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Sample records for photovoltaic array fact

  1. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  2. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  3. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  4. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar photovoltaics (PV) domestically. The SunShot Initiative aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  5. A photovoltaic array simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachtsevanos, G. J.; Grimbas, E. J.

    A system simulating the output voltage-current characteristics of a photovoltaic array is described. The simulator may be used to test the performance of PV arrays and associated power conditioning equipment necessary for the autonomous or interconnected operation of photovoltaic energy sources. The simulator's main features include simplicity of construction, wide parametric variability and low cost. It is capable of reproducing the output characteristics of commercially available arrays at varying solar irradiation levels with sufficient accuracy. The design ensures the lowest possible power dissipation and minimal thermal drift. It is estimated that the cost of the simulator is an insignificant fraction of the actual array cost in the kilowatt power range.

  6. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  7. Photovoltaic Reliability and Engineering (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Photovoltaic Reliability and Engineering. One-sided sheet that includes Scope, Core Competencies and Capabilities, and Contact/Web information.

  8. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced, universally-mountable, integrated residential photovoltaic array concept was defined based upon an in-depth formulation and evaluation of three candidate approaches which were synthesized from existing or proposed residential array concepts. The impact of module circuitry and process sequence is considered and technology gaps and performance drivers associated with residential photovoltaic array concepts are identified. The actual learning experience gained from the comparison of the problem areas of the hexagonal shingle design with the rectangular module design led to what is considered an advanced array concept. Building the laboratory mockup provided actual experience and the opportunity to uncover additional technology gaps.

  9. FEMP Renewable Energy Fact Sheet: Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Photovoltaic energy systems, which convert sunlight to electricity, can meet many different needs in Federal facilities. This fact sheet describes how photovoltaic (PV) energy systems can be used to provide electricity for lighting, communications, refrigeration, fans, signs, pumps, drilling equipment, emergency power packs, and cathodic (corrosion) protection, among others. Applications for PV power in Federal facilities include staff housing, parking areas, campgrounds, marinas, visitor centers, roadside communications equipment, ranger stations, underground pipelines, irrigation and disinfecting systems, and disaster response units. PV systems are particularly suitable and cost-effective for facilities that now use diesel power or that are in remote areas far from electric power lines.

  10. Advanced photovoltaic solar array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard M.; Stella, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Phase 2 of the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array (APSA) program, started in mid-1987, is currently in progress to fabricate prototype wing hardware that will lead to wing integration and testing in 1989. The design configuration and key details are reviewed. A status of prototype hardware fabricated to date is provided. Results from key component-level tests are discussed. Revised estimates of array-level performance as a function of solar cell device technology for geosynchronous missions are given.

  11. Advanced Rainbow Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Shields, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays of the rainbow type, equipped with light-concentrator and spectral-beam-splitter optics, have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, high-efficiency solar electric power sources. This investigation has contributed to a revival of the concept of the rainbow photovoltaic array, which originated in the 1950s but proved unrealistic at that time because the selection of solar photovoltaic cells was too limited. Advances in the art of photovoltaic cells since that time have rendered the concept more realistic, thereby prompting the present development effort. A rainbow photovoltaic array comprises side-by-side strings of series-connected photovoltaic cells. The cells in each string have the same bandgap, which differs from the bandgaps of the other strings. Hence, each string operates most efficiently in a unique wavelength band determined by its bandgap. To obtain maximum energy-conversion efficiency and to minimize the size and weight of the array for a given sunlight input aperture, the sunlight incident on the aperture is concentrated, then spectrally dispersed onto the photovoltaic array plane, whereon each string of cells is positioned to intercept the light in its wavelength band of most efficient operation. The number of cells in each string is chosen so that the output potentials of all the strings are the same; this makes it possible to connect the strings together in parallel to maximize the output current of the array. According to the original rainbow photovoltaic concept, the concentrated sunlight was to be split into multiple beams by use of an array of dichroic filters designed so that each beam would contain light in one of the desired wavelength bands. The concept has since been modified to provide for dispersion of the spectrum by use of adjacent prisms. A proposal for an advanced version calls for a unitary concentrator/ spectral-beam-splitter optic in the form of a parabolic curved Fresnel-like prism

  12. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  13. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  14. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-10-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  15. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  16. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  17. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The design details of an optimized integrated residential photovoltaic module/array are presented. This selected design features a waterproofing and mounting scheme which was devised to simplify the installation procedures by the avoidance of complex gasketed or caulked joints, while still maintaining a high confidence that the watertight integrity of the integral roofing surface will be achieved for the design lifetime of the system. The production and installation costs for the selected module/array design are reported for a range of annual production rates as a function of the cost of solar cells.

  18. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royal, G. C., III

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen conceptual designs of residential photovoltaic arrays are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that effect further array subsystem development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are: (1) An array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipper locking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters. (2) An array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipper locking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks. (3) An array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

  19. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, G. C., III

    1981-04-01

    Sixteen conceptual designs of residential photovoltaic arrays are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that effect further array subsystem development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are: (1) An array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipper locking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters. (2) An array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipper locking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks. (3) An array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

  20. Photovoltaic array mounting apparatus, systems, and methods

    DOEpatents

    West, Jack Raymond; Atchley, Brian; Hudson, Tyrus Hawkes; Johansen, Emil

    2016-01-05

    A photovoltaic array, including: (a) supports laid out on a surface in rows and columns; (b) photovoltaic modules positioned on top of the supports; and (c) fasteners connecting the photovoltaic modules to the supports, wherein the supports have an upper pedestal surface and a lower pedestal surface such that the photovoltaic modules are positioned at a non-horizontal angle when edges of the photovoltaic modules are positioned on top of the upper and lower pedestal surfaces, and wherein a portion of the fasteners rotate to lock the photovoltaic modules onto the supports.

  1. Photovoltaic array mounting apparatus, systems, and methods

    DOEpatents

    West, Jack Raymond; Atchley, Brian; Hudson, Tyrus Hawkes; Johansen, Emil

    2015-04-14

    A photovoltaic array, including: (a) supports laid out on a surface in rows and columns; (b) photovoltaic modules positioned on top of the supports; and (c) fasteners connecting the photovoltaic modules to the supports, wherein the supports have an upper pedestal surface and a lower pedestal surface such that the photovoltaic modules are positioned at a non-horizontal angle when edges of the photovoltaic modules are positioned on top of the upper and lower pedestal surfaces, and wherein a portion of the fasteners rotate to lock the photovoltaic modules onto the supports.

  2. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An optimum integrated residential photovoltaic array/module is addressed. Nineteen existing or proposed systems intended for residential applications are described. Each of these systems is rated against a comprehensive set of evaluation criteria in an effort to formulate three module design concepts for further study and analysis. This evaluation led to a number of observations which are enumerated and should be considered in future module and array designs. Three module concepts are presented as baseline design approaches to be further analyzed and optimized. These options include: (1) a rectangular, direct mounted, shingle type module; (2) an integrally mounted module with nonconductive exposed elements; and (3) an aluminum framed, stand off module. Preliminary design drawings are presented for each of these module configurations.

  3. Residential photovoltaic module and array requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nearhoof, S. L.; Oster, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications were identified. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to residential photovoltaic array installations. Four installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. It is concluded that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in residential arrays. However, there is no applicable building code category for residential photovoltaic modules and arrays and additional work with standards writing organizations is needed to develop residential module and array requirements.

  4. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry.

  5. Photovoltaic array space power plus diagnostics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidice, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) experiment is to measure the effects of the interaction of the low- to mid-altitude space environment on the performance of a diverse set of small solar-cell arrays (planar and concentrator, representative of present and future military technologies) under differing conditions of velocity-vector orientation and simulated (by biasing) high-voltage operation. Solar arrays to be tested include Si and GaAs planar arrays and several types of GaAs concentrator arrays. Diagnostics (a Langmuir probe and a pressure gauge) and a transient pulse monitor (to measure radiated and conducted EMI during arcing) will be used to determine the impact of the environment on array operation to help verify various interactions models. Results from a successful PASP Plus flight will furnish answers to important interactions questions and provide inputs for design and test standards for photovoltaic space-power subsystems.

  6. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Three basic module design concepts were analyzed with respect to both production and installation costs. The results of this evaluation were used to synthesize a fourth design which incorporates the best features of these initial concepts to produce a module/array design approach which offers the promise of a substantial reduction in the installed cost of a residential array. A unique waterproofing and mounting scheme was used to reduce the cost of installing an integral array while still maintaining a high probability that the installed array will be watertight for the design lifetime of the system. This recommended concept will also permit the array to be mounted as a direct or stand-off installation with no changes to the module design.

  7. Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1981-10-01

    Optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays is discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost-effective for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic-trough arrays.

  8. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2013-08-27

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame, The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  9. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan [El Cerrito, CA; Graves, Simon [Berkeley, CA; Lenox, Carl J. S. [Oakland, CA; Culligan, Matthew [Berkeley, CA; Danning, Matt [Oakland, CA

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  10. The Air Force concentrating photovoltaic array program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geis, Jack W.

    1987-01-01

    A summary is given of Air Force solar concentrator projects beginning with the Rockwell International study program in 1977. The Satellite Materials Hardening Programs (SMATH) explored and developed techniques for hardening planar solar cell array power systems to the combined nuclear and laser radiation threat environments. A portion of program dollars was devoted to developing a preliminary design for a hardened solar concentrator. The results of the Survivable Concentrating Photovoltaic Array (SCOPA) program, and the design, fabrication and flight qualification of a hardened concentrator panel are discussed.

  11. Characterization of photovoltaic array performance - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1986-10-01

    Techniques are described for standardized performance monitoring of photovoltaic arrays. Performance is measured in terms of the array electrical output for a given set of environmental or standard reporting conditions or the total output per given time interval. The environmental conditions can be a standard 25 C or the normal operating temperature in the presence of 80 mW/sq cm irradiance, 20 C air temperature and 1 m/sec wind velocity. Methods are presented for converting the measurements over time into I-V characteristics representations for entire arrays. The techniques are accurate to within 5 percent, provided in situ data are collected and the distribution of the measured parameters is known.

  12. Photovoltaic array space power plus diagnostics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to summarize the five years of hardware development and fabrication represented by the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) Instrument. The original PASP Experiment requirements and background is presented along with the modifications which were requested to transform the PASP Experiment into the PASP Plus Instrument. The PASP Plus hardware and software is described. Test results for components and subsystems are given as well as final system tests. Also included are appendices which describe the major subsystems and present supporting documentation such as block diagrams, schematics, circuit board artwork, drawings, test procedures and test reports.

  13. Pvarray: A software tool for photovoltaic array design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The application of PVARRAY, a software program for design of photovoltaic arrays are described. Results of sample parametric studies on array configurations are presented. It is concluded that PVARRAY could simulate a variety of configurations.

  14. Photovoltaic Array Space Power flight experiment plus diagnostics (PASP+) modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, William T.; Adams, Steven F.; Reinhardt, Kitt C.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics flight experiment (PASP+) subsumes twelve solar array modules which represent the state of the art in the space photovoltaic array industry. Each of the twelve modules individually feature specific photovoltaic technologies such as advanced semiconductor materials, multi-bandgap structures, lightweight array designs, advanced interconnect technologies, or concentrator array designs. This paper will describe each module in detail including the configuration, components, materials, anticipated on orbit performance, and some of the aspects of each array technology. The layout of each module and the photovoltaic cells or array cross section will be presented graphically. A discussion on the environmental constraints and materials selection will be included as well as a delineation of the differences between the modules and the baseline array configuration in its intended application.

  15. Photovoltaic Array Space Power flight experiment plus diagnostics (PASP+) modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, William T.; Adams, Steven F.; Reinhardt, Kitt C.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics flight experiment (PASP+) subsumes twelve solar array modules which represent the state of the art in the space photovoltaic array industry. Each of the twelve modules individually feature specific photovoltaic technologies such as advanced semiconductor materials, multi-bandgap structures, lightweight array designs, advanced interconnect technologies, or concentrator array designs. This paper will describe each module in detail including the configuration, components, materials, anticipated on orbit performance, and some of the aspects of each array technology. The layout of each module and the photovoltaic cells or array cross section will be presented graphically. A discussion on the environmental constraints and materials selection will be included as well as a delineation of the differences between the modules and the baseline array configuration in its intended application.

  16. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  17. Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    The optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays are discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost effective than active for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic trough arrays. The analysis produced several other conclusions of interest which are also discussed.

  18. Photovoltaic array for Martian surface power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Landis, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Missions to Mars will require electric power. A leading candidate for providing power is solar power produced by photovoltaic arrays. To design such a power system, detailed information on solar-radiation availability on the Martian surface is necessary. The variation of the solar radiation on the Martian surface is governed by three factors: (1) variation in Mars-Sun distance; (2) variation in solar zenith angle due to Martian season and time of day; and (3) dust in the Martian atmosphere. A major concern is the dust storms, which occur on both local and global scales. However, there is still appreciable diffuse sunlight available even at high opacity, so that solar array operation is still possible. Typical results for tracking solar collectors are also shown and compared to the fixed collectors. During the Northern Hemisphere spring and summer the isolation is relatively high, 2-5 kW-hr/sq m-day, due to the low optical depth of the Martian atmosphere. These seasons, totalling a full terrestrial year, are the likely ones during which manned mission will be carried out.

  19. Microprocessor-controlled photovoltaic-array loading unit

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D.F.

    1982-08-01

    Described is a microprocessor-controlled test system in operation at the Photovoltaics Advanced Systems Test Facility located at Sandia National Laboratories. The test system is designed to measure the total energy output of photovoltaic arrays. The theory, installation, operation, and calibration of the test system are described.

  20. Plasma chamber testing of advanced photovoltaic solar array coupons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillard, G. Barry

    1994-05-01

    The solar array module plasma interactions experiment is a space shuttle experiment designed to investigate and quantify the high voltage plasma interactions. One of the objectives of the experiment is to test the performance of the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array (APSA). The material properties of array blanket are also studied as electric insulators for APSA arrays in high voltage conditions. Three twelve cell prototype coupons of silicon cells were constructed and tested in a space simulation chamber.

  1. Photovoltaic array with minimally penetrating rooftop support system

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.S.

    2012-10-23

    A photovoltaic array including a plurality of photovoltaic assemblies and a plurality of mounting units. The mounting units each include an elongate rail and a plurality of leg assemblies. The rail is sized and configured to maintain a portion of at least two of the photovoltaic assemblies, with the leg assemblies extending from the rail in a spaced-apart fashion and terminating in a foot for placement against a rooftop structure for minimally penetration installation. Further, at least one of the leg assemblies can include a retractable leg. When the photovoltaic array is installed to a rooftop structure including a membrane intermittently secured to a rooftop deck, the retractable leg accommodates upward billowing of the membrane under windy conditions.

  2. Feasibility Study of Solar Dome Encapsulation of Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The technical and economic advantages of using air-supported plastic enclosures to protect flat plate photovoltaic arrays are described. Conceptual designs for a fixed, latitude-tilt array and a fully tracking array were defined. Detailed wind loads and strength analyses were performed for the fixed array. Detailed thermal and power output analyses provided array performance for typical seasonal and extreme temperature conditions. Costs of each design as used in a 200 MWe central power station were defined from manufacturing and material cost estimates. The capital cost and cost of energy for the enclosed fixed-tilt array were lower than for the enclosed tracking array. The enclosed fixed-tilt array capital investment was 38% less, and the levelized bus bar energy cost was 26% less than costs for a conventional, glass-encapsulated array design. The predicted energy cost for the enclosed fixed array was 79 mills/kW-h for direct current delivered to the power conditioning units.

  3. Residential photovoltaic module and array requirements study, appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nearhoof, S. L.; Oster, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Regional building code variations, federal and city codes, and the national electric code are reviewed for their possible effects on the design of photovoltaic modules. Problems that photovoltaic arrays may impose on the insurability of residences are also discussed. Mounting configurations are developed for the modules, and grounding, wiring, terminal, and voltage requirements are established. Installation and materials costs are presented along with performance criteria.

  4. Array structure design handbook for stand alone photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didelot, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    This handbook will permit the user to design a low-cost structure for a variety of photovoltaic system applications under 10 kW. Any presently commercially available photovoltaic modules may be used. Design alternatives are provided for different generic structure types, structural materials, and electric interfaces. The use of a hand-held calculator is sufficient to perform the necessary calculations for the array designs.

  5. Solar radiation on Mars: Stationary photovoltaic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Sherman, I.; Landis, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy is likely to be an important power source for surface-based operation on Mars. Photovoltaic cells offer many advantages. In this article we have presented analytical expressions and solar radiation data for stationary flat surfaces (horizontal and inclined) as a function of latitude, season and atmospheric dust load (optical depth). The diffuse component of the solar radiation on Mars can be significant, thus greatly affecting the optimal inclination angle of the photovoltaic surface.

  6. Photovoltaic array: Power conditioner interface characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The electrical output (power, current, and voltage) of flat plate solar arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as dc-to-ac power conditioners must be capable of accommodating widely varying input levels while maintaining operation at or near the maximum power point of the array. The array operating characteristics and extreme output limits necessary for the systematic design of array load interfaces under a wide variety of climatic conditions are studied. A number of interface parameters are examined, including optimum operating voltage, voltage energy, maximum power and current limits, and maximum open circuit voltage. The effect of array degradation and I-V curve fill factor or the array power conditioner interface is also discussed. Results are presented as normalized ratios of power conditioner parameters to array parameters, making the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes.

  7. Development of photovoltaic array and module safety requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Safety requirements for photovoltaic module and panel designs and configurations likely to be used in residential, intermediate, and large-scale applications were identified and developed. The National Electrical Code and Building Codes were reviewed with respect to present provisions which may be considered to affect the design of photovoltaic modules. Limited testing, primarily in the roof fire resistance field was conducted. Additional studies and further investigations led to the development of a proposed standard for safety for flat-plate photovoltaic modules and panels. Additional work covered the initial investigation of conceptual approaches and temporary deployment, for concept verification purposes, of a differential dc ground-fault detection circuit suitable as a part of a photovoltaic array safety system.

  8. Stretched Lens Array (SLA) Photovoltaic Concentrator Hardware Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael; O'Neill, Mark J.; Eskenazi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, the Stretched Lens Array (SLA) photovoltaic concentrator has evolved, under a NASA contract, from a concept with small component demonstrators to operational array hardware that is ready for space validation testing. A fully-functional four panel SLA solar array has been designed, built and tested. This paper will summarize the focus of the hardware development effort, discuss the results of recent testing conducted under this program and present the expected performance of a full size 7kW array designed to meet the requirements of future space missions.

  9. In situ performance measurements of the mitre photovoltaic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherdak, A. S.; Haas, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    A data acquisition system was developed to provide more accurate and consistent measurement of the degradation of solar arrays. A technique was developed for in-situ measurement of photovoltaic panels of sufficient quality to permit evaluation of electrical performance over extended periods of several years.

  10. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads. The arrays located at the outer boundary of an array field have a protective influence on the interior arrays of the field. A significant decrease of the array wind loads were recorded in the wind tunnel test on array panels located behind a fence and/or interior to the array field compared to the arrays on the boundary and unprotected from the wind. The magnitude of this decrease was the same whether caused by a fence or upwind arrays.

  11. Design to improve photoelectric efficiency for photovoltaic cell array for laser power beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojiang; Li, Beibei

    2017-02-01

    Photovoltaic cell (PV) array is a photovoltaic conversion device for laser power beaming, and uneven distribution of laser beam energy will have negative influence on the photovoltaic efficiency of PV array. In order to improve the photovoltaic efficiency under uneven laser irradiation, an optimized and efficient parallel-series PV array is designed. Based on the mathematical model and MATLB/Simulink simulation model of PV array , the influencing factors of photovoltaic efficiency are analyzed, and the concept and scheme to improve the photovoltaic efficiency of parallel-series PV array are proposed. Finally, compared with typical PV array, the effects improving efficiency of optimized array is simulated and analyzed. The simulation results show that under uneven laser irradiation, the optimized parallel-series PV array can obtain higher photovoltaic efficiency.

  12. Solar Radiation on Mars: Tracking Photovoltaic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.; Crutchik, Marcos

    1994-01-01

    A photovoltaic power source for surface-based operation on Mars can offer many advantages. Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars and the insolation on various types of collector surfaces are necessary for effective design of future planned photovoltaic systems. In this article we have presented analytical expressions for solar radiation calculation and solar radiation data for single axis (of various types) and two axis tracking surfaces and compared the insulation to horizontal and inclined surfaces. For clear skies (low atmospheric dust load) tracking surfaces resulted in higher insolation than stationary surfaces, whereas for highly dusty atmospheres, the difference is small. The insolation on the different types of stationary and tracking surfaces depend on latitude, season and optical depth of the atmosphere, and the duration of system operation. These insolations have to be compared for each mission.

  13. Glass for low-cost photovoltaic solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of glass encapsulation that are important for the designer of photovoltaic systems are discussed. Candidate glasses and available information defining the state of the art of glass encapsulation materials and processes for automated, high volume production of terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications are presented. The criteria for consideration of the glass encapsulation systems were based on the low-cost solar array project goals for arrays: (1) a low degradation rate, (2) high reliability, (3) an efficiency greater than 10 percent, (4) a total array price less than $500/kW, and (5) a production capacity of 500,000 kW/yr. The glass design areas discussed include the types of glass, sources and costs, physical properties, and glass modifications, such as antireflection coatings.

  14. Photovoltaic array environmental protection program. [in Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilger, Kevin M.; Gjerde, Helen B.; Sater, Bernard L.

    1989-01-01

    During the photovoltaic array environmental protection program, a coating material, application technique, and design approach intended to protect flexible solar array blankets during a nominal fifteen-year operating lifetime were developed. Numerous thin-film coatings for protecting the Kapton polyimide material used in the construction of the Space Station Freedom flexible solar array blanket were evaluated. The critical solar array design features and protection measures are discussed with special emphasis on the effects of solar array fabrication and flexible printed circuit manufacturing processes on coating durability. The results of the mechanical and environmental test evaluation, including oxygen plasma, neutral oxygen beam, and UV/charged-particle combined exposure, are discussed. These results led to the selection of a silicon dioxide thin-film coating to protect the solar array blanket from the low-earth-orbit atomic oxygen environment.

  15. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development. Quarterly report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, N.F. Jr.

    1981-05-18

    The results of a selection process to define the conceptual design of an optimum integrated residential photovoltaic module array are discussed. Three basic module design concepts have been analyzed with respect to both production and installation costs. The results of this evaluation have been used to synthesize a fourth design which incorporates the best features of these initial concepts to produce a module/array design approach which offers the promise of a substantial reduction in the installed cost of a residential array. A unique waterproofing and mounting scheme has been used to reduce the cost of installing an integral array while still maintaining a high probability that the installed array will be watertight for the design lifetime of the system. This recommended concept will also permit the array to be mounted as a direct or stand-off installation with no changes to the module design.

  16. Glass for low-cost photovoltaic solar arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bouquet, F.L.

    1980-02-01

    In photovoltaic systems, the encapsulant material that protects the solar cells should be highly transparent and very durable. Glass satisfies these two criteria and is considered a primary candidate for low-cost, photovoltaic encapsulation systems. In this report, various aspects of glass encapsulation are treated that are important for the designer of photovoltaic systems. Candidate glasses and available information defining the state of the art of glass encapsulation materials and processes for automated, high volume production of terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications are presented. The criteria for consideration of the glass encapsulation systems were based on the LSA (Low-cost Solar Array) Project goals for arrays: (a) a low degradation rate, (b) high reliability, (c) an efficiency greater than 10 percent, (d) a total array price less than $500/kW, and (e) a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. The glass design areas treated herein include the types of glass, sources and costs, physical properties and glass modifications, such as antireflection coatings. 78 references.

  17. Field experience with voltage breakdown in photovoltaic (PV) arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, T. D.; Fernandez, J. P.

    Information about voltage breakdown of photovoltaic arrays in the field was obtained array sites. The arrays were located at Beverly High School, Lovington Square Shopping Center, Newman Power Station, and the Oklahoma Center for Sciences and Arts. No breakdowns are reported for these sites. Breakdowns at other sites which are attributed to burrs on washers piercing insulation in one instance and delamination of a metal frame causing a short circuit in another are discussed. Other problems not attributable to voltage breakdown are also discussed.

  18. Design of photovoltaic central power station concentrator array

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A design for a photovoltaic central power station using tracking concentrators has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes an advanced Martin Marietta two-axis tracking fresnel lens concentrator. The concentrators are arrayed in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic plant output is connected to the existing 115 kV switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

  19. Advanced photovoltaic solar array - Design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard; Stella, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of an ultralightweight flexible blanket, flatpack, foldout solar array design that can provide 3- to 4-fold improvement on specific power performance of current rigid panel arrays and a factor of two improvement over a first-generation flexible blanket array developed as a forerunner to the Space Station Freedom array. To date a prototype wing has been built with a projected specific power performance of about 138 W/kg at beginning-of-life (BOL) and 93 W/kg end-of-life (EOL) at 12 kW (BOL) for a 10-year geosynchronous (GEO) mission. The prototype wing hardware has been subjected to a series of system-level tests to demonstrate design feasibility. The design of the array is summarized. The major trade studies that led to the selection of the baseline design are discussed. Key system-level and component-level testing are described. Array-level performance projections are presented as a function of existing and advanced solar array component technology for various mission applications.

  20. Advanced photovoltaic solar array - Design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard; Stella, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of an ultralightweight flexible blanket, flatpack, foldout solar array design that can provide 3- to 4-fold improvement on specific power performance of current rigid panel arrays and a factor of two improvement over a first-generation flexible blanket array developed as a forerunner to the Space Station Freedom array. To date a prototype wing has been built with a projected specific power performance of about 138 W/kg at beginning-of-life (BOL) and 93 W/kg end-of-life (EOL) at 12 kW (BOL) for a 10-year geosynchronous (GEO) mission. The prototype wing hardware has been subjected to a series of system-level tests to demonstrate design feasibility. The design of the array is summarized. The major trade studies that led to the selection of the baseline design are discussed. Key system-level and component-level testing are described. Array-level performance projections are presented as a function of existing and advanced solar array component technology for various mission applications.

  1. Stretched Lens Array Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Solar arrays have been and continue to be the mainstay in providing power to nearly all commercial and government spacecraft. Light from the Sun is directly converted into electrical energy using solar cells. One way to reduce the cost of future space power systems is by minimizing the size and number of expensive solar cells by focusing the sunlight onto smaller cells using concentrator optics. The stretched lens array (SLA) is a unique concept that uses arched Fresnel lens concentrators to focus sunlight onto a line of high-efficiency solar cells located directly beneath. The SLA concept is based on the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) design that was used on NASA's New Millennium Deep Space 1 mission. The highly successful asteroid/comet rendezvous mission (1998 to 2001) demonstrated the performance and long-term durability of the SCARLET/SLA solar array design and set the foundation for further improvements to optimize its performance.

  2. An Advanced Photovoltaic Array Regulator Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Current trends in satellite design are focused on developing small, reliable, and inexpensive spacecraft. To that end, a modular power management and distribution system is proposed which will help transition the aerospace industry towards an assembly line approach to building spacecraft. The modular system is based on an innovative DC voltage boost converter called the Series Connected Boost Unit (SCBU). The SCBU uses any isolating DC-DC converter and adds a unique series connection. This simple modification provides the SCBU topology with many advantages over existing boost converters. Efficiencies of 94-98%, power densities above 1,000 W/kg, and inherent fault tolerance are just a few of the characteristics presented. Limitations of the SCBU technology are presented, and it is shown that the SCBU makes an ideal photovoltaic an-ay regulator. A set of photovoltaic power system requirements are presented that can be applied to almost any low Earth orbit satellite. Finally, a modular design based on the series connected boost unit is outlined and functional descriptions of the components are given.

  3. Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array program status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard M.; Stella, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Photolvoltaic Solar Array (APSA) Program is discussed. The objective of the program is to demonstrate a producible array system by the end of this decade with a beginning-of-life (BOL) specific power of 130 W/kg at 10 kW as an intermediate milestone toward the ultimate goal of 300 W/kg at 25 kW by the year 2000. The near-term goal represents a significant improvement over existing rigid panel flight arrays (25 to 45 W/kg) and the first-generation flexible blanket NASA/OAST SAFE I array of the early 1980s, which was projected to provide about 60 W/kg BOL. The prototype wing hardware is in the last stages of fabrication and integration. The current status of the program is reported. The array configuration and key design details are shown. Projections are shown for future performance enhancements that may be expected through the use of advanced structural components and solar cells.

  4. Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array program status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard M.; Stella, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Photolvoltaic Solar Array (APSA) Program is discussed. The objective of the program is to demonstrate a producible array system by the end of this decade with a beginning-of-life (BOL) specific power of 130 W/kg at 10 kW as an intermediate milestone toward the ultimate goal of 300 W/kg at 25 kW by the year 2000. The near-term goal represents a significant improvement over existing rigid panel flight arrays (25 to 45 W/kg) and the first-generation flexible blanket NASA/OAST SAFE I array of the early 1980s, which was projected to provide about 60 W/kg BOL. The prototype wing hardware is in the last stages of fabrication and integration. The current status of the program is reported. The array configuration and key design details are shown. Projections are shown for future performance enhancements that may be expected through the use of advanced structural components and solar cells.

  5. Photovoltaic array mounting apparatus, systems, and methods

    SciTech Connect

    West, John Raymond; Atchley, Brian; Hudson, Tyrus Hawkes; Johansen, Emil

    2014-12-02

    An apparatus for mounting a photovoltaic (PV) module on a surface, including a support with an upper surface, a lower surface, tabs, one or more openings, and a clip comprising an arm and a notch, where the apparatus resists wind forces and seismic forces and creates a grounding electrical bond between the PV module, support, and clip. The invention further includes a method for installing PV modules on a surface that includes arranging supports in rows along an X axis and in columns along a Y axis on a surface such that in each row the distance between two neighboring supports does not exceed the length of the longest side of a PV module and in each column the distance between two neighboring supports does not exceed the length of the shortest side of a PV module.

  6. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt

    2011-11-29

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  7. Broadband-antireflective hybrid nanopillar array for photovoltaic application

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Keiji Yamamoto, Jiro; Tsuchiya, Ryuta

    2015-08-28

    Subwavelength structures such as nanopillars, nanoholes, and nanodomes have recently attracted considerable attention as antireflective structures for solar cells. Recent studies on the optical property of nanopillar array revealed that the reflection minimum is related to the diameter, the pitch, and the height of nanopillars. Here, we investigate the “hybrid” nanopillar array, which is composed of different diameters of nanopillars. Finite differential time domain simulations revealed that the photogeneration in a hybrid nanopillar array is spatially heterogeneous: carriers are generated mainly in the narrower pillars for short-wavelength incident light and in the thicker pillars for long-wavelength light, respectively. Hybrid silicon nanopillar arrays fabricated by using electron beam lithography and dry etching show excellent broadband antireflection property. Hybrid nanopillar array is thus highly promising for next-generation antireflection for photovoltaic applications.

  8. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields (nonsteady winds)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques to predict the dynamic response and the structural dynamic loads of flat plate photovoltaic arrays due to wind turbulence were analyzed. Guidelines for use in predicting the turbulent portion of the wind loading on future similar arrays are presented. The dynamic response and the loads dynamic magnification factor of the two array configurations are similar. The magnification factors at a mid chord and outer chord location on the array illustrated and at four points on the chord are shown. The wind tunnel test experimental rms pressure coefficient on which magnification factors are based is shown. It is found that the largest response and dynamic magnification factor occur at a mid chord location on an array and near the trailing edge. A technique employing these magnification factors and the wind tunnel test rms fluctuating pressure coefficients to calculate design pressure loads due to wind turbulence is presented.

  9. Wind Loads on Flat Plate Photovoltaic Array Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.; Zimmerman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays were investigated. Local pressure distributions and total aerodynamic forces on the arrays are shown. Design loads are presented to cover the conditions of array angles relative to the ground from 20 deg to 60 deg, variable array spacings, a ground clearance gap up to 1.2 m (4 ft) and array slant heights of 2.4 m (8 ft) and 4.8 m (16 ft). Several means of alleviating the wind loads on the arrays are detailed. The expected reduction of the steady state wind velocity with the use of fences as a load alleviation device are indicated to be in excess of a factor of three for some conditions. This yields steady state wind load reductions as much as a factor of ten compared to the load incurred if no fence is used to protect the arrays. This steady state wind load reduction is offset by the increase in turbulence due to the fence but still an overall load reduction of 2.5 can be realized. Other load alleviation devices suggested are the installation of air gaps in the arrays, blocking the flow under the arrays and rounding the edges of the array. A wind tunnel test plan to supplement the theoretical study and to evaluate the load alleviation devices is outlined.

  10. Energy efficient two-phase cooling for concentrated photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeser, Alexander Douglas

    Concentrated sunlight focused on the aperture of a photovoltaic solar cell, coupled with high efficiency, triple junction cells can produce much greater power densities than traditional 1 sun photovoltaic cells. However, the large concentration ratios will lead to very high cell temperatures if not efficiently cooled by a thermal management system. Two phase, flow boiling is an attractive cooling option for such CPV arrays. In this work, two phase flow boiling in mini/microchannels and micro pin fin arrays will be explored as a possible CPV cooling technique. The most energy efficient microchannel design is chosen based on a least-material, least-energy analysis. Heat transfer and pressure drop obtained in micro pin fins will be compared to data in the recent literature and new correlations for heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop will be presented. The work concludes with an energy efficiency comparison of micro pin fins with geometrically similar microchannel geometry.

  11. Solar Photovoltaic Array With Mini-Dome Fresnel Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    1994-01-01

    Mini-dome Fresnel lenses concentrate sunlight onto individual photovoltaic cells. Facets of Fresnel lens designed to refract incident light at angle of minimum deviation to minimize reflective losses. Prismatic cover on surface of each cell reduces losses by redirecting incident light away from metal contacts toward bulk of semiconductor, where it is usefully absorbed. Simple design of mini-dome concentrator array easily adaptable to automated manufacturing techniques currently used by semiconductor industry. Attractive option for variety of future space missions.

  12. Solar Photovoltaic Array With Mini-Dome Fresnel Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    1994-01-01

    Mini-dome Fresnel lenses concentrate sunlight onto individual photovoltaic cells. Facets of Fresnel lens designed to refract incident light at angle of minimum deviation to minimize reflective losses. Prismatic cover on surface of each cell reduces losses by redirecting incident light away from metal contacts toward bulk of semiconductor, where it is usefully absorbed. Simple design of mini-dome concentrator array easily adaptable to automated manufacturing techniques currently used by semiconductor industry. Attractive option for variety of future space missions.

  13. Integral assembly of photovoltaic arrays using glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Maxwell, H. G.; Holtze, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    For a number of reasons glass is an excellent material for encapsulation of solar cell arrays. Glass can be readily available at relatively low cost. It exhibits excellent stability against degradation by solar ultraviolet illumination and atmospheric pollutants. A superior approach results if glass is employed directly as an integral encapsulant without secondary organic materials. A description is presented of a electrostatic bonding process which is being developed for integral assembly of glass encapsulated arrays. Solar cells are placed in contact with the glass surface, temperature is raised until the glass becomes ionically conductive, and an electric field is applied to initiate the bonding action. Silicon solar cells up to 3 inches in diameter have been integrally bonded without degradation.

  14. Inflatable lenses for space photovoltaic concentrator arrays

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, M.J.; Piszczor, M.F.

    1997-12-31

    For 12 years, ENTECH and NASA Lewis have been developing Fresnel lens concentrator technology for space power applications. ENTECH provided the point-focus mini-dome lenses for the PASP+ array, launched in 1994. These silicone lenses performed well on orbit, with only about 3% optical performance loss after 1 year in elliptical orbit, with high radiation, atomic oxygen, and ultraviolet exposure. The only protection for these silicone lenses was a thin-film coating provided by OCLI. ENTECH also provided the line-focus lenses for the SCARLET 1 and SCARLET 2 arrays in 1995 and 1997, respectively. These lenses are laminated assemblies, with protective ceria glass superstrates over the silicone lens. In March 1997, ENTECH and NASA Lewis began development of inflatable Fresnel lenses, to achieve lower weight, smaller launch volume, reduced cost, less fragility, and other advantages. This paper summarizes the new concentrator approach, including key program results to date.

  15. Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses

    SciTech Connect

    Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S.; de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-07-15

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

  16. Advanced photovoltaic solar array program - A preliminary assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J.; Stella, P.

    1986-01-01

    Two solar array designs developed for the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array program are described. The goal of the program is to develop solar arrays with higher mass specific power and power density and good robustness. The specific design requirements are: a beginning-of-life value of 130 W/kg, and end-of-life goals of 105 W/kg and 110 W/sq m. The two array-wing designs consisted of a single blanket. The differences in the blanket material (25 micron-thick Kapton versus 50 micron-thick carbon-loaded Kapton), solar cells (100 micron-thick wrap around versus 50 micron-thick 2 x 4 cm planar contact cells), and performance objectives (proposed industry requirements versus mission objectives) of the two designs are examined.

  17. Enhanced absorption and carrier collection in Si wire arrays for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Kelzenberg, Michael D; Boettcher, Shannon W; Petykiewicz, Jan A; Turner-Evans, Daniel B; Putnam, Morgan C; Warren, Emily L; Spurgeon, Joshua M; Briggs, Ryan M; Lewis, Nathan S; Atwater, Harry A

    2010-03-01

    Si wire arrays are a promising architecture for solar-energy-harvesting applications, and may offer a mechanically flexible alternative to Si wafers for photovoltaics. To achieve competitive conversion efficiencies, the wires must absorb sunlight over a broad range of wavelengths and incidence angles, despite occupying only a modest fraction of the array's volume. Here, we show that arrays having less than 5% areal fraction of wires can achieve up to 96% peak absorption, and that they can absorb up to 85% of day-integrated, above-bandgap direct sunlight. In fact, these arrays show enhanced near-infrared absorption, which allows their overall sunlight absorption to exceed the ray-optics light-trapping absorption limit for an equivalent volume of randomly textured planar Si, over a broad range of incidence angles. We furthermore demonstrate that the light absorbed by Si wire arrays can be collected with a peak external quantum efficiency of 0.89, and that they show broadband, near-unity internal quantum efficiency for carrier collection through a radial semiconductor/liquid junction at the surface of each wire. The observed absorption enhancement and collection efficiency enable a cell geometry that not only uses 1/100th the material of traditional wafer-based devices, but also may offer increased photovoltaic efficiency owing to an effective optical concentration of up to 20 times.

  18. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Muljadi, E.; Taylor, R.W.

    1998-05-05

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load. 20 figs.

  19. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Muljadi, Eduard; Taylor, Roger W.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load.

  20. Simplified calculation of solar cell temperatures in terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, J. G.

    1984-12-01

    A simplified algorithm to predict the average steady-state temperature of the solar cells in a photovoltaic array has been developed. The methodology can be applied to arrays on the roof (or walls) of buildings as well as on the ground. It is intended primarily for residential buildings, although it can be used for any type of building, and considers all four-array mounting systems (rack, stand-off, direct, and integral). Input parameters in this development include weather (insolation, ambient temperature, wind speed, humidity, and sky cloud cover), as well as building construction and operation characteristics. The photovoltaic array's geometrical, optical, and thermal properties are used in the analysis as well. Natural or forced convection under the solar panels and/or in the building attic below can also be accounted for by this model. The model has been partially verified against limited measured data and found to be in very good agreement for wind speeds of 1 m/s or more.

  1. Thin-Film Photovoltaic Solar Array Parametric Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Jacobs, Mark K.; Ponnusamy, Deva

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes a study that had the objective to develop a model and parametrically determine the circumstances for which lightweight thin-film photovoltaic solar arrays would be more beneficial, in terms of mass and cost, than arrays using high-efficiency crystalline solar cells. Previous studies considering arrays with near-term thin-film technology for Earth orbiting applications are briefly reviewed. The present study uses a parametric approach that evaluated the performance of lightweight thin-film arrays with cell efficiencies ranging from 5 to 20 percent. The model developed for this study is described in some detail. Similar mass and cost trends for each array option were found across eight missions of various power levels in locations ranging from Venus to Jupiter. The results for one specific mission, a main belt asteroid tour, indicate that only moderate thin-film cell efficiency (approx. 12 percent) is necessary to match the mass of arrays using crystalline cells with much greater efficiency (35 percent multi-junction GaAs based and 20 percent thin-silicon). Regarding cost, a 12 percent efficient thin-film array is projected to cost about half is much as a 4-junction GaAs array. While efficiency improvements beyond 12 percent did not significantly further improve the mass and cost benefits for thin-film arrays, higher efficiency will be needed to mitigate the spacecraft-level impacts associated with large deployed array areas. A low-temperature approach to depositing thin-film cells on lightweight, flexible plastic substrates is briefly described. The paper concludes with the observation that with the characteristics assumed for this study, ultra-lightweight arrays using efficient, thin-film cells on flexible substrates may become a leading alternative for a wide variety of space missions.

  2. Planetary and Deep Space Requirements for Photovoltaic Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Bennett, R. B.; Stella, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    In the past 25 years, the majority of interplanetary spacecraft have been powered by nuclear sources. However, as the emphasis on smaller, low cost missions gains momentum, more deep space missions now being planned have baselined photovoltaic solar arrays due to the low power requirements (usually significantly less than 100 W) needed for engineering and science payloads. This will present challenges to the solar array builders, inasmuch as planetary requirements usually differ from earth orbital requirements. In addition, these requirements often differ greatly, depending on the specific mission; for example, inner planets vs. outer planets, orbiters vs. flybys, spacecraft vs. landers, and so on. Also, the likelihood of electric propulsion missions will influence the requirements placed on solar array developers. This paper will discuss representative requirements for a range of planetary and deep space science missions now in the planning stages. We have divided the requirements into three categories: Inner planets and the sun; outer planets (greater than 3 AU); and Mars, cometary, and asteroid landers and probes. Requirements for Mercury and Ganymede landers will be covered in the Inner and Outer Planets sections with their respective orbiters. We will also discuss special requirements associated with solar electric propulsion (SEP). New technology developments will be needed to meet the demanding environments presented by these future applications as many of the technologies envisioned have not yet been demonstrated. In addition, new technologies that will be needed reside not only in the photovoltaic solar array, but also in other spacecraft systems that are key to operating the spacecraft reliably with the photovoltaics.

  3. Enhanced absorption and carrier collection in Si wire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Putnam, Morgan C.; Warren, Emily L.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2010-02-14

    Si wire arrays are a promising architecture for solar-energy-harvesting applications, and may offer a mechanically flexible alternative to Si wafers for photovoltaics. To achieve competitive conversion efficiencies, the wires must absorb sunlight over a broad range of wavelengths and incidence angles, despite occupying only a modest fraction of the array’s volume. Here, we show that arrays having less than 5% areal fraction of wires can achieve up to 96% peak absorption, and that they can absorb up to 85% of day-integrated, above-bandgap direct sunlight. In fact, these arrays show enhanced near-infrared absorption, which allows their overall sunlight absorption to exceed the ray-optics light-trapping absorption limit18 for an equivalent volume of randomly textured planar Si, over a broad range of incidence angles. We furthermore demonstrate that the light absorbed by Si wire arrays can be collected with a peak external quantum efficiency of 0.89, and that they show broadband, near-unity internal quantum efficiency for carrier collection through a radial semiconductor/liquid junction at the surface of each wire. The observed absorption enhancement and collection efficiency enable a cell geometry that not only uses 1/100th the material of traditional wafer-based devices, but also may offer increased photovoltaic efficiency owing to an effective optical concentration of up to 20 times.

  4. An array of directable mirrors as a photovoltaic solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittner, W. B., III

    1980-01-01

    Calculations of the optics of heliostats for use in large thermal power towers have been carried out in considerable detail, chiefly by Vant-Hull et al. This paper describes a simplified method for calculating the images generated by a special type of concentrator, i.e. an array of independently steered mirrors on a single frame, intended to direct the solar image onto a flat photovoltaic solar cell target. The case of interest is one in which the field of illumination on the target is as uniform as possible, and the emphasis is thus on small 'rim angle' geometries (a configuration which also minimizes mirror interference effects). Calculations are presented for constructing the individual mirror target images in terms of three angles: (1) the angle between the photovoltaic target normal and the reflecting mirror (called here the mirror position angle), (2) the angle between the target center and the sun as measured from the center of the reflecting mirror, and (3) the angle at which the plane defined by the center of the sun, the mirror center and the target center intersects the plane of the target. The overall system efficiency for various mirror configurations, characterized by such parameters as the maximum mirror angle (i.e. 'rim angle'), target-mirror plane separation, and mirror aiming accuracy is discussed in terms of the specifications desirable in an optical concentrator designed specifically to illuminate uniformly a photovoltaic solar cell target.

  5. Stand-off building block systems for roof-mounted photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, M. C.; Kern, E. C., Jr.

    1986-06-01

    A low-cost building-block array for roof-mounted, grid-connected photovoltaic installations has been developed and prototype-tested. The focus of this work was on standardizing the array mounting hardware and installation methods to reduce installed system costs. The targeted consumer price for the balance-of-system - all hardware and assembly/installation labor, excluding the purchase price of modules and power conditioner was $50 per square meter of photovoltaic array (or $0.50/Wp for a nominal 10% efficient array). A cost of $40.78 per square meter of photovoltaic array (or $0.41 Wp) was achieved for the prototype installation.

  6. Consideration of encapsulants for photovoltaic arrays in terrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Carroll, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term survivability of photovoltaic arrays and components in terrestrial environments will require development of adequate protective systems. Highly considered are polymeric encapsulants, a method which was successfully employed in space and aerospace applications to protect critical electrical circuitry. To be employable, however, the polymer encapsulants must themselves be chemically and mechanically resistant to failure in terrestrial service. Chemical resistance includes stability to the degrading actions of ultraviolet light, oxygen, moisture and elevated temperatures in sun rich areas. Programs are underway to identify and develop chemically stable encapsulant candidates. Chemical considerations aside, mechanical failures of the encapsulants must also be avoided in array designs. This paper discusses design considerations for avoiding mechanical failures of polymeric encapsulants, with emphasis on biaxial properties, thermal fatigue, and anisotropy and nonhomogeneity of material properties. The general principles to be presented evolved from actual failures of polymeric materials in engineering applications. Also included are brief remarks on the permeability of polymer materials to atmospheric gases.

  7. Planetary and deep space requirements for photovoltaic solar arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bankston, C.P.; Bennett, R.B.; Stella, P.M.

    1995-10-01

    In the past 25 years, the majority of interplanetary spacecraft have been powered by nuclear sources. However, as the emphasis on smaller, low cost missions gains momentum, the majority of missions now being planned will use photovoltaic solar arrays. This will present challenges to the solar array builders, inasmuch as planetary requirements usually differ from earth orbital requirements. In addition, these requirements often differ greatly, depending on the specific mission; for example, inner planets vs. outer planets, orbiters vs. flybys, spacecraft vs. landers, and so on. Also, the likelihood of electric propulsion missions will influence the requirements placed on solar array developers. The paper will discuss representative requirements for a range of planetary missions now in the planning stages. Insofar as inner planets are concerned, a Mercury orbiter is being studied with many special requirements. Solar arrays would be exposed to high temperatures and a potentially high radiation environment, and will need to be increasingly pointed off sun as the vehicle approaches Mercury. Identification and development of cell materials and arrays at high incidence angles will be critical to the design. Missions to the outer solar system that have been studied include a Galilean orbiter and a flight to the Kuiper belt. While onboard power requirements would be small (as low as 10 watts), the solar intensity will require relatively large array areas. As a result, such missions will demand extremely compact packaging and low mass structures to conform to launch vehicle constraints. In turn, the large area, low mass designs will impact allowable spacecraft loads. Inflatable array structures, with and without concentration, and multiband gap cells will be considered if available. In general, the highest efficiency cell technologies operable under low intensity, low temperature conditions are needed.

  8. A photovoltaic catenary-tent array for the Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Appelbaum, J.; Crutchik, M.

    1993-01-01

    To provide electrical power during an exploration mission to Mars, a deployable tent-shaped structure with a flexible photovoltaic (PV) blanket is proposed. The array is designed with a self-deploying mechanism utilizing pressurized gas expansion. The structural design for the array uses a combination of cables, beams, and columns to support and deploy the PV blanket. Under the force of gravity, a cable carrying a uniform load will take the shape of a catenary curve. A catenary-tent collector is self shading which must be taken into account in the solar radiation calculation. The shape and the area of the shadow on the array was calculated and used in the determination of the global irradiance on the array. The PV blanket shape and structure dimensions were optimized to achieve a configuration which maximizes the specific power (W/kg). The optimization was performed for three types of PV blankets (silicon, gallium arsenide over germanium, and amorphous silicon) and two types of structural materials (carbon composite and arimid fiber composite). The results show that the catenary shape of the PV blanket corresponding to zero end angle at the base with respect to the horizontal results in the highest specific power. The tent angle is determined by optimizing the specific mass and the output power for maximum specific power. The combination of carbon fiber structural material and amorphous silicon blanket produces the highest specific power.

  9. Component and prototype panel testing of the mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Swartz, Clifford K.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    The mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator array, a high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic array concept, is described. The three critical elements of the array concept are the Fresnel lens concentrator, the prismatic cell power cover, and the photovoltaic cell. Prototype concentrator lenses have been fabricated and tested, with optical efficiencies reaching 90 percent. Work is progressing on the design and fabrication of the panel structure. The impact of recent advances in 30 percent-efficient multijunction photovoltaic cells on array performance is also discussed. Near-term performance goals of 300 w/sq m and 100 w/kg are now feasible.

  10. A photovoltaic catenary-tent array for the Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutchik, M.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Appelbaum, J.

    1993-08-01

    To provide electrical power during an exploration mission to Mars, a deployable tent-shaped structure with a flexible photovoltaic (PV) blanket is proposed. The array is designed with a self-deploying mechanism utilizing pressurized gas expansion. The structural design for the array uses a combination of cables, beams, and columns to support and deploy the PV blanket. Under the force of gravity a cable carrying a uniform load will take the shape of a catenary curve. A catenary-tent collector is self shadowing which must be taken into account in the solar radiation calculation. The shape and the area of the shadow on the array was calculated and used in the determination of the global radiation on the array. The PV blanket shape and structure dimension were optimized to achieve a configuration which maximizes the specific power (W/kg). The optimization was performed for four types of PV blankets (Si, GaAs/Ge, GaAs CLEFT, and amorphous Si) and four types of structure materials (Carbon composite, Aramid Fiber composite, Aluminum, and Magnesium). The results show that the catenary shape of the PV blanket, which produces the highest specific power, corresponds to zero end angle at the base with respect to the horizontal. The tent angle is determined by the combined effect of the array structure specific mass and the PV blanket output power. The combination of carbon composite structural material and GaAs CLEFT solar cells produce the highest specific power. The study was carried out for two sites on Mars corresponding to the Viking Lander locations. The designs were also compared for summer, winter, and yearly operation.

  11. A photovoltaic catenary-tent array for the Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutchik, M.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Appelbaum, J.

    1993-01-01

    To provide electrical power during an exploration mission to Mars, a deployable tent-shaped structure with a flexible photovoltaic (PV) blanket is proposed. The array is designed with a self-deploying mechanism utilizing pressurized gas expansion. The structural design for the array uses a combination of cables, beams, and columns to support and deploy the PV blanket. Under the force of gravity a cable carrying a uniform load will take the shape of a catenary curve. A catenary-tent collector is self shadowing which must be taken into account in the solar radiation calculation. The shape and the area of the shadow on the array was calculated and used in the determination of the global radiation on the array. The PV blanket shape and structure dimension were optimized to achieve a configuration which maximizes the specific power (W/kg). The optimization was performed for four types of PV blankets (Si, GaAs/Ge, GaAs CLEFT, and amorphous Si) and four types of structure materials (Carbon composite, Aramid Fiber composite, Aluminum, and Magnesium). The results show that the catenary shape of the PV blanket, which produces the highest specific power, corresponds to zero end angle at the base with respect to the horizontal. The tent angle is determined by the combined effect of the array structure specific mass and the PV blanket output power. The combination of carbon composite structural material and GaAs CLEFT solar cells produce the highest specific power. The study was carried out for two sites on Mars corresponding to the Viking Lander locations. The designs were also compared for summer, winter, and yearly operation.

  12. Thermal performance of stratospheric airship with photovoltaic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Yang, Yanchu; Cui, Yanxiang; Cai, Jingjing

    2017-03-01

    The increase of airship applications makes it necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the thermal performance of stratospheric airships. A numerical model was proposed to simulate the thermal performance of a stratospheric airship with photovoltaic array, an analysis code was developed based on the thermal model and was verified by experimental data. A further inspection into the temperature field and flow field distribution of the airship was analyzed in detail. The simulation results suggest that solar radiation can exert great influence on the thermal performance of the airship. The higher temperature Helium was gathered in the upper part inside of the airship, the flow of Helium was regular at nighttime but was chaotic in the middle and upper part of the airship at daytime. The temperature and velocity performance of fin was different from that of the hull and other fins due to the shadow of hull and other fins.

  13. Glass fiber reinforced concrete for terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, H.

    1979-01-01

    The use of glass-fiber-reinforced concrete (GRC) as a low-cost structural substrate for terrestrial solar cell arrays is discussed. The properties and fabrication of glass-reinforced concrete structures are considered, and a preliminary design for a laminated solar cell assembly built on a GRC substrate is presented. A total cost for such a photovoltaic module, composed of a Korad acrylic plastic film front cover, an aluminum foil back cover, an ethylene/vinyl acetate pottant/adhesive and a cotton fabric electrical isolator in addition to the GRC substrate, of $9.42/sq m is projected, which is less than the $11.00/sq m cost goal set by the Department of Energy. Preliminary evaluations are concluded to have shown the design capabilities and cost effectiveness of GRC; however, its potential for automated mass production has yet to be evaluated.

  14. Glass fiber reinforced concrete for terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, H.

    1979-01-01

    The use of glass-fiber-reinforced concrete (GRC) as a low-cost structural substrate for terrestrial solar cell arrays is discussed. The properties and fabrication of glass-reinforced concrete structures are considered, and a preliminary design for a laminated solar cell assembly built on a GRC substrate is presented. A total cost for such a photovoltaic module, composed of a Korad acrylic plastic film front cover, an aluminum foil back cover, an ethylene/vinyl acetate pottant/adhesive and a cotton fabric electrical isolator in addition to the GRC substrate, of $9.42/sq m is projected, which is less than the $11.00/sq m cost goal set by the Department of Energy. Preliminary evaluations are concluded to have shown the design capabilities and cost effectiveness of GRC; however, its potential for automated mass production has yet to be evaluated.

  15. Voltage Control of Distribution Network with a Large Penetration of Photovoltaic Generations using FACTS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Taro; Baba, Jumpei; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    In recent years, there is a great deal of interest in distributed generations from viewpoints of environmental problem and energy saving measure. Thus, a lot of distributed generators will be connected to the distribution network in the future. However, increase of distributed generators, which convert natural energy into electric energy, is concerned on their adverse effects on distribution network. Therefore, control of distribution networks using Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices is considered in order to adjust the voltage profile, and as a result more distributed generations can be installed into the networks. In this paper, four types of FACTS devices, Static Synchronous Compensator (STATCOM), Static Synchronous Series Compensator (SSSC), Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) and self-commutated Back-To-Back converter (BTB), are analyzed by comparison of required minimum capacity of the inverters in a residential distribution network with a large penetration of photovoltaic generations.

  16. Latest developments in the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Kurland, Richard M.

    1990-01-01

    In 1985, the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array (APSA) Program was established to demonstrate a producible array system with a specific power greater than 130 W/kg at a 10-kW (BOL) power level. The latest program phase completed fabrication and initial functional testing of a prototype wing representative of a full-scale 5-kW (BOL) wing (except truncated in length to about 1 kW), with weight characteristics that could meet the 130-W/kg (BOL) specific power goal using thin silicon solar cell modules and weight-efficient structural components. The wing configuration and key design details are reviewed, along with results from key component-level and wing-level tests. Projections for future enhancements that may be expected through the use of advanced solar cells and structural components are shown. Performance estimates are given for solar electric propulsion orbital transfer missions through the Van Allen radiation belts. The latest APSA program plans are presented.

  17. Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology 1985: High Efficiency, Space Environment, and Array Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The seventh NASA Conference on Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology was held at NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, from 30 April until 2 May 1985. Its purpose was to assess the progress made, the problems remaining, and future strategy for space photovoltaic research. Particular emphasis was placed on high efficiency, space environment, and array technology.

  18. Report of an exploratory study: safety and liability considerations for photovoltaic modules/panels, Low Cost Solar Array Project

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, A.S.; Meeker, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Product safety and product liability considerations are explored for photovoltaic module/array devices. A general review of photovoltaic literature was made using computerized literature searches. A literature search was also made of relevant legal material as it applies to design. Recommendations are made to minimize or eliminate perceived hazards in manufacture and use of a photovoltaic module/array. (MHR)

  19. Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology 1986. High Efficiency, Space Environment, and Array Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The conference provided a forum to assess the progress made, the problems remaining, and the strategy for the future of photovoltaic research. Cell research and technology, space environmental effects, array technology and applications were discussed.

  20. Solar cell array design handbook - The principles and technology of photovoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell array design and technology for ground-based and space applications are discussed from the user's point of view. Solar array systems are described, with attention given to array concepts, historical development, applications and performance, and the analysis of array characteristics, circuits, components, performance and reliability is examined. Aspects of solar cell array design considered include the design process, photovoltaic system and detailed array design, and the design of array thermal, radiation shielding and electromagnetic components. Attention is then given to the characteristics and design of the separate components of solar arrays, including the solar cells, optical elements and mechanical elements, and the fabrication, testing, environmental conditions and effects and material properties of arrays and their components are discussed.

  1. Commercial/industrial photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-cost solar array project engineering area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in commercial and industrial applications were identified. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to commercial and industrial photovoltaic array installation. Four general installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Each of the generic mounting types can be used in vertical wall mounting systems. This implies eight mounting types exist in the commercial/industrial sector. Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. Cost drivers were identified. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. The general conclusion is that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in commercial/industrial arrays.

  2. Commercial/industrial photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-cost solar array project engineering area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-12-01

    Design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in commercial and industrial applications were identified. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to commercial and industrial photovoltaic array installation. Four general installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Each of the generic mounting types can be used in vertical wall mounting systems. This implies eight mounting types exist in the commercial/industrial sector. Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. Cost drivers were identified. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. The general conclusion is that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in commercial/industrial arrays.

  3. The mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array - Current program status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; O'Neill, Mark J.; Fraas, Lewis

    1991-01-01

    Over the last seven years, NASA Lewis, ENTECH, and Boeing have been developing a high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic concentrator array. The authors report the current status of the mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator program, emphasizing the latest results on the fabrication and testing of a space-qualifiable version of the concentrator lens and panel structure. Calculations indicated that such an array can achieve 300 W/sq m at a specific power of 100 W/kg. The authors describe the current status of component and prototype panel testing and the preliminary development of a flight panel for the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) flight experiment.

  4. Photovoltaic module and array performance characterization methods for all system operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, David L.

    1997-02-01

    This paper provides new test methods and analytical procedures for characterizing the electrical performance of photovoltaic modules and arrays. The methods use outdoor measurements to provide performance parameters both at standard reporting conditions and for all operating conditions encountered by typical photovoltaic systems. Improvements over previously used test methods are identified, and examples of the successful application of the methodology are provided for crystalline- and amorphous-silicon modules and arrays. This work provides an improved understanding of module and array performance characteristics, and perhaps most importantly, a straight-forward yet rigorous model for predicting array performance at all operating conditions. For the first time, the influences of solar irradiance, operating temperature, solar spectrum, solar angle-of-incidence, and temperature coefficients are all addressed in a practical way that will benefit both designers and users of photovoltaics.

  5. Testing of solar photovoltaic arrays for utilization on marine aids to navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchard, S. E.

    1980-11-01

    In 1978, approximately 400 solar photovoltaic arrays were procured and placed at marine exposure facilities in Groton, Connecticut, and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The arrays were measured quarterly to ascertain the effects of the marine environment on electrical performance. Concurrently, a screening test for photovoltaic arrays to be used in the marine environment was developed at the Coast Guard R and D Center. Identical panels to those on test at the exposure sites were run through the pressure, immersion, and temperature (PIT) screening test. Based on the marine environment exposure test and the PIT screening test, recommendations are made on the constituent materials and construction techniques of solar photovoltaic arrays that are most suited for use in the marine environment.

  6. NREL Determines Better Testing Methods for Photovoltaic Module Durability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    NREL discoveries will enable manufacturers to produce more robust photovoltaic modules. Over the past decade, some photovoltaic (PV) modules have experienced power losses because of the system voltage stress that modules experience in fielded arrays. This is partly because qualification tests and standards do not adequately evaluate the durability of modules that undergo the long-term effects of high voltage. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) tried various testing methods and stress levels to demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. The results of these accelerated tests, along with outdoor testing, were used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to more accurately evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. NREL was able to determine stress factors, levels, and methods for testing based on the stresses experienced by modules in the field. These results, in combination with those in the literature, suggest that constant stress with humidity and system voltage is more damaging than stress applied intermittently or with periods of recovery comprising hot and dry conditions or alternating bias in between. NREL has determined some module constructions to be extremely durable to PID. These findings will help the manufacturers of PV materials and components produce more durable products that better satisfy their customers. NREL determined that there is rapid degradation of some PV modules under system voltage stress and evaluated degradation rates in the field to develop more accurate accelerated testing methods. PV module manufacturers will be better able to choose robust materials and durable designs and guarantee sturdier, longer-lasting products. As PV modules become more durable, and thus more efficient over the long term, the risks and the cost of PV power will be reduced.

  7. Flight Experience from Space Photovoltaic Concentrator Arrays and its Implication on Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly all photovoltaic solar arrays flown in space have used a planar (non- concentrating) design. However, there have been a few notable exceptions where photovoltaic concentrators have been tested and used as the mission s primary power source. Among these are the success experienced by the SCARLET (Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology) concept used to power NASA's Deep Space 1 mission and the problems encountered by the original Boeing 702 reflective trough concentrator design. This presentation will give a brief overview of past photovoltaic concentrator systems that have flown in space, specifically addressing the valuable lessons learned from flight experience, and other viable concentrator concepts that are being proposed for the future. The general trends of this flight experience will be noted and discussed with regard to its implications on terrestrial photovoltaic concentrator designs.

  8. Safety-related requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levins, A.; Smoot, A.; Wagner, R.

    1984-01-01

    Safety requirements for photovoltaic module and panel designs and configurations for residential, intermediate, and large scale applications are investigated. Concepts for safety systems, where each system is a collection of subsystems which together address the total anticipated hazard situation, are described. Descriptions of hardware, and system usefulness and viability are included. A comparison of these systems, as against the provisions of the 1984 National Electrical Code covering photovoltaic systems is made. A discussion of the Underwriters Laboratory UL investigation of the photovoltaic module evaluated to the provisions of the proposed UL standard for plat plate photovoltaic modules and panels is included. Grounding systems, their basis and nature, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are described. The meaning of frame grounding, circuit groundings, and the type of circuit ground are covered.

  9. Glass as encapsulation for low-cost photovoltaic solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    In photovoltaic systems, the encapsulant material that protects the solar cells should be highly transparent and very durable. Glass satisfies these two criteria and is considered a primary candidate for low-cost, photovoltaic encapsulation systems. In this paper, various aspects of glass encapsulation are treated that are important for the designer of photovoltaic systems. Candidate glasses and available information defining the state of the art of glass encapsulation materials and processes for automated, high volume production of terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications are presented. The desired characteristics of glass encapsulation are (1) low degradation rates, (2) high transmittance, (3) high reliability, (4) low-cost, and (5) high annual production capacity. The glass design areas treated herein include the types of glass, sources, prices, physical properties and glass modifications, such as antireflection coatings.

  10. Safety-related requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levins, A.; Smoot, A.; Wagner, R.

    1984-03-01

    Safety requirements for photovoltaic module and panel designs and configurations for residential, intermediate, and large scale applications are investigated. Concepts for safety systems, where each system is a collection of subsystems which together address the total anticipated hazard situation, are described. Descriptions of hardware, and system usefulness and viability are included. A comparison of these systems, as against the provisions of the 1984 National Electrical Code covering photovoltaic systems is made. A discussion of the Underwriters Laboratory UL investigation of the photovoltaic module evaluated to the provisions of the proposed UL standard for plat plate photovoltaic modules and panels is included. Grounding systems, their basis and nature, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are described. The meaning of frame grounding, circuit groundings, and the type of circuit ground are covered.

  11. Design of a photovoltaic central power station: flat-plate array

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A design for a photovoltaic central power station using fixed flat-panel arrays has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes high-efficiency photovoltaic modules using dendritic web cells. The modules are arranged in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic output is connected to the existing 115 kV utility switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

  12. Design and development of a linear Fresnel lens air-cooled photovoltaic module and a stand-alone photovoltaic collector array

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A summary description of the design development of a linear Fresnel lens air-cooled photovoltaic collector and a stand-alone photovoltaic collector array is presented. Module performance is characterized by 12.9% electrical efficiency under operational conditions (800 w/m/sup 2/, 20/sup 0/C ambient temperature) and 14.2% electrical efficiency at 28/sup 0/C cell reference temperature. The stand-alone photovoltaic collector array design utilizes eight air-cooled photovoltaic modules and produces a peak output of 2680 watts at 20/sup 0/C ambient temperature and 1000 w/m/sup 2/ direct normal insolation. This corresponds to an overall array electrical efficiency of 12%. A prototype subscale array was fabricated and performance tested and verified the stand-alone array concept.

  13. SCARLET Photovoltaic Concentrator Array Selected for Flight Under NASA's New Millennium Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center continues to demonstrate its expertise in the development and implementation of advanced space power systems. For example, during the past year, the NASA New Millennium Program selected the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) photovoltaic array as the power system for its Deep Space-1 (DS-1) mission. This Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) managed DS-1 mission, which represents the first operational flight of a photovoltaic concentrator array, will provide a baseline for the use of this technology in a variety of future government and commercial applications. SCARLET is a joint NASA Lewis/Ballistic Missile Defense Organization program to develop advanced photovoltaic array technology that uses a unique refractive concentrator design to focus sunlight onto a line of photovoltaic cells located below the optical element. The general concept is based on previous work conducted at Lewis under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with AEC-Able Engineering, Inc., for the Multiple Experiments to Earth Orbit and Return (METEOR) spacecraft. The SCARLET II design selected by the New Millennium Program is a direct adaptation of the smaller SCARLET I array built for METEOR. Even though SCARLET I was lost during a launch failure in October 1995, the hardware (designed, built, and flight qualified within 6 months) provided invaluable information and experience that led to the selection of this technology as the primary power source for DS-1.

  14. Radiative behaviors of crystalline silicon nanowire and nanohole arrays for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xing; Zhao, C. Y.; Bao, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The optical absorption of four square arrays of crystalline silicon nanostructures, i.e., circular nanowire array, circular nanohole arrays, square nanowire arrays, and square nanohole arrays, are numerically investigated. The method of rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is employed to calculate the absorptivity for the arrays with lattice constant from 100 nm to 1500 nm. The results indicated that the lattice constant is the foremost structural parameter to determine the ultimate efficiency, and the peaks of ultimate efficiencies for the four different nanostructures always appear around the lattice constant of 600 nm. It demonstrates that square nanowire arrays and circular nanohole arrays have great potentials for photovoltaic applications with high ultimate efficiencies and low filling ratios. Moreover, high ultimate efficiencies of all structures can be maintained over a large range of incident angles.

  15. Elevated temperature testing of Mir 1 cooperative solar array photovoltaic panel module

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, M.T.; Brisco, H.N.

    1995-12-31

    The Mir 1 Cooperative Solar Array project supplies the Russians, Rocket Space Corporation-Energia (RSC-E) with US photovoltaic panel modules (PPMs) based on the International Space Station Alpha`s (ISSA) solar array technology developed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC). The PPMs are integrated into the Russian module frame assemblies (MFA) and deployment mechanisms, and will replace solar arrays on the current Mir 1 Station. The replacement solar arrays will generate 6.5 kW beginning of life power (BOL). This paper documents LMSC`s effort in the diagnosis of the PPMs` performance degradation after completion of the development tests at RSC-E.

  16. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on Photovoltaic Metallization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A photovoltaic Metallization Research forum, under the sponsorship of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project consisted of five sessions, covering: (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques, and (5) future metallization challenges.

  17. Assessment of low-cost manufacturing process sequences. [photovoltaic solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    An extensive research and development activity to reduce the cost of manufacturing photovoltaic solar arrays by a factor of approximately one hundred is discussed. Proposed and actual manufacturing process descriptions were compared to manufacturing costs. An overview of this methodology is presented.

  18. Simplified design guide for estimating photovoltaic flat array and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.L.; Facinelli, W.A.; Koehler, L.P.

    1981-03-01

    Simplified, non-computer based methods are presented for predicting photovoltaic array and system performance. The array performance prediction methods are useful for calculating the potential output of passively cooled, flat, south facing max-power tracked arrays. A solar/weather data base for 97 different US and US affiliated stations is provided to aid in these calculations. Also, performance estimates can be made for photovoltaic systems (array, battery, power conditioner) that are backed-up by non-solar reserves capable of meeting the load when the solar system cannot. Such estimates can be made for a total of 41 different sinusoidal, unimodal, and bimodal diurnal load profiles from appropriate graphs included. These allow easy determination of the fraction of the load met by the solar photovoltaic system as a function of array size and (dedicated) battery storage capacity. These performance graphs may also be used for systems without battery storage. Use of array manufacturer's specification sheet data is discussed. Step-by-step procedures, along with suggested worksheets, are provided for carrying out the necessary calculations.

  19. High-Speed Monitoring of Multiple Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Array Configurations and Supplementary Weather Station.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Matthew T

    2017-06-01

    Three grid-connected monocrystalline silicon photovoltaic arrays have been instrumented with research-grade sensors on the Gaithersburg, MD campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These arrays range from 73 kW to 271 kW and have different tilts, orientations, and configurations. Irradiance, temperature, wind, and electrical measurements at the arrays are recorded, and images are taken of the arrays to monitor shading and capture any anomalies. A weather station has also been constructed that includes research-grade instrumentation to measure all standard meteorological quantities plus additional solar irradiance spectral bands, full spectrum curves, and directional components using multiple irradiance sensor technologies. Reference photovoltaic (PV) modules are also monitored to provide comprehensive baseline measurements for the PV arrays. Images of the whole sky are captured, along with images of the instrumentation and reference modules to document any obstructions or anomalies. Nearly, all measurements at the arrays and weather station are sampled and saved every 1s, with monitoring having started on Aug. 1, 2014. This report describes the instrumentation approach used to monitor the performance of these photovoltaic systems, measure the meteorological quantities, and acquire the images for use in PV performance and weather monitoring and computer model validation.

  20. P6 Truss, Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Array Wing (SAW)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-07

    STS097-376-019 (7 December 2000) --- A close-up view of the P6 solar array on the International Space Station (ISS), backdropped against the blackness of space and the Earth’s horizon. The P6 solar array is the first of eight sets of solar arrays that at the completion of the space station construction in 2006, will comprise the station’s electrical power system, converting sunlight to electricity.

  1. P6 Truss, Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Array Wing (SAW)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-07

    STS097-376-006 (7 Dec 2000) --- A close-up view of the P6 solar array on the International Space Station (ISS), backdropped against the blackness of space and the Earth?s horizon. The P6 solar array is the first of eight sets of solar arrays that at the completion of the space station construction in 2006, will comprise the station?s electrical power system, converting sunlight to electricity.

  2. Data base on batteries, power-conditioning equipment, and photovoltaic arrays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, A; Kapner, M; Morse, T

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compile an up-to-date comprehensive data base for research, design, and development of photovoltaic systems, primarily in the areas of applications and battery technology, and secondarily in the area of power conditioning and photovoltaic array technology. This volume contains the data base used to develop the end-use scenarios and identify the R and D needed for batteries to be used in photovoltaic power systems. In addition to its specific application to the present study, this data base is intended to provide state-of-the-art information to manufacturers of the various components of photovoltaic power systems, system designers, and researchers in this field. An extensive literature search was conducted to obtain technical data on batteries, power conditioners, and photovoltaic arrays. The data obtained from published technical literature and direct communication with manufacturers and developers are compiled. Principles of operation, types of systems, performance characteristics, test data, and cost data are included for each of the components. (WHK)

  3. Daytime Solar Heating of Photovoltaic Arrays in Low Density Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to determine the out-gassing rate of H2O molecules for a solar array placed under daytime solar heating (full sunlight) conditions typically encountered in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Arc rates are established for individual arrays held at 14 C and are used as a baseline for future comparisons. Radiated thermal solar flux incident to the array is simulated by mounting a stainless steel panel equipped with resistive heating elements several centimeters behind the array. A thermal plot of the heater plate temperature and the array temperature as a function of heating time is then obtained. A mass spectrometer is used to record the levels of partial pressure of water vapor in the test chamber after each of the 5 heating/cooling cycles. Each of the heating cycles was set to time duration of 40 minutes to simulate the daytime solar heat flux to the array over a single orbit. Finally the array is cooled back to ambient temperature after 5 complete cycles and the arc rates of the solar arrays is retested. A comparison of the various data is presented with rather some unexpected results.

  4. Dense nanoimprinted silicon nanowire arrays with passivated axial p-i-n junctions for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Pei; Siontas, Stylianos; Zaslavsky, A.; Pacifici, D.; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, S.; Davydov, A. V.

    2015-03-28

    We report on the fabrication and photovoltaic characteristics of vertical arrays of silicon axial p-i-n junction nanowire (NW) solar cells grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) epitaxy. NW surface passivation with silicon dioxide shell is shown to enhance carrier recombination time, open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}), and fill factor (FF). The photovoltaic performance of passivated individual NW and NW arrays was compared under 532 nm laser illumination with power density of ∼10 W/cm{sup 2}. Higher values of V{sub OC} and FF in the NW arrays are explained by enhanced light trapping. In order to verify the effect of NW density on light absorption and hence on the photovoltaic performance of NW arrays, dense Si NW arrays were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography to periodically arrange the gold seed particles prior to epitaxial growth. Compared to sparse NW arrays fabricated using VLS growth from randomly distributed gold seeds, the nanoimprinted NW array solar cells show a greatly increased peak external quantum efficiency of ∼8% and internal quantum efficiency of ∼90% in the visible spectral range. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of Si NW periodic arrays with varying pitch (P) confirm the importance of high NW density. Specifically, due to diffractive scattering and light trapping, absorption efficiency close to 100% in the 400–650 nm spectral range is calculated for a Si NW array with P = 250 nm, significantly outperforming a blanket Si film of the same thickness.

  5. The Stretched Lens Array (SLA): An Ultra-Light Photovoltaic Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, Mark J.; Pisczor, Michael F.; Eskenazi, Michael I.; McDanal, A. J.; George, Patrick J.; Botke, Matthew M.; Brandhorst, Henry W.; Edwards, David L.; Jaster, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    A high-performance, ultralight, photovoltaic concentrator array is being developed for space power. The stretched lens array (SLA) uses stretched-membrane, silicone Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight onto triple-junction photovoltaic cells. The cells are mounted to a composite radiator structure. The entire solar array wing, including lenses, photovoltaic cell flex circuits, composite panels, hinges, yoke, wiring harness, and deployment mechanisms, has a mass density of 1.6 kg/sq.m. NASA Glenn has measured 27.4% net SLA panel efficiency, or 375 W/sq.m. power density, at room temperature. At GEO operating cell temperature (80 C), this power density will be 300 W/sq.m., resulting in more than 180 W/kg specific power at the full wing level. SLA is a direct ultralight descendent of the successful SCARLET array on NASA's Deep Space 1 spacecraft. This paper describes the evolution from SCARLET to SLA, summarizes the SLA's key features, and provides performance and mass data for this new concentrator array.

  6. The Stretched Lens Array (SLA): An Ultra-Light Photovoltaic Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ONeill, Mark J.; Pisczor, Michael F.; Eskenazi, Michael I.; McDanal, A. J.; George, Patrick J.; Botke, Matthew M.; Brandhorst, Henry W.; Edwards, David L.; Jaster, Paul A.

    2002-10-01

    A high-performance, ultralight, photovoltaic concentrator array is being developed for space power. The stretched lens array (SLA) uses stretched-membrane, silicone Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight onto triple-junction photovoltaic cells. The cells are mounted to a composite radiator structure. The entire solar array wing, including lenses, photovoltaic cell flex circuits, composite panels, hinges, yoke, wiring harness, and deployment mechanisms, has a mass density of 1.6 kg/sq.m. NASA Glenn has measured 27.4% net SLA panel efficiency, or 375 W/sq.m. power density, at room temperature. At GEO operating cell temperature (80 C), this power density will be 300 W/sq.m., resulting in more than 180 W/kg specific power at the full wing level. SLA is a direct ultralight descendent of the successful SCARLET array on NASA's Deep Space 1 spacecraft. This paper describes the evolution from SCARLET to SLA, summarizes the SLA's key features, and provides performance and mass data for this new concentrator array.

  7. Field experience with a new performance characterization procedure for photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

    1997-12-31

    As photovoltaic systems become larger and more numerous, improved methods are needed for testing and modeling their performance. Test methods that successfully separate the interacting, time-of-day dependent influences of solar irradiance, operating temperature, solar spectrum, and solar angle-of-incidence have now been developed. These test methods have resulted in a new array performance model that is reasonably simple, yet accurately predicts performance for all operating conditions. This paper describes the new model, outdoor tests required to implement it, results of field tests for five arrays of different technologies, and the evolution of the model into a numerical tool for designing and sizing photovoltaic arrays based on annual energy production.

  8. Plasmonic Periodic Nanodot Arrays via Laser Interference Lithography for Organic Photovoltaic Cells with >10% Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yulin; Lim, Ju Won; Kim, Jae Geun; Wang, Huan; Kang, Byung-Hyun; Park, Young Wook; Kim, Heejun; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Jihyeon; Kim, Dong Ha; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-11-22

    In this study, we demonstrate a viable and promising optical engineering technique enabling the development of high-performance plasmonic organic photovoltaic devices. Laser interference lithography was explored to fabricate metal nanodot (MND) arrays with elaborately controlled dot size as well as periodicity, allowing spectral overlap between the absorption range of the active layers and the surface plasmon band of MND arrays. MND arrays with ∼91 nm dot size and ∼202 nm periodicity embedded in a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hole transport layer remarkably enhanced the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 7.52% up to 10.11%, representing one of the highest PCE and degree of enhancement (∼34.4%) levels compared to the pristine device among plasmonic organic photovoltaics reported to date. The plasmonic enhancement mechanism was investigated by both optical and electrical analyses using finite difference time domain simulation and conductive atomic force microscopy studies.

  9. Dye-sensitized photovoltaic wires using highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoyue; Misra, Mano

    2010-04-27

    Dye-sensitized photovoltaic wires (DSPVWs) are developed using anodized Ti wires that contain ordered arrays of TiO2 nanotubes. The prototype DSPVW consists of N719 dye-adsorbed TiO2 nanotube arrays around a Ti wire as a working electrode, a platinum wire as a counter electrode, and an organic electrolyte encased in a capillary glass tube. The effect of length of nanotube arrays on the photovoltaic performance of DSPVWs is studied systematically. A solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of 2.78% is achieved with 55 microm long nanotubes under 98.3 mW/cm(2) AM 1.5 simulated full light. The prototype device is capable of achieving a long distance transport of photocurrent and harvesting all light from any direction in surroundings to generate electricity.

  10. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields. Phase III, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Zimmerman, D.K.

    1981-04-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads.

  11. Performance Improvement of Partially Shaded Photovoltaic Arrays under Moving Shadow Conditions through Shade Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalekshmy, S.; Bindu, G. R.; Rama Iyer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Photovoltaic arrays, which are prone to partial shading (PS) reduce the output power than the real power rating of the array. This paper presents the comparative analyses on the electrical characteristics and power losses of a conventional totally cross tied (TCT) configuration, and rearranged TCT (RTCT) in which the modules are physically rearranged in such a way that there is an improvement of power output of array under moving illumination condition (moving cloud). In RTCT, the physical position of the modules is organized based on the Sudoku puzzle pattern so as to scatter the shading effect over the entire array. The rearrangement of modules is performed without varying the electrical connection of the modules in the array. It is validated that the power generation of array under amoving shadow condition is enhanced and the various PS losses are reduced in rearranged configuration.

  12. Solar Powered Aircraft, Photovoltaic Array/Battery System Tabletop Demonstration: Design and Operation Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Scheiman, David A.; Bailey, Sheila (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A system was constructed to demonstrate the power system operation of a solar powered aircraft. The system consists of a photovoltaic (PV) array, a charge controller, a battery, an electric motor and propeller. The system collects energy from the PV array and either utilizes this energy to operate an electric motor or stores it in a rechargeable battery for future use. The system has a control panel which displays the output of the array and battery as well as the total current going to the electric motor. The control panel also has a means for adjusting the output to the motor to control its speed. The entire system is regulated around 12 VDC.

  13. Development of a building block design of modular photovoltaic concentrator array fields

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, D.C.; Alexander, G.; Noel, G.T.; Scurlock, L.D.; Huss, W.R.; Stickford, G.H.

    1983-08-01

    To reduce the balance-of-system (BOS) costs and site-specific design costs for photovoltaic concentrator array fields, a modular Building Block design has been developed for installing array fields of each of two available concentrator collectors. The array-field subsystems and requirements incorporated in the design analyses include site preparation, foundations, electrical wiring, grounding, lightning protection, electromagnetic interference provisions, and tracking and controls. The Building Block designs developed minimize these array-field BOS costs and serve as standardized units to be used in multiples to construct array fields of various sizes. The detailed drawings and construction specifications prepared for the designs require only minimal design modification and cost for adaption to a specific site and application. The two concentrator collectors for which the modular array-field designs were developed are the linear-focus Fresnel-lens array manufactured by E-Systems, Inc., and the point-focus Fresnel-lens array manufactured by Martin Marietta Aerospace Corporation. Both designs are two-axis tracking and passively cooled. The developed Building Block designs are immediately applicable and reduce the array-field BOS costs and site-specific design costs to a fraction of those experienced in previous installations. The estimated array-field BOS costs (in 1982 dollars) using these modular designs are $0.78/W for the modular field based on the E-Systems array and $1.18/W for the modular field based on the Martin-Marietta array.

  14. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of an inclined nanowire array solar cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-11-30

    An innovative solar cell based on inclined p-i-n nanowire array is designed and analyzed. The results show that the inclined geometry can sufficiently increase the conversion efficiency of solar cells by enhancing the absorption of light in the active region. By tuning the nanowire array density, nanowire diameter, nanowire length, as well as the proportion of intrinsic region of the inclined nanowire solar cell, a remarkable efficiency in excess of 16% can be obtained in GaAs. Similar results have been obtained in InP and Si nanowire solar cells, demonstrating the universality of the performance enhancement of inclined nanowire arrays.

  15. Optimized design and research of secondary microprism for dense array concentrating photovoltaic module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guanghui; Chen, Bingzhen; Liu, Youqiang; Guo, Limin; Yao, Shun; Wang, Zhiyong

    2015-10-01

    As the critical component of concentrating photovoltaic module, secondary concentrators can be effective in increasing the acceptance angle and incident light, as well as improving the energy uniformity of focal spots. This paper presents a design of transmission-type secondary microprism for dense array concentrating photovoltaic module. The 3-D model of this design is established by Solidworks and important parameters such as inclination angle and component height are optimized using Zemax. According to the design and simulation results, several secondary microprisms with different parameters are fabricated and tested in combination with Fresnel lens and multi-junction solar cell. The sun-simulator IV test results show that the combination has the highest output power when secondary microprism height is 5mm and top facet side length is 7mm. Compared with the case without secondary microprism, the output power can improve 11% after the employment of secondary microprisms, indicating the indispensability of secondary microprisms in concentrating photovoltaic module.

  16. Array structures for fixed flat-plate photovoltaic power generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, G.

    Several structural concepts intended to reduce photovoltaic module support structure costs are presented. The structures can be made of galvanized steel, aluminum, reinforced concrete, and wood, with consideration given to a concrete slab base and screwing or welding the structure together. Wood treated with preservative resists weathering, insects, and fungi. Details of the site selection and preparation processes are provided, noting that the use of wood offers the potential of reducing the cost of the support systems to $0.1-0.2/Wp. Galvanized steel wire guy cables and module beds are included in the design. The wooden structures, if made of treated chestnut or Azobe wood, are projected to have 25 and 40 yr lifetimes, respectively.

  17. Characterization of the electrical output of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.C.; Hill, G.M.; Ross, R.G.

    1982-09-01

    The electric output of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as direct-current to alternating-current power conditioners must be able to accommodate widely varying input levels while maintaining operation at or near the array maximum power point. The results of an extensive computer simulation study that was used to define the parameters necessary for the systematic design of array/power-conditioner interfaces are presented as normalized ratios of power-conditioner parameters to array parameters, to make the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes. The advantages of maximum power tracking and a technique for computing average annual power-conditioner efficiency are discussed.

  18. Dark Forward Electrical Test Techniques Developed for Large-Area Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Scheiman, David A.; Hoffman, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Spacecraft photovoltaic arrays (PVA's) must be carefully handled during ground integration processing and transportation to the launch site. Care is exercised to avoid damage that could degrade on-orbit electrical performance. Because of this damage risk, however, PVA's are typically deployed and illuminated with a light source so performance characteristics can be measured prior to launch. For large-area arrays, such as the Mir Cooperative Solar Array (2.7- by 18-m) and the International Space Station PVA blankets (4.6- by 31.7-m), this integrity check becomes resource intensive. Large test support structures are needed to offload the array during deployment in 1g, and large-aperture illumination equipment is required to uniformly illuminate array panels. Significant program time, funds, and manpower must be allocated for this kind of test program. Alternatively, launch site electrical performance tests can be bypassed with an attendant increase in risk.

  19. Characterization of the electrical output of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    The electric output of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as direct-current to alternating-current power conditioners must be able to accommodate widely varying input levels, while maintaining operation at or near the array maximum power point.The results of an extensive computer simulation study that was used to define the parameters necessary for the systematic design of array/power-conditioner interfaces are presented as normalized ratios of power-conditioner parameters to array parameters, to make the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes. The advantages of maximum power tracking and a technique for computing average annual power-conditioner efficiency are discussed.

  20. Strong light absorption of self-organized 3-D nanospike arrays for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Ching, Kwong-Lung; Lin, Qingfeng; Leung, Siu-Fung; Arcrossito, Diaz; Fan, Zhiyong

    2011-11-22

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have been widely explored for efficient light trapping; however, many of the nanostructure fabrication processes reported have high cost and/or limited scalability. In this work, self-organized 3-D Al nanospike arrays were successfully fabricated on thin Al foils with controlled nanospike geometry such as height and pitch. Thereafter, photovoltaic materials of a-Si and CdTe thin films were conformally deposited on the nanospikes structures thus forming 3-D nanostructures with strong light absorption over a broad wavelength range and photon incident angle. Specifically, 100 nm-thick CdTe film on nanospikes showed 97% peak absorption, and up to 95% day-integrated sunlight absorption. These results indicate that self-organized 3-D Al nanospike arrays can serve as lightweight and low cost substrates for cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Proceedings of the flat-plate solar array project research forum on photovoltaic metallization systems

    SciTech Connect

    1983-11-15

    A Photovoltaic Metallization Research Forum, under the sponsorship of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flat-Plate Solar Array Project and the US Department of Energy, was held March 16-18, 1983 at Pine Mountain, Georgia. The Forum consisted of five sessions, covering (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques and (5) future metallization challenges. Twenty-three papers were presented.

  2. Plasmonic Photovoltaic Cells with Dual-Functional Gold, Silver, and Copper Half-Shell Arrays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Kim, Gyu Min; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2017-09-12

    Solid-state photovoltaic cells based on plasmon-induced charge separation (PICS) have attracted growing attention during the past decade. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the previously reported devices, which are generally loaded with dispersed metal nanoparticles as light absorbers, has not been sufficiently high. Here we report simpler plasmonic photovoltaic cells with interconnected Au, Ag, and Cu half-shell arrays deposited on SiO2@TiO2 colloidal crystals, which serve both as a plasmonic light absorber and as a current collector. The well-controlled and easily prepared plasmonic structure allows precise comparison of the PICS efficiency between different plasmonic metal species. The cell with the Ag half-shell array has higher photovoltaic performance than the cells with Au and Cu half-shell arrays because of the high population of photogenerated energetic electrons, which gives a high electron injection efficiency and suppressed charge recombination probability, achieving the highest PCE among the solid-state PICS devices even without a hole transport layer.

  3. Mir 1 cooperative solar array photovoltaic panel production

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the production and on-schedule delivery to Russia of 80-watt solar array panels by Lockheed Missiles and Space Co., Inc. Ninety flight-ready panels were delivered to RSC-Energia in Kaliningrad near Moscow in November and December 1994. After assembly by the Russians they are scheduled to be delivered in October 1995 by the US Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-74) to the Russian Mir 1 module of International Space Station Alpha.

  4. Impact of photovoltaic-array conversion efficiency on system energy cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. J.; Post, H. N.

    The relationship between photovoltaic collector efficiency and total system cost is analyzed using the most recent data on subsystem costs. Results are compared with competitive system prices to determine minimum array efficiency requirements. Central power station results show a requirement for arrays with a 10 percent minimum efficiency even for inexpensive collectors. For intermediate applications, this required minimum drops to 6 to 7 percent for the same collectors. Residential systems would seem to allow much lower efficiencies but are probably constrained by the available roof area.

  5. Space satellite power system. [conversion of solar energy by photovoltaic solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    The concept of a satellite solar power station was studied. It is shown that it offers the potential to meet a significant portion of future energy needs, is pollution free, and is sparing of irreplaceable earth resources. Solar energy is converted by photovoltaic solar cell arrays to dc energy which in turn is converted into microwave energy in a large active phased array. The microwave energy is beamed to earth with little attenuation and is converted back to dc energy on the earth. Economic factors are considered.

  6. Comparative study of absorption in tilted silicon nanowire arrays for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Kayes, Md Imrul; Leu, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowire arrays have been shown to demonstrate light trapping properties and promising potential for next-generation photovoltaics. In this paper, we show that the absorption enhancement in vertical nanowire arrays on a perfectly electric conductor can be further improved through tilting. Vertical nanowire arrays have a 66.2% improvement in ultimate efficiency over an ideal double-pass thin film of the equivalent amount of material. Tilted nanowire arrays, with the same amount of material, exhibit improved performance over vertical nanowire arrays across a broad range of tilt angles (from 38° to 72°). The optimum tilt of 53° has an improvement of 8.6% over that of vertical nanowire arrays and 80.4% over that of the ideal double-pass thin film. Tilted nanowire arrays exhibit improved absorption over the solar spectrum compared with vertical nanowires since the tilt allows for the excitation of additional modes besides the HE 1m modes that are excited at normal incidence. We also observed that tilted nanowire arrays have improved performance over vertical nanowire arrays for a large range of incidence angles (under about 60°).

  7. Si Radial p-i-n Junction Photovoltaic Arrays with Built-In Light Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Campbell, Ian H; Dayeh, Shadi A; Schuele, Paul; Evans, David; Picraux, S Tom

    2015-05-26

    High-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices require strong light absorption, low reflection and efficient photogenerated carrier collection for high quantum efficiency. Previous optical studies of vertical wires arrays have revealed that extremely efficient light absorption in the visible wavelengths is achievable. Photovoltaic studies have further advanced the wire approach by employing radial p-n junction architectures to achieve more efficient carrier collection. While radial p-n junction formation and optimized light absorption have independently been considered, PV efficiencies have further opportunities for enhancement by exploiting the radial p-n junction fabrication procedures to form arrays that simultaneously enhance both light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Here we report a concept of morphology control to improve PV performance, light absorption and quantum efficiency of silicon radial p-i-n junction arrays. Surface energy minimization during vapor phase epitaxy is exploited to form match-head structures at the tips of the wires. The match-head structure acts as a built-in light concentrator and enhances optical absorptance and external quantum efficiencies by 30 to 40%, and PV efficiency under AM 1.5G illumination by 20% compared to cylindrical structures without match-heads. The design rules for these improvements with match-head arrays are systematically studied. This approach of process-enhanced control of three-dimensional Si morphologies provides a fab-compatible way to enhance the PV performance of Si radial p-n junction wire arrays.

  8. Analysis of mismatch and shading effects in a photovoltaic array using different technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, J.; Muñoz, Y.; Ibáñez, F.; Ospino, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of a photovoltaic array implemented in the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia which consists of modules of different technologies and power, connected in series, in order to quantify the energy losses due to mismatch and the effect of the shadows. To do this, the performance of the modules was measured in operation under ambient conditions with field measurement equipment (AMPROBE Solar Analyzer, Solar - 4000), which allows the extrapolation of measures to standard conditions STC. For the data validation, measures under controlled conditions were taken to some modules in the flash test laboratory of the Institute of Energy Technology ITE of Valencia in Spain. Subsequently the array curves measured were validated with a photovoltaic array model developed in MATLAB-Simulink for the same conditions and technologies. The results of this particular array are lost up to 20% of the energy supplied due to the modules mismatch. The study shows the curves and the energy loss due to shadows modules. This result opens scenarios for conceivable modifications to the PV field configurations today, chosen during the design stage and unchangeable during the operating stage; and gives greater importance to the energy loss by mismatch in the PV array.

  9. NREL Certifies First All-Quantum-Dot Photovoltaic Cell; Demonstrates Stability, Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have certified the first all-quantum-dot photovoltaic cell, which was based on lead sulfide and demonstrated reasonable quantum dot solar cell performance for an initial efficiency measurement along with good stability. The certified open-circuit voltage of the quantum dot cell is greater than that possible from bulk lead sulfide because of quantum confinement.

  10. Highly uniform and vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Yup; Kang, Jin Soo; Shin, Junyoung; Kim, Jin; Han, Seung-Joo; Park, Jongwoo; Min, Yo-Sep; Ko, Min Jae; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-04-01

    Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process. In the modified process, ultrasonication is utilized to avoid formation of partial compact layers and lateral cracks in the SnO2 nanochannel arrays. Building on this breakthrough, we first demonstrate the photovoltaic application of these vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays. These vertically aligned arrays were directly and successfully applied in quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as photoanodes, yielding reasonable conversion efficiency under back-side illumination. In addition, a significantly short process time (330 s) for achieving the optimal thickness (7.0 μm) and direct utilization of the anodized electrodes enable a simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication process. Furthermore, a TiO2 shell layer was coated on the SnO2 nanochannel arrays by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for enhancement of dye-loading and prolonging the electron lifetime in the DSSC. Owing to the presence of the ALD TiO2 layer, the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) and conversion efficiency were increased by 20% and 19%, respectively, compared to those of the DSSC without the ALD TiO2 layer. This study provides valuable insight into the development of efficient SnO2-based photoanodes for photovoltaic application by a simple and rapid fabrication process.Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process

  11. Highly uniform and vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yup; Kang, Jin Soo; Shin, Junyoung; Kim, Jin; Han, Seung-Joo; Park, Jongwoo; Min, Yo-Sep; Ko, Min Jae; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-05-14

    Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process. In the modified process, ultrasonication is utilized to avoid formation of partial compact layers and lateral cracks in the SnO2 nanochannel arrays. Building on this breakthrough, we first demonstrate the photovoltaic application of these vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays. These vertically aligned arrays were directly and successfully applied in quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as photoanodes, yielding reasonable conversion efficiency under back-side illumination. In addition, a significantly short process time (330 s) for achieving the optimal thickness (7.0 μm) and direct utilization of the anodized electrodes enable a simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication process. Furthermore, a TiO2 shell layer was coated on the SnO2 nanochannel arrays by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for enhancement of dye-loading and prolonging the electron lifetime in the DSSC. Owing to the presence of the ALD TiO2 layer, the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) and conversion efficiency were increased by 20% and 19%, respectively, compared to those of the DSSC without the ALD TiO2 layer. This study provides valuable insight into the development of efficient SnO2-based photoanodes for photovoltaic application by a simple and rapid fabrication process.

  12. Crystal Orientation Controlled Photovoltaic Properties of Multilayer GaAs Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Han, Ning; Yang, Zai-Xing; Wang, Fengyun; Yip, SenPo; Li, Dapan; Hung, Tak Fu; Chen, Yunfa; Ho, Johnny C

    2016-06-28

    In recent years, despite significant progress in the synthesis, characterization, and integration of various nanowire (NW) material systems, crystal orientation controlled NW growth as well as real-time assessment of their growth-structure-property relationships still presents one of the major challenges in deploying NWs for practical large-scale applications. In this study, we propose, design, and develop a multilayer NW printing scheme for the determination of crystal orientation controlled photovoltaic properties of parallel GaAs NW arrays. By tuning the catalyst thickness and nucleation and growth temperatures in the two-step chemical vapor deposition, crystalline GaAs NWs with uniform, pure ⟨110⟩ and ⟨111⟩ orientations and other mixture ratios can be successfully prepared. Employing lift-off resists, three-layer NW parallel arrays can be easily attained for X-ray diffraction in order to evaluate their growth orientation along with the fabrication of NW parallel array based Schottky photovoltaic devices for the subsequent performance assessment. Notably, the open-circuit voltage of purely ⟨111⟩-oriented NW arrayed cells is far higher than that of ⟨110⟩-oriented NW arrayed counterparts, which can be interpreted by the different surface Fermi level pinning that exists on various NW crystal surface planes due to the different As dangling bond densities. All this indicates the profound effect of NW crystal orientation on physical and chemical properties of GaAs NWs, suggesting the careful NW design considerations for achieving optimal photovoltaic performances. The approach presented here could also serve as a versatile and powerful platform for in situ characterization of other NW materials.

  13. Low-cost modular array-field designs for flat-panel and concentrator photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, H.N.; Alexander, G.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

    1982-09-01

    This paper describes the design and development of low-cost, modular array fields for flatpanel and concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems. The objective of the work was to reduce substantially the cost of the array-field balance-of-system (BOS) subsystems and site-specific design costs as compared to previous PV installations. These subsystems include site preparation, foundations, support structures, electrical wiring, grounding, lightning protection, electromagnetic interference considerations, and controls. To reduce these BOS and design costs, standardized modular (building-block) designs for flat-panel and concentrator array fields have been developed that are fully integrated and optimized for lowest life-cycle costs. Using drawings and specifications now available, these building-block designs can be used in multiples to install various size array fields. The developed designs are immediately applicable and reduce the array-field BOS costs to a small fraction of previous costs. Prototype array fields are currently being installed using each of the two alternative building-block designs developed for flat-panel PV array fields.

  14. Unlikely Combination of Experiments With a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

    2006-05-01

    A new high-voltage array comprising bipolar strings of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules was inaugurated in 2005. It is equipped with a unique combination of tests, which likely have never before been deployed simultaneously within a single array: full current-voltage (I-V) traces, high-voltage leakage current measurements, and peak-power tracking or temporal stepped-bias profiling. The array nominally produces 1 kW power at 1 sun. The array's electrical characteristics are continuously monitored and controlled with a programmable electronic load interfaced to a data acquisition system (DAS), that also records solar and meteorological data. The modules are mounted with their frames electrically isolated from earth ground, in order to facilitate measurement of the leakage currents that arise between the high voltage bias developed in the series-connected cells and modules and their mounting frames. Because the DAS can perform stepped biasing of the array as a function of time, synchronous detection of the leakage current data with alternating bias is available. Leakage current data and their dependence on temperature and voltage are investigated. Array power data are analyzed across a wide range of varying illuminations and temperatures from the I-V traces. Array performance is also analyzed from an energy output perspective using peak-power tracking data.

  15. Unlikely Combination of Experiments with a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array

    SciTech Connect

    del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

    2006-01-01

    A new high-voltage array comprising bipolar strings of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules was inaugurated in 2005. It is equipped with a unique combination of tests, which likely have never before been deployed simultaneously within a single array: full current-voltage (I-V) traces, high-voltage leakage current measurements, and peak-power tracking or temporal stepped-bias profiling. The array nominally produces 1 kW power at 1 sun. The array's electrical characteristics are continuously monitored and controlled with a programmable electronic load interfaced to a data acquisition system (DAS), that also records solar and meteorological data. The modules are mounted with their frames electrically isolated from earth ground, in order to facilitate measurement of the leakage currents that arise between the high voltage bias developed in the series-connected cells and modules and their mounting frames. Because the DAS can perform stepped biasing of the array as a function of time, synchronous detection of the leakage current data with alternating bias is available. Leakage current data and their dependence on temperature and voltage are investigated. Array power data are analyzed across a wide range of varying illuminations and temperatures from the I-V traces. Array performance is also analyzed from an energy output perspective using peak-power tracking data.

  16. Modeling and reconfiguration of solar photovoltaic arrays under non-uniform shadow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dung Duc

    Mass production and use of electricity generated from solar energy has become very common recently because of the environmental threats arising from the production of electricity from fossil fuels and nuclear power. The obvious benefits of solar energy are clean energy production and infinite supply of daylight. The main disadvantage is the high cost. In these photovoltaic systems, semiconductor materials convert the solar light into electrical energy. Current versus voltage characteristics of the solar cells are nonlinear, thus leading to technical control challenges. In the first order approximation, output power of a solar array is proportional to the irradiance of sunlight. However, in many applications, such as solar power plants, building integrated photovoltaic or solar tents, the solar photovoltaic arrays might be illuminated non-uniformly. The cause of non-uniform illumination may be the shadow of clouds, the trees, booms, neighbor's houses, or the shadow of one solar array on the other, etc. This further leads to nonlinearities in characteristics. Because of the nature of the electrical characteristics of solar cells, the maximum power losses are not proportional to the shadow, but magnify nonlinearly [1]. Further, shadows of solar PV array can cause other undesired effects: (1) The power actually generated from the solar PV array is much less than designed. At some systems, the annual losses because of the shadow effects can be reached 10%. Thus, the probability for "loss of load" increases [2]. (2) The local hot spot in the shaded part of the solar PV array can damage the solar cells. The shaded solar cells may be work on the negative voltage region and become a resistive load and absorb power. Bypass diodes are sometimes connected parallel to solar cells to protect them from damage. However, in most cases, just one diode is connected in parallel to group of solar cells [3], and this hidden the potential power output of the array. This proposed research

  17. Synthesis and characterization of silicon nanowire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichfeld, Sarah M.

    The overall objective of this thesis was the development of processes for the fabrication of radial p-n silicon nanowires (SiNWs) using bottom-up nanowire growth techniques on silicon and glass substrates. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth was carried out on Si(111) substrates using SiCl4 as the silicon precursor. Growth conditions including temperature, PSiCl4, PH2, and position were investigated to determine the optimum growth conditions for epitaxially oriented silicon nanowire arrays. The experiments revealed that the growth rate of the silicon nanowires exhibits a maximum as a function of PSiCl4 and P H2. Gas phase equilibrium calculations were used in conjunction with a mass transport model to explain the experimental data. The modeling results demonstrate a similar maximum in the mass of solid silicon predicted to form as a function of PSiCl4 and PH2, which results from a change in the gas phase concentration of SiHxCly and SiClx species. This results in a shift in the process from growth to etching with increasing PSiCl4. In general, for the atmospheric pressure conditions employed in this study, growth at higher temperatures >1000°C and higher SiCl4 concentrations gave the best results. The growth of silicon nanowire arrays on anodized alumina (AAO)-coated glass substrates was also investigated. Glass will not hold up to the high temperatures required for Si nanowire growth with SiCl4 so SiH 4 was used as the Si precursor instead. Initial studies were carried out to measure the resistivity of p-type and n-type silicon nanowires grown in freestanding AAO membranes. A series of nanowire samples were grown in which the doping and the nanowire length inside the membrane were varied. Circular metal contacts were deposited on the top surface of the membranes and the resistance of the nanowire arrays was measured. The measured resistance versus nanowire length was plotted and the nanowire resistivity was extracted from the slope. The resistivity of the silicon

  18. Dendron growth from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube thin layer arrays for photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Mark Alexander; Köper, Ingo; Quinton, Jamie Scott; Shapter, Joe George

    2011-04-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotube arrays attached to conductive transparent electrodes have previously shown promise for use in photovoltaic devices, whilst still retaining light transmission. Here, chemical modification of these thin (<200 nm) arrays with PAMAM-type dendrons has been undertaken to enhance the photoresponse of these devices. The effect of modification on the electrode was measured by differential pulse voltammetry to detect the dendrons, and the effect on the nanotubes was measured by Raman spectroscopy. Solar simulator illumination of the cells was performed to measure the effect of the nanotube modification on the cell power, and determine the optimal modification. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was also used to investigate the equivalent electronic circuit elements of the cells. The optimal dendron modification occurred with the second generation (G-2.0), which gave a 70% increase in power over the unmodified nanotube array.

  19. Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology, 1988. High Efficiency, Space Environment, and Array Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The 9th Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology conference was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center from April 19 to 21, 1988. The papers and workshop summaries report remarkable progress on a wide variety of approaches in space photovoltaics, for both near and far term applications. Among the former is the recently developed high efficiency GaAs/Ge cell, which formed the focus of a workshop discussion on heteroepitaxial cells. Still aimed at the long term, but with a significant payoff in a new mission capability, are InP cells, with their potentially dramatic improvement in radiation resistance. Approaches to near term, array specific powers exceeding 130 W/kg are also reported, and advanced concentrator panel technology with the potential to achieve over 250 W/sq m is beginning to take shape.

  20. Engineering study of the module/array interface for large terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Three major areas--structural, electrical, and maintenance--were evaluated. Efforts in the structural area included establishing acceptance criteria for materials and members, determining loading criteria, and analyzing glass modules in various framing system configurations. Array support structure design was addressed briefly. Electrical considerations included evaluation of module characteristics, intermodule connectors, array wiring, converters and lightning protection. Plant maintenance features such as array cleaning, failure detection, and module installation and replacement were addressed.

  1. Atomic oxygen durability evaluation of the flexible batten for the photovoltaic array mast on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stidham, Curtis R.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Flaherty, David S.; Roig, David M.; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1994-01-01

    A test program was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) to evaluate the long term low Earth orbital (LEO) atomic oxygen (AO) durability of a flexible (fiberglass-epoxy composite) batten. The flexible batten is a component used to provide structural rigidity in the photovoltaic array mast on Space Station. The mast is used to support and articulate the photovoltaic array, therefore, the flexible batten must be preloaded for the 15 year lifetime of an array blanket. Development hardware and composite materials were evaluated in ground testing facilities for AO durability and dynamic retraction-deployment cyclic loading representative of expected full life in-space application. The CV1144 silicone (AO protective) coating was determined to provide adequate protection against AO degradation of the composite material and provided fiber containment, thus the structural integrity of the flexible batten was maintained. Both silicone coated and uncoated flexible battens maintained load carrying capabilities. Results of the testing did indicate that the CV1144 silicone protective coating was oxidized by AO reactions to form a brittle glassy (SiO2) skin that formed cracking patterns on all sides of the coated samples. The cracking was observed in samples that were mechanically stressed as well as samples in non-stressed conditions. The oxidized silicon was observed to randomly spall in small localized areas, on the flexible battens that underwent retraction-deployment cycling. Some darkening of the silicon, attributed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, was observed.

  2. A systematic method of interconnection optimization for dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system.

    PubMed

    Siaw, Fei-Lu; Chong, Kok-Keong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new systematic approach to analyze all possible array configurations in order to determine the most optimal dense-array configuration for concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems. The proposed method is fast, simple, reasonably accurate, and very useful as a preliminary study before constructing a dense-array CPV panel. Using measured flux distribution data, each CPV cells' voltage and current values at three critical points which are at short-circuit, open-circuit, and maximum power point are determined. From there, an algorithm groups the cells into basic modules. The next step is I-V curve prediction, to find the maximum output power of each array configuration. As a case study, twenty different I-V predictions are made for a prototype of nonimaging planar concentrator, and the array configuration that yields the highest output power is determined. The result is then verified by assembling and testing of an actual dense-array on the prototype. It was found that the I-V curve closely resembles simulated I-V prediction, and measured maximum output power varies by only 1.34%.

  3. A Systematic Method of Interconnection Optimization for Dense-Array Concentrator Photovoltaic System

    PubMed Central

    Siaw, Fei-Lu

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new systematic approach to analyze all possible array configurations in order to determine the most optimal dense-array configuration for concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems. The proposed method is fast, simple, reasonably accurate, and very useful as a preliminary study before constructing a dense-array CPV panel. Using measured flux distribution data, each CPV cells' voltage and current values at three critical points which are at short-circuit, open-circuit, and maximum power point are determined. From there, an algorithm groups the cells into basic modules. The next step is I-V curve prediction, to find the maximum output power of each array configuration. As a case study, twenty different I-V predictions are made for a prototype of nonimaging planar concentrator, and the array configuration that yields the highest output power is determined. The result is then verified by assembling and testing of an actual dense-array on the prototype. It was found that the I-V curve closely resembles simulated I-V prediction, and measured maximum output power varies by only 1.34%. PMID:24453823

  4. Ground testing of array modules for the photovoltaic array space power (PASP) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert K.; Grier, Norman T.

    1987-01-01

    One of the objectives of the PASP experiment is the verification of cost-effective ground simulations of high-voltage solar array/space-environment interactions by comparing the results with flight data. These ground tests consist of electrical characterization, thermal cycling, and plasma chamber simulations. The results of the latter tests are reported. Five array modules which are representative of the flight arrays were tested. The module types are planar silicon, planar gallium arsenide, planar silicon passivated with an integrally deposited cover glass, mini-Cassegrainian concentrator, and SLATS concentrator. The modules were biased to -1000 V in varying plasma densities from 4 x 103 to 2 x 105 e-/cu cm. Each array was tested in both dark and illuminated conditions with a load resistance. In addition to monitoring arcing during the plasma tests, the arrays were visually inspected and electrically characterized before and after exposure in the chamber. The electrical results are tabulated and briefly discussed.

  5. On-Orbit Electrical Performance of a Mir Space Station Photovoltaic Array Predicted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Hoffman, David J.; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) was developed jointly by the United States and Russia to provide approximately 6 kW of photovoltaic power to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA was launched to Mir in November 1995 and installed on the Kvant-1 module in May 1996, where it has been performing well to date. Since the MCSA panels are nearly identical to those of the International Space Station (ISS), MCSA operation offered an opportunity to gather multiyear performance data on this technology prior to its implementation on the ISS. Initial, on-orbit electrical performance and temperature data were measured in June and December of 1996.

  6. Electricity from photovoltaic solar cells. Flat-Plate Solar Array Project of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaics Program: 10 years of progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Elmer

    1985-01-01

    The objectives were to develop the flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) array technologies required for large-scale terrestrial use late in the 1980s and in the 1990s; advance crystalline silicon PV technologies; develop the technologies required to convert thin-film PV research results into viable module and array technology; and to stimulate transfer of knowledge of advanced PV materials, solar cells, modules, and arrays to the PV community. Progress reached on attaining these goals, along with future recommendations are discussed.

  7. Application of power transistors to residential and intermediate rating photovoltaic array power conditioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigerwald, R. L.; Ferraro, A.; Turnbull, F. G.

    1983-04-01

    Power conditioning systems that interface with photovoltaic arrays are presently investigated for the cases of 5-30 kW residential systems interfacing with a 240-V single-phase utility connection, and 30-200 kW intermediate systems interfacing with a 480-V three-phase utility connection. Both systems require an isolation transformer between the array and the utility interface. A tradeoff study is conducted for numerous transistor and thyristor circuits and configurations, with weighting criteria that include full- and part-load efficiency, size, weight, reliability, ease of control, injected harmonics, reactive power requirements, and parts cost. On the basis of study results, a 10-kW high frequency transistor inverter feeding a high frequency isolation transformer with a sinusoidally shaped current wave was selected.

  8. Impact of Nanostructure Configuration on the Photovoltaic Performance of Quantum-Dot Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbezier, Aude; Aeberhard, Urs

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a mesoscopic model based on the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism for a tight-binding-like effective Hamiltonian is used to investigate a selectively contacted quantum-dot array designed for operation as a single-junction quantum-dot solar cell. By establishing a direct relation between nanostructure configuration and optoelectronic properties, the investigation reveals the influence of interdot and dot-contact coupling strengths on the rates of charge-carrier photogeneration, radiative recombination, and extraction at contacts, and, consequently, on the ultimate performance of photovoltaic devices with finite quantum-dot arrays as the active medium. For long carrier lifetimes, the dominant configuration effects originate in the dependence of the joint density of states on the interdot coupling in terms of band width and effective band gap. In the low-carrier-lifetime regime, where recombination competes with carrier extraction, the extraction efficiency shows a critical dependence on the dot-contact coupling.

  9. Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, D. C.; Gaines, G. B.; Sliemers, F. A.; Kistler, C. W.; Igou, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Published and unpublished information relating to encapsulation systems and materials properties was collected by searching the literature and appropriate data bases (over 1,300 documents were selected and reviewed) and by personal contacts including site and company visits. A data tabulation summarizing world experience with terrestrial photovoltaic arrays (50 installations) is presented in the report. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 500,000 kW/yr. The recommended materials (all commercially available) include, depending upon the device design, various borosilicate and soda-lime glasses and numerous polymerics suitable for specific encapsulation system functions.

  10. Measurement Techniques and Instruments Suitable for Life-prediction Testing of Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Wood, V. E.; Mcginniss, V. D.; Hassell, J. A.; Richard, N. A.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The validation of a 20-year service life for low-cost photovoltaic arrays is a critical requirement in the Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project. The validation is accomplished through accelerated life-prediction tests. A two-phase study was conducted to address the needs before such tests are carried out. The results and recommended techniques from the Phase 1 investigation are summarized in the appendix. Phase 2 of the study is covered in this report and consisted of experimental evaluations of three techniques selected from these recommended as a results of the Phase 1 findings. The three techniques evaluated were specular and nonspecular optical reflectometry, chemiluminescence measurements, and electric current noise measurements.

  11. Glad nanostructured arrays with enhanced carrier collection and light trapping for photoconductive and photovoltaic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansizoglu, Hilal

    Solar energy harvesting has been of great interest for researchers over the past 50 years. Main emphasis has been on developing high quality materials with low defect density and proper band gaps. However, high cost of bulk materials and insufficient light absorption in thin films led to utilization of semiconductor nanostructures in photovoltaics and photonics. Light trapping abilities of nanostructures can provide high optical absorption whereas core/shell nanostructured arrays can allow enhanced charge carrier collection. However, most of the nanofabrication methods that can produce uniform nanostructure geometries are limited in materials, dimensions, and not compatible with industrial production systems. Therefore, it is essential to develop innovative low-cost fabrication approaches that can address these issues. The primary goal of this project is to investigate light trapping and carrier collection properties of glancing angle deposited (GLAD) nanostructured arrays for high-efficiency, low-cost photoconductive and photovoltaic devices using characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy and time resolved photocurrent measurements. Indium sulfide (In2S3) has been chosen as a model material system in this study. GLAD nanostructured arrays of vertical rods, screws, springs, zigzags and tilted rods were fabricated and characterized. A strong dependence of optical absorption on the shapes of nanostructures is observed from UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. A simulation study using finite difference time domain (FDTD) shows that introducing 3D geometry results in diffuse scattering of light and leads to high optical absorption. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine a simple and scalable fabrication technique for conformal and uniform shell coatings. The results suggest that an atomic flux with angular distribution, which can be

  12. 26+ Year Old Photovoltaic Power Plant: Degradation and Reliability Evaluation of Crystalline Silicon Modules -- South Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olakonu, Kolapo

    As the use of photovoltaic (PV) modules in large power plants continues to increase globally, more studies on degradation, reliability, failure modes, and mechanisms of field aged modules are needed to predict module life expectancy based on accelerated lifetime testing of PV modules. In this work, a 26+ year old PV power plant in Phoenix, Arizona has been evaluated for performance, reliability, and durability. The PV power plant, called Solar One, is owned and operated by John F. Long's homeowners association. It is a 200 kW dc, standard test conditions (STC) rated power plant comprised of 4000 PV modules or frameless laminates, in 100 panel groups (rated at 175 kW ac). The power plant is made of two center-tapped bipolar arrays, the north array and the south array. Due to a limited time frame to execute this large project, this work was performed by two masters students (Jonathan Belmont and Kolapo Olakonu) and the test results are presented in two masters theses. This thesis presents the results obtained on the south array and the other thesis presents the results obtained on the north array. Each of these two arrays is made of four sub arrays, the east sub arrays (positive and negative polarities) and the west sub arrays (positive and negative polarities), making up eight sub arrays. The evaluation and analyses of the power plant included in this thesis consists of: visual inspection, electrical performance measurements, and infrared thermography. A possible presence of potential induced degradation (PID) due to potential difference between ground and strings was also investigated. Some installation practices were also studied and found to contribute to the power loss observed in this investigation. The power output measured in 2011 for all eight sub arrays at STC is approximately 76 kWdc and represents a power loss of 62% (from 200 kW to 76 kW) over 26+ years. The 2011 measured power output for the four south sub arrays at STC is 39 kWdc and represents a power

  13. Performance optimization of dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system considering effects of circumsolar radiation and slope error.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chee-Woon; Chong, Kok-Keong; Tan, Ming-Hui

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents an approach to optimize the electrical performance of dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system comprised of non-imaging dish concentrator by considering the circumsolar radiation and slope error effects. Based on the simulated flux distribution, a systematic methodology to optimize the layout configuration of solar cells interconnection circuit in dense array concentrator photovoltaic module has been proposed by minimizing the current mismatch caused by non-uniformity of concentrated sunlight. An optimized layout of interconnection solar cells circuit with minimum electrical power loss of 6.5% can be achieved by minimizing the effects of both circumsolar radiation and slope error.

  14. Portable, X-Y translating, infrared microscope for remote inspection of photovoltaic solar arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The prevalent physical defect found in terrestrial photovoltaic modules during manufacture and field exposure has been the cracked solar cell. Cells can become cracked during handling, because of thermal mismatch in their encapsulation packages, or due to environmental phenomena such as hail. A device is described which can be used remotely to locate cracked silicon solar cells in photovoltaic modules. This solar-cell inspection device can be used either in the laboratory for quality assurance and failure analysis evaluation or at array fields to monitor cracked-cell occurrence. It consists of: (a) an infrared microscope that operates at 1.0 micron, uses darkfield illumination, has a relatively large field of view (3.0 in.), has low system magnification (5X to 15X), and has a video display output; (b) a portable X-Y translator that is capable of moving the microscope over an 8 ft. x 8 ft. area; and (c) a console that allows remote instrument control and visual inspection of modules or arrays (up to 500 ft). This system presently is undergoing laboratory and field testing as part of the DOE-sponsored MIT Lincoln Laboratory Solar Photovoltiac Residential Project.

  15. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Phillips, Brandon S.

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats, Communication Satellites, and Outer Planet Science Satellites all share one thing in common: Mission success depends on maintaining power in the harsh space environment. For a vast majority of satellites, spacecraft power is sourced by a photovoltaic (PV) array system. Built around PV cells, the array systems also include wiring, substrates, connectors, and protection diodes. Each of these components must function properly throughout the mission in order for power production to remain at nominal levels. Failure of even one component can lead to a crippling loss of power. To help ensure PV array systems do not suffer failures on-orbit due to the space environment, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a wide ranging test and evaluation capability. Key elements of this capability include: Testing: a. Ultraviolet (UV) Exposure b. Charged Particle Radiation (Electron and Proton) c. Thermal Cycling d. Plasma and Beam Environments Evaluation: a. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Screening b. Optical Inspection and easurement c. PV Power Output including Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) measurements This paper will describe the elements of the space environment which particularly impact PV array systems. MSFC test capabilities will be described to show how the relevant space environments can be applied to PV array systems in the laboratory. A discussion of MSFC evaluation capabilities will also be provided. The sample evaluation capabilities offer test engineers a means to quantify the effects of the space environment on their PV array system or component. Finally, examples will be shown of the effects of the space environment on actual PV array materials tested at MSFC.

  16. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  17. Impact of LDEF photovoltaic experiment findings upon spacecraft solar array design and development requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Leighton E.

    1993-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells (solar cells) and other solar array materials were flown in a variety of locations on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). With respect to the predicted leading edge, solar array experiments were located at 0 degrees (row 9), 30 degrees (row 8) and 180 degrees (row 3). Postflight estimates of location of the experiments with respect to the velocity vector add 8.1 degrees to these values. Experiments were also located on the Earth end of the LDEF longitudinal axis. Types and magnitudes of detrimental effects differ between the locations with some commonality. Postflight evaluation of the solar array experiments reveal that some components/materials are very resistant to the environment to which they were exposed while others need protection, modification, or replacement. Interaction of materials with atomic oxygen (AO), as an area of major importance, was dramatically demonstrated by LDEF results. Information gained from the LDEF flight allows array developers to set new requirements for on-going and future technology and flight component development.

  18. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  19. Effect of row-to-row shading on the output of flat-plate south-facing photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Hassan, A.Y.; Collis, J. ); Stefanakos, E.K. )

    1989-08-01

    When solar arrays (photovoltaic, thermal, etc.) are arranged in multiple rows of modules, all but the first row suffer reduction in (power) output, even when sufficient spacing between rows is provided. The reduction in output power occurs because the first row prevents some of the diffuse and reflected radiation from reaching the row directly behind it. This work presents estimates of the effect of shading on the amounts of solar radiation received by consecutive rows of flat-plate arrays.

  20. A review and analysis on growth and optical absorption properties of silicon nanowire array for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ritu; Dusad, Lalit Kumar

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, optical absorptions in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) arrays obtained from theoretical studies and experimental approaches have been reviewed. A brief description on the different growth techniques for SiNW arrays reported so far is presented. Comparative analysis based on major research findings has been done and the advantages of SiNW-based solar cells over thin film solar cells are presented. Furthermore, future aspects of the use of SiNWs for photovoltaic applications are discussed.

  1. The status of lightweight photovoltaic space array technology based on amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Kaschmitter, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Ultralight, flexible photovoltaic (PV) array of amorphous silicon (a-Si) was identified as a potential low cost power source for small satellites. A survey was conducted of the status of the a-Si PV array technology with respect to present and future performance, availability, cost, and risks. For existing, experimental array blankets made of commercial cell material, utilizing metal foil substrates, the Beginning of Life (BOL) performance at Air Mass Zero (AM0) and 35 C includes total power up to 200 W, power per area of 64 W/sq m and power per weight of 258 W/kg. Doubling of power per weight occurs when polyimide substrates are used. Estimated End of Life (EOL) power output after 10 years in a nominal low earth orbit would be 80 pct. of BOL, the degradation being due to largely light induced effects (-10 to -15 pct.) and in part (-5 pct.) to space radiation. Predictions for the year 1995 for flexible PV arrays, made on the basis of published results for rigid a-Si modules, indicate EOL power output per area and per weight of 105 W/sq m and 400 W/kg, respectively, while predictions for the late 1990s based on existing U.S. national PV program goals indicate EOL values of 157 W/sq m and 600 W/kg. Cost estimates by vendors for 200 W ultralight arrays in volume of over 1000 units range from $100/watt to $125/watt. Identified risks include the lack of flexible, space compatible encapsulant, the lack of space qualification effort, recent partial or full acquisitions of US manufacturers of a-Si cells by foreign firms, and the absence of a national commitment for a long range development program toward developing of this important power source for space.

  2. Plasmonic enhancement of amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells with hexagonal silver arrays made with nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Guney, D. O.; Pearce, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) provides an opportunity for a low-cost and scalable method to optically engineer solar photovoltaic (PV) cells. For PV applications, NSL is widely used in rear contact scenarios to excite surface plasmon polariton and/or high order diffractions, however, the top contact scenarios using NSL are rare. In this paper a systematic simulation study is conducted to determine the capability of achieving efficiency enhancement in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells using NSL as a top contact plasmonic optical enhancer. The study focuses on triangular prism and sphere arrays as they are the most commonly and easily acquired through direct deposition or low-temperature annealing, respectively. For optical enhancement, a characteristic absorption profile is generated and analyzed to determine the effects of size, shape and spacing of plasmonic structures compared to an un-enhanced reference cell. The factors affecting NSL-enhanced PV performance include absorption, shielding effects, diffraction, and scattering. In the triangular prism array, parasitic absorption of the silver particles proves to be problematic, and although it can be alleviated by increasing the particle spacing, no useful enhancement was observed in the triangular prism arrays that were simulated. Sphere arrays, on the other hand, have broad scattering cross-sections that create useful scattering fields at several sizes and spacing intervals. For the simulated sphere arrays the highest enhancement found was 7.4%, which was fabricated with a 250 nm radius nanosphere and a 50 nm silver thickness, followed by annealing in inert gas. These results are promising and provide a path towards the commercialization of plasmonic a-Si:H solar cells using NSL fabrication techniques.

  3. Superior broadband antireflection from buried Mie resonator arrays for high-efficiency photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Sihua; Zeng, Yang; Huang, Zengguang; Shen, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Establishing reliable and efficient antireflection structures is of crucial importance for realizing high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells. In this study, we provide a design guideline for buried Mie resonator arrays, which is composed of silicon nanostructures atop a silicon substrate and buried by a dielectric film, to attain a superior antireflection effect over a broadband spectral range by gaining entirely new discoveries of their antireflection behaviors. We find that the buried Mie resonator arrays mainly play a role as a transparent antireflection structure and their antireflection effect is insensitive to the nanostructure height when higher than 150 nm, which are of prominent significance for photovoltaic applications in the reduction of photoexcited carrier recombination. We further optimally combine the buried Mie resonator arrays with micron-scale textures to maximize the utilization of photons, and thus have successfully achieved an independently certified efficiency of 18.47% for the nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large-size wafer (156 mm × 156 mm). PMID:25746848

  4. Low Earth orbit durability evaluation of protected silicone for advanced refractive photovoltaic concentrator arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Mccollum, Timothy A.

    1994-01-01

    The need for efficient, cost effective sources of electrical power in space has led to the development of photovoltaic power systems which make use of novel refractive solar concentrators. These concentrators have been conceived in both point-focus and linear-focus designs. Current concentrator lenses are fabricated from flexible silicones with Fresnel facets along their inside surface. To insure the efficient operation of these power systems, the concentrator lenses must be durable and the silicone material must remain specularly transmitting over a reasonable lifetime in low Earth orbit (LEO) and other space environments. Because of the vulnerability of silicones to atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation in LEO these lenses have been coated with a multi-layer metal oxide protective coating. The objective of this research was to evaluate the LEO durability of the multilayer coated silicone for advanced refractive photovoltaic concentrator arrays with respect to optical properties and microstructure. Flat metal oxide coated silicone samples were exposed to ground-laboratory and in-space atomic oxyqen for durability evaluation.

  5. Three-dimensional nanopillar-array photovoltaics on low-cost and flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiyong; Razavi, Haleh; Do, Jae-Won; Moriwaki, Aimee; Ergen, Onur; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Leu, Paul W.; Ho, Johnny C.; Takahashi, Toshitake; Reichertz, Lothar A.; Neale, Steven; Yu, Kyoungsik; Wu, Ming; Ager, Joel W.; Javey, Ali

    2009-08-01

    Solar energy represents one of the most abundant and yet least harvested sources of renewable energy. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in developing photovoltaics that can be potentially mass deployed. Of particular interest to cost-effective solar cells is to use novel device structures and materials processing for enabling acceptable efficiencies. In this regard, here, we report the direct growth of highly regular, single-crystalline nanopillar arrays of optically active semiconductors on aluminium substrates that are then configured as solar-cell modules. As an example, we demonstrate a photovoltaic structure that incorporates three-dimensional, single-crystalline n-CdS nanopillars, embedded in polycrystalline thin films of p-CdTe, to enable high absorption of light and efficient collection of the carriers. Through experiments and modelling, we demonstrate the potency of this approach for enabling highly versatile solar modules on both rigid and flexible substrates with enhanced carrier collection efficiency arising from the geometric configuration of the nanopillars.

  6. Three-dimensional nanopillar-array photovoltaics on low-cost and flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhiyong; Razavi, Haleh; Do, Jae-won; Moriwaki, Aimee; Ergen, Onur; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Leu, Paul W; Ho, Johnny C; Takahashi, Toshitake; Reichertz, Lothar A; Neale, Steven; Yu, Kyoungsik; Wu, Ming; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2009-08-01

    Solar energy represents one of the most abundant and yet least harvested sources of renewable energy. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in developing photovoltaics that can be potentially mass deployed. Of particular interest to cost-effective solar cells is to use novel device structures and materials processing for enabling acceptable efficiencies. In this regard, here, we report the direct growth of highly regular, single-crystalline nanopillar arrays of optically active semiconductors on aluminium substrates that are then configured as solar-cell modules. As an example, we demonstrate a photovoltaic structure that incorporates three-dimensional, single-crystalline n-CdS nanopillars, embedded in polycrystalline thin films of p-CdTe, to enable high absorption of light and efficient collection of the carriers. Through experiments and modelling, we demonstrate the potency of this approach for enabling highly versatile solar modules on both rigid and flexible substrates with enhanced carrier collection efficiency arising from the geometric configuration of the nanopillars.

  7. Using Measured Plane-of-Array Data Directly in Photovoltaic Modeling: Methodology and Validation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Janine; Freestate, David; Riley, Cameron; Hobbs, William

    2016-11-01

    Measured plane-of-array (POA) irradiance may provide a lower-cost alternative to standard irradiance component data for photovoltaic (PV) system performance modeling without loss of accuracy. Previous work has shown that transposition models typically used by PV models to calculate POA irradiance from horizontal data introduce error into the POA irradiance estimates, and that measured POA data can correlate better to measured performance data. However, popular PV modeling tools historically have not directly used input POA data. This paper introduces a new capability in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) to directly use POA data in PV modeling, and compares SAM results from both POA irradiance and irradiance components inputs against measured performance data for eight operating PV systems.

  8. Using Measured Plane-of-Array Data Directly in Photovoltaic Modeling: Methodology and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Janine; Freestate, David; Hobbs, William; Riley, Cameron

    2016-06-05

    Measured plane-of-array (POA) irradiance may provide a lower-cost alternative to standard irradiance component data for photovoltaic (PV) system performance modeling without loss of accuracy. Previous work has shown that transposition models typically used by PV models to calculate POA irradiance from horizontal data introduce error into the POA irradiance estimates, and that measured POA data can correlate better to measured performance data. However, popular PV modeling tools historically have not directly used input POA data. This paper introduces a new capability in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) to directly use POA data in PV modeling, and compares SAM results from both POA irradiance and irradiance components inputs against measured performance data for eight operating PV systems.

  9. Using Measured Plane-of-Array Data Directly in Photovoltaic Modeling: Methodology and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Janine; Freestate, David; Hobbs, William; Riley, Cameron

    2016-11-21

    Measured plane-of-array (POA) irradiance may provide a lower-cost alternative to standard irradiance component data for photovoltaic (PV) system performance modeling without loss of accuracy. Previous work has shown that transposition models typically used by PV models to calculate POA irradiance from horizontal data introduce error into the POA irradiance estimates, and that measured POA data can correlate better to measured performance data. However, popular PV modeling tools historically have not directly used input POA data. This paper introduces a new capability in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) to directly use POA data in PV modeling, and compares SAM results from both POA irradiance and irradiance components inputs against measured performance data for eight operating PV systems.

  10. Theory for optimal design of waveguiding light concentrators in photovoltaic microcell arrays.

    PubMed

    Semichaevsky, Andrey V; Johnson, Harley T; Yoon, Jongseung; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Li, Lanfang; Rogers, John

    2011-06-10

    Efficiency of ultrathin flexible solar photovoltaic silicon microcell arrays can be significantly improved using nonimaging solar concentrators. A fluorophore is introduced to match the solar spectrum and the low-reflectivity wavelength range of Si, reduce the escape losses, and allow the nontracking operation. In this paper we optimize our solar concentrators using a luminescent/nonluminescent photon transport model. Key modeling results are compared quantitatively to experiments and are in good agreement with the latter. Our solar concentrator performance is not limited by the dye self-absorption. Bending deformations of the flexible solar collectors do not result in their indirect gain degradation compared to flat solar concentrators with the same projected area.

  11. Evaluation available encapsulation materials for low-cost long-life silicon photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, D. C.; Gaines, G. B.; Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Nance, G. P.; Bunk, A. R.; Brockway, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of selected encapsulation designs and materials based on an earlier study which have potential for use in low cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays are reported. The performance of candidate materials and encapsulated cells were evaluated principally for three types of encapsulation designs based on their potentially low materials and processing costs: (1) polymeric coatings, transparent conformal coatings over the cell with a structural-support substrate; (2) polymeric film lamination, cells laminated between two films or sheets of polymeric materials; and (3) glass-covered systems, cells adhesively bonded to a glass cover (superstrate) with a polymeric pottant and a glass or other substrate material. Several other design types, including those utilizing polymer sheet and pottant materials, were also included in the investigation.

  12. Optical absorption enhancement in slanted silicon nanocone hole arrays for solar photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Wen; Li, Zhao-Feng; Liu, Min; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Fu-Hua

    2016-10-01

    We investigate slanted silicon nanocone hole arrays as light absorbing structures for solar photovoltaics via simulation. With only 1-μm equivalent thickness, a maximum short-circuit current density of 34.9 mA/cm2 is obtained. Moreover, by adding an Ag mirror under the whole structure, a short-circuit current density of 37.9 mA/cm2 is attained. It is understood that the optical absorption enhancement mainly results from three aspects. First, the silicon nanocone holes provide a highly efficient antireflection effect. Second, after breaking the geometric symmetry, the slanted silicon nanocone hole supports more resonant absorption modes than vertical structures. Third, the Fabry-Perot resonance enhances the light absorption after adding an Ag mirror. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274066, 61474115, and 61504138) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032602).

  13. Mast material test program (MAMATEP). [for Solar Array Assembly of Space Station Photovoltaic Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1988-01-01

    The MAMATEP program, which is aimed at verifying the need for and evaluating the performance of various protection techniques for the solar array assembly mast of the Space Station photovoltaic power module, is discussed. Coated and uncoated mast material samples have been environmentally tested and evaluated, before and after testing, in terms of mass and bending modulus. The protective coatings include CV-1144 silicone, a Ni/Al/InSn eutectic, and an open-weave Al braid. Long-term plasma asher results from unprotected samples indicate that, even though fiberglass-epoxy samples degrade, a protection technique may not be necessary to ensure structural integrity. A protection technique, however, may be desirable to limit or contain the amount of debris generated by the degradation of the fiberglass-epoxy.

  14. Zinc oxide nanowire arrays for photovoltaic and light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janfeshan, Bita; Sadeghimakki, Bahareh; Jahed, Navid M. S.; Sivoththaman, Siva

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge of carrier transfer, in quantum dot sensitized solar cells, is the key to engineering the device structure and architecture optimization. In this work, Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire (NW) arrays were synthesized on glass wafers and on GaN thin films for application in photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. The nanowires grown on glass wafers were incorporated with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD) and their steady state and lifetime photoluminescence (PL) were studied to investigate the feasibility of electron transfer from excited QDs to ZnO NWs. The results provide an indication that the injected electrons, from excited high quantum efficiency QDs, live longer and hence facilitate electron transport without undergoing non-radiative recombination at surface trap states. Morphology and optical properties of the ZnO nanowires on GaN film were also studied for application in light-emitting devices.

  15. Energy distribution design on the photovoltaic cell array of the SSPS-OMEGA concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yiqun; Fan, Guanheng; Wang, Dongxu; Li, Xun

    2017-05-01

    Solar energy collection and conversion is of great significance to the power transmission of the Space Solar Power Station (SSPS), and has influences on the overall system, technologically and economically. For the proposed SSPS-OMEGA concept, the original conceptual design had non-uniform energy distribution and excessive energy density in local areas, which would cause decreases in its optical and electric performance. Aiming at this point, firstly, this paper evaluates the optical performance of the OMEGA concept via ray trace technique. Secondly, the generatrix geometry design of the photovoltaic (PV) cell array based on Bézier curve is carried out to obtain optimal optical performance available for efficient response to sunrays. After that numerical examples achieve good collection efficiency and suitable energy distribution. Finally, modular construction for the main concentrator and its influence on optical performance are investigated. Moreover, the effect of the orbital motion and tracking error are analyzed to provide reference for the realization of the OMEGA.

  16. Optical characterization of nonimaging dish concentrator for the application of dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming-Hui; Chong, Kok-Keong; Wong, Chee-Woon

    2014-01-20

    Optimization of the design of a nonimaging dish concentrator (NIDC) for a dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system is presented. A new algorithm has been developed to determine configuration of facet mirrors in a NIDC. Analytical formulas were derived to analyze the optical performance of a NIDC and then compared with a simulated result obtained from a numerical method. Comprehensive analysis of optical performance via analytical method has been carried out based on facet dimension and focal distance of the concentrator with a total reflective area of 120 m2. The result shows that a facet dimension of 49.8 cm, focal distance of 8 m, and solar concentration ratio of 411.8 suns is the most optimized design for the lowest cost-per-output power, which is US$1.93 per watt.

  17. Optical absorption enhancement with low structural-parameter sensitivity in three-dimensional silicon nanocavity array for solar photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuqiang; Sun, Ruinan; Hu, Ya; Peng, Kui-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Effective light trapping is essential for improving the efficiency and reducing the cost of thin-film silicon solar cells. Here, we numerically study the optical characteristics of periodic three-dimensional (3D) silicon nanocavity arrays. We found that the 3D silicon nanocavity array shows low sensitivity to geometric structural parameters for photon capture and achieves an outstanding efficiency superior to those of previously reported silicon nanostructures such as a nanowire and a nanohole with the same thickness. This excellence is attributed to a better antireflection capability and more resonant modes. The 3D silicon nanocavity array provides a new light-trapping strategy for thin-film photovoltaic devices.

  18. Broadband High Efficiency Fractal-Like and Diverse Geometry Silicon Nanowire Arrays for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Zoubi, Omar H.

    Solar energy has many advantages over conventional sources of energy. It is abundant, clean and sustainable. One way to convert solar energy directly into electrical energy is by using the photovoltaic solar cells (PVSC). Despite PVSC are becoming economically competitive, they still have high cost and low light to electricity conversion efficiency. Therefore, increasing the efficiency and reducing the cost are key elements for producing economically more competitive PVSC that would have significant impact on energy market and saving environment. A significant percentage of the PVSC cost is due to the materials cost. For that, thin films PVSC have been proposed which offer the benefits of the low amount of material and fabrication costs. Regrettably, thin film PVSC show poor light to electricity conversion efficiency because of many factors especially the high optical losses. To enhance conversion efficiency, numerous techniques have been proposed to reduce the optical losses and to enhance the absorption of light in thin film PVSC. One promising technique is the nanowire (NW) arrays in general and the silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays in particular. The purpose of this research is to introduce vertically aligned SiNW arrays with enhanced and broadband absorption covering the entire solar spectrum while simultaneously reducing the amount of material used. To this end, we apply new concept for designing SiNW arrays based on employing diversity of physical dimensions, especially radial diversity within certain lattice configurations. In order to study the interaction of light with SiNW arrays and compute their optical properties, electromagnetic numerical modeling is used. A commercial numerical electromagnetic solver software package, high frequency structure simulation (HFSS), is utilized to model the SiNW arrays and to study their optical properties. We studied different geometries factors that affect the optical properties of SiNW arrays. Based on this study, we

  19. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the Design of Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Arrays for Central Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Flat Plate Solar Array Project, focuses on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt level central station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat plate central station or other large scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost effective configurations. Design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory reserch activities are investigated. Technical issues are examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect/engineer and laboratory researcher. Topics on optimum source circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements, and array operation and maintenance are discussed.

  20. Inverted organic photovoltaic cells using three-dimensionally interconnected TiO2 nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehwan; Koh, Joo Hwan; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2013-04-01

    Here we describe a simple sol-gel method to fabricate inverted organic photovoltaics (OPV) using interconnected TiO2 nanotubes (inter-TiO2 NT) as an efficient electron transport layer. Three-dimensionally inter-TiO2 NT arrays were prepared by spin-coating a TiO2 precursor solution on the ZnO nanorod (NR) template grown via the liquid phase deposition method. Upon etching of ZnO NRs, inter-TiO2 NT arrays were generated, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). A blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deeply infiltrated into the pores of inter-TiO2 NT, as revealed by FE-SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of inter-TiO2 NT-based inverted OPV reached 3.0% at an air mass of 1.5 (100 mW/cm2), which is a 25% performance improvement compared to flat TiO2 films derived from the sol-gel process or commercial paste. The efficiency improvement arises from facilitated charge separation and collection due to the increased TiO2 interface arera and efficient transport pathway.

  1. Electrical Performance of the International Space Station U.S. Photovoltaic Array During Bifacial Illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delleur, Ann M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    With the first United States (U.S.) photovoltaic array (PVA) activated on International Space Station (ISS) in December 2000, on-orbit data can now be compared to analytical predictions. Due to ISS operational constraints, it is not always possible to point the front side of the arrays at the Sun. Thus, in many cases, sunlight directly illuminates the backside of the PVA as well as albedo illumination on either the front or the back. During this time, appreciable power is produced since the solar cells are mounted on a thin, solar transparent substrate. It is important to present accurate predictions for both front and backside power generation for mission planning, certification of flight readiness for a given mission, and on-orbit mission support. To provide a more detailed assessment of the ISS power production capability, the authors developed a PVA electrical performance model applicable to generalized bifacial illumination conditions. On-orbit PVA performance data were also collected and analyzed. This paper describes the ISS PVA performance model, and the methods used to reduce orbital performance data. Analyses were performed using SPACE. a NASA-GRC developed computer code for the ISS program office. Results showed a excellent comparison of on-orbit performance data and analytical results.

  2. Distributed solar photovoltaic array location and extent dataset for remote sensing object identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Kyle; Saboo, Raghav; L. Johnson, Timothy; Malof, Jordan M.; Devarajan, Arjun; Zhang, Wuming; M. Collins, Leslie; G. Newell, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Earth-observing remote sensing data, including aerial photography and satellite imagery, offer a snapshot of the world from which we can learn about the state of natural resources and the built environment. The components of energy systems that are visible from above can be automatically assessed with these remote sensing data when processed with machine learning methods. Here, we focus on the information gap in distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, of which there is limited public data on solar PV deployments at small geographic scales. We created a dataset of solar PV arrays to initiate and develop the process of automatically identifying solar PV locations using remote sensing imagery. This dataset contains the geospatial coordinates and border vertices for over 19,000 solar panels across 601 high-resolution images from four cities in California. Dataset applications include training object detection and other machine learning algorithms that use remote sensing imagery, developing specific algorithms for predictive detection of distributed PV systems, estimating installed PV capacity, and analysis of the socioeconomic correlates of PV deployment.

  3. Distributed solar photovoltaic array location and extent dataset for remote sensing object identification.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Kyle; Saboo, Raghav; L Johnson, Timothy; Malof, Jordan M; Devarajan, Arjun; Zhang, Wuming; M Collins, Leslie; G Newell, Richard

    2016-12-06

    Earth-observing remote sensing data, including aerial photography and satellite imagery, offer a snapshot of the world from which we can learn about the state of natural resources and the built environment. The components of energy systems that are visible from above can be automatically assessed with these remote sensing data when processed with machine learning methods. Here, we focus on the information gap in distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, of which there is limited public data on solar PV deployments at small geographic scales. We created a dataset of solar PV arrays to initiate and develop the process of automatically identifying solar PV locations using remote sensing imagery. This dataset contains the geospatial coordinates and border vertices for over 19,000 solar panels across 601 high-resolution images from four cities in California. Dataset applications include training object detection and other machine learning algorithms that use remote sensing imagery, developing specific algorithms for predictive detection of distributed PV systems, estimating installed PV capacity, and analysis of the socioeconomic correlates of PV deployment.

  4. Distributed solar photovoltaic array location and extent dataset for remote sensing object identification

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Kyle; Saboo, Raghav; L. Johnson, Timothy; Malof, Jordan M.; Devarajan, Arjun; Zhang, Wuming; M. Collins, Leslie; G. Newell, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Earth-observing remote sensing data, including aerial photography and satellite imagery, offer a snapshot of the world from which we can learn about the state of natural resources and the built environment. The components of energy systems that are visible from above can be automatically assessed with these remote sensing data when processed with machine learning methods. Here, we focus on the information gap in distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, of which there is limited public data on solar PV deployments at small geographic scales. We created a dataset of solar PV arrays to initiate and develop the process of automatically identifying solar PV locations using remote sensing imagery. This dataset contains the geospatial coordinates and border vertices for over 19,000 solar panels across 601 high-resolution images from four cities in California. Dataset applications include training object detection and other machine learning algorithms that use remote sensing imagery, developing specific algorithms for predictive detection of distributed PV systems, estimating installed PV capacity, and analysis of the socioeconomic correlates of PV deployment. PMID:27922592

  5. Scalable, epitaxy-free fabrication of super-absorbing sparse III-V nanowire arrays for photovoltaic applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hui; Fountaine, Katherine T.; Bukowsky, Colton R.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-09-01

    III-V compound semiconductor nanowire arrays are promising candidates for photovoltaics applications due to their high volumetric absorption. Uniform nanowire arrays exhibit high absorption at certain wavelengths due to strong coupling into lossy waveguide modes. Previously, simulations predicted near-unity, broadband absorption in sparse semiconductor nanowire arrays (<5% fill fraction) with multi-radii and tapered nanowire array designs [1]. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate near-unity broadband absorption in InP nanowire arrays via a scalable, epitaxy-free fabrication method, using nanoimprint lithography and ICP-RIE to define nanowire arrays in bulk InP wafers. In addition to mask pattern design (wire radius and spacing) and etch chemistry (wire taper), appropriate selection of a hard mask for the InP etch is critical to precise dimension control and reproducibility. Polymer-embedded wires are removed from the bulk InP substrate by a mechanical method that facilitates extensive reuse of a single bulk InP wafer to synthesize many polymer-embedded nanowire array thin films. Arrays containing multiple nanowire radii and tapered nanowires were successfully fabricated. For both designs, the polymer-embedded arrays achieved 90% broadband absorption (λ=400-900 nm) in less than 100 nm planar equivalence of InP. The addition of a silver back reflector increased this broadband absorption to 95%. The repeatable process of imprinting, etching and peeling to obtain many nanowire arrays from one single wafer represents an economical manufacturing route for high efficiency III-V photovoltaics. [1] K.T. Fountaine, C.G. Kendall, Harry A. Atwater, "Near-unity broadband absorption designs for semiconducting nanowire arrays via localized radial mode excitation," Opt. Exp. (2014).

  6. The mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array - Current status of component and prototype panel testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Swartz, C. K.; O'Neill, M. J.; Mcdanal, A. J.; Fraas, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    NASA Lewis and ENTECH have been developing a high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic concentrator array. The emphasis of the program has shifted to fabrication and testing of the minidome Fresnel lens and other array components. Protototype lenses have been tested for optical efficiency, with results around 90 percent, and tracking error performance. The results of these tests have been very consistent with the predicted analytical performance. Work has also progressed in the fabrication of the array support structure. Recent advances in 30 percent efficient stacked cell technology will have a significant effect on the array performance. It is concluded that near-term array performance goals of 300 W/sq m and 100 W/kg are feasible.

  7. Photovoltaic concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A status report on photovoltaic (PV) concentrators technology is presented. The major topics covered are as follows: (1) current PV concentrator arrays; designs, performances, and costs; (2) current PV concentrator array components; cells and cell assemblies, optical concentrators, support structures, tracking, and drive; (3) design of PV concentrator arrays; and (4) array manufacturing technology.

  8. The Application of Structural Reliability Techniques to Plume Impingement Loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunis, Isam S.; Carney, Kelly S.

    1993-01-01

    A new aerospace application of structural reliability techniques is presented, where the applied forces depend on many probabilistic variables. This application is the plume impingement loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Arrays. When the space shuttle berths with Space Station Freedom it must brake and maneuver towards the berthing point using its primary jets. The jet exhaust, or plume, may cause high loads on the photovoltaic arrays. The many parameters governing this problem are highly uncertain and random. An approach, using techniques from structural reliability, as opposed to the accepted deterministic methods, is presented which assesses the probability of failure of the array mast due to plume impingement loading. A Monte Carlo simulation of the berthing approach is used to determine the probability distribution of the loading. A probability distribution is also determined for the strength of the array. Structural reliability techniques are then used to assess the array mast design. These techniques are found to be superior to the standard deterministic dynamic transient analysis, for this class of problem. The results show that the probability of failure of the current array mast design, during its 15 year life, is minute.

  9. The application of structural reliability techniques to plume impingement loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunis, Isam S.; Carney, Kelly S.

    1993-01-01

    A new aerospace application of structural reliability techniques is presented, where the applied forces depend on many probabilistic variables. This application is the plume impingement loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Arrays. When the space shuttle berths with Space Station Freedom it must brake and maneuver towards the berthing point using its primary jets. The jet exhaust, or plume, may cause high loads on the photovoltaic arrays. The many parameters governing this problem are highly uncertain and random. An approach, using techniques from structural reliability, as opposed to the accepted deterministic methods, is presented which assesses the probability of failure of the array mast due to plume impingement loading. A Monte Carlo simulation of the berthing approach is used to determine the probability distribution of the loading. A probability distribution is also determined for the strength of the array. Structural reliability techniques are then used to assess the array mast design. These techniques are found to be superior to the standard deterministic dynamic transient analysis, for this class of problem. The results show that the probability of failure of the current array mast design, during its 15 year life, is minute.

  10. Development of a second-generation linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic and thermal (PVT) concentrator array, including fabrication and installation of a 200 square meter collector field

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, M.J.

    1985-02-01

    This report summarizes work performed in two areas: development of a second-generation linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array, and development and fabrication of a 22 kilowatt photovoltaic and thermal concentrator array. Under these programs, ENTECH, Inc. developed a new second-generation linear Fresnel lens PVT concentrator system, and deployed a 200 square meter collector field of the new design at Sandia-Albuquerque. The new system combines excellent performance and low mass-production cost.

  11. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and photovoltaic fission fragment detector arrays for light-ion induced fission correlation studies

    DOE PAGES

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; ...

    2017-02-20

    Here, the Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE–E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution ofmore » 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.« less

  12. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and Photovoltaic Fission Fragment Detector Arrays for Light-Ion Induced Fission Correlation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-05-01

    The Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE - E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution of 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.

  13. Utilizing Maximum Power Point Trackers in Parallel to Maximize the Power Output of a Solar (Photovoltaic) Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Figure 5. The p-n junction under short circuit current conditions (From [2]). The total current I of a solar cell is defined as the diode...January 14). “A new, lower value of total solar irradiance: evidence and climate significance,” in Geophysical Research Letters [Online], vol. 38...POWER POINT TRACKERS IN PARALLEL TO MAXIMIZE THE POWER OUTPUT OF A SOLAR (PHOTOVOLTAIC) ARRAY by Christopher Alan Stephenson December 2012

  14. Flat-plate solar array project of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaics Program: Ten years of progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Elmer

    1985-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, a Government-sponsored photovoltaics project, was initiated in January 1975 (previously named the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project) to stimulate the development of PV systems for widespread use. Its goal then was to develop PV modules with 10% efficiency, a 20-year lifetime, and a selling price of $0.50 per peak watt of generating capacity (1975 dollars). It was recognized that cost reduction of PV solar-cell and module manufacturing was the key achievement needed if PV power systems were to be economically competitive for large-scale terrestrial use.

  15. Growth of Well-Aligned ZnO Nanorod Arrays and Their Application for Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhaolin; Yao, Juncai

    2017-07-01

    We have fabricated well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNRAs) on indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates by a facile chemical bath deposition method. We used field-emission scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy to study the morphology, crystalline structure and optical absorption of the fabricated ZNRAs, respectively. The results showed that ZnO nanorods stood almost perpendicularly on the substrate, were about 30-50 nm in diameter and 800-900 nm in length, and were wurtzite-structured (hexagonal) ZnO. In addition, well-aligned ZNRAs exhibited a weak absorption in the visible region and had an optical band gap value of 3.28 eV. Furthermore, a hybrid ZNRAs/polymer photovoltaic device was made, under 1 sun AM 1.5 illumination (light intensity, ˜100 mW/cm2), and the device showed an open circuit voltage (V oc) of 0.32 V, a short circuit current density (J sc) of 7.67 mA/cm2, and a fill factor (FF) of 0.37, yielding an overall power conversion efficiency of 0.91%. Also, the exciton dissociation and transportation processes of charge carriers in the device under illumination were explained according to its current density-voltage (J-V) curve and the energy level diagram.

  16. Preparation and photovoltaic properties of perovskite solar cell based on ZnO nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Tian; Li, Zhaosong; Feng, Bingjie; Li, Siqian; Duan, Jinxia; Ye, Cong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    A careful control of ZnO nanorod arrays with various densities and thickness were achieved by hydrothermal method. An obvious increase in the ZnO nanorod density is observed as the concentrations of zinc acetate dropped as expected through the surface SEM images. On the other hand, samples with and without TiO2 compact layer were also studied and results had been analyzed to seek for an optimized substrate structure for light absorbing layer and increase the efficiency. What's more, a deep research for the drying temperature for perovskite layer was also conducted. As a result, SEM images discribe a promising surface appearance of perovskite layer which is finely attached onto the nanorod structure. Final power conversion efficiency (PCE) of FTO/ZnO seed layer/ZnO nanorods/perovskite/spiro-OMe-TAD/Au electrode photovoltaic device reached ∼9.15% together with open-circuit voltage of 957 mV, short-circuit current density of 17.8 mA/cm2 and fill factor of 0.537.

  17. The effects of lunar dust accumulation on the performance of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzan, Cynthia M.; Brinker, David J.; Kress, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Lunar base activity, particularly rocket launch and landing, will suspend and transport lunar dust. From preliminary models, the resulting dust accumulation can be significant, even as far as 2 km from the source. For example, at 2 km approximately 0.28 mg/sq cm of dust is anticipated to accumulate after only 10 surface missions with a 26,800 N excursion vehicle. The possible associated penalties in photovoltaic array performance were therefore the subject of experimental as well as theoretical investigation. To evaluate effects of dust accumulation on relative power output, current-voltage characteristics of dust-covered silicon cells were determined under the illumination of a Spectrolab X-25L solar simulator. The dust material used in these experiments was a terrestrial basalt which approximated lunar soil in particle size and composition. Cell short circuit current, an indicator of the penetrating light intensity, was found to decrease exponentially with dust accumulation. This was predicted independently by modeling the light occlusion caused by a growing layer of dust particles. Moreover, the maximum power output of dust-covered cells, derived from the I-V curves, was also found to degrade exponentially. Experimental results are presented and potential implications discussed.

  18. Evaluations of candidate encapsulation designs and materials for low-cost silicon photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.; Sliemers, F. A.; Brockway, M. C.; Bunk, A. R.; Nance, G. P.

    1978-01-01

    Three encapsulation designs for silicon photovoltaic arrays based on cells with silk-screened Ag metallization have been evaluated: transparent polymeric coatings over cells laminated between two films or sheets of polymeric materials; cells adhesively bonded to a glass cover with a polymer pottant and a glass or other substrate component. Silicone and acrylic coatings were assessed, together with acrylic sheet, 0.635 mm fiberglass-reinforced polyester sheet, 0.102 mm polycarbonate/acrylic dual-layer film, 0.127 mm fluorocarbon film, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, low-iron glass, and several adhesives. The encapsulation materials were characterized by light transmittance measurements, determination of moisture barrier properties and bond strengths, and by the performance of cells before and after encapsulation. Silicon and acrylic coatings provided inadequate protection. Acrylic and fluorocarbon films displayed good weatherability and acceptable optical transmittance. Borosilicate, low-iron and soda-lime-float glasses were found to be acceptable candidate encapsulants for most environments.

  19. A high-performance photovoltaic concentrator array - The mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator with 30 percent efficient GaAs/GaSb tandem cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Brinker, D. J.; Flood, D. J.; Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.; Fairbanks, E. S.; Yerkes, J. W.; O'Neill, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    A high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic concentrator array is described. Previous work on the minidome Fresnel lens concentrator concept is being integrated with Boeing's 30 percent efficient tandem GaAs/GaSb concentrator cells into a high-performance photovoltaic array. Calculations indicate that, in the near term, such an array can achieve 300 W/sq m at a specific power of 100 W/kg. Emphasis of the program has now shifted to integrating the concentrator lens, tandem cell, and supporting panel structure into a space-qualifiable array. A description is presented of the current status of component and prototype panel testing and the development of a flight panel for the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP PLUS) flight experiment.

  20. A high-performance photovoltaic concentrator array - The mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator with 30 percent efficient GaAs/GaSb tandem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Brinker, D. J.; Flood, D. J.; Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.; Fairbanks, E. S.; Yerkes, J. W.; O'Neill, M. J.

    A high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic concentrator array is described. Previous work on the minidome Fresnel lens concentrator concept is being integrated with Boeing's 30 percent efficient tandem GaAs/GaSb concentrator cells into a high-performance photovoltaic array. Calculations indicate that, in the near term, such an array can achieve 300 W/sq m at a specific power of 100 W/kg. Emphasis of the program has now shifted to integrating the concentrator lens, tandem cell, and supporting panel structure into a space-qualifiable array. A description is presented of the current status of component and prototype panel testing and the development of a flight panel for the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP PLUS) flight experiment.

  1. Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.; Schwartz, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the relative economic potentials of concenrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications in the mid-1990's. Specific objectives of this study are to provide information on concentrator photovoltaic collector probabilistic price and efficiency levels to illustrate critical areas of R&D for concentrator cells and collectors, and to compare concentrator and flat-plate PV price and efficiency alternatives for several locations, based on their implied costs of energy. To deal with the uncertainties surrounding research and development activities in general, a probabilistic assessment of commercially achievable concentrator photovoltaic collector efficiencies and prices (at the factory loading dock) is performed. The results of this projection of concentrator photovoltaic technology are then compared with a previous flat-plate module price analysis (performed early in 1983). To focus this analysis on specific collector alternatives and their implied energy costs for different locations, similar two-axis tracking designs are assumed for both concentrator and flat-plate options.

  2. Safety-related requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, A.

    1984-03-01

    Underwriters Laboratories has conducted a study to identify and develop safety requirements for photovoltaic module and panel designs and configurations for residential, intermediate, and large scale applications. Concepts for safety systems, where each system is a collection of subsystems which together address the total anticipated hazard situation, are described. Descriptions of hardware, and system usefulness and viability are included. This discussion of safety systems recognizes that there is little history on which to base the expected safety related performance of a photovoltaic system. A comparison of these systems, as against the provisions of the 1984 National Electrical Code covering photovoltaic systems is made. A discussion of the UL investigation of the photovoltaic module evaluated to the provisions of the Proposed UL Standard for Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules and Panels is included. Grounding systems, their basis and nature, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are described. The meaning of frame grounding, circuit grounding, and the type of circuit ground are covered. The development of the Standard for Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules and Panels has continued, and with both industry comment and a product submittal and listing, the Standard has been refined to a viable document allowing an objective safety review of photovoltaic modules and panels. How this document, and other UL documents would cover investigations of certain other photovoltaic system components is described.

  3. Inner retinal preservation in rat models of retinal degeneration implanted with subretinal photovoltaic arrays.

    PubMed

    Light, Jacob G; Fransen, James W; Adekunle, Adewumi N; Adkins, Alice; Pangeni, Gobinda; Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Palanker, Daniel V; McCall, Maureen A; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-11-01

    Photovoltaic arrays (PVA) implanted into the subretinal space of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are designed to electrically stimulate the remaining inner retinal circuitry in response to incident light, thereby recreating a visual signal when photoreceptor function declines or is lost. Preservation of inner retinal circuitry is critical to the fidelity of this transmitted signal to ganglion cells and beyond to higher visual targets. Post-implantation loss of retinal interneurons or excessive glial scarring could diminish and/or eliminate PVA-evoked signal transmission. As such, assessing the morphology of the inner retina in RP animal models with subretinal PVAs is an important step in defining biocompatibility and predicting success of signal transmission. In this study, we used immunohistochemical methods to qualitatively and quantitatively compare inner retinal morphology after the implantation of a PVA in two RP models: the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) or transgenic S334ter-line 3 (S334ter-3) rhodopsin mutant rat. Two PVA designs were compared. In the RCS rat, we implanted devices in the subretinal space at 4 weeks of age and histologically examined them at 8 weeks of age and found inner retinal morphology preservation with both PVA devices. In the S334ter-3 rat, we implanted devices at 6-12 weeks of age and again, inner retinal morphology was generally preserved with either PVA design 16-26 weeks post-implantation. Specifically, the length of rod bipolar cells and numbers of cholinergic amacrine cells were maintained along with their characteristic inner plexiform lamination patterns. Throughout the implanted retinas we found nonspecific glial reaction, but none showed additional glial scarring at the implant site. Our results indicate that subretinally implanted PVAs are well-tolerated in rodent RP models and that the inner retinal circuitry is preserved, consistent with our published results showing implant-evoked signal transmission.

  4. Photovoltaic solar array technology required for three wide scale generating systems for terrestrial applications: rooftop, solar farm, and satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Three major options for wide-scale generation of photovoltaic energy for terrestrial use are considered: (1) rooftop array, (2) solar farm, and (3) satellite station. The rooftop array would use solar cell arrays on the roofs of residential or commercial buildings; the solar farm would consist of large ground-based arrays, probably in arid areas with high insolation; and the satellite station would consist of an orbiting solar array, many square kilometers in area. The technology advancement requirements necessary for each option are discussed, including cost reduction of solar cells and arrays, weight reduction, resistance to environmental factors, reliability, and fabrication capability, including the availability of raw materials. The majority of the technology advancement requirements are applicable to all three options, making possible a flexible basic approach regardless of the options that may eventually be chosen. No conclusions are drawn as to which option is most advantageous, since the feasibility of each option depends on the success achieved in the technology advancement requirements specified.

  5. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the design of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central stations

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, has focused on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt-level central-station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat-plate central-station or other large-scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost-effective configurations. The Central Station Research Forum addressed design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central-station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory research activities. Technical issues were examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect-engineer and laboratory researcher. The forum included presentations on optimum source-circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements and array operation and maintenance. The Research Forum focused on current capabilities as well as design difficulties requiring additional technological thrusts and/or continued research emphasis. Session topic summaries highlighting major points during group discussions, identifying promising technical approaches or areas of future research, are presented.

  6. CdSe nanocrystal sensitized anatase TiO2 (001) tetragonal nanosheet-array films for photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuanglong; Yang, Junyou; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yong

    2013-02-01

    CdSe nanocrystal sensitized TiO2 nanosheet array heterostructure films were fabricated by a two-step method. Firstly, a single crystalline anatase TiO2 tetragonal nanosheet-array film on a transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was successfully prepared by hydrothermal method. Then, CdSe nanocrystalline sensitizers were deposited on the TiO2 nanosheet array by CBD method. The products were characterized with XRD, SEM, TEM and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The effect of the CdSe nanocrystal deposition time and the length of the TiO2 sheet on the photovoltaic performance of the resulting CdSe/TiO2 nanosheet array electrodes were also investigated. In comparison with the non-sensitized TiO2 nanosheet array, the photocurrent of CdSe sensitized TiO2 nanosheet has a great enhancement, which gives some insight to the fundamental mechanism of the performance improvement.

  7. FACT, Mega-ROSA, SOLAROSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Brian; White, Steve; Schmid, Kevin; Douglas Mark

    2012-01-01

    all photovoltaic and concentrator flexible blanket technologies, and can readily accommodate standard multijunction and emerging ultra-lightweight IMM (inverted metamorphic) photovoltaic flexible blanket assemblies, as well as ENTECHs Stretched Lens Array (SLA) and DSSs (Deployable Space Systems) FACT, which allows for cost reduction at the array level.

  8. Flexible Near-Infrared Photovoltaic Devices Based on Plasmonic Hot-Electron Injection into Silicon Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Dong; Gao, Yang; Ma, Jun; Long, Ran; Wang, Chengming; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-03-24

    The development of flexible near-infrared (NIR) photovoltaic (PV) devices containing silicon meets the strong demands for solar utilization, portability, and sustainable manufacture; however, improvements in the NIR light absorption and conversion efficiencies in ultrathin crystalline Si are required. We have developed an approach to improve the quantum efficiency of flexible PV devices in the NIR spectral region by integrating Si nanowire arrays with plasmonic Ag nanoplates. The Ag nanoplates can directly harvest and convert NIR light into plasmonic hot electrons for injection into Si, while the Si nanowire arrays offer light trapping. Taking the wavelength of 800 nm as an example, the external quantum efficiency has been improved by 59 % by the integration Ag nanoplates. This work provides an alternative strategy for the design and fabrication of flexible NIR PVs.

  9. A transient plasticity study and low cycle fatigue analysis of the Space Station Freedom photovoltaic solar array blanket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Liao, Mei-Hwa; Morris, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom photovoltaic solar array blanket assembly is comprised of several layers of materials having dissimilar elastic, thermal, and mechanical properties. The operating temperature of the solar array, which ranges from -75 to +60 C, along with the material incompatibility of the blanket assembly components combine to cause an elastic-plastic stress in the weld points of the assembly. The weld points are secondary structures in nature, merely serving as electrical junctions for gathering the current. The thermal mechanical loading of the blanket assembly operating in low earth orbit continually changes throughout each 90 min orbit, which raises the possibility of fatigue induced failure. A series of structural analyses were performed in an attempt to predict the fatigue life of the solar cell in the Space Station Freedom photovoltaic array blanket. A nonlinear elastic-plastic MSC/NASTRAN analysis followed by a fatigue calculation indicated a fatigue life of 92,000 to 160,000 cycles for the solar cell weld tabs. Additional analyses predict a permanent buckling phenomenon in the copper interconnect after the first loading cycle. This should reduce or eliminate the pulling of the copper interconnect on the joint where it is welded to the silicon solar cell. It is concluded that the actual fatigue life of the solar array blanket assembly should be significantly higher than the calculated 92,000 cycles, and thus the program requirement of 87,500 cycles (orbits) will be met. Another important conclusion that can be drawn from the overall analysis is that, the strain results obtained from the MSC/NASTRAN nonlinear module are accurate to use for low-cycle fatigue analysis, since both thermal cycle testing of solar cells and analysis have shown higher fatigue life than the minimum program requirement of 87,500 cycles.

  10. An investigation of the effect of wind cooling on photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L.

    1982-01-01

    Convective cooling of photovoltaic modules for different wind conditions, including steady state controlled testing in a solar simulator and natural test environments in a field was investigated. Analytical thermal models of different module designs were used to correlate experimental data. The applicability of existing heat transfer correlations is confirmed. Reasonable agreement is obtained by applying a power law wind profile.

  11. Energy Gleaning to Increase the Efficiency of 2-Axis Time-Position Tracking Photovoltaic Arrays Under Variably Cloudy Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Stephanie White

    Positioning a photovoltaic (PV) array in the optimal orientation increases the collection of solar radiation and the production of electricity. Many methods for determining the optimal tilt angle of a fixed PV array have been reported in the literature; however, few methods have been proposed for finding the optimal tilt angle of a 2-axis time-position tracking PV array. This dissertation derives and validates a simple formula for directly calculating the optimal tilt angle of a 2-axis time-position tracking PV array under varying sky conditions. By modifying the conventional tilt angle as the sky conditions change, the tracking PV array can glean the additional small amounts of irradiation that are overlooked and unused on cloudy days. The validity of this formula was verified using 36 months of weather data from an installation in the northeastern United States where clear skies occur about 40% of the time. Simulations indicated that modifying the conventional tracking angles in response to changing cloud cover results in 2.26% increase in collected insolation and 2.33% increase in AC energy over a 36-month period when compared with conventional 2-axis time-position tracking. During hourly and sub-hourly intervals with cloud cover, the increase in energy collection can reach up to 50% more than for conventional 2-axis tracking. The ability to modify the conventional tracking angles in response to changing cloud cover allows the PV array to glean the previously uncollected energy, thereby capturing more of the total available irradiation and increasing electrical power production.

  12. Tandem concentrator photovoltaic array applied to Space Station Freedom evolutionary power requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Edward M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Additional power is required to support Space Station Freedom (SSF) evolution. Boeing Defense and Space Group, LeRC, and Entech Corporation have participated in the development of efficiency gallium arsenide and gallium antimonide solar cells make up the solar array tandem cell stacks. Entech's Mini-Dome Fresnel Lens Concentrators focus solar energy onto the active area of the solar cells at 50 times one solar energy flux. Development testing for a flight array, to be launched in Nov. 1992 is under way with support from LeRC. The tandem cells, interconnect wiring, concentrator lenses, and structure were integrated into arrays subjected to environmental testing. A tandem concentrator array can provide high mass and area specific power and can provide equal power with significantly less array area and weight than the baseline array design. Alternatively, for SSF growth, an array of twice the baseline power can be designed which still has a smaller drag area than the baseline.

  13. Optimal Design of MPPT Controllers for Grid Connected Photovoltaic Array System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, M. A.; AbdelHadi, H. A.; Mahmoud, H. M.; Saied, E. M.; Salama, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Integrating photovoltaic (PV) plants into electric power system exhibits challenges to power system dynamic performance. These challenges stem primarily from the natural characteristics of PV plants, which differ in some respects from the conventional plants. The most significant challenge is how to extract and regulate the maximum power from the sun. This paper presents the optimal design for the most commonly used Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) techniques based on Proportional Integral tuned by Particle Swarm Optimization (PI-PSO). These suggested techniques are, (1) the incremental conductance, (2) perturb and observe, (3) fractional short circuit current and (4) fractional open circuit voltage techniques. This research work provides a comprehensive comparative study with the energy availability ratio from photovoltaic panels. The simulation results proved that the proposed controllers have an impressive tracking response. The system dynamic performance improved greatly using the proposed controllers.

  14. An initial analysis of options for a UK feed-in tariff for photovoltaic energy, from an array owner's viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plater, Steve

    2009-10-01

    The UK government has announced the introduction from April 2010 of a feed-in tariff (FIT) for renewable energy, and initiated a consultation on its design. This paper compares three possible variants of a UK FIT for rooftop photovoltaic (PV) arrays, on the basis of calculated income and array cost payback time, and for three locations (north, central and southern England) and various levels of household electricity consumption. This modelling is based on an FIT rate equivalent to Germany's. It concludes that an FIT which paid only for PV electricity surplus to on-site needs, and exported to the grid, would mean a simple payback time too long to make array purchase appealing. Preferable would be either export to the grid of all PV electricity for FIT payment; or a lower FIT rate for electricity used on-site, plus full FIT for any surplus exported. The latter would involve significantly lower costs in feed-in tariff payments. Finally, the effect of the UK government's illustrative FIT rate for consultation is examined for the same locations and annual consumption levels.

  15. Core-shell heterojunction of silicon nanowire arrays and carbon quantum dots for photovoltaic devices and self-driven photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Nie, Biao; Zeng, Longhui; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Ming-Zheng; Luo, Linbao; Feng, Mei; Yu, Yongqiang; Wu, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yucheng; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-22

    Silicon nanostructure-based solar cells have lately intrigued intensive interest because of their promising potential in next-generation solar energy conversion devices. Herein, we report a silicon nanowire (SiNW) array/carbon quantum dot (CQD) core-shell heterojunction photovoltaic device by directly coating Ag-assisted chemical-etched SiNW arrays with CQDs. The heterojunction with a barrier height of 0.75 eV exhibited excellent rectifying behavior with a rectification ratio of 10(3) at ±0.8 V in the dark and power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 9.10% under AM 1.5G irradiation. It is believed that such a high PCE comes from the improved optical absorption as well as the optimized carrier transfer and collection capability. Furthermore, the heterojunction could function as a high-performance self-driven visible light photodetector operating in a wide switching wavelength with good stability, high sensitivity, and fast response speed. It is expected that the present SiNW array/CQD core-shell heterojunction device could find potential applications in future high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  16. Performance of photovoltaic arrays in-vivo and characteristics of prosthetic vision in animals with retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lorach, Henri; Goetz, Georges; Mandel, Yossi; Lei, Xin; Kamins, Theodore I.; Mathieson, Keith; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Harris, James S.; Palanker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of photoreceptors during retinal degeneration leads to blindness, but information can be reintroduced into the visual system using electrical stimulation of the remaining retinal neurons. Subretinal photovoltaic arrays convert pulsed illumination into pulsed electric current to stimulate the inner retinal neurons. Since required irradiance exceeds the natural luminance levels, an invisible near-infrared (915nm) light is used to avoid photophobic effects. We characterized the thresholds and dynamic range of cortical responses to prosthetic stimulation with arrays of various pixel sizes and with different number of photodiodes. Stimulation thresholds for devices with 140µm pixels were approximately half those of 70µm pixels, and with both pixel sizes, thresholds were lower with 2 diodes than with 3 diodes per pixel. In all cases these thresholds were more than two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. At high stimulation frequencies (>20Hz), the cortical response exhibited flicker fusion. Over one order of magnitude of dynamic range could be achieved by varying either pulse duration or irradiance. However, contrast sensitivity was very limited. Cortical responses could be detected even with only a few illuminated pixels. Finally, we demonstrate that recording of the corneal electric potential in response to patterned illumination of the subretinal arrays allows monitoring the current produced by each pixel, and thereby assessing the changes in the implant performance over time. PMID:25255990

  17. Performance of photovoltaic arrays in-vivo and characteristics of prosthetic vision in animals with retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lorach, Henri; Goetz, Georges; Mandel, Yossi; Lei, Xin; Galambos, Ludwig; Kamins, Theodore I; Mathieson, Keith; Huie, Philip; Dalal, Roopa; Harris, James S; Palanker, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Loss of photoreceptors during retinal degeneration leads to blindness, but information can be reintroduced into the visual system using electrical stimulation of the remaining retinal neurons. Subretinal photovoltaic arrays convert pulsed illumination into pulsed electric current to stimulate the inner retinal neurons. Since required irradiance exceeds the natural luminance levels, an invisible near-infrared (915 nm) light is used to avoid photophobic effects. We characterized the thresholds and dynamic range of cortical responses to prosthetic stimulation with arrays of various pixel sizes and with different number of photodiodes. Stimulation thresholds for devices with 140 μm pixels were approximately half those of 70 μm pixels, and with both pixel sizes, thresholds were lower with 2 diodes than with 3 diodes per pixel. In all cases these thresholds were more than two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. At high stimulation frequencies (>20 Hz), the cortical response exhibited flicker fusion. Over one order of magnitude of dynamic range could be achieved by varying either pulse duration or irradiance. However, contrast sensitivity was very limited. Cortical responses could be detected even with only a few illuminated pixels. Finally, we demonstrate that recording of the corneal electric potential in response to patterned illumination of the subretinal arrays allows monitoring the current produced by each pixel, and thereby assessing the changes in the implant performance over time.

  18. Superstrate CuInS2 photovoltaics with enhanced performance using a CdS/ZnO nanorod array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwook; Yong, Kijung

    2012-12-01

    An air-stable, low-temperature, solution-based process for preparing CuInS(2) (CIS) superstrate solar cells using CdS-decorated ZnO nanorod (NR) arrays is reported. Efficient light harvesting and photoexcited charge transport were achieved by fabricating a ZnO NR window layer with a large p-n junction area via a hydrothermal reaction. A CdS buffer layer was deposited on a transparent ZnO NR substrate at room temperature via successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) or nanocrystal layer deposition (NCLD). The prepared CdS/ZnO NR assembly was coated with a CIS absorber layer without the need for surface passivation organics or dispersion reagents. The CIS precursor solution, prepared using a metal salt, thiourea, and an amine solvent, yielded CIS nanocrystals (NCs) at temperatures up to 250 °C. The CIS/CdS/ZnO NR heterojunction structure exhibited an excellent photovoltaic performance compared to a planar ZnO film device due to enhanced light transmittance toward the absorber and a high charge collection efficiency. These results suggest that a superstrate CIS/CdS/ZnO NRs photovoltaic cell fabricated via the low-cost route described here has great potential as a next-generation solar cell device.

  19. Preliminary Design of a Solar Photovoltaic Array for Net-Zero Energy Buildings at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stuart K.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate photovoltaic (solar electric systems) systems for a single building at NASA Langley as a representative case for alternative sustainable power generation. Building 1250 in the Science Directorate is comprised of office and laboratory space, and currently uses approximately 250,000 kW/month of electrical power with a projected use of 200,000 kW/month with additional conservation measures. The installation would be applied towards a goal for having Building 1250 classified as a net-zero energy building as it would produce as much energy as it uses over the course of a year. Based on the facility s electrical demand, a photovoltaic system and associated hardware were characterized to determine the optimal system, and understand the possible impacts from its deployment. The findings of this investigation reveal that the 1.9 MW photovoltaic electrical system provides favorable and robust results. The solar electric system should supply the needed sustainable power solution especially if operation and maintenance of the system will be considered a significant component of the system deployment.

  20. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). This allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use as transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer. PMID:25705085

  1. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods.

    PubMed

    Camino, Fernando E; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D; Black, Charles T; Sfeir, Matthew Y

    2014-12-15

    We present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm(2)). This allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use as transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer.

  2. The influence of passivation and photovoltaic properties of α-Si:H coverage on silicon nanowire array solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays for radial p-n junction solar cells offer potential advantages of light trapping effects and quick charge collection. Nevertheless, lower open circuit voltages (Voc) lead to lower energy conversion efficiencies. In such cases, the performance of the solar cells depends critically on the quality of the SiNW interfaces. In this study, SiNW core-shell solar cells have been fabricated by growing crystalline silicon (c-Si) nanowires via the metal-assisted chemical etching method and by depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) via the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The influence of deposition parameters on the coverage and, consequently, the passivation and photovoltaic properties of α-Si:H layers on SiNW solar cells have been analyzed. PMID:24059343

  3. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    DOE PAGES

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; ...

    2014-05-15

    Here we present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). Lastly, this allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use asmore » transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer.« less

  4. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    SciTech Connect

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-05-15

    Here we present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100 μm using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1 mm2). Lastly, this allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use as transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer.

  5. The influence of passivation and photovoltaic properties of α-Si:H coverage on silicon nanowire array solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuntang; Wang, Xiuqin; Lu, Pengfei; Ding, Jianning; Yuan, Ningyi

    2013-09-23

    Silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays for radial p-n junction solar cells offer potential advantages of light trapping effects and quick charge collection. Nevertheless, lower open circuit voltages (Voc) lead to lower energy conversion efficiencies. In such cases, the performance of the solar cells depends critically on the quality of the SiNW interfaces. In this study, SiNW core-shell solar cells have been fabricated by growing crystalline silicon (c-Si) nanowires via the metal-assisted chemical etching method and by depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) via the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The influence of deposition parameters on the coverage and, consequently, the passivation and photovoltaic properties of α-Si:H layers on SiNW solar cells have been analyzed.

  6. An approach for configuring space photovoltaic tandem arrays based on cell layer performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flora, C. S.; Dillard, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Meeting solar array performance goals of 300 W/Kg requires use of solar cells with orbital efficiencies greater than 20 percent. Only multijunction cells and cell layers operating in tandem produce this required efficiency. An approach for defining solar array design concepts that use tandem cell layers involve the following: transforming cell layer performance at standard test conditions to on-orbit performance; optimizing circuit configuration with tandem cell layers; evaluating circuit sensitivity to cell current mismatch; developing array electrical design around selected circuit; and predicting array orbital performance including seasonal variations.

  7. Dense-array concentrator photovoltaic system using non-imaging dish concentrator and crossed compound parabolic concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kok-Keong; Yew, Tiong-Keat; Wong, Chee-Woon; Tan, Ming-Hui; Tan, Woei-Chong; Lai, An-Chow; Lim, Boon-Han; Lau, Sing-Liong; Rahman, Faidz Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Solar concentrating device plays an important role by making use of optical technology in the design, which can be either reflector or lens to deliver high flux of sunlight onto the Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) module receiver ranging from hundreds to thousand suns. To be more competitive compared with fossil fuel, the current CPV systems using Fresnel lens and Parabolic dish as solar concentrator that are widely deployed in United States, Australia and Europe are facing great challenge to produce uniformly focused sunlight on the solar cells as to reduce the cost of electrical power generation. The concept of non-imaging optics is not new, but it has not fully explored by the researchers over the world especially in solving the problem of high concentration solar energy, which application is only limited to be a secondary focusing device or low concentration device using Compound Parabolic Concentrator. With the current advancement in the computer processing power, we has successfully invented the non-imaging dish concentrator (NIDC) using numerical simulation method to replace the current parabolic dish as primary focusing device with high solar concentration ratio (more than 400 suns) and large collective area (from 25 to 125 m2). In this paper, we disclose our research and development on dense array CPV system based on non-imaging optics. The geometry of the NIDC is determined using a special computational method. In addition, an array of secondary concentrators, namely crossed compound parabolic concentrators, is also proposed to further focus the concentrated sunlight by the NIDC onto active area of solar cells of the concentrator photovoltaic receiver. The invention maximizes the absorption of concentrated sunlight for the electric power generation system.

  8. Estimation of the potential array output charge in the performance analysis of stand-alone photovoltaic systems without MPPT (Case study: Mediterranean climate)

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, F.J.; Echbarthi, I.; Nofuentes, G.; Fuentes, M.; Aguilera, J.

    2009-11-15

    The potential array output energy, E{sub P}, stated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in their European Guidelines for the Assessment of Photovoltaic Plants and the IEC Standard 61724 does not estimate properly the potential array output of stand-alone photovoltaic (SAPV) systems without maximum power point tracker (MPPT) as it is the case for SAPV systems with MPPT and grid connected systems. In this way, the main purpose of this paper is to validate an expression that compromises simplicity and accuracy when estimating the potential array output of SAPV systems without MPPT. This issue can be of high interest to photovoltaic (PV) practitioners and experts as it can improve the analysis performance of this type of systems, helping to discriminate better the different losses in this kind of systems. Furthermore, a study of the array potential estimation through different expressions will be developed in order to evaluate which matches better the array potential output in SAPV system without MPPT. Although the analysis will be focused especially in Mediterranean climates, it will be derived some general conclusions that can be considered in other climates. (author)

  9. Photovoltaic properties of dye sensitised solar cells using TiO2 nanotube arrays for photoanodes: Role of hydrochloric acid treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tian; Wang, Baoyuan; Xie, Jian; Li, Quantong; Zhang, Jun; Asghar, Muhammad Imran; Lund, Peter D.; Wang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    A hydrochloric acid treatment was performed to modify the surface of TiO2 nanotube arrays for improving the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells. The microstructural, optical and photovoltaic properties of TiO2 nanotube arrays and the assembled cells were investigated in detail. It was found that HCl treatment does not change the morphology and crystallographic structure of the nanotube arrays, but it results in more hydroxyl groups on the TiO2 surface for dye adsorption and a surface protonation for both an improved dye adsorption and a higher quantum yield of electron injection. A major performance enhancement was found which originated from the remarkable increase in the dye adsorption. A power conversion efficiency of 8.4%, JSC of ∼16.8 mA cm-2 and VOC of 0.7 V was observed when the photoanode was treated with a 0.1 M HCl solution.

  10. Photovoltaic cell and array technology development for future unique NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, S.; Curtis, H.; Piszczor, M.; Surampudi, R.; Hamilton, T.; Rapp, D.; Stella, P.; Mardesich, N.; Mondt, J.; Bunker, R.; Nesmith, B.; Gaddy, E.; Marvin, D.; Kazmerski, L.

    2002-01-01

    A technology review committee from NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Air Force Research Lab, was formed to assess solar cell and array technologies required for future NASA science missions.

  11. Photovoltaic cell and array technology development for future unique NASA missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, S.; Curtis, H.; Piszczor, M.; Surampudi, R.; Hamilton, T.; Rapp, D.; Stella, P.; Mardesich, N.; Mondt, J.; Bunker, R.; hide

    2002-01-01

    A technology review committee from NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Air Force Research Lab, was formed to assess solar cell and array technologies required for future NASA science missions.

  12. Testing of Solar Photovoltaic Arrays for Utilization on Marine Aids to Navigation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    Coating Thickness Change FIGURE 11. BREAKDOWN OF DEGRADATION FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO OPTICAL LOSSES WHICH CAUSE A DECREASE IN THE LIGHT-GENERATED...Factors Contriouting to Optical Losses Which Cause a Decrease in the Light-Generated Current 16 12 Degradation Changes Manifest as Series Resistance...Array (figure 1) - In this array, the sealant forms both the cover surface of the panel and the pottant between cells. The thick substrate provides the

  13. An advanced space photovoltaic concentrator array using Fresnel lenses, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a space concentrator array which uses refractive optics, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers to achieve excellent performance at a very low array mass is documented. The prismatically covered cells have established records for space cell performance (24.2 percent efficient at 100 AM0 suns and 25 C) and terrestrial single-junction cell performance (29.3 percent efficient at 200 AM1.5 suns and 25 C).

  14. An advanced space photovoltaic concentrator array using Fresnel lenses, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a space concentrator array which uses refractive optics, gallium arsenide cells, and prismatic cell covers to achieve excellent performance at a very low array mass is documented. The prismatically covered cells have established records for space cell performance (24.2 percent efficient at 100 AM0 suns and 25 C) and terrestrial single-junction cell performance (29.3 percent efficient at 200 AM1.5 suns and 25 C).

  15. Measurement techniques and instruments suitable for life-prediction testing of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Deringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Candidate techniques and instruments are identified on the basis of extensive reviews of published and unpublished information. These methods are organized in six measurement categories - chemical, electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, and other physicals. Using specified evaluation criteria, the most promising techniques and instruments for use in life prediction tests of arrays were selected.

  16. Use of two-dimensional nanorod arrays with slanted ITO film to enhance optical absorption for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yung-Chi; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Hsu, Hsu-Cheng; She, Li-Wei; Cheng, Chun-Mao; Chen, Yi-Ching; Wu, Chien-Jang; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2012-02-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) Si-nanorod arrays offer a promising architecture that has been widely recognized as attractive devices for photovoltaic applications. To further reduce the Fresnel reflection that occurs at the interface between the air and the 2D Si-nanorod array because of the large difference in their effective refractive indices, we propose and adopt a slanted ITO film as an intermediate layer by using oblique-angle sputtering deposition. The nearly continuous surface of the slanted ITO film is lossless and has high electrical conductivity; therefore, it could serve as an electrode layer for solar cells. As a result, the combination of the above-mentioned nanostructures exhibits high optical absorption over a broad range of wavelengths and incident angles, along with a calculated short-circuit current density of JSC = 32.81 mA/cm2 and a power generation efficiency of η = 22.70%, which corresponds to an improvement of approximately 42% over that of its bare single-crystalline Si counterpart.

  17. High density micro-pyramids with silicon nanowire array for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tasmiat; Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Fobelets, Kristel

    2014-12-05

    We use a metal assisted chemical etch process to fabricate silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs) onto a dense periodic array of pyramids that are formed using an alkaline etch masked with an oxide layer. The hybrid micro-nano structure acts as an anti-reflective coating with experimental reflectivity below 1% over the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. This represents an improvement of up to 11 and 14 times compared to the pyramid array and SiNWAs on bulk, respectively. In addition to the experimental work, we optically simulate the hybrid structure using a commercial finite difference time domain package. The results of the optical simulations support our experimental work, illustrating a reduced reflectivity in the hybrid structure. The nanowire array increases the absorbed carrier density within the pyramid by providing a guided transition of the refractive index along the light path from air into the silicon. Furthermore, electrical simulations which take into account surface and Auger recombination show an efficiency increase for the hybrid structure of 56% over bulk, 11% over pyramid array and 8.5% over SiNWAs.

  18. Development and fabrication of photovoltaic concentrator modules for a point-focus Fresnel lens array

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbent, S.; Sanders, J.A.

    1985-06-01

    Design of the second generation photovoltaic concentrator module originally developed by Martin Marietta under Contract 46-3018 was improved. Module efficiency was improved from 14.4% to 15.5% and numerous detailed design enhancements were incorporated to facilitate fabrication and improve cost effectiveness. Sixty modules were manufactured to populate the second generation structure already installed at the Sandia National Laboratories test site in Albuquerque, NM, plus 10 spares and test units. To further improve the life capability and facilitate installation of the design, additional design development was authorized for (1) cell interconnect research to provide greater stress relief at the cell-interconncet and substrate-interconnect interfaces; and (2) incorporation of a reflective secondary to relieve tracking accuracy and initial alignment accuracy requirements.

  19. Comparative Analysis on the Performance of a Short String of Series-Connected and Parallel-Connected Photovoltaic Array Under Partial Shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalekshmy, S.; Rama Iyer, S.; Beevi, Bisharathu

    2015-09-01

    The output power from the photovoltaic (PV) array decreases and the array exhibit multiple peaks when it is subjected to partial shading (PS). The power loss in the PV array varies with the array configuration, physical location and the shading pattern. This paper compares the relative performance of a PV array consisting of a short string of three PV modules for two different configurations. The mismatch loss, shading loss, fill factor and the power loss due to the failure in tracking of the global maximum power point, of a series string with bypass diodes and short parallel string are analysed using MATLAB/Simulink model. The performance of the system is investigated for three different conditions of solar insolation for the same shading pattern. Results indicate that there is considerable power loss due to shading in a series string during PS than in a parallel string with same number of modules.

  20. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen micrometeoroid, and debris interactions with photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide Kapton solar array blankets can be protected from atomic oxygen in low earth orbit if SiO sub x thin film coatings are applied to their surfaces. The useful lifetime of a blanket protected in this manner strongly depends on the number and size of defects in the protective coatings. Atomic oxygen degradation is dominated by undercutting at defects in protective coatings caused by substrate roughness and processing rather than micrometeoroid or debris impacts. Recent findings from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and ground based studies show that interactions between atomic oxygen and silicones may cause grazing and contamination problems which may lead to solar array degradation.

  1. Unlikely Combination of Experiments with a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

    2006-05-01

    The goals of this study are to: (1) parameterize current-voltage (I-V) performance over a wide range of illumination and temperatures: (a) 50-1150 W/m{sup 2} irradiance, 5-65 C; (b) obtain array temperature coefficients; and (c) quantify energy production; (2) investigate high-voltage leakage currents from the CIS modules in a high-voltage array: determine dependence on moisture, temperature, and voltage bias and ascertain corrosion problems if any; and (3) study long-term power and energy production stability.

  2. Photovoltaic Roofs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, R. W., Jr.; Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar cells perform two functions: waterproofing roof and generating electricity. Sections through horizontal and slanting joints show overlapping modules sealed by L-section rubber strips and side-by-side modules sealed by P-section strips. Water seeping through seals of slanting joints drains along channels. Rooftop photovoltaic array used watertight south facing roof, replacing shingles, tar, and gravel. Concept reduces cost of residential solar-cell array.

  3. On-Orbit Performance Degradation of the International Space Station P6 Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Gustafson, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the on-orbit performance and performance degradation of the International Space Station P6 solar array wings (SAWs) from the period of December 2000 through February 2003. Data selection considerations and data reduction methods are reviewed along with the approach for calculating array performance degradation based on measured string shunt current levels. Measured degradation rates are compared with those predicted by the computational tool SPACE and prior degradation rates measured with the same SAW technology on the Mir space station. Initial results show that the measured SAW short-circuit current is degrading 0.2 to 0.5 percent per year. This degradation rate is below the predicted rate of 0.8 percent per year and is well within the 3 percent estimated uncertainty in measured SAW current levels. General contributors to SAW degradation are briefly discussed.

  4. Optical absorption enhancement in silicon nanowire arrays with a large lattice constant for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, we use the transfer matrix method to calculate the optical absorptance of vertically-aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. For fixed filling ratio, significant optical absorption enhancement occurs when the lattice constant is increased from 100 nm to 600 nm. The enhancement arises from an increase in field concentration within the nanowire as well as excitation of guided resonance modes. We quantify the absorption enhancement in terms of ultimate efficiency. Results show that an optimized SiNW array with lattice constant of 600 nm and wire diameter of 540 nm has a 72.4% higher ultimate efficiency than a Si thin film of equal thickness. The enhancement effect can be maintained over a large range of incidence angles.

  5. Low earth orbit durability of protected silicone for refractive photovoltaic concentrator arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Timothy A.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1995-01-01

    Photovoltaic power systems with novel refractive silicone solar concentrators are being developed for use in low Earth orbit (LEO). Because of the vulnerability of silicones to atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation, these lenses are coated with a multilayer metal oxide protective coating. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of atomic oxygen and thermal exposures on multilayer coated silicone. Samples were exposed to high-fluence ground-laboratory and low-fluence in-space atomic oxygen. Ground testing resulted in decreases in both total and specular transmittance, while in-space exposure resulted in only small decreases in specular transmittance. A contamination film, attributed to exposed silicone at coating crack sites, was found to cause transmittance decreases during ground testing. Propagation of coating cracks was found to be the result of sample heating during exposure. The potential for silicone exposure, with the resulting degradation of optical properties from silicone contamination, indicates that this multilayer coated silicone is not durable for LEO space applications where thermal exposures will cause coating crack development and propagation.

  6. Novel architecture of plasmon excitation based on self-assembled nanoparticle arrays for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hanggochnuri; Sohn, Ahrum; Shin, Kyung-Sik; Kumar, Brijesh; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-01-22

    An efficient approach to producing hexagonally self-assembled and well-dispersed gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) in the pores of porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is reported. This approach is particularly useful for tuning the surface plasmon resonance frequency of Au NPs by varying the effective dielectric constant of AAO. A strongly enhanced Raman spectrum of dye molecule rhodamine 6G using these well-dispersed Au NPs revealed that such a self-assembled Au NP array can induce a strong plasmonic field. Furthermore, we demonstrated a new architecture of plasmon excitation in a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) inverted organic solar cell (IOSC) using the Au NP array with AAO. The optical response of an active layer poly(3-hexylthiophene):(6,6)-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester was enhanced by this strong plasmonic field associated a well-dispersed Au NP array. A comparative study of AAO with and without Au NPs confirmed plasmonic improvement of the BHJ IOSC. Simulation results showed that Au NPs concentrate the incoming light into a strongly localized field and enhance light absorption in a wide wavelength range.

  7. Stochastic control of smart home energy management with plug-in electric vehicle battery energy storage and photovoltaic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Hu, Xiaosong; Moura, Scott; Yin, Xiaofeng; Pickert, Volker

    2016-11-01

    Energy management strategies are instrumental in the performance and economy of smart homes integrating renewable energy and energy storage. This article focuses on stochastic energy management of a smart home with PEV (plug-in electric vehicle) energy storage and photovoltaic (PV) array. It is motivated by the challenges associated with sustainable energy supplies and the local energy storage opportunity provided by vehicle electrification. This paper seeks to minimize a consumer's energy charges under a time-of-use tariff, while satisfying home power demand and PEV charging requirements, and accommodating the variability of solar power. First, the random-variable models are developed, including Markov Chain model of PEV mobility, as well as predictive models of home power demand and PV power supply. Second, a stochastic optimal control problem is mathematically formulated for managing the power flow among energy sources in the smart home. Finally, based on time-varying electricity price, we systematically examine the performance of the proposed control strategy. As a result, the electric cost is 493.6% less for a Tesla Model S with optimal stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) control relative to the no optimal control case, and it is by 175.89% for a Nissan Leaf.

  8. Core-shell structured photovoltaic devices based on PbS quantum dots and silicon nanopillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Fute; Lei, Xiaofei; Xu, Yonglan; Lee, Shuittong; Sun, Baoquan

    2012-02-21

    We fabricated three-dimensional silicon nanopillar array (SiNP)-based photovoltaic (PV) devices using PbS quantum dots (QDs) as the hole-transporting layers. The core-shell structured device, which is based on high aspect ratio SiNPs standing on roughed silicon substrates, displays a higher PV performance with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.53% compared with that of the planar device (2.11%). The enhanced PCE is ascribed to the increased light absorption and the improved charge carrier collections in SiNP-modified silicon surfaces. We also show that, for the core-shell structured device, the thickness of the shell layer plays a critical role in enhancing the PV performance and around five monolayers of QDs are preferred for efficient hole-transporting. Wafer-scale PV devices with a radial PbS/SiNP heterojunction can be fabricated by solution phase techniques at low temperatures, suggesting a facile route to fabricate unique three-dimensional nanostructured devices.

  9. Polymer nanopillar arrays via NIL for optical, photovoltaic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal, Binod; Hogan, Thomas; Gennaoui, Christina; Virgil, Daniel; Simidjiyski, Svet; Chiles, T. C.; Naughton, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    We have used nanoimprint lithography to fabricate high fidelity replicants of silicon nanopillar arrays in polymer form, using PDMS molds to create SU-8 and siloxane spin-on-glass structures. Typical nanopillar dimensions are 50-200 nm diameter and 1-2 μm height, with pitches between 0.8 and 1.5 μm. Both substrated and free-standing films have been produced. Forming the structural cores of nanocoaxial electrodes, the polymer nanopillars can facilitate a flexible platform for a wide variety of nanoscale applications, including optical waveguiding, solar cells, and multiplexed biochemical sensing. We will report on each.

  10. Concept and initial design of a stationary concentrator photovoltaic system based on a mirror array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Takumi; Amano, Ryo; Fujieda, Ichiro

    2013-09-01

    We propose a stationary module in which a mirror array is inserted between a lens and a solar cell. Each mirror is set up so that the light passing the principal point of the lens reaches a fixed point on an exit plane and that the length of its optical path is equal to the focal length of the lens. The light passing the other points in the lens reaches other mirrors. If the reflected light mostly reached the area near the fixed point, a slightly larger solar cell would harvest it. We have carried out ray tracing simulations to see how the optical power is distributed on an exit plane of such a module. The model consists of a hollow rectangular parallelepiped containing a mirror array, a plano-convex lens attached to the top plane of the parallelepiped, and a detector attached to one of the side planes. A light source generates parallel beams with various directions defined by the declination angle and the hour angle. Although the irradiance distribution at the exit plane depends on these angles, the basic concept of confining the optical power inside a certain area is demonstrated. Further studies on its design would improve its light utilization. For example, the rays with large incident angles suffer from total internal reflection at the bottom of the lens. Filling the hollow parallelepiped by a material with a matching refraction index solves this problem.

  11. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2011-11-22

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  12. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2012-10-23

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  13. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2013-12-31

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  14. Semiconductor/dielectric half-coaxial nanowire arrays for large-area nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, X.; Zeng, Y.; Shen, W. Z.

    2014-03-01

    We present a simple assembly strategy of single nanowires (NWs) to form half-coaxial nanowire arrays (NWAs) which can be easily realized in large size by standard pattering and deposition techniques. Through the finite-difference time-domain simulation, we show that the proposed half-coaxial NWAs effectively preserve the leaky modes resonances within single NWs and consequently achieve strong absorption enhancement under optimization of various structural factors. The best half-coaxial NWAs with 100 nm thick absorbing shell offer equivalent light absorption of more than 400 nm thick planar film. Benefiting from the >75% cut of the required thickness of the absorbing layer, the performances of the demonstrated half-coaxial NWAs based a-Si thin film solar cell also gain significant improvement.

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation and thermal cycling effects on atomic oxygen protective photovoltaic array blanket materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, J.; Banks, B.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of synergistic environmental exposure is demonstrated through the evaluation of DuPont 93-1 in simulated LEO environment. Changes in optical properties, surface condition, and mass loss data are described. The qualitative results indicate the necessity for exposure of materials to a series of simulated LEO environments in order to properly determine synergistic effects and demonstrate the overall LEO durability of candidate materials. It is shown that synergistic effects may occur with vacuum thermal cycling combined with VUV radiation followed by atomic oxygen exposure. Testing the durability of candidate solar array blanket materials in a test sequence with necessary synergistic effects makes it possible to determine the appropriate material for providing structural support and maintaining the proper operating temperature for solar cells in the SSF Photovaltaic Power System.

  16. Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications. Issue study

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, C.S.; Schwartz, D.L.

    1984-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to assess the relative economic potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications in the mid-1990's. Specific objectives of this study are to provide information on concentrator photovoltaic collector probabilistic price and efficiency levels to illustrate critical areas of R and D for concentrator cells and collectors, and to compare concentrator and flat-plate PV price and efficiency alternatives for several locations, based on their implied costs of energy. To deal with the uncertainties surrounding research and development activities in general, a probabilistic assessment of commercially achievable concentrator photovoltaic collector efficiencies and prices (at the factory loading dock) is performed. The results of this projection of concentrator photovoltaic technology are then compared with a previous flat-plate module price analysis (performed early in 1983). To focus this analysis on specific collector alternatives and their implied energy costs for different locations, similar two-axis tracking designs are assumed for both concentrator and flat-plate options. The results of this study provide the first comprehensive assessment of PV concentrator collector manufacturing costs in combination with those of flat-plate modules, both projected to their commercial potentials in the mid-1990's.

  17. Approaches to Future Generation Photovoltaics and Solar Fuels: Quantum Dots, Arrays, and Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, O.; Luther, J.; Beard, M.; Johnson, J.; Gao, J.; Nozik, A.

    2012-01-01

    One potential, long-term approach to more efficient and lower cost future generation solar cells for solar electricity and solar fuels is to utilize the unique properties of quantum dots (QDs) to control the relaxation pathways of excited states to enhance multiple exciton generation (MEG). We have studied MEG in close-packed PbSe QD arrays where the QDs are electronically coupled in the films and thus exhibit good transport while still maintaining quantization and MEG. We have developed simple, all-inorganic solution-processable QD solar cells that produce large short-circuit photocurrents and power conversion efficiencies above 5% via nanocrystalline p-n junctions. These solar cells show QYs for photocurrent that exceed 100% in the photon energy regions where MEG is possible; the photocurrent MEG QYs as a function of photon energy match those determined via time-resolved spectroscopy Recent analyses of the major effect of MEG combined with solar concentration on the conversion efficiency of solar cells will also be discussed.

  18. Bilayer-metal assisted chemical etching of silicon microwire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R. W.; Yuan, G. D.; Wang, K. C.; Wei, T. B.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wang, G. H.; Wang, J. X.; Li, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon microwires with lateral dimension from 5 μm to 20 μm and depth as long as 20 μm are prepared by bilayer metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE). A bilayer metal configuration (Metal 1 / Metal 2) was applied to assist etching of Si where metal 1 acts as direct catalyst and metal 2 provides mechanical support. Different metal types were investigated to figure out the influence of metal catalyst on morphology of etched silicon. We find that silicon microwires with vertical side wall are produced when we use Ag/Au bilayer, while cone-like and porous microwires formed when Pt/Au is applied. The different micro-/nano-structures in as-etched silicon are demonstrated to be due to the discrepancy of work function of metal catalyst relative to Si. Further, we constructed a silicon microwire arrays solar cells in a radial p-n junction configurations in a screen printed aluminum paste p-doping process.

  19. Plasmonic photovoltaics: near-field of a metal nanowire array on the interface for solar cell efficiency enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitruk, N. L.; Korovin, A. V.

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of the main principles of plasmonic photovoltaics relative to the enhancement of the efficiency of solar cells (SCs) by means of light trapping in a thin film SC is considered in this paper. Theoretical analysis and corresponding numerical calculations of the transmittance into a semiconductor base enhancement due to light trapping via the excitation of local (surface) plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons in a periodic metal nanowire array have been performed. The calculations have been performed for rectangular cross-section metal nanowires by the differential formalism method using the covariant form of Maxwell’s equations in a curvilinear coordinate system. Local distributions of the electric field in plasmonic nanostructures are calculated for metal nanowires in both s- and p-polarization of incident light. Then both the light transmittance in the near- and far-field (wave) zones and the local generation rate of electron-hole pairs have been calculated using the spatial distribution of the Poynting vector. Angular/spectral distributions of transmittance and position/spectral distributions of the generation rate in the near-field zone have complicated the non-homogeneous character due to the excitation of surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons. It has been shown that the main highly enhanced near-field generation is localized in the so-called hot points on the nanoparticles/nanowires surface. The planar-averaged generation rate for the p-polarization of light has a near-field component, which is always more for a Si base (indirect bandgap semiconductor) than for GaAs (direct bandgap one). This plasmonic effect can be used for the base thicknesses down up to 100-150 nm due to light scattering and the surface plasmon enhancement of near-fields. These plasmon-carrying metal nanowires can be used as a current grid in an SC too.

  20. Residential photovoltaic system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A project to develop Residential Photovoltaic Systems has begun at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory with the construction and testing of five Prototype Systems. All of these systems utilize a roof-mounted photovoltaic array and allow excess solar-generated electric energy to be fed back to the local utility grid, eliminating the need for on-site storage. Residential photovoltaic system design issues are discussed and specific features of the five Prototype Systems now under test are presented.

  1. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of fully flexible dye-sensitized solar cells based on the Nb2O5 coated hierarchical TiO2 nanowire-nanosheet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenwu; Hong, Chengxun; Wang, Hui-gang; Zhang, Mei; Guo, Min

    2016-02-01

    Nb2O5 coated hierarchical TiO2 nanowire-sheet arrays photoanode was synthesized on flexible Ti-mesh substrate by using a hydrothermal approach. The effect of TiO2 morphology and Nb2O5 coating layer on the photovoltaic performance of the flexible dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on Ti-mesh supported nanostructures were systematically investigated. Compared to the TiO2 nanowire arrays (NWAs), hierarchical TiO2 nanowire arrays (HNWAs) with enlarged internal surface area and strong light scattering properties exhibited higher overall conversion efficiency. The introduction of thin Nb2O5 coating layers on the surface of the TiO2 HNWAs played a key role in improving the photovoltaic performance of the flexible DSSC. By separating the TiO2 and electrolyte (I-/I3-), the Nb2O5 energy barrier decreased the electron recombination rate and increased electron collection efficiency and injection efficiency, resulting in improved Jsc and Voc. Furthermore, the influence of Nb2O5 coating amounts on the power conversion efficiency were discussed in detail. The fully flexible DSSC based on Nb2O5 coated TiO2 HNWAs films with a thickness of 14 μm displayed a well photovoltaic property of 4.55% (Jsc = 10.50 mA cm-2, Voc = 0.75 V, FF = 0.58). The performance enhancement of the flexible DSSC is largely attributed to the reduced electron recombination, enlarged internal surface area and superior light scattering ability of the formed hierarchical nanostructures.

  2. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  3. Roll-to-roll fabrication of large scale and regular arrays of three-dimensional nanospikes for high efficiency and flexible photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Leung, Siu-Fung; Gu, Leilei; Zhang, Qianpeng; Tsui, Kwong-Hoi; Shieh, Jia-Min; Shen, Chang-Hong; Hsiao, Tzu-Hsuan; Hsu, Chin-Hung; Lu, Linfeng; Li, Dongdong; Lin, Qingfeng; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-03-07

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have demonstrated enticing potency to boost performance of photovoltaic devices primarily owning to the improved photon capturing capability. Nevertheless, cost-effective and scalable fabrication of regular 3-D nanostructures with decent robustness and flexibility still remains as a challenging task. Meanwhile, establishing rational design guidelines for 3-D nanostructured solar cells with the balanced electrical and optical performance are of paramount importance and in urgent need. Herein, regular arrays of 3-D nanospikes (NSPs) were fabricated on flexible aluminum foil with a roll-to-roll compatible process. The NSPs have precisely controlled geometry and periodicity which allow systematic investigation on geometry dependent optical and electrical performance of the devices with experiments and modeling. Intriguingly, it has been discovered that the efficiency of an amorphous-Si (a-Si) photovoltaic device fabricated on NSPs can be improved by 43%, as compared to its planar counterpart, in an optimal case. Furthermore, large scale flexible NSP solar cell devices have been fabricated and demonstrated. These results not only have shed light on the design rules of high performance nanostructured solar cells, but also demonstrated a highly practical process to fabricate efficient solar panels with 3-D nanostructures, thus may have immediate impact on thin film photovoltaic industry.

  4. Roll-to-roll fabrication of large scale and regular arrays of three-dimensional nanospikes for high efficiency and flexible photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Siu-Fung; Gu, Leilei; Zhang, Qianpeng; Tsui, Kwong-Hoi; Shieh, Jia-Min; Shen, Chang-Hong; Hsiao, Tzu-Hsuan; Hsu, Chin-Hung; Lu, Linfeng; Li, Dongdong; Lin, Qingfeng; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have demonstrated enticing potency to boost performance of photovoltaic devices primarily owning to the improved photon capturing capability. Nevertheless, cost-effective and scalable fabrication of regular 3-D nanostructures with decent robustness and flexibility still remains as a challenging task. Meanwhile, establishing rational design guidelines for 3-D nanostructured solar cells with the balanced electrical and optical performance are of paramount importance and in urgent need. Herein, regular arrays of 3-D nanospikes (NSPs) were fabricated on flexible aluminum foil with a roll-to-roll compatible process. The NSPs have precisely controlled geometry and periodicity which allow systematic investigation on geometry dependent optical and electrical performance of the devices with experiments and modeling. Intriguingly, it has been discovered that the efficiency of an amorphous-Si (a-Si) photovoltaic device fabricated on NSPs can be improved by 43%, as compared to its planar counterpart, in an optimal case. Furthermore, large scale flexible NSP solar cell devices have been fabricated and demonstrated. These results not only have shed light on the design rules of high performance nanostructured solar cells, but also demonstrated a highly practical process to fabricate efficient solar panels with 3-D nanostructures, thus may have immediate impact on thin film photovoltaic industry. PMID:24603964

  5. Roll-to-roll fabrication of large scale and regular arrays of three-dimensional nanospikes for high efficiency and flexible photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Siu-Fung; Gu, Leilei; Zhang, Qianpeng; Tsui, Kwong-Hoi; Shieh, Jia-Min; Shen, Chang-Hong; Hsiao, Tzu-Hsuan; Hsu, Chin-Hung; Lu, Linfeng; Li, Dongdong; Lin, Qingfeng; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures have demonstrated enticing potency to boost performance of photovoltaic devices primarily owning to the improved photon capturing capability. Nevertheless, cost-effective and scalable fabrication of regular 3-D nanostructures with decent robustness and flexibility still remains as a challenging task. Meanwhile, establishing rational design guidelines for 3-D nanostructured solar cells with the balanced electrical and optical performance are of paramount importance and in urgent need. Herein, regular arrays of 3-D nanospikes (NSPs) were fabricated on flexible aluminum foil with a roll-to-roll compatible process. The NSPs have precisely controlled geometry and periodicity which allow systematic investigation on geometry dependent optical and electrical performance of the devices with experiments and modeling. Intriguingly, it has been discovered that the efficiency of an amorphous-Si (a-Si) photovoltaic device fabricated on NSPs can be improved by 43%, as compared to its planar counterpart, in an optimal case. Furthermore, large scale flexible NSP solar cell devices have been fabricated and demonstrated. These results not only have shed light on the design rules of high performance nanostructured solar cells, but also demonstrated a highly practical process to fabricate efficient solar panels with 3-D nanostructures, thus may have immediate impact on thin film photovoltaic industry.

  6. Temperature-sensitive junction transformations for mid-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays by laser beam induced current microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Weicheng; Hu, Weida Lin, Tie; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei; Cheng, Xiang'ai Wang, Rui

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we report on the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect and the unusual temperature dependence of junction transformation for mid-wavelength, n-on-p HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays. The n-type region is formed by B{sup +} ion implantation on Hg-vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe. Junction transformations under different temperatures are visually captured by a laser beam induced current microscope. A physical model of temperature dependence on junction transformation is proposed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations. It is shown that Hg-interstitial diffusion and temperature activated defects jointly lead to the p-n junction transformation dependence on temperature, and the weaker mixed conduction compared with long-wavelength HgCdTe photodiode contributes to the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect in mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detector arrays.

  7. Measurements and Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Measurements and Characterization that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Analytical Microscopy, Electro-Optical Characterization, Surface Analysis, and Cell and Module Performance.

  8. Photovoltaic technology development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-31

    This report describes the following investigations being pursued under photovoltaic technology development at Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic systems technology; concentrator technology; concentrator arrays and tracking structures; concentrator solar cell development; system engineering; subsystem development; and test and applications.

  9. Arrays of ZnO/CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} nanocables with tunable shell composition for efficient photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Akram, Muhammad Aftab; Javed, Sofia; Xu, Jun; Mujahid, Mohammad; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-05-28

    Arrays of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure are receiving much attention for their optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications due to their advantages in light absorption, charge separation, and transportation. In this work, arrays of ZnO/CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} core/shell nanocables with tunable shell compositions over the full range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 have been controllably synthesized. Chemical conversions of ZnO nanorods to a series of ZnO-based nanocables, including ZnO/ZnSe, ZnO/CuSe, ZnO/CuSe/In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}, ZnO/CuSe/(In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}Se{sub 3}, and ZnO/CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2}, are well designed and successfully achieved. Composition-dependent influences of the CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} shells on photovoltaic performance are investigated. It is found that the increase in indium content (x) leads to an increase in short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}) but a decrease in open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) for the ZnO/CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} nanocable solar cells. An array of ZnO/CuIn{sub 0.67}Ga{sub 0.33}Se{sub 2} nanocables with a length of ∼1 μm and a shell thickness of ∼10 nm exhibits a bandgap of 1.20 eV, and yields a maximum power conversion efficiency of 1.74% under AM 1.5 G illumination at an intensity of 100 mW/cm{sup 2}. It dramatically surpasses that (0.22%) of the ZnO/CuIn{sub 0.67}Ga{sub 0.33}Se{sub 2} planar thin-film device. Our work reveals that 1D nanoarray allows efficient photovoltaics without using toxic CdS buffer layer.

  10. Innovative photovoltaic application for residences experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmaram, G. H.; Litka, A. H.

    1982-06-01

    Operational results on the performance of the 5 kilowatt peak photovoltaic residential system at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) described. Operational performance results of 1 year on the FSEC photovoltaic residential system are presented. The description of the residence, photovoltaic system, instrumentation and data collection procedure is included. The performance of the photovoltaic array, inverters and total photovoltaic system is detailed. The instrumentation upgrading, system diagnostics, and any failures or system downtime are described.

  11. BMDO photovoltaics program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Allen, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    This is an overview of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) Photovoltaic Program. Areas discussed are: (1) BMDO advanced Solar Array program; (2) Brilliant Eyes type satellites; (3) Electric propulsion; (4) Contractor Solar arrays; (5) Iofee Concentrator and Cell development; (6) Entech linear mini-dome concentrator; and (7) Flight test update/plans.

  12. ZnO nanowire arrays synthesized on ZnO and GaN films for photovoltaic and light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janfeshan, Bita; Sadeghimakki, Bahareh; Sadeghi Jahed, Navid Mohammad; Sivoththaman, Siva

    2014-01-01

    The wide bandgap, one-dimensional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) and their heterostructures with other materials provide excellent pathways for efficient photovoltaic (PV) and light-emitting devices. ZnO NWs sensitized with quantum dots (QDs) provide high-surface area and tunable bandgap absorbers with a directional path for carriers in advanced PV devices, while ZnO heterojunctions with other p-type wide bandgap materials lead to light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with better emission and waveguiding properties compared with the homojunction counterparts. Synthesis of the structures with the desired morphology is a key to device applications. In this work, ZnO NW arrays were synthesized using hydrothermal method on ZnO and GaN thin films. Highly crystalline, upright, and ordered arrays of ZnO NWs in the 50 to 250-nm diameter range and 1 μm in length were obtained. The morphology and optical properties of the NWs were studied. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed nonstoichiometric oxygen content in the grown ZnO NWs. Photoluminescence (PL) studies depicted the presence of oxygen vacancy and interstitial zinc defects in the grown ZnO NWs, underlining the potential for LEDs. Further, hydrophobically ligated CdSe/ZnS QDs were successfully incorporated to the NW arrays. PL analysis indicated the injection of electrons from photoexcited QDs to the NWs, showing the potential for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

  13. High-efficiency thin and compact concentrator photovoltaics using micro-solar cells with via-holes sandwiched between thin lens-array and circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itou, Akihiro; Asano, Tetsuya; Inoue, Daijiro; Arase, Hidekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Futakuchi, Ryutaro; Inoue, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Fujii, Eiji; Nakagawa, Tohru; Anda, Yoshiharu; Ishida, Hidetoshi; Ueda, Tetsuzo; Fidaner, Onur; Wiemer, Michael; Ueda, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a compact concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) module that comprises micro-solar cells with an area of ≈0.6 × 0.6 mm2 sandwiched between a 20-mm-thick lens array and a 1-mm-thick circuit board with no air gap. To establish electrical connections between the circuit board and the micro-solar cells, we developed a micro-solar cell with positive and negative electrodes on the lower face of the cell. In this study, we demonstrated the photovoltaic performance of the micro-solar cell closely approaches that of the standard solar cell measuring ≈5 × 5 mm2 commonly used in conventional CPVs under concentrated illumination. Our study showed that the negative effect on PV performance of perimeter carrier recombination in the micro-solar cell was insignificant under concentrated illumination. Finally, we assembled our micro-solar cells into a CPV module and achieved the module energy conversion efficiency of 34.7% under outdoor solar illumination.

  14. Drug Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  15. Consideration of coordinated solar tracking of an array of compact solar-pumped lasers combined with photovoltaic cells for electricity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Ichiki, Akihisa; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Ito, Tadashi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Takeda, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2015-08-01

    A monochromatic laser light with a photon energy just above the band edge of photovoltaic cells can be converted into electricity with minimal thermal loss. To attain efficient conversion of sunlight to laser light, a coordinated solar tracking system for an array of originally designed compact solar-pumped lasers of 50 mm aperture diameter is being constructed. As for the feasibility of this system, a prototype with a holding capacity of 25 compact solar-pumped lasers has been fabricated. The primary requisite of this system is that the angular accuracy of tracking should be below 1 mrad for all 25 compact solar-pumped lasers to sustain their continuous lasing. To realize this, imperative challenges have been elucidated including thermal expansion under sunlight. A prototype fabricated with its main frame made of Super Invar alloy was found to fulfill the requisite by measurement using a three-dimensional coordinate measuring machine.

  16. Design and Fabrication of Monolithically-Integrated Laterally-Arrayed Multiple Band Gap Solar Cells using Composition-Graded Alloy Nanowires for Spectrum-Splitting Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Derek

    This dissertation aims to demonstrate a new approach to fabricating solar cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems with the potential to reduce their cost and complexity of manufacturing, called Monolithically Integrated Laterally Arrayed Multiple Band gap (MILAMB) solar cells. Single crystal semiconductor alloy nanowire (NW) ensembles are grown with the alloy composition and band gap changing continuously across a broad range over the surface of a single substrate in a single, inexpensive growth step by the Dual-Gradient Method. The nanowire ensembles then serve as the absorbing materials in a set of solar cells for spectrum-splitting photovoltaic systems. Preliminary design and simulation studies based on Anderson's model band line-ups were undertaken for CdPbS and InGaN alloys. Systems of six subcells obtained efficiencies in the 32-38% range for CdPbS and 34-40% for InGaN at 1-240 suns, though both materials systems require significant development before these results could be achieved experimentally. For an experimental demonstration, CdSSe was selected due to its availability. Proof-of-concept CdSSe nanowire ensemble solar cells with two subcells were fabricated simultaneously on one substrate. I-V characterization under 1 sun AM1.5G conditions yielded open-circuit voltages (Voc) up to 307 and 173 mV and short-circuit current densities (Jsc) up to 0.091 and 0.974 mA/cm2 for the CdS- and CdSe-rich cells, respectively. Similar thin film cells were also fabricated for comparison. The nanowire cells showed substantially higher Voc than the film cells, which was attributed to higher material quality in the CdSSe absorber. I-V measurements were also conducted with optical filters to simulate a simple form of spectrum-splitting. The CdS-rich cells showed uniformly higher Voc and fill factor (FF) than the CdSe-rich cells, as expected due to their larger band gaps. This suggested higher power density was produced by the CdS-rich cells on the single

  17. Scalable high-fidelity growth of semiconductor nanorod arrays with controlled geometry for photovoltaic devices using block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Pelligra, Candice I; Huang, Su; Singer, Jonathan P; Mayo, Anthony T; Mu, Richard R; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2014-11-12

    Controlled density semiconducting oxide arrays are highly desirable for matching nanometer length scales specific to emerging applications. This work demonstrates a facile one-step method for templating hydrothermal growth which provides arrays with high-fidelity tuning of nanorod spacing and diameter. This solution-based method leverages the selective swelling of block copolymer micelle templates, which can be rationally designed by tuning molecular weight and volume fraction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Assessment of High-Voltage Photovoltaic Technologies for the Design of a Direct Drive Hall Effect Thruster Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, I. G.; Jongeward, G. A.; Schneider, T.; Carruth, M. R.; Peterson, T.; Kerslake, T. W.; Snyder, D.; Ferguson, D.; Hoskins, A.

    2004-01-01

    A three-year program to develop a Direct Drive Hall-Effect Thruster system (D2HET) begun in 2001 as part of the NASA Advanced Cross-Enterprise Technology Development initiative. The system, which is expected to reduce significantly the power processing, complexity, weight, and cost over conventional low-voltage systems, will employ solar arrays that operate at voltages higher than (or equal to) 300 V. The lessons learned from the development of the technology also promise to become a stepping-stone for the production of the next generation of power systems employing high voltage solar arrays. This paper summarizes the results from experiments conducted mainly at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center with two main solar array technologies. The experiments focused on electron collection and arcing studies, when the solar cells operated at high voltages. The tests utilized small coupons representative of each solar array technology. A hollow cathode was used to emulate parts of the induced environment on the solar arrays, mostly the low-energy charge-exchange plasma (1012-1013 m-3 and 0.5-1 eV). Results and conclusions from modeling of electron collection are also summarized. The observations from the total effort are used to propose a preliminary, new solar array design for 2 kW and 30-40 kW class, deep space missions that may employ a single or a cluster of Hall- Effect thrusters.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the size effect of room temperature nanoimprinted P3HT nanopillar arrays on the photovoltaic performance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guangzhu; Li, Chao; Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Yangjiang; Liu, Jieping; Li, Yaowen; Hu, Zhijun; Li, Yongfang

    2015-07-07

    We develop a solvent-assisted room temperature nanoimprint lithography (SART-NIL) technique to fabricate an ideal active layer consisting of poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanopillar arrays surrounded by [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, two-dimensional grazing incidence wide angle X-rays diffraction, and conducting atomic force microscopy reveals that the SART-NIL technique can precisely control the size of P3HT nanopillar arrays. With the decrease in diameters of P3HT nanopillar arrays, the P3HT nanopillar arrays exhibit a more preferable face-on molecular orientation, enhanced UV-vis absorption and higher conducting ability along the direction perpendicular to the substrate. The ordered bulk heterojunction film consisting of P3HT nanopillar arrays with a diameter of ∼45 nm (OBHJ-45) gives face-on orientation, a high interfacial area of 2.87, a high conducting ability of ∼130 pA and efficient exciton diffusion and dissociation. The polymer solar cell (PSC) based on an OBHJ-45 film exhibits a significantly improved device performance compared with those of PSCs based on the P3HT nanoapillar arrays with diameters ∼100 nm and ∼60 nm. We believe that the SART-NIL technique is a powerful tool for fabricating an ideal active layer for high performance PSCs.

  20. Study of a micro-concentrated photovoltaic system based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 microcells array.

    PubMed

    Jutteau, Sebastien; Guillemoles, Jean-François; Paire, Myriam

    2016-08-20

    We study a micro-concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system based on micro solar cells made from a thin film technology, Cu(In,Ga)Se2. We designed, using the ray-tracing software Zemax OpticStudio 14, an optical system adapted and integrated to the microcells, with only spherical lenses. The designed architecture has a magnification factor of 100× for an optical efficiency of 85% and an acceptance angle of ±3.5°, without anti-reflective coating. An experimental study is realized to fabricate the first generation prototype on a 5  cm×5  cm substrate. A mini-module achieved a concentration ratio of 72× under AM1.5G, and an absolute efficiency gain of 1.8% for a final aperture area efficiency of 12.6%.

  1. The relationship between nanoscale architecture and function in photovoltaic multichromophoric arrays as visualized by Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Otten, Matthijs B J; Liscio, Andrea; Schwartz, Erik; de Witte, Pieter A J; Castriciano, Maria Angela; Wienk, Martijn M; Nolde, Fabian; De Luca, Giovanna; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Janssen, René A J; Müllen, Klaus; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M; Samorì, Paolo

    2008-11-05

    The physicochemical properties of organic (multi)component films for optoelectronic applications depend on both the mesoscopic and nanoscale architectures within the semiconducting material. Two main classes of semiconducting materials are commonly used: polymers and (liquid) crystals of small aromatic molecules. Whereas polymers (e.g., polyphenylenevinylenes and polythiophenes) are easy to process in solution in thin and uniform layers, small molecules can form highly defined (liquid) crystals featuring high charge mobilities. Herein, we combine the two material types by employing structurally well-defined polyisocyanopeptide polymers as scaffolds to precisely arrange thousands of electron-accepting molecules, namely, perylenebis(dicarboximides) (PDIs), in defined chromophoric wires with lengths of hundreds of nanometers. The polymer backbone enforces high control over the spatial location of PDI dyes, favoring both enhanced exciton and charge transfer. When blended with an electron-donor system such as regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), this polymeric PDI shows a relative improvement in charge generation and diffusion with respect to monomeric, aggregated PDI. In order to correlate this enhanced behavior with respect to the architecture, atomic force microscopy investigations on the mixtures were carried out. These studies revealed that the two polymers form interpenetrated bundles having a nanophase-segregated character and featuring a high density of contact points between the two different phases. In order to visualize the relationship between the architecture and the photovoltaic efficiency, Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements were carried out on submonolayer-thick films. This technique allowed for the first time the direct visualization of the photovoltaic activity occurring in such a nanoscale phase-segregated ultrathin film with true nanoscale spatial resolution, thus making possible a study of the correlation between function and architecture

  2. Maintenance of photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. R.

    1984-08-01

    This publication establishes standard practices for inspection, testing, and maintenance of photovoltaic power systems at Dept. of the Navy installations. The practices and procedures are recommended to ensure reliable operation of the power systems. The manual covers photovoltaic-array, battery, voltage-regulator, inverter, and wiring subsystems. In addition, this manual provides a troubleshooting guide and self-study questions and answers.

  3. Quantitative analysis of the size effect of room temperature nanoimprinted P3HT nanopillar arrays on the photovoltaic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guangzhu; Li, Chao; Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Yangjiang; Liu, Jieping; Li, Yaowen; Hu, Zhijun; Li, Yongfang

    2015-06-01

    We develop a solvent-assisted room temperature nanoimprint lithography (SART-NIL) technique to fabricate an ideal active layer consisting of poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanopillar arrays surrounded by [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, two-dimensional grazing incidence wide angle X-rays diffraction, and conducting atomic force microscopy reveals that the SART-NIL technique can precisely control the size of P3HT nanopillar arrays. With the decrease in diameters of P3HT nanopillar arrays, the P3HT nanopillar arrays exhibit a more preferable face-on molecular orientation, enhanced UV-vis absorption and higher conducting ability along the direction perpendicular to the substrate. The ordered bulk heterojunction film consisting of P3HT nanopillar arrays with a diameter of ~45 nm (OBHJ-45) gives face-on orientation, a high interfacial area of 2.87, a high conducting ability of ~130 pA and efficient exciton diffusion and dissociation. The polymer solar cell (PSC) based on an OBHJ-45 film exhibits a significantly improved device performance compared with those of PSCs based on the P3HT nanoapillar arrays with diameters ~100 nm and ~60 nm. We believe that the SART-NIL technique is a powerful tool for fabricating an ideal active layer for high performance PSCs.We develop a solvent-assisted room temperature nanoimprint lithography (SART-NIL) technique to fabricate an ideal active layer consisting of poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanopillar arrays surrounded by [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, two-dimensional grazing incidence wide angle X-rays diffraction, and conducting atomic force microscopy reveals that the SART-NIL technique can precisely control the size of P3HT nanopillar arrays. With the decrease in diameters of P3HT nanopillar arrays, the P3HT nanopillar arrays exhibit a more preferable face-on molecular orientation, enhanced UV-vis absorption and higher

  4. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  5. Combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  6. Do photovoltaics have a future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    There is major concern as to the economic practicality of widespread terrestrial use because of the high cost of the photovoltaic arrays themselves. Based on their high efficiency, photovoltaic collectors should be one of the cheapest forms of energy generators known. Present photovoltaic panels are violating the trend of lower costs with increasing efficiency due to their reliance on expensive materials. A medium technology solution should provide electricity competitive with the existing medium to high technology energy generators such as oil, coal, gas, and nuclear fission thermal plants. Programs to reduce the cost of silicon and develop reliable thin film materials have a realistic chance of producing cost effective photovoltaic panels.

  7. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A.; Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents jph being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at jph ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length ld eff as a function of jph for jph → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of ld eff vs jph as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  8. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A. Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-03

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents j{sub ph} being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at j{sub ph} ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length l{sub d} {sub eff} as a function of j{sub ph} for j{sub ph} → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of l{sub d} {sub eff} vs j{sub ph} as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  9. Effect of boron doping on the rectification effect and photovoltaic performance of CdS/Si heterostructure based on Si nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ling Ling; Wang, Xiao Bo; Liu, Wei Kang; Li, Xin Jian

    2015-07-01

    A series of CdS/Si heterostructures were prepared through growing B-doped CdS thin films on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by a chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experimental data show that B-doping concentration of CdS thin films could be tuned effectively through controlling the mole ratio of [B]/[Cd] of the initial CBD solution without causing obvious variation of the crystal phase and surface morphology of CdS/Si-NPA. Both the electrical rectification and photovoltaic parameters of CdS/Si-NPA show strong dependence upon B-doping concentration, and the optimal characteristics are achieved for the samples prepared with [B]/[Cd] = 0.01. Compared with CdS/Si-NPA solar cells without B-doping, an increment over 300 times for energy conversion efficiency is realized. The mechanism for the efficiency increment is analyzed based on the effect of B-doping on the band structure of CdS/Si-NPA. These results indicate that B-doping might be an effective path for promoting the device performance of solar cells based on CdS/Si-NPA.

  10. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + Solectria (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the collaboration between NREL and Solectria at the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) to to develop 500- and 750-kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) inverters with advanced features that can support the electric grid.

  11. Oxidation and protection of fiberglass-epoxy composite masts for photovoltaic arrays in the low earth orbital environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Ciancone, Michael L.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1988-01-01

    The extent of degradation of fiberglass-epoxy composite masts of the Space Station solar array panel, when these are exposed to atomic oxygen environment of the low-earth orbit, was investigated in ground testing of fiberglass-epoxy composites in an RF plasma asher. In addition, several methods of protecting the composite structures were evaluated, including an aluminum braid covering, an In-Sn eutectic, and a silicone based paint. It was found that, during exposure, the epoxy at the surface of the composite was oxidized, exposing individual glass fibers which could easily be removed. The results of mass measurements and SEM examination carried out after thermal cycling and flexing of exposed composite samples indicated that coatings such as In-Sn eutectic may provide adequate protection by containing the glass fibers, even though mass loss still occurs.

  12. Oxidation and protection of fiberglass-epoxy composite masts for photovoltaic arrays in the low earth orbital environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Ciancone, Michael L.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1988-01-01

    The extent of degradation of fiberglass-epoxy composite masts of the Space Station solar array panel, when these are exposed to atomic oxygen environment of the low-earth orbit, was investigated in ground testing of fiberglass-epoxy composites in an RF plasma asher. In addition, several methods of protecting the composite structures were evaluated, including an aluminum braid covering, an In-Sn eutectic, and a silicone based paint. It was found that, during exposure, the epoxy at the surface of the composite was oxidized, exposing individual glass fibers which could easily be removed. The results of mass measurements and SEM examination carried out after thermal cycling and flexing of exposed composite samples indicated that coatings such as In-Sn eutectic may provide adequate protection by containing the glass fibers, even though mass loss still occurs.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  14. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics are on the verge of revolutionizing building-integrated photovoltaics. For other applications, however, several basic open scientific questions need answering to, in particular, further improve energy-conversion efficiency and lifetime.

  15. Chemical Fabrication Used to Produce Thin-Film Materials for High Power-to- Weight-Ratio Space Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Rybicki, George C.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Harris, Jerry D.; Hehemann, David G.; Junek, William; Gorse, Joseph; Thompson, Tracy L.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Buhro, William E.

    2000-01-01

    The key to achieving high specific power (watts per kilogram) space solar arrays is the development of a high-efficiency, thin-film solar cell that can be fabricated directly on a flexible, lightweight, space-qualified durable substrate such as Kapton (DuPont) or other polyimide or suitable polymer film. Cell efficiencies approaching 20 percent at AM0 (air mass zero) are required. Current thin-film cell fabrication approaches are limited by either (1) the ultimate efficiency that can be achieved with the device material and structure or (2) the requirement for high-temperature deposition processes that are incompatible with all presently known flexible polyimide or other polymer substrate materials. Cell fabrication processes must be developed that will produce high-efficiency cells at temperatures below 400 degrees Celsius, and preferably below 300 degress Celsius to minimize the problems associated with the difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the substrate and thin-film solar cell and/or the decomposition of the substrate.

  16. Oxidation and protection of fiberglass-epoxy composite masts for photovoltaic arrays in the low Earth orbital environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composites are considered for use as structural members for the mast of the space station solar array panel. The low Earth orbital environment in which space station is to operate is composed mainly of atomic oxygen, which has been shown to cause erosion of many organic materials and some metals. Ground based testing in a plasma asher was performed to determine the extent of degradation of fiberglass-epoxy composites when exposed to a simulated atomic oxygen environment. During exposure, the epoxy at the surface of the composite was oxidized, exposing individual glass fibers which could easily be removed. Several methods of protecting the composite were evaluated in an atomic oxygen environment and with thermal cycling and flexing. The protection techniques evaluated to date include an aluminum braid covering, an indium-tin eutectic and a silicone based paint. The open aluminum braid offered little protection while the CV-1144 coating offered some initial protection against atomic oxygen, but appears to develop cracks which accelerate degradation when flexed. Coatings such as the In-Sn eutectic may provide adequate protection by containing the glass fibers even though mass loss still occurs.

  17. Versatile control of metal-assisted chemical etching for vertical silicon microwire arrays and their photovoltaic applications

    PubMed Central

    Um, Han-Don; Kim, Namwoo; Lee, Kangmin; Hwang, Inchan; Hoon Seo, Ji; Yu, Young J.; Duane, Peter; Wober, Munib; Seo, Kwanyong

    2015-01-01

    A systematic study was conducted into the use of metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) to fabricate vertical Si microwire arrays, with several models being studied for the efficient redox reaction of reactants with silicon through a metal catalyst by varying such parameters as the thickness and morphology of the metal film. By optimizing the MacEtch conditions, high-quality vertical Si microwires were successfully fabricated with lengths of up to 23.2 μm, which, when applied in a solar cell, achieved a conversion efficiency of up to 13.0%. These solar cells also exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 547.7 mV, a short-circuit current density of 33.2 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 71.3% by virtue of the enhanced light absorption and effective carrier collection provided by the Si microwires. The use of MacEtch to fabricate high-quality Si microwires therefore presents a unique opportunity to develop cost-effective and highly efficient solar cells. PMID:26060095

  18. Organ Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Living Donor About the Operation Financing Living Donation Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney ... Contacting my donor family Data Facts about living donation Financing a transplant Matching organs Member directory Newsroom Online store Stories of hope ...

  19. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  20. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  1. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  2. Photovoltaic power systems workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, H. J.; Given, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discussions are presented on apparent deficiencies in NASA planning and technology development relating to a standard power module (25-35 kW) and to future photovoltaic power systems in general. Topics of discussion consider the following: (1) adequate studies on power systems; (2) whether a standard power system module should be developed from a standard spacecraft; (3) identification of proper approaches to cost reduction; (4) energy storage avoidance; (5) attitude control; (6) thermal effects of heat rejection on solar array configuration stability; (7) assembly of large power systems in space; and (8) factoring terrestrial photovoltaic work into space power systems for possible payoff.

  3. Silicon solar photovoltaic power stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowaniec, C. R.; Ferber, R. R.; Pittman, P. F.; Marshall, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    Modular design of components and arrays, cost estimates for modules and support structures, and cost/performance analysis of a central solar photovoltaic power plant are discussed. Costs of collector/reflector arrays are judged the dominant element in the total capital investment. High-concentration solar tracking arrays are recommended as the most economic means for producing solar photovoltaic energy when solar cells costs are high ($500 per kW generated). Capital costs for power conditioning subsystem components are itemized and system busbar energy costs are discussed at length.

  4. Silicon solar photovoltaic power stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowaniec, C. R.; Ferber, R. R.; Pittman, P. F.; Marshall, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    Modular design of components and arrays, cost estimates for modules and support structures, and cost/performance analysis of a central solar photovoltaic power plant are discussed. Costs of collector/reflector arrays are judged the dominant element in the total capital investment. High-concentration solar tracking arrays are recommended as the most economic means for producing solar photovoltaic energy when solar cells costs are high ($500 per kW generated). Capital costs for power conditioning subsystem components are itemized and system busbar energy costs are discussed at length.

  5. Photovoltaic fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, P.; Jones, J.; Glenn, B.; Cook, G.; Billman, L.; Adcock, R.

    1991-09-01

    This booklet describes how PV devices and systems work. It also describes the specific materials and devices that are most widely used commercially as of 1990 and those that have the brightest prospects. Students, engineers, scientists, and others needing an introduction to basic PV technology, and manufacturers and consumers who want more information about PV systems should find this booklet helpful. We begin with an overview and then explain the rudimentary physical process of the technology, the photovoltaic effect. Next, we consider how scientists and engineers have harnessed this process to generate electricity in silicon solar cells, thin-film devices, and high-efficiency cells. We then look at how these devices are incorporated into modules, arrays, and power-producing systems. We have written and designed this book so that the reader may approach the subject on three different levels. First, for the person who is in a hurry or needs a very cursory overview, in the margins of each page we generalize the important points of that page. Second, for a somewhat deeper understanding, we have provided ample illustrations, photographs, and captions. And third, for a thorough introduction to the subject, the reader can resort to reading the text.

  6. Photovoltaic Energy Program Overview Fiscal Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Significant activities in the National Photovoltaic Program are reported for each of the three main program elements. In Research and Development, advances in thin-film materials and crystalline silicon materials are described. The Technology Development report describes activities in photovoltaic manufacturing technology, industrial expansion, module and array development, and testing photovoltaic system components. Systems Engineering and Applications projects described include projects with government agencies, projects with utilities, documentation of performance for international applications, and product certification.

  7. High voltage photovoltaic power converter

    DOEpatents

    Haigh, Ronald E.; Wojtczuk, Steve; Jacobson, Gerard F.; Hagans, Karla G.

    2001-01-01

    An array of independently connected photovoltaic cells on a semi-insulating substrate contains reflective coatings between the cells to enhance efficiency. A uniform, flat top laser beam profile is illuminated upon the array to produce electrical current having high voltage. An essentially wireless system includes a laser energy source being fed through optic fiber and cast upon the photovoltaic cell array to prevent stray electrical signals prior to use of the current from the array. Direct bandgap, single crystal semiconductor materials, such as GaAs, are commonly used in the array. Useful applications of the system include locations where high voltages are provided to confined spaces such as in explosive detonation, accelerators, photo cathodes and medical appliances.

  8. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Facts Listen Drinks like beer, malt liquor, wine, and hard liquor contain alcohol. Alcohol is the ... alcohol in it than beer, malt liquor, or wine. These drink sizes have about the same amount ...

  9. NASA space photovoltaic research and technology programs

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, J.P.; Flood, D.J.

    1982-06-01

    The NASA programs for increasing conversion efficiency, reduced mass and cost, and extending operating life of photovoltaic converters and arrays and for evaluating advanced solar array concepts are outlined. Research into radiation resistance and annealing, development of thin blankets, high-power low-cost arrays, and lightweight structures for near-Earth and planetary applications are discussed.

  10. Semiconductors: In Situ Processing of Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The possible processing of semiconductor photovoltaic devices is discussed. The requirements for lunar PV cells is reviewed, and the key challenges involved in their manufacturing are investigated. A schematic diagram of a passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) is presented. The possible fabrication of large photovoltaic arrays in space from lunar materials is also discussed.

  11. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  12. Photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  13. NASA-OAST photovoltaic energy conversion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. P.; Loria, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA program in photovoltaic energy conversion research is discussed. Solar cells, solar arrays, gallium arsenides, space station and spacecraft power supplies, and state of the art devices are discussed.

  14. Photovoltaic panel support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.M.; Underwood, J.C.; Shingleton, J.

    1993-07-20

    A solar energy electrical power source is described comprising in combination at least two flat photovoltaic panels disposed side-by-side in co-planar relation with one another, a pivot shaft extending transversely across the panels, at least two supports spaced apart lengthwise of the pivot shaft, means for connecting the pivot shaft to the at least two supports, attachment means for connecting the at least two panels to the pivot shaft so that the panels can pivot about the longitudinal axis of the shaft, coupling means mechanically coupling all of the panels together so as to form a unified flat array, and selectively operable drive means for mechanically pivoting the unified flat array about the axis; wherein each of the flat photovoltaic panels comprises at least two modules each comprising a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells, the at least two modules being aligned along a line extending at a right angle to the pivot shaft, and the coupling means comprises (a) an elongate member extending parallel to and spaced from the pivot shaft and (b) means for attaching the elongate member to the panels; and further wherein each flat photovoltaic panel comprises a unitary frame consisting of a pair of end frame members extending parallel to the pivot shaft, a pair of side frame members extending between and connected to the end frame members, and a pair of spaced apart cross frame members, with one of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and a first one of each of the end and cross frame members, and the other of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and the second one of each of the end and cross frame members, whereby the gap created by the spaced apart cross frame members allow air to pass between them in order to reduce the sail effect when the solar array is subjected to buffeting winds.

  15. The structure and photovoltaic properties of double-shell TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe/CdSe nanocable arrays synthesized by using TiO{sub 2}/ZnO nanocables template

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Baoyuan; Liu, Tian; Xia, Chen; Zhou, Fangyuan; He, Fan; Liu, Rong; Hu, Yunxia; Wang, Hao

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The ZnSe/CdSe/TiO{sub 2} nanocable arrays were synthesized. • The TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe/CdSe double shell electrode shown better photovoltaic performance. • A stepwise band alignment structure was constructed in the TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe/CdSe electrode. • A highest power conversion efficiency of 1.33% has been obtained. - Abstract: A simple method was reported for the first time to synthesize ZnSe/CdSe co-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanorod arrays. TiO{sub 2}/ZnO nanocables were firstly prepared by magnetic sputtering ZnO films on TiO{sub 2} nanorod arrays, and the TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe nanocables were synthesized by selenization of TiO{sub 2}/ZnO nanocables with Se{sup 2−} ions. Finally, CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were electrodeposited on the TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe nanocables forming a TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe/CdSe tri-layer configuration. It is found that the tri-layer photoelectrode has a complementary effect in the light absorption, while the ZnSe shell acts as a blocking layer to retarding the interfacial recombination. Furthermore, a stepwise band alignment structure was constructed in the TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe/CdSe electrode, which greatly speeds up the transfer rate of photoexcited electrons from CdSe to TiO{sub 2}. Thus, the TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe/CdSe electrode presented better photovoltaic performance than the single shell. Through optimization the thickness of ZnSe layer in the TiO{sub 2}/ZnSe/CdSe photoelectrode, a highest power conversion efficiency of 1.33% was obtained.

  16. Snack, Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Suzanne M.

    2005-01-01

    The American diet has undergone substantial changes, a fact that has negatively impacted the dental health of children. Primary prevention is the ideal method to address the current increased incidence of tooth decay. Educating kids, and their parents, about the qualities of snacks as well as the role of frequency of snacking could help to reduce…

  17. Brain Facts.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2013-11-20

    The Brain Facts website is a treasure trove of information about neuroscience and the brain. It covers a range of diseases and disorders, as well as the science of ageing, and is relevant to practitioners and students in all branches of nursing and midwifery.

  18. Snack, Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Suzanne M.

    2005-01-01

    The American diet has undergone substantial changes, a fact that has negatively impacted the dental health of children. Primary prevention is the ideal method to address the current increased incidence of tooth decay. Educating kids, and their parents, about the qualities of snacks as well as the role of frequency of snacking could help to reduce…

  19. Reptile Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinheimer, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Describes an award-winning bulletin board for introducing a unit on reptiles. This interactive bulletin board contains fun facts and counters common misconceptions about reptiles. Twelve true-false statements are hidden behind pull-up flaps. Four pictures ask students to identify the difference between often-confused animals. (PR)

  20. Reptile Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinheimer, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Describes an award-winning bulletin board for introducing a unit on reptiles. This interactive bulletin board contains fun facts and counters common misconceptions about reptiles. Twelve true-false statements are hidden behind pull-up flaps. Four pictures ask students to identify the difference between often-confused animals. (PR)

  1. Photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Perez-Albuerne, E A; Tyan, Y S

    1980-05-23

    Solid-state photovoltaic cells are feasible devices for converting solar energy directly to electricity. Recent cost reductions have spurred an incipient industry, but further advances in materials science and technology are needed before photovoltaic cells can compete with other sources for the supply of large amounts of energy. In this article energy loss mechanisms in solid-state photovoltaic cells are examined and related to materials properties. Various systems under development are reviewed which illustrate some key concepts, opportunities, and problems of this most promising emerging technology. Areas where contributions from innovative materials research would have a significant effect are also indicated.

  2. Spatially Resolved Photocurrent Mapping of Operating Organic Photovoltaic Devices Using Atomic Force Photovoltaic Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    106, 191 2006. 14H. R. Moutinho, R. G. Dhere, C. S. Jiang, M. M. Al-Jassim, and L. L. Kazmerski, Thin Solid Films 514, 150 2006. 15D. C. Coffey...characterize spatially localized inhomogeneities in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In AFPM, a biased cAFM probe is raster scanned over an array...technique, atomic force photovoltaic microscopy (AFPM), has been developed to characterize spatially localized inhomogeneities in organic photovoltaic

  3. Design considerations for lunar base photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. Mark; Curtis, Henry B.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    A survey was made of factors that may affect the design of photovoltaic arrays for a lunar base. These factors, which include the lunar environment and system design criteria, are examined. A photovoltaic power system design with a triangular array geometry is discussed and compared to a nuclear reactor power systems and a power system utilizing both nuclear and solar power sources.

  4. Novel approaches for low-cost photovoltaic concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T.; Maraschin, R.

    1982-11-01

    The feasibility of producing a low cost photovoltaic concentrator that uses sealed beam headlight technology was investigated. The photovoltaic cell is placed at the focus of the headlamp reflector. A prototype 60 W array was built. The array efficiency was approximately 6%.

  5. Design considerations for lunar base photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, J. M.; Curtis, Henry B.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    A survey was made of factors that may affect the design of photovoltaic arrays for a lunar base. These factors, which include the lunar environment and system design criteria, are examined. A photovoltaic power system design with a triangular array geometry is discussed and compared to a nuclear reactor power system and a power system utilizing both nuclear and solar power sources.

  6. Red facts: Ethylene. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88) to review all pesticide products containing active ingredients initially registered before November 1, 1984, and to reregister those products that have a substantially complete data base and do not pose unreasonable adverse effects to people or the environment. The pesticide reregistration program is to be completed by the late 1990's. The RED FACTS fact sheet summarizes EPA's conclusion, as set forth in the Reregistration Eligibility Document (or RED), that products containing a pesticide do not pose unreasonable risks when used as directed by Agency-approved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

  7. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  8. Facts First

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2009-02-01

    I enjoy reading online news and opinions not only because of convenience, but also because of the responses from the readers. I know that these responses tend to be biased towards the extremes of opinions, but it is always interesting to see the diverse reactions from even seemingly non-controversial subjects. A recent example was the response to an editorial by Richard Gallaghar (October, 2008) that proffered the seemingly obvious opinion that science students need a strong understanding of scientific history and philosophy to help them face future challenges. This provoked a response from a reader, a college professor, that a major reason for the lack of good university science education was the laziness of his colleagues. They were taking the “easy way out” by concentrating on teaching facts rather than scientific concepts. In the respondent’s viewpoint, it was far better to teach students how to think. Facts could always be looked up in textbooks. If you did not understand how to think critically and create knowledge, you could not be considered educated. Although I am very sympathetic to this point of view, I don’t believe that laziness is the reason why students are flooded with facts rather than concepts in biology class.

  9. NASA photovoltaic research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1988-01-01

    NASA photovoltaic R and D efforts address future Agency space mission needs through a comprehensive, integrated program. Activities range from fundamental studies of materials and devices to technology demonstrations of prototype hardware. The program aims to develop and apply an improved understanding of photovoltaic energy conversion devices and systems that will increase the performance, reduce the mass, and extend the lifetime of photovoltaic arrays for use in space. To that end, there are efforts aimed at improving cell efficiency, reducing the effects of space particulate radiation damage (primarily electrons and protons), developing ultralightweight cells, and developing advanced ray component technology for high efficiency concentrator arrays and high performance, ultralightweight arrays. Current goals that have been quantified for the program are to develop cell and array technology capable of achieving 300 watts/kg for future missions for which mass is a critical factor, or 300 watts/sq m for future missions for which array size is a major driver (i.e., Space Station). A third important goal is to develop cell and array technology which will survive the GEO space radiation environment for at least 10 years.

  10. Photovoltaic Systems Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mir Shahed

    2010-11-01

    This thesis deals with the implementation of generalized photovoltaic model and integration of the same with 7-bus electrical utility system to evaluate the impact that the photovoltaic generator have on the utility system. Among all the impacts that the photovoltaic generator have on the utility system, voltage rise of the power distribution line at the position where the Photovoltaic generator is connected due to reverse power flow from the photovoltaic model has been one of the major problem. Therefore, this thesis proposes the steady-state simulations to evaluate the effectiveness of battery-integrated PV system on avoiding the over voltage problem. Further, fault analysis is done to study the effect of the PV model on the utility network during faults and it is deduced that the impact of the PV model on the utility system voltage during faults is nominal. The photovoltaic model/generator and the 7-bus utility system is developed using Matlab/Simulink software package. The developed photovoltaic model can be represented as PV cell, module or an array. The model is developed with icons that are easy to understand. The developed model takes into consideration cell's working temperature, amount of sunlight (irradiance) available, voltage of the circuit when the circuit is open and current of the circuit when it is shorted. The developed Photovoltaic model is then integrated with a Li-ion battery, over here battery serves two purposes first it will store the excess power from the Photovoltaic generator if any, during the day time and in night the battery acts as an generator and deliver the power to the utility or connected load with the help of an invertors.

  11. NASA photovoltaic technology program

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, J.P.; Loria, J.C.; Brandhorst, H.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Office of Aeronautical and Space Technology OAST Program in space photovoltaics is reviewed. From the perspective of national landmark mission requirements and five year and 25-year long range plans, the texture of the program is revealed. Planar silicon and concentrator GaAs array technology advances are discussed. Advances in lightweight (50 micro cell) arrays and radiation tolerance research are presented. Recent progress in cascade cells and ultralightweight GaAs planar cells is noted. Progress in raising silicon cell voltage to its theoretical maximum is detailed. Advanced concepts such as plasmon converters and the Long Duration Exposure Facility LDEF flight experiments pertaining to solar cell and array technology are also shown.

  12. Concentrating photovoltaic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will summarize the status and discuss likely future directions of photovoltaic concentrator technology. A current commercial Si cell module has a peak efficiency of 15.5%, and 17% has been reached with an experimental module. Advanced cells and module design improvements offer still higher efficiencies. Concentrator Fresnel lens array fields installed several years ago have all demonstrated very good electrical performance with little performance degradation. Fresnel lens arrays were commercially available and prices of $7/watt for installed one megawatt systems have been quoted. Cost projections predict that current technology concentrating PV arrays can be installed for less than $2/watt if they are manufactured in large, steady quantities. More advanced designs may cost even less.

  13. Reverse bias protected solar array with integrated bypass battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for protecting the photovoltaic cells in a photovoltaic (PV) array from reverse bias damage by utilizing a rechargeable battery for bypassing current from a shaded photovoltaic cell or group of cells, avoiding the need for a bypass diode. Further, the method mitigates the voltage degradation of a PV array caused by shaded cells.

  14. Estimating the Performance of a Concentrating Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, E. P.; Mills, M. W.; Backovsky, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Comprehensive mathematical-analysis technique developed for array of solar-photovoltaic panels equipped with truncated-pyramid concentrators. Hollow pyramidal concentrator reflects Sunlight onto panel of photovoltaic cells. Comprehensive optical, thermal, and electrical analysis performed on array of units. Technique applicable, with modifications, to analysis and design of other multiple-cell reflecting photovoltaic systems.

  15. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  16. Measurements and Characterization: Cell and Module Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Measurements and Characterization -- Cell and Module Performance. One-sided sheet that includes Scope, Core Competencies and Capabilities, and Contact/Web information.

  17. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + Advanced Energy (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the collaboration between NREL and Advanced Energy Industries at the ESIF to test its advanced photovoltaic inverter technology with the ESIF's power hardware-in-the-loop system and megawatt-scale grid simulators.

  18. Red facts: Dibromodicyanobutane. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This fact sheet summarizes the information in the RED document for reregistration case 2780, dibromodicyanobutane. Dibromodicyanobutane (1,2-dibromo-2,4-dicyanobutane) is a microbiocide/microbiostat used to control slime-forming bacteria and fungi in commercial/industrial water cooling systems (recirculating), oil recovery drilling muds/packer fluids, pulp/paper mill water systems, secondary oil recovery rejection water, industrial adhesives and coatings, resin/latex/polymer emulsions, metalworking cutting fluids, paints, specialty industrial products (including fiber processing fluids, waxes, polishes, and inks), and wet-end additives/industrial processing chemicals.

  19. Microelectrode arrays in combination with in vitro models of spinal cord injury as tools to investigate pathological changes in network activity: facts and promises.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, Miranda; Nistri, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represent an important tool to study the basic characteristics of spinal networks that control locomotion in physiological conditions. Fundamental properties of this neuronal rhythmicity like burst origin, propagation, coordination, and resilience can, thus, be investigated at multiple sites within a certain spinal topography and neighboring circuits. A novel challenge will be to apply this technology to unveil the mechanisms underlying pathological processes evoked by spinal cord injury (SCI). To achieve this goal, it is necessary to fully identify spinal networks that make up the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG) and to understand their operational rules. In this review, the use of isolated spinal cord preparations from rodents, or organotypic spinal slice cultures is discussed to study rhythmic activity. In particular, this review surveys our recently developed in vitro models of SCI by evoking excitotoxic (or even hypoxic/dysmetabolic) damage to spinal networks and assessing the impact on rhythmic activity and cell survival. These pathological processes which evolve via different cell death mechanisms are discussed as a paradigm to apply MEA recording for detailed mapping of the functional damage and its time-dependent evolution.

  20. Europe's space photovoltaics programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogus, Klaus P.

    1994-01-01

    The current space PV (photovoltaic) technology development program of ESA is described. The program is closely coupled to the European space mission scenario for the next 10 year period and has as its main objective to make the most effective use of the limited resources available for technology in the present economical climate. This requires a well-balanced approach between concentration on very few options and keeping the competition alive if more than one promising technology exists. The paper describes ESA's main activities in the areas of solar array technology, solar cell technology, solar cell assembly technology, and special test and verification activities including the in-orbit demonstration of new technologies.

  1. Integrating Residential Photovoltaics With Power Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Report finds rooftop solar-cell arrays feed excess power to electric-utility grid for fee are potentially attractive large-scale application of photovoltaic technology. Presents assessment of breakeven costs of these arrays under variety of technological and economic assumptions.

  2. Integrating Residential Photovoltaics With Power Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Report finds rooftop solar-cell arrays feed excess power to electric-utility grid for fee are potentially attractive large-scale application of photovoltaic technology. Presents assessment of breakeven costs of these arrays under variety of technological and economic assumptions.

  3. MOD silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, G. M.; Vest, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of flat plate solar arrays is reported. Photovoltaic cells require back side metallization and a collector grid system on the front surface. Metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) silver films can eliminate most of the present problems with silver conductors. The objectives are to: (1) identify and characterize suitable MO compounds; (2) develop generic synthesis procedures for the MO compounds; (3) develop generic fabrication procedures to screen printable MOD silver inks; (4) optimize processing conditions to produce grid patterns and photovoltaic cells; and (5) develop a model which describes the adhesion between the fired silver film and the silicon surface.

  4. Photovoltaic systems sizing for Algeria

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, A.H.; Driss, B.A.; Amimeur, R.; Lorenzo, E.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an optimization method applicable to stand-alone photovoltaic systems as a function of its reliability. For a given loss-of-load probability (LLP), there are many combinations of battery capacity and photovoltaic array peak power. The problem consists in determining the couple which corresponds to a minimum total system cost. The method has been applied to various areas all over Algeria taking into account various climatic zones. The parameter used to define the different climatic zones is the clearness index KT for all the considered sites. The period of the simulation system is 10 years. 5 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + Google (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the collaboration between NREL, Google, and the IEEE Power Electronics Society at the ESIF to work on the Little Box Challenge, an open competition challenging engineers to build smaller power inverters for use in photovoltaic power systems.

  6. Photovoltaic Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute through David Scheiman and Phillip Jenkins provided the Photovoltaics Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with expertise in photovoltaic (PV) research, flight experiments and solar cell calibration. NASA GRC maintains the only world-class solar cell calibration and measurement facility within NASA. GRC also has a leadership role within the solar cell calibration community, and is leading the effort to develop ISO standards for solar cell calibration. OAI scientists working under this grant provided much of the expertise and leadership in this area.

  7. Quo Vadis photovoltaics 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger-Waldau, A.

    2011-10-01

    Since more than 10 years photovoltaics is one of the most dynamic industries with growth rates well beyond 40% per annum. This growth is driven not only by the progress in materials knowledge and processing technology, but also by market introduction programmes in many countries around the world. Despite the negative impacts on the economy by the financial crisis since 2009, photovoltaics is still growing at an extraordinary pace and had in 2010 an extraordinary success, as both production and markets doubled. The open question is what will happen in 2011 and the years after as the situation is dominated by huge manufacturing overcapacities and an increasing unpredictability of policy support. How can the PV industry continue their cost reduction to ensure another 10 to 20 years of sustained and strong growth necessary to make PV to one of the main pillars of a sustainable energy supply in 2030. Despite the fact, that globally the share of electricity from photovoltaic systems is still small, at local level it can be already now above 30% of the demand at certain times of the year. Future research in PV has to provide intelligent solutions not only on the solar cell alone, but also on the module and the system integration level in order to permit a 5 to 10% share of electricity in 2020.

  8. Design of a photovoltaic system for a temperate climate all-electric residence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehalick, E. M.; Tully, G. F.; Johnson, J.; Truncellito, N.; Schaeffer, R.

    1982-01-01

    A photovoltaic system was developed and integrated into a single story residence having low space conditioning loads typical of a temperate climate similar to Santa Maria, CA. The design addresses the residential market segment of low energy consuming houses with limited roof area availability; in fact the garage roof is used for the array. The array size to meet the requirements of this type of house covers 40 square m with a rated power output of 4.3 kW at NOCT conditions. A flexible array installation is presented which can be implemented as an integral mount or a stand-off mount depending on the homeowner preference. A 4 kW utility-tied inverter is used in the power conversion subsystem, representative of currently available hardware. The system provides feedback of excess energy to the utility which is the most promising approach for grid-connected residential systems in the mid 1980's.

  9. Photovoltaic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. photovoltaic industry enjoyed a growth rate of 30 percent in sales for the second year in a row. This sends a message that the way we think about electricity is changing. Instead of big energy projects that perpetuate environmental and economic damage, there is a growing trend toward small renewable technologies that are well matched to end-user needs and operating conditions. As demand grows and markets expand, investment capital will be drawn to the industry and new growth trends will emerge. The photovoltaic industry around the world achieved record shipments also. Worldwide shipments of photovoltaic (PV) modules for 1989 totaled more than 40 megawatts (MW), nearly a 20 percent increase over last year's shipments. The previous two years showed increases in worldwide shipments of 23 and 25 percent, respectively. If this growth rate continues through the 1990s, as industry back orders would indicate, 300 to 1000 MW of PV-supplied power could be on line by 2000. Photovoltaic systems have low environmental impact and they are inexpensive to operate and maintain. Using solid-state technology, PV systems directly convert sunlight to electricity without high-temperature fluids or moving parts that could cause mechanical failure. This makes the technology very reliable.

  10. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    DOEpatents

    Miros, Robert H. J. [Fairfax, CA; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham [Oakland, CA; Seery, Martin N [San Rafael, CA; Holland, Rodney H [Novato, CA

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  11. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    DOEpatents

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N; Holland, Rodney H

    2012-09-18

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  12. Photovoltaic power system for a lunar base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karia, Kris

    An assessment is provided of the viability of using photovoltaic power technology for lunar base application during the initial phase of the mission. The initial user power demands were assumed to be 25 kW (daytime) and 12.5 kW (night time). The effect of lunar adverse environmental conditions were also considered in deriving the photovoltaic power system concept. The solar cell array was found to impose no more design constraints than those solar arrays currently being designed for spacecraft and the Space Station Freedom. The long lunar night and the need to store sufficient energy to sustain a lunar facility during this period was found to be a major design driver. A photovoltaic power system concept was derived using high efficiency thin GaAs solar cells on a deployable flexible Kapton blanket. The solar array design was sized to generate sufficient power for daytime use and for a regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage system to provide power during the night. Solar array sun-tracking is also proposed to maximize the array power output capability. The system launch mass was estimated to be approximately 10 metric tons. For mission application of photovoltaic technology other issues have to be addressed including the constraints imposed by launch vehicle, safety, and cost. For the initial phase of the mission a photovoltaic power system offers a safe option.

  13. FSEC experimental photovoltaic house simulation and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Khattar, M.K.; Atmaram, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Presented is an analysis of the electrical performance of the 5kW peak photovoltaic array on the roof of the Florida Solar Energy Center experimental photovoltaic house. The system was modeled and simulated using SOLCEL II and TRNSYS Version 11.1 computer codes. Measured hourly radiation on the tilted collector plane, ambient temperature and wind speed data were used as weather input in the modeling. Predicted dc power and energy output, assuming maximum power tracking in simulation models, has been compared with measured output data from the photovoltaic array on four days with varying degree of solar radiation - from bright to cloudy days. In addition, the predicted cell temperature from these models has been compared with measured data. Presented are a description of the photovoltaic system and its data acquisition system, the characteristics of the days selected for hourly simulations, and a comparison of the measured performance versus the model predictions.

  14. A Novel Technique for Maximum Power Point Tracking of a Photovoltaic Based on Sensing of Array Current Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zoghby, Helmy M.; Bendary, Ahmed F.

    2016-10-01

    Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) is now widely used method in increasing the photovoltaic (PV) efficiency. The conventional MPPT methods have many problems concerning the accuracy, flexibility and efficiency. The MPP depends on the PV temperature and solar irradiation that randomly varied. In this paper an artificial intelligence based controller is presented through implementing of an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) to obtain maximum power from PV. The ANFIS inputs are the temperature and cell current, and the output is optimal voltage at maximum power. During operation the trained ANFIS senses the PV current using suitable sensor and also senses the temperature to determine the optimal operating voltage that corresponds to the current at MPP. This voltage is used to control the boost converter duty cycle. The MATLAB simulation results shows the effectiveness of the ANFIS with sensing the PV current in obtaining the MPPT from the PV.

  15. Residential photovoltaic power systems for the northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A project to develop Residential Photovoltaic Systems has begun at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory with the construction and testing of five Prototype Systems. Each of these systems utilizes a roof-mounted photovoltaic array and allows excess solar-generated electric energy to be fed back to the local utility grid, eliminating the need for on-site storage. Specific features of the five Prototype Systems now under test are presented, and performance results to date are discussed.

  16. Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Eleventh Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology conference was held at NASA Lewis Research Center from May 7 to 9, 1991. The papers and workshop summaries presented here report remarkable progress on a wide variety of approaches in space photovoltaics, both near and far term applications. Papers were presented in a variety of technical areas, including multijunction cell technology, GaAs and InP cells, system studies, cell and array development, and photovoltaics for conversion of laser radiation. Three workshops were held to discuss thin film cell development, III-V cell development, and space environmental effects.

  17. Blood Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Learn About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  18. Implantation of Modular Photovoltaic Subretinal Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Yeong; Lorach, Henri; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Establish the surgical procedure for subretinal implantation of multiple photovoltaic arrays for the restoration of sight. Multiple silicon photovoltaic arrays of 1 mm in diameter and 30 µm in thickness were implanted subretinally via single retinotomy in rabbits. Ophthalmoscopic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to validate the implants' placement. Vitrectomy, followed by subretinal fluid injection for retinal detachment and retinotomy, allowed accurate placement of seven modules in the bleb, covering approximately a 3.5-mm diameter area on the retina via a single 1.5-mm retinotomy. OCT confirmed complete reattachment of the retina over the implants. Subretinal implantation of multiple photovoltaic arrays via a single retinotomy, followed by their tiling, minimizes the scleral and retinal incisions and provides better fit to the spherical shape of the eye ball, compared to a single, larger module. Such minimally traumatic procedure can be performed with 20-gauge intraocular instruments. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Method of improving photoelectric efficiency for laser power beaming based on photovoltaic cell layout optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Beibei; Li, Xiaojiang

    2017-02-01

    In accordance with the high impact of the uneven distribution of laser beam power on the photovoltaic efficiency of photovoltaic cell (PV) array, a method based on PV layout optimization is proposed to improve the photovoltaic efficiency. First of all, a mathematical model of series-parallel PV array is built, and by analyzing the influencing factors on photovoltaic efficiency, the idea and scheme to improve the photovoltaic efficiency based on PV layout optimization is provided; then, the MATLAB/Simulink simulation tool is used to simulate the effects of improving photoelectric efficiency. The simulation results show that compared to the traditional PV array, the optimized PV array can obtain higher photovoltaic efficiency, and compared to the situation with uneven temperature distribution, the array efficiency has higher efficiency under even temperature distribution.

  20. Photovoltaic fabrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-22

    during wire fabrication. Weaving was demonstrated for both military-type nylon -cotton blend (NYCO) warp fibers and cotton-polyester warp fibers. A...Lowell, MA 01852 14. ABSTRACT This report describes a project to improve photovoltaic fabrics. It had four objectives: 1) Efficiency – make PV wires on...a continuous basis that exhibit 7% efficiency; 2) Automated Welding – demonstrate an automated means of interconnecting the electrodes of one wire

  1. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  2. NASA-OAST program in photovoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. P.; Flood, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA program in photovoltaic energy conversion includes research and technology development efforts on solar cells, blankets, and arrays. The overall objectives are to increase conversion efficiency, reduce mass, reduce cost, and increase operating life. The potential growth of space power requirements in the future presents a major challenge to the current state of technology in space photovoltaic systems.

  3. Photovoltaic power for a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Curtis, Henry B.; Brinker, David J.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    A lunar base is an attractive option for space exploration plans early in the next century. The primary options for a lunar base power system are solar and nuclear. This paper details the requirements for a photovoltaic powered lunar base. Topics covered are (1) requirements for power during the lunar day and during the night, (2) solar cells, present and future availability, efficiency, specific power, and temperature sensitivity, (3) storage options for the lunar night, (4) arrays and system integration, and (5) the potential for production of photovoltaic arrays and storage capability from locally available materials.

  4. Performance characteristics of a combination solar photovoltaic heat engine energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A combination solar photovoltaic heat engine converter is proposed. Such a system is suitable for either terrestrial or space power applications. The combination system has a higher efficiency than either the photovoltaic array or the heat engine alone can attain. Advantages in concentrator and radiator area and receiver mass of the photovoltaic heat engine system over a heat-engine-only system are estimated. A mass and area comparison between the proposed space station organic Rankine power system and a combination PV-heat engine system is made. The critical problem for the proposed converter is the necessity for high temperature photovoltaic array operation. Estimates of the required photovoltaic temperature are presented.

  5. Photovoltaic Plasma Interaction Test 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Bradford A.; Chrulski, Daniel; Myers, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program is developing a plasma contactor to mitigate the harmful effects of charge collection on the station's large photovoltaic arrays. The purpose of the present test was to examine the effects of charge collection on the solar array electrical circuit and to verify the effectiveness of the plasma contactor. The results showed that the plasma contactor was able to eliminate structure arcing for any array output voltage. However, the current requirements of the plasma contactor were higher than those for prior testing and predicted by analysis. Three possible causes for this excess current demand are discussed. The most likely appeared to be a high local pressure on or very near the surface of the array as a result of vacuum tank conditions. Therefore, in actual space conditions, the plasma contactor should work as predicted.

  6. Double-layer electrode based on TiO2 nanotubes arrays for enhancing photovoltaic properties in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    He, Zuoli; Que, Wenxiu; Sun, Peng; Ren, Jiangbo

    2013-12-26

    The present work reports a rapid and facile method to fabricate a novel double-layer TiO2 photoanode, which is based on highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays and monodispersive scattering microspheres. This double-layer TiO2 sphere/TNTA photoanode have got many unique structural and optical properties from TiO2 scattering microspheres, such as high specific surface area, multiple interparticle scattering, and efficient light-harvesting. Results indicate that this as-fabricated double-layer TiO2 sphere/TNTA front-illumination dye-sensitized solar cell, which is fabricated from the TiO2 nanotube arrays with a 17.4 μm length after TiCl4 treatment, exhibits a pronounced power conversion efficiency of 7.24% under an AM1.5 G irradiation, which can be attributed to the increased incident photon-to-current conversion and light-harvesting efficiency.

  7. Painkiller (Oxy, Vike) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ... these pills just like they sell heroin or cocaine. Some people borrow or steal these pills from ...

  8. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  9. Basic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, K.

    1984-01-01

    Here is a photovoltaics guide that converts highly technical information into language that can be understood by both scientists and non-scientists. It provides an introduction to solar cell technology, explaining how PV cells work, how they are manufactured, and how they are put together into effective energy-producing systems. The authors investigate a new PV technology based on an altered form of silicon capable of producing conversion efficiencies of 10% to 15%. They explain the PV effect, loss mechanisms, and advances in fabrication methods.

  10. Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

  11. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Crandall, R.S.; Deb, S.K.; Stone, J.L.

    1995-01-24

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired. 11 figures.

  12. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Crandall, Richard S.; Deb, Satyendra K.; Stone, Jack L.

    1995-01-01

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired.

  13. A study of water electrolysis with photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpetis, C.

    The performance of the hydrogen production system consisting of the photovoltaic array and the water electrolysis unit is studied. The results of the calculation are compared with available experimental data and the performance of a hydrogen production plant by means of photovoltaic solar energy conversion is determined for two typical locations. A method for the estimation of the power matching conditions of the system solar array electrolysis unit is formulated to allow conclusions of general validity.

  14. Photovoltaic receivers for laser beamed power in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the use of beamed power to support space exploration activities. One of the most promising beamed power concepts uses a laser beam to transmit power to a remote photovoltaic array. Large lasers can be located on cloud-free sites at one or more ground locations and illuminate solar arrays to a level sufficient to provide operating power. Issues involved in providing photovoltaic receivers for such applications are discussed.

  15. NREL Center for Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Solar cells, also called photovoltaics (PV) by solar cell scientists, convert sunlight directly into electricity. Solar cells are often used to power calculators and watches. The performance of a solar cell is measured in terms of its efficiency at turning sunlight into electricity. Only sunlight of certain energies will work efficiently to create electricity, and much of it is reflected or absorbed by the material that make up the cell. Because of this, a typical commercial solar cell has an efficiency of 15%—about one-sixth of the sunlight striking the cell generates electricity. Low efficiencies mean that larger arrays are needed, and that means higher cost. Improving solar cell efficiencies while holding down the cost per cell is an important goal of the PV industry, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, and they have made significant progress. The first solar cells, built in the 1950s, had efficiencies of less than 4%. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/re_photovoltaics_video_text.html

  16. NREL Center for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Solar cells, also called photovoltaics (PV) by solar cell scientists, convert sunlight directly into electricity. Solar cells are often used to power calculators and watches. The performance of a solar cell is measured in terms of its efficiency at turning sunlight into electricity. Only sunlight of certain energies will work efficiently to create electricity, and much of it is reflected or absorbed by the material that make up the cell. Because of this, a typical commercial solar cell has an efficiency of 15%—about one-sixth of the sunlight striking the cell generates electricity. Low efficiencies mean that larger arrays are needed, and that means higher cost. Improving solar cell efficiencies while holding down the cost per cell is an important goal of the PV industry, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, and they have made significant progress. The first solar cells, built in the 1950s, had efficiencies of less than 4%. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/re_photovoltaics_video_text.html

  17. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Clews, Peggy J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-08

    A process including forming a photovoltaic solar cell on a substrate, the photovoltaic solar cell comprising an anchor positioned between the photovoltaic solar cell and the substrate to suspend the photovoltaic solar cell from the substrate. A surface of the photovoltaic solar cell opposite the substrate is attached to a receiving substrate. The receiving substrate may be bonded to the photovoltaic solar cell using an adhesive force or a metal connecting member. The photovoltaic solar cell is then detached from the substrate by lifting the receiving substrate having the photovoltaic solar cell attached thereto and severing the anchor connecting the photovoltaic solar cell to the substrate. Depending upon the type of receiving substrate used, the photovoltaic solar cell may be removed from the receiving substrate or remain on the receiving substrate for use in the final product.

  18. Photoelectrical properties of Ag2S quantum dot-modified TiO2 nanorod arrays and their application for photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingkun; Wang, Dejun; Zhang, Yu; Fan, Haimei; Lin, Yanhong; Jiang, Tengfei; Xie, Tengfeng

    2013-02-14

    Vertically aligned TiO(2) nanorod arrays (NRAs) modified with Ag(2)S quantum dots (QDs) have been successfully prepared via a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra and surface photovoltage (SPV) measurements reveal that the Ag(2)S sensitization extends the range of the photoresponse of the TiO(2) NRAs to the visible region and exhibits higher photovoltage responses. With a polysulfide electrolyte, a maximum conversion efficiency of 0.148% with a superior J(sc) of 1.177 mA cm(-2) are obtained after 6 SILAR cycles under illumination at 100 mW cm(-2). These results indicate that the Ag(2)S QDs/TiO(2) NRAs photoelectrode has a promising application in solar cells.

  19. Assembly, physics, and application of highly electronic-type purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes in aligned array field effect transistors and photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in (1) achieving highly monodisperse semiconducting carbon nanotubes without problematic metallic nanotubes and (2) depositing these nanotubes into useful, organized arrays and assemblies on substrates have created new opportunities for studying the physics of these one-dimensional conductors and for applying them in electronics and photonics technologies. In this talk, I will present on two topics that are along these lines. In the first, we have pioneered a scalable approach for depositing aligned arrays of ultrahigh purity semiconducting SWCNTs (prepared using polyfluorene-derivatives) called floating evaporative self-assembly (FESA). FESA is exploited to create FETs with exceptionally high combined on-conductance and on-off ratio of 261 μS/ μm and 2 x105, respectively, for a channel length of 240 nm. This is 1400 x greater on-off ratio than SWCNT FETs fabricated by other methods, at comparable on-conductance per width of 250 μS/ μm, and 30-100 x greater on-conductance per width, at comparable on-off ratio of 105-107. In the second, we have discovered how to efficiently harvest photons using semiconducting SWCNTs by driving the dissociation of excitons using donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The flow of energy in SWCNT films occurs across a complex energy landscape, temporally resolved using two-dimensional white light ultrafast spectroscopy. We have demonstrated simple solar cells driven by SWCNT excitons, based on bilayers between C60 and ultrathin (5 nm) films of SWCNTs that achieve a 1% solar power conversion efficiency (7% at the bandgap). High internal quantum efficiency indicates that future blended or multijunction cells exploiting multiple layers will be many times more efficient.

  20. Space and Terrestrial Photovoltaics: Synergy and Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Emery, Keith

    2002-10-01

    terrestrial solar cell communities shall once again share many common goals and, in fact, companies may manufacture both space and terrestrial solar cells in III-V materials and thin film materials. Basic photovoltaics research including these current trends in nanotechnology provides a valuable service for both worlds in that fundamental understanding of cell processes is still vitally important, particularly with new materials or new cell structures. It is entirely possible that one day we might have one solar array design that will meet the criteria for success in both space and on the Earth or perhaps the Moon or Mars.

  1. Space and Terrestrial Photovoltaics: Synergy and Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Emery, Keith

    2002-01-01

    terrestrial solar cell communities shall once again share many common goals and, in fact, companies may manufacture both space and terrestrial solar cells in III-V materials and thin film materials. Basic photovoltaics research including these current trends in nanotechnology provides a valuable service for both worlds in that fundamental understanding of cell processes is still vitally important, particularly with new materials or new cell structures. It is entirely possible that one day we might have one solar array design that will meet the criteria for success in both space and on the Earth or perhaps the Moon or Mars.

  2. Recent advances in photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Photovoltaic energy conversion has been widely used for over three decades in the space program to power satellites and in the last two decades has also found widespread use in remote applications such as powering microwave communication repeaters, providing cathodic protection for wells and pipelines, pumping water in remote locations, etc. With continued improvements in performance and ongoing reductions in manufacturing costs, PV systems are expected to become cost effective for grid-connected applications in the next few years. While crystalline silicon technology accounts for the majority of the present PV business, new thin film PV technologies such as multifunction amorphous silicon, copper-indium-diselenide and cadmium telluride have progressed to a point where several companies are building multi-megawatt production facilities. High efficiency concentrator arrays may also prove to be cost effective for grid-connected applications in regions of the world with significant direct sunlight.

  3. High-performance Si microwire photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Putnam, Morgan C.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Baek, Jae Y.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2011-01-07

    Crystalline Si wires, grown by the vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) process, have emerged as promising candidate materials for low-cost, thin-film photovoltaics. Here, we demonstrate VLS-grown Si microwires that have suitable electrical properties for high-performance photovoltaic applications, including long minority-carrier diffusion lengths (Ln>> 30 µm) and low surface recombination velocities (S << 70 cm·s-1). Single-wire radial p–n junction solar cells were fabricated with amorphous silicon and silicon nitride surface coatings, achieving up to 9.0% apparent photovoltaic efficiency, and exhibiting up to ~600 mV open-circuit voltage with over 80% fill factor. Projective single-wire measurements and optoelectronic simulations suggest that large-area Si wire-array solar cells have the potential to exceed 17% energy-conversion efficiency, offering a promising route toward cost-effective crystalline Si photovoltaics.

  4. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  5. Laser photovoltaic power system synergy for SEI applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Hickman, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Solar arrays can provide reliable space power, but do not operate when there is no solar energy. Photovoltaic arrays can also convert laser energy with high efficiency. One proposal to reduce the required mass of energy storage required is to illuminate the photovoltaic arrays by a ground laser system. It is proposed to locate large lasers on cloud-free sites at one or more ground locations, and use large lenses or mirrors with adaptive optical correction to reduce the beam spread due to diffraction or atmospheric turbulence. During the eclipse periods or lunar night, the lasers illuminate the solar arrays to a level sufficient to provide operating power.

  6. Microsystem enabled photovoltaic modules and systems

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sweatt, William C; Okandan, Murat

    2015-05-12

    A microsystem enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) module including: an absorber layer; a fixed optic layer coupled to the absorber layer; a translatable optic layer; a translation stage coupled between the fixed and translatable optic layers; and a motion processor electrically coupled to the translation stage to controls motion of the translatable optic layer relative to the fixed optic layer. The absorber layer includes an array of photovoltaic (PV) elements. The fixed optic layer includes an array of quasi-collimating (QC) micro-optical elements designed and arranged to couple incident radiation from an intermediate image formed by the translatable optic layer into one of the PV elements such that it is quasi-collimated. The translatable optic layer includes an array of focusing micro-optical elements corresponding to the QC micro-optical element array. Each focusing micro-optical element is designed to produce a quasi-telecentric intermediate image from substantially collimated radiation incident within a predetermined field of view.

  7. Novel approaches for low-cost photovoltaic concentrator. Final report, January 1978-July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, T.; Maraschin, R.

    1982-11-01

    A concept has been developed for a photovoltaic concentrator that uses sealed beam headlight technology. The photovoltaic cell is placed at the focus of the headlamp reflector. A prototype 60 W array was designed, built, and tested. Array efficiency was approximately 6%.

  8. Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaics: Characterization of Thin-Film Deposition and Analysis of Enhanced Light Trapping from Scattering Nanoparticle Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeland, Krista S.

    Thin-film solar cells have the potential to significantly decrease the cost of a finished device by cutting materials cost, and the characteristics of carrier transport through a thin film can concurrently increase the device performance over that of a wafer-based cell while tolerating a higher defect density in the absorbing material. However, while silicon is an attractive material for use in solar cells due to its nearly ideal band gap for single-junction cells and its relative abundance, its inefficient absorption of infrared light necessitates the development of light-trapping techniques to avoid losses in current generation. This thesis research has focused on two important goals: the development of a scalable thin-film silicon deposition method that produces high-quality material at minimal cost, and the evaluation of light-trapping mechanisms that will increase photon absorption in these films. Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition is used to fabricate silicon thin films with high crystalline fractions even on inexpensive substrates, and films grown with appropriate growth conditions exhibit initial open-circuit voltages above 450 mV, and while challenges in passivation still exist, this research illustrates the potential of this highly scalable and inexpensive deposition technique. Silver and silicon subwavelength structures were then both fabricated and simulated on ultra-thin silicon films on SiO2 to evaluate their potential for increasing light absorption through plasmonic and physical scattering mechanisms, and spectral response measurements demonstrate over a ten-fold increase in carrier generation with a metal nanoparticle surface array. Periodic dielectric structures exhibit Bloch modes in both measurement and simulation, with an increase in overall quantum efficiency of over 11% from both a flat silicon layer and one that is randomly textured. These results highlight the significant role of scattering particle distribution in determining the light

  9. Design considerations for Mars photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Appelbaum, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Considerations for operation of a photovoltaic power system on Mars are discussed with reference to Viking Lander data. The average solar insolation at Mars is 590 W/sq m, which is reduced yet further by atmospheric dust. Of major concern are dust storms, which have been observed to occur on local as well as on global scales, and their effect on solar array output. While atmospheric opacity may rise to values ranging from 3 to 9, depending on storm severity, there is still an appreciable large diffuse illumination, even at high opacities, so that photovoltaic operation is still possible. If the power system is to continue to generate power even on high-optical-opacity (i.e., dusty atmosphere) days, it is important that the photovoltaic system be designed to collect diffuse irradiance as well as direct. Energy storage will be required for operation during the night. Temperature and wind provide additional considerations for array design.

  10. Space power technology 21: Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The Space Power needs for the 21st Century and the program in photovoltaics needed to achieve it are discussed. Workshops were conducted in eight different power disciplines involving industry and other government agencies. The Photovoltaics Workshop was conducted at Aerospace Corporation in June 1987. The major findings and recommended program from this workshop are discussed. The major finding is that a survivable solar power capability is needed in photovoltaics for critical Department of Defense missions including Air Force and Strategic Defense Initiative. The tasks needed to realize this capability are described in technical, not financial, terms. The second finding is the need for lightweight, moderately survivable planar solar arrays. High efficiency thin III-V solar cells can meet some of these requirements. Higher efficiency, longer life solar cells are needed for application to both future planar and concentrator arrays with usable life up to 10 years. Increasing threats are also anticipated and means for avoiding prolonged exposure, retraction, maneuvering and autonomous operation are discussed.

  11. Space power technology 21: Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Joseph

    1989-04-01

    The Space Power needs for the 21st Century and the program in photovoltaics needed to achieve it are discussed. Workshops were conducted in eight different power disciplines involving industry and other government agencies. The Photovoltaics Workshop was conducted at Aerospace Corporation in June 1987. The major findings and recommended program from this workshop are discussed. The major finding is that a survivable solar power capability is needed in photovoltaics for critical Department of Defense missions including Air Force and Strategic Defense Initiative. The tasks needed to realize this capability are described in technical, not financial, terms. The second finding is the need for lightweight, moderately survivable planar solar arrays. High efficiency thin III-V solar cells can meet some of these requirements. Higher efficiency, longer life solar cells are needed for application to both future planar and concentrator arrays with usable life up to 10 years. Increasing threats are also anticipated and means for avoiding prolonged exposure, retraction, maneuvering and autonomous operation are discussed.

  12. Improved efficiency for nanopillar array of c-Si photovoltaic by down-conversion and anti-reflection of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-chung; Chen, Hsin-Chu; Han, Hau-Vei; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Chang, Chia-Hua; Tsai, Min-An; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Yu, Peichen

    2012-02-01

    Improvement of efficiency for crystalline silicon (c-Si) with nanopillar arrays (NPAs) solar cell was demonstrated by deployment of CdS quantum dots (QDs). The NPAs was fabricated by colloidal lithography of self-assembled polystyrene (PS) nanospheres with a 600 nm in size and reactive-ion etching techniques, and then a colloidal CdS QDs with a concentration of 5 mg/mL was spun on the surface of c-Si with NPAs solar cell. Under a simulated one-sun condition, the device with CdS QDs shows a 33% improvement of power conversion efficiency, compared with the one without QDs. Additionally, we also found that the device with CdS QDs shows a 32% reduction in electrical resistance, compared with the one without QDs solar cell, under an ultraviolet (UV) light of 355nm illumination. This reduced electrical resistance can directly contribute to our fill-factor (FF) enhancement. For further investigation, the excitation spectrum of photoluminescence (PL), absorbance spectrum, current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, reflectance and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the device were measured and analyzed. Based on the spectral response and optical measurement, we believe that CdS QDs not only have the capability for photon down-conversion in ultraviolet region, but also provide extra antireflection capability.

  13. Ultrasonic Substrate Vibration-Assisted Drop Casting (SVADC) for the Fabrication of Photovoltaic Solar Cell Arrays and Thin-Film Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Zabihi, Fatemeh

    2015-12-01

    A simple, low-cost, versatile, and potentially scalable casting method is proposed for the fabrication of micro- and nano-thin films, herein termed as ultrasonic "substrate vibration-assisted drop casting" (SVADC). The impingement of a solution drop onto a substrate in a simple process called drop casting, usually results in spreading of the liquid solution and the formation of a non-uniform thin solid film after solvent evaporation. Our previous and current supporting results, as well as few similar reports by others, confirm that imposing ultrasonic vibration on the substrate can simply convert the uncontrollable drop casting method into a controllable coating technique. Therefore, the SVADC may be used to fabricate an array of emerging thin-film solar cells, such as polymer, perovskite, and quantum-dot solar cells, as well as other small thin-film devices, in a roll-to-roll and automated fabrication process. The preliminary results demonstrate a ten-fold increase in electrical conductivity of PEDOT: PSS made by SVADC compared with the film made by conventional drop casting. Also, simple planar perovskite solar cells made here using SVADC show promising performance with an efficiency of over 3 % for a simple structure without performing process optimization or using expensive materials and treatments.

  14. Ultrasonic Substrate Vibration-Assisted Drop Casting (SVADC) for the Fabrication of Photovoltaic Solar Cell Arrays and Thin-Film Devices.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Morteza; Zabihi, Fatemeh

    2015-12-01

    A simple, low-cost, versatile, and potentially scalable casting method is proposed for the fabrication of micro- and nano-thin films, herein termed as ultrasonic "substrate vibration-assisted drop casting" (SVADC). The impingement of a solution drop onto a substrate in a simple process called drop casting, usually results in spreading of the liquid solution and the formation of a non-uniform thin solid film after solvent evaporation. Our previous and current supporting results, as well as few similar reports by others, confirm that imposing ultrasonic vibration on the substrate can simply convert the uncontrollable drop casting method into a controllable coating technique. Therefore, the SVADC may be used to fabricate an array of emerging thin-film solar cells, such as polymer, perovskite, and quantum-dot solar cells, as well as other small thin-film devices, in a roll-to-roll and automated fabrication process. The preliminary results demonstrate a ten-fold increase in electrical conductivity of PSS made by SVADC compared with the film made by conventional drop casting. Also, simple planar perovskite solar cells made here using SVADC show promising performance with an efficiency of over 3 % for a simple structure without performing process optimization or using expensive materials and treatments.

  15. Controllable in situ photo-assisted chemical deposition of CdSe quantum dots on ZnO/CdS nanorod arrays and its photovoltaic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Hong; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-02-01

    Compound semiconductors have been widely applied in the energy field as light-harvesting materials, conducting substrates and other functional parts. Nevertheless, to effectively grow them in various forms toward objective applications, limitations have often been met to achieving high growth rate, simplicity of method and controllability of growing processes simultaneously. In this work, we have grown a uniform CdSe layer on ZnO/CdS nanorod arrays by a novel in situ photo-assisted chemical deposition method. The morphology and quality of the as-formed material could be significantly influenced by tuning the optical parameters of the injected light. Due to the effect of injected light on the key reactions during the growth, a modified natural light with removal of the UV and IR components seems to be more suitable than monochromic light. An efficiency of 3.59% was achieved without any additional treatment, significantly higher than the efficiency of 2.88% of the sample by conventional CBD method under similar conditions with growth rate one order of magnitude higher. In general, the result has suggested its potential importance for other compound materials and opto-electronic devices.

  16. Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed Designed for Calibrating Photovoltaic Devices in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the performance of solar arrays in space requires that the cells be tested in comparison with a space-flown standard. Recognizing that improvements in future solar cell technology will require an ever-increasing fidelity of standards, the Photovoltaics and Space Environment Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute, designed a prototype facility to allow routine calibration, measurement, and qualification of solar cells on the International Space Station, and then the return of the cells to Earth for laboratory use. For solar cell testing, the Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) site provides a true air-mass-zero (AM0) solar spectrum. This allows solar cells to be accurately calibrated using the full spectrum of the Sun.

  17. Detailed Performance Model for Photovoltaic Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Mancilla-David, F.; Ellis, K.; Muljadi, E.; Jenkins, P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a modified current-voltage relationship for the single diode model. The single-diode model has been derived from the well-known equivalent circuit for a single photovoltaic cell. The modification presented in this paper accounts for both parallel and series connections in an array.

  18. Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Crank, Ice) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Listen Methamphetamine—meth for short—is a white, bitter powder. ... names for meth are: Crank Ice Crystal Glass Chalk PDF File: EasyToRead_MethFacts_012017.pdf In This ...

  19. Diet myths and facts

    MedlinePlus

    Obesity - diet myths and facts; Overweight - diet myths and fact; Weight-loss diet myths and facts ... evidence: using the proposed effect of breakfast on obesity to show 2 practices that distort scientific evidence. ...

  20. Solar photovoltaic power stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowaniec, C. R.; Pittman, P. F.; Ferber, R. R.; Marshall, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    The subsystems of a solar photovoltaic central power system are identified and the cost of major components are estimated. The central power system, which would have a peak power capability in the range of 50 to 1000 MW, utilizes two types of subsystems - a power conditioner and a solar array. Despite differences in costs of inverters, the overall cost of the total power conditioning subsystem is about the same for all approaches considered. A combination of two inverters operating from balanced dc buses as a pair of 6-pulse groups is recommended. A number of different solar cell modules and tracking array structures were analyzed. It is concluded that when solar cell costs are high (greater than $500/kW), high concentration modules are more cost effective than those with low concentration. Vertical-axis tracking is the most effective of the studied tracking modes. For less expensive solar cells (less than $400/kW), fixed tilt collector/reflector modules are more cost effective than those which track.

  1. Mir Cooperative Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skor, Mike; Hoffman, Dave J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), produced jointly by the United States and Russia, was deployed on the Mir Russian space station on May 25, 1996. The MCSA is a photovoltaic electrical power system that can generate up to 6 kW. The power from the MCSA is needed to extend Mir's lifetime and to support experiments conducted there by visiting U.S. astronauts. The MCSA was brought to Mir via the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-74 mission, launched November 12, 1995. This cooperative venture combined the best technology of both countries: the United States provided high-efficiency, lightweight photovoltaic panel modules, whereas Russia provided the array structure and deployment mechanism. Technology developed in the Space Station Freedom Program, and now being used in the International Space Station, was used to develop MCSA's photovoltaic panel. Performance data obtained from MCSA operation on Mir will help engineers better understand the performance of the photovoltaic panel modules in orbit. This information will be used to more accurately predict the performance of the International Space Station solar arrays. Managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center for NASA's International Space Station Program Office in Houston, Texas, the MCSA Project was completed on time and under budget despite a very aggressive schedule.

  2. Energy losses in photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Wagdy R.; Nour, M. Abdulsadek

    1994-10-01

    The maximum power generated by photovoltaic (PV) arrays is not fully used. During summer, the main cause for the energy loss is the system design that necessitates an oversizing of the PV array to supply the load during the winter season when the solar energy is limited. Other reasons that cause energy loss are: the mismatch between the array and the load or battery, the loss in the batteries, and the loss due to the PV array disconnect. The array disconnect loss takes place during summer season when the battery is fully charged. To avoid the disconnect loss, a novel battery voltage regulator (BVR) is used. This supplies the load directly from the array when the battery is fully charged. Energy losses have been analyzed and divided into fundamental (unavoidable) and non-fundamental losses. Both conventional (using a conventional BVR) and new (using a novel BVR) PV systems are studied. A load that consumes constant power for 24 h a day through the year is considered. The climatic condition of Cairo city is taken as the test case.

  3. Thermionic photovoltaic energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermionic photovoltaic energy conversion device comprises a thermionic diode mounted within a hollow tubular photovoltaic converter. The thermionic diode maintains a cesium discharge for producing excited atoms that emit line radiation in the wavelength region of 850 nm to 890 nm. The photovoltaic converter is a silicon or gallium arsenide photovoltaic cell having bandgap energies in this same wavelength region for optimum cell efficiency.

  4. Portable thermo-photovoltaic power source

    DOEpatents

    Zuppero, Anthony C.; Krawetz, Barton; Barklund, C. Rodger; Seifert, Gary D.

    1997-01-14

    A miniature thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) device for generation of electrical power for use in portable electronic devices. A TPV power source is constructed to provide a heat source chemical reactor capable of using various fuels, such as liquid hydrocarbons, including but not limited to propane, LPG, butane, alcohols, oils and diesel fuels to generate a source of photons. A reflector dish guides misdirected photon energy from the photon source toward a photovoltaic array. A thin transparent protector sheet is disposed between the photon source and the array to reflect back thermal energy that cannot be converted to electricity, and protect the array from thermal damage. A microlens disposed between the protector sheet and the array further focuses the tailored band of photon energy from the photon source onto an array of photovoltaic cells, whereby the photon energy is converted to electrical power. A heat recuperator removes thermal energy from reactor chamber exhaust gases, preferably using mini- or micro-bellows to force air and fuel past the exhaust gases, and uses the energy to preheat the fuel and oxidant before it reaches the reactor, increasing system efficiency. Mini- or micro-bellows force ambient air through the system both to supply oxidant and to provide cooling. Finally, an insulator, which is preferably a super insulator, is disposed around the TPV power source to reduce fuel consumption, and to keep the TPV power source cool to the touch so it can be used in hand-held devices.

  5. Photovoltaic concentrator test results and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwin, H. J.

    A series of actively- and passively-cooled photovoltaic modules and arrays have been tested at the Sandia Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility. Four actively-cooled collectors were studied: (1) the Acurex parabolic trough module efficiency is 7.9%, (2) the E-systems module demonstrates a 9.9% efficiency, (3) the General Electric module has an 8.2% efficiency, and (4) the Varian module measures a 14% efficiency. Among the passively-cooled collectors tested is the Martin-Marietta Array, and it is shown that a 10 C difference in cell temperature changes the conversion efficiency from 9.0 to about 9.4%. In addition, the Spectrolab array has been 99.2% reliable and has a measured efficiency of 7.4%. Finally, the Motorola module demonstrates efficiencies of 7.8% and 10.7%. In order to compare collector performances, each design must be optimized.

  6. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    PubMed

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers.

  7. Photovoltaic device and method

    DOEpatents

    Cleereman, Robert; Lesniak, Michael J.; Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K.; Boven, Michelle L.

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  8. Photovoltaic device and method

    DOEpatents

    Cleereman, Robert J; Lesniak, Michael J; Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joe A; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K; Boven, Michelle L

    2015-01-27

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  9. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  10. High density photovoltaic

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, R.E.; Jacobson, G.F.; Wojtczuk, S.

    1997-10-14

    Photovoltaic technology can directly generate high voltages in a solid state material through the series interconnect of many photovoltaic diodes. We are investigating the feasibility of developing an electrically isolated, high-voltage power supply using miniature photovoltaic devices that convert optical energy to electrical energy.

  11. Current topics in photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, T.J. ); Meakin, J.D. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on current research in photovoltaics. Areas include: outdoor spectral odor radiation variations and their relationship to photovoltaic device performance, numerical modeling for analysis and design of solar cells, radiation damage mechanisms in GaAs and Si solar cells, and health and safety issues in the manufacturing of photovoltaic cells.

  12. SCARLET Solar Array Delivered for METEOR Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) is a joint NASA Lewis Research Center/Ballistic Missile Defense Organization program to develop advanced photovoltaic array technology for future space missions. This advanced power system technology uses a unique refractive concentrator design to focus sunlight onto a line of photovoltaic cells located below the optical element. The concentrator design is based on previous work conducted at Lewis under a Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) with Entech, Inc.

  13. Photovoltaics - Where are we going?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The directions that will be followed for solar cell development, production and marketing are projected on the basis of experiences gained during the JPL's Flat-Plate Solar Array project. It is thought that a billion dollar market for Si ribbons can be established by 1990. Thin film technology will yield a product at $2 U.S./W at the end of the 1980s. R&D is growing more focused on central station photovoltaic generators, although the residential market may be the more suitable goal. The intermediate markets, e.g., schools, hospitals and shopping centers may be developed before the central stations.

  14. Photovoltaics - Where are we going?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The directions that will be followed for solar cell development, production and marketing are projected on the basis of experiences gained during the JPL's Flat-Plate Solar Array project. It is thought that a billion dollar market for Si ribbons can be established by 1990. Thin film technology will yield a product at $2 U.S./W at the end of the 1980s. R&D is growing more focused on central station photovoltaic generators, although the residential market may be the more suitable goal. The intermediate markets, e.g., schools, hospitals and shopping centers may be developed before the central stations.

  15. Microsystem enabled photovoltaic modules and systems

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Sweatt, William C.; Okandan, Murat

    2017-09-12

    A photovoltaic (PV) module includes an absorber layer coupled to an optic layer. The absorber layer includes an array of PV elements. The optic layer includes a close-packed array of Keplerian telescope elements, each corresponding to one of an array of pupil elements. The Keplerian telescope substantially couple radiation that is incident on their objective surfaces into the corresponding pupil elements. Each pupil element relays radiation that is coupled into it from the corresponding Keplerian telescope element into the corresponding PV element.

  16. Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The Fourteenth Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology conference was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center from October 24-26, 1995. The abstracts presented in this volume report substantial progress in a variety of areas in space photovoltaics. Technical and review papers were presented in many areas, including high efficiency GaAs and InP solar cells, GaAs/Ge cells as commercial items, high efficiency multiple bandgap cells, solar cell and array technology, heteroepitaxial cells, thermophotovoltaic energy conversion, and space radiation effects. Space flight data on a variety of cells were also presented.

  17. Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Fourteenth Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology conference was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center from October 24-26, 1995. The abstracts presented in this volume report substantial progress in a variety of areas in space photovoltaics. Technical and review papers were presented in many areas, including high efficiency GaAs and InP solar cells, GaAs/Ge cells as commercial items, high efficiency multiple bandgap cells, solar cell and array technology, heteroepitaxial cells, thermophotovoltaic energy conversion, and space radiation effects. Space flight data on a variety of cells were also presented.

  18. Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darkazalli, G.

    1980-07-01

    Month by month energy transfer data between an occupied residence and its energy supply systems are presented. Energy transfer data are divided into different categories depending on how the energy is consumed. Energy transfers between some system components are also categorized. These components include a flat-plate thermal collector array, a flat-plate photovoltaic array, a dc to ac inverter, thermal storage tanks, and a series heat pump. System operations included directing surplus electrical energy (generated by the photovoltaic array) into the local utility grid. The heat pump used off-peak utility power to chill water during the cooling season.

  19. An inverter/controller subsystem optimized for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, R. L.; Osullivan, G.; Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of solar array dc power to ac power stimulated the specification, design, and simulation testing of an inverter/controller subsystem tailored to the photovoltaic power source characteristics. Optimization of the inverter/controller design is discussed as part of an overall photovoltaic power system designed for maximum energy extraction from the solar array. The special design requirements for the inverter/ controller include: a power system controller (PSC) to control continuously the solar array operating point at the maximum power level based on variable solar insolation and cell temperatures; and an inverter designed for high efficiency at rated load and low losses at light loadings to conserve energy.

  20. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  1. NREL Policy Stacking Theory Correlates Key Indicators with Solar Market Success (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    NREL's Integrated Applications Group evaluated the time-dependent relationships between policy implementation and the success of solar markets using historical data for installed capacity of solar photovoltaic energy systems. This Science and Technology Highlights fact sheet summarizes their research.

  2. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  3. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  4. Photovoltaics: electricity from sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The role of photovoltaic power in the world's energy mix is discussed. The role of the US federal government in the research and development of photovoltaic technology is described as one of undertaking long-range, high-risk research and development in areas that industry is not likely to pursue because of the costs and risks involved. The commercial growth of photovoltaic technology is alluded to briefly, and the basic operating theory of photovoltaic conversion is introduced. Numerous applications of photovoltaic technology are described, including uses in communications, rural electrification, waer pumping, corrosion protectio, navigational aids, and railroads, as well as utility network power. The economics of photovoltaic power are discussed, and the products and technology of the US photovoltaic industry are described. (LEW)

  5. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

  6. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  7. Potential high efficiency solar cells: Applications from space photovoltaic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA involvement in photovoltaic energy conversion research development and applications spans over two decades of continuous progress. Solar cell research and development programs conducted by the Lewis Research Center's Photovoltaic Branch have produced a sound technology base not only for the space program, but for terrestrial applications as well. The fundamental goals which have guided the NASA photovoltaic program are to improve the efficiency and lifetime, and to reduce the mass and cost of photovoltaic energy conversion devices and arrays for use in space. The major efforts in the current Lewis program are on high efficiency, single crystal GaAs planar and concentrator cells, radiation hard InP cells, and superlattice solar cells. A brief historical perspective of accomplishments in high efficiency space solar cells will be given, and current work in all of the above categories will be described. The applicability of space cell research and technology to terrestrial photovoltaics will be discussed.

  8. Photovoltaic-system evaluation at the Northeast Residential Experiment Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Five residential photovoltaic systems were tested and the systems' performance and cost was evaluated. The five systems each consist of an unoccupied structure employing a roof mounted photovoltaic array and a utility connected power inverter capable of sending excess PV generated energy to the local utility system. The photovoltaic systems are designed to meet at least 50% of the total annual electrical demand of residences in the cold climate regions of the country. The following specific issues were investigated: photovoltaic array and inverter system power rating and performance characterization, system energy production, reliability and system cost/worth. Summary load data from five houses in the vicinity of the Northeast Residential Experiment Station, and meteorological data from the station's weather station are also presented.

  9. Decentalized solar photovoltaic energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, M. C.

    1980-09-01

    Environmental data for decentralized solar photovoltaic systems have been generated in support of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems program (TASE). Emphasis has been placed upon the selection and use of a model residential photovoltaic system to develop and quantify the necessary data. The model consists of a reference home located in Phoenix, AZ, utilizing a unique solar cell array-roof shingle combination. Silicon solar cells, rated at 13.5% efficiency at 28/sup 0/C and 100 mW/cm/sup 2/ (AMI) insolation are used to generate approx. 10 kW (peak). An all-electric home is considered with lead-acid battery storage, dc-ac inversion and utility backup. The reference home is compared to others in regions of different insolation. Major material requirements, scaled to quad levels of end-use energy include significant quantities of silicon, copper, lead, antimony, sulfuric acid and plastics. Operating residuals generated are negligible with the exception of those from the storage battery due to a short (10-year) lifetime. A brief general discussion of other environmental, health, and safety and resource availability impacts is presented. It is suggested that solar cell materials production and fabrication may have the major environmental impact when comparing all facets of photovoltaic system usage. Fabrication of the various types of solar cell systems involves the need, handling, and transportation of many toxic and hazardous chemicals with attendant health and safety impacts. Increases in production of such materials as lead, antimony, sulfuric acid, copper, plastics, cadmium and gallium will be required should large scale usage of photovoltaic systems be implemented.

  10. Photovoltaic Power for the Nanosat Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, B.H.

    1999-06-01

    This report describes the characteristics of photovoltaic arrays that maybe suitable for use with nanosatellite electronic systems. It includes a thorough literature search on power management and distribution systems for satellites as small as microsatellites. The major conclusion to be drawn is that it is the total system, including satellite electronic system, photovoltaic systems, peak power tracker and the power management and distribution systems which need to be optimized. An example of a peak power tracker is given, and a novel series connected boost unit is described which might allow the system voltage to be increased if enough photovoltaic panels to operate the systems in real time is impractical. Finally, it is recommended that the development effort be oriented and expanded to include a peak power tracker and other power management and distribution systems.

  11. Economical photovoltaic power generation with heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, G.

    1977-01-01

    Three designs for conversion of solar radiation to electricity and thermal energy are analyzed. The objective of these converters is to increase the electric and thermal output for each photovoltaic array so as to lower the cell cost relative to the amount of energy delivered. An analysis of the economical aspects of conversion by photovoltaic cells with heat recovery is carried out in terms of hypothetical examples. Thus, it is shown that the original cost of say $40,000 per generated kilowat can be reduced to $572.00 per kilowatt by increasing the original electric output of 1 kW to 10 kW in electricity and 60 kW in thermal energy. The newly derived specific cost is only 1.4 percent of the original one. It is expected that a cost reduction of roughly 2% of the present specific cost per kilowatt will greatly stimulate public acceptance of photovoltaic terrestrial conversion to electricity.

  12. Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    F-13 PHOTOGRAPHS 1 Langmuir Probe Sweep .... ............ E-35 2 HVPS , Set #1, 50V Noise .... ........... E-35 3 HVPS , Set #1, 300V Noise...E-35 4 HVPS , Set #1, 500V Noise ... .......... E-35 5 HVPS , Set #2, 50V Noise .... ........... E-36 6 HVPS , Set #2, 150V Noise ... .......... E...36 7 HVPS , Set #2, 300V Noise ... .......... E-36 8 HVPS , Set #2, 500V Noise ... .......... E-36 9 In-Rush Current ..... ............... E-37 10

  13. Performance degradation and cleaning of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheskin, T. J.; Chang, G. C.; Cull, R. C.; Knapp, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    NASA tests results from an 18 mo program of cleaning silicone-encapsulated and glass fronted solar cell panels in urban and desert environments to examine the effects of cleaning on module performance are reported. The panels were cleaned on weekly, monthly, quarterly, or semi-annual basis, while other panels of the same construction were not cleaned and served as controls. Commercially-available detergents and city water were employed for the tests, and the measurements were maintained of the modules' continuing short-circuit current output. The decay of the output was determined by least square regression analyses. Performance degradation was noticeably less in glass covered, rather than silicone-encapsulated modules which decayed faster in urban than in desert environments. Lower frequency cleanings are recommended where labor costs are high.

  14. Performance degradation and cleaning of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheskin, T. J.; Chang, G. C.; Cull, R. C.; Knapp, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    NASA tests results from an 18 mo program of cleaning silicone-encapsulated and glass fronted solar cell panels in urban and desert environments to examine the effects of cleaning on module performance are reported. The panels were cleaned on weekly, monthly, quarterly, or semi-annual basis, while other panels of the same construction were not cleaned and served as controls. Commercially-available detergents and city water were employed for the tests, and the measurements were maintained of the modules' continuing short-circuit current output. The decay of the output was determined by least square regression analyses. Performance degradation was noticeably less in glass covered, rather than silicone-encapsulated modules which decayed faster in urban than in desert environments. Lower frequency cleanings are recommended where labor costs are high.

  15. Autonomous photovoltaic-diesel power system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calloway, T. M.

    A methodology for designing an autonomous photovoltaic power system in conjunction with a diesel-fueled electric generator and a battery has been developed. Any photovoltaic array energy not utilized immediately by the load is stored in the battery bank. The diesel generator set is operated periodically at 14-day intervals to ensure its availability and occasionally as needed during winter to supplement combined output from the array and battery. It is hypothesized that logistical support is infrequent, so the hybrid photovoltaic-diesel power system is designed to consume only 10% as much fuel as would a diesel-only system. This constraint is used to generate a set of possible combinations of array area and battery energy storage capacity. For each combination, a battery-life model predicts the time interval between battery replacements by deducting the fraction of total life consumed each day. An economic model then produces life-cycle system cost. Repeating this process for different combinations of array area and battery capacity identifies the minimum-cost system design.

  16. Photovoltaics overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventre, G. G.

    The resource magnitude, types, manufacturing techniques and applications of solar cells are outlined. The first cells were made in the 1950s and cost nearly $1000/W; current large-batch production runs yield a product at about $5/W. Sunlight varies diurnally, seasonally, locally and with atmospheric conditions, and averages around 1 kW/sq m of tilted surface globally. The most advanced cells are made of single and polycrystalline Si materials. Czochralski, edge-defined, dendritic web, heat exchange and Si-on-ceramic wafer cell growth methods are described. Attention is also given to battery storage, power conditioning equipment, and flat plate and concentrating array modules. Most cells are now used on spacecraft, at remote sites and for portable consumer electronics devices drawing less than 100 W. Further research and cost reduction are required to open the large-scale residential and utility markets.

  17. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and

  18. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  19. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... May 2014) 14 Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Infographic Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  20. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... Information Page NINDS Epilepsy Information Page NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page NINDS Farber's Disease Information Page ...

  1. Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts Listen Marijuana is a green, brown, or gray mix of dried, shredded leaves and flowers from the marijuana plant. Marijuana can be rolled up and smoked ...

  2. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  3. Uterine Fibroids Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Uterine fibroids fact sheet (PDF, 950 KB) FDA warning on power morcellators in treatment for uterine ... Topics Uterine fibroids fact sheet (PDF, 950 KB) FDA warning on power morcellators in treatment for uterine ...

  4. Microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutley, Michael C.; Stevens, Richard F.; Daly, Daniel J.

    1992-04-01

    Microlenses have been with us for a long time as indeed the very word lens reminds us. Many early lenses,including those made by Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in the 17th century were small and resembled lentils. Many languages use the same word for both (French tilentillelt and German "Linse") and the connection is only obscure in English because we use the French word for the vegetable and the German for the optic. Many of the applications for arrays of inicrolenses are also well established. Lippmann's work on integral photography at the turn of the century required lens arrays and stimulated an interest that is very much alive today. At one stage, lens arrays played an important part in high speed photography and various schemes have been put forward to take advantage of the compact imaging properties of combinations of lens arrays. The fact that many of these ingenious schemes have not been developed to their full potential has to a large degree been due to the absence of lens arrays of a suitable quality and cost.

  5. Mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1986 work on a new high-performance, light-weight space photovoltaic concentration array has been conducted. An update on the mini-dome lens concentrator array development program is provided. Recent prototype cell and lens test results indicate that near-term array performance goals of 300 w/sq m and 100 w/kg are feasible, and that a longer-term goal of 200 w/kg is reasonable.

  6. Optimal design of aperiodic, vertical silicon nanowire structures for photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2011-09-12

    We design a partially aperiodic, vertically-aligned silicon nanowire array that maximizes photovoltaic absorption. The optimal structure is obtained using a random walk algorithm with transfer matrix method based electromagnetic forward solver. The optimal, aperiodic structure exhibits a 2.35 times enhancement in ultimate efficiency compared to its periodic counterpart. The spectral behavior mimics that of a periodic array with larger lattice constant. For our system, we find that randomly-selected, aperiodic structures invariably outperform the periodic array.

  7. PV concentrator array power costs

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    Photovoltaic concentrator array installed costs per adjusted peak watt (W/sub ap/) have been developed for three leading tracking structure designs using current and expected concentrator module performance. Total installed costs are presented for the arrays for 10/sup 5/m/sup 2//y production and 500 kW/sub p/ field sizes. Array field annual performance and power costs are developed as a function of array spacing using the results of a detailed computer performance code which includes the effects of array shading, series/parallel wiring, bypass diode, maximum power tracking, and PCU voltage limitations. Results indicate installed costs of the three arrays are within 10% of each other. Installed power costs are relatively insensitive to array spacing and are approximately $4/W/sub ap/ with current technology and can be expected to drop to $3 to $3.50/W/sub ap/ with array cost reductions and cell efficiency improvements.

  8. Photovoltaic energy systems: Design and installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buresch, M.

    The characteristics of solar radiation, the design of solar cells, and the installation of Si solar cell arrays for various applications are described. The discussion is limited to medium-scale photovoltaic systems, from 0.1-100 kW peak output, mounted in fixed flat plate modules, the simplest, most maintenance-free concept. Solar cell functioning principles are outlined, including the parasitic mechanisms which reduce cell efficiency. The magnitude, variations, and distribution of the global solar energy input are quantified. Consideration is given to series and parallel connected solar arrays, and to performance under a variable load. Array protection and failure detection are explored, as are integrated array power conditioning equipment comprising energy storage, voltage regulation, and ac to dc converters. Attention is also devoted to array mounting and matching solar cell systems to load.

  9. Method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl

    2013-11-05

    One embodiment of the invention relates to a segmented photovoltaic (PV) module which is manufactured from laminate segments. The segmented PV module includes rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped PV laminates and further includes non-rectangular-shaped laminate segments formed from rectangular-shaped and approximately-triangular-shaped PV laminates. The laminate segments are mechanically joined and electrically interconnected to form the segmented module. Another embodiment relates to a method of manufacturing a large-area segmented photovoltaic module from laminate segments of various shapes. Other embodiments relate to processes for providing a photovoltaic array for installation at a site. Other embodiments and features are also disclosed.

  10. An evaluation facility for photovoltaic water pumping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, J. L.

    A facility for the evaluation of photovoltaic-powered water pumping systems has been installed at Sandia's Photovoltaic Advanced Systems Test Facility (PASTF). This paper describes the facility which consists of an instrumented flow loop capable of handling pumps with capacities up to 90 gpm at simulated well depths up to 400 feet. The pumps can be operated either by a power supply, which permits rapid determination of a pump's operational characteristics, or by a photovoltaic array, which permits simulation of field operation. Data are collected and processed by means of a computer-based data acquisition system. Examples of tests results demonstrating some of the facility's capabilities are presented.

  11. Photovoltaic-electrolyzer system transient simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Metz, P.D.; Michalek, K.

    1986-05-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a Hydrogen Technology Evaluation Center to illustrate advanced hydrogen technology. The first phase of this effort investigated the use of solar energy to produce hydrogen from water via photovoltaic-powered electrolysis. A coordinated program of system testing, computer simulation, and economic analysis has been adopted to characterize and optimize the photovoltaic-electrolyzer system. This paper presents the initial transient simulation results. Innovative features of the modeling include the use of real weather data, detailed hourly modeling of thermal characteristics of the PV array and of system control strategies, and examination of systems over a wide range of power and voltage ratings. The transient simulation system TRNSYS was used, incorporating existing, modified or new component subroutines as required. For directly coupled systems, the authors found the PV array voltage which maximizes hydrogen production to be quite near the nominal electrolyzer voltage for a wide range of PV array powers. The array voltage which maximizes excess electricity production is slightly higher. The use of an ideal (100 percent efficient) maximum power tracking system provides only a six percent increase in annual hydrogen production. An examination of the effect of the PV array tilt indicates, as expected, that annual hydrogen production is insensitive to tilt angle within +-20 deg of latitude. Summer production greatly exceeds winter generation. Tilting the array, even to 90 deg, produces no significant increase in winter hydrogen production.

  12. Photovoltaic-electrolyzer system transient simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Metz, P.D.; Michalek, K.

    1983-12-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is developing an integrated test bed to illustrate advanced hydrogen technology. The first phase of this effort will investigate the use of solar energy to produce hydrogen from water via photovoltaic-powered electrolysis. A coordinated program of system testing, computer simulation, and economic analysis has been adopted to characterize and optimize the photovoltaic-electrolyzer system. This paper presents the initial transient simulation results. Innovative features of the modeling include the use of real weather data, detailed hourly modeling of the thermal characteristics of the PV array and of system control strategies, and examination of systems over a wide range of power and voltage ratings. The transient simulation system TRNSYS was used, incorporating existing, modified or new component subroutines as required. For directly coupled systems, we found the PV array voltage which maximizes hydrogen production to be quite near the nominal electrolyzer voltage for a wide range of PV array powers. The array voltage which maximizes excess electricity production is slightly higher. The use of an ideal (100% efficient) maximum power tracking system provides only a six percent increase in annual hydrogen production. An examination of the effect of PV array tilt indicates, as expected, that annual hydrogen production is insensitive to tilt angle within +- 20/sup 0/ of latitude. Summer production greatly exceeds winter generation. Tilting the array, even to 90/sup 0/, produces no significant increase in winter hydrogen production.

  13. Photovoltaics: The endless spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presented. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  14. Photovoltaic technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the history of photovoltaic devices and a discussion of the cost goals set for photovoltaic modules, the status of photovoltaic technology is assessed. Included are discussions of: current applications, present industrial production, low-cost silicon production techniques, energy payback periods for solar cells, advanced materials research and development, concentrator systems, balance-of-system components. Also discussed are some nontechnical aspects, including foreign markets, US government program approach, and industry attitudes and approaches. (LEW)

  15. Status of the ERDA/NASA photovoltaic tests and applications project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyo, J. N.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    The Tests and Applications Project of the ERDA Photovoltaic Program is concerned with the testing of photovoltaic systems and the growth of their use in real terrestrial applications. This activity is an important complement to the development of low cost solar arrays by providing requirements based on application needs and stimulating markets to create demand to absorb increasing production capacity. A photovoltaic system test facility is now operational, market stimulation has been initiated through applications, and standards for terrestrial cell measurements established.

  16. Facts about Hib Disease. ARC Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX.

    The fact sheet provides basic information about Hib Disease in young children, which may involve a bacterial meningitis causing mental retardation, hearing loss, partial blindness, speech disorders, partial paralysis, behavioral problems, or seizures. Stressed is prevention of Hib Disease through immunization. The question and answer format…

  17. Facts about Hib Disease. ARC Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX.

    The fact sheet provides basic information about Hib Disease in young children, which may involve a bacterial meningitis causing mental retardation, hearing loss, partial blindness, speech disorders, partial paralysis, behavioral problems, or seizures. Stressed is prevention of Hib Disease through immunization. The question and answer format…

  18. Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

    1980-07-01

    Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Details of the study are presented in this volume. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors. Remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

  19. Photovoltaic development in Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrin, E.M.; Duran, J.C.; Frigerio, A.; Moragues, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A critical assessment of the photovoltaic program in Argentina is presented. Research and development activities on photovoltaic cells as well as industrial and technological development are still in the initial stages. Activities accomplished by the Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the Institute of Technology Development for the Chemical industry (INTEC) are briefly described. The evolution of photovoltaic installations in Argentina is analyzed and accumulative data up to 1993 are given. A summary of the potential market for photovoltaic systems in the short and medium term is presented.

  20. Parametric analysis of stand-alone residential photovoltaic systems and the SOLSTOR simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caskey, D. L.; Aronson, E. A.; Murphy, K. D.

    Grid-connected residential photovoltaic (PV) systems have been studied in great detail during the past few years. However, stand-alone systems have received considerably less attention. This paper describes the results of an evaluation of the economic feasibility of stand-alone systems. The SOLSTOR simulation program, developed by Sandia, was the primary analysis tool. The results indicate that stand-alone PV systems offer considerable economic advantage over the fossil-fueled generator systems. This is true even with no escalation of fuel prices, with PV array costs of twice the 1986 DOE goal, with present day battery costs, and in the Northeast as well as in the Southwest part of the United States. The on-site generator was generally used less than 1400 hours per year, and in fact can be eliminated in many cases in the Southwest.

  1. Aeolian removal of dust from photovoltaic surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Marabito, Mark

    1990-01-01

    It is well documented that Mars is totally engulfed in huge dust storms nearly each Martian year. Dust elevated in these global dust storms, or in any of the numerous local dust storms could settle on photovoltaic surfaces and seriously hamper photovoltaic power system performance. Using a recently developed technique to uniformly dust simulated photovoltaic surfaces, samples were subjected to Martian-like winds in an attempt to determine whether natural aeolian processes on Mars would sweep off the settled dust. The effects of wind velocity, angle of attack, height off the Martian surface, and surface coating material were investigated. Principles which can help to guide the design of photovoltaic arrays bound for the Martian surface were uncovered. Most importantly, arrays mounted with an angle of attack approaching 45 deg show the most efficient clearing. Although the angular dependence is not sharp, horizontally mounted arrays required significantly higher wind velocities to clear off the dust. From the perspective of dust-clearing it appears that the arrays may be erected quite near the ground, but previous studies have suggested that saltation effects can be expected to cause such arrays to be covered by sand if they are set up less than about a meter from the ground. Providing that the surface chemistry of Martian dusts is comparable to our test dust, the materials used for protective coating may be optimized for other considerations such as transparency, and chemical or abrasion resistance. The static threshold velocity is low enough that there are regions on Mars which experience winds strong enough to clear off a photovoltaic array if it is properly oriented. Turbulence fences proved to be an ineffective strategy to keep dust cleared from the photovoltaic surfaces.

  2. Manufacturing injection-moleded Fresnel lens parquets for point-focus concentrating photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, E.M.; Masso, J.D.

    1995-10-01

    This project involved the manufacturing of curved-faceted, injection-molded, four-element Fresnel lens parquets for concentrating photovoltaic arrays. Previous efforts showed that high-efficiency (greater than 82%) Fresnel concentrators could be injection molded. This report encompasses the mold design, molding, and physical testing of a four-lens parquet for a solar photovoltaic concentrator system.

  3. Photovoltaic applications of Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, R.

    1975-01-01

    The use of a compound parabolic concentrator as field collector, in conjunction with a primary focusing concentrator for photovoltaic applications is studied. The primary focusing concentrator can be a parabolic reflector, an array of Fresnel mirrors, a Fresnel lens or some other lens. Silicon solar cell grid structures are proposed that increase efficiency with concentration up to 10 suns. A ray tracing program has been developed to determine energy distribution at the exit of a compound parabolic concentrator. Projected total cost of a CPC/solar cell system will be between 4 and 5 times lower than for flat plate silicon cell arrays.

  4. Making America's Buildings Better (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies program. Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy? In fact, buildings consume more than 70% of the electricity and more than 50% of the natural gas Americans use. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Technologies Program (BTP) is working to improve building energy performance through high-impact research, out-reach, and regulatory efforts. These efforts will result in affordable, high-performance homes and commercial buildings. These grid-connected buildings will be more energy efficient than today's typical buildings, with renewable energy providing a portion of the power needs. They will combine energy-smart 'whole building' design and construction, appliances and equipment that minimize plug loads, and cost-effective photovoltaics or other on-site energy systems.

  5. Simulation and simplified design studies of photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.L.; Facinelli, W.A.; Koehler, L.P.

    1980-09-01

    Results of TRNSYS simulations of photovoltaic systems with electrical storage are described. Studies of the sensitivity of system performance, in terms of the fraction of the electrical load supplied by the solar energy system, to variables such as array size, battery size, location, time of year, and load shape are reported. An accurate simplified method for predicting array output of max-power photovoltaic systems is presented. A second simplified method, which estimates the overall performance of max-power systems, is developed. Finally, a preliminary technique for predicting clamped-voltage system performance is discussed.

  6. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  7. Photovoltaics for residential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)

  8. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  9. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  10. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  11. Characterization of Photovoltaic Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values…

  12. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2016-07-12

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  13. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2012-07-02

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  14. Photovoltaics industry profile

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  15. Characterization of Photovoltaic Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values…

  16. Proceedings of the First ERDA Semiannual Solar Photovoltaic Conversion Program Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Organization, basic research and applied technology for the Solar Photovoltaic Conversion Program are outlined. The program aims to provide a technology base for low cost thin film solar cells and solar arrays.

  17. AIDS Fact Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The three fact sheets presented in this document address issues surrounding adolescent sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first fact sheet, "Young Women and AIDS: A Worldwide Perspective," suggests that since open discussions of adolescent sexuality have long been…

  18. Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Listen Heroin is a white ... Español English Español PDF Version Download "I needed heroin just to get by." ©istock.com/ pixelheadphoto Deon ...

  19. Facts for Feeding Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    This document compiles several fact sheets, in multiple languages, for mothers and parent educators providing information and answering questions concerning breastfeeding infants. The fact sheets are published in English, French, and Spanish, and cover the following topics: (1) "Recommended Practices To Improve Infant Nutrition during the…

  20. Assessing Basic Fact Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kling, Gina; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors share a variety of ways to formatively assess basic fact fluency. The define fluency, raise some issues related to timed testing, and then share a collection of classroom-tested ideas for authentic fact fluency assessment. This article encourages teachers to try a variety of alternative assessments from this sampling,…