID:17905842

  3. Engineered autonomous human variable domains

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Tessier, Peter M.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2017-01-01

    The complex multi-chain architecture of antibodies has spurred interest in smaller derivatives that retain specificity but can be more easily produced in bacteria. Domain antibodies consisting of single variable domains are the smallest antibody fragments and have been shown to possess enhanced ability to target epitopes that are difficult to access using multidomain antibodies. However, in contrast to natural camelid antibody domains, human variable domains typically suffer from low stability and high propensity to aggregate. This review summarizes strategies to improve the biophysical properties of heavy chain variable domains from human antibodies with an emphasis on aggregation resistance. Several protein engineering approaches have targeted antibody frameworks and complementarity determining regions to stabilize the native state and prevent aggregation of the denatured state. Recent findings enable the construction of highly diverse libraries enriched in aggregation-resistant variants that are expected to provide binders to diverse antigens. Engineered domain antibodies possess unique advantages in expression, epitope preference and flexibility of formatting over conventional immunoreagents and are a promising class of antibody fragments for biomedical development. PMID:27655414

  4. Domain and Specification Models for Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iscoe, Neil; Liu, Zheng-Yang; Feng, Guohui

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses our approach to representing application domain knowledge for specific software engineering tasks. Application domain knowledge is embodied in a domain model. Domain models are used to assist in the creation of specification models. Although many different specification models can be created from any particular domain model, each specification model is consistent and correct with respect to the domain model. One aspect of the system-hierarchical organization is described in detail.

  5. Localization of resistive domains in inhomogeneous superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of resistive domains due to the Joule heating in inhomogeneous superconductors with transport currents are studied. The equilibrium of a domain at an inhomogeneity of arbitrary type and with dimensions much smaller than the dimensions of the domain is investigated. It is shown that resistive domains can become localized at inhomogeneities. The temperature distribution in a domain and the current--voltage characteristic of the domain are determined. The stability of localized domains is discussed. It is shown that such domains give rise to a hysteresis in the destruction (recovery) of the superconductivity by the transport current.

  6. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  7. The Evolution and Functional Role of Flavin-based Prokaryotic Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Losi, Aba; Mandalari, Carmen; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-based photoreceptor proteins of the LOV (light, oxygen and voltage) superfamily are ubiquitous and appear to be essential blue-light sensing systems not only in plants, algae and fungi, but also in prokaryotes, where they are represented in more than 10% of known species. Despite their broad occurrence, only in few cases LOV proteins have been correlated with important phenomena such as bacterial infectivity, selective growth patterns or/and stress responses; nevertheless these few known roles are helping us understand the multiple ways by which prokaryotes can exploit these soluble blue-light photoreceptors. Given the large number of sequences now deposited in databases, it becomes meaningful to define a signature for bona fide LOV domains, a procedure that facilitates identification of proteins with new properties and phylogenetic analysis. The latter clearly evidences that a class of LOV proteins from alpha-proteobacteria is the closest prokaryotic relative of eukaryotic LOV domains, whereas cyanobacterial sequences cluster with the archaeal and the other bacterial LOV domains. Distance trees built for LOV domains suggest complex evolutionary patterns, possibly involving multiple horizontal gene transfer events. Based on available data, the in vivo relevance and evolution of prokaryotic LOV is discussed.

  8. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  9. Sinh-domain complex integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotis, George-Drosos; Khanday, Farooq A.; Psychalinos, Costas

    2015-07-01

    The basic building blocks for performing complex signal processing in the Sinh-domain are introduced in this article. Attractive offered benefits are the capabilities for achieving resistorless realisations with electronic adjustment of their frequency characteristics, independent tuning of centre frequency and bandwidth and operating in a low-voltage environment. In addition, the inherent class-AB operation of Sinh-domain filters allows the handling of signals greater than the bias current, leading to a power saving. The aforementioned benefits have been evaluated through simulation results, using the Analog Design Environment of the Cadence software.

  10. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  11. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Development in the Food Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Discusses problems of general interest in developmental psychology that can be successfully studied in the domain of food; these include (1) development of food likes and dislikes; (2) establishment of the edible/inedible distinction; (3) disgust and contagion; (4) transgenerational communication of preferences; and (5) transition to food…

  13. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  14. Impact of Domain Analysis on Reuse Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-06

    libraries with very different domain models . The semantic network knowledge representation system (differing in this respect from object-oriented approaches...2.1.4 Organizational Strategies ...... ............. 10 2.1.5 Role of Existing Systems ..... .............. ..11 2.2 Process Models for Domain Analysis...Acquire Domain Analysis Resources. ... 15 2.2.4 Develop the Domain Model ..... .............. .16 2.2.4.1 Identification of Domain Objects

  15. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  16. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  17. Certifying Domain-Specific Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Proof-checking code for compliance to safety policies potentially enables a product-oriented approach to certain aspects of software certification. To date, previous research has focused on generic, low-level programming-language properties such as memory type safety. In this paper we consider proof-checking higher-level domain -specific properties for compliance to safety policies. The paper first describes a framework related to abstract interpretation in which compliance to a class of certification policies can be efficiently calculated Membership equational logic is shown to provide a rich logic for carrying out such calculations, including partiality, for certification. The architecture for a domain-specific certifier is described, followed by an implemented case study. The case study considers consistency of abstract variable attributes in code that performs geometric calculations in Aerospace systems.

  18. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  19. Domain Processes in Ferroelectric Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-14

    WALLS Electron holography utilizing the wave characteristics of electrons. Through a sharp emission tip, the emitted electron beam is largely coherent, or...mirostructural modulation at 25% doping. The strongly first order ferroelectric phase transition in PbTiO3 is also gradually changed to a nearly second...a new domain configuraton. 13 The end-member of the PZT solid solution, PbTiO3 , has the highest transition temperature (Tc = 490 °C) and the largest

  20. Dynamic optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Dror; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-04-21

    We describe a dynamic Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) system which enables real time, long range, acoustic sensing at high sampling rate. The system is based on a fast scanning laser and coherent detection scheme. Distributed sensing is obtained by probing the Rayleigh backscattered light. The system was tested by interrogation of a 10 km communication type single mode fiber and successfully detected localized impulse and sinusoidal excitations.

  1. Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking.

    PubMed

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Huber, Robert

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 microm in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated.

  2. Cross-Domain Network Fault Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    digest, or simply digest, for Gi. • Gj = ( n ] i6=j f(Gi) ) ] Gj , where j is a domain performing cross-domain inference and ] is a model-specific union... Gj is the cross-domain model integrating the digests from all the other domains with domain j’s undigested graph. Now, domain j may use an existing...algorithm such as SHRINK to perform inference over Gj . Before a practical graph digest design can be implemented, interoperability standards must be

  3. A novel domain-by-domain survivable mechanism in multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Xingwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Chongshan; Li, Hongming; Wang, Hongpeng; Liu, Xin

    2009-03-01

    In multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical networks, the inter-domain routing is a challenge since each single-domain cannot view the full network topology. At the same time, survivability is also an important issue in optical networks since the failures of fiber links or network nodes may lead to a lot of traffic being blocked. In this paper, we study the survivability in multi-domain WDM optical networks, and propose a new survivable mechanism called load balanced domain-by-domain routing (LBDDR). In LBDDR, in order to obtain the efficient inter-domain survivable routes, we present the domain-by-domain routing (DDR) method which can find the intra-domain sub-working path and sub-backup path in each single-domain to form the inter-domain working path and backup path for each demand. In order to reduce the blocking probability, we present the load balanced routing method which can encourage the traffic to be uniformly distributed on the links with more free wavelengths. Simulation results show that, compared with conventional mechanism, LBDDR can obtain better performances.

  4. Characterization of lipid domains in erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W; Glaser, M

    1991-02-15

    Fluorescence digital imaging microscopy was used to study the lateral distribution of the lipid components in erythrocyte membranes. Intact erythrocytes labeled with phospholipids containing a fluorophore attached to one fatty acid chain showed an uneven distribution of the phospholipids in the membrane thereby demonstrating the presence of membrane domains. The enrichment of the lipotropic compound chlor-promazine in domains in intact erythrocytes also suggested that the domains are lipid-enriched regions. Similar membrane domains were present in erythrocyte ghosts. The phospholipid enrichment was increased in the domains by inducing membrane protein aggregation. Double-labeling experiments were done to determine the relative distributions of different phospholipids in the membrane. Vesicles made from extracted lipids did not show the presence of domains consistent with the conclusion that membrane proteins were responsible for creating the domains. Overall, it was found that large domains exist in the red blood cell membrane with unequal enrichment of the different phospholipid species.

  5. DEP domains: structurally similar but functionally different.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Sarah V; Maurice, Madelon M; Bos, Johannes L

    2014-05-01

    The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain is a globular protein domain that is present in about ten human protein families with well-defined structural features. A picture is emerging that DEP domains mainly function in the spatial and temporal control of diverse signal transduction events by recruiting proteins to the plasma membrane. DEP domains can interact with various partners at the membrane, including phospholipids and membrane receptors, and their binding is subject to regulation.

  6. Generic domain models in software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, Neil

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines three research directions related to domain-specific software development: (1) reuse of generic models for domain-specific software development; (2) empirical evidence to determine these generic models, namely elicitation of mental knowledge schema possessed by expert software developers; and (3) exploitation of generic domain models to assist modelling of specific applications. It focuses on knowledge acquisition for domain-specific software development, with emphasis on tool support for the most important phases of software development.

  7. Domain wall orientation and domain shape in KTiOPO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Vaskina, E. M.; Pelegova, E. V.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Kizko, O. V.; Ivanov, M.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Domain shape evolution and domain wall motion have been studied in KTiOPO4 (KTP) ferroelectric single crystals using complementary experimental methods. The in situ visualization of domain kinetics has allowed revealing: (1) qualitative change of the domain shape, (2) dependence of the domain wall velocity on its orientation, (3) jump-like domain wall motion caused by domain merging, (4) effect of domain shape stability. The model of domain wall motion driven by generation of elementary steps (kink-pair nucleation) and subsequent kink motion is presented. The decrease in the relative velocity of the approaching parallel domain walls is attributed to electrostatic interaction. The effect of polarization reversal induced by chemical etching is observed. The obtained results are important for the development of domain engineering in the crystals of KTP family.

  8. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  9. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  10. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  11. Pectin Homogalacturonans: Nanostructural Characterization of Methylesterified Domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functionality of pectic hydrocolloids is largely dependent on the two major domains commonly found in their homogalacturonan (HG) regions, i.e., methylester protected domains (MPDs)and non methylesterified domains (NMDs). MPDs can participate in hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions but unli...

  12. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  13. The Promise of Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, Ashish A.; Li, Jingling; Vaijanapurkar, Samarth; Bue, Brian; Miller, Adam; Donalek, Ciro; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Graham, Matthew; CRTS, iPTF

    2016-01-01

    Most new surveys spend an appreciable time in collecting data on which to train classifiers before they can be used on future observations from the same dataset. The result generating phase can start much earlier if the training could incorporate data accumulated from older surveys enhanced with a small set from the new survey. This is exactly what Domain Adaptation (DA) allows us to do. The main idea behind DAs can be summarized thus: if we have two classes of separable objects in some feature space of a Source survey (S), we can define a hyperplane to separate the two types. In a second Target survey (T), for the same features the hyperplane would be inclined differently. DA methods get the mapping between the two hyperplanes using a small fraction of data from the Target (T) survey and can then be used to predict the classes of the remaining majority of data in T. We discuss the parameters that need to be tuned, the difficulties involved, and ways to improve the results. As we move towards bigger, and deeper surveys, being able to use existing labelled information to conduct classification in future surveys will be more cost-effective and promote time efficiency as well. Starting with the light curve data of 50,000 periodic objects from Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), we have applied domain adaptation techniques such as Geodesic Flow Kernel (GFK) with Random forest classifier and Co-training for domain adaptation (CODA) to the CRTS data which has 35,000 points overlapping with Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and 12,000 with Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR). The results suggest that domain adaptation is an area worth exploring as the knowledge between these surveys is transferable and the approaches to find the mappings between these surveys can be applied to the remaining data as well as for near future surveys such as CRTS-II, Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) to name a few at the optical

  14. Walking droplets in confined domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Pedro; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    A millimetric liquid drop can walk spontaneously along the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, propelled by a resonant interaction with its own wave field. These walking droplets exhibit features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. We here explore experimentally the dynamics and statistics of this macroscopic wave-particle system in confined domains, or 'corrals'. Particular attention is given to characterizing the influence of the corral geometry on the emergent probability distributions. The relation to analogous quantum systems (specifically, quantum corrals, the quantum mirage and scarring in Bose-Einstein condensates) is discussed. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  15. Time domain backcalculation of pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kunihito; Nishizawa, Tatsuo; Kikuta, Yukio

    1998-03-01

    Falling weight deflectometor (FWD) has been frequently used to evaluate structural integrity of pavement. The device applies an impulsive force on the surface of pavement and measure surface deflections at several locations including the place of loading. Although the test is dynamic, the data is regarded as pseudo-static data. According to common practice, using the peak load and the corresponding peak deflections, layer moduli are estimated in a static domain such that the measured peak deflections coincide with the corresponding calculated deflections based on the assumption of the theory of linear elasticity. This paper presents a method to back calculate layer moduli in dynamic domain such that the histories of both measured and calculated responses corresponding to the impulsive force coincide. Pavement is modeled by an axisymmetric linear elastic system. FEM is utilized coupled with Ritz vector to reduce a matrix and thus to improve computational efficiency. The backcalculation algorithm used is the Gauss-Newton method coupled with a truncated singular value decomposition.

  16. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  17. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  18. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development.

  19. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  20. Collective magnetism at multiferroic vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Lee, N; Choi, Y J; Cheong, S-W; Wu, Weida

    2012-12-12

    Cross-coupled phenomena of multiferroic domains and domain walls are of fundamental scientific and technological interest. Using cryogenic magnetic force microscopy, we find alternating net magnetic moments at ferroelectric domain walls around vortex cores in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO(3), which correlate with each other throughout the entire vortex network. This collective nature of domain wall magnetism originates from the uncompensated Er(3+) moments at domain walls and the self-organization of the vortex network. Our results demonstrate that the collective domain wall magnetism can be controlled by external magnetic fields and represent a major advancement in the manipulation of local magnetic moments by harnessing cross-coupled domain walls.

  1. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level.

  2. Structure and function of KH domains.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Roberto; Edwards, Laura; Regan, Lynne

    2008-06-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  3. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  4. Functional domains in tetraspanin proteins.

    PubMed

    Stipp, Christopher S; Kolesnikova, Tatiana V; Hemler, Martin E

    2003-02-01

    Exciting new findings have emerged about the structure, function and biochemistry of tetraspanin proteins. Five distinct tetraspanin regions have now been delineated linking structural features to specific functions. Within the large extracellular loop of tetraspanins, there is a variable region that mediates specific interactions with other proteins, as well as a more highly conserved region that has been suggested to mediate homodimerization. Within the transmembrane region, the four tetraspanin transmembrane domains are probable sites of both intra- and inter-molecular interactions that are crucial during biosynthesis and assembly of the network of tetraspanin-linked membrane proteins known as the 'tetraspanin web'. In the intracellular juxtamembrane region, palmitoylation of cysteine residues also contributes to tetraspanin web assembly, and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail region could provide specific functional links to cytoskeletal or signaling proteins.

  5. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  6. Domain Adaptation with Conditional Transferable Components

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Mingming; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng; Glymour, Clark; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Domain adaptation arises in supervised learning when the training (source domain) and test (target domain) data have different distributions. Let X and Y denote the features and target, respectively, previous work on domain adaptation mainly considers the covariate shift situation where the distribution of the features P(X) changes across domains while the conditional distribution P(Y∣X) stays the same. To reduce domain discrepancy, recent methods try to find invariant components T(X) that have similar P(T(X)) on different domains by explicitly minimizing a distribution discrepancy measure. However, it is not clear if P(Y∣T(X)) in different domains is also similar when P(Y∣X) changes. Furthermore, transferable components do not necessarily have to be invariant. If the change in some components is identifiable, we can make use of such components for prediction in the target domain. In this paper, we focus on the case where P(X∣Y) and P(Y) both change in a causal system in which Y is the cause for X. Under appropriate assumptions, we aim to extract conditional transferable components whose conditional distribution P(T(X)∣Y) is invariant after proper location-scale (LS) transformations, and identify how P(Y) changes between domains simultaneously. We provide theoretical analysis and empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world data to show the effectiveness of our method. PMID:28239433

  7. Domain Adaptation with Conditional Transferable Components.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mingming; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng; Glymour, Clark; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Domain adaptation arises in supervised learning when the training (source domain) and test (target domain) data have different distributions. Let X and Y denote the features and target, respectively, previous work on domain adaptation mainly considers the covariate shift situation where the distribution of the features P(X) changes across domains while the conditional distribution P(Y∣X) stays the same. To reduce domain discrepancy, recent methods try to find invariant components [Formula: see text] that have similar [Formula: see text] on different domains by explicitly minimizing a distribution discrepancy measure. However, it is not clear if [Formula: see text] in different domains is also similar when P(Y∣X) changes. Furthermore, transferable components do not necessarily have to be invariant. If the change in some components is identifiable, we can make use of such components for prediction in the target domain. In this paper, we focus on the case where P(X∣Y) and P(Y) both change in a causal system in which Y is the cause for X. Under appropriate assumptions, we aim to extract conditional transferable components whose conditional distribution [Formula: see text] is invariant after proper location-scale (LS) transformations, and identify how P(Y) changes between domains simultaneously. We provide theoretical analysis and empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world data to show the effectiveness of our method.

  8. Electron-beam-induced ferroelectric domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope: Toward deterministic domain patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, James L.; Liu, Shi; Lang, Andrew C.; Hubert, Alexander; Zukauskas, Andrius; Canalias, Carlota; Beanland, Richard; Rappe, Andrew M.; Arredondo, Miryam; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on transmission electron microscope beam-induced ferroelectric domain nucleation and motion. While previous observations of this phenomenon have been reported, a consistent theory explaining induced domain response is lacking, and little control over domain behavior has been demonstrated. We identify positive sample charging, a result of Auger and secondary electron emission, as the underlying mechanism driving domain behavior. By converging the electron beam to a focused probe, we demonstrate controlled nucleation of nanoscale domains. Molecular dynamics simulations performed are consistent with experimental results, confirming positive sample charging and reproducing the result of controlled domain nucleation. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of sample geometry and electron irradiation conditions on induced domain response. These findings elucidate past reports of electron beam-induced domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope and provide a path towards more predictive, deterministic domain patterning through electron irradiation.

  9. Domain-specific control of selective attention.

    PubMed

    Lin, Szu-Hung; Yeh, Yei-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that loading information on working memory affects selective attention. However, whether the load effect on selective attention is domain-general or domain-specific remains unresolved. The domain-general effect refers to the findings that load in one content (e.g. phonological) domain in working memory influences processing in another content (e.g., visuospatial) domain. Attentional control supervises selection regardless of information domain. The domain-specific effect refers to the constraint of influence only when maintenance and processing operate in the same domain. Selective attention operates in a specific content domain. This study is designed to resolve this controversy. Across three experiments, we manipulated the type of representation maintained in working memory and the type of representation upon which the participants must exert control to resolve conflict and select a target into the focus of attention. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants maintained digits and nonverbalized objects, respectively, in working memory while selecting a target in a letter array. In Experiment 2, we presented auditory digits with a letter flanker task to exclude the involvement of resource competition within the same input modality. In Experiments 3a and 3b, we replaced the letter flanker task with an object flanker task while manipulating the memory load on object and digit representation, respectively. The results consistently showed that memory load modulated distractibility only when the stimuli of the two tasks were represented in the same domain. The magnitude of distractor interference was larger under high load than under low load, reflecting a lower efficacy of information prioritization. When the stimuli of the two tasks were represented in different domains, memory load did not modulate distractibility. Control of processing priority in selective attention demands domain-specific resources.

  10. Domain Decomposition for the SPN Solver MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-12-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3® code.

  11. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  12. Domain walls in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas; Fullerton, Eric E

    2003-11-07

    We report experimentally observed magnetic domain-wall structures in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films with perpendicular anisotropy. Our studies reveal a first-order phase transition from domain walls with no net moment to domain walls with ferromagnetic cores. The transition originates from the competition between dipolar and exchange energies, which we tune by means of layer thickness. Although observed in a synthetic antiferromagnetic system, such domain-wall structures may be expected to occur in A-type antiferromagnets with anisotropic exchange coupling.

  13. Stability on Time-Dependent Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Krechetnikov, R.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the key differences in the stability picture between extended systems on time-fixed and time-dependent spatial domains. As a paradigm, we take the complex Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is the simplest nonlinear model with a finite critical wavenumber, and use it to study dynamic pattern formation and evolution on time-dependent spatial domains in translationally invariant systems, i.e., when dilution effects are absent. In particular, we discuss the effects of a time-dependent domain on the stability of spatially homogeneous and spatially periodic base states, and explore its effects on the Eckhaus instability of periodic states. New equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the pattern wavenumber on time-dependent domains are derived, and the results compared with those on fixed domains. Pattern coarsening on time-dependent domains is contrasted with that on fixed domains with the help of the Cahn-Hilliard equation extended here to time-dependent domains. Parallel results for the evolution of the Benjamin-Feir instability on time-dependent domains are also given.

  14. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  15. Transform domain steganography with blind source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouny, Ismail

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies blind source separation or independent component analysis for images that may contain mixtures of text, audio, or other images for steganography purposes. The paper focuses on separating mixtures in the transform domain such as Fourier domain or the Wavelet domain. The study addresses the effectiveness of steganography when using linear mixtures of multimedia components and the ability of standard blind sources separation techniques to discern hidden multimedia messages. Mixing in the space, frequency, and wavelet (scale) domains is compared. Effectiveness is measured using mean square error rate between original and recovered images.

  16. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire.

  17. Bioconvection in spatially extended domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, A.; Paul, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    We numerically explore gyrotactic bioconvection in large spatially extended domains of finite depth using parameter values from available experiments with the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas nivalis. We numerically integrate the three-dimensional, time-dependent continuum model of Pedley [J. Fluid Mech.10.1017/S0022112088002393 195, 223 (1988)] using a high-order, parallel, spectral-element approach. We explore the long-time nonlinear patterns and dynamics found for layers with an aspect ratio of 10 over a range of Rayleigh numbers. Our results yield the pattern wavelength and pattern dynamics which we compare with available theory and experimental measurement. There is good agreement for the pattern wavelength at short times between numerics, experiment, and a linear stability analysis. At long times we find that the general sequence of patterns given by the nonlinear evolution of the governing equations correspond qualitatively to what has been described experimentally. However, at long times the patterns in numerics grow to larger wavelengths, in contrast to what is observed in experiment where the wavelength is found to decrease with time.

  18. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  19. Discoidin Domain Receptors in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to diseases progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  20. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  1. Molecular dynamics study of ferroelectric domain nucleation and domain switching dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boddu, Vishal; Endres, Florian; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-04-11

    Ferroelectric materials contain domains of ordered electric dipoles, separated by domain walls, that can undergo polarisation switching under externally applied electric fields. The domain switching dynamics in ferroelectric materials plays an essential role in their application to electronic and electro-optic de- vices. Previous studies suggest that the switching occurs largely through domain wall motion which is explained from the viewpoint of statistical physics on surface growth as the behaviour of a pinned elas- tic interface. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the domain switching process and quantitatively estimate the switching speed of anti-parallel 180° domains in ferroelectric, tetragonal BaTiO3 perfect single crystals at room temperature using the core-shell model. We observe an unprece- dented, non-linear increase in the domain switching speed caused by the nucleation of new domains within the switching domain. We determine the strength of the electric field to evoke nucleation of new domains and show that the nucleated domains diffuse into nearby favourable domains when the electric field is removed. Furthermore, we discuss the prominence of domain nucleations during ferroelectric switching.

  2. Fuzzy domains: new way of describing flexibility and interdependence of the protein domains.

    PubMed

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O; Kharkyanen, Valery N

    2009-03-01

    We proposed the innovative method of domain identification based on the concept of the fuzzy domains. In this method each residue of the protein can belong to several domains simultaneously with certain weights, which reflect to what extent this residue shares the motion pattern of the given domain. Our method allows describing the fuzzy boundaries between the domains and the gradual changes of the motion pattern from one domain to the other. It provides the reasonable compromise between the continuous change of the protein dynamics from one residue to the other and the discrete description of the structure in terms of small number of domains. We suggested quantitative criterion, which shows the overall degree of domain flexibility in the protein. The concept of the fuzzy domains provides an innovative way of visualization of domain flexibility, which makes the gradual transitions between the domains clearly visible and comparable to available experimental and structural data. In the future, the concept of the fuzzy domains can be used in the coarse-grained simulations of the domain dynamics in order to account for internal protein flexibility.

  3. Novel blue light-sensitive proteins from a metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Pathak, G P; Ehrenreich, A; Losi, A; Streit, W R; Gärtner, W

    2009-09-01

    A microarray-based approach was used to screen a soil metagenome for the presence of blue light (BL) photoreceptor-encoding genes. The microarray carried 149 different 54-mer oligonucleotides, derived from consensus sequences of light, oxygen and voltage (LOV) domain BL photoreceptor genes. Calibration of the microarrays allowed the detection of minimally 50 ng of genomic DNA against a background of 2-5 microg of genomic DNA. Identification of a positive cosmid clone was still possible for an amount of 0.25 ng against a background of 10 microg of labelled DNA clones. The array could readily identify targets carrying 4% sequence mismatch. Using the LOV microarray, up to 1200 library clones in concentrations of c. 20 ng each with a c. 40 kb insert size could be screened in a single batch. After calibration and reliability controls, the microarray was probed with cosmid-cloned DNA from the thermophilic fraction of a soil sample. From this approach, a novel gene was isolated that encodes a protein consisting of several Per-Arnt-Sim domains, a LOV domain associated to a histidine kinase and a response regulator domain. The novel gene showed highest similarity to a known sequence from Kineococcus radiotolerans SRS30216 (58% identity for the LOV domain only) and to a gene from Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 (57% identity). The gene, designated as ht-met1 (Hamburg Thermophile Metagenome 1), was isolated and fully sequenced (3615 bp). ht-met1 is followed by a second open reading frame encoding a Fe-chelatase, an arrangement quite frequent for BL photoreceptors. The LOV domain region of ht-met1 was subcloned and expressed yielding a fully functional, flavin-containing LOV domain. Irradiation generated the typical LOV photochemistry, with the transient formation of a flavin-protein photoadduct. The dark recovery lifetime was found as tau(REC) = 120 s (20 degrees C) and is among the fastest ones determined so far for bacterial LOV domains.

  4. Thermodynamics of heme-induced conformational changes in hemopexin: role of domain-domain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. L.; Morgan, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hemopexin is a serum glycoprotein that binds heme with high affinity and delivers heme to the liver cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. A hinge region connects the two non-disulfide-linked domains of hemopexin, a 35-kDa N-terminal domain (domain I) that binds heme, and a 25-kDa C-terminal domain (domain II). Although domain II does not bind heme, it assumes one structural state in apo-hemopexin and another in heme-hemopexin, and this change is important in facilitating the association of heme-hemopexin with its receptor. In order to elucidate the structure and function of hemopexin, it is important to understand how structural information is transmitted to domain II when domain I binds heme. Here we report a study of the protein-protein interactions between domain I and domain II using analytical ultracentrifugation and isothermal titration calorimetry. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis showed that domain I associates with domain II both in the presence and absence of heme with Kd values of 0.8 microM and 55 microM, respectively. The interaction between heme-domain I and domain II has a calorimetric enthalpy of +11 kcal/mol, a heat capacity (delta Cp) of -720 cal/mol.K, and a calculated entropy of +65 cal/mol.K. By varying the temperature of the centrifugation equilibrium runs, a van't Hoff plot with an apparent change in enthalpy (delta H) of -3.6 kcal/mol and change in entropy (delta S) of +8.1 cal/mol.K for the association of apo-domain I with domain II was obtained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7773173

  5. The Domain Specificity of Academic Emotional Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Hall, Nathan C.

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyzed the domain specificity of emotions and focused on experiences of enjoyment, anxiety, and boredom in the domains of mathematics, Latin, German, and English. On the basis of assumptions in R. Pekrun's (2000; in press) control-value theory and findings of pilot studies, the authors hypothesized the existence of a largely…

  6. Domains of the Florida Performance Measurement System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This monograph sets forth in detail the concepts included in the five domains of teaching as identified by the Florida Coalition for the Development of a Performance Evaluation System. The first domain, planning, includes the concepts: (1) content coverage; (2) utilization of instructional materials; (3) activity structure; (4) goal focusing; and…

  7. Multiple hypothesis tracking for the cyber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoegler, Stefan; Blackman, Sam; Holsopple, Jared; Hirsch, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses how methods used for conventional multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) can be extended to domain-agnostic tracking of entities from non-kinematic constraints such as those imposed by cyber attacks in a potentially dense false alarm background. MHT is widely recognized as the premier method to avoid corrupting tracks with spurious data in the kinematic domain but it has not been extensively applied to other problem domains. The traditional approach is to tightly couple track maintenance (prediction, gating, filtering, probabilistic pruning, and target confirmation) with hypothesis management (clustering, incompatibility maintenance, hypothesis formation, and Nassociation pruning). However, by separating the domain specific track maintenance portion from the domain agnostic hypothesis management piece, we can begin to apply the wealth of knowledge gained from ground and air tracking solutions to the cyber (and other) domains. These realizations led to the creation of Raytheon's Multiple Hypothesis Extensible Tracking Architecture (MHETA). In this paper, we showcase MHETA for the cyber domain, plugging in a well established method, CUBRC's INFormation Engine for Real-time Decision making, (INFERD), for the association portion of the MHT. The result is a CyberMHT. We demonstrate the power of MHETA-INFERD using simulated data. Using metrics from both the tracking and cyber domains, we show that while no tracker is perfect, by applying MHETA-INFERD, advanced nonkinematic tracks can be captured in an automated way, perform better than non-MHT approaches, and decrease analyst response time to cyber threats.

  8. XML Based Markup Languages for Specific Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varde, Aparna; Rundensteiner, Elke; Fahrenholz, Sally

    A challenging area in web based support systems is the study of human activities in connection with the web, especially with reference to certain domains. This includes capturing human reasoning in information retrieval, facilitating the exchange of domain-specific knowledge through a common platform and developing tools for the analysis of data on the web from a domain expert's angle. Among the techniques and standards related to such work, we have XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This serves as a medium of communication for storing and publishing textual, numeric and other forms of data seamlessly. XML tag sets are such that they preserve semantics and simplify the understanding of stored information by users. Often domain-specific markup languages are designed using XML, with a user-centric perspective. Standardization bodies and research communities may extend these to include additional semantics of areas within and related to the domain. This chapter outlines the issues to be considered in developing domain-specific markup languages: the motivation for development, the semantic considerations, the syntactic constraints and other relevant aspects, especially taking into account human factors. Illustrating examples are provided from domains such as Medicine, Finance and Materials Science. Particular emphasis in these examples is on the Materials Markup Language MatML and the semantics of one of its areas, namely, the Heat Treating of Materials. The focus of this chapter, however, is not the design of one particular language but rather the generic issues concerning the development of domain-specific markup languages.

  9. Time Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time -Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication Paul Swanson Andrew Wang...Approved for public release. SSC Pacific San Diego, CA 92152-5001 TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time ...objective of this report is to record the decision-making process for developing the device design and fabrication workflow for the time -domain switched

  10. FERM Domain Interaction Promotes FAK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dunty, Jill M.; Gabarra-Niecko, Veronica; King, Michelle L.; Ceccarelli, Derek F. J.; Eck, Michael J.; Schaller, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    From the results of deletion analyses, the FERM domain of FAK has been proposed to inhibit enzymatic activity and repress FAK signaling. We have identified a sequence in the FERM domain that is important for FAK signaling in vivo. Point mutations in this sequence had little effect upon catalytic activity in vitro. However, the mutant exhibits reduced tyrosine phosphorylation and dramatically reduced Src family kinase binding. Further, the abilities of the mutant to transduce biochemical signals and to promote cell migration were severely impaired. The results implicate a FERM domain interaction in cell adhesion-dependent activation of FAK and downstream signaling. We also show that the purified FERM domain of FAK interacts with full-length FAK in vitro, and mutation of this sequence disrupts the interaction. These findings are discussed in the context of models of FAK regulation by its FERM domain. PMID:15169899

  11. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of the self structured multilayered bubble domain memory as a mass memory medium for satellite applications is examined. Theoretical considerations of multilayer bubble supporting materials are presented, in addition to the experimental evaluation of current accessed circuitry for various memory functions. The design, fabrication, and test of four device designs is described, and a recommended memory storage area configuration is presented. Memory functions which were demonstrated include the current accessed propagation of bubble domains and stripe domains, pinning of stripe domain ends, generation of single and double bubbles, generation of arrays of coexisting strip and bubble domains in a single garnet layer, and demonstration of different values of the strip out field for single and double bubbles indicating adequate margins for data detection. All functions necessary to develop a multilayer self structured bubble memory device were demonstrated in individual experiments.

  12. Discoidin Domains as Emerging Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2016-08-01

    Discoidin (DS) domains are found in eukaryotic and prokaryotic extracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins. These small domains play different functional roles and can interact with phospholipids, glycans, and proteins, including collagens. DS domain-containing proteins are often involved in cellular adhesion, migration, proliferation, and matrix-remodeling events, while some play a major role in blood coagulation. Mutations in DS domains have been associated with various disease conditions. This review provides an update on the structure, function, and modulation of the DS domains, with a special emphasis on two circulating blood coagulation cofactors, factor V and factor VIII, and the transmembrane neuropilin receptors that have been targeted for inhibition by biologics and small chemical compounds.

  13. Time-Domain Stability Margin Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  14. Time Domain Stability Margin Assessment Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  15. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  16. Field tuning of ferromagnetic domain walls on elastically coupled ferroelectric domain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Kévin J. A.; Lahtinen, Tuomas H. E.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2012-03-01

    We report on the evolution of ferromagnetic domain walls during magnetization reversal in elastically coupled ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures. Using optical polarization microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we demonstrate that the spin rotation and width of ferromagnetic domain walls can be accurately controlled by the strength of the applied magnetic field if the ferromagnetic walls are pinned onto 90∘ ferroelectric domain boundaries. Moreover, reversible switching between magnetically charged and uncharged domain walls is initiated by magnetic field rotation. Switching between both wall types reverses the wall chirality and abruptly changes the width of the ferromagnetic domain walls by up to 1000%.

  17. Structural organization of human replication timing domains.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Rasha E; Drillon, Guénola; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain; Audit, Benjamin

    2015-10-07

    Recent analysis of genome-wide epigenetic modification data, mean replication timing (MRT) profiles and chromosome conformation data in mammals have provided increasing evidence that flexibility in replication origin usage is regulated locally by the epigenetic landscape and over larger genomic distances by the 3D chromatin architecture. Here, we review the recent results establishing some link between replication domains and chromatin structural domains in pluripotent and various differentiated cell types in human. We reconcile the originally proposed dichotomic picture of early and late constant timing regions that replicate by multiple rather synchronous origins in separated nuclear compartments of open and closed chromatins, with the U-shaped MRT domains bordered by "master" replication origins specified by a localized (∼200-300 kb) zone of open and transcriptionally active chromatin from which a replication wave likely initiates and propagates toward the domain center via a cascade of origin firing. We discuss the relationships between these MRT domains, topologically associated domains and lamina-associated domains. This review sheds a new light on the epigenetically regulated global chromatin reorganization that underlies the loss of pluripotency and the determination of differentiation properties.

  18. J domain independent functions of J proteins.

    PubMed

    Ajit Tamadaddi, Chetana; Sahi, Chandan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock proteins of 40 kDa (Hsp40s), also called J proteins, are obligate partners of Hsp70s. Via their highly conserved and functionally critical J domain, J proteins interact and modulate the activity of their Hsp70 partners. Mutations in the critical residues in the J domain often result in the null phenotype for the J protein in question. However, as more J proteins have been characterized, it is becoming increasingly clear that a significant number of J proteins do not "completely" rely on their J domains to carry out their cellular functions, as previously thought. In some cases, regions outside the highly conserved J domain have become more important making the J domain dispensable for some, if not for all functions of a J protein. This has profound effects on the evolution of such J proteins. Here we present selected examples of J proteins that perform J domain independent functions and discuss this in the context of evolution of J proteins with dispensable J domains and J-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  19. Chiral spin torque at magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Thomas, Luc; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Spin-polarized currents provide a powerful means of manipulating the magnetization of nanodevices, and give rise to spin transfer torques that can drive magnetic domain walls along nanowires. In ultrathin magnetic wires, domain walls are found to move in the opposite direction to that expected from bulk spin transfer torques, and also at much higher speeds. Here we show that this is due to two intertwined phenomena, both derived from spin-orbit interactions. By measuring the influence of magnetic fields on current-driven domain-wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co trilayers, we find an internal effective magnetic field acting on each domain wall, the direction of which alternates between successive domain walls. This chiral effective field arises from a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Co/Pt interfaces and, in concert with spin Hall currents, drives the domain walls in lock-step along the nanowire. Elucidating the mechanism for the manipulation of domain walls in ultrathin magnetic films will enable the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  20. Thermal variations of domain wall thickness and number of domains in magnetic rectangular grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Merrill, Ronald T.

    1990-12-01

    Equilibrium domain wall thickness and number of domains in rectangular magnetic grains are determined by using a modified Amar model. It is shown that domain structure, particularly domain wall thickness, in a magnetized grain depends strongly on grain shape and orientation. These dependencies are attributed to the existence of two competing self-magnetostatic interactions, one from the ends of the grain and the other from the sides. One of the consequences of this is that the thermal variation of domain wall thickness in an elongated grain is greater (smaller) than predicted by classical theory when the grain is magnetized along the shortest (longest) dimension. For magnetite, classical theory provides a good approximation in predicting both domain wall thickness and number of domains in equal-dimensional grains larger than about 4 μm.

  1. The domain-specific and domain-general relationships of visuospatial working memory to reasoning ability.

    PubMed

    Shipstead, Zach; Yonehiro, Jade

    2016-10-01

    The degree to which visuospatial working memory (VSWM) is separable from working memory in general is an open question. On one hand, the construct is often researched as a unitary, domain-specific system. On the other, there is evidence that VWSM shares a common processing component with verbal memory. One might interpret this shared component as domain-general attention. We used confirmatory factor analysis to demonstrate that VSWM shares a domain-general component with verbal memory tasks and has a domain-specific component that is independent of verbal memory. Furthermore, the domain-general component was found to correlate with reasoning ability in both the visuospatial and verbal domains. The domain-specific component only correlated with reasoning ability when the tests had a strong visuospatial component. We argue that theories of VSWM need to place greater emphasis on its multiply determined nature.

  2. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  3. Compositional Dictionaries for Domain Adaptive Face Recognition.

    PubMed

    Qiang Qiu; Chellappa, Rama

    2015-12-01

    We present a dictionary learning approach to compensate for the transformation of faces due to the changes in view point, illumination, resolution, and so on. The key idea of our approach is to force domain-invariant sparse coding, i.e., designing a consistent sparse representation of the same face in different domains. In this way, the classifiers trained on the sparse codes in the source domain consisting of frontal faces can be applied to the target domain (consisting of faces in different poses, illumination conditions, and so on) without much loss in recognition accuracy. The approach is to first learn a domain base dictionary, and then describe each domain shift (identity, pose, and illumination) using a sparse representation over the base dictionary. The dictionary adapted to each domain is expressed as the sparse linear combinations of the base dictionary. In the context of face recognition, with the proposed compositional dictionary approach, a face image can be decomposed into sparse representations for a given subject, pose, and illumination. This approach has three advantages. First, the extracted sparse representation for a subject is consistent across domains, and enables pose and illumination insensitive face recognition. Second, sparse representations for pose and illumination can be subsequently used to estimate the pose and illumination condition of a face image. Last, by composing sparse representations for the subject and the different domains, we can also perform pose alignment and illumination normalization. Extensive experiments using two public face data sets are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for face recognition.

  4. Domain-decomposed preconditionings for transport operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The performance was tested of five different interface preconditionings for domain decomposed convection diffusion problems, including a novel one known as the spectral probe, while varying mesh parameters, Reynolds number, ratio of subdomain diffusion coefficients, and domain aspect ratio. The preconditioners are representative of the range of practically computable possibilities that have appeared in the domain decomposition literature for the treatment of nonoverlapping subdomains. It is shown that through a large number of numerical examples that no single preconditioner can be considered uniformly superior or uniformly inferior to the rest, but that knowledge of particulars, including the shape and strength of the convection, is important in selecting among them in a given problem.

  5. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  6. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  7. An introduction to recognizing functional domains.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Gary D

    2006-10-01

    This unit provides an overview of issues involved in domain recognition in protein and DNA sequences. It opens with a discussion of the two primary methods of domain representation, namely consensus sequences and alignment matrices (e.g., the log-odds matrix). The unit continues with a brief overview of some of the resources available for identifying functional domains in nucleotide sequences (e.g., TRANSFAC). In addition, it reviews databases such as Pfam, InterPro and Blocks, which are available for protein analysis.

  8. Inferring Evolutionary Scenarios for Protein Domain Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoeft, John; Krause, Roland; Eulenstein, Oliver

    Essential cellular processes are controlled by functional interactions of protein domains, which can be inferred from their evolutionary histories. Methods to reconstruct these histories are challenged by the complexity of reconstructing macroevolutionary events. In this work we model these events using a novel network-like structure that represents the evolution of domain combinations, called plexus. We describe an algorithm to find a plexus that represents the evolution of a given collection of domain histories as phylogenetic trees with the minimum number of macroevolutionary events, and demonstrate its effectiveness in practice.

  9. Cross domains Arabic named entity recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ahmari, S. Saad; Abdullatif Al-Johar, B.

    2016-07-01

    Named Entity Recognition (NER) plays an important role in many Natural Language Processing (NLP) applications such as; Information Extraction (IE), Question Answering (QA), Text Clustering, Text Summarization and Word Sense Disambiguation. This paper presents the development and implementation of domain independent system to recognize three types of Arabic named entities. The system works based on a set of domain independent grammar-rules along with Arabic part of speech tagger in addition to gazetteers and lists of trigger words. The experimental results shown, that the system performed as good as other systems with better results in some cases of cross-domains corpora.

  10. Supporting multiple domains in a single reuse repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David

    1992-01-01

    Domain analysis typically results in the construction of a domain-specific repository. Such a repository imposes artificial boundaries on the sharing of similar assets between related domains. A lattice-based approach to repository modeling can preserve a reuser's domain specific view of the repository, while avoiding replication of commonly used assets and supporting a more general perspective on domain interrelationships.

  11. FHA domains: Phosphopeptide binding and beyond.

    PubMed

    Almawi, Ahmad W; Matthews, Lindsay A; Guarné, Alba

    2016-12-08

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are small phosphopeptide recognition modules found in eubacterial and eukaryotic, but not archeal, genomes. Although they were originally found in forkhead-type transcription factors, they have now been identified in many other signaling proteins. FHA domains share a remarkably conserved fold despite very low sequence conservation. They only have five conserved amino acids that are important for binding to phosphorylated epitopes. Recent work from several laboratories has demonstrated that FHA domains can mediate many interactions that do not depend on their ability to recognize a phosphorylated threonine. In this review, we present structural and biochemical work that has unveiled novel interaction interfaces on FHA domains. We discuss how these non-canonical interactions modulate the recognition of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated substrates, as well as protein oligomerization - events that collectively determine FHA function.

  12. Resistance domain in type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1980-01-05

    We show that traveling domains with a finite resistance can exist in type II superconductors in the presence of a transport current. An experiment in which this effect generates an alternating electric field and current is proposed.

  13. Time-domain flicker measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miseli, Joseph

    1999-04-01

    The visibility of flicker on a display depends upon many factors, including the observer's sensitivity to flicker. Whenever flicker is observed, it is probably undesirable and often unacceptable. Much has been written about flicker, its perception, and its variability. Methods have been presented to the industry that use frequency domain analysis of measured flicker response. Here we prose an alternate method to quantify flicker in the time domain, just as people see it, and we will try to understand how the measurements relate to what people see. Both the frequency domain and time domain flicker measurements can be found in the Video Electronics Standards Association Flat Panel Display Measurements Standard. An attempt is made to compare the two methods and show how the simpler measurement can be employed for many display technologies.

  14. Domain wall magneto-Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysteczko, Patryk; Hu, Xiukun; Liebing, Niklas; Sievers, Sibylle; Schumacher, Hans W.

    2015-10-01

    The interplay between charge, spin, and heat currents in magnetic nanostructures subjected to a temperature gradient has led to a variety of novel effects and promising applications studied in the fast-growing field of spin caloritronics. Here, we explore the magnetothermoelectrical properties of an individual magnetic domain wall in a permalloy nanowire. In thermal gradients of the order of few K /μ m along the long wire axis, we find a clear magneto-Seebeck signature due to the presence of a single domain wall. The observed domain wall magneto-Seebeck effect can be explained by the magnetization-dependent Seebeck coefficient of permalloy in combination with the local spin configuration of the domain wall.

  15. Magnified time-domain ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Barbier, Margaux; Friberg, Ari T.; Dudley, John M.; Genty, Goëry

    2017-04-01

    Ghost imaging allows the imaging of an object without directly seeing this object. Originally demonstrated in the spatial domain, it was recently shown that ghost imaging can be transposed into the time domain to detect ultrafast signals, even in the presence of distortion. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a temporal ghost imaging scheme which generates a 5× magnified ghost image of an ultrafast waveform. Inspired by shadow imaging in the spatial domain and building on the dispersive Fourier transform of an incoherent supercontinuum in an optical fiber, the approach overcomes the resolution limit of standard time-domain ghost imaging generally imposed by the detectors speed. The method can be scaled up to higher magnification factors using longer fiber lengths and light source with shorter duration.

  16. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  17. Investigations on polarimetric terahertz frequency domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yandong; Zhang, Banghong; Notake, Takashi; Minamide, Hiroaki; Olivo, Malini; Sugii, Shigeki

    2014-04-01

    A polarimetric Terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy system is presented which has an additional polarization measurement function at the Terahertz band. The achromatic Terahertz waveplate, which acts as the key device in the system, is also presented.

  18. Epistemic Analysis of Interrogative Domains using Cuboids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Cameron; Hughes, Tracey

    We are interested in analyzing the propositional knowledge extracted by an epistemic agent from interrogative domains. The interrogative domains that have our current focus are taken from transcripts of legal trials, congressional hearings, or law enforcement interrogations. These transcripts have be encoded in XML or HTML formats. The agent uses these transcripts as a primary knowledge source. The complexity, size, scope and potentially conflicting nature of transcripts from interrogative domains bring into question the quality of propositional knowledge that can be garnered by the agent. Epistemic Cuboids or Cubes are used as a knowledge analysis technique that helps determine the quality and quantity of the propositional knowledge extracted by an epistemic agent from an interrogative domain. In this paper we explore how 'Epistemic Cubes' can be used to evaluate the nature of the agent's propositional knowledge.

  19. Time-Domain vs. Frequency-Domain CSEM: Implications for Marine Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, D. M.; Key, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    The frequency-domain marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method is now routinely applied to map resistive hydrocarbons buried beneath the seabed in deepwater. Alternatively, it has been suggested that time-domain CSEM methods may offer improved resolution of difficult targets such as deeply buried reservoirs. Furthermore, time-domain methods may overcome a sensitivity limitation imposed by the airwave saturation that is experienced for shallow-water frequency-domain CSEM. In order to examine and test these claims, we have developed a modeling code for computing time-domain responses for layered 1D models with arbitrarily located and oriented transmitters and receivers. Our code extends the open-source frequency domain code Dipole1D by efficiently computing the time-domain step-on and impulse responses by Fourier transformation of the frequency-domain kernels. By applying a realistic noise model to synthetic data generated from this code, we systematically examine the sensitivity and resolution of time-domain and frequency-domain CSEM to representative targets of interest for offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploration surveys of seafloor volcanic and hydrothermal systems. These studies have practical implications for marine EM survey systems that use either towed or stationary transmitters and receivers.

  20. Between-domain relations of students' academic emotions and their judgments of school domain similarity

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Thomas; Haag, Ludwig; Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.; Keller, Melanie M.; Frenzel, Anne C.; Collier, Antonie P. M.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to deepen our understanding of the between-domain relations of academic emotions, a series of three studies was conducted. We theorized that between-domain relations of trait (i.e., habitual) emotions reflected students' judgments of domain similarities, whereas between-domain relations of state (i.e., momentary) emotions did not. This supposition was based on the accessibility model of emotional self-report, according to which individuals' beliefs tend to strongly impact trait, but not state emotions. The aim of Study 1 (interviews; N = 40; 8th and 11th graders) was to gather salient characteristics of academic domains from students' perspective. In Study 2 (N = 1709; 8th and 11th graders) the 13 characteristics identified in Study 1 were assessed along with academic emotions in four different domains (mathematics, physics, German, and English) using a questionnaire-based trait assessment. With respect to the same domains, state emotions were assessed in Study 3 (N = 121; 8th and 11th graders) by employing an experience sampling approach. In line with our initial assumptions, between-domain relations of trait but not state academic emotions reflected between-domain relations of domain characteristics. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:25374547

  1. Forum domain in Drosophila melanogaster cut locus possesses looped domains inside.

    PubMed

    Tchurikov, N A; Krasnov, A N; Ponomarenko, N A; Golova, Y B; Chernov, B K

    1998-07-01

    We have studied the relationship between chromosomal forum domains and looped domains in the cut locus of Drosophila melanogaster . Forum domains were earlier detected by separation in pulsed-field gels of 50-150 kb chromosomal DNA fragments obtained after spontaneous non-random degradation of chromosomes. We have localized the boundary region where cleavage sites are scattered between two forum domains in the regulatory region of the cut locus. We have sequenced a 13 kb region spanning few kilobases from distal domain, the boundary region and part of the proximal forum domain where several scaffold associated regions (SARs) were observed. We conclude that forum domains and looped domains are physically different types of domains and belong to different levels of organization in eukaryotic chromosomes. The boundary region between the neighboring forum domains in the cut locus possesses the Doc element insertion and a micro-satellite stretch and thus might remind a small island of heterochromatin and correspond to so-called intercalary heterochromatin that is known to be located in the 7B1-2 band where the major part of the cut locus is reside.

  2. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  3. Work Domain Analysis: Theoretical Concepts and Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    method to elicit expert knowledge: A case study in the methodology of cognitive task analysis. Human Factors, 40, 254-276. Itoh, J., Sakuma, A...Work Domain Analysis: Theoretical Concepts and Methodology Neelam Naikar, Robyn Hopcroft, and Anna Moylan Air Operations...theoretical and methodological approach for work domain analysis (WDA), the first phase of cognitive work analysis. The report: (1) addresses a number of

  4. Planning with Continuous Resources in Stochastic Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mausam, Mausau; Benazera, Emmanuel; Brafman, Roneu; Hansen, Eric

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of optimal planning in stochastic domains with metric resource constraints. Our goal is to generate a policy whose expected sum of rewards is maximized for a given initial state. We consider a general formulation motivated by our application domain--planetary exploration--in which the choice of an action at each step may depend on the current resource levels. We adapt the forward search algorithm AO* to handle our continuous state space efficiently.

  5. Multi-domain training enhances attentional control.

    PubMed

    Binder, Julia C; Martin, Mike; Zöllig, Jacqueline; Röcke, Christina; Mérillat, Susan; Eschen, Anne; Jäncke, Lutz; Shing, Yee Lee

    2016-06-01

    Multi-domain training potentially increases the likelihood of overlap in processing components with transfer tasks and everyday life, and hence is a promising training approach for older adults. To empirically test this, 84 healthy older adults aged 64 to 75 years were randomly assigned to one of three single-domain training conditions (inhibition, visuomotor function, spatial navigation) or to the simultaneous training of all three cognitive functions (multi-domain training condition). All participants trained on an iPad at home for 50 training sessions. Before and after the training, and at a 6-month follow-up measurement, cognitive functioning and training transfer were assessed with a neuropsychological test battery including tests targeting the trained functions (near transfer) and transfer to executive functions (far transfer: attentional control, working memory, speed). Participants in all four training groups showed a linear increase in training performance over the 50 training sessions. Using a latent difference score model, the multi-domain training group, compared with the single-domain training groups, showed more improvement on the far transfer attentional control composite. Individuals with initially lower baseline performance showed higher training-related improvements, indicating that training compensated for lower initial cognitive performance. At the 6-month follow-up, performance on the cognitive test battery remained stable. This is one of the first studies to investigate systematically multi-domain training including comparable single-domain training conditions. Our findings suggest that multi-domain training enhances attentional control involved in handling several different tasks at the same time, an aspect in everyday life that is particularly challenging for older people. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Moving Towards Domain Wall Devices in Ferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    Domain walls in ferroelectric, ferroelastic and multiferroic oxides are distinct functional materials in their own right. They can be conducting, or even superconducting, when surrounding domains are insulating; they can demonstrate magnetism when the surrounding bulk is non-magnetic and they can contain ordered electrical dipoles when the matrix containing them is non-polar. Since domain walls can also be created, destroyed, and controllably moved from place to place, there is an amazing opportunity for us to design new forms of devices in which functionality is actively and dynamically deployed (now you see it; now you don't). This is the essence of the emerging field known as ``domain wall nanoelectronics''. In time, this arena of research could change the way we think of nanoscale functional devices, moving increasingly towards agile circuitry and neuromorphic device architectures. While the control of domain wall injection, movement and annihilation has been developed rather well in the nanomagnetics community (in race-track and domain wall logic research), similar research has not been widely performed in nanoscale ferroelectrics, ferroelastics and multiferroics. This talk will discuss progress that has been made to date and the way in which nanomagnetics research can be used as a source of inspiration. Site-specific domain wall injection and motion control in both proper and improper ferroelectrics using inhomogeneous electric and elastic fields, as well as dielectric patterning in uniaxial ferroelectrics, will be specifically considered. As will be shown, sufficient control has been developed to allow the creation of a diode for domain wall motion in ferroelectrics, for example. The author acknowledges support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  7. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio )

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  8. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Hishiro T.; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-01

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Nanoscopic Lipid Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Mostofian, Barmak; Stanley, Christopher; Lindner, Benjamin; Heberle, Frederick A.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Feygenson, Mikhail; Egami, Takeshi; Standaert, Robert F.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Myles, Dean A. A.; Ohl, Michael; Katsaras, John

    2015-09-28

    We found that the lipid raft hypothesis presents insight into how the cell membrane organizes proteins and lipids to accomplish its many vital functions. Yet basic questions remain about the physical mechanisms that lead to the formation, stability, and size of lipid rafts. Thus, much interest has been generated in the study of systems that contain similar lateral heterogeneities, or domains. In the current work we present an experimental approach that is capable of isolating the bending moduli of lipid domains. This is accomplished using neutron scattering and its unique sensitivity to the isotopes of hydrogen. Combining contrast matching approaches with inelastic neutron scattering, we isolate the bending modulus of ~13 nm diameter domains residing in 60 nm unilamellar vesicles, whose lipid composition mimics the mammalian plasma membrane outer leaflet. Importantly, the bending modulus of the nanoscopic domains differs from the modulus of the continuous phase surrounding them. Moreover, from additional structural measurements and all-atom simulations, we also determine that nanoscopic domains are in-register across the bilayer leaflets. Taken together, these results inform a number of theoretical models of domain/raft formation and highlight the fact that mismatches in bending modulus must be accounted for when explaining the emergence of lateral heterogeneities in lipid systems and biological membranes.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Nanoscopic Lipid Domains

    DOE PAGES

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Mostofian, Barmak; ...

    2015-09-28

    We found that the lipid raft hypothesis presents insight into how the cell membrane organizes proteins and lipids to accomplish its many vital functions. Yet basic questions remain about the physical mechanisms that lead to the formation, stability, and size of lipid rafts. Thus, much interest has been generated in the study of systems that contain similar lateral heterogeneities, or domains. In the current work we present an experimental approach that is capable of isolating the bending moduli of lipid domains. This is accomplished using neutron scattering and its unique sensitivity to the isotopes of hydrogen. Combining contrast matching approachesmore » with inelastic neutron scattering, we isolate the bending modulus of ~13 nm diameter domains residing in 60 nm unilamellar vesicles, whose lipid composition mimics the mammalian plasma membrane outer leaflet. Importantly, the bending modulus of the nanoscopic domains differs from the modulus of the continuous phase surrounding them. Moreover, from additional structural measurements and all-atom simulations, we also determine that nanoscopic domains are in-register across the bilayer leaflets. Taken together, these results inform a number of theoretical models of domain/raft formation and highlight the fact that mismatches in bending modulus must be accounted for when explaining the emergence of lateral heterogeneities in lipid systems and biological membranes.« less

  11. Constant domain-regulated antibody catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-10-19

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies.

  12. Structured hints : extracting and abstracting domain expertise.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Stevens, R.; Sterling, T.; Gao, G. R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; California Inst. of Tech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ. of Delaware

    2009-03-16

    We propose a new framework for providing information to help optimize domain-specific application codes. Its design addresses problems that derive from the widening gap between the domain problem statement by domain experts and the architectural details of new and future high-end computing systems. The design is particularly well suited to program execution models that incorporate dynamic adaptive methodologies for live tuning of program performance and resource utilization. This new framework, which we call 'structured hints', couples a vocabulary of annotations to a suite of performance metrics. The immediate target is development of a process by which a domain expert describes characteristics of objects and methods in the application code that would not be readily apparent to the compiler; the domain expert provides further information about what quantities might provide the best indications of desirable effect; and the interactive preprocessor identifies potential opportunities for the domain expert to evaluate. Our development of these ideas is progressing in stages from case study, through manual implementation, to automatic or semi-automatic implementation. In this paper we discuss results from our case study, an examination of a large simulation of a neural network modeled after the neocortex.

  13. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Hishiro T.; Yamaura, Jun-ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-01-01

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics. PMID:28195565

  14. Joining RDC data from flexible protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgheri, Luca

    2010-11-01

    We study the inverse problem of determining the conformational freedom of two protein domains from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurements. For each paramagnetic ion attached to one of the domains we obtain a magnetic susceptibility tensor χ from the RDC of couples of atoms of that domain, and a mean paramagnetic susceptibility tensor {\\bar{\\chi }} from the RDC of couples of atoms of the other domain. The latter is an integral average of rotations of χ which depends on the conformational freedom of the two domains. In this paper we consider the case when we have data from paramagnetic ions attached separately to each of the domains. We prove that in this case not all the elements of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} are independent. We derive the mathematical equations for the compatibility of the measurements and show how these relations can be used in the presence of noisy data to determine a compatible set of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} with an unconstrained minimization. If available, information about the shape of the noise can be included in the target function. We show that in this case the compatible set obtained has a reduced error with respect to the noisy data.

  15. Protein function prediction using domain families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we assessed the use of domain families for predicting the functions of whole proteins. These 'functional families' (FunFams) were derived using a protocol that combines sequence clustering with supervised cluster evaluation, relying on available high-quality Gene Ontology (GO) annotation data in the latter step. In essence, the protocol groups domain sequences belonging to the same superfamily into families based on the GO annotations of their parent proteins. An initial test based on enzyme sequences confirmed that the FunFams resemble enzyme (domain) families much better than do families produced by sequence clustering alone. For the CAFA 2011 experiment, we further associated the FunFams with GO terms probabilistically. All target proteins were first submitted to domain superfamily assignment, followed by FunFam assignment and, eventually, function assignment. The latter included an integration step for multi-domain target proteins. The CAFA results put our domain-based approach among the top ten of 31 competing groups and 56 prediction methods, confirming that it outperforms simple pairwise whole-protein sequence comparisons. PMID:23514456

  16. Incubational domain characterization in lightly doped ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhipeng; Mori, Toshiyuki; John Auchterlonie, Graeme; Zou Jin; Drennan, John

    2012-08-15

    Microstructures of both Gd- and Y-doped ceria with different doping level (i.e., 10 at% and 25 at%) have been comprehensively characterized by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Coherent nano-sized domains can be widely observed in heavily doped ceria. Nevertheless, it was found that a large amount of dislocations actually exist in lightly doped ceria instead of heavily doped ones. Furthermore, incubational domains can be detected in lightly doped ceria, with dislocations located at the interfaces. The interactions between such linear dislocations and dopant defects have been simulated accordingly. As a consequence, the formation mechanism of incubational domains is rationalized in terms of the interaction between intrinsic dislocations of doped ceria and dopant defects. This study offers the insights into the initial state and related mechanism of the formation of nano-sized domains, which have been widely observed in heavily rare-earth-doped ceria in recent years. - Graphical abstract: Interactions between dislocations and dopants lead to incubational domain formation in lightly doped ceria. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures were characterized in both heavily and light Gd-/Y-doped ceria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocations are existed in lightly doped ceria rather than heavily doped one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions between dislocations and dopant defects were simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of dislocation associated incubational domain is rationalized.

  17. Robust ferromagnetism carried by antiferromagnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Hishiro T; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-14

    Ferroic materials, such as ferromagnetic or ferroelectric materials, have been utilized as recording media for memory devices. A recent trend for downsizing, however, requires an alternative, because ferroic orders tend to become unstable for miniaturization. The domain wall nanoelectronics is a new developing direction for next-generation devices, in which atomic domain walls, rather than conventional, large domains themselves, are the active elements. Here we show that atomically thin magnetic domain walls generated in the antiferromagnetic insulator Cd2Os2O7 carry unusual ferromagnetic moments perpendicular to the wall as well as electron conductivity: the ferromagnetic moments are easily polarized even by a tiny field of 1 mT at high temperature, while, once cooled down, they are surprisingly robust even in an inverse magnetic field of 7 T. Thus, the magnetic domain walls could serve as a new-type of microscopic, switchable and electrically readable magnetic medium which is potentially important for future applications in the domain wall nanoelectronics.

  18. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas G [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-03-29

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  19. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-04-20

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  20. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    PubMed Central

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  1. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments.

  2. Competition between LIM-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jacqueline M; Bhati, Mugdha; Craig, Vanessa J; Deane, Janet E; Jeffries, Cy; Lee, Christopher; Nancarrow, Amy L; Ryan, Daniel P; Sunde, Margaret

    2008-12-01

    LMO (LIM-only) and LIM-HD (LIM-homeodomain) proteins form a family of proteins that is required for myriad developmental processes and which can contribute to diseases such as T-cell leukaemia and breast cancer. The four LMO and 12 LIM-HD proteins in mammals are expressed in a combinatorial manner in many cell types, forming a transcriptional 'LIM code'. The proteins all contain a pair of closely spaced LIM domains near their N-termini that mediate protein-protein interactions, including binding to the approximately 30-residue LID (LIM interaction domain) of the essential co-factor protein Ldb1 (LIM domain-binding protein 1). In an attempt to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the LIM code, we have determined the molecular basis of binding of LMO and LIM-HD proteins for Ldb1(LID) through a series of structural, mutagenic and biophysical studies. These studies provide an explanation for why Ldb1 binds the LIM domains of the LMO/LIM-HD family, but not LIM domains from other proteins. The LMO/LIM-HD family exhibit a range of affinities for Ldb1, which influences the formation of specific functional complexes within cells. We have also identified an additional LIM interaction domain in one of the LIM-HD proteins, Isl1. Despite low sequence similarity to Ldb1(LID), this domain binds another LIM-HD protein, Lhx3, in an identical manner to Ldb1(LID). Through our and other studies, it is emerging that the multiple layers of competitive binding involving LMO and LIM-HD proteins and their partner proteins contribute significantly to cell fate specification and development.

  3. Domain structure of Lassa virus L protein.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Lelke, Michaela; Hass, Meike; Kleinsteuber, Katja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The 200-kDa L protein of arenaviruses plays a central role in viral genome replication and transcription. This study aimed at providing evidence for the domain structure of L protein by combining bioinformatics with a stepwise mutagenesis approach using the Lassa virus minireplicon system. Potential interdomain linkers were predicted using various algorithms. The prediction was challenged by insertion of flexible sequences into the predicted linkers. Insertion of 5 or 10 amino acid residues was tolerated at seven sites (S407, G446, G467, G774, G939, S1952, and V2074 in Lassa virus AV). At two of these sites, G467 and G939, L protein could be split into an N-terminal and a C-terminal part, which were able to trans-complement each other and reconstitute a functional complex upon coexpression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed physical interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains, irrespective of whether L protein was split at G467 or G939. In confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the N-terminal domains showed a dot-like, sometimes perinuclear, cytoplasmic distribution similar to that of full-length L protein, while the C-terminal domains were homogenously distributed in cytoplasm. The latter were redistributed into the dot-like structures upon coexpression with the corresponding N-terminal domain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates two interdomain linkers in Lassa virus L protein, at G467 and G939, suggesting that L protein is composed of at least three structural domains spanning residues 1 to 467, 467 to 939, and 939 to 2220. The first domain seems to mediate accumulation of L protein into cytoplasmic dot-like structures.

  4. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  5. Algorithms for propagating uncertainty across heterogeneous domains

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Heyrim; Yang, Xiu; Venturi, D.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-12-30

    We address an important research area in stochastic multi-scale modeling, namely the propagation of uncertainty across heterogeneous domains characterized by partially correlated processes with vastly different correlation lengths. This class of problems arise very often when computing stochastic PDEs and particle models with stochastic/stochastic domain interaction but also with stochastic/deterministic coupling. The domains may be fully embedded, adjacent or partially overlapping. The fundamental open question we address is the construction of proper transmission boundary conditions that preserve global statistical properties of the solution across different subdomains. Often, the codes that model different parts of the domains are black-box and hence a domain decomposition technique is required. No rigorous theory or even effective empirical algorithms have yet been developed for this purpose, although interfaces defined in terms of functionals of random fields (e.g., multi-point cumulants) can overcome the computationally prohibitive problem of preserving sample-path continuity across domains. The key idea of the different methods we propose relies on combining local reduced-order representations of random fields with multi-level domain decomposition. Specifically, we propose two new algorithms: The first one enforces the continuity of the conditional mean and variance of the solution across adjacent subdomains by using Schwarz iterations. The second algorithm is based on PDE-constrained multi-objective optimization, and it allows us to set more general interface conditions. The effectiveness of these new algorithms is demonstrated in numerical examples involving elliptic problems with random diffusion coefficients, stochastically advected scalar fields, and nonlinear advection-reaction problems with random reaction rates.

  6. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices. PMID:27882932

  7. The architecture of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2005-03-14

    Understanding the design of the universe of protein structures may provide insights into protein evolution. We study the architecture of the protein domain universe, which has been found to poses peculiar scale-free properties. We examine the origin of these scale-free properties of the graph of protein domain structures (PDUG) and determine that that the PDUG is not modular, i.e. it does not consist of modules with uniform properties. Instead, we find the PDUG to be self-similar at all scales. We further characterize the PDUG architecture by studying the properties of the hub nodes that are responsible for the scale-free connectivity of the PDUG. We introduce a measure of the betweenness centrality of protein domains in the PDUG and find a power-law distribution of the betweenness centrality values. The scale-free distribution of hubs in the protein universe suggests that a set of specific statistical mechanics models, such as the self-organized criticality model, can potentially identify the principal driving forces of protein evolution. We also find a gatekeeper protein domain, removal of which partitions the largest cluster into two large sub-clusters. We suggest that the loss of such gatekeeper protein domains in the course of evolution is responsible for the creation of new fold families.

  8. Lipid membrane domains in the brain.

    PubMed

    Aureli, Massimo; Grassi, Sara; Prioni, Simona; Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The brain is characterized by the presence of cell types with very different functional specialization, but with the common trait of a very high complexity of structures originated by their plasma membranes. Brain cells bear evident membrane polarization with the creation of different morphological and functional subcompartments, whose formation, stabilization and function require a very high level of lateral order within the membrane. In other words, the membrane specialization of brain cells implies the presence of distinct membrane domains. The brain is the organ with the highest enrichment in lipids like cholesterol, glycosphingolipids, and the most recently discovered brain membrane lipid, phosphatidylglucoside, whose collective behavior strongly favors segregation within the membrane leading to the formation of lipid-driven membrane domains. Lipid-driven membrane domains function as dynamic platforms for signal transduction, protein processing, and membrane turnover. Essential events involved in the development and in the maintenance of the functional integrity of the brain depend on the organization of lipid-driven membrane domains, and alterations in lipid homeostasis, leading to deranged lipid-driven membrane organization, are common in several major brain diseases. In this review, we summarize the forces behind the formation of lipid membrane domains and their biological roles in different brain cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  9. Generalized vector calculus on convex domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Om P.; Xu, Yufeng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we apply recently proposed generalized integral and differential operators to develop generalized vector calculus and generalized variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In particular, we present some generalization of Green's and Gauss divergence theorems involving some new operators, and apply these theorems to generalized variational calculus. For fractional power kernels, the formulation leads to fractional vector calculus and fractional variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In special cases, when certain parameters take integer values, we obtain formulations for integer order problems. Two examples are presented to demonstrate applications of the generalized variational calculus which utilize the generalized vector calculus developed in the paper. The first example leads to a generalized partial differential equation and the second example leads to a generalized eigenvalue problem, both in two dimensional convex domains. We solve the generalized partial differential equation by using polynomial approximation. A special case of the second example is a generalized isoperimetric problem. We find an approximate solution to this problem. Many physical problems containing integer order integrals and derivatives are defined over arbitrary domains. We speculate that future problems containing fractional and generalized integrals and derivatives in fractional mechanics will be defined over arbitrary domains, and therefore, a general variational calculus incorporating a general vector calculus will be needed for these problems. This research is our first attempt in that direction.

  10. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-11-01

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices.

  11. Tunable inertia of chiral magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Torrejon, Jacob; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-11-24

    The time it takes to accelerate an object from zero to a given velocity depends on the applied force and the environment. If the force ceases, it takes exactly the same time to completely decelerate. A magnetic domain wall is a topological object that has been observed to follow this behaviour. Here we show that acceleration and deceleration times of chiral Neel walls driven by current are different in a system with low damping and moderate Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant. The time needed to accelerate a domain wall with current via the spin Hall torque is much faster than the time it needs to decelerate once the current is turned off. The deceleration time is defined by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange constant whereas the acceleration time depends on the spin Hall torque, enabling tunable inertia of chiral domain walls. Such unique feature of chiral domain walls can be utilized to move and position domain walls with lower current, key to the development of storage class memory devices.

  12. Direct measurement of antiferromagnetic domain fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Shpyrko, O G; Isaacs, E D; Logan, J M; Feng, Yejun; Aeppli, G; Jaramillo, R; Kim, H C; Rosenbaum, T F; Zschack, P; Sprung, M; Narayanan, S; Sandy, A R

    2007-05-03

    Measurements of magnetic noise emanating from ferromagnets owing to domain motion were first carried out nearly 100 years ago, and have underpinned much science and technology. Antiferromagnets, which carry no net external magnetic dipole moment, yet have a periodic arrangement of the electron spins extending over macroscopic distances, should also display magnetic noise. However, this must be sampled at spatial wavelengths of the order of several interatomic spacings, rather than the macroscopic scales characteristic of ferromagnets. Here we present a direct measurement of the fluctuations in the nanometre-scale superstructure of spin- and charge-density waves associated with antiferromagnetism in elemental chromium. The technique used is X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, where coherent X-ray diffraction produces a speckle pattern that serves as a 'fingerprint' of a particular magnetic domain configuration. The temporal evolution of the patterns corresponds to domain walls advancing and retreating over micrometre distances. This work demonstrates a useful measurement tool for antiferromagnetic domain wall engineering, but also reveals a fundamental finding about spin dynamics in the simplest antiferromagnet: although the domain wall motion is thermally activated at temperatures above 100 K, it is not so at lower temperatures, and indeed has a rate that saturates at a finite value-consistent with quantum fluctuations-on cooling below 40 K.

  13. Evolution of magnetic domain structures from Pseudo-Single-Domain to Multidomain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Lesleis; Fabian, Karl; Muxworthy, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic observations over the last 60 years have made a significant contribution to our understanding of the geological structure of the Earth. The interpretation of these recordings is almost entirely based on the assumption that the remanence is held in uniformly magnetised (single-domain) particles. However it has long been recognised that the upper limit for SD magnetite is at about 80nm (for equidimensional grains of magnetite) and it is likely that many palaeomagnetic samples will contain a much broader range of grain sizes, which may be dominated by non-uniformly magnetised pseudo-single-domain (PSD) grains. Recent progress in determining energy barriers between the different possible domain states in a grain (to be discussed in this session by Nagy et al.) shows that the thermal stability of PSD grains are dominated by energy barriers and domain transitions whose characteristics are SD-like. The magnetic structures in PSD grains undergo a form of domain rotation rather than the domain wall motions observed in multidomain (MD) grains. Thus transition in stability and fidelity of palaeomagentic recorders from the more reliable PSD to less reliable MD structures can be mapped to the evolution of domain walls from the vortex cores of PSD grains. In this talk we will discuss our preliminary results for very large scale micromagnetic models using a new parallel numerical model called DUNLOP. We will outline the magnetic properties and structures of what we classify as PSD grains and how these types of domains evolve from vortex-dominated to MD structures for easy-axis aligned domains. Such domains are separated by narrow Bloch and Néel - type walls and we discuss the likely impact on the classification of reliable palaeomagentic domain structures.

  14. Structure and function of WD40 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-03-01

    The WD40 domain exhibits a β-propeller architecture, often comprising seven blades. The WD40 domain is one of the most abundant domains and also among the top interacting domains in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we will discuss the identification, definition and architecture of the WD40 domains. WD40 domain proteins are involved in a large variety of cellular processes, in which WD40 domains function as a protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction platform. WD40 domain mediates molecular recognition events mainly through the smaller top surface, but also through the bottom surface and sides. So far, no WD40 domain has been found to display enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the different binding modes exhibited by the large versatile family of WD40 domain proteins. In the last part of this review, we will discuss how post-translational modifications are recognized by WD40 domain proteins.

  15. A Domain Description Language for Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith

    2003-01-01

    We discuss an application of planning to data processing, a planning problem which poses unique challenges for domain description languages. We discuss these challenges and why the current PDDL standard does not meet them. We discuss DPADL (Data Processing Action Description Language), a language for describing planning domains that involve data processing. DPADL is a declarative, object-oriented language that supports constraints and embedded Java code, object creation and copying, explicit inputs and outputs for actions, and metadata descriptions of existing and desired data. DPADL is supported by the IMAGEbot system, which we are using to provide automation for an ecological forecasting application. We compare DPADL to PDDL and discuss changes that could be made to PDDL to make it more suitable for representing planning domains that involve data processing actions.

  16. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  17. Moment domain representation of nonblind image deblurring.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ahlad; Paramesran, Raveendran; Shakibaei, Barmak Honarvar

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of geometric moments to the field of nonblind image deblurring. Using the developed relationship of geometric moments for original and blurred images, a mathematical formulation based on the Euler-Lagrange identity and variational techniques is proposed. It uses an iterative procedure to deblur the image in moment domain. The theoretical framework is validated by a set of experiments. A comparative analysis of the results obtained using the spatial and moment domains are evaluated using a quality assessment method known as the Blind/Reference-less Image Spatial Quality Evaluator (BRISQUE). The results show that the proposed method yields a higher quality score when compared with the spatial domain method for the same number of iterations.

  18. Time domain reflectometry in time variant plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent electron density fluctuations on a synthesized time domain reflectometry response of a one-dimensional cold plasma sheath are considered. Numerical solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation, which describes the electric field of a normally incident plane wave in a specified static electron density profile, are used. A study of the effects of Doppler shifts resulting from moving density fluctuations in the electron density profile of the sheath is included. Varying electron density levels corrupt time domain and distance measurements. Reducing or modulating the electron density levels of a given electron density profile affects the time domain response of a plasma and results in motion of the turning point, and the effective motion has a significant effect on measuring electron density locations.

  19. On thick domain walls in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    Planar scalar field configurations in general relativity differ considerably from those in flat space. It is shown that static domain walls of finite thickness in curved space-time do not possess a reflection symmetry. At infinity, the space-time tends to the Taub vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Minkowski vacuum (Rindler space-time) on the other. Massive test particles are always accelerated towards the Minkowski side, i.e., domain walls are attractive on the Taub side, but repulsive on the Minkowski side (Taub-vacuum cleaner). It is also proved that the pressure in all directions is always negative. Finally, a brief comment is made concerning the possibility of infinite, i.e., bigger than horizon size, domain walls in our universe. All of the results are independent of the form of the potential V(phi) greater than or equal to 0 of the scalar field phi.

  20. On automating domain connectivity for overset grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau; Meakin, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    An alternative method for domain connectivity among systems of overset grids is presented. Reference uniform Cartesian systems of points are used to achieve highly efficient domain connectivity, and form the basis for a future fully automated system. The Cartesian systems are used to approximate body surfaces and to map the computational space of component grids. By exploiting the characteristics of Cartesian systems, Chimera type hole-cutting and identification of donor elements for intergrid boundary points can be carried out very efficiently. The method is tested for a range of geometrically complex multiple-body overset grid systems. A dynamic hole expansion/contraction algorithm is also implemented to obtain optimum domain connectivity; however, it is tested only for geometry of generic shapes.

  1. Adaptive corrector operating in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radikaynen, Y. M.

    1984-11-01

    An interference-immune corrector for a signal converter with automatic regulation of adaptation speed is described which operates in the frequency domain with fast convergence and high signal-to-noise ratio. It contains an analog-to-digital converter, a demodulator, and a filter array with equidistant spacing of center frequencies, three multipliers and two summators, as well as a reference signal generator, a frequency divider, a counter, and a noise meter. Filtering is done by a n-point Fourier transformation or bunching with a memory at the filter input followed by inverse Fourier transformation or debunching, respectively. The algorithm of corrector operation in the frequency domain can be constructed heuristically by an analog to the complex algorithm of minimizing the mean-square error in the time domain. Each weight factor can be processed independently and only once per Fourier transformation cycle, which ensures fast convergence without preliminary phase correction even with large distortions in the communication channel.

  2. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  3. Domain switching of fatigued ferroelectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tak Lim, Yun; Yeog Son, Jong E-mail: hoponpop@ulsan.ac.kr; Shin, Young-Han E-mail: hoponpop@ulsan.ac.kr

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the domain wall speed of a ferroelectric PbZr{sub 0.48}Ti{sub 0.52}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin film using an atomic force microscope incorporated with a mercury-probe system to control the degree of electrical fatigue. The depolarization field in the PZT thin film decreases with increasing the degree of electrical fatigue. We find that the wide-range activation field previously reported in ferroelectric domains result from the change of the depolarization field caused by the electrical fatigue. Domain wall speed exhibits universal behavior to the effective electric field (defined by an applied electric field minus the depolarization field), regardless of the degree of the electrical fatigue.

  4. Conducting Ferroelectric Walls, Domain Topology, and Domain Switching Kinetics in a Hybrid Improper Ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Sang-Wook; Rutgers CenterEmergent Materials Team

    Charged polar interfaces such as charged ferroelectric domain walls or heterostructured interfaces of ZnO/(Zn,Mg)O and LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 , across which the normal component of electric polarization changes suddenly, can host large two-dimensional conduction. Charged ferroelectric domain walls can be highly conducting but energetically unfavored; however, they were found to be mysteriously abundant in hybrid improper ferroelectric (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 single crystals. From the exploration of antiphase domain boundaries, which are hidden in piezoresponse force microscopy, using dark-field electron microscopy, we have explored the macroscopic topology of polarization domains and antiphase domains. We found that the macroscopic domain topology is directly responsible for the presence of charged domain walls, and is closely related with the polarization domain switching mechanism in (Ca,Sr) 3 Ti 2 O 7 . Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

  5. Continuous and discontinuous domains: an algorithm for the automatic generation of reliable protein domain definitions.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A. S.; Barton, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the fast and accurate definition of protein structural domains from coordinate data without prior knowledge of the number or type of domains. The algorithm explicitly locates domains that comprise one or two continuous segments of protein chain. Domains that include more than two segments are also located. The algorithm was applied to a nonredundant database of 230 protein structures and the results compared to domain definitions obtained from the literature, or by inspection of the coordinates on molecular graphics. For 70% of the proteins, the derived domains agree with the reference definitions, 18% show minor differences and only 12% (28 proteins) show very different definitions. Three screens were applied to identify the derived domains least likely to agree with the subjective definition set. These screens revealed a set of 173 proteins, 97% of which agree well with the subjective definitions. The algorithm represents a practical domain identification tool that can be run routinely on the entire structural database. Adjustment of parameters also allows smaller compact units to be identified in proteins. PMID:7663343

  6. Design PID controllers for desired time-domain or frequency-domain response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yugeng; Yang, Genke; Xu, Xiaoming

    2002-10-01

    Practical requirements on the design of control systems, especially process control systems, are usually specified in terms of time-domain response, such as overshoot and rise time, or frequency-domain response, such as resonance peak and stability margin. Although numerous methods have been developed for the design of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, little work has been done in relation to the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses. In this paper, we study the following problem: Given a nominal stable process with time delay, we design a suboptimal PID controller to achieve the required time-domain response or frequency-domain response for the nominal system or the uncertain system. An H(infinity) PID controller is developed based on optimal control theory and the parameters are derived analytically. Its properties are investigated and compared with that of two developed suboptimal controllers: an H2 PID controller and a Maclaurin PID controller. It is shown that all three controllers can provide the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses.

  7. SH3 Domains Differentially Stimulate Distinct Dynamin I Assembly Modes and G Domain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sai; Collett, Michael; Robinson, Phillip J.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin I is a highly regulated GTPase enzyme enriched in nerve terminals which mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. One regulatory mechanism involves its interactions with proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. At least 30 SH3 domain-containing proteins bind dynamin at its proline-rich domain (PRD). Those that stimulate dynamin activity act by promoting its oligomerisation. We undertook a systematic parallel screening of 13 glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged endocytosis-related SH3 domains on dynamin binding, GTPase activity and oligomerisation. No correlation was found between dynamin binding and their potency to stimulate GTPase activity. There was limited correlation between the extent of their ability to stimulate dynamin activity and the level of oligomerisation, indicating an as yet uncharacterised allosteric coupling of the PRD and G domain. We examined the two variants, dynamin Iab and Ibb, which differ in the alternately splice middle domain α2 helix. They responded differently to the panel of SH3s, with the extent of stimulation between the splice variants varying greatly between the SH3s. This study reveals that SH3 binding can act as a heterotropic allosteric regulator of the G domain via the middle domain α2 helix, suggesting an involvement of this helix in communicating the PRD-mediated allostery. This indicates that SH3 binding both stabilises multiple conformations of the tetrameric building block of dynamin, and promotes assembly of dynamin-SH3 complexes with distinct rates of GTP hydrolysis. PMID:26659814

  8. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  9. Quantum Oscillations of Interacting Nanoscale Structural Inhomogeneities in a Domain Wall of Magnetic Stripe Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Barabash, Maksym

    2016-10-01

    It was established that at low temperatures, quantum oscillations of a pair of interacting nanoscale structural inhomogeneities (vertical Bloch lines) occur in a domain wall of stripe domain in uniaxial ferromagnetic film. The effective mass of vertical Bloch line and conditions for this effect were determined. The effect can be used in the hybrid storage devices bit + q-bit.

  10. Matter antimatter domains: A possible solution to the CP domain wall problem in the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohanty, A. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    An SU(5) grand unified theory model is used to show how the degeneracy between vacua with different spontaneously broken charge parity can be dynamically lifted by a condensate of heavy fermion pairs. This drives a phase transition to a unique vacuum state with definite charge parity. The transition eliminates the domain walls in a matter antimatter symmetric domain cosmology.

  11. An inhibitor domain in Sp3 regulates its glutamine-rich activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Dennig, J; Beato, M; Suske, G

    1996-01-01

    Sp3 is a ubiquitously expressed human transcription factor closely related to Sp1 and Sp4. All three proteins contain a highly conserved DNA binding domain and two glutamine-rich regions, suggesting that they possess similar activation functions. In our previous experiments, however, Sp3 failed to activate transcription. Instead, it repressed Sp1-mediated transcriptional activation, suggesting that it is an inhibitory member of this family of regulatory factors. Here we show that Sp3 can also act as a positive regulator of transcription. The glutamine-rich domains on their own have a strong activation function and interact with the TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor dTAFII110. However, in full-length Sp3 as well as in Gal4-Sp3 fusion proteins, both activation domains are silenced by an inhibitory domain located between the second glutamine-rich region and the DNA binding domain. The inhibitory domain completely suppressed transcriptional activation when fused to a heterologous glutamine-rich domain but only moderately suppressed transcription when linked to an acidic activation domain. Site-directed mutagenesis identified a stretch of highly charged amino acid residues essential for inhibitor function. Substitution of the amino acid triplet KEE by alanine residues within this region changed the almost transcriptionally inactive Sp3 into a strong activator. Our results suggest that the transcriptional activity of Sp3 might be regulated in vivo by relief of inhibition. Images PMID:8896459

  12. Proteins and cholesterol-rich domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    Biological membranes are composed of many molecular species of lipids and proteins. These molecules do not mix ideally. In the plane of the membrane components are segregated into domains that are enriched in certain lipids and proteins. Cholesterol is a membrane lipid that is not uniformly distributed in the membrane. Proteins play an important role in determining cholesterol distribution. Certain types of protein lipidation are known to cause the lipoprotein to sequester with cholesterol and to stabilize cholesterol-rich domains. However, proteins that are excluded from such domains also contribute to the redistribution of cholesterol. One of the motifs that favor interaction with cholesterol is the CRAC motif. The role of the CRAC motif of the gp41 fusogenic protein of HIV is discussed. The distribution of the multianionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bis-phosphate (PtnIns(4,5)P2), is also not uniform in cell membranes. This lipid has several functions in the cell, including a morphological role in determining the sites of attachment of the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. PtnIns(4,5)P2 is sequestered by proteins having clusters of cationic residues in their sequence. Certain proteins containing cationic clusters also contain moieties such as myristoylation or a CRAC segment that would also endow them with the ability to sequester to a cholesterol-rich domain. These proteins interact with PtnIns(4,5)P2 in a cholesterol-dependent manner forming domains that are enriched in both cholesterol and in PtnIns(4,5)P2 but can also be distinct from liquid-ordered raft-like domains.

  13. Identification and characterization of structural domains of human ERp57: association with calreticulin requires several domains.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Laura; Myllyharju, Johanna; Ruoppolo, Margherita; Orrù, Stefania; Caterino, Marianna; Kivirikko, Kari I; Koivunen, Peppi

    2004-04-02

    The amino acid sequence of ERp57, which functions in the endoplasmic reticulum together with the lectins calreticulin and calnexin to achieve folding of newly synthesized glycoproteins, is highly similar to that of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), but they have their own distinct roles in protein folding. We have characterized the domain structure of ERp57 by limited proteolysis and N-terminal sequencing and have found it to be similar but not identical to that of PDI. ERp57 had three major protease-sensitive regions, the first of which was located between residues 120 and 150, the second between 201 and 215, and the third between 313 and 341, the data thus being consistent with a four-domain structure abb'a'. Recombinant expression in Escherichia coli was used to verify the domain boundaries. Each single domain and a b'a' double domain could be produced in the form of soluble, folded polypeptides, as verified by circular dichroism spectra and urea gradient gel electrophoresis. When the ability of ERp57 and its a and a' domains to fold denatured RNase A was studied by electrospray mass analyses, ERp57 markedly enhanced the folding rate at early time points, although less effectively than PDI, but was an ineffective catalyst of the overall process. The a and a' domains produced only minor, if any, increases in the folding rate at the early stages and no increase at the late stages. Interaction of the soluble ERp57 domains with the P domain of calreticulin was studied by chemical cross-linking in vitro. None of the single ERp57 domains nor the b'a' double domain could be cross-linked to the P domain, whereas cross-linking was obtained with a hybrid ERpabb'PDIa'c polypeptide but not with ERpabPDIb'a'c, indicating that multiple domains are involved in this protein-protein interaction and that the b' domain of ERp57 cannot be replaced by that of PDI.

  14. Reconstituting Protein Interaction Networks Using Parameter-Dependent Domain-Domain Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-07

    Superfamily ( SF ) [33], and SMART [34,35]. PFAM domains: FH2, Drf_FH3, and two Drf_GBD domains; SF domains: Formin homology 2 domain (FH2 domain) and ARM...annotation data from six commonly used annotation databases: PFAM-A (release 25.0) [32], Superfamily ( SF ) [33], SMART [34,35], PRODOM [36], TIGRFAM [37... SF 3,651 62.1 962,602 33.0 1,355 1,307 0.79 SMART 3,023 51.4 455,523 15.6 392 379 0.66 PRODOM 146 2.5 19,760 0.7 111 111 0.02 TIGRFAM 3,019 51.3

  15. Casimir forces in the time domain: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-07-15

    We present a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. The method involves the time evolution of electric and magnetic fields in response to a set of current sources, in a modified medium with frequency-independent conductivity. The advantage of this approach is that it allows one to exploit existing FDTD software, without modification, to compute Casimir forces. In this paper, we focus on the derivation, implementation choices, and essential properties of the time-domain algorithm, both considered analytically and illustrated in the simplest parallel-plate geometry.

  16. [Development of domain specific search engines].

    PubMed

    Takai, T; Tokunaga, M; Maeda, K; Kaminuma, T

    2000-01-01

    As cyber space exploding in a pace that nobody has ever imagined, it becomes very important to search cyber space efficiently and effectively. One solution to this problem is search engines. Already a lot of commercial search engines have been put on the market. However these search engines respond with such cumbersome results that domain specific experts can not tolerate. Using a dedicate hardware and a commercial software called OpenText, we have tried to develop several domain specific search engines. These engines are for our institute's Web contents, drugs, chemical safety, endocrine disruptors, and emergent response for chemical hazard. These engines have been on our Web site for testing.

  17. Anderson localization in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Delande, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    In analogy with the usual Anderson localization taking place in time-independent disordered quantum systems where the disorder acts in configuration space, systems exposed to temporally disordered potentials can display Anderson localization in the time domain. We demonstrate this phenomenon with one-dimensional examples where a temporally disordered potential induces localization during the quantum evolution of wave packets, in contrast with a fully delocalized classical dynamics. This is an example of a time crystal phenomenon, i.e., a crystalline behavior in the time domain.

  18. On automating domain connectivity for overset grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1994-01-01

    An alternative method for domain connectivity among systems of overset grids is presented. Reference uniform Cartesian systems of points are used to achieve highly efficient domain connectivity, and form the basis for a future fully automated system. The Cartesian systems are used to approximated body surfaces and to map the computational space of component grids. By exploiting the characteristics of Cartesian Systems, Chimera type hole-cutting and identification of donor elements for intergrid boundary points can be carried out very efficiently. The method is tested for a range of geometrically complex multiple-body overset grid systems.

  19. A PH domain in ACAP1 possesses key features of the BAR domain in promoting membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaoyun; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Bingquan; Ma, Jun; Li, Jian; Deng, Yuchen; Zhou, Qiangjun; Egelman, Edward H.; Hsu, Victor W.; Sun, Fei

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The BAR (Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs) domain undergoes dimerization to produce a curved protein structure, which superimposes onto membrane through electrostatic interactions to sense and impart membrane curvature. In some cases, a BAR domain also possesses an amphipathic helix that inserts into the membrane to induce curvature. ACAP1 (Arfgap with Coil coil, Ankyrin repeat and PH domain protein 1) contains a BAR domain. Here, we show that this BAR domain can neither bind membrane nor impart curvature, but instead, requires a neighboring PH (Pleckstrin Homology) domain to achieve these functions. Specific residues within the PH domain are responsible for both membrane binding and curvature generation. The BAR domain adjacent to the PH domain instead interacts with the BAR domains of neighboring ACAP1 proteins to enable clustering at the membrane. Thus, we have uncovered the molecular basis for an unexpected and unconventional collaboration between PH and BAR domains in membrane bending. PMID:25284369

  20. Effects of sub-domain structure on initial magnetization curve and domain size distribution of stacked media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Kumagai, S.; Sugita, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, in order to confirm the sub-domain structure in stacked media demagnetized with in-plane field, initial magnetization curves and magnetic domain size distribution were investigated. Both experimental and simulation results showed that an initial magnetization curve for the medium demagnetized with in-plane field (MDI) initially rose faster than that for the medium demagnetized with perpendicular field (MDP). It is inferred that this is because the MDI has a larger number of domain walls than the MDP due to the existence of the sub-domains, resulting in an increase in the probability of domain wall motion. Dispersion of domain size for the MDI was larger than that for the MDP. This is because sub-domains are formed not only inside the domain but also at the domain boundary region, and they change the position of the domain boundary to affect the domain size.

  1. Predicting detection performance with model observers: Fourier domain or spatial domain?

    PubMed

    Chen, Baiyu; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James; Favazza, Christopher; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-02-27

    The use of Fourier domain model observer is challenged by iterative reconstruction (IR), because IR algorithms are nonlinear and IR images have noise texture different from that of FBP. A modified Fourier domain model observer, which incorporates nonlinear noise and resolution properties, has been proposed for IR and needs to be validated with human detection performance. On the other hand, the spatial domain model observer is theoretically applicable to IR, but more computationally intensive than the Fourier domain method. The purpose of this study is to compare the modified Fourier domain model observer to the spatial domain model observer with both FBP and IR images, using human detection performance as the gold standard. A phantom with inserts of various low contrast levels and sizes was repeatedly scanned 100 times on a third-generation, dual-source CT scanner at 5 dose levels and reconstructed using FBP and IR algorithms. The human detection performance of the inserts was measured via a 2-alternative-forced-choice (2AFC) test. In addition, two model observer performances were calculated, including a Fourier domain non-prewhitening model observer and a spatial domain channelized Hotelling observer. The performance of these two mode observers was compared in terms of how well they correlated with human observer performance. Our results demonstrated that the spatial domain model observer correlated well with human observers across various dose levels, object contrast levels, and object sizes. The Fourier domain observer correlated well with human observers using FBP images, but overestimated the detection performance using IR images.

  2. Predicting detection performance with model observers: Fourier domain or spatial domain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baiyu; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James; Favazza, Christopher; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    The use of Fourier domain model observer is challenged by iterative reconstruction (IR), because IR algorithms are nonlinear and IR images have noise texture different from that of FBP. A modified Fourier domain model observer, which incorporates nonlinear noise and resolution properties, has been proposed for IR and needs to be validated with human detection performance. On the other hand, the spatial domain model observer is theoretically applicable to IR, but more computationally intensive than the Fourier domain method. The purpose of this study is to compare the modified Fourier domain model observer to the spatial domain model observer with both FBP and IR images, using human detection performance as the gold standard. A phantom with inserts of various low contrast levels and sizes was repeatedly scanned 100 times on a third-generation, dual-source CT scanner at 5 dose levels and reconstructed using FBP and IR algorithms. The human detection performance of the inserts was measured via a 2-alternative-forced-choice (2AFC) test. In addition, two model observer performances were calculated, including a Fourier domain non-prewhitening model observer and a spatial domain channelized Hotelling observer. The performance of these two mode observers was compared in terms of how well they correlated with human observer performance. Our results demonstrated that the spatial domain model observer correlated well with human observers across various dose levels, object contrast levels, and object sizes. The Fourier domain observer correlated well with human observers using FBP images, but overestimated the detection performance using IR images.

  3. Rsp5 WW domains interact directly with the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Chang, A; Cheang, S; Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    2000-07-07

    RSP5 is an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was recently shown to form a physical and functional complex with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II). The amino-terminal half of Rsp5 consists of four domains: a C2 domain, which binds membrane phospholipids; and three WW domains, which are protein interaction modules that bind proline-rich ligands. The carboxyl-terminal half of Rsp5 contains a HECT (homologous to E6-AP carboxyl terminus) domain that catalytically ligates ubiquitin to proteins and functionally classifies Rsp5 as an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. The C2 and WW domains are presumed to act as membrane localization and substrate recognition modules, respectively. We report that the second (and possibly third) Rsp5 WW domain mediates binding to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA pol II large subunit. The CTD comprises a heptamer (YSPTSPS) repeated 26 times and a PXY core that is critical for interaction with a specific group of WW domains. An analysis of synthetic peptides revealed a minimal CTD sequence that is sufficient to bind to the second Rsp5 WW domain (Rsp5 WW2) in vitro and in yeast two-hybrid assays. Furthermore, we found that specific "imperfect" CTD repeats can form a complex with Rsp5 WW2. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of this minimal CTD sequence on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues acts as a negative regulator of the Rsp5 WW2-CTD interaction. In view of the recent data pertaining to phosphorylation-driven interactions between the RNA pol II CTD and the WW domain of Ess1/Pin1, we suggest that CTD dephosphorylation may be a prerequisite for targeted RNA pol II degradation.

  4. Predicting detection performance with model observers: Fourier domain or spatial domain?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baiyu; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James; Favazza, Christopher; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The use of Fourier domain model observer is challenged by iterative reconstruction (IR), because IR algorithms are nonlinear and IR images have noise texture different from that of FBP. A modified Fourier domain model observer, which incorporates nonlinear noise and resolution properties, has been proposed for IR and needs to be validated with human detection performance. On the other hand, the spatial domain model observer is theoretically applicable to IR, but more computationally intensive than the Fourier domain method. The purpose of this study is to compare the modified Fourier domain model observer to the spatial domain model observer with both FBP and IR images, using human detection performance as the gold standard. A phantom with inserts of various low contrast levels and sizes was repeatedly scanned 100 times on a third-generation, dual-source CT scanner at 5 dose levels and reconstructed using FBP and IR algorithms. The human detection performance of the inserts was measured via a 2-alternative-forced-choice (2AFC) test. In addition, two model observer performances were calculated, including a Fourier domain non-prewhitening model observer and a spatial domain channelized Hotelling observer. The performance of these two mode observers was compared in terms of how well they correlated with human observer performance. Our results demonstrated that the spatial domain model observer correlated well with human observers across various dose levels, object contrast levels, and object sizes. The Fourier domain observer correlated well with human observers using FBP images, but overestimated the detection performance using IR images. PMID:27239086

  5. Folding mechanism of a multiple independently-folding domain protein: double B domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Hammes, Gordon G; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-10-10

    The antibody binding properties of staphylococcal protein A (SpA) can be attributed to the presence of five highly homologous domains (E, D, A, B, and C). Although the folding of the B domain of protein A (BdpA) is well-characterized, the folding behavior of this domain in the context of full-length SpA in the cell remains unexplored. The sequence of the B domain is 89 and 91% identical to those of domains A and C, respectively. We have fused B domain sequences (BBdpA) as a close approximation of the A-B or B-C portion of SpA. Circular dichroism and fluorescence-detected denaturation curves of BBdpA are experimentally indistinguishable from those of BdpA. The rate constants for folding and unfolding from NMR line shape analysis for the single- and double-domain proteins are the same within experimental uncertainties (+/-20%). These results support the designation of SpA as a multiple independently-folding domain (MIFD) protein. We develop a mathematical model that describes the folding thermodynamics and kinetics of MIFD proteins. The model depicts MIFD protein folding and unfolding as a parallel network and explicitly calculates the flux through all parallel pathways. These fluxes are combined to give a complete description of the global thermodynamics and kinetics of the folding and unfolding of MIFD proteins. The global rates for complete folding and unfolding of a MIFD protein and those of the individual domains depend on the stability of the protein. We show that the global unfolding rate of a MIFD protein may be many orders of magnitude slower than that of the constituent domains.

  6. Critical role of domain crystallinity, domain purity and domain interface sharpness for reduced bimolecular recombination in polymer solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Chen, Jihua; Ngo, Evan C.; ...

    2014-12-31

    In this study, inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) blended with two different fullerene derivatives namely phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM) and indene-C60 bis-adduct (IC60BA). The effects of annealing temperatures on the morphology, optical and structural properties were studied and correlated to differences in photovoltaic device performance. It was observed that annealing temperature significantly improved the performance of P3HT:IC60BA solar cells while P3HT:PC60BM cells showed relatively less improvement. The performance improvement is attributed to the extent of fullerene mixing with polymer domains. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that ICBAmore » mixes with disordered P3HT much more readily than PC60BM which leads to lower short circuit current density and fill factor for P3HT:IC60BA cells annealed below 120°C. Annealing above 120°C improves the crystallinity of P3HT in case of P3HT:IC60BA whereas in P3HT:PC60BM films, annealing above 80°C leads to negligible change in crystallinity. Crystallization of P3HT also leads to higher domain purity as seen EFTEM. Further it is seen that cells processed with additive nitrobenzene (NB) showed enhanced short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency regardless of the fullerene derivative used. Addition of NB led to nanoscale phase separation between purer polymer and fullerene domains. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) images showed that enhanced domain purity in additive casted films led to a sharper interface between polymer and fullerene. Lastly, enhanced domain purity and interfacial sharpness led to lower bimolecular recombination and higher mobility and charge carrier lifetime in NB modified devices.« less

  7. Regional Climate Model Sensitivity to Domain Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, M.; Laprise, R.

    2006-05-01

    Regional Climate Models are increasingly used to add small-scale features that are not present in their lateral boundary conditions (LBCs). It is well known that the limited area over which a model integrates must be large enough to allow the full development of small scales features (Jones et al., 1995). On the other hand, integrations on very large domains have shown important departures from the driving data, unless large-scale nudging is applied (e.g., Castro and Pielke, 2005). Here the effects of domain size on the development of small-scales are examined using the "Big-Brother" approach developed by Denis et al. (2002). This method consists of generating a high-resolution simulation over a large domain (the Big-Brother). The next step is to degrade this dataset with a low-pass filter based on discrete cosine transform (DCT; Denis et al., 2002) to emulate coarse-resolution LBCs that are usually taken from GCMs or reanalyses. A second simulation (the Little-Brother) is driven by the coarse-resolution LBCs and generates its own small-scale features inside the new smaller domain. Nested and added scales of the Little- Brother can then be compared with the Big-Brother (unfiltered) ones by using the DCT-filter again. Three February months (1990,1991 and 1992) were integrated over a continental grid (Big-Brother: 196x196 gridpoints) with a spatial resolution of 45 km covering almost the entire North-America. After filtering, this dataset is used to drive five simulations with varying domain size (48x48, 72x72, 96x96, 120x120 and 144x144) centred on the same geographic location; all other parameters are kept constant. Monthly statistics of the five Little-Brothers are compared with the virtual reference (Big-Brother) over the common domain (28x28) corresponding to the smallest Little-Brother but without its sponge zone. Results show that temporal correlation of large-scale events increases when the domain size is reduced from 144x144 to 48x48. For the same domain

  8. Extra domains in secondary transport carriers and channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Barabote, Ravi D; Tamang, Dorjee G; Abeywardena, Shannon N; Fallah, Neda S; Fu, Jeffrey Yu Chung; Lio, Jeffrey K; Mirhosseini, Pegah; Pezeshk, Ronnie; Podell, Sheila; Salampessy, Marnae L; Thever, Mark D; Saier, Milton H

    2006-10-01

    "Extra" domains in members of the families of secondary transport carrier and channel proteins provide secondary functions that expand, amplify or restrict the functional nature of these proteins. Domains in secondary carriers include TrkA and SPX domains in DASS family members, DedA domains in TRAP-T family members (both of the IT superfamily), Kazal-2 and PDZ domains in OAT family members (of the MF superfamily), USP, IIA(Fru) and TrkA domains in ABT family members (of the APC superfamily), ricin domains in OST family members, and TrkA domains in AAE family members. Some transporters contain highly hydrophilic domains consisting of multiple repeat units that can also be found in proteins of dissimilar function. Similarly, transmembrane alpha-helical channel-forming proteins contain unique, conserved, hydrophilic domains, most of which are not found in carriers. In some cases the functions of these domains are known. They may be ligand binding domains, phosphorylation domains, signal transduction domains, protein/protein interaction domains or complex carbohydrate-binding domains. These domains mediate regulation, subunit interactions, or subcellular targeting. Phylogenetic analyses show that while some of these domains are restricted to closely related proteins derived from specific organismal types, others are nearly ubiquitous within a particular family of transporters and occur in a tremendous diversity of organisms. The former probably became associated with the transporters late in the evolutionary process; the latter probably became associated with the carriers much earlier. These domains can be located at either end of the transporter or in a central region, depending on the domain and transporter family. These studies provide useful information about the evolution of extra domains in channels and secondary carriers and provide novel clues concerning function.

  9. The Loyal Opposition Comments on Plan Domain Description Languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Golden, Keith; Jonsson, Ari

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we take a critical look at PDDL 2.1 as designers and users of plan domain description languages. We describe planning domains that have features which are hard to model using PDDL 2.1. We then offer some suggestions on domain description language design, and describe how these suggestions make modeling our chosen domains easier.

  10. Flares In Time-Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam; Hawley, Suzanne; Davenport, James; Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Heinzel, Petr; Notsu, Yuta; Loyd, Parke; Martinez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Pugh, Chloe; Schmidt, Sarah Jane; Karmakar, Subhajeet; Pye, John; Flaccomio, Ettore

    2016-07-01

    Proceedings for the splinter session "Flares in Time-Domain Surveys" convened at Cool Stars 19 on June 07, 2016 in Uppsala, Sweden. Contains a two page summary of the splinter session, links to YouTube talks, and a PDF copy of the slides from the presenters.

  11. Developing Domain Ontologies for Course Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Sinead; Pahl, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Ontologies have the potential to play an important role in instructional design and the development of course content. They can be used to represent knowledge about content, supporting instructors in creating content or learners in accessing content in a knowledge-guided way. While ontologies exist for many subject domains, their quality and…

  12. Factor Score Reliabilities and Domain Validities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorsuch, Richard L.

    1980-01-01

    Kaiser and Michael reported a formula for factor scores giving an internal consistency reliability and its square root, the domain validity. Using this formula is inappropriate if variables are included which have trival weights rather than salient weights for the factor for which the score is being computed. (Author/RL)

  13. Public Domain Microcomputer Software for Forestry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Les

    A project was conducted to develop a computer forestry/forest products bibliography applicable to high school and community college vocational/technical programs. The project director contacted curriculum clearinghouses, computer companies, and high school and community college instructors in order to obtain listings of public domain programs for…

  14. An English language interface for constrained domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Brenda J.

    1989-01-01

    The Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) Jargon Interpreter (MJI) demonstrates an English language interface for a constrained domain. A constrained domain is defined as one with a small and well delineated set of actions and objects. The set of actions chosen for the MJI is from the domain of MSOCC Applications Executive (MAE) Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL) directives and contains directives for signing a cathode ray tube (CRT) on or off, calling up or clearing a display page, starting or stopping a procedure, and controlling history recording. The set of objects chosen consists of CRTs, display pages, STOL procedures, and history files. Translation from English sentences to STOL directives is done in two phases. In the first phase, an augmented transition net (ATN) parser and dictionary are used for determining grammatically correct parsings of input sentences. In the second phase, grammatically typed sentences are submitted to a forward-chaining rule-based system for interpretation and translation into equivalent MAE STOL directives. Tests of the MJI show that it is able to translate individual clearly stated sentences into the subset of directives selected for the prototype. This approach to an English language interface may be used for similarly constrained situations by modifying the MJI's dictionary and rules to reflect the change of domain.

  15. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  17. Solving the Cross-Domain Conundrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    synchronous or asynchronous, depending on mission requirements and data pedigree . The cross-domain enterprise will also provide information discovery...context of Eisenhower’s Executive Order 10290. Today’s networks inherit their genetic disposition to the 1958 ARPA scheme of physical data segregation

  18. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  19. Memetic Algorithms, Domain Knowledge, and Financial Investing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Jie

    2012-01-01

    While the question of how to use human knowledge to guide evolutionary search is long-recognized, much remains to be done to answer this question adequately. This dissertation aims to further answer this question by exploring the role of domain knowledge in evolutionary computation as applied to real-world, complex problems, such as financial…

  20. Domain growth kinetics in stratifying foam films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-11-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are ~ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification, which results in a thickness-dependent variation in reflected light intensity, visualized as progressively darker shades of gray. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. We show that the domain expansion dynamics exhibit two distinct growth regimes with characteristic scaling laws. Though several studies have focused on the expansion dynamics of isolated domains that exhibit a diffusion-like scaling, the change in expansion kinetics observed after domains contact with the Plateau border has not been reported and analyzed before.

  1. Time-Domain Simulation of RF Couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David; Carlsson, Johan; Austin, Travis

    2009-11-26

    We have developed a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) fluid-like approach to integrated plasma-and-coupler simulation [1], and show how it can be used to model LH and ICRF couplers in the MST and larger tokamaks.[2] This approach permits very accurate 3-D representation of coupler geometry, and easily includes non-axi-symmetry in vessel wall, magnetic equilibrium, and plasma density. The plasma is integrated with the FDTD Maxwell solver in an implicit solve that steps over electron time-scales, and permits tenuous plasma in the coupler itself, without any need to distinguish or interface between different regions of vacuum and/or plasma. The FDTD algorithm is also generalized to incorporate a time-domain sheath potential [3] on metal structures within the simulation, to look for situations where the sheath potential might generate local sputtering opportunities. Benchmarking of the time-domain sheath algorithm has been reported in the references. Finally, the time-domain software [4] permits the use of particles, either as field diagnostic (test particles) or to self-consistently compute plasma current from the applied RF power.

  2. Image domain propeller fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Skare, Stefan; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Lilja, Anders; Bammer, Roland

    2013-04-01

    A new pulse sequence for high-resolution T2-weighted (T2-w) imaging is proposed - image domain propeller fast spin echo (iProp-FSE). Similar to the T2-w PROPELLER sequence, iProp-FSE acquires data in a segmented fashion, as blades that are acquired in multiple TRs. However, the iProp-FSE blades are formed in the image domain instead of in the k-space domain. Each iProp-FSE blade resembles a single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequence with a very narrow phase-encoding field of view (FOV), after which N rotated blade replicas yield the final full circular FOV. Our method of combining the image domain blade data to a full FOV image is detailed, and optimal choices of phase-encoding FOVs and receiver bandwidths were evaluated on phantom and volunteers. The results suggest that a phase FOV of 15-20%, a receiver bandwidth of ±32-63 kHz and a subsequent readout time of about 300 ms provide a good tradeoff between signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency and T2 blurring. Comparisons between iProp-FSE, Cartesian FSE and PROPELLER were made on single-slice axial brain data, showing similar T2-w tissue contrast and SNR with great anatomical conspicuity at similar scan times - without colored noise or streaks from motion. A new slice interleaving order is also proposed to improve the multislice capabilities of iProp-FSE.

  3. Simplified technique demonstrates magnetic domain switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Light from a conventional photographic light source is polarized and projected through thin samples of gadolinium iron garnet and then observed with a conventional polarizing microscope. A distinctive change in color from red to yellow is observed as the magnetic domains are switched.

  4. Development of sulfonamide AKT PH domain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ahad, Ali Md; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Moses, Sylvestor A; Zhou, Li Li; Zhang, Shuxing; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Mash, Eugene A

    2011-03-15

    Disruption of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway can lead to apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously we identified a lead sulfonamide that selectively bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT and induced apoptosis when present at low micromolar concentrations. To examine the effects of structural modification, a set of sulfonamides related to the lead compound was designed, synthesized, and tested for binding to the expressed PH domain of AKT using a surface plasmon resonance-based competitive binding assay. Cellular activity was determined by means of an assay for pAKT production and a cell killing assay using BxPC-3 cells. The most active compounds in the set are lipophilic and possess an aliphatic chain of the proper length. Results were interpreted with the aid of computational modeling. This paper represents the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a large family of AKT PH domain inhibitors. Information obtained will be used in the design of the next generation of inhibitors of AKT PH domain function.

  5. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation. The main algorithms we consider are: • Domain decomposition of constructive solid geometry: enables extremely large calculations in which the background geometry is too large to fit in the memory of a single computational node. • Load Balancing: keeps the workload per processor as even as possible so the calculation runs efficiently. • Global Particle Find: if particles are on the wrong processor, globally resolve their locations to the correct processor based on particle coordinate and background domain. • Visualizing constructive solid geometry, sourcing particles, deciding that particle streaming communication is completed and spatial redecomposition. These algorithms are some of the most important parallel algorithms required for domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport. We demonstrate that our previous algorithms were not scalable, prove that our new algorithms are scalable, and run some of the algorithms up to 2 million MPI processes on the Sequoia supercomputer.

  6. C3 Domain Analysis, Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    organize the domain. This approach is heavily based on the principles of library science and is geared toward a reuse effort with a large library-like...method adapts many principles from library science to the organization and implementation of a reuse library. C-1 DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY

  7. Public Domain Generic Tools: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erjavec, Tomaz

    This paper presents an introduction to language engineering software, especially for computerized language and text corpora. The focus of the paper is on small and relatively independent pieces of software designed for specific, often low-level language analysis tasks, and on tools in the public domain. Discussion begins with the application of…

  8. Notes from Beyond the Cognitive Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Alice, G., Comp.; Graves, Dick, Comp.

    This collection of materials, a summary of a workshop, is in four parts. The first part lists participants in the workshop and their addresses. The second part presents a recorder's summary of statements made by six participants in a panel presentation on "What Is the Domain Beyond?" The third section gives brief accounts of three…

  9. The Fourth Domain of Educational Objectives: Induction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holleman, Wes

    1985-01-01

    Tests the claim to comprehensiveness of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives by analyzing educational objectives of some freshmen orientation programs and those connected with human developmental tasks. It is concluded that the taxonomy should be enlarged with a fourth domain: actual induction into tasks for which students are being…

  10. Layer tracking, asymptotics, and domain decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. L.; Chin, R. C. Y.; Hedstrom, G. W.; Manteuffel, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report is presented on the work on the tracking of internal layers in a singularly-perturbed convection-diffusion equation. It is shown why such tracking may be desirable, and it is also shown how to do it using domain decomposition based on asymptotic analysis.

  11. The Different Roles of Aggrecan Interaction Domains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aggregating proteoglycans of the lectican family are important components of extracellular matrices. Aggrecan is the most well studied of these and is central to cartilage biomechanical properties and skeletal development. Key to its biological function is the fixed charge of the many glycosaminoglycan chains, that provide the basis for the viscoelastic properties necessary for load distribution over the articular surface. This review is focused on the globular domains of aggrecan and their role in anchoring the proteoglycans to other extracellular matrix components. The N-terminal G1 domain is vital in that it binds the proteoglycan to hyaluronan in ternary complex with link protein, retaining the proteoglycan in the tissue. The importance of the C-terminal G3 domain interactions has recently been emphasized by two different human hereditary disorders: autosomal recessive aggrecan-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and autosomal dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans. In these two conditions, different missense mutations in the aggrecan C-type lectin repeat have been described. The resulting amino acid replacements affect the ligand interactions of the G3 domain, albeit with widely different phenotypic outcomes. PMID:23019016

  12. Learning and Reasoning in Unknown Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strannegård, Claes; Nizamani, Abdul Rahim; Juel, Jonas; Persson, Ulf

    2016-12-01

    In the story Alice in Wonderland, Alice fell down a rabbit hole and suddenly found herself in a strange world called Wonderland. Alice gradually developed knowledge about Wonderland by observing, learning, and reasoning. In this paper we present the system Alice In Wonderland that operates analogously. As a theoretical basis of the system, we define several basic concepts of logic in a generalized setting, including the notions of domain, proof, consistency, soundness, completeness, decidability, and compositionality. We also prove some basic theorems about those generalized notions. Then we model Wonderland as an arbitrary symbolic domain and Alice as a cognitive architecture that learns autonomously by observing random streams of facts from Wonderland. Alice is able to reason by means of computations that use bounded cognitive resources. Moreover, Alice develops her belief set by continuously forming, testing, and revising hypotheses. The system can learn a wide class of symbolic domains and challenge average human problem solvers in such domains as propositional logic and elementary arithmetic.

  13. X-Ray Topography of Hydride Domains.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    boundaries between hydride (deuteride) domains, and the irregular boundaries correspond to incoherent twin boundaries . Trace analysis of the coherent...topographs of the NbHo.78 and NbO 0 .75 crystals. As discussed by Schober and Linke (1976b), the straight boundaries correspond to coherent twin

  14. The Research Domain of Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Green, Larry A.

    2004-01-01

    This article characterizes the large research domain of family medicine. It is a domain that can be productively explored from different perspectives, including: (1) the ecology of medical care and its focus on the environments of health care and interactions among them; (2) the realm of causation and important opportunities to discover how people lose and regain their health; (3) knowing medicine in different ways, focusing on what things mean in the inner and outer realities of individuals and groups of individuals; (4) the nature of the work of family physicians, such as first-contact care for any type of problem, sticking with patients regardless of their diagnoses, incorporating context into decision making, development of relevant technologies, articulating useful theory, and measuring what happens in family medicine; (5) the standard research categories of basic, clinical, health services, health policy, and educational research; and (6) thinking of family medicine research as both a linear process of translation and a wheel of knowledge with iterative loops of discovery that come from within family medicine. The domain of family medicine research is important and ripe for fuller discovery, and it invites the thinking and imagination of the best investigators. It seems unlikely that medical research can ever be complete without a robust family medicine research enterprise. As the domain of family medicine research is explored, not a few, but billions of people will benefit. PMID:15655084

  15. Domain General Constraints on Statistical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiessen, Erik D.

    2011-01-01

    All theories of language development suggest that learning is constrained. However, theories differ on whether these constraints arise from language-specific processes or have domain-general origins such as the characteristics of human perception and information processing. The current experiments explored constraints on statistical learning of…

  16. Conceptualizing Indicator Domains for Evaluating Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen; Rowe, Wendy; Ferkins, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to share thinking about meta-level evaluation of action research (AR), and to introduce indicator domains for assessing and measuring inputs, outputs and outcomes. Meta-level and multi-site evaluation has been rare in AR beyond project implementation and participant satisfaction. The paper is the first of several…

  17. The dynamics of domain walls and strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Haws, David; Garfinkle, David

    1989-01-01

    The leading order finite-width corrections to the equation of motion describing the motion of a domain wall are derived. The regime in which this equation of motion is invalid is discussed. Spherically and cylindrically symmetric solutions to this equation of motion are found. A misconception that has arisen in recent years regarding the rigidity (or otherwise) of cosmic strings is also clarified.

  18. Creating Domain-Referenced Tests by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millman, Jason

    A unique system is described for creating tests by computer. It is unique because, instead of storing items in the computer, item algorithms similar to Hively's notion of item forms are banked. Every item, and thus every test, represents a sample from domains consisting of thousands of items. The paper contains a discussion of the special…

  19. Microdissection of Shoot Meristem Functional Domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintains a pool of indeterminate cells within the SAM proper, while lateral organs are initiated from the SAM periphery. Laser microdissection–microarray technology was used to compare transcriptional profiles within these SAM domains to identify novel maize genes th...

  20. Adaptive random testing with combinatorial input domain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rubing; Chen, Jinfu; Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics.

  1. Intramolecular co-action of two independent photosensory modules in the fern phytochrome 3.

    PubMed

    Kanegae, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Fern phytochrome3/neochrome1 (phy3/neo1) is a chimeric photoreceptor composed of a phytochrome-chromophore binding domain and an almost full-length phototropin. phy3 thus contains two different light-sensing modules; a red/far-red light receptor phytochrome and a blue light receptor phototropin. phy3 induces both red light- and blue light-dependent phototropism in phototropin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana (phot1 phot2) seedlings. The red-light response is dependent on the phytochrome module of phy3, and the blue-light response is dependent on the phototropin module. We recently showed that both the phototropin-sensing module and the phytochrome-sensing module mediate the blue light-dependent phototropic response. Particularly under low-light conditions, these two light-sensing modules cooperate to induce the blue light-dependent phototropic response. This intramolecular co-action of two independent light-sensing modules in phy3 enhances light sensitivity, and perhaps allowed ferns to adapt to the low-light canopy conditions present in angiosperm forests.

  2. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors' knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  3. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors’ knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  4. Structure of a double-domain phosphagen kinase reveals an asymmetric arrangement of the tandem domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiming; Qiao, Zhu; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2015-04-01

    Tandem duplications and fusions of single genes have led to magnificent expansions in the divergence of protein structures and functions over evolutionary timescales. One of the possible results is polydomain enzymes with interdomain cooperativities, few examples of which have been structurally characterized at the full-length level to explore their innate synergistic mechanisms. This work reports the crystal structures of a double-domain phosphagen kinase in both apo and ligand-bound states, revealing a novel asymmetric L-shaped arrangement of the two domains. Unexpectedly, the interdomain connections are not based on a flexible hinge linker but on a rigid secondary-structure element: a long α-helix that tethers the tandem domains in relatively fixed positions. Besides the connective helix, the two domains also contact each other directly and form an interdomain interface in which hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions further stabilize the L-shaped domain arrangement. Molecular-dynamics simulations show that the interface is generally stable, suggesting that the asymmetric domain arrangement crystallographically observed in the present study is not a conformational state simply restrained by crystal-packing forces. It is possible that the asymmetrically arranged tandem domains could provide a structural basis for further studies of the interdomain synergy.

  5. Simplicity and Specificity in Language: Domain-General Biases Have Domain-Specific Effects

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Kirby, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which the linguistic system—its architecture, the representations it operates on, the constraints it is subject to—is specific to language has broad implications for cognitive science and its relation to evolutionary biology. Importantly, a given property of the linguistic system can be “specific” to the domain of language in several ways. For example, if the property evolved by natural selection under the pressure of the linguistic function it serves then the property is domain-specific in the sense that its design is tailored for language. Equally though, if that property evolved to serve a different function or if that property is domain-general, it may nevertheless interact with the linguistic system in a way that is unique. This gives a second sense in which a property can be thought of as specific to language. An evolutionary approach to the language faculty might at first blush appear to favor domain-specificity in the first sense, with individual properties of the language faculty being specifically linguistic adaptations. However, we argue that interactions between learning, culture, and biological evolution mean any domain-specific adaptations that evolve will take the form of weak biases rather than hard constraints. Turning to the latter sense of domain-specificity, we highlight a very general bias, simplicity, which operates widely in cognition and yet interacts with linguistic representations in domain-specific ways. PMID:26793132

  6. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis.

  7. Revised domain structure of ulvan lyase and characterization of the first ulvan binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Melcher, Rebecca L. J.; Neumann, Marten; Fuenzalida Werner, Juan Pablo; Gröhn, Franziska; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.

    2017-01-01

    Biomass waste products from green algae have recently been given new life, as these polysaccharides have potential applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. One such polysaccharide group called ulvans displays many different, potentially useful properties that arise from their structural versatility. Hence, performing structural analyses on ulvan is crucial for future applications. However, chemical reaction–based analysis methods cannot fully characterize ulvan and tend to alter its structure. Thus, better methods require well-characterized ulvan-degrading enzymes. Therefore, we analysed a previously sequenced ulvan lyase (GenebankTM reference number JN104480) and characterized its domains. We suggest that the enzyme consists of a shorter than previously described catalytic domain, a newly identified substrate binding domain, and a C-terminal type 9 secretion system signal peptide. By separately expressing the two domains in E. coli, we confirmed that the binding domain is ulvan specific, having higher affinity for ulvan than most lectins for their ligands (affinity constant: 105 M−1). To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ulvan-binding domain. Overall, identifying this new binding domain is one step towards engineering ulvan enzymes that can be used to characterize ulvan, e.g. through enzymatic/mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses, and help unlock its full potential. PMID:28327560

  8. Crystal structure of domain-swapped STE20 OSR1 kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Cobb, Melanie H.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.

    2009-09-15

    OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive-1) and SPAK (Ste20/Sps1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) belong to the GCK-VI subfamily of Ste20 group kinases. OSR1 and SPAK are key regulators of NKCCs (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporters) and activated by WNK family members (with-no-lysine kinase), mutations of which are known to cause Gordon syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of inherited hypertension. The crystal structure of OSR1 kinase domain has been solved at 2.25 {angstrom}. OSR1 forms a domain-swapped dimer in an inactive conformation, in which P+1 loop and {alpha}EF helix are swapped between dimer-related monomers. Structural alignment with nonswapped Ste20 TAO2 kinase indicates that the integrity of chemical interactions in the kinase domain is well preserved in the domain-swapped interfaces. The OSR1 kinase domain has now been added to a growing list of domain-swapped protein kinases recently reported, suggesting that the domain-swapping event provides an additional layer of complexity in regulating protein kinase activity.

  9. Bacterial Pleckstrin Homology Domains: A Prokaryotic Origin for the PH Domain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Bateman, Alex; Finn, Robert D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains have been identified only in eukaryotic proteins to date. We have determined crystal structures for three members of an uncharacterized protein family (Pfam PF08000), which provide compelling evidence for the existence of PH-like domains in bacteria (PHb). The first two structures contain a single PHb domain that forms a dome-shaped, oligomeric ring with C5 symmetry. The third structure has an additional helical hairpin attached at the C-terminus and forms a similar but much larger ring with C12 symmetry. Thus, both molecular assemblies exhibit rare, higher-order, cyclic symmetry but preserve a similar arrangement of their PHb domains, which gives rise to a conserved hydrophilic surface at the intersection of the β-strands of adjacent protomers that likely mediates protein–protein interactions. As a result of these structures, additional families of PHb domains were identified, suggesting that PH domains are much more widespread than originally anticipated. Thus, rather than being a eukaryotic innovation, the PH domain superfamily appears to have existed before prokaryotes and eukaryotes diverged. PMID:19913036

  10. Individual globular domains and domain unfolding visualized in overstretched titin molecules with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mártonfalvi, Zsolt; Kellermayer, Miklós

    2014-01-01

    Titin is a giant elastomeric protein responsible for the generation of passive muscle force. Mechanical force unfolds titin's globular domains, but the exact structure of the overstretched titin molecule is not known. Here we analyzed, by using high-resolution atomic force microscopy, the structure of titin molecules overstretched with receding meniscus. The axial contour of the molecules was interrupted by topographical gaps with a mean width of 27.7 nm that corresponds well to the length of an unfolded globular (immunoglobulin and fibronectin) domain. The wide gap-width distribution suggests, however, that additional mechanisms such as partial domain unfolding and the unfolding of neighboring domain multimers may also be present. In the folded regions we resolved globules with an average spacing of 5.9 nm, which is consistent with a titin chain composed globular domains with extended interdomain linker regions. Topographical analysis allowed us to allocate the most distal unfolded titin region to the kinase domain, suggesting that this domain systematically unfolds when the molecule is exposed to overstretching forces. The observations support the prediction that upon the action of stretching forces the N-terminal ß-sheet of the titin kinase unfolds, thus exposing the enzyme's ATP-binding site and hence contributing to the molecule's mechanosensory function.

  11. Domain adaptation of statistical machine translation with domain-focused web crawling.

    PubMed

    Pecina, Pavel; Toral, Antonio; Papavassiliou, Vassilis; Prokopidis, Prokopis; Tamchyna, Aleš; Way, Andy; van Genabith, Josef

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of domain adaptation of statistical machine translation (SMT) by exploiting domain-specific data acquired by domain-focused crawling of text from the World Wide Web. We design and empirically evaluate a procedure for automatic acquisition of monolingual and parallel text and their exploitation for system training, tuning, and testing in a phrase-based SMT framework. We present a strategy for using such resources depending on their availability and quantity supported by results of a large-scale evaluation carried out for the domains of environment and labour legislation, two language pairs (English-French and English-Greek) and in both directions: into and from English. In general, machine translation systems trained and tuned on a general domain perform poorly on specific domains and we show that such systems can be adapted successfully by retuning model parameters using small amounts of parallel in-domain data, and may be further improved by using additional monolingual and parallel training data for adaptation of language and translation models. The average observed improvement in BLEU achieved is substantial at 15.30 points absolute.

  12. Comparison of frequency-domain and time-domain rotorcraft vibration control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Active control of rotor-induced vibration in rotorcraft has received significant attention recently. Two classes of techniques have been proposed. The more developed approach works with harmonic analysis of measured time histories and is called the frequency-domain approach. The more recent approach computes the control input directly using the measured time history data and is called the time-domain approach. The report summarizes the results of a theoretical investigation to compare the two approaches. Five specific areas were addressed: (1) techniques to derive models needed for control design (system identification methods), (2) robustness with respect to errors, (3) transient response, (4) susceptibility to noise, and (5) implementation difficulties. The system identification methods are more difficult for the time-domain models. The time-domain approach is more robust (e.g., has higher gain and phase margins) than the frequency-domain approach. It might thus be possible to avoid doing real-time system identification in the time-domain approach by storing models at a number of flight conditions. The most significant error source is the variation in open-loop vibrations caused by pilot inputs, maneuvers or gusts. The implementation requirements are similar except that the time-domain approach can be much simpler to implement if real-time system identification were not necessary.

  13. Framing Effects: Dynamics and Task Domains

    PubMed

    Wang

    1996-11-01

    The author examines the mechanisms and dynamics of framing effects in risky choices across three distinct task domains (i.e., life-death, public property, and personal money). The choice outcomes of the problems presented in each of the three task domains had a binary structure of a sure thing vs a gamble of equal expected value; the outcomes differed in their framing conditions and the expected values, raging from 6000, 600, 60, to 6, numerically. It was hypothesized that subjects would become more risk seeking, if the sure outcome was below their aspiration level (the minimum requirement). As predicted, more subjects preferred the gamble when facing the life-death choice problems than facing the counterpart problems presented in the other two task domains. Subjects' risk preference varied categorically along the group size dimension in the life-death domain but changed more linearly over the expected value dimension in the monetary domain. Framing effects were observed in 7 of 13 pairs of problems, showing a positive frame-risk aversion and negative frame-risk seeking relationship. In addition, two types of framing effects were theoretically defined and empirically identified. A bidirectional framing effect involves a reversal in risk preference, and occurs when a decision maker's risk preference is ambiguous or weak. Four bidirectional effects were observed; in each case a majority of subjects preferred the sure outcome under a positive frame but the gamble under a negative frame. In contrast, a unidirectional framing effect refers to a preference shift due to the framing of choice outcomes: A majority of subjects preferred one choice outcome (either the sure thing or the gamble) under both framing conditions, with positive frame augmented the preference for the sure thing and negative frame augmented the preference for the gamble. These findings revealed some dynamic regularities of framing effects and posed implications for developing predictive and testable

  14. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  15. ECOD: an evolutionary classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hua; Schaeffer, R Dustin; Liao, Yuxing; Kinch, Lisa N; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of a protein, including both close and distant relationships, often reveals insight into its structure and function. Fast and easy access to such up-to-date information facilitates research. We have developed a hierarchical evolutionary classification of all proteins with experimentally determined spatial structures, and presented it as an interactive and updatable online database. ECOD (Evolutionary Classification of protein Domains) is distinct from other structural classifications in that it groups domains primarily by evolutionary relationships (homology), rather than topology (or "fold"). This distinction highlights cases of homology between domains of differing topology to aid in understanding of protein structure evolution. ECOD uniquely emphasizes distantly related homologs that are difficult to detect, and thus catalogs the largest number of evolutionary links among structural domain classifications. Placing distant homologs together underscores the ancestral similarities of these proteins and draws attention to the most important regions of sequence and structure, as well as conserved functional sites. ECOD also recognizes closer sequence-based relationships between protein domains. Currently, approximately 100,000 protein structures are classified in ECOD into 9,000 sequence families clustered into close to 2,000 evolutionary groups. The classification is assisted by an automated pipeline that quickly and consistently classifies weekly releases of PDB structures and allows for continual updates. This synchronization with PDB uniquely distinguishes ECOD among all protein classifications. Finally, we present several case studies of homologous proteins not recorded in other classifications, illustrating the potential of how ECOD can be used to further biological and evolutionary studies.

  16. Saccharomyces SRP RNA secondary structures: a conserved S-domain and extended Alu-domain.

    PubMed

    Van Nues, Rob W; Brown, Jeremy D

    2004-01-01

    The contribution made by the RNA component of signal recognition particle (SRP) to its function in protein targeting is poorly understood. We have generated a complete secondary structure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRP RNA, scR1. The structure conforms to that of other eukaryotic SRP RNAs. It is rod-shaped with, at opposite ends, binding sites for proteins required for the SRP functions of signal sequence recognition (S-domain) and translational elongation arrest (Alu-domain). Micrococcal nuclease digestion of purified S. cerevisiae SRP separated the S-domain of the RNA from the Alu-domain as a discrete fragment. The Alu-domain resolved into several stable fragments indicating a compact structure. Comparison of scR1 with SRP RNAs of five yeast species related to S. cerevisiae revealed the S-domain to be the most conserved region of the RNA. Extending data from nuclease digestion with phylogenetic comparison, we built the secondary structure model for scR1. The Alu-domain contains large extensions, including a sequence with hallmarks of an expansion segment. Evolutionarily conserved bases are placed in the Alu- and S-domains as in other SRP RNAs, the exception being an unusual GU(4)A loop closing the helix onto which the signal sequence binding Srp54p assembles (domain IV). Surprisingly, several mutations within the predicted Srp54p binding site failed to disrupt SRP function in vivo. However, the strength of the Srp54p-scR1 and, to a lesser extent, Sec65p-scR1 interaction was decreased in these mutant particles. The availability of a secondary structure for scR1 will facilitate interpretation of data from genetic analysis of the RNA.

  17. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica rapa MATH-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liming; Huang, Yong; Hu, Yan; He, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenhui; Liu, Chunlin; Ruan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) domain is a fold of seven anti-parallel β-helices involved in protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 90 MATH-domain proteins from the Brassica rapa genome. By sequence analysis together with MATH-domain proteins from other species, the B. rapa MATH-domain proteins can be grouped into 6 classes. Class-I protein has one or several MATH domains without any other recognizable domain; Class-II protein contains a MATH domain together with a conserved BTB (Broad Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric-a-Brac ) domain; Class-III protein belongs to the MATH/Filament domain family; Class-IV protein contains a MATH domain frequently combined with some other domains; Class-V protein has a relative long sequence but contains only one MATH domain; Class-VI protein is characterized by the presence of Peptidase and UBQ (Ubiquitinylation) domains together with one MATH domain. As part of our study regarding seed development of B. rapa, six genes are screened by SSH (Suppression Subtractive Hybridization) and their expression levels are analyzed in combination with seed developmental stages, and expression patterns suggested that Bra001786, Bra03578 and Bra036572 may be seed development specific genes, while Bra001787, Bra020541 and Bra040904 may be involved in seed and flower organ development. This study provides the first characterization of the MATH domain proteins in B. rapa PMID:24179444

  19. Creating and Manipulating a Domain-Specific Formal Object Base to Support a Domain-Oriented Application Composition System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    and add new attributes as needed (11:129). 2.2.3.2 Feature Oriented Domain Analysis In their Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis ( FODA ) study, the...problems within the domain 3. Architecture Modeling - Create software architecture(s) to implement a solution in the problem domain. The FODA study also...dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin Texas, 1990. 12. Kang, Kyo C. and others. Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis ( FODA ) Feasibil- ity Study

  20. Energetics of Calmodulin Domain Interactions with the Calmodulin Binding Domain of CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. Idil Apak; Shea, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic calcium receptor that regulates many kinases, including CaMKII. Calcium-depleted CaM does not bind to CaMKII under physiological conditions. However, binding of (Ca2+)4-CaM to a basic amphipathic helix in CaMKII releases auto-inhibition of the kinase. The crystal structure of CaM bound to CaMKIIp, a peptide representing the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of CaMKII, shows an anti-parallel interface: the C-domain of CaM primarily contacts the N-terminal half of the CaMBD. The two domains of calcium-saturated CaM are believed to play distinct roles in releasing auto-inhibition. To investigate the underlying mechanism of activation, calcium-dependent titrations of isolated domains of CaM binding to CaMKIIp were monitored using fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CaMKIIp for the domains of CaM increased upon saturation with calcium, with a 35-fold greater increase observed for the C-domain than the N-domain. Because the interdomain linker of CaM regulates calcium-binding affinity and contribute to conformational change, the role of each CaM domain was explored further by investigating effects of CaMKIIp on site-knockout mutants affecting the calcium-binding sites of a single domain. Investigation of the thermodynamic linkage between saturation of individual calcium-binding sites and CaM-domain binding to CaMKIIp showed that calcium binding to sites III and IV was sufficient to recapitulate the behavior of (Ca2+)4-CaM. The magnitude of favorable interdomain cooperativity varied depending on which of the four calcium-binding sites were mutated, emphasizing differential regulatory roles for the domains of CaM, despite the high degree of homology among the four EF-hands of CaM. PMID:19089983

  1. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Schymkowitz, Joost WH; Rousseau, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Background Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures. PMID:18842137

  2. Persistent Mappings in Cross-Domain Analogical Learning of Physics Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    retrieval? 6.1 Materials The problems were selected from a variety of physics resources, (Shearer et al. 1971; Giancoli 1991; Ogata 1997; Fogiel...of electricity. In Mental Models, by D. Gentner and A.L. Stevens. Eltham, London: Greenwich University Press. Giancoli , D. (1991). Physics ...PERSISTENT MAPPINGS IN CROSS-DOMAIN ANALOGICAL LEARNING OF PHYSICS DOMAINS Matthew Klenk (matthew.klenk.ctr@nrl.navy.mil) Navy Center for

  3. Domain Engineering Validation Case Study: Synthesis for the Air Traffic Display/Collision Warning Monitor Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    AD-A259 407 DTIC itELECTE JANI2 6 1993 C DOMAIN ENGINEERING VALIDATION CASE STUDY: SYNTHESIS FOR THE AIR TRAFFIC DISPLAY/COLLISION WARNING MONITOR...Kramer, DARPA/ SISTO, Arl., VA 22203 1-26-93 JK DOMAIN ENGINEERING VALIDATION CASE STUDY: SYNTHESIS FOR THE AIR TRAFFIC DISPLAY/COLLISION WARNING MONITOR...COLLISION WARNING MONITOR CASE STUDY WITH AUTOMATION ............... C-1 C .1 Introduction .............................................................. C -1

  4. Critical role of domain crystallinity, domain purity and domain interface sharpness for reduced bimolecular recombination in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Chen, Jihua; Ngo, Evan C.; Dubey, Ashish; Khatiwada, Devendra; Zhang, Cheng; Qiao, Qiquan

    2014-12-31

    In this study, inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) blended with two different fullerene derivatives namely phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM) and indene-C60 bis-adduct (IC60BA). The effects of annealing temperatures on the morphology, optical and structural properties were studied and correlated to differences in photovoltaic device performance. It was observed that annealing temperature significantly improved the performance of P3HT:IC60BA solar cells while P3HT:PC60BM cells showed relatively less improvement. The performance improvement is attributed to the extent of fullerene mixing with polymer domains. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that ICBA mixes with disordered P3HT much more readily than PC60BM which leads to lower short circuit current density and fill factor for P3HT:IC60BA cells annealed below 120°C. Annealing above 120°C improves the crystallinity of P3HT in case of P3HT:IC60BA whereas in P3HT:PC60BM films, annealing above 80°C leads to negligible change in crystallinity. Crystallization of P3HT also leads to higher domain purity as seen EFTEM. Further it is seen that cells processed with additive nitrobenzene (NB) showed enhanced short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency regardless of the fullerene derivative used. Addition of NB led to nanoscale phase separation between purer polymer and fullerene domains. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) images showed that enhanced domain purity in additive casted films led to a sharper interface between polymer and fullerene. Lastly, enhanced domain purity and interfacial sharpness led to lower bimolecular recombination and higher mobility and charge carrier lifetime in NB modified devices.

  5. Purification and Structural Analysis of LEM-Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Bourgeois, Benjamin; Samson, Camille; Buendia, Brigitte; Worman, Howard J; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM)-domain proteins are modular proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved motif of about 50 residues. Most LEM-domain proteins localize at the inner nuclear membrane, but some are also found in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear interior. Their architecture has been analyzed by predicting the limits of their globular domains, determining the 3D structure of these domains and in a few cases calculating the 3D structure of specific domains bound to biological targets. The LEM domain adopts an α-helical fold also found in SAP and HeH domains of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. The LEM domain binds to BAF (barrier-to-autointegration factor; BANF1), which interacts with DNA and tethers chromatin to the nuclear envelope. LAP2 isoforms also share an N-terminal LEM-like domain, which binds DNA. The structure and function of other globular domains that distinguish LEM-domain proteins from each other have been characterized, including the C-terminal dimerization domain of LAP2α and C-terminal WH and UHM domains of MAN1. LEM-domain proteins also have large intrinsically disordered regions that are involved in intra- and intermolecular interactions and are highly regulated by posttranslational modifications in vivo.

  6. Classification and Lineage Tracing of SH2 Domains Throughout Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bernard A

    2017-01-01

    Today there exists a rapidly expanding number of sequenced genomes. Cataloging protein interaction domains such as the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain across these various genomes can be accomplished with ease due to existing algorithms and predictions models. An evolutionary analysis of SH2 domains provides a step towards understanding how SH2 proteins integrated with existing signaling networks to position phosphotyrosine signaling as a crucial driver of robust cellular communication networks in metazoans. However organizing and tracing SH2 domain across organisms and understanding their evolutionary trajectory remains a challenge. This chapter describes several methodologies towards analyzing the evolutionary trajectory of SH2 domains including a global SH2 domain classification system, which facilitates annotation of new SH2 sequences essential for tracing the lineage of SH2 domains throughout eukaryote evolution. This classification utilizes a combination of sequence homology, protein domain architecture and the boundary positions between introns and exons within the SH2 domain or genes encoding these domains. Discrete SH2 families can then be traced across various genomes to provide insight into its origins. Furthermore, additional methods for examining potential mechanisms for divergence of SH2 domains from structural changes to alterations in the protein domain content and genome duplication will be discussed. Therefore a better understanding of SH2 domain evolution may enhance our insight into the emergence of phosphotyrosine signaling and the expansion of protein interaction domains.

  7. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  8. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  9. 14-3-3 proteins, FHA domains and BRCT domains in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Duaa H; Yaffe, Michael B

    2009-09-02

    The DNA damage response depends on the concerted activity of protein serine/threonine kinases and modular phosphoserine/threonine-binding domains to relay the damage signal and recruit repair proteins. The PIKK family of protein kinases, which includes ATM/ATR/DNA-PK, preferentially phosphorylate Ser-Gln sites, while their basophilic downstream effecter kinases, Chk1/Chk2/MK2 preferentially phosphorylate hydrophobic-X-Arg-X-X-Ser/Thr-hydrophobic sites. A subset of tandem BRCT domains act as phosphopeptide binding modules that bind to ATM/ATR/DNA-PK substrates after DNA damage. Conversely, 14-3-3 proteins interact with substrates of Chk1/Chk2/MK2. FHA domains have been shown to interact with substrates of ATM/ATR/DNA-PK and CK2. In this review we consider how substrate phosphorylation together with BRCT domains, FHA domains and 14-3-3 proteins function to regulate ionizing radiation-induced nuclear foci and help to establish the G(2)/M checkpoint. We discuss the role of MDC1 a molecular scaffold that recruits early proteins to foci, such as NBS1 and RNF8, through distinct phosphodependent interactions. In addition, we consider the role of 14-3-3 proteins and the Chk2 FHA domain in initiating and maintaining cell cycle arrest.

  10. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  11. Domain view: a web tool for protein domain visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaokang; Bingman, Craig A; Wesenberg, Gary E; Sun, Zhaohui; Phillips, George N

    2010-12-01

    The identification of sequence-based protein domains and their boundaries is often a prelude to structure determination. An accurate prediction of disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences can improve the efficiency of selection in structural genomics and also aid in design of constructs for directed structural biology studies. At the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) we have developed DomainView, a web tool to visualize and analyze predicted protein domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences for selection of experimental protein structure attempts. DomainView consists of a relational database and a web graphical-user interface. The database was developed based on MySQL, which stores data from target protein sequences and their domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments. The program of the web user interface is a Perl CGI script. When a user searches for a target protein sequence, the script displays the combinational information about the domains and other features of that target sequence graphically on a web page by querying the database. The graphical representation for each feature is linked to a web page showing more detailed annotation information or to a new window directly running the corresponding prediction program to show further information about that feature.

  12. Myonuclear domains in muscle adaptation and disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle fibers are among the few cell types that are truly multinucleated. Recently, evidence has accumulated supporting a role for the modulation of myonuclear number during muscle remodeling in response to injury, adaptation, and disease. These studies have demonstrated that muscle hypertrophy is associated with, and is dependent on, the addition of newly formed myonuclei via the fusion of myogenic cells to the adult myofiber, whereas muscle atrophy and disease appear to be associated with the loss of myonuclei, possibly through apoptotic-like mechanisms. Moreover, these studies also have demonstrated that myonuclear domain size, i. e., the amount of cytoplasm per myonucleus, is unchanged following the acute phase of hypertrophy but is reduced following atrophy. Together these data demonstrate that modulation of myonuclear number or myonuclear domain size (or both) is a mechanism contributing to the remodeling of adult skeletal muscle in response to alterations in the level of normal neuromuscular activity. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Tunable resistivity of individual magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Hoeijmakers, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2012-01-20

    Despite the relevance of current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion for new spintronics applications, the exact details of the current-domain wall interaction are not yet understood. A property intimately related to this interaction is the intrinsic DW resistivity. Here, we investigate experimentally how the resistivity inside a DW depends on the wall width Δ, which is tuned using focused ion beam irradiation of Pt/Co/Pt strips. We observe the nucleation of individual DWs with Kerr microscopy, and measure resistance changes in real time. A 1/Δ(2) dependence of DW resistivity is found, compatible with Levy-Zhang theory. Also quantitative agreement with theory is found by taking full account of the current flowing through each individual layer inside the multilayer stack.

  14. Membrane Domain Formation on Nanostructured Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Charles; Liu, Fangjie; Srijanto, Bernadeta

    The spatial organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes seems to have a functional role in the life of a cell. Separation of the lipids into distinct domains of greater order and anchoring to the cytoskeleton are two main mechanisms for organizing the membrane in cells. We propose a novel model membrane consisting of a lipid bilayer suspended over a nanostructured scaffold consisting of arrays of fabricated nanopillars. Unlike traditional model membranes, our model will have well-defined lateral structure and distributed substrate attachments that will emulate the connections of cellular membranes to the underlying cytoskeleton. Membranes will be characterized using neutron reflectometry, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence to verify a suspended, planar geometry with restricted diffusion at suspension points, and free diffusion in between. This architecture will allow the controlled study of lipid domain reorganization, viral infection and signal transduction that depend on the lateral structure of the membrane.

  15. Magnetic domain-wall racetrack memory.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Stuart S P; Hayashi, Masamitsu; Thomas, Luc

    2008-04-11

    Recent developments in the controlled movement of domain walls in magnetic nanowires by short pulses of spin-polarized current give promise of a nonvolatile memory device with the high performance and reliability of conventional solid-state memory but at the low cost of conventional magnetic disk drive storage. The racetrack memory described in this review comprises an array of magnetic nanowires arranged horizontally or vertically on a silicon chip. Individual spintronic reading and writing nanodevices are used to modify or read a train of approximately 10 to 100 domain walls, which store a series of data bits in each nanowire. This racetrack memory is an example of the move toward innately three-dimensional microelectronic devices.

  16. The interaction of transverse domain walls.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Benjamin

    2012-01-18

    The interaction between transverse domain walls is calculated analytically using a multipole expansion up to third order. Starting from an analytical expression for the magnetization in the wall, the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole moments are derived and their impact on the interaction is investigated using the surface and volume charges. The surface charges are important for the dipole moment while the volume charges constitute the monopole and quadrupole moments. For domain walls that are situated in different wires it is found that there is a strong deviation from the interaction of two monopoles. This deviation is caused by the interaction of the monopole of the wall in the first wire with the dipole of the wall in the second wire and vice versa. The dipole-dipole and the quadrupole-monopole interactions are found to be also of considerable size and non-negligible. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows a good agreement.

  17. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  18. Entropy gives rise to topologically associating domains

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Paula A.; Hult, Caitlin; Adalsteinsson, David; Lawrimore, Josh; Forest, Mark G.; Bloom, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    We investigate chromosome organization within the nucleus using polymer models whose formulation is closely guided by experiments in live yeast cells. We employ bead-spring chromosome models together with loop formation within the chains and the presence of nuclear bodies to quantify the extent to which these mechanisms shape the topological landscape in the interphase nucleus. By investigating the genome as a dynamical system, we show that domains of high chromosomal interactions can arise solely from the polymeric nature of the chromosome arms due to entropic interactions and nuclear confinement. In this view, the role of bio-chemical related processes is to modulate and extend the duration of the interacting domains. PMID:27257057

  19. Domain Growth Kinetics in Stratifying Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are μ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. We experimentally elucidate the influence of these different driving forces, and confinement on drainage kinetics of horizontal stratifying foam films. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. Quantitative characterization of domain growth visualized in a using Scheludko-type thin film cell and a theoretical model based on lubrication analysis, provide critical insights into hydrodynamics of thin foam films, and the strength and nature of surface forces, including supramolecular oscillatory structural forces.

  20. Domain wall motion by localized temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Simone; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo; Lopez-Diaz, Luis

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by a localized Gaussian temperature profile is studied in a Permalloy nanostrip within the framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. The different contributions to thermally induced DW motion, entropic torque and magnonic spin transfer torque, are isolated and compared. The analysis of magnonic spin transfer torque includes a description of thermally excited magnons in the sample. A third driving force due to a thermally induced dipolar field is found and described. Finally, thermally induced DW motion is studied under realistic conditions by taking into account the edge roughness. The results give quantitative insights into the different mechanisms responsible for domain wall motion in temperature gradients and allow for comparison with experimental results.

  1. A study of two domain decomposition preconditioners.

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, Clark R.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale finite element analysis often requires the iterative solution of equations with many unknowns. Preconditioners based on domain decomposition concepts have proven effective at accelerating the convergence of iterative methods like conjugate gradients for such problems. A study of two new domain decomposition preconditioners is presented here. The first is based on a substructuring approach and can viewed as a primal counterpart of the dual-primal variant of the finite element tearing and interconnecting method called FETI-DP. The second uses an algebraic approach to construct a coarse problem for a classic overlapping Schwarz method. The numerical properties of both preconditioners are shown to scale well with problem size. Although developed primarily for structural mechanics applications, the preconditioners are also useful for other problems types. Detailed descriptions of the two preconditioners along with numerical results are included.

  2. Domain decomposition for implicit solvation models.

    PubMed

    Cancès, Eric; Maday, Yvon; Stamm, Benjamin

    2013-08-07

    This article is the first of a series of papers dealing with domain decomposition algorithms for implicit solvent models. We show that, in the framework of the COSMO model, with van der Waals molecular cavities and classical charge distributions, the electrostatic energy contribution to the solvation energy, usually computed by solving an integral equation on the whole surface of the molecular cavity, can be computed more efficiently by using an integral equation formulation of Schwarz's domain decomposition method for boundary value problems. In addition, the so-obtained potential energy surface is smooth, which is a critical property to perform geometry optimization and molecular dynamics simulations. The purpose of this first article is to detail the methodology, set up the theoretical foundations of the approach, and study the accuracies and convergence rates of the resulting algorithms. The full efficiency of the method and its applicability to large molecular systems of biological interest is demonstrated elsewhere.

  3. Domain Derivatives in Dielectric Rough Surface Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    written as the directional derivative: φ̇(~x) = d dτ (φ · Tτ )|τ=0 = d dτ φτ (τ, ~xτ )|τ=0. (9) φ̇, as defined in (8) (or (9)), is a Gateaux differential...Ωτ φτ (~xτ ) d ~xτ be a domain functional of φτ over the perturbed domain, Ωτ . It can be written as: F (φτ ; Ω) = ∫ Ω φτ (~x+ τ ~V (~x)) |JT... d ~x. (14) 7 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited |JT | is the Jacobian matrix of Tτ , and (JT )ij = δij+Vi,j, Vi,j = ∂Vi/∂xj . Direct

  4. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  5. Indexing Flower Patent Images using Domain Knowledge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    approach is illustrated by using it to provide a solution to the problem of indexing images of flowers for searching a flower patents database by color...The flower region is isolated from the background by using an automatic iterative segmentation algorithm with domain knowledge driven feedback. The...color of the flower is defined by the color names present in the flower region and their relative proportions. The database can be queried by example

  6. Independent Structural Domains in Paramyxovirus Polymerase Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Melanie; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Crowe, James E.; Moore, Martin L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    All enzymatic activities required for genomic replication and transcription of nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses (or Mononegavirales) are believed to be concentrated in the viral polymerase (L) protein. However, our insight into the organization of these different enzymatic activities into a bioactive tertiary structure remains rudimentary. Fragments of Mononegavirales polymerases analyzed to date cannot restore bioactivity through trans-complementation, unlike the related L proteins of segmented NSVs. We investigated the domain organization of phylogenetically diverse Paramyxovirus L proteins derived from measles virus (MeV), Nipah virus (NiV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Through a comprehensive in silico and experimental analysis of domain intersections, we defined MeV L position 615 as an interdomain candidate in addition to the previously reported residue 1708. Only position 1708 of MeV and the homologous positions in NiV and RSV L also tolerated the insertion of epitope tags. Splitting of MeV L at residue 1708 created fragments that were unable to physically interact and trans-complement, but strikingly, these activities were reconstituted by the addition of dimerization tags to the fragments. Equivalently split fragments of NiV, RSV, and MeV L oligomerized with comparable efficiency in all homo- and heterotypic combinations, but only the homotypic pairs were able to trans-complement. These results demonstrate that synthesis as a single polypeptide is not required for the Mononegavirales polymerases to adopt a proper tertiary conformation. Paramyxovirus polymerases are composed of at least two truly independent folding domains that lack a traditional interface but require molecular compatibility for bioactivity. The functional probing of the L domain architecture through trans-complementation is anticipated to be applicable to all Mononegavirales polymerases. PMID:22215662

  7. Domain adaptation for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wachinger, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, research focuses on the early computer-aided diagnosis of dementia with the goal to understand the disease process, determine risk and preserving factors, and explore preventive therapies. By now, large amounts of data from multi-site studies have been made available for developing, training, and evaluating automated classifiers. Yet, their translation to the clinic remains challenging, in part due to their limited generalizability across different datasets. In this work, we describe a compact classification approach that mitigates overfitting by regularizing the multinomial regression with the mixed ℓ1/ℓ2 norm. We combine volume, thickness, and anatomical shape features from MRI scans to characterize neuroanatomy for the three-class classification of Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. We demonstrate high classification accuracy via independent evaluation within the scope of the CADDementia challenge. We, furthermore, demonstrate that variations between source and target datasets can substantially influence classification accuracy. The main contribution of this work addresses this problem by proposing an approach for supervised domain adaptation based on instance weighting. Integration of this method into our classifier allows us to assess different strategies for domain adaptation. Our results demonstrate (i) that training on only the target training set yields better results than the naïve combination (union) of source and target training sets, and (ii) that domain adaptation with instance weighting yields the best classification results, especially if only a small training component of the target dataset is available. These insights imply that successful deployment of systems for computer-aided diagnostics to the clinic depends not only on accurate classifiers that avoid overfitting, but also on a dedicated domain adaptation strategy.

  8. Domain Parking: Not as Malicious as Expected

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Domain Parking: Not as Malicious as Expected Leigh Metcalf , Jonathan Spring netsa-contact@cert.org CERT® Coordination Center, Software Engineering...Parking: Not as Malicious as Expected 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Metcalf /Jonathan Spring Leigh 5d...Tech. Rep. RFC 3927, May 2005. [11] L. B. Metcalf and J. M. Spring, “Everything you wanted to know about black- lists but were afraid to ask

  9. Domain-Independent Heuristics for Goal Formulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    While this increases autonomy, it employs a domain- dependent reward function; indirectly, LGDA’s goal selection strategy is guided by a human. MADBot...autonomy for responding to unexpected events in strategy simulations. To appear in Computational Intelligence. Molineaux, M., Klenk, M., & Aha, D.W...2010a). Goal-driven autonomy in a Navy strategy simulation. In Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence. Atlanta

  10. Psychological Operations within the Cyberspace Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-17

    Year‖ 29 Fogg , Persuasive Technology, 5 30 Thomas, Cyber Silhouettes, 279 11 The cyber domain and persuasive technologies offers several...31 Fogg , Persuasive Technology, 7 32 Ibid., 7 33 Ibid., 8 34 Ibid., 8 35 Ibid., 8 36 Joint Publication 3-53, Psychological Operations...44 Smart, Metaverse Roadmap, 14 45 Fogg , Persuasive Technology, 196 46 Ibid., 197 47 Ibid., 197 15 principle of social

  11. Stability domains for vane with viscous filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosaev, Marat

    2017-01-01

    The motion of a four-blade axisymmetric vane with fixed point is considered in the constant flow of medium. This is a mechanical system with variable dissipation. One can observe the opposition between external aerodynamic load and internal friction. Stability of the permanent rotation of vane in medium flow is studied. We consider the stability conditions for this motion. Stability domains are analyzed numerically for blades with low fineness.

  12. Dynamic Domains in Data Production Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Pang, Wanlin

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses a planner-based approach to automating data production tasks, such as producing fire forecasts from satellite imagery and weather station data. Since the set of available data products is large, dynamic and mostly unknown, planning techniques developed for closed worlds are unsuitable. We discuss a number of techniques we have developed to cope with data production domains, including a novel constraint propagation algorithm based on planning graphs and a constraint-based approach to interleaved planning, sensing and execution.

  13. Simulations of the Domain State Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    bulk of the antiferromagnet, the latter is diluted throughout its volume. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the model were performed in the past...that a corresponding theoretical model, the domain state model, investigated by Monte Carlo simulations shows a behavior very similar to the...discuss this in detail in the following. 15 RESULTS Monte Carlo methods are used with a heat-bath algorithm and single-spin flip dynamics [26] for the

  14. Domain decomposition multigrid for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-01-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of elliptic boundary value problems using finite element schemes on possibly unstructured meshes is introduced. It is based on a domain decomposition and a Galerkin scheme for the coarse level vertex unknowns. For both the implementation and the analysis, it is not required that the curves of discontinuity in the coefficients of the PDE match the interfaces between subdomains. Generalizations to nonmatching or overlapping grids are made.

  15. 2015 Cross-Domain Deterrence Seminar Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, Anthony

    2016-02-04

    In November 2015, the Center for Global Security Research, NSO, and Global Security program jointly sponsored a seminar investigating questions related to cross-domain deterrence at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the seminar, experts were asked to moderate discussion based on the four topics below. For each of these topics, we have compiled a short list of literature that will help analysts develop a baseline understanding of the issue.

  16. Antiferromagnetic domains in epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Andreas

    2002-03-01

    Interface and surface effects play a central role in modern magnet structures. Magnetic exchange coupling and bias, spin injection across the boundary between magnetic and non-magnetic layers, and the surface and interface anisotropy in multilayers are examples for interface phenomena that are utilized in magneto-electronics. In particular, the microscopic origin of exchange bias at ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interfaces is still an unsolved problem despite of intense research, driven by the important application of exchange bias in hard disk read-heads and magnetic RAM. Knowledge of the microscopic magnetic structure in antiferromagnetic thin films and surfaces is of crucial importance for a better understanding of the exchange bias effect. Microscopic experiments on magnetically coupled ferromagnet/antiferromagnet layers using X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) now provide a new insight into the microscopic processes at this important interface. Using a combination of x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) contrast and microscopic electron yield detection we have resolved the magnetic domain structure in LaFeO3 and NiO thin films and crystals. The antiferromagnetic domain structure is linked to the crystallographic structure of the material and vanishes approaching the magnetic ordering temperature. Ferromagnetic films grown on the antiferromagnetic substrate show a corresponding ferromagnetic domain structure, an uniaxial exchange anistropy and a local bias which increases with decreasing domain size, suggesting a statistical origin of the bias effect. The role of uncompensated interface spins will also be discussed. We will present first experiments on magnetic interlayer coupling across metallic antiferromagnets, which suggest a similar origin of bias in full-metallic exchange bias system. A. Scholl et al., Science 287, 1014 (2000), F. Nolting et al., Nature 405, 767 (2000), H. Ohldag et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2878 (2001)

  17. Metrology for terahertz time-domain spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, John F.; Naftaly, Mira

    2015-12-01

    In recent years the terahertz time-domain spectrometer (THz TDS) [1] has emerged as a key measurement device for spectroscopic investigations in the frequency range of 0.1-5 THz. To date, almost every type of material has been studied using THz TDS, including semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, metal films, liquid crystals, glasses, pharmaceuticals, DNA molecules, proteins, gases, composites, foams, oils, and many others. Measurements with a TDS are made in the time domain; conversion from the time domain data to a frequency spectrum is achieved by applying the Fourier Transform, calculated numerically using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. As in many other types of spectrometer, THz TDS requires that the sample data be referenced to similarly acquired data with no sample present. Unlike frequency-domain spectrometers which detect light intensity and measure absorption spectra, a TDS records both amplitude and phase information, and therefore yields both the absorption coefficient and the refractive index of the sample material. The analysis of the data from THz TDS relies on the assumptions that: a) the frequency scale is accurate; b) the measurement of THz field amplitude is linear; and c) that the presence of the sample does not affect the performance characteristics of the instrument. The frequency scale of a THz TDS is derived from the displacement of the delay line; via FFT, positioning errors may give rise to frequency errors that are difficult to quantify. The measurement of the field amplitude in a THz TDS is required to be linear with a dynamic range of the order of 10 000. And attention must be given to the sample positioning and handling in order to avoid sample-related errors.

  18. Shortened Engineered Human Antibody CH2 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Zhao, Qi; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain is critical for antibody effector functions. Isolated CH2 domains are promising scaffolds for construction of libraries containing diverse binders that could also confer some effector functions. We have shown previously that an isolated human CH2 domain is relatively unstable to thermally induced unfolding, but its stability can be improved by engineering an additional disulfide bond (Gong, R., Vu, B. K., Feng, Y., Prieto, D. A., Dyba, M. A., Walsh, J. D., Prabakaran, P., Veenstra, T. D., Tarasov, S. G., Ishima, R., and Dimitrov, D. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 14203–14210). We have hypothesized that the stability of this engineered antibody domain could be further increased by removing unstructured residues. To test our hypothesis, we removed the seven N-terminal residues that are in a random coil as suggested by our analysis of the isolated CH2 crystal structure and NMR data. The resulting shortened engineered CH2 (m01s) was highly soluble, monomeric, and remarkably stable, with a melting temperature (Tm) of 82.6 °C, which is about 10 and 30 °C higher than those of the original stabilized CH2 (m01) and CH2, respectively. m01s and m01 were more resistant to protease digestion than CH2. A newly identified anti-CH2 antibody that recognizes a conformational epitope bound to m01s significantly better (>10-fold higher affinity) than to CH2 and slightly better than to m01. m01s bound to a recombinant soluble human neonatal Fc receptor at pH 6.0 more strongly than CH2. These data suggest that shortening the m01 N terminus significantly increases stability without disrupting its conformation and that our approach for increasing stability and decreasing size by removing unstructured regions may also apply to other proteins. PMID:21669873

  19. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  20. Time Domain Aperture Antenna Study. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    Introduction 96 6.2 Special Case, Inpul",e - 97 6.3 Sjwcial Case, :mpulse :.xcitation, R =0, g,ý1 99 6.4 Gene Excitation, Proadside Direcion (e:90), R -O...can be calculated in a simple, closed form, with relative ease using only cime -domain techniques (almost a "back-of-the- envelope" type of calculation

  1. The Dof domain, a zinc finger DNA-binding domain conserved only in higher plants, truly functions as a Cys2/Cys2 Zn finger domain.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yoshimi; Ishiduka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Rie; Esaka, Muneharu

    2004-03-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are plant transcription factors that have a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, called the Dof domain. The Dof domain, which is composed of 52 amino acid residues, is similar to the Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain of GATA1 and steroid hormone receptors, but has a longer putative loop than that in the case of these zinc finger domains. The DNA-binding function of ascorbate oxidase gene binding protein (AOBP), a Dof protein, was investigated by gel retardation analysis. When Cys was replaced by His, the Dof domain could not function as a Cys3/His- or a Cys2/His2-type zinc finger. The characteristic longer loop was essential for DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, heavy metals such as Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the Dof domain. Manganese ion as well as zinc ion was coordinated by the Dof domain in vitro. On the other hand, the analysis using inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed that the Dof domain contained zinc ion but not manganese ion. Thus, the Dof domain was proved to function as a Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger domain.

  2. Masked object registration in the Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Padfield, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Registration is one of the most common tasks of image analysis and computer vision applications. The requirements of most registration algorithms include large capture range and fast computation so that the algorithms are robust to different scenarios and can be computed in a reasonable amount of time. For these purposes, registration in the Fourier domain using normalized cross-correlation is well suited and has been extensively studied in the literature. Another common requirement is masking, which is necessary for applications where certain regions of the image that would adversely affect the registration result should be ignored. To address these requirements, we have derived a mathematical model that describes an exact form for embedding the masking step fully into the Fourier domain so that all steps of translation registration can be computed efficiently using Fast Fourier Transforms. We provide algorithms and implementation details that demonstrate the correctness of our derivations. We also demonstrate how this masked FFT registration approach can be applied to improve the Fourier-Mellin algorithm that calculates translation, rotation, and scale in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate the computational efficiency, advantages, and correctness of our algorithm on a number of images from real-world applications. Our framework enables fast, global, parameter-free registration of images with masked regions.

  3. Domain specific software design for decision aiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Kirby; Stanley, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    McDonnell Aircraft Company (MCAIR) is involved in many large multi-discipline design and development efforts of tactical aircraft. These involve a number of design disciplines that must be coordinated to produce an integrated design and a successful product. Our interpretation of a domain specific software design (DSSD) is that of a representation or framework that is specialized to support a limited problem domain. A DSSD is an abstract software design that is shaped by the problem characteristics. This parallels the theme of object-oriented analysis and design of letting the problem model directly drive the design. The DSSD concept extends the notion of software reusability to include representations or frameworks. It supports the entire software life cycle and specifically leads to improved prototyping capability, supports system integration, and promotes reuse of software designs and supporting frameworks. The example presented in this paper is the task network architecture or design which was developed for the MCAIR Pilot's Associate program. The task network concept supported both module development and system integration within the domain of operator decision aiding. It is presented as an instance where a software design exhibited many of the attributes associated with DSSD concept.

  4. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Feng; Shi, Jian-Jun; Guan, Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases.

  5. Domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Johnny

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we continue the study of domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory initiated by Keye Martin and Bob Coecke in 2002. The first part of the thesis is focused on exploring the domain theoretic properties of qubit channels. We discover that the Scott continuous qubit channels are exactly those that are unital or constant. We then prove that the unital qubit channels form a continuous dcpo, and identify various measurements on them. We show that Holevo capacity is a measurement on unital qubit channels, and discover the natural measurement in this setting. We find that qubit channels also form a continuous dcpo, but capacity fails to be a measurement. In the second part we focus on the study of exact dcpos, a domain theoretic structure, closely related to continuous dcpos, possessed by quantum states. Exact dcpos admit a topology, called the exact topology, and we show that the exact topology has an order theoretic characterization similar to the characterization of the Scott topology on continuous dcpos. We then explore the connection between exact and continuous dcpos; first, by identifying an important set of points, called the split points, that distinguishes between exact and continuous structures; second, by exploring a continuous completion of exact dcpos, and showing that we can recover the exact topology from the Scott topology of the completion.

  6. Domain wall motion in ferroelectrics: Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Nikolaeva, E.; Shishkin, E.

    2002-03-01

    The switching current noise has been recorded during polarization reversal in single-crystalline gadolinium molybdate (GMO) and lithium tantalate (LT). Analysis of Barkhausen noise (BN) data allows to classify the noise types by determination of the critical indexes and fractal dimensions. BN is manifested as the short pulses during the polarization reversal. We have analyzed the BN data recorded in GMO and LT with various types of controlled domain structure. The data treatment in terms of probability distribution of duration, area and energy of individual pulses reveals the critical behavior typical for the fractal records in time. We used the Fourier transform and Hurst's rescaled range analysis for obtaining the Hurst factor, fractal dimension and classifying the noise types. We investigated by computer simulation the mechanism of sideways motion of 180O domain wall by nucleation at the wall taking into account the nuclei-nuclei interaction. It was shown that the moving domain walls display the fractal shape and their motion is accompanied by Flicker noise, which is in accord with experimental data. The research was made possible in part by Programs "Basic Research in Russian Universities" and "Priority Research in High School. Electronics", by Grant No. 01-02-17443 of RFBR, by Award No.REC-005 of CRDF.

  7. Time-domain robotic vision application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolliver, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    The quest for the highest resolution microwaves imaging and the principle of time-domain imaging is the primary motivation for recent developments in time-domain techniques. With the present technology fast time varying signals can now be measured and recorded both in magnitude and in phase. It has also enhanced the ability to extract relevant details concerning the scattering object. In the past, the inference of object geometry or shape from scattered signals has received substantial attention in radar technology. Various inverse scattering theories were proposed to develop analytical solutions to this problem. Furthermore, the random inversion, frequenty swept holography, and the synthetic radar imaging, all of which have two things in common: the physical optic far-field approximation and the utilization of the channels as an extra physical dimension, were also advanced significantly. Despite the inherent vectorial nature of electromagnetic waves, these scalar treatments have brought forth some promising results in practice with notable examples in subsurface and structure sounding. The use of time-domain imaging for space robotic vision applications was proposed. A multisensor approach to vision was shown to have several advantages over the video-only approach.

  8. Birdsong dialect patterns explained using magnetic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, James; Kenney, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The songs and calls of many bird species, like human speech, form distinct regional dialects. We suggest that the process of dialect formation is analogous to the physical process of magnetic domain formation. We take the coastal breeding grounds of the Puget Sound white crowned sparrow as an example. Previous field studies suggest that birds of this species learn multiple songs early in life, and when establishing a territory for the first time, retain one of these dialects in order to match the majority of their neighbors. We introduce a simple lattice model of the process, showing that this matching behavior can produce single dialect domains provided the death rate of adult birds is sufficiently low. We relate death rate to thermodynamic temperature in magnetic materials, and calculate the critical death rate by analogy with the Ising model. Using parameters consistent with the known behavior of these birds we show that coastal dialect domain shapes may be explained by viewing them as low-temperature "stripe states."

  9. Linking in domain-swapped protein dimers

    PubMed Central

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The presence of knots has been observed in a small fraction of single-domain proteins and related to their thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The exchanging of identical structural elements, typical of domain-swapped proteins, makes such dimers suitable candidates to validate the possibility that mutual entanglement between chains may play a similar role for protein complexes. We suggest that such entanglement is captured by the linking number. This represents, for two closed curves, the number of times that each curve winds around the other. We show that closing the curves is not necessary, as a novel parameter G′, termed Gaussian entanglement, is strongly correlated with the linking number. Based on 110 non redundant domain-swapped dimers, our analysis evidences a high fraction of chains with a significant intertwining, that is with |G′| > 1. We report that Nature promotes configurations with negative mutual entanglement and surprisingly, it seems to suppress intertwining in long protein dimers. Supported by numerical simulations of dimer dissociation, our results provide a novel topology-based classification of protein-swapped dimers together with some preliminary evidence of its impact on their physical and biological properties. PMID:27659606

  10. Domain walls in ω-phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, Mahdi; Saxena, Avadh

    1998-11-01

    The β-phase (body-centered cubic: b.c.c.) to ω-phase transformation in certain elements (e.g. Zr) and alloys (e.g. ZrNb) is induced either by quenching or application of pressure. The ω-phase is a metastable state and usually coexists with the β-matrix in the form of small particles. To study the formation of domain walls in these materials we have extended the Landau model of Cook for the ω-phase transition by including a spatial gradient (Ginzburg) term of the scalar order parameter. In general, the Landau free energy is an asymmetric double-well potential. From the variational derivative of the total free energy we obtain a static equilibrium condition. By solving this equation for different physical parameters and boundary conditions, we obtained different quasi-one-dimensional soliton-like solutions. These solutions correspond to three different types of domain walls between the ω-phase and the β-matrix. In addition, we obtained soliton lattice (domain wall array) solutions, calculated their formation energy and the asymptotic interaction between the solitons.

  11. Time-Domain Filtering of Metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    In general electromagnetic response of each material to a continuous wave does not vary in time domain if the frequency component remains the same. Recently, it turned out that integrating several circuit elements including schottky diodes with periodically metallised surfaces, or the so-called metasurfaces, leads to selectively absorbing specific types of waveforms or pulse widths even at the same frequency. These waveform-selective metasurfaces effectively showed different absorbing performances for different widths of pulsed sine waves by gradually varying their electromagnetic responses in time domain. Here we study time-filtering effects of such circuit-based metasurfaces illuminated by continuous sine waves. Moreover, we introduce extra circuit elements to these structures to enhance the time-domain control capability. These time-varying properties are expected to give us another degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves and thus contribute to developing new kinds of electromagnetic applications and technologies, e.g. time-windowing wireless communications and waveform conversion. PMID:26564027

  12. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  13. Manipulation of ferroelectric vortex domains in hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilienblum, M.; Soergel, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2011-09-01

    The modification of ferroelectric vortex domain patterns in hexagonal manganites (here exemplified by YMnO3 and HoMnO3) owing to chemical treatment, thermal annealing, and local electric-field poling is investigated by piezoresponse force microscopy. Chemical treatment transfers the domain pattern into a topographical pattern by domain selective etching. Thermal annealing alters the domain pattern without any sign of temperature memory effects. Local electric fields affect the domain structure with possible signs of electric memory effects. These observations are important for future investigations of the microscopic mechanisms and macroscopic parameters defining the formation of ferroelectric domains in this unusual multiferroic.

  14. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    PubMed

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-03

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices.

  15. Antiferromagnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques

    PubMed Central

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin-waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  16. Cache Domains That are Homologous to, but Different from PAS Domains Comprise the Largest Superfamily of Extracellular Sensors in Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Amit A; Fleetwood, Aaron D; Adebali, Ogun; Finn, Robert D; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-04-01

    Cellular receptors usually contain a designated sensory domain that recognizes the signal. Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous sensors in thousands of species ranging from bacteria to humans. Although PAS domains were described as intracellular sensors, recent structural studies revealed PAS-like domains in extracytoplasmic regions in several transmembrane receptors. However, these structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains do not match sequence-derived PAS domain models, and thus their distribution across the genomic landscape remains largely unknown. Here we show that structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains belong to the Cache superfamily, which is homologous to, but distinct from the PAS superfamily. Our newly built computational models enabled identification of Cache domains in tens of thousands of signal transduction proteins including those from important pathogens and model organisms. Furthermore, we show that Cache domains comprise the dominant mode of extracellular sensing in prokaryotes.

  17. Cache domains that are homologous to, but different from PAS domains comprise the largest superfamily of extracellular sensors in prokaryotes

    DOE PAGES

    Upadhyay, Amit A.; Fleetwood, Aaron D.; Adebali, Ogun; ...

    2016-04-06

    Cellular receptors usually contain a designated sensory domain that recognizes the signal. Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous sensors in thousands of species ranging from bacteria to humans. Although PAS domains were described as intracellular sensors, recent structural studies revealed PAS-like domains in extracytoplasmic regions in several transmembrane receptors. However, these structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains do not match sequence-derived PAS domain models, and thus their distribution across the genomic landscape remains largely unknown. Here we show that structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains belong to the Cache superfamily, which is homologous to, but distinct from the PAS superfamily. Our newly builtmore » computational models enabled identification of Cache domains in tens of thousands of signal transduction proteins including those from important pathogens and model organisms.Moreover, we show that Cache domains comprise the dominant mode of extracellular sensing in prokaryotes.« less

  18. Cache domains that are homologous to, but different from PAS domains comprise the largest superfamily of extracellular sensors in prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Amit A.; Fleetwood, Aaron D.; Adebali, Ogun; Finn, Robert D.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Schlessinger, Avner

    2016-04-06

    Cellular receptors usually contain a designated sensory domain that recognizes the signal. Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous sensors in thousands of species ranging from bacteria to humans. Although PAS domains were described as intracellular sensors, recent structural studies revealed PAS-like domains in extracytoplasmic regions in several transmembrane receptors. However, these structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains do not match sequence-derived PAS domain models, and thus their distribution across the genomic landscape remains largely unknown. Here we show that structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains belong to the Cache superfamily, which is homologous to, but distinct from the PAS superfamily. Our newly built computational models enabled identification of Cache domains in tens of thousands of signal transduction proteins including those from important pathogens and model organisms.Moreover, we show that Cache domains comprise the dominant mode of extracellular sensing in prokaryotes.

  19. Cache Domains That are Homologous to, but Different from PAS Domains Comprise the Largest Superfamily of Extracellular Sensors in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Amit A.; Fleetwood, Aaron D.; Adebali, Ogun; Finn, Robert D.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular receptors usually contain a designated sensory domain that recognizes the signal. Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous sensors in thousands of species ranging from bacteria to humans. Although PAS domains were described as intracellular sensors, recent structural studies revealed PAS-like domains in extracytoplasmic regions in several transmembrane receptors. However, these structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains do not match sequence-derived PAS domain models, and thus their distribution across the genomic landscape remains largely unknown. Here we show that structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains belong to the Cache superfamily, which is homologous to, but distinct from the PAS superfamily. Our newly built computational models enabled identification of Cache domains in tens of thousands of signal transduction proteins including those from important pathogens and model organisms. Furthermore, we show that Cache domains comprise the dominant mode of extracellular sensing in prokaryotes. PMID:27049771

  20. Thermomagnetic Stability in Pseudo Single Domain Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Lesleis; Williams, Wyn; Muxworthy, Adrian; Fabian, Karl; Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of paleomagnetic remanences are well understood for fine grains of magnetite that are single-domain (SD, uniformly magnetized). In particular Néel's theory [1] outlined the thermal energies required to block and unblock magnetic remanences. This lead to determination of thermal stability for magnetization in fine grains as outlined in Pullaiah et. al. [2] and a comprehensive understanding of SD paleomagnetic recordings. It has been known for some time that single domain magnetite is possible only in the grain size range 30 - 80nm, which may only account for a small fraction of the grain size distribution in any rock sample. Indeed rocks are often dominated by grains in the pseudo single domain (PSD) size range, at approximately 80 - 1000nm. Toward the top end of this range multi-domain features begin to dominate. In order to determine thermomagnetic stability in PSD grains we need to identify the energy barriers between all possible pairs of local energy minima (LEM) domain states as a function of both temperature and grain size. We have attempted to do this using the nudged elastic band (NEB) method [3] which searches for minimum energy paths between any given pair of LEM states. Using this technique we have determined, for the first time, complete thermomagnetic stability curves for PSD magnetite. The work presented is at a preliminary stage. However it can be shown that PSD grains of magnetite with simple geometries (e.g. cubes or cuboctahedra) have very few low energy transition paths and the stability is likely to be similar to that observed for SD grains (as expected form experimental observations). The results will provide a basis for a much more rigorous understanding of the fidelity of paleomagnetic signals in assemblages of PSD grains and their ability to retain ancient recordings of the geomagnetic field. References: [1] Néel, Louis. "Théorie du traînage magnétique des ferromagnétiques en grains fins avec applications aux terres

  1. Design of protein function leaps by directed domain interface evolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Koide, Akiko; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2008-01-01

    Most natural proteins performing sophisticated tasks contain multiple domains where an active site is located at the domain interface. Comparative structural analyses suggest that major leaps in protein function occur through gene recombination events that connect two or more protein domains to generate a new active site, frequently occurring at the newly created domain interface. However, such functional leaps by combination of unrelated domains have not been directly demonstrated. Here we show that highly specific and complex protein functions can be generated by joining a low-affinity peptide-binding domain with a functionally inert second domain and subsequently optimizing the domain interface. These directed evolution processes dramatically enhanced both affinity and specificity to a level unattainable with a single domain, corresponding to >500-fold and >2,000-fold increases of affinity and specificity, respectively. An x-ray crystal structure revealed that the resulting “affinity clamp” had clamshell architecture as designed, with large additional binding surface contributed by the second domain. The affinity clamps having a single-nanomolar dissociation constant outperformed a monoclonal antibody in immunochemical applications. This work establishes evolutionary paths from isolated domains with primitive function to multidomain proteins with sophisticated function and introduces a new protein-engineering concept that allows for the generation of highly functional affinity reagents to a predefined target. The prevalence and variety of natural interaction domains suggest that numerous new functions can be designed by using directed domain interface evolution. PMID:18445649

  2. Flowing on Riemannian manifold: domain adaptation by shifting covariance.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhen; Li, Wen; Xu, Dong; Shan, Shiguang; Chen, Xilin; Li, Xuelong

    2014-12-01

    Domain adaptation has shown promising results in computer vision applications. In this paper, we propose a new unsupervised domain adaptation method called domain adaptation by shifting covariance (DASC) for object recognition without requiring any labeled samples from the target domain. By characterizing samples from each domain as one covariance matrix, the source and target domain are represented into two distinct points residing on a Riemannian manifold. Along the geodesic constructed from the two points, we then interpolate some intermediate points (i.e., covariance matrices), which are used to bridge the two domains. By utilizing the principal components of each covariance matrix, samples from each domain are further projected into intermediate feature spaces, which finally leads to domain-invariant features after the concatenation of these features from intermediate points. In the multiple source domain adaptation task, we also need to effectively integrate different types of features between each pair of source and target domains. We additionally propose an SVM based method to simultaneously learn the optimal target classifier as well as the optimal weights for different source domains. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our method for both single source and multiple source domain adaptation tasks.

  3. Synthetic actin-binding domains reveal compositional constraints for function.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Maria; Gimona, Mario

    2008-01-01

    The actin-binding domains of many proteins consist of a canonical type 1/type 2 arrangement of the structurally conserved calponin homology domain. Using the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin-1 as a scaffold we have generated synthetic actin-binding domains by altering position and composition of the calponin homology domains. We show that the presence of two calponin homology domains alone and in the context of an actin-binding domain is not sufficient for actin-binding, and that both single and homotypic type 2 calponin homology domain tandems fail to bind to actin in vitro and in transfected cells. In contrast, single and tandem type 1 calponin homology domain arrays bind actin directly but result in defective turnover rates on actin filaments, and in aberrant actin bundling when introduced into the full-length alpha-actinin molecule. An actin-binding domain harboring the calponin homology domains in an inverted position, however, functions both in isolation and in the context of the dimeric alpha-actinin molecule. Our data demonstrate that the dynamics and specificity of actin-binding via actin-binding domains requires both the filament binding properties of the type 1, and regulation by type 2 calponin homology domains, and appear independent of their position.

  4. Binding to retinoblastoma pocket domain does not alter the inter-domain flexibility of the J domain of SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina K; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Hammel, Michal; Pipas, James; Chazin, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    Simian Virus 40 uses the large T antigen (Tag) to bind and inactivate retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (Rb), which can result in cellular transformation. Tag is a modular protein with four domains connected by flexible linkers. The N-terminal J domain of Tag is necessary for Rb inactivation. Binding of Rb is mediated by an LXCXE consensus motif immediately C-terminal to the J domain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to study the structural dynamics and interaction of Rb with the LXCXE motif, the J domain and a construct (N(260)) extending from the J domain through the origin binding domain (OBD). NMR and SAXS data revealed substantial flexibility between the domains in N(260). Binding of pRb to a construct containing the LXCXE motif and the J domain revealed weak interactions between pRb and the J domain. Analysis of the complex of pRb and N(260) indicated that the OBD is not involved and retains its dynamic independence from the remainder of Tag. These results support a 'chaperone' model in which the J domain of Tag changes its orientation as it acts upon different protein complexes.

  5. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities

    PubMed Central

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape. PMID:23978905

  6. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities.

    PubMed

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape.

  7. Domain structure of black hole space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Harmark, Troels

    2009-07-15

    We introduce the domain structure for stationary black hole space-times. The domain structure lives on the submanifold of fixed points of the Killing vector fields. Depending on which Killing vector field has fixed points the submanifold is naturally divided into domains. The domain structure provides invariants of the space-time, both topological and continuous. It is defined for any space-time dimension and any number of Killing vector fields. We examine the domain structure for asymptotically flat space-times and find a canonical form for the metric of such space-times. The domain structure generalizes the rod structure introduced for space-times with D-2 commuting Killing vector fields. We analyze in detail the domain structure for Minkowski space, the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole and the Myers-Perry black hole in six and seven dimensions. Finally, we consider the possible domain structures for asymptotically flat black holes in six and seven dimensio0008.

  8. Apoplastic domains and sub-domains in the shoots of etiolated corn seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epel, B. L.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Light Green, an apoplastic probe, was applied to the cut mesocotyl base or to the cut coleoptile apex of etiolated seedlings of Zea mays L. cv. Silver Queen. Probe transport was measured and its tissue distribution determined. In the mesocotyl, there is an apoplastic barrier between cortex and stele. This barrier creates two apoplastic domains which are non-communicating. A kinetic barrier exists between the apoplast of the mesocotyl stele and that of the coleoptile. This kinetic barrier is not absolute and there is limited communication between the apoplasts of the two regions. This kinetic barrier effectively creates two sub-domains. In the coleoptile, there is communication between the apoplast of the vascular strands and that of the surrounding cortical tissue. No apoplastic communication was observed between the coleoptile cortex and the mesocotyl cortex. Thus, the apoplastic space of the coleoptile cortex is a sub-domain of the integrated coleoptile domain and is separate from that of the apoplastic domain of the mesocotyl cortex.

  9. Apoplastic domains and sub-domains in the shoots of etiolated corn seedlings.

    PubMed

    Epel, B L; Bandurski, R S

    1990-01-01

    Light Green, an apoplastic probe, was applied to the cut mesocotyl base or to the cut coleoptile apex of etiolated seedlings of Zea mays L. cv. Silver Queen. Probe transport was measured and its tissue distribution determined. In the mesocotyl, there is an apoplastic barrier between cortex and stele. This barrier creates two apoplastic domains which are non-communicating. A kinetic barrier exists between the apoplast of the mesocotyl stele and that of the coleoptile. This kinetic barrier is not absolute and there is limited communication between the apoplasts of the two regions. This kinetic barrier effectively creates two sub-domains. In the coleoptile, there is communication between the apoplast of the vascular strands and that of the surrounding cortical tissue. No apoplastic communication was observed between the coleoptile cortex and the mesocotyl cortex. Thus, the apoplastic space of the coleoptile cortex is a sub-domain of the integrated coleoptile domain and is separate from that of the apoplastic domain of the mesocotyl cortex.

  10. Prediction of VH-VL domain orientation for antibody variable domain modeling.

    PubMed

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Dunbar, James; Lipsmeier, Florian; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Antes, Iris; Deane, Charlotte M; Georges, Guy

    2015-04-01

    The antigen-binding site of antibodies forms at the interface of their two variable domains, VH and VL, making VH-VL domain orientation a factor that codetermines antibody specificity and affinity. Preserving VH-VL domain orientation in the process of antibody engineering is important in order to retain the original antibody properties, and predicting the correct VH-VL orientation has also been recognized as an important factor in antibody homology modeling. In this article, we present a fast sequence-based predictor that predicts VH-VL domain orientation with Q(2) values ranging from 0.54 to 0.73 on the evaluation set. We describe VH-VL orientation in terms of the six absolute ABangle parameters that have recently been proposed as a means to separate the different degrees of freedom of VH-VL domain orientation. In order to assess the impact of adjusting VH-VL orientation according to our predictions, we use the set of antibody structures of the recently published Antibody Modeling Assessment (AMA) II study. In comparison to the original AMAII homology models, we find an improvement in the accuracy of VH-VL orientation modeling, which also translates into an improvement in the average root-mean-square deviation with regard to the crystal structures.

  11. Frequency-domain sensitivity analysis for small imaging domains using the equation of radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuejun; Ren, Kui; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-04-01

    Optical tomography of small imaging domains holds great promise as the signal-to-noise ratio is usually high, and the achievable spatial resolution is much better than in large imaging domains. Emerging applications range from the imaging of joint diseases in human fingers to monitoring tumor growth or brain activity in small animals. In these cases, the diameter of the tissue under investigation is typically smaller than 3 cm, and the optical path length is only a few scattering mean-free paths. It is well known that under these conditions the widely applied diffusion approximation to the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) is of limited applicability. To accurately model light propagation in these small domains, the ERT has to be solved directly. We use the frequency-domain ERT to perform a sensitivity study for small imaging domains. We found optimal source-modulation frequencies for which variations in optical properties, size, and location of a tissue inhomogeneity lead to maximal changes in the amplitude and phase of the measured signal. These results will be useful in the design of experiments and optical tomographic imaging systems that probe small tissue volumes.

  12. Shape-Measure Method for Introducing the Nearly Optimal Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    elements. The problem is to find the optimal domain approximately for a given functional that is involved with the solution of a linear or nonlinear...elliptic equation with a boundary condition over a domain. The Shape-Measure method, in Cartesian coordinates will be used to find the nearly optimal...domain by using the embedding method. Then the Shape-Measure method will be applied to find the best domain approximately. An example will be given.

  13. Intraprotein signal transduction by HAMP domains: a balancing act.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Joachim E; Kanchan, Kajal; Ziegler, Miriam

    2015-02-01

    HAMP domains are small protein modules that predominantly operate as signal transducers in bacterial sensor proteins most of which are membrane delimited. The domain organization of such sensors has the HAMPs localized at the intersection between the membrane-anchored input sensor and the cytosolic output machinery. The data summarized here indicate that HAMP modules use a universal signaling language in balancing the communication between diverse membrane-bound input domains and cytosolic output domains that are completely foreign to each other.

  14. Compassion and professional care: exploring the domain.

    PubMed

    van der Cingel, Margreet

    2009-04-01

    Compassion unites people during times of suffering and distress. Unfortunately, compassion cannot take away suffering. Why then, is compassion important for people who suffer? Nurses work in a domain where human suffering is evidently present. In order to give meaning to compassion in the domain of professional care, it is necessary to describe what compassion is. The purpose of this paper is to explore questions and contradictions in the debate on compassion related to nursing care. The paper reviews classical philosophers as well as contemporary scientists' main arguments on compassion. First, I will examine the relationship between compassion and suffering. Second, how does one recognize serious suffering? This issue raises questions about the role of imagination and the need for identification. Third, literature describes compassion as an emotion. Some philosophers consider emotions uncontrollable feelings; others see a clear rational dimension in emotions. In order to determine what compassion is, it is necessary to weigh these contradictional arguments. Fourth, I will discuss motives for compassion. Is compassion an act of altruism or egoism? In this debate Nietzsche and Schopenhauer are well-known opponents. Today, analysis of their arguments leads to some surprising conclusions. Fifth, there is the issue of fault and compassion. Can we only feel compassionate when people who suffer are not to blame for their own suffering? Such a condition faces professional caretakers with a dilemma which needs a thorough analysis if compassion is to be of use in the field of professional care. Finally, I will explore the moral meaning of compassion. Compassion, described as a concept with cognitive as well as affective dimensions, also has volitional and behavioural aspects. These aspects specifically are of importance to nursing care and further research of compassion in the nursing domain.

  15. Spatial-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, L.; Gay, D.; Piché, M.

    2008-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique invented in 1991 and allowing the observation of biological tissues with millimeter depth of penetration and a few micrometer resolution. In the standard time-domain OCT setup (TD-OCT), a broadband light source is used with a Michelson interferometer where one of the mirrors is replaced by the sample (which is mechanically moved transversally during data acquisition) while the other is axially vibrating. By analyzing the temporal signal at the exit of the interferometer, a high resolution tomographic cut of the sample can be obtained. A number of new OCT setups have been proposed since 1991 in order to improve the data acquisition speed. In particular, Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT) has allowed in vivo observation of samples by eliminating the necessity of the axial motion of the reference mirror in the setup. We propose in this paper new OCT setups having the same potential without requiring numerical treatment of the signal (as it is the case in FD-OCT). Because those setups are such that the axial information of the sample becomes linearly distributed at different points of space in an interference pattern, we call them spatial-domain OCT setups (SD-OCT). SD-OCT setups use a tilted mirror in a Michelson interferometer to produce an interference pattern which is imaged on a CCD detector. The pattern contains all the information on the sample and is obtained without mechanical motion or numerical treatment of the recorded signal. In order to validate the proposed scheme, prototypes of the setups have been made in the laboratories of COPL at Laval University; biological samples such as onion peels and phloem of trees have been tested in order to produce their tomographic images. Comparisons of some of our results with those from a commercial setup with the same samples had notably confirmed the capacity of ours prototypes to effectively image biological samples.

  16. Credentialing Data Scientists: A Domain Repository Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Furukawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    A career in data science can have many paths: data curation, data analysis, metadata modeling - all of these in different commercial or scientific applications. Can a certification as 'data scientist' provide the guarantee that an applicant or candidate for a data science position has just the right skills? How valuable is a 'generic' certification as data scientist for an employer looking to fill a data science position? Credentials that are more specific and discipline-oriented may be more valuable to both the employer and the job candidate. One employment sector for data scientists are the data repositories that provide discipline-specific data services for science communities. Data science positions within domain repositories include a wide range of responsibilities in support of the full data life cycle - from data preservation and curation to development of data models, ontologies, and user interfaces, to development of data analysis and visualization tools to community education and outreach, and require a substantial degree of discipline-specific knowledge of scientific data acquisition and analysis workflows, data quality measures, and data cultures. Can there be certification programs for domain-specific data scientists that help build the urgently needed workforce for the repositories? The American Geophysical Union has recently started an initiative to develop a program for data science continuing education and data science professional certification for the Earth and space sciences. An Editorial Board has been charged to identify and develop curricula and content for these programs and to provide input and feedback in the implementation of the program. This presentation will report on the progress of this initiative and evaluate its utility for the needs of domain repositories in the Earth and space sciences.

  17. Microseismic source imaging in a compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Rodriguez, Ismael; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2014-08-01

    Microseismic monitoring is an essential tool for the characterization of hydraulic fractures. Fast estimation of the parameters that define a microseismic event is relevant to understand and control fracture development. The amount of data contained in the microseismic records however, poses a challenge for fast continuous detection and evaluation of the microseismic source parameters. Work inspired by the emerging field of Compressive Sensing has showed that it is possible to evaluate source parameters in a compressed domain, thereby reducing processing time. This technique performs well in scenarios where the amplitudes of the signal are above the noise level, as is often the case in microseismic monitoring using downhole tools. This paper extends the idea of the compressed domain processing to scenarios of microseismic monitoring using surface arrays, where the signal amplitudes are commonly at the same level as, or below, the noise amplitudes. To achieve this, we resort to the use of an imaging operator, which has previously been found to produce better results in detection and location of microseismic events from surface arrays. The operator in our method is formed by full-waveform elastodynamic Green's functions that are band-limited by a source time function and represented in the frequency domain. Where full-waveform Green's functions are not available, ray tracing can also be used to compute the required Green's functions. Additionally, we introduce the concept of the compressed inverse, which derives directly from the compression of the migration operator using a random matrix. The described methodology reduces processing time at a cost of introducing distortions into the results. However, the amount of distortion can be managed by controlling the level of compression applied to the operator. Numerical experiments using synthetic and real data demonstrate the reductions in processing time that can be achieved and exemplify the process of selecting the

  18. Between- and Within-Domain Relations of Students' Academic Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Hall, Nathan C.; Ludtke, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated between- and within-domain relations of academic emotions, including students' enjoyment, pride, anxiety, anger, and boredom experienced in mathematics, physics, German, and English classes (N = 542; Grades 8 and 11). Corroborating assumptions of domain specificity, the between-domains relations of these emotions were weak…

  19. New Internet Domain Name Tags on the Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searcher, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Because 825,000 Internet domain names are assigned and 85,000 new site names are registered each month, the availability of new names is limited. To ease the situation, seven new generic top-level domain names (gTLDs) have been proposed for the Internet's domain name system by the International Ad Hoc Committee established by the Internet Assigned…

  20. Frequency-Domain Methods for Characterization of Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Ferriera, T J; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    This paper discusses methods of frequency-domain characterization of pulsed power sensors using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer techniques that offer significant simplification over time-domain methods, while mitigating or minimizing the effect of the difficulties present in time domain characterization. These methods are applicable to characterization of a wide variety of sensors.

  1. Biology and Beyond: Domain Specificity in a Broader Developmental Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keil, Frank C.

    2007-01-01

    The assumption of domain specificity has been invaluable to the study of the emergence of biological thought in young children. Yet, domains of thought must be understood within a broader context that explains how those domains relate to the surrounding cultures, to different kinds of cognitive constraints, to framing effects, to abilities to…

  2. Changing Your Domain Name in 25 Nail-Biting Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Carol

    2012-01-01

    When staff at the Wisconsin State Law Library began compiling a wish list for a new website, the topic of a new domain name came up almost immediately. Their old website was located at http://wsll.state.wi.us. Spelling that relatively complex domain over the phone day after day provided the impetus to explore other options. Whatever domain name…

  3. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation of Aircraft Composites Using Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-10

    Taday, P. F., Pepper , M. (2008). Elimination of scattering effects in spectral measurement of granulated materials using terahertz time domain...W., Ferguson , B., Rainsford, T., Mickan, S. P., & Abbott, D. (2005). Material parameter extraction for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy using... Ferguson , B., Rainsford, T., Mickan, S. P., & Abbott, D. (2005). Simple material parameter estimation via terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

  5. A Methodology to Develop Ontologies for Emerging Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meenorngwar, Chai

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic of complex, dynamic domains, such as an emerging domain, is that the information necessary to describe them is not fully established. Standards are not yet established for these domains, and hence they are difficult to describe and present, and methods are needed that will reflect the changes that will occur as the domains…

  6. Frequency Domain Modeling of SAW Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    New SAW sensors for integrated vehicle health monitoring of aerospace vehicles are being investigated. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. However, the lack of design tools for MEMS devices in general, and for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices specifically, has led to the development of tools that will enable integrated design, modeling, simulation, analysis and automatic layout generation of SAW devices. A frequency domain model has been created. The model is mainly first order, but it includes second order effects from triple transit echoes. This paper presents the model and results from the model for a SAW delay line device.

  7. Time-domain multiple-quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Weitekamp, D.P.

    1982-11-01

    The development of time-domain multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance is reviewed through mid 1982 and some prospects for future development are indicated. Particular attention is given to the problem of obtaining resolved, interpretable, many-quantum spectra for anisotropic magnetically isolated systems of coupled spins. New results are presented on a number of topics including the optimization of multiple-quantum-line intensities, analysis of noise in two-dimensional spectroscopy, and the use of order-selective excitation for cross polarization between nuclear-spin species.

  8. Single domain camel antibodies: current status.

    PubMed

    Muyldermans, S

    2001-06-01

    The antigen-binding capacity of the paired variable domains of an antibody is well established. The observation that the isolated heavy chains of anti-hapten antibodies retain some antigen-binding capacity in the absence of light chains led to attempts to obtain an even smaller antigen-binding unit in a VH format. Unfortunately, the poor solubility, the reduced affinity for the antigen and the irreproducible outcome showed that additional protein engineering would be required to successfully generate single-domain antibody fragments. By serendipity, it was discovered that this engineering is already performed continuously in nature. Part of the humoral immune response of camels and llamas is based largely on heavy-chain antibodies where the light chain is totally absent. These unique antibody isotypes interact with the antigen by virtue of only one single variable domain, referred to as VHH. Despite the absence of the VH-VL combinatorial diversity, these heavy-chain antibodies exhibit a broad antigen-binding repertoire by enlarging their hypervariable regions. Methods are described to tap the VHH repertoire of an immunised dromedary or llama. These VHH libraries contain a high titre of intact antigen-specific binders that were matured in vivo. Synthetic libraries of a 'camelised' human VH, a mouse VH or a camelid VHH scaffold with a randomised CDR3 could constitute a valid alternative to immune libraries to retrieve useful single-domain antigen binders. The recombinant VHH that are selected from such libraries are well expressed, highly soluble in aqueous environments and very robust. Some in vivo matured VHH were also shown to be potent enzyme inhibitors, and the low complexity of the antigen-binding site is an asset in the design of peptide mimetics. Because of their smaller size and the above properties, the VHH clearly offer added-value over conventional antibody fragments. They are expected to open perspectives as enzyme inhibitors and intrabodies, as modular

  9. Receptor binding domain based HIV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Bi, Wenwen; Wang, Qian; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the main trend of the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccines in recent years. Designing an HIV-1 vaccine that provides robust protection from HIV-1 infection remains a challenge despite many years of effort. Therefore, we describe the receptor binding domain of gp120 as a target for developing AIDS vaccines. And we recommend some measures that could induce efficiently and produce cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies with high binding affinity. Those measures may offer a new way of the research and development of the potent and broad AIDS vaccines.

  10. Observation of complementarity in the macroscopic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Dezhong; Xiong Jun; Tang Hua; Lin Lufang; Zhang Suheng; Wang Kaige

    2007-09-15

    Complementarity is usually considered as a phenomenon of microscopic systems. In this paper, we report an experimental observation of complementarity in correlated double-slit interference with a pseudothermal light source. The thermal light beam is divided into test and reference beams which are correlated with each other. The double slit is set in the test arm, and an interference pattern can be observed in the intensity correlation between the two arms. The experimental results show that the disappearance of the interference fringe depends on whether which-path information is gained through the reference arm. The experiment therefore shows complementarity occurring in the macroscopic domain.

  11. Block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.; Ron, H.

    1987-01-01

    Much of the earth's crust is broken by sets of parallel strike-slip faults which are organized in domains. A simple kinematic model suggests that when subject to tectonic strain, the faults, and the blocks bound by them, rotate. The rotation can be estimated from the structurally-determined fault slip and fault spacing, and independently from local deviations of paleomagnetic declinations from global values. A rigorous test of this model was carried out in northern Israel, where good agreement was found between the two rotations.

  12. Data Mining Integrated with Domain Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Anqiang; Zhang, Lingling; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Shi, Yong

    Traditional data mining is a data-driven trial-and-error process[1], which aims at discovered pattern/rule. People either view data mining as an autonomous process, or only analyze the issues in an isolated and case-by-case manner. Because it overlooks some valuable information, such as existing knowledge, expert experience, context and real constraints, the results coming out can’t be directly applied to support decisions in business. This paper proposes a new methodology called Data Mining Integrated With Domain Knowledge, aiming to discovery more interesting, more actionable knowledge.

  13. Scaling properties of multitension domain wall networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. F.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2015-02-01

    We study the asymptotic scaling properties of domain wall networks with three different tensions in various cosmological epochs. We discuss the conditions under which a scale-invariant evolution of the network (which is well established for simpler walls) still applies and also consider the limiting case where defects are locally planar and the curvature is concentrated in the junctions. We present detailed quantitative predictions for scaling densities in various contexts, which should be testable by means of future high-resolution numerical simulations.

  14. Genome architecture: domain organization of interphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Bickmore, Wendy A; van Steensel, Bas

    2013-03-14

    The architecture of interphase chromosomes is important for the regulation of gene expression and genome maintenance. Chromosomes are linearly segmented into hundreds of domains with different protein compositions. Furthermore, the spatial organization of chromosomes is nonrandom and is characterized by many local and long-range contacts among genes and other sequence elements. A variety of genome-wide mapping techniques have made it possible to chart these properties at high resolution. Combined with microscopy and computational modeling, the results begin to yield a more coherent picture that integrates linear and three-dimensional (3D) views of chromosome organization in relation to gene regulation and other nuclear functions.

  15. Domain wall orientation in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Vedmedenko, E Y; Kubetzka, A; von Bergmann, K; Pietzsch, O; Bode, M; Kirschner, J; Oepen, H P; Wiesendanger, R

    2004-02-20

    Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that domain walls in ultrathin Fe nanowires are oriented along a certain crystallographic direction, regardless of the orientation of the wires. Monte Carlo simulations on a discrete lattice are in accordance with the experiment if the film relaxation is taken into account. We demonstrate that the wall orientation is determined by the atomic lattice and the resulting strength of an effective exchange interaction. The magnetic anisotropy and the magnetostatic energy play a minor role for the wall orientation in that system.

  16. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  17. Frequency-Domain Identification Of Aeroelastic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes flight measurements and frequency-domain analyses of aeroelastic vibrational modes of wings of XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft. Begins with description of flight-test methods. Followed by brief discussion of methods of analysis, which include Fourier-transform computations using chirp z transformers, use of coherence and other spectral functions, and methods and computer programs to obtain frequencies and damping coefficients from measurements. Includes brief description of results of flight tests and comparisions among various experimental and theoretical results. Ends with section on conclusions and recommended improvements in techniques.

  18. Building the DAML Electronic Commerce Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    refined the eCommerce domain ontology requirements identified in the previous quarter. The effort this quarter focused on analyzing e-business models...the predominant means of marketing in many industries, causing a massive upswing in 2004 and driving fundamental changes to the way enterprises do...business with each other. Also, it is assumed that e-marketplaces will drive nearly 40 percent of B2B e-commerce transactions in 2004. The probability of occurrence of the market outcomes predicted above is estimated at about 20 percent.

  19. Numerical methods for time-domain and frequency-domain analysis: applications in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamas, R. D.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical methods are widely used for modeling different physical phenomena in engineering, especially when an analytic approach is not possible. Time-domain or frequency- domain type variations are generally investigated, depending on the nature of the process under consideration. Some methods originate from mechanics, although most of their applications belong to other fields, such as electromagnetism. Conversely, other methods were firstly developed for electromagnetism, but their field of application was extended to other fields. This paper presents some results that we have obtained by using a general purpose method for solving linear equations, i.e., the method of moments (MoM), and a time-domain method derived for electromagnetism, i.e., the Transmission Line Matrix method (TLM).

  20. Projectin PEVK domain, splicing variants and domain structure in basal and derived insects.

    PubMed

    Ayme-Southgate, A; Philipp, R A; Southgate, R J

    2011-06-01

    The third elastic filament of striated muscles consists of giant proteins: titin (in vertebrates) and kettin/projectin (in insects). In all three proteins, elasticity is at least partly associated with the so-called PEVK domain. The projectin PEVK domains of diverse insects are highly divergent compared with an otherwise conserved protein organization. We present the characterization of the PEVK domain in two dragonflies and in human lice. A conserved segment at the end of the PEVK, the NH(2)-terminal conserved segment-1 (NTCS-1), may serve as an anchor point for projectin to either myosin or actin, providing a mechanical link. The analysis of alternative splicing variants identifies the shortest PEVK isoform as the predominant form in the flight muscles of several insects, possibly contributing to myofibrillar stiffness.

  1. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  2. Domain-General and Domain-Specific Creative-Thinking Tests: Effects of Gender and Item Content on Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; Wu, Junbin

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the effects of gender and item content of domain-general and domain-specific creative-thinking tests on four subscale scores of creative-thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration). Chinese tenth-grade students (234 males and 244 females) participated in the study. Domain-general creative thinking was measured…

  3. Exploring Domain-General and Domain-Specific Linguistic Knowledge in the Assessment of Academic English Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romhild, Anja; Kenyon, Dorry; MacGregor, David

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of domain-general and domain-specific linguistic knowledge in the assessment of academic English language proficiency using a latent variable modeling approach. The goal of the study was to examine if modeling of domain-specific variance results in improved model fit and well-defined latent factors. Analyses were…

  4. Frequency Domain Calculations Of Acoustic Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Two complex geometry problems are solved using the linearized Euler equations. The impedance mismatch method1 is used to impose the solid surfaces without the need to use a body-fitted grid. The problem is solved in the frequency domain to avoid long run times. Although the harmonic assumption eliminates all time dependence, a pseudo-time term is added to allow conventional iterative methods to be employed. A Jameson type, Runge-Kutta scheme is used to advance the solution in pseudo time. The spatial operator is based on a seven-point, sixth-order finite difference. Constant coefficient, sixth-derivative artificial dissipation is used throughout the domain. A buffer zone technique employing a complex frequency to damp all waves near the boundaries is used to minimize reflections. The results show that the method is capable of capturing the salient features of the scattering, but an excessive number of grid points are required to resolve the phenomena in the vicinity of the solid bodies because the wavelength of the acoustics is relatively short compared with the size of the bodies. Smoothly transitioning into the immersed boundary condition alleviates the difficulties, but a fine mesh is still required.

  5. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  6. Data hiding technique in JPEG compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Peter H. W.; Au, Oscar C. L.; Wong, Justy W. C.

    2001-08-01

    JPEG is a common image format in the world wide web. JPEG-compressed images can be used to hide data for secret internet communication and simply any auxiliary data. In this paper, we propose an algorithm called J-Mark to embed invisible watermark information into JPEG compressed images in the compress domain. There are three parts of J-Mark: block selection, DCT coefficient selection, and modification of selected DCT coefficients. Only the texture blocks with significant masking properties are selected in block selection. Only the DCT coefficients with significant energy in the selected blocks are selected. The watermark data are embedded as the 'randomized parity' in the selected DCT coefficients. The embedded data can be recovered perfectly in the compressed domain without fully decoding the JPEG image. Experiment results suggest that the proposed J-Mark can hide the watermarking data without detectable visual artifacts. Although the data hiding capacity differs among images, some parameter of J-Mark can be used to achieve tradeoff between data hiding capacity and visual quality.

  7. Processing and domain selection: Quantificational variability effects

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jesse A.; Clifton, Charles; Frazier, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    Three studies investigated how readers interpret sentences with variable quantificational domains, e.g., The army was mostly in the capital, where mostly may quantify over individuals or parts (Most of the army was in the capital) or over times (The army was in the capital most of the time). It is proposed that a general conceptual economy principle, No Extra Times (Majewski 2006, in preparation), discourages the postulation of potentially unnecessary times, and thus favors the interpretation quantifying over parts. Disambiguating an ambiguously quantified sentence to a quantification over times interpretation was rated as less natural than disambiguating it to a quantification over parts interpretation (Experiment 1). In an interpretation questionnaire, sentences with similar quantificational variability were constructed so that both interpretations of the sentence would require postulating multiple times; this resulted in the elimination of the preference for a quantification over parts interpretation, suggesting the parts preference observed in Experiment 1 is not reducible to a lexical bias of the adverb mostly (Experiment 2). An eye movement recording study showed that, in the absence of prior evidence for multiple times, readers exhibit greater difficulty when reading material that forces a quantification over times interpretation than when reading material that allows a quantification over parts interpretation (Experiment 3). These experiments contribute to understanding readers’ default assumptions about the temporal properties of sentences, which is essential for understanding the selection of a domain for adverbial quantifiers and, more generally, for understanding how situational constraints influence sentence processing. PMID:25328262

  8. Hydrology Domain Cyberinfrastructures: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Anticipated changes to climate, human population, land use, and urban form will alter the hydrology and availability of water within the water systems on which the world's population relies. Understanding the effects of these changes will be paramount in sustainably managing water resources, as well as maintaining associated capacity to provide ecosystem services (e.g., regulating flooding, maintaining instream flow during dry periods, cycling nutrients, and maintaining water quality). It will require better information characterizing both natural and human mediated hydrologic systems and enhanced ability to generate, manage, store, analyze, and share growing volumes of observational data. Over the past several years, a number of hydrology domain cyberinfrastructures have emerged or are currently under development that are focused on providing integrated access to and analysis of data for cross-domain synthesis studies. These include the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) Hydrologic Information System (HIS), the Critical Zone Observatory Information System (CZOData), HyroShare, the BiG CZ software system, and others. These systems have focused on sharing, integrating, and analyzing hydrologic observations data. This presentation will describe commonalities and differences in the cyberinfrastructure approaches used by these projects and will highlight successes and lessons learned in addressing the challenges of big and complex data. It will also identify new challenges and opportunities for next generation cyberinfrastructure and a next generation of cyber-savvy scientists and engineers as developers and users.

  9. Spectral fusing Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Meemon, Panomsak; Widjaja, Joewono; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-02-01

    Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) is one of many variations of optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques that aims for invariant high resolution across a 3D field of view by utilizing the ability to dynamically refocus the imaging optics in the sample arm. GD-OCM acquires multiple cross-sectional images at different focus positions of the objective lens, and then fuses them to obtain an invariant high-resolution 3D image of the sample, which comes with the intrinsic drawback of a longer processing time as compared to conventional Fourier domain OCT. Here, we report on an alternative Gabor fusing algorithm, the spectral-fusion technique, which directly processes each acquired spectrum and combines them prior to the Fourier transformation to obtain a depth profile. The implementation of the spectral-fusion algorithm is presented and its performance is compared to that of the prior GD-OCM spatial-fusion approach. The spectral-fusion approach shows twice the speed of the spatial-fusion approach for a spectrum size of less than 2000 point sampling, which is a commonly used spectrum size in OCT imaging, including GD-OCM.

  10. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andréassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  11. Establishment and Maintenance of a Heterochromatin Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ira M.; Shankaranarayana, Gurumurthy D.; Noma, Ken-ichi; Ayoub, Nabieh; Cohen, Amikam; Grewal, Shiv I. S.

    2002-09-01

    The higher-order assembly of chromatin imposes structural organization on the genetic information of eukaryotes and is thought to be largely determined by posttranslational modification of histone tails. Here, we study a 20-kilobase silent domain at the mating-type region of fission yeast as a model for heterochromatin formation. We find that, although histone H3 methylated at lysine 9 (H3 Lys9) directly recruits heterochromatin protein Swi6/HP1, the critical determinant for H3 Lys9 methylation to spread in cis and to be inherited through mitosis and meiosis is Swi6 itself. We demonstrate that a centromere-homologous repeat (cenH) present at the silent mating-type region is sufficient for heterochromatin formation at an ectopic site, and that its repressive capacity is mediated by components of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. Moreover, cenH and the RNAi machinery cooperate to nucleate heterochromatin assembly at the endogenous mat locus but are dispensable for its subsequent inheritance. This work defines sequential requirements for the initiation and propagation of regional heterochromatic domains.

  12. Birth order effects on autism symptom domains.

    PubMed

    Reichenberg, Abraham; Smith, Christopher; Schmeidler, James; Silverman, Jeremy M

    2007-03-30

    Autism is predominantly genetically determined. Evidence supports familiality of the main sets of behavioral characteristics that define the syndrome of autism; however, possible non-genetic effects have also been suggested. The present study compared levels of autism symptom domains, as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Interview, and useful phrase speech scores between 106 pairs of first- and second-born siblings from multiply affected families. In addition, the intercorrelations between the measures were compared between siblings. The overall mean repetitive behavior total score was significantly higher (worse) in first-born than in second-born siblings. In contrast, first-born siblings had significantly lower (better) useful phrase speech than their younger siblings. Autism social and non-verbal communication scores were significantly correlated in first- and in second-born siblings. However, there was a significant difference in the coefficients between first- and second-born siblings. Performance on the non-verbal communication domain was also significantly and positively correlated with useful phrase speech score in both first- and second-born siblings. It is unclear at this time whether these results are of biologic origin. Nevertheless, the findings suggest that genetic studies in autism using specific levels of familial autism traits as phenotypes should take into account their intercorrelations and birth order effects embedded in the instrument.

  13. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  14. Microdissection of Shoot Meristem Functional Domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Ruilian; Sarkar, Ananda; Hargreaves, Sarah; Elshire, Robert J.; Eudy, Douglas; Pawlowska, Teresa; Ware, Doreen; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Buckner, Brent; Timmermans, Marja C. P.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Nettleton, Dan; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintains a pool of indeterminate cells within the SAM proper, while lateral organs are initiated from the SAM periphery. Laser microdissection–microarray technology was used to compare transcriptional profiles within these SAM domains to identify novel maize genes that function during leaf development. Nine hundred and sixty-two differentially expressed maize genes were detected; control genes known to be upregulated in the initiating leaf (P0/P1) or in the SAM proper verified the precision of the microdissections. Genes involved in cell division/growth, cell wall biosynthesis, chromatin remodeling, RNA binding, and translation are especially upregulated in initiating leaves, whereas genes functioning during protein fate and DNA repair are more abundant in the SAM proper. In situ hybridization analyses confirmed the expression patterns of six previously uncharacterized maize genes upregulated in the P0/P1. P0/P1-upregulated genes that were also shown to be downregulated in leaf-arrested shoots treated with an auxin transport inhibitor are especially implicated to function during early events in maize leaf initiation. Reverse genetic analyses of asceapen1 (asc1), a maize D4-cyclin gene upregulated in the P0/P1, revealed novel leaf phenotypes, less genetic redundancy, and expanded D4-CYCLIN function during maize shoot development as compared to Arabidopsis. These analyses generated a unique SAM domain-specific database that provides new insight into SAM function and a useful platform for reverse genetic analyses of shoot development in maize. PMID:19424435

  15. Microdissection of shoot meristem functional domains.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Lionel; Strable, Josh; Zhang, Xiaolan; Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Ruilian; Sarkar, Ananda; Hargreaves, Sarah; Elshire, Robert J; Eudy, Douglas; Pawlowska, Teresa; Ware, Doreen; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Buckner, Brent; Timmermans, Marja C P; Schnable, Patrick S; Nettleton, Dan; Scanlon, Michael J

    2009-05-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintains a pool of indeterminate cells within the SAM proper, while lateral organs are initiated from the SAM periphery. Laser microdissection-microarray technology was used to compare transcriptional profiles within these SAM domains to identify novel maize genes that function during leaf development. Nine hundred and sixty-two differentially expressed maize genes were detected; control genes known to be upregulated in the initiating leaf (P0/P1) or in the SAM proper verified the precision of the microdissections. Genes involved in cell division/growth, cell wall biosynthesis, chromatin remodeling, RNA binding, and translation are especially upregulated in initiating leaves, whereas genes functioning during protein fate and DNA repair are more abundant in the SAM proper. In situ hybridization analyses confirmed the expression patterns of six previously uncharacterized maize genes upregulated in the P0/P1. P0/P1-upregulated genes that were also shown to be downregulated in leaf-arrested shoots treated with an auxin transport inhibitor are especially implicated to function during early events in maize leaf initiation. Reverse genetic analyses of asceapen1 (asc1), a maize D4-cyclin gene upregulated in the P0/P1, revealed novel leaf phenotypes, less genetic redundancy, and expanded D4-CYCLIN function during maize shoot development as compared to Arabidopsis. These analyses generated a unique SAM domain-specific database that provides new insight into SAM function and a useful platform for reverse genetic analyses of shoot development in maize.

  16. Accelerating advances in continental domain hydrologic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Clark, Martyn; Arheimer, Berit; Hay, Lauren E.; McMillan, Hilary; Kiang, Julie E.; Seibert, Jan; Hakala, Kirsti; Bock, Andrew R.; Wagener, Thorsten; Farmer, William H.; Andreassian, Vazken; Attinger, Sabine; Viglione, Alberto; Knight, Rodney; Markstrom, Steven; Over, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, hydrologic modeling of surface water resources has mainly focused on simulating the hydrologic cycle at local to regional catchment modeling domains. There now exists a level of maturity among the catchment, global water security, and land surface modeling communities such that these communities are converging toward continental domain hydrologic models. This commentary, written from a catchment hydrology community perspective, provides a review of progress in each community toward this achievement, identifies common challenges the communities face, and details immediate and specific areas in which these communities can mutually benefit one another from the convergence of their research perspectives. Those include: (1) creating new incentives and infrastructure to report and share model inputs, outputs, and parameters in data services and open access, machine-independent formats for model replication or reanalysis; (2) ensuring that hydrologic models have: sufficient complexity to represent the dominant physical processes and adequate representation of anthropogenic impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, a process-based approach to model parameter estimation, and appropriate parameterizations to represent large-scale fluxes and scaling behavior; (3) maintaining a balance between model complexity and data availability as well as uncertainties; and (4) quantifying and communicating significant advancements toward these modeling goals.

  17. Single-domain epitaxial silicene on diboride thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Fleurence, A.; Gill, T. G.; Friedlein, R.; ...

    2016-04-12

    Epitaxial silicene, which forms spontaneously on ZrB2(0001) thin films grown on Si(111) wafers, has a periodic stripe domain structure. By adsorbing additional Si atoms on this surface, we find that the domain boundaries vanish, and a single-domain silicene sheet can be prepared without altering its buckled honeycomb structure. The amount of Si required to induce this change suggests that the domain boundaries are made of a local distortion of the silicene honeycomb lattice. LastlThe realization of a single domain sheet with structural and electronic properties close to those of the original striped state demonstrates the high structural flexibility of silicene.

  18. A Unified Approach to Intra-Domain Security

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, Craig A; Kalafut, Andrew J.; Gupta, Prof. Minaxi

    2009-01-01

    While a variety of mechanisms have been developed for securing individual intra-domain protocols, none address the issue in a holistic manner. We develop a unified framework to secure prominent networking protocols within a single domain. We begin with a secure version of the DHCP protocol, which has the additional feature of providing each host with a certificate. We then leverage these certificates to secure ARP, prevent spoofing within the domain, and secure SSH and VPN connections between the domain and hosts which have previously interacted with it locally. In doing so, we also develop an incrementally deployable public key infrastructure which can later be leveraged to support inter-domain authentication.

  19. Effects of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert damping on domain growth.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kazue

    2016-12-01

    Domain patterns are simulated by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with an easy-axis anisotropy. If the Gilbert damping is removed from the LLG equation, it merely describes the precession of magnetization with a ferromagnetic interaction. However, even without the damping, domains that look similar to those of scalar fields are formed, and they grow with time. It is demonstrated that the damping has no significant effects on domain growth laws and large-scale domain structure. In contrast, small-scale domain structure is affected by the damping. The difference in small-scale structure arises from energy dissipation due to the damping.

  20. Single-domain epitaxial silicene on diboride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Fleurence, A.; Gill, T. G.; Friedlein, R.; Sadowski, J. T.; Aoyagi, K.; Copel, M.; Tromp, R. M.; Hirjibehedin, C. F.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.

    2016-04-12

    Epitaxial silicene, which forms spontaneously on ZrB2(0001) thin films grown on Si(111) wafers, has a periodic stripe domain structure. By adsorbing additional Si atoms on this surface, we find that the domain boundaries vanish, and a single-domain silicene sheet can be prepared without altering its buckled honeycomb structure. The amount of Si required to induce this change suggests that the domain boundaries are made of a local distortion of the silicene honeycomb lattice. LastlThe realization of a single domain sheet with structural and electronic properties close to those of the original striped state demonstrates the high structural flexibility of silicene.

  1. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic spirals via domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, Ryan D.; Kunz, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics have been investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic nanostructures for potential applications in logic, sensing, and recording. We present a combination of analytic and simulated results describing the reliable field driven motion of a domain wall through the arms of a ferromagnetic spiral nanowire. The spiral geometry is capable of taking advantage of the benefits of both straight and circular wires. Measurements of the in-plane components of the spirals' magnetization can be used to determine the angular location of the domain wall, impacting the magnetoresistive applications dependent on the domain wall location. The spirals' magnetization components are found to depend on the spiral parameters: the initial radius and spacing between spiral arms, along with the domain wall location. The magnetization is independent of the parameters of the rotating field used to move the domain wall, and therefore the model is valid for current induced domain wall motion as well. The speed of the domain wall is found to depend on the frequency of the rotating driving field, and the domain wall speeds can be reliably varied over several orders of magnitude. We further demonstrate a technique capable of injecting multiple domain walls and show the reliable and unidirectional motion of domain walls through the arms of the spiral.

  2. Structural and Functional Analysis of Multi-Interface Domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Hoi, Steven C. H.; Wong, Limsoon; Hamp, Tobias; Li, Jinyan

    2012-01-01

    A multi-interface domain is a domain that can shape multiple and distinctive binding sites to contact with many other domains, forming a hub in domain-domain interaction networks. The functions played by the multiple interfaces are usually different, but there is no strict bijection between the functions and interfaces as some subsets of the interfaces play the same function. This work applies graph theory and algorithms to discover fingerprints for the multiple interfaces of a domain and to establish associations between the interfaces and functions, based on a huge set of multi-interface proteins from PDB. We found that about 40% of proteins have the multi-interface property, however the involved multi-interface domains account for only a tiny fraction (1.8%) of the total number of domains. The interfaces of these domains are distinguishable in terms of their fingerprints, indicating the functional specificity of the multiple interfaces in a domain. Furthermore, we observed that both cooperative and distinctive structural patterns, which will be useful for protein engineering, exist in the multiple interfaces of a domain. PMID:23272073

  3. Origin of stationary domain wall enhanced ferroelectric susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-03-01

    Ferroelectrics usually adopt a multidomain state with domain walls separating domains with polarization axes oriented differently. It has long been recognized that domain walls can dramatically impact the properties of ferroelectric materials. The enhancement of low-field susceptibility/permittivity under subswitching conditions is usually attributed to reversible domain wall vibration. Recent experiments highlight the stationary domain wall contribution to the dielectric susceptibility irrespective of any lateral displacements or deformations of the wall. We study the effects of domain walls on the low-field permittivity of PbTiO3 with density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The static dielectric constant is calculated as a function of increasing domain wall density and temperature. We find an increase of dielectric permittivity with increasing domain wall density, which is expected to occur at a low driving field where the lateral motion of domain walls is forbidden. Real-space decomposition of the dielectric response reveals that frustrated dipoles within the finite width of the domain walls are responsible for the enhanced low-field permittivity. We explain the 100 % enhancement of the dielectric susceptibility form domain walls, which arises from the softer potential wells within them.

  4. Combinatorial geometry domain decomposition strategies for Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Deng, L.; Mo, Z.; Liu, Z.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Li, S.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis and modeling of nuclear reactors can lead to memory overload for a single core processor when it comes to refined modeling. A method to solve this problem is called 'domain decomposition'. In the current work, domain decomposition algorithms for a combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code are developed on the JCOGIN (J Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo transport INfrastructure). Tree-based decomposition and asynchronous communication of particle information between domains are described in the paper. Combination of domain decomposition and domain replication (particle parallelism) is demonstrated and compared with that of MERCURY code. A full-core reactor model is simulated to verify the domain decomposition algorithms using the Monte Carlo particle transport code JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport Code), which has being developed on the JCOGIN infrastructure. Besides, influences of the domain decomposition algorithms to tally variances are discussed. (authors)

  5. Domain Decomposition By the Advancing-Partition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new method of domain decomposition has been developed for generating unstructured grids in subdomains either sequentially or using multiple computers in parallel. Domain decomposition is a crucial and challenging step for parallel grid generation. Prior methods are generally based on auxiliary, complex, and computationally intensive operations for defining partition interfaces and usually produce grids of lower quality than those generated in single domains. The new technique, referred to as "Advancing Partition," is based on the Advancing-Front method, which partitions a domain as part of the volume mesh generation in a consistent and "natural" way. The benefits of this approach are: 1) the process of domain decomposition is highly automated, 2) partitioning of domain does not compromise the quality of the generated grids, and 3) the computational overhead for domain decomposition is minimal. The new method has been implemented in NASA's unstructured grid generation code VGRID.

  6. Do proteins facilitate the formation of cholesterol-rich domains?

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2004-11-03

    Both biological and model membranes can exhibit the formation of domains. A brief review of some of the diverse methodologies used to identify the presence of domains in membranes is given. Some of these domains are enriched in cholesterol. The segregation of lipids into cholesterol-rich domains can occur in both pure lipid systems as well as membranes containing peptides and proteins. Peptides and proteins can promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains not only by preferentially interacting with cholesterol and being sequestered into these regions of the membrane, but also indirectly as a consequence of being excluded from cholesterol-rich domains. The redistribution of components is dictated by the thermodynamics of the system. The formation of domains in a biological membrane is a consequence of all of the intermolecular interactions including those among lipid molecules as well as between lipids and proteins.

  7. Sensor domains of two-component regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jonah; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2010-04-01

    Two-component systems regulate crucial cellular processes in microorganisms, and each comprises a homodimeric histidine kinase receptor and a cytoplasmic response regulator. Histidine kinases, often membrane associated, detect environmental input at sensor domains and propagate resulting signals to catalytic cytoplasmic transmitter domains. Recent studies on the great diversity of sensor domains reveal patterns of domain organization and biochemical properties that provide insight into mechanisms of signaling. Despite the enormous sequence variability found within sensor input domains, they fall into a relatively small number of discrete structural classes. Subtle rearrangements along a structurally labile dimer interface, in the form of possible sliding or rotational motions, are propagated from the sensor domain to the transmitter domain to modulate activity of the receptor.

  8. Introduction: History of SH2 Domains and Their Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bernard A; Machida, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    The Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain is the prototypical protein interaction module that lies at the heart of phosphotyrosine signaling. Since its serendipitous discovery, there has been a tremendous advancement in technologies and an array of techniques available for studying SH2 domains and phosphotyrosine signaling. In this chapter, we provide a glimpse of the history of SH2 domains and describe many of the tools and techniques that have been developed along the way and discuss future directions for SH2 domain studies. We highlight the gist of each chapter in this volume in the context of: the structural biology and phosphotyrosine binding; characterizing SH2 specificity and generating prediction models; systems biology and proteomics; SH2 domains in signal transduction; and SH2 domains in disease, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Many of the individual chapters provide an in-depth approach that will allow scientists to interrogate the function and role of SH2 domains.

  9. Conformational instability of the MARK3 UBA domain compromises ubiquitin recognition and promotes interaction with the adjacent kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James M.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Briant, Douglas J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Sicheri, Frank; Kay, Lewis E.; Pawson, Tony

    2012-10-23

    The Par-1/MARK protein kinases play a pivotal role in establishing cellular polarity. This family of kinases contains a unique domain architecture, in which a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain is located C-terminal to the kinase domain. We have used a combination of x-ray crystallography and NMR dynamics experiments to understand the interaction of the human (h) MARK3 UBA domain with the adjacent kinase domain as compared with ubiquitin. The x-ray crystal structure of the linked hMARK3 kinase and UBA domains establishes that the UBA domain forms a stable intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. However, solution-state NMR studies of the isolated UBA domain indicate that it is highly dynamic, undergoing conformational transitions that can be explained by a folding-unfolding equilibrium. NMR titration experiments indicated that the hMARK3 UBA domain has a detectable but extremely weak affinity for mono ubiquitin, which suggests that conformational instability of the isolated hMARK3 UBA domain attenuates binding to ubiquitin despite the presence of residues typically involved in ubiquitin recognition. Our data identify a molecular mechanism through which the hMARK3 UBA domain has evolved to bind the kinase domain, in a fashion that stabilizes an open conformation of the N- and C-terminal lobes, at the expense of its capacity to engage ubiquitin. These results may be relevant more generally to the 30% of UBA domains that lack significant ubiquitin-binding activity, and they suggest a unique mechanism by which interaction domains may evolve new binding properties.

  10. Social cognitive conflict resolution: contributions of domain-general and domain-specific neural systems.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Jamil; Hennigan, Kelly; Weber, Jochen; Ochsner, Kevin N

    2010-06-23

    Cognitive control mechanisms allow individuals to behave adaptively in the face of complex and sometimes conflicting information. Although the neural bases of these control mechanisms have been examined in many contexts, almost no attention has been paid to their role in resolving conflicts between competing social cues, which is surprising given that cognitive conflicts are part of many social interactions. Evidence about the neural processing of social information suggests that two systems--the mirror neuron system (MNS) and mental state attribution system (MSAS)--are specialized for processing nonverbal and contextual social cues, respectively. This could support a model of social cognitive conflict resolution in which competition between social cues would recruit domain-general cognitive control mechanisms, which in turn would bias processing toward the MNS or MSAS. Such biasing could also alter social behaviors, such as inferences made about the internal states of others. We tested this model by scanning participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging while they drew inferences about the social targets' emotional states based on congruent or incongruent nonverbal and contextual social cues. Conflicts between social cues recruited the anterior cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortex, brain areas associated with domain-general control processes. This activation was accompanied by biasing of neural activity toward areas in the MNS or MSAS, which tracked, respectively, with perceivers' behavioral reliance on nonverbal or contextual cues when drawing inferences about targets' emotions. Together, these data provide evidence about both domain-general and domain-specific mechanisms involved in resolving social cognitive conflicts.

  11. Critiquing the logic of the domain section of the Occupational therapy practice framework: domain and process.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David L

    2006-01-01

    The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process (also known as the Framework), an official document of the American Occupational Therapy Association, advocates terminology and a classification system for concepts that are central to the profession of occupational therapy. Its use has been advocated in practice, research, education, and communications with those who wish to know more about occupational therapy. Given its importance to the profession and to society, the Framework deserves intense scrutiny and sustained scholarly inquiry. This article investigates the logic of Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process, with a focus on domain. Are definitions and classifications within the domain logically coherent? The Framework repeatedly violates two rules of logical definitions: (a) a unique term must be applicable to certain particulars and must not be applicable to others (the rule of precision); and (b) the particulars assigned to one term must not be assignable to another term unless there is a logical explanation (the rule of parsimony). The Framework also repeatedly violates two rules of logical classification: (a) a lower-level category must be classifiable only within its assigned higher-level category (the rule of exclusivity); and (b) all relevant particulars must be classifiable (the rule of exhaustiveness). The profession of occupational therapy needs one or more logically coherent conceptual frameworks, but the Framework is not recommended as a logical basis for practice, education, research, and external communications. Specific recommendations are made in support of the development of a logical framework and the refinement of existing frameworks.

  12. Examining the Domain-Specificity of Metacognition Using Academic Domains and Task-Specific Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Brianna M.; Berman, Ashleigh F.

    2013-01-01

    Metacognition refers to students' knowledge and regulation of cognition, as well as their accuracy in predicting their academic performance. This study addressed two major questions: 1) how do metacognitive knowledge, regulation and accuracy differ across domains?, and 2) how do students' individual differences relate to their reported…

  13. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System.

    PubMed

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M; Enninga, Jost; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of the Shigella flexneri effector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles.

  14. Effective Domain Partitioning for Multi-Clock Domain IP Core Wrapper Design under Power Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Thomas Edison; Yoneda, Tomokazu; Zhao, Danella; Fujiwara, Hideo

    The rapid advancement of VLSI technology has made it possible for chip designers and manufacturers to embed the components of a whole system onto a single chip, called System-on-Chip or SoC. SoCs make use of pre-designed modules, called IP-cores, which provide faster design time and quicker time-to-market. Furthermore, SoCs that operate at multiple clock domains and very low power requirements are being utilized in the latest communications, networking and signal processing devices. As a result, the testing of SoCs and multi-clock domain embedded cores under power constraints has been rapidly gaining importance. In this research, a novel method for designing power-aware test wrappers for embedded cores with multiple clock domains is presented. By effectively partitioning the various clock domains, we are able to increase the solution space of possible test schedules for the core. Since previous methods were limited to concurrently testing all the clock domains, we effectively remove this limitation by making use of bandwidth conversion, multiple shift frequencies and properly gating the clock signals to control the shift activity of various core logic elements. The combination of the above techniques gains us greater flexibility when determining an optimal test schedule under very tight power constraints. Furthermore, since it is computationally intensive to search the entire expanded solution space for the possible test schedules, we propose a heuristic 3-D bin packing algorithm to determine the optimal wrapper architecture and test schedule while minimizing the test time under power and bandwidth constraints.

  15. The domain interface method in non-conforming domain decomposition multifield problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloberas-Valls, O.; Cafiero, M.; Cante, J.; Ferrer, A.; Oliver, J.

    2017-04-01

    The Domain Interface Method (DIM) is extended in this contribution for the case of mixed fields as encountered in multiphysics problems. The essence of the non-conforming domain decomposition technique consists in a discretization of a fictitious zero-thickness interface as in the original methodology and continuity of the solution fields across the domains is satisfied by incorporating the corresponding Lagrange Multipliers. The multifield DIM inherits the advantages of its irreducible version in the sense that the connections between non-matching meshes, with possible geometrically non-conforming interfaces, is accounted by the automatic Delaunay interface discretization without considering master and slave surfaces or intermediate surface projections as done in many established techniques, e.g. mortar methods. The multifield enhancement identifies the Lagrange multiplier field and incorporates its contribution in the weak variational form accounting for the corresponding consistent stabilization term based on a Nitsche method. This type of constraint enforcement circumvents the appearance of instabilities when the Ladyzhenskaya-Babu\\vska-Brezzi (LBB) condition is not fulfilled by the chosen discretization. The domain decomposition framework is assessed in a large deformation setting for mixed displacement/pressure formulations and coupled thermomechanical problems. The continuity of the mixed field is studied in well selected benchmark problems for both mixed formulations and the objectivity of the response is compared to reference monolithic solutions. Results suggest that the presented strategy shows sufficient potential to be a valuable tool in situations where the evolving physics at particular domains require the use of different spatial discretizations or field interpolations.

  16. The domain interface method in non-conforming domain decomposition multifield problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloberas-Valls, O.; Cafiero, M.; Cante, J.; Ferrer, A.; Oliver, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Domain Interface Method (DIM) is extended in this contribution for the case of mixed fields as encountered in multiphysics problems. The essence of the non-conforming domain decomposition technique consists in a discretization of a fictitious zero-thickness interface as in the original methodology and continuity of the solution fields across the domains is satisfied by incorporating the corresponding Lagrange Multipliers. The multifield DIM inherits the advantages of its irreducible version in the sense that the connections between non-matching meshes, with possible geometrically non-conforming interfaces, is accounted by the automatic Delaunay interface discretization without considering master and slave surfaces or intermediate surface projections as done in many established techniques, e.g. mortar methods. The multifield enhancement identifies the Lagrange multiplier field and incorporates its contribution in the weak variational form accounting for the corresponding consistent stabilization term based on a Nitsche method. This type of constraint enforcement circumvents the appearance of instabilities when the Ladyzhenskaya-Babu\\vska-Brezzi (LBB) condition is not fulfilled by the chosen discretization. The domain decomposition framework is assessed in a large deformation setting for mixed displacement/pressure formulations and coupled thermomechanical problems. The continuity of the mixed field is studied in well selected benchmark problems for both mixed formulations and the objectivity of the response is compared to reference monolithic solutions. Results suggest that the presented strategy shows sufficient potential to be a valuable tool in situations where the evolving physics at particular domains require the use of different spatial discretizations or field interpolations.

  17. SNP@Domain: a web resource of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within protein domain structures and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Han, Areum; Kang, Hyo Jin; Cho, Yoobok; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Joo; Gong, Sungsam

    2006-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in conserved protein regions have been thought to be strong candidates that alter protein functions. Thus, we have developed SNP@Domain, a web resource, to identify SNPs within human protein domains. We annotated SNPs from dbSNP with protein structure-based as well as sequence-based domains: (i) structure-based using SCOP and (ii) sequence-based using Pfam to avoid conflicts from two domain assignment methodologies. Users can investigate SNPs within protein domains with 2D and 3D maps. We expect this visual annotation of SNPs within protein domains will help scientists select and interpret SNPs associated with diseases. A web interface for the SNP@Domain is freely available at and from . PMID:16845090

  18. Catalytic Domain Architecture of Metzincin Metalloproteases*

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteases cleave proteins and peptides, and deregulation of their function leads to pathology. An understanding of their structure and mechanisms of action is necessary to the development of strategies for their regulation. Among metallopeptidases are the metzincins, which are mostly multidomain proteins with ∼130–260-residue globular catalytic domains showing a common core architecture characterized by a long zinc-binding consensus motif, HEXXHXXGXX(H/D), and a methionine-containing Met-turn. Metzincins participate in unspecific protein degradation such as digestion of intake proteins and tissue development, maintenance, and remodeling, but they are also involved in highly specific cleavage events to activate or inactivate themselves or other (pro)enzymes and bioactive peptides. Metzincins are subdivided into families, and seven such families have been analyzed at the structural level: the astacins, ADAMs/adamalysins/reprolysins, serralysins, matrix metalloproteinases, snapalysins, leishmanolysins, and pappalysins. These families are reviewed from a structural point of view. PMID:19201757

  19. Birefringence insensitive optical coherence domain reflectometry system

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Davis, Joseph G.

    2002-01-01

    A birefringence insensitive fiber optic optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) system is provided containing non-polarization maintaining (non-PM) fiber in the sample arm and the reference arm without suffering from signal degradation caused by birefringence. The use of non-PM fiber significantly reduces the cost of the OCDR system and provides a disposable or multiplexed section of the sample arm. The dispersion in the reference arm and sample arm of the OCDR system are matched to achieve high resolution imaging. This system is useful in medical applications or for non-medical in situ probes. The disposable section of non-PM fiber in the sample arm can be conveniently replaced when contaminated by a sample or a patient.

  20. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  1. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation determined that current accessed self structured bubble memory devices have the potential of meeting projected data density and speed requirements. Device concepts analyzed include multilayer ferrimagnetic devices where the top layer contains a domain structure which defines the data location and the second contains the data. Current aperture and permalloy assisted current propagation devices were evaluated. Based on the result of this work more detailed device research was initiated. Detailed theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the difference in strip and threshold between a single bubble in the control layer and a double bubble which would exist in both the control layer and data layer is adequate to allow for detection of data. Detailed detector designs were investigated.

  2. Microwave background distortions from domain walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-01-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. It was found that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order pi G sigma H(sup -1)(sub 0), where sigma is the surface energy density and H(sup -1)(sub 0) the Hubble parameter. It was also found that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e., the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor gamma the redshift distortion is enhanced by gamma cubed.

  3. Microwave background distortions from domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1990-08-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. It was found that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order pi G sigma H(sup -1)(sub 0), where sigma is the surface energy density and H(sup -1)(sub 0) the Hubble parameter. It was also found that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e., the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor gamma the redshift distortion is enhanced by gamma cubed.

  4. Microwave background distortions from domain walls.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, G.; Nötzold, D.

    1991-03-01

    Domain walls arising in a cosmic phase transition after decoupling were recently proposed as seeds for the formation of large-scale structure. The distortion induced in the microwave background radiation is calculated in dependence of the wall thickness, surface density, scalar field potential, cosmic redshift and the velocity of the wall. The authors find that the maximal redshift distortion for both spherical and planar walls is of the order πGσH0-1, where σ is the surface energy density and H0 the Hubble parameter. They also find that, for a wall thickness smaller than the horizon, walls can be treated as infinitely thin, i.e. the redshift distortion is independent of the wall thickness and the specific form of the scalar potential. For planar walls moving with a Lorentz-factor γ the redshift distortion is enhanced by γ3.

  5. On entropy rate for the complex domain

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Adalı, Tülay; Li, Yi-Ou; Li, Hualiang; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2010-01-01

    We derive the entropy rate formula for a complex Gaussian random process by using a widely linear model. The resulting expression is general and applicable to both circular and noncircular Gaussian processes, since any second-order stationary process can be modeled as the output of a widely linear system driven by a circular white noise. Furthermore, we demonstrate application of the derived formula to an order selection problem. We extend a scheme for independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) sampling to the complex domain to improve the estimation performance of information-theoretic criteria when samples are correlated. We show the effectiveness of the approach for order selection for simulated and actual functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data that are inherently complex valued. PMID:20634923

  6. Precision time-domain dielectric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mopsik, F. I.

    1984-01-01

    A description is given for an automated method for determining dielectric constant and loss by the measurement of the time response of the dielectric to a step voltage. Attention is paid to the circuits necessary to achieve high accuracy (0.1%) and high sensitivity (tan δ=10-5) over audio and subaudio frequencies (104 to 10-4 Hz). These include a 100-V step generator accurate to 5 ppm, a charge detector with a time-independent bias current of 30 fA, and a clock that can control sampling time from 5 μs to 10 s. In addition, a numerical Laplace transform, based on a cubic spline, is described that preserves the accuracy of the time data when they are transformed into the frequency domain.

  7. Domain decomposition algorithms and computation fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    In the past several years, domain decomposition was a very popular topic, partly motivated by the potential of parallelization. While a large body of theory and algorithms were developed for model elliptic problems, they are only recently starting to be tested on realistic applications. The application of some of these methods to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics are investigated. Some examples are two dimensional convection-diffusion problems and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. The construction and analysis of efficient preconditioners for the interface operator to be used in the iterative solution of the interface solution is described. For the convection-diffusion problems, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is discussed.

  8. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, D.; Adams, L.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper the authors propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning and interprocessor data communication techniques. They prove that the PSOR method has the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the Red/Black (R/B) SOR method for the five-point stencil on both strip and block partitions, and as the four-color (R/B/G/O) SOR method for the nine-point stencil on strip partitions. They also demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different MIMD multiprocessors (a KSR1, an Intel Delta, a Paragon, and an IBM SP2). Finally, they compare the parallel performance of PSOR, R/B SOR, and R/B/G/O SOR. Numerical results on the Paragon indicate that PSOR is more efficient than R/B SOR and R/B/G/O SOR in both computation and interprocessor data communication.

  9. Research Domain Criteria: toward future psychiatric nosologies.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Bruce N

    2015-03-01

    The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project was initiated by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in early 2009 as the implementation of Goal 1.4 of its just-issued strategic plan. In keeping with the NIMH mission, to "transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research," RDoC was explicitly conceived as a research-related initiative. The statement of the relevant goal in the strategic plan reads: "Develop, for research purposes, new ways of classifying mental disorders based on dimensions of observable behavior and neurobiological measures." Due to the novel approach that RDoC takes to conceptualizing and studying mental disorders, it has received widespread attention, well beyond the borders of the immediate research community. This review discusses the rationale for the experimental framework that RDoC has adopted, and its implications for the nosology of mental disorders in the future.

  10. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  11. Domain specific software architectures: Command and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Christine; Hatch, William; Ruegsegger, Theodore; Balzer, Bob; Feather, Martin; Goldman, Neil; Wile, Dave

    1992-01-01

    GTE is the Command and Control contractor for the Domain Specific Software Architectures program. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an architecture-driven, component-based capability for the automated generation of command and control (C2) applications. Such a capability will significantly reduce the cost of C2 applications development and will lead to improved system quality and reliability through the use of proven architectures and components. A major focus of GTE's approach is the automated generation of application components in particular subdomains. Our initial work in this area has concentrated in the message handling subdomain; we have defined and prototyped an approach that can automate one of the most software-intensive parts of C2 systems development. This paper provides an overview of the GTE team's DSSA approach and then presents our work on automated support for message processing.

  12. Superconducting phase domains for memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study theoretically the properties of S-F/N-sIS type Josephson junctions in the frame of the quasiclassical Usadel formalism. The structure consists of two superconducting electrodes (S), a tunnel barrier (I), a combined normal metal/ferromagnet (N/F) interlayer, and a thin superconducting film (s). We demonstrate the breakdown of a spatial uniformity of the superconducting order in the s-film and its decomposition into domains with a phase shift π. The effect is sensitive to the thickness of the s layer and the widths of the F and N films in the direction along the sIS interface. We predict the existence of a regime where the structure has two energy minima and can be switched between them by an electric current injected laterally into the structure. The state of the system can be non-destructively read by an electric current flowing across the junction.

  13. Frequency domain laser velocimeter signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Murphy, R. Jay

    1991-01-01

    A new scheme for processing signals from laser velocimeter systems is described. The technique utilizes the capabilities of advanced digital electronics to yield a signal processor capable of operating in the frequency domain maximizing the information obtainable from each signal burst. This allows a sophisticated approach to signal detection and processing, with a more accurate measurement of the chirp frequency resulting in an eight-fold increase in measurable signals over the present high-speed burst counter technology. Further, the required signal-to-noise ratio is reduced by a factor of 32, allowing measurements within boundary layers of wind tunnel models. Measurement accuracy is also increased up to a factor of five.

  14. Synthetic mimetics of protein secondary structure domains

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nathan T.; Katt, William P.; Hamilton, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins modulate the majority of all biological functions and are primarily composed of highly organized secondary structural elements such as helices, turns and sheets. Many of these functions are affected by a small number of key protein–protein contacts, often involving one or more of these well-defined structural elements. Given the ubiquitous nature of these protein recognition domains, their mimicry by peptidic and non-peptidic scaffolds has become a major focus of contemporary research. This review examines several key advances in secondary structure mimicry over the past several years, particularly focusing upon scaffolds that show not only promising projection of functional groups, but also a proven effect in biological systems. PMID:20123744

  15. Taxonomy for spatial domain LSB steganography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, James C.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2014-05-01

    The Least Significant Bit (LSB) embedding technique is a well-known and broadly employed method in multimedia steganography, used mainly in applications involving single bit-plane manipulations in the spatial domain [1]. The key advantages of LSB procedures are they are simple to understand, easy to implement, have high embedding capacity, and can be resistant to steganalysis attacks. Additionally, the LSB approach has spawned numerous applications and can be used as the basis of more complex techniques for multimedia data embedding. In the last several decades, hundreds of new LSB or LSB variant methods have been developed in an effort to optimize capacity while minimizing detectability, taking advantage of the overall simplicity of this method. LSB-steganalysis research has also intensified in an effort to find new or improved ways to evaluate the performance of this widely used steganographic system. This paper reviews and categorizes some of these major techniques of LSB embedding, focusing specifically on the spatial domain. Some justification for establishing and identifying promising uses of a proposed SD-LSB centric taxonomy are discussed. Specifically, we define a new taxonomy for SD-LSB embedding techniques with the goal of aiding researchers in tool classification methodologies that can lead to advances in the state-of-the-art in steganography. With a common framework to work with, researchers can begin to more concretely identify core tools and common techniques to establish common standards of practice for steganography in general. Finally, we provide a summary on some of the most common LSB embedding techniques followed by a proposed taxonomy standard for steganalysis.

  16. A Spatial Domain Quantum Watermarking Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhan-Hong; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Xu, Shu-Jiang; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a spatial domain quantum watermarking scheme. For a quantum watermarking scheme, a feasible quantum circuit is a key to achieve it. This paper gives a feasible quantum circuit for the presented scheme. In order to give the quantum circuit, a new quantum multi-control rotation gate, which can be achieved with quantum basic gates, is designed. With this quantum circuit, our scheme can arbitrarily control the embedding position of watermark images on carrier images with the aid of auxiliary qubits. Besides reversely acting the given quantum circuit, the paper gives another watermark extracting algorithm based on quantum measurements. Moreover, this paper also gives a new quantum image scrambling method and its quantum circuit. Differ from other quantum watermarking schemes, all given quantum circuits can be implemented with basic quantum gates. Moreover, the scheme is a spatial domain watermarking scheme, and is not based on any transform algorithm on quantum images. Meanwhile, it can make sure the watermark be secure even though the watermark has been found. With the given quantum circuit, this paper implements simulation experiments for the presented scheme. The experimental result shows that the scheme does well in the visual quality and the embedding capacity. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61272514, 61170272, 61373131, 61121061, 61411146001, the program for New Century Excellent Talents under Grant No. NCET-13-0681, the National Development Foundation for Cryptological Research (Grant No. MMJJ201401012) and the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation under Grant No. 131067, and the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. ZR2013FM025

  17. Optimization Testbed Cometboards Extended into Stochastic Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2010-01-01

    COMparative Evaluation Testbed of Optimization and Analysis Routines for the Design of Structures (CometBoards) is a multidisciplinary design optimization software. It was originally developed for deterministic calculation. It has now been extended into the stochastic domain for structural design problems. For deterministic problems, CometBoards is introduced through its subproblem solution strategy as well as the approximation concept in optimization. In the stochastic domain, a design is formulated as a function of the risk or reliability. Optimum solution including the weight of a structure, is also obtained as a function of reliability. Weight versus reliability traced out an inverted-S-shaped graph. The center of the graph corresponded to 50 percent probability of success, or one failure in two samples. A heavy design with weight approaching infinity could be produced for a near-zero rate of failure that corresponded to unity for reliability. Weight can be reduced to a small value for the most failure-prone design with a compromised reliability approaching zero. The stochastic design optimization (SDO) capability for an industrial problem was obtained by combining three codes: MSC/Nastran code was the deterministic analysis tool, fast probabilistic integrator, or the FPI module of the NESSUS software, was the probabilistic calculator, and CometBoards became the optimizer. The SDO capability requires a finite element structural model, a material model, a load model, and a design model. The stochastic optimization concept is illustrated considering an academic example and a real-life airframe component made of metallic and composite materials.

  18. Time domain para hydrogen induced polarization.

    PubMed

    Ratajczyk, Tomasz; Gutmann, Torsten; Dillenberger, Sonja; Abdulhussaein, Safaa; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Breitzke, Hergen; Bommerich, Ute; Trantzschel, Thomas; Bernarding, Johannes; Magusin, Pieter C M M; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Para hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) is a powerful hyperpolarization technique, which increases the NMR sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. However the hyperpolarized signal is created as an anti-phase signal, which necessitates high magnetic field homogeneity and spectral resolution in the conventional PHIP schemes. This hampers the application of PHIP enhancement in many fields, as for example in food science, materials science or MRI, where low B(0)-fields or low B(0)-homogeneity do decrease spectral resolution, leading to potential extinction if in-phase and anti-phase hyperpolarization signals cannot be resolved. Herein, we demonstrate that the echo sequence (45°-τ-180°-τ) enables the acquisition of low resolution PHIP enhanced liquid state NMR signals of phenylpropiolic acid derivatives and phenylacetylene at a low cost low-resolution 0.54 T spectrometer. As low field TD-spectrometers are commonly used in industry or biomedicine for the relaxometry of oil-water mixtures, food, nano-particles, or other systems, we compare two variants of para-hydrogen induced polarization with data-evaluation in the time domain (TD-PHIP). In both TD-ALTADENA and the TD-PASADENA strong spin echoes could be detected under conditions when usually no anti-phase signals can be measured due to the lack of resolution. The results suggest that the time-domain detection of PHIP-enhanced signals opens up new application areas for low-field PHIP-hyperpolarization, such as non-invasive compound detection or new contrast agents and biomarkers in low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Finally, solid-state NMR calculations are presented, which show that the solid echo (90y-τ-90x-τ) version of the TD-ALTADENA experiment is able to convert up to 10% of the PHIP signal into visible magnetization.

  19. Recombinant spider silk genetically functionalized with affinity domains.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Ronnie; Thatikonda, Naresh; Lindberg, Diana; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Nygren, Per-Åke; Hedhammar, My

    2014-05-12

    Functionalization of biocompatible materials for presentation of active protein domains is an area of growing interest. Herein, we describe a strategy for functionalization of recombinant spider silk via gene fusion to affinity domains of broad biotechnological use. Four affinity domains of different origin and structure; the IgG-binding domains Z and C2, the albumin-binding domain ABD, and the biotin-binding domain M4, were all successfully produced as soluble silk fusion proteins under nondenaturing purification conditions. Silk films and fibers produced from the fusion proteins were demonstrated to be chemically and thermally stable. Still, the bioactive domains are concluded to be folded and accessible, since their respective targets could be selectively captured from complex samples, including rabbit serum and human plasma. Interestingly, materials produced from mixtures of two different silk fusion proteins displayed combined binding properties, suggesting that tailor-made materials with desired stoichiometry and surface distributions of several binding domains can be produced. Further, use of the IgG binding ability as a general mean for presentation of desired biomolecules could be demonstrated for a human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF) model system, via a first capture of anti-VEGF IgG to silk containing the Z-domain, followed by incubation with hVEGF. Taken together, this study demonstrates the potential of recombinant silk, genetically functionalized with affinity domains, for construction of biomaterials capable of presentation of almost any desired biomolecule.

  20. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-07

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future.