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Sample records for photovoltaic spectral responsivity

  1. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  2. Spectral response characteristics of photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanselman, Daniel L.

    The most efficient solar modules use multiple materials of slightly varying composition and electronic characteristics to convert different bandwidths of the solar spectrum into usable electricity. Cells made in this fashion generally require very expensive, high precision equipment leading to a high cost of the modules. It has been suggested that an optical system be used to disperse the sunlight into its constituent wavelengths (see Conte et. al. (1989)[22]) with different materials strategically placed under the appropriate bandwidth of light to produce higher efficiency, low cost modules. The proper selection and placement of materials requires detailed knowledge of the response of various materials to different wavelengths of light. Solid State Theory calculates this response through complicated mathematical models describing the band structure of the materials and the density of states for charge carriers. The research described herein defines this response through experiment. The experiment designed for this research examines the response of commercially available photovoltaic cells of various materials. Concentrated sunlight is passed through filters with known transmittance to illuminate a photovoltaic cell. The incident irradiance, and thereby the incident power, on the cell is recorded as well as the power output by the cell. These two powers are compared for each filter, and the results are plotted as efficiency vs. wavelength providing an experimental check for theoretical calculations. This experiment can be performed on any photovoltaic material of interest to determine optimal material selection and placement under the dispersed sunlight for a solar module. The combination of the methods developed in this research and the optics described in the paper by Conte et. al. can be used to produce an inexpensive, high efficiency solar module.

  3. Multijunction organic photovoltaics with a broad spectral response.

    PubMed

    Macko, Jill A; Lunt, Richard R; Osedach, Timothy P; Brown, Patrick R; Barr, Miles C; Gleason, Karen K; Bulovic, Vladimir

    2012-11-14

    We demonstrate series-integrated multijunction organic photovoltaics fabricated monolithically by vapor-deposition in a transposed subcell order with the near-infrared-absorbing subcell in front of the green-absorbing subcell. This transposed subcell order is enabled by the highly complementary absorption spectra of a near-infrared-absorbing visibly-transparent subcell and a visible-absorbing subcell and motivated by the non-spatially-uniform optical intensity in nanoscale photovoltaics. The subcell order and thicknesses are optimized via transfer-matrix formalism and short-circuit current simulations. An efficient charge recombination zone consisting of layers of BCP/Ag/MoOx leads to negligible voltage and series-resistance losses. Under 1-sun illumination the multijunction solar cells exhibit a power conversion efficiency of 5.5 ± 0.2% with an FF of 0.685 ± 0.002 and a V(OC) of 1.65 ± 0.02 V, corresponding to the sum of the V(OC) of the component subcells. These devices exhibit a broad spectral response (in the wavelength range of 350 nm to 850 nm) but are limited by subcell external quantum efficiencies between 20% and 30% over the photoactive spectrum.

  4. Application of digital micromirror devices for spectral-response characterization of solar cells and photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Alexandre Y.

    2010-02-01

    A key parameter in evaluating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) solar cells is characterization of electrical response to various incident source spectra. Conventional techniques utilize monochromators that emit single band-passes across a spectral region of interest. Since many solar cells respond differently at different broadband source light levels, a white bias light source that raises the overall light level to simulate the sun's broadband emission is typically introduced. However, such sources cannot render realistic solar continua. We present some initial results demonstrating how a spectrally-dispersed broadband source modulated with Texas Instruments' Digital Light Projection (DLP®) technology can be used to more faithfully synthesize solar spectra for this application.

  5. Spectral responsivity measurement of photovoltaic detectors by comparison with a pyroelectric detector on individual nano-second laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kee-Suk; Park, Seongchong; Hwang, Jisoo; Atkinson, Errol; Manson, Peter; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the individual single pulse of a nano-second laser can be used to measure the spectral responsivity of photovoltaic detectors. With this new scheme, the relative spectral responsivity of a photodiode can be determined from the spectral reflectance of the surface of a pyroelectric detector. We also developed the adequate data acquisition procedure, which can eliminate systematic errors caused by the nonlinear pulse response. The method is experimentally demonstrated for Si and Ge photodiodes in a wide wavelength range from 420 nm to 1600 nm and verified by comparison with the method using a CW source.

  6. Spectral response measurement of double-junction thin-film photovoltaic devices: the impact of shunt resistance and bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravettoni, Mauro; Galleano, Roberto; Virtuani, Alessandro; Müllejans, Harald; Dunlop, Ewan D.

    2011-04-01

    Multijunction photovoltaic (PV) thin-film modules are becoming more and more important on the market, due to their low cost and improved module efficiency now well above 10%. The spectral response (SR) measurement of multijunction thin-film cells presents additional challenges with respect to the SR measurement procedure for single-junction devices. Several works have appeared in the last 15 years in the PV literature, describing certain measurement artefacts that typically appear when measuring the SR of multijunction cells without applying an appropriate voltage bias to the entire cell. In this paper, the authors revise the theoretical description of SR measurements on multijunction devices, show how to detect the possible origin of measurement artefacts from the dark SR and show why bias voltage sometimes is not enough to avoid such artefacts or why it is not even necessary. An experimental confirmation of the theoretical approach is finally given.

  7. Versatile light-emitting-diode-based spectral response measurement system for photovoltaic device characterization.

    PubMed

    Hamadani, Behrang H; Roller, John; Dougherty, Brian; Yoon, Howard W

    2012-07-01

    An absolute differential spectral response measurement system for solar cells is presented. The system couples an array of light emitting diodes with an optical waveguide to provide large area illumination. Two unique yet complementary measurement methods were developed and tested with the same measurement apparatus. Good agreement was observed between the two methods based on testing of a variety of solar cells. The first method is a lock-in technique that can be performed over a broad pulse frequency range. The second method is based on synchronous multifrequency optical excitation and electrical detection. An innovative scheme for providing light bias during each measurement method is discussed.

  8. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predictedmore » to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.« less

  9. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predicted to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.

  10. Spectral splitting photovoltaics using perovskite and wideband dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Takumi; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Joong Jeon, Nam; Giordano, Fabrizio; Abate, Antonio; Uchida, Satoshi; Kubo, Takaya; Seok, Sang Il; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The extension of the light absorption of photovoltaics into the near-infrared region is important to increase the energy conversion efficiency. Although the progress of the lead halide perovskite solar cells is remarkable, and high conversion efficiency of >20% has been reached, their absorption limit on the long-wavelength side is ~800 nm. To further enhance the conversion efficiency of perovskite-based photovoltaics, a hybridized system with near-infrared photovoltaics is a useful approach. Here we report a panchromatic sensitizer, coded DX3, that exhibits a broad response into the near-infrared, up to ~1100 nm, and a photocurrent density exceeding 30 mA cm-2 in simulated air mass 1.5 standard solar radiation. Using the DX3-based dye-sensitized solar cell in conjunction with a perovskite cell that harvests visible light, the hybridized mesoscopic photovoltaics achieved a conversion efficiency of 21.5% using a system of spectral splitting.

  11. Enhanced photovoltaic energy conversion using thermally based spectral shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, David M.; Lenert, Andrej; Chan, Walker R.; Bhatia, Bikram; Celanović, Ivan; Soljačić, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-06-01

    Solar thermophotovoltaic devices have the potential to enhance the performance of solar energy harvesting by converting broadband sunlight to narrow-band thermal radiation tuned for a photovoltaic cell. A direct comparison of the operation of a photovoltaic with and without a spectral converter is the most critical indicator of the promise of this technology. Here, we demonstrate enhanced device performance through the suppression of 80% of unconvertible photons by pairing a one-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitter with a tandem plasma-interference optical filter. We measured a solar-to-electrical conversion rate of 6.8%, exceeding the performance of the photovoltaic cell alone. The device operates more efficiently while reducing the heat generation rates in the photovoltaic cell by a factor of two at matching output power densities. We determined the theoretical limits, and discuss the implications of surpassing the Shockley-Queisser limit. Improving the performance of an unaltered photovoltaic cell provides an important framework for the design of high-efficiency solar energy converters.

  12. Spectral losses of high concentrator photovoltaic modules depending on latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Moya, Alberto; Fernández, Eduardo F.; Almonacid, Florencia; Mallick, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    High concentrator photovoltaic (HCPV) modules and systems are affected by changes on the incident solar spectrum. It is well known that among all the atmospheric parameters, the air mass has the largest impact on the spectral behavior of HCPV devices. The air mass can be considered as a geometrical parameter which depends entirely on the Sun's zenith angle (θ). Because of this, the yield of HCPV modules is affected by latitude. In this paper, a new method to estimate the gains/losses of energy due to the spectral impact has been introduced. Furthermore, the annual spectral losses depending on latitude have been calculated for several theoretical modules. For default values defined in the standard AM1.5d ASTM G-173-03 spectrum, results show that the spectral losses are almost independent of latitude for locations with low latitude values. Losses between 3% and 5% on the annual energy yield have been estimated for those areas. For high latitudes, the losses increase until they reach values between 10% and 14%. Results depend on the multi-junction solar cells and optical devices of the HCPV module considered.

  13. Spectral dependence of carrier lifetimes in silicon for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, John F.; Li, Yu-Tai; Dagenais, Mario; Hamadani, Behrang H.

    2016-12-01

    Charge carrier lifetimes in photovoltaic-grade silicon wafers were measured by a spectral-dependent, quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique. Narrow bandwidth light emitting diodes were used to excite excess charge carriers within the material, and the effective lifetimes of these carriers were measured as a function of wavelength and intensity. The dependence of the effective lifetime on the excitation wavelength was then analyzed within the context of an analytical model relating effective lifetime to the bulk lifetime and surface recombination velocity of the material. The agreement between the model and the experimental data provides validation for this technique to be used at various stages of the solar cell production line to investigate the quality of the passivation layers and the bulk properties of the material.

  14. Spectral splitting photovoltaics using perovskite and wideband dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takumi; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Jeon, Nam Joong; Giordano, Fabrizio; Abate, Antonio; Uchida, Satoshi; Kubo, Takaya; Seok, Sang Il; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-05

    The extension of the light absorption of photovoltaics into the near-infrared region is important to increase the energy conversion efficiency. Although the progress of the lead halide perovskite solar cells is remarkable, and high conversion efficiency of >20% has been reached, their absorption limit on the long-wavelength side is ∼800 nm. To further enhance the conversion efficiency of perovskite-based photovoltaics, a hybridized system with near-infrared photovoltaics is a useful approach. Here we report a panchromatic sensitizer, coded DX3, that exhibits a broad response into the near-infrared, up to ∼1100 nm, and a photocurrent density exceeding 30 mA cm(-2) in simulated air mass 1.5 standard solar radiation. Using the DX3-based dye-sensitized solar cell in conjunction with a perovskite cell that harvests visible light, the hybridized mesoscopic photovoltaics achieved a conversion efficiency of 21.5% using a system of spectral splitting.

  15. Spectral splitting photovoltaics using perovskite and wideband dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Takumi; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Joong Jeon, Nam; Giordano, Fabrizio; Abate, Antonio; Uchida, Satoshi; Kubo, Takaya; Seok, Sang Il; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The extension of the light absorption of photovoltaics into the near-infrared region is important to increase the energy conversion efficiency. Although the progress of the lead halide perovskite solar cells is remarkable, and high conversion efficiency of >20% has been reached, their absorption limit on the long-wavelength side is ∼800 nm. To further enhance the conversion efficiency of perovskite-based photovoltaics, a hybridized system with near-infrared photovoltaics is a useful approach. Here we report a panchromatic sensitizer, coded DX3, that exhibits a broad response into the near-infrared, up to ∼1100 nm, and a photocurrent density exceeding 30 mA cm−2 in simulated air mass 1.5 standard solar radiation. Using the DX3-based dye-sensitized solar cell in conjunction with a perovskite cell that harvests visible light, the hybridized mesoscopic photovoltaics achieved a conversion efficiency of 21.5% using a system of spectral splitting. PMID:26538097

  16. Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-19

    ferroelectric PbTiO3 via direct coupling to its intrinsic photovoltaic response. Using time-resolved x-ray scattering to visualize atomic displacements on...addressing a key obstruction towards the goal of memory devices both written to and read out by light. Page 13 of 21   Acknowledgements Portions

  17. Photoconductive and photovoltaic response of high-dark-resistivity 6H-SiC devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Pak S.; Goldhar, Julius; Lee, Chi H.; Saddow, Stephen E.; Neudeck, Philip

    1995-01-01

    The optoelectronic properties of high-resistivity p-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) have been investigated using lateral photoconductive switches. Both photovoltaic and photoconductive effects are reported, measured at 337 nm, which is above the 6H-SiC absorption edge. These photoconductive switches have been fabricated with dark resistances of up to 1 M omega; photoconductive switching efficiencies of more than 80% have been achieved. In addition, these devices displayed a high-speed photovoltaic response to nanosecond laser excitations in the ultraviolet spectral region; in particular, the observed photovoltaic response pulse width can be shorter than the exciting laser pulse width. This subnanosecond photovoltaic response has been modeled and good qualitative agreement with experiment has been obtained.

  18. Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Daranciang, Dan

    2012-02-15

    We show that light drives large-amplitude structural changes in thin films of the prototypical ferroelectric PbTiO3 via direct coupling to its intrinsic photovoltaic response. Using time-resolved x-ray scattering to visualize atomic displacements on femtosecond timescales, photoinduced changes in the unit-cell tetragonality are observed. These are driven by the motion of photogenerated free charges within the ferroelectric and can be simply explained by a model including both shift and screening currents, associated with the displacement of electrons first antiparallel to and then parallel to the ferroelectric polarization direction.

  19. Influence of the spectral distribution of light on the characteristics of photovoltaic panel. Comparison between simulation and experimental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadel, Meriem; Bouzaki, Mohammed Moustafa; Chadel, Asma; Petit, Pierre; Sawicki, Jean-Paul; Aillerie, Michel; Benyoucef, Boumediene

    2017-02-01

    We present and analyze experimental results obtained with a laboratory setup based on a hardware and smart instrumentation for the complete study of performance of PV panels using for illumination an artificial radiation source (Halogen lamps). Associated to an accurate analysis, this global experimental procedure allows the determination of effective performance under standard conditions thanks to a simulation process originally developed under Matlab software environment. The uniformity of the irradiated surface was checked by simulation of the light field. We studied the response of standard commercial photovoltaic panels under enlightenment measured by a spectrometer with different spectra for two sources, halogen lamps and sunlight. Then, we bring a special attention to the influence of the spectral distribution of light on the characteristics of photovoltaic panel, that we have performed as a function of temperature and for different illuminations with dedicated measurements and studies of the open circuit voltage and short-circuit current.

  20. On the spectral response of PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J. Y.; Guo, S.; Walsh, T. M.; Hishikawa, Y.; Stangl, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    The spectral response of silicon wafer based and thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules is studied using simulation and experimental methods. Circuit simulations show that the module spectral response (SR) depends on (1) the SR of the cells, (2) the shunt resistance Rshunt of the cells, and (3) the bypass diodes of the module. For realistic Rshunt values, the module SR is significantly higher than the minimal SR of the individual cells (which would be the module SR in the case of infinite Rshunt). Round-robin tests using different experimental methods (partial illumination and full-area illumination) to determine the SR of a wafer-based module and a thin-film silicon module were conducted. Both SR methods are found to agree reasonably well. However, circuit simulations indicate that if only one cell, or a few cells, within the module have significantly different characteristics but not known, the results may differ considerably. The partial illumination method can access the SR of the individual cells within a module, but it possibly requires a long measurement time in order to measure the SR and Rshunt of each cell for confirming the SR of the whole module. In contrast, full-area illumination methods measure the module SR directly, but they cannot access the cell SRs if problematic cells exist. An uncertainty analysis of the full-area illumination method is conducted, which reveals that—if the calibrated reference cell is chosen properly—the calibration uncertainty of the reference cell itself is the main source of uncertainty.

  1. Photovoltaic Systems Based on Spectrally Selective Holographic Concentrators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    in the choice of materials for space applications, but that there are ample candidate materials that have long life with high stability in a space...3.0 3.2 Blue Red Wavelength, prm Spectral intensities of the extraterrestral and air mass one (sun directly overhead, measured at sea level) direct

  2. Spectral splitting optimization for high-efficiency solar photovoltaic and thermal power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, David M.; Lenert, Andrej; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the full solar spectrum is desirable to enhance the conversion efficiency of a solar power generator. In practice, this can be achieved through spectral splitting between multiple converters in parallel. However, it is unclear which wavelength bands should be directed to each converter in order to maximize the efficiency. We developed a model of an ideal hybrid solar converter which utilizes both a single-junction photovoltaic cell and a thermal engine. We determined the limiting efficiencies of this hybrid strategy and the corresponding optimum spectral bandwidth directed to the photovoltaic cell. This optimum width is inversely proportional to the thermal engine efficiency and scales with the bandgap of the photovoltaic cell. This bandwidth was also obtained analytically through an entropy minimization scheme and matches well with our model. We show that the maximum efficiency of the system occurs when it minimizes the spectral entropy generation. This concept can be extended to capture generalized non-idealities to increase the usefulness of this technique for a range of full solar spectrum utilization technologies.

  3. Photovoltaic systems based on spectrally selective holographic concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludman, Jacques E.; Sampson, John L.; Bradbury, Rudolph A.; Martin, Jose G.; Riccobono, Juanita R.; Sliker, Guy; Rallis, Evangelos

    1992-05-01

    A holographic device has been developed that greatly improves the efficiency of solar energy conversion. The single-element hologram focuses light to the side and also spectrally splits it. The output appears as a thin concentrated line, focused perpendicular to the hologram and displaced to the side. Different wavelengths are diffracted, concentrated, and dispersed to different locations on the line which resembles an elegant rainbow in the visible. The hologram lets each of two or more different solar cells absorb only those wavelengths which can efficiently convert to electric power. The device also prevents overheating by diffracting unwanted infrared radiation away from the cells. The side focus eliminates shadow effects, and cooling is easy, since the cells are not cascaded and the heat load is minimal. This novel system is ideal for concentrated, split-spectrum, high efficiency solar power generation.

  4. Point-focus spectral splitting solar concentrator for multiple cells concentrating photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragliano, Carlo; Chiesa, Matteo; Stefancich, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present and experimentally validate a low-cost design of a spectral splitting concentrator for the efficient conversion of solar energy. The optical device consists of a dispersive prismatic lens made of polycarbonate designed to simultaneously concentrate solar light and split it into its spectral components. With respect to our previous implementation, this device concentrates light along two axes and generates a light pattern compatible with the dimensions of a set of concentrating photovoltaic cells, while providing a higher concentration ratio. The mathematical framework and the constructive approach used for the design are presented and the device performance is simulated using ray-tracing software. We obtain spectral separation in the visible range within a 3 × 1 cm2 area and a maximum concentration of 210× for a single wavelength. The device is fabricated by injection molding and its performance is experimentally investigated. We measure an optical transmissivity above 90% in the range 400-800 nm and we observe a spectral distribution in good accordance with simulations. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of the device for cost effective high efficiency concentrated photovoltaic systems.

  5. A high temperature hybrid photovoltaic-thermal receiver employing spectral beam splitting for linear solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojiri, Ahmad; Stanley, Cameron; Rosengarten, Gary

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV-T) solar collectors are capable of delivering heat and electricity concurrently. Implementing such receivers in linear concentrators for high temperature applications need special considerations such as thermal decoupling of the photovoltaic (pv) cells from the thermal receiver. Spectral beam splitting of concentrated light provides an option for achieving this purpose. In this paper we introduce a relatively simple hybrid receiver configuration that spectrally splits the light between a high temperature thermal fluid and silicon pv cells using volumetric light filtering by semi-conductor doped glass and propylene glycol. We analysed the optical performance of this device theoretically using ray tracing and experimentally through the construction and testing of a full scale prototype. The receiver was mounted on a commercial parabolic trough concentrator in an outdoor experiment. The prototype receiver delivered heat and electricity at total thermal efficiency of 44% and electrical efficiency of 3.9% measured relative to the total beam energy incident on the primary mirror.

  6. Performance of a split-spectrum photovoltaic device operating under time-varying spectral conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrey, E. R.; Ruden, P. P.; Cohen, P. I.

    2011-04-01

    The performance of a split-spectrum photovoltaic device using a lateral array of single-junction photovoltaic cells and holographic films to carry out spectral splitting and concentration is analyzed. The performance of an idealized device is determined under time-varying spectral conditions. Detailed balance efficiency maxima are calculated at a concentration of 100 suns for 2-, 3-, and 4-cell arrays, optimized for the AM 1.5 direct-plus-circumsolar spectrum and operating under a range of clear-sky spectra generated using SMARTS 2.9.5 for a location near Flagstaff, Arizona. Operating efficiencies of these arrays are examined for two electrical configurations: one in which the cells are assumed to remain electrically isolated and a second in which the cells are placed in series. Gains in the operating efficiency are demonstrated for the isolated configuration with respect to the series configuration. These vary with cell count and over the course of the year, ranging from 7.3% in June to 10.3% in December for a 2-cell array, from 6.2% in June to 10.8% in December for a 3-cell array, and from 7.0% in June to 12.1% in December for a 4-cell array.

  7. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (includingthe level of out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors to a known source of electromagnetic radiation individually. This was determined by measuring the interferometric output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. Knowledge of the relative variations in the spectral response between HFI detectors allows for a more thorough analysis of the HFI data. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. While previous papers describe the pre-flight experiments conducted on the Planck HFI, this paper focusses on the analysis of the pre-flight spectral response measurements and the derivation of data products, e.g. band-average spectra, unit conversion coefficients, and colour correction coefficients, all with related uncertainties. Verifications of the HFI spectral response data are provided through comparisons with photometric HFI flight data. This validation includes use of HFI zodiacal emission observations to demonstrate out-of-band spectral signal rejection better than 108. The accuracy of the HFI relative spectral response data is verified through comparison with complementary flight-data based unit conversion coefficients and colour correction

  8. Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin FEM: Spectral Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, R.; Omidi, O.; Clarke, P. L.

    2014-11-01

    Materials in nature demonstrate certain spectral shapes in terms of their material properties. Since successful experimental demonstrations in 2000, metamaterials have provided a means to engineer materials with desired spectral shapes for their material properties. Computational tools are employed in two different aspects for metamaterial modeling: 1. Mircoscale unit cell analysis to derive and possibly optimize material's spectral response; 2. macroscale to analyze their interaction with conventional material. We compare two different approaches of Time-Domain (TD) and Frequency Domain (FD) methods for metamaterial applications. Finally, we discuss advantages of the TD method of Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (FEM) for spectral analysis of metamaterials.

  9. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Silverman, John; McDowell, Jonathan; Callanan, Paul; Snowden, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is 'wobbled', possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC (an x ray spectral fitting package) response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how, the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  10. Optically functional nanomaterials: Optothermally responsive composites and carbon nanotube photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, David Christopher

    The utilization of light to produce useful responses holds much potential for changing the world through smart materials and photovoltaic systems. We report the utilization of a variety of carbon nanotube composites as photovoltaic devices or as optothermal materials for the controlled placement of heat. Toward carbon nanotube - polymer photovoltaics we have successfully shown supramolecular compatibilization and functional bilayer devices. Optothermal processes are shown to manipulate a variety of system variables: surface energy, surface tension, and pressure. By manipulating these variables interesting responses are produced. Optothermal surface energy control produced wettability switches of 70º on composite surfaces. Optothermally modulated surface tensions of fluids converted light into work in the form of controlled linear motion, rotational motion, and volumetric expansion. Optothermally heated liquids confined within impermeable microcapsules resulted in the phototriggerable release of chemicals on demand. This release allowed small molecule reactions and polymerizations to be remotely initiated in a spatially selective manner. These results lay the framework for the expansion of the field of advanced optothermally responsive materials.

  11. Calibration of the ROSAT HRI Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT High Resolution Imager has a limited (2-band) spectral response. This spectral capability can give X-ray hardness ratios on spatial scales of 5 arcseconds. The spectral response of the center of the detector was calibrated before the launch of ROSAT, but the gain decreases-with time and also is a function of position on the detector. To complicate matters further, the satellite is "wobbled", possibly moving a source across several spatial gain states. These difficulties have prevented the spectral response of the ROSAT HRI from being used for scientific measurements. We have used Bright Earth data and in-flight calibration sources to map the spatial and temporal gain changes, and written software which will allow ROSAT users to generate a calibrated XSPEC response matrix and hence determine a calibrated hardness ratio. In this report, we describe the calibration procedure and show how to obtain a response matrix. In Section 2 we give an overview of the calibration procedure, in Section 3 we give a summary of HRI spatial and temporal gain variations. Section 4 describes the routines used to determine the gain distribution of a source. In Sections 5 and 6, we describe in detail how the Bright Earth database and calibration sources are used to derive a corrected response matrix for a given observation. Finally, Section 7 describes how to use the software.

  12. Swift/BAT Calibration and Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard NASA#s Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is a large coded aperture gamma-ray telescope consisting of a 2.4 m (8#) x 1.2 m (4#) coded aperture mask supported 1 meter above a 5200 square cm area detector plane containing 32,768 individual 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm CZT detectors. The BAT is now completely assembled and integrated with the Swift spacecraft in anticipation of an October 2004 launch. Extensive ground calibration measurements using a variety of radioactive sources have resulted in a moderately high fidelity model for the BAT spectral and photometric response. This paper describes these ground calibration measurements as well as related computer simulations used to study the efficiency and individual detector properties of the BAT detector array. The creation of a single spectral response model representative of the fully integrated BAT posed an interesting challenge and is at the heart of the public analysis tool #batdrmgen# which computes a response matrix for any given sky position within the BAT FOV. This paper will describe the batdrmgen response generator tool and conclude with a description of the on-orbit calibration plans as well as plans for the future improvements needed to produce the more detailed spectral response model that is required for the construction of an all-sky hard x-ray survey.

  13. Swift/BAT Calibration and Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard NASA#s Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is a large coded aperture gamma-ray telescope consisting of a 2.4 m (8#) x 1.2 m (4#) coded aperture mask supported 1 meter above a 5200 square cm area detector plane containing 32,768 individual 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm CZT detectors. The BAT is now completely assembled and integrated with the Swift spacecraft in anticipation of an October 2004 launch. Extensive ground calibration measurements using a variety of radioactive sources have resulted in a moderately high fidelity model for the BAT spectral and photometric response. This paper describes these ground calibration measurements as well as related computer simulations used to study the efficiency and individual detector properties of the BAT detector array. The creation of a single spectral response model representative of the fully integrated BAT posed an interesting challenge and is at the heart of the public analysis tool #batdrmgen# which computes a response matrix for any given sky position within the BAT FOV. This paper will describe the batdrmgen response generator tool and conclude with a description of the on-orbit calibration plans as well as plans for the future improvements needed to produce the more detailed spectral response model that is required for the construction of an all-sky hard x-ray survey.

  14. Optics-based approach to thermal management of photovoltaics: Selective-spectral and radiative cooling

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xingshu; Silverman, Timothy J.; Zhou, Zhiguang; ...

    2017-01-20

    For commercial one-sun solar modules, up to 80% of the incoming sunlight may be dissipated as heat, potentially raising the temperature 20-30 °C higher than the ambient. In the long term, extreme self-heating erodes efficiency and shortens lifetime, thereby dramatically reducing the total energy output. Therefore, it is critically important to develop effective and practical (and preferably passive) cooling methods to reduce operating temperature of photovoltaic (PV) modules. In this paper, we explore two fundamental (but often overlooked) origins of PV self-heating, namely, sub-bandgap absorption and imperfect thermal radiation. The analysis suggests that we redesign the optical properties of themore » solar module to eliminate parasitic absorption (selective-spectral cooling) and enhance thermal emission (radiative cooling). Comprehensive opto-electro-thermal simulation shows that the proposed techniques would cool one-sun terrestrial solar modules up to 10 °C. As a result, this self-cooling would substantially extend the lifetime for solar modules, with corresponding increase in energy yields and reduced levelized cost of electricity.« less

  15. Broad spectral sensitivity and improved efficiency in CuPc/Sub-Pc organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Hemant; Kumar, Pankaj; Bhardwaj, Ramil; Sharma, G. D.; Chand, Suresh; Jain, S. C.; Kumar, Vikram

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate organic photovoltaic devices incorporating two donors, namely, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and boron sub-phthalocyanine chloride (Sub-Pc) in association with single acceptor fullerene (C60) with sensitivity extending across the visible solar spectrum. It has been found that the absorption in different spectral regions in CuPc and Sub-Pc results in efficient harvesting of incident light photons which leads to enhanced power conversion efficiency (η). An enhancement in η from 0.64%, in the device architecture indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/CuPc(20 nm)/C60(40 nm)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen) (8 nm)/Al(150 nm), to ~1.3% in the optimized device having a 2 nm layer of Sub-Pc in the geometry ITO/CuPc(18 nm)/Sub-Pc(2 nm)/C60 (40 nm)/BPhen (8 nm)/Al(150 nm) has been observed. This enhancement in η is dominantly attributed to the increment in short circuit current density (Jsc) due to efficient photon harvesting by incorporation of dual donors.

  16. Spectral response of microbolometers for hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honniball, Casey I.; Wright, Rob; Lucey, Paul G.

    2017-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technique with a growing list of applications and potential users, as this technique combines the power of imaging with the chemical discrimination of spectroscopy. Because HSI divides light from the scene into narrow slices of wavelength, the technique is typically thought to require cryogenic arrays to achieve the ultimate sensitivity. However, within the last two decades microbolometer arrays have improved in sensitivity, pixel count and total array area. In Hawai'i we have shown that microbolometer arrays can provide sufficient sensitivities for a variety of infrared HSI applications. The ability of microbolometer arrays to operate at ambient-temperature make them attractive candidates for low power applications, including space-based instruments on small satellites. We have two NASA projects to determine the suitability of uncooled microbolometers for HSI systems with the aim of HSI measurements from smaller satellites than is possible with cryogenic instruments. The suitability of a detector is governed in part by its spectral response. Microbolometers have wide variations in spectral response by technology and vendor, as part of our NASA projects we are conducting a spectral response measurement campaign on five different microbolometer cameras. Three of the cameras are sensitive to the long-wave infrared from 7.5 to 14 microns (two FLIR cameras and a Sofradir camera), one to the mid-wave infrared from 3 to 5 microns (LumaSense camera), and the last is sensitive to both regions from 3 to 14 microns (INO camera). Results from this campaign will be presented.

  17. Sunlight Simulator for Photovoltaic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Light with normalized spectral irradiance resembling that of airmass 1.5 sunlight striking surface of Earth produced by use of ultraviolet filter to modify output of set of flashlamps used as large-area pulsed solar simulator (LAPSS). Filtered LAPSS light allows more realistic measurements of output of photovoltaic devices when using silicon reference cell having different spectral response characteristic.

  18. Relative spectral responsivity determination of photometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, J. C.; Bermudez, J. C.; Hernández-López, J. E.

    2006-02-01

    The experimental evaluation of the relative spectral response of a standard photometer is presented; the measurements were carried out by the substitution method by means a double monochromator in the range of 405 nm to 730 nm with 5 nm resolution wavelength. The experimental uncertainty and its mismatching factor f I' are evaluated as part of the routine procedure to realize the candela unit with trazability to an absolute cryogenic radiometer which is the national standard of radiant flux at CENAM (National Center of Metrology of Mexico).

  19. Neural fields, spectral responses and lateral connections

    PubMed Central

    Pinotsis, D.A.; Friston, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a neural field model for local (mesoscopic) dynamics on the cortical surface. Our focus is on sparse intrinsic connections that are characteristic of real cortical microcircuits. This sparsity is modelled with radial connectivity functions or kernels with non-central peaks. The ensuing analysis allows one to generate or predict spectral responses to known exogenous input or random fluctuations. Here, we characterise the effect of different connectivity architectures (the range, dispersion and propagation speed of intrinsic or lateral connections) and synaptic gains on spatiotemporal dynamics. Specifically, we look at spectral responses to random fluctuations and examine the ability of synaptic gain and connectivity parameters to induce Turing instabilities. We find that although the spatial deployment and speed of lateral connections can have a profound affect on the behaviour of spatial modes over different scales, only synaptic gain is capable of producing phase-transitions. We discuss the implications of these findings for the use of neural fields as generative models in dynamic causal modeling (DCM). PMID:21138771

  20. Development of simple band-spectral pyranometer and quantum meter using photovoltaic cells and bandpass filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bilguun, Amarsaikhan Nakaso, Tetsushi; Harigai, Toru; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tanoue, Hideto

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, greenhouse automatic-control, based on the measurement of solar irradiance, has been attracting attention. This control is an effective method for improving crop production. In the agricultural field, it is necessary to measure Photon Flux Density (PFD), which is an important parameter in the promotion of plant growth. In particular, the PFD of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) and Plant Biologically Active Radiation (PBAR, 300-800 nm) have been discussed in agricultural plant science. The commercial quantum meter (QM, PAR meter) can only measure Photosynthetically Photon Flux Density (PPFD) which is the integrated PFD quantity on the PAR wavelength. In this research, a band-spectral pyranometer or quantum meter using PVs with optical bandpass filters for dividing the PBAR wavelength into 100 nm bands (five independent channels) was developed. Before field testing, calibration of the instruments was carried out using a solar simulator. Next, a field test was conducted in three differing weather conditions such as clear, partly cloudy and cloudy skies. As a result, it was found that the response rate of the developed pyranometer was faster by four seconds compared with the response rate of the commercial pyranometer. Moreover, the outputs of each channel in the developed pyranometer were very similar to the integrated outputs of the commercial spectroradiometer. It was confirmed that the solar irradiance could be measured in each band separately using the developed band-spectral pyranometer. It was indicated that the developed band-spectral pyranometer could also be used as a PV band-spectral quantum meter which is obtained by converting the band irradiance into band PFD.

  1. Development of simple band-spectral pyranometer and quantum meter using photovoltaic cells and bandpass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilguun, Amarsaikhan; Nakaso, Tetsushi; Harigai, Toru; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tanoue, Hideto

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, greenhouse automatic-control, based on the measurement of solar irradiance, has been attracting attention. This control is an effective method for improving crop production. In the agricultural field, it is necessary to measure Photon Flux Density (PFD), which is an important parameter in the promotion of plant growth. In particular, the PFD of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) and Plant Biologically Active Radiation (PBAR, 300-800 nm) have been discussed in agricultural plant science. The commercial quantum meter (QM, PAR meter) can only measure Photosynthetically Photon Flux Density (PPFD) which is the integrated PFD quantity on the PAR wavelength. In this research, a band-spectral pyranometer or quantum meter using PVs with optical bandpass filters for dividing the PBAR wavelength into 100 nm bands (five independent channels) was developed. Before field testing, calibration of the instruments was carried out using a solar simulator. Next, a field test was conducted in three differing weather conditions such as clear, partly cloudy and cloudy skies. As a result, it was found that the response rate of the developed pyranometer was faster by four seconds compared with the response rate of the commercial pyranometer. Moreover, the outputs of each channel in the developed pyranometer were very similar to the integrated outputs of the commercial spectroradiometer. It was confirmed that the solar irradiance could be measured in each band separately using the developed band-spectral pyranometer. It was indicated that the developed band-spectral pyranometer could also be used as a PV band-spectral quantum meter which is obtained by converting the band irradiance into band PFD.

  2. Enhancement of Spectral Response of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuai

    ruthenium-based/organic dyes for co-sensitized DSSCs are also investigated. Another approach is to increase light utility in DSSCs exploiting surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of noble metal nanostructures (e.g. Au, Ag). In this thesis, I will show that the strong longitudinal plasmonic absorption of Au nanorods (NRs) can be used to increase the low-photon energy sunlight harvesting in DSSCs, broadening strong light response of the devices. In specific, a remarkable improvement in photocurrent generation at 600-720 nm is achieved. This enhancement mechanism is anticipated to be applied to other kind of DSSCs with various dye molecules. In another approach, AuNRs/TiO2 core-shell nanostructures are employed as scattering layer for plasmon-enhanced light harvesting in DSSCs and also obtained positive results. Evolved from DSSCs, perovskite solar cells (PSCs) now become a new favorite in the field of photovoltaics. An intrinsic problem of this kind of solar cells is the use of lead based materials, which is of high toxicity and prohibited by the European Union and some other countries. I have conducted some fundamental research for lead-free PSCs using tin-based perovskite and have observed a surface plasmon resonance absorption of the organometal perovskite film of CH3NH3SnI3, which has potential applications for IR-absorption in the future solar photovoltaics. I believe the improved understanding on the co-sensitization mechanisms and the plasmonic effect to broaden the spectral response in DSSCs are luciferous for the design and fabrication of the new generation solar cells with high-efficiency and low-cost.

  3. Temperature effect on measurements of spectral responsivity of reference solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Li, Yuanbo; Ng, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells, or solar cells, take advantage of the photoelectric effect to convert solar energy to electricity. With rapidly increasing of demands of new and green energy, solar energy industry becomes more important in the global economic development. PV cells are the building blocks of all PV systems because they are the devices that convert sunlight to electricity. Characterization and performance testing are critical to the development of existing and emerging photovoltaic technologies and the growth of the solar industry. As new solar products are being developed and manufactured, the energy conversion efficiency and other critical parameters must be accurately measured and tested under globally recognized standard testing conditions which include solar cell temperature, spectral distribution and total irradiance level of solar radiation on the cell to be tested. The aim of this paper is to investigate one of critical parameters - solar cell temperature effect on measurement of spectral responsivity of the cell. When a reference solar cell is illuminated by solar radiation, the cell temperature will vary with different irradiance levels. Consequently it will affect the accurate measurement of spectral responsivity of the cell. In order to better understand the temperature effect on the measurement, temperature coefficients of reference solar cell in spectral range from 300 nm to 1000 nm are measured in temperature range from 25 oC to 35 oC. The measurement uncertainties of temperature coefficient are evaluated and described in this paper according to JCGM 100: 2008 (ISO/IEC Guide 98-3) - Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement.

  4. Measuring solar spectral and angle-of-incidence effects on photovoltaic modules and solar irradiance sensors

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

    1997-11-01

    Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation.

  5. Temporal spectral response of a corn canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Kimes, D. S.; Tucker, C. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1981-01-01

    Techniques developed for the prediction of winter wheat yields from remotely sensed data indicating crop status over the growing season are tested for their applicability to corn. Ground-based spectral measurements in the Landsat Thematic Mapper bands 3 (0.62-0.69 microns), 4 (0.76-0.90 microns) and 5 (1.55-1.75 microns) were performed at one-week intervals throughout the growing season for 24 plots of corn, and analyzed to derive spectral ratios and normalized spectral differences of the IR and shortwave IR bands with the red. The ratios of the near IR and shortwave IR bands are found to provide the highest and most consistent correlations with corn yield and dry matter accumulation, however the value of band 5 could not be tested due to the absence of water stress conditions. Integration of spectral ratios over several dates improved the correlations over those of any single date by achieving a seasonal, rather than instantaneous, estimate of crop status. Results point to the desirability of further tests under other growth conditions to determine whether satellite-derived data will be useful in providing corn yield information.

  6. Temporal spectral response of a corn canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Kimes, D. S.; Tucker, C. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1981-01-01

    Techniques developed for the prediction of winter wheat yields from remotely sensed data indicating crop status over the growing season are tested for their applicability to corn. Ground-based spectral measurements in the Landsat Thematic Mapper bands 3 (0.62-0.69 microns), 4 (0.76-0.90 microns) and 5 (1.55-1.75 microns) were performed at one-week intervals throughout the growing season for 24 plots of corn, and analyzed to derive spectral ratios and normalized spectral differences of the IR and shortwave IR bands with the red. The ratios of the near IR and shortwave IR bands are found to provide the highest and most consistent correlations with corn yield and dry matter accumulation, however the value of band 5 could not be tested due to the absence of water stress conditions. Integration of spectral ratios over several dates improved the correlations over those of any single date by achieving a seasonal, rather than instantaneous, estimate of crop status. Results point to the desirability of further tests under other growth conditions to determine whether satellite-derived data will be useful in providing corn yield information.

  7. Spectral Response of Metallic Optical Antennas Driven by Temperature.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Alexander; López-Alonso, José Manuel; González, Francisco Javier; Alda, Javier

    2017-01-01

    When optical antennas are used as light detectors, temperature changes their spectral response. Using this relation, we determine the spectrum of a light beam from an optical antenna's signal. A numerical evaluation of the temperature-spectral response has been completed with a model for the noise of the device. Using both the response and the noise model, we have established the capabilities of the device by quantifying the error in the spectrum determination both for broadband spectrum and monochromatic radiation.

  8. Enhancement of photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2 induced by plasma doping.

    PubMed

    Wi, Sungjin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Guo, L Jay; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2014-05-27

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides hold promise for making ultrathin-film photovoltaic devices with a combination of excellent photovoltaic performance, superior flexibility, long lifetime, and low manufacturing cost. Engineering the proper band structures of such layered materials is essential to realize such potential. Here, we present a plasma-assisted doping approach for significantly improving the photovoltaic response in multilayer MoS2. In this work, we fabricated and characterized photovoltaic devices with a vertically stacked indium tin oxide electrode/multilayer MoS2/metal electrode structure. Utilizing a plasma-induced p-doping approach, we are able to form p-n junctions in MoS2 layers that facilitate the collection of photogenerated carriers, enhance the photovoltages, and decrease reverse dark currents. Using plasma-assisted doping processes, we have demonstrated MoS2-based photovoltaic devices exhibiting very high short-circuit photocurrent density values up to 20.9 mA/cm(2) and reasonably good power-conversion efficiencies up to 2.8% under AM1.5G illumination, as well as high external quantum efficiencies. We believe that this work provides important scientific insights for leveraging the optoelectronic properties of emerging atomically layered two-dimensional materials for photovoltaic and other optoelectronic applications.

  9. Material reconstruction for spectral computed tomography with detector response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiulong; Gao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Different from conventional computed tomography (CT), spectral CT using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is able to provide the unprecedented material compositions. However accurate spectral CT needs to account for the detector response function (DRF), which is often distorted by factors such as pulse pileup and charge-sharing. In this work, we propose material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF. The simulation results suggest that the proposed methods reconstructed more accurate material compositions than the conventional method without DRF. Moreover, the proposed linearized method with linear data fidelity from spectral resampling had improved reconstruction quality from the nonlinear method directly based on nonlinear data fidelity.

  10. Coumarin-substituted manganese phthalocyanines: synthesis, characterization, photovoltaic behaviour, spectral and electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Altun, Selçuk; Odabaş, Zafer; Altındal, Ahmet; Özkaya, Ali Rıza

    2014-06-07

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of novel manganese(III) phthalocyanines bearing 7-oxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-8-methylcoumarin or/and chloro groups have been achieved. The effect of alpha and beta substitution on the ligand- and metal-based reduction processes of the manganese phthalocyanine complexes and their interaction with dioxygen were investigated. The more effective interaction of the central metal of the beta coumarin substituted complex with dioxygen than that of its alpha substituted analogue was attributed to the hindrance of the interaction by the nonplanarity in the case of alpha substitution. Similarly, the aggregation tendency was lower in the case of alpha substitution. Among the fabricated coumarin-substituted manganese phthalocyanine donor layer and fullerene (C60) acceptor based photovoltaic heterojunction devices, the one containing 8 exhibited the best performance. The effect of the thickness of the active Pc layer on solar cell parameters has also been investigated. A nearly thickness independent open circuit voltage was observed.

  11. Efficiency enhancement in two-cell CIGS photovoltaic system with low-cost optical spectral splitter.

    PubMed

    Maragliano, Carlo; Apostoleris, Harry; Bronzoni, Matteo; Rampino, Stefano; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2016-01-25

    Spectrum splitting represents a valid alternative to multi-junction solar cells for broadband light-to-electricity conversion. While this concept has existed for decades, its adoption at the industrial scale is still stifled by high manufacturing costs and inability to scale to large areas. Here we report the experimental validation of a novel design that could allow the widespread adoption of spectrum splitting as a low-cost approach to high efficiency photovoltaic conversion. Our system consists of a prismatic lens that can be manufactured using the same methods employed for conventional CPV optic production, and two inexpensive CuInGaSe(2) (CIGS) solar cells having different composition and, thus, band gaps. We demonstrate a large improvement in cell efficiency under the splitter and show how this can lead to substantial increases in system output at competitive cost using existing technologies.

  12. Field measurements of the spectral response of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolucci, L. A.; Robinson, B. F.; Silva, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral response (air-water interface reflectance and water-volume scattering) of turbid river water (99 mg/liter suspended solids) and relatively clear lake water (10 mg/liter suspended solids) was measured in situ with a field spectroradiometer. The influence of the river bottom on the spectral response of the water also was determined by using a modified Secchi disc approach. The results indicated that turbid river water had a higher spectral response than clear lake water (about 6 percent) in the red (0.6-0.7 micron) and near-infrared (0.7-0.9 micron) portions of the spectrum. Also, the reflectance characteristics of the river bottom did not influence the spectral response of the turbid river water when the water was deeper than 30 cm

  13. Field measurements of the spectral response of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolucci, L. A.; Robinson, B. F.; Silva, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral response (air-water interface reflectance and water-volume scattering) of turbid river water (99 mg/liter suspended solids) and relatively clear lake water (10 mg/liter suspended solids) was measured in situ with a field spectroradiometer. The influence of the river bottom on the spectral response of the water also was determined by using a modified Secchi disc approach. The results indicated that turbid river water had a higher spectral response than clear lake water (about 6 percent) in the red (0.6-0.7 micron) and near-infrared (0.7-0.9 micron) portions of the spectrum. Also, the reflectance characteristics of the river bottom did not influence the spectral response of the turbid river water when the water was deeper than 30 cm

  14. Novel zinc porphyrin sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells: synthesis and spectral, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Lu, Hsueh-Pei; Lan, Chi-Ming; Huang, Yi-Lin; Liang, You-Ren; Yen, Wei-Nan; Liu, Yen-Chun; Lin, You-Shiang; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Yeh, Chen-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Novel meso- or beta-derivatized porphyrins with a carboxyl group have been designed and synthesized for use as sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The position and nature of a bridge connecting the porphyrin ring and carboxylic acid group show significant influences on the spectral, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties of these sensitizers. Absorption spectra of porphyrins with a phenylethynyl bridge show that both Soret and Q bands are red-shifted with respect to those of porphyrin 6. This phenomenon is more pronounced for porphyrins 3 and 4, which have a pi-conjugated electron-donating group at the meso position opposite the anchoring group. Upon introduction of an ethynylene group at the meso position, the potential at the first oxidation alters only slightly whereas that for the first reduction is significantly shifted to the positive, thus indicating a decreased HOMO-LUMO gap. Quantum-chemical (DFT) results support the spectroelectrochemical data for a delocalization of charge between the porphyrin ring and the amino group in the first oxidative state of diarylamino-substituted porphyrin 5, which exhibits the best photovoltaic performance among all the porphyrins under investigation. From a comparison of the cell performance based on the same TiO(2) films, the devices made of porphyrin 5 coadsorbed with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) on TiO(2) in ratios [5]/[CDCA] = 1:1 and 1:2 have efficiencies of power conversion similar to that of an N3-based DSSC, which makes this green dye a promising candidate for colorful DSSC applications.

  15. The origin of photovoltaic responses in BiFeO3 multiferroic ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tu, C-S; Hung, C-M; Schmidt, V H; Chien, R R; Jiang, M-D; Anthoninappen, J

    2012-12-12

    Multiferroic BiFeO(3) (BFO) ceramics with electrodes of indium tin oxide (ITO) and Au thin films exhibit significant photovoltaic effects under near-ultraviolet illumination (λ = 405 nm) and show strong dependences on light wavelength, illumination intensity, and sample thickness. The correlation between photovoltaic responses and illumination intensity can be attributed to photo-excited and thermally generated charge carriers in the interface depletion region between BFO ceramic and ITO thin film. A theoretical model is developed to describe the open-circuit photovoltage and short-circuit photocurrent density as a function of illumination intensity. This model can be applied to the photovoltaic effects in p-n junction type BFO thin films and other systems. The BFO ceramic exhibits stronger photovoltaic responses than the ferroelectric Pb(1-x)La(x)(Zr(y)Ti(1-y))(1-x/4)O(3) (PLZT) ceramics under near-ultraviolet illumination. Comparisons are made with other systems and models for the photovoltaic effect.

  16. Current topics in photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, T.J. ); Meakin, J.D. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on current research in photovoltaics. Areas include: outdoor spectral odor radiation variations and their relationship to photovoltaic device performance, numerical modeling for analysis and design of solar cells, radiation damage mechanisms in GaAs and Si solar cells, and health and safety issues in the manufacturing of photovoltaic cells.

  17. Photovoltaic response in a resonant tunneling wire-dot-wire junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbezier, Aude; Autran, Jean-Luc; Michelini, Fabienne

    2013-07-01

    Using the Green's function technique, we investigated the nonequilibrium photovoltaic response in a double barrier wire-dot-wire junction for tunneling coupling stronger than optical coupling. In the narrow window of photon-gap energy resonance, the photocurrent increases when the voltage increases from zero, which means a negative shunt conductance in the generator equivalent circuit, and forces a fill factor above one. We then show a counterintuitive behavior of such resonant tunneling photovoltaic systems: the photocurrent increases when the tunneling rate through contact decreases. The negative shunt conductance we observed hence rises in the density of states of semi-infinite wires that vanishes at band edges.

  18. Pronounced Photovoltaic Response from Multilayered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides PN-Junctions.

    PubMed

    Memaran, Shahriar; Pradhan, Nihar R; Lu, Zhengguang; Rhodes, Daniel; Ludwig, Jonathan; Zhou, Qiong; Ogunsolu, Omotola; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Smirnov, Dmitry; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Balicas, Luis

    2015-11-11

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are layered semiconductors with indirect band gaps comparable to Si. These compounds can be grown in large area, while their gap(s) can be tuned by changing their chemical composition or by applying a gate voltage. The experimental evidence collected so far points toward a strong interaction with light, which contrasts with the small photovoltaic efficiencies η ≤ 1% extracted from bulk crystals or exfoliated monolayers. Here, we evaluate the potential of these compounds by studying the photovoltaic response of electrostatically generated PN-junctions composed of approximately 10 atomic layers of MoSe2 stacked onto the dielectric h-BN. In addition to ideal diode-like response, we find that these junctions can yield, under AM-1.5 illumination, photovoltaic efficiencies η exceeding 14%, with fill factors of ~70%. Given the available strategies for increasing η such as gap tuning, improving the quality of the electrical contacts, or the fabrication of tandem cells, our study suggests a remarkable potential for photovoltaic applications based on TMDs.

  19. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed

  20. Spectral response of the Viking lander camera: Preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L., IV; Huck, F. O.; Arvidson, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Viking lander imaging investigation is to obtain color and near-infrared multispectral panoramas of the Martian surface using six spectral channels in the 0.4 to 1.1 microns wavelength range. This data can be compared with data obtained by imaging a reference test chart to construct approximate spectral reflectance curves that can then be matched to laboratory standards to aid in identifying surface materials. Some channels exhibit appreciable out-of-band spectral responses, making data reduction and interpretation difficult. A preliminary evaluation of predicted multispectral data for eight geological materials reveals that fairly good reflectance estimates can be made for those materials which have monotonically increasing or decreasing reflectances. Reflectance estimates for materials with more complex reflectances often do not reveal important spectral features and sometimes provide misleading results.

  1. Spectral response of magnetic nanofluid to toxic cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendran, V.; Philip, John

    2013-04-01

    We probe the spectral response of a magnetically polarizable nanofluid in the presence of different toxic metal cations. In the presence of cations like Ni2+, Mn2+, Pb2+, and Cd2+, the nanofluid shows large blue shift in the diffracted Bragg peak and a visually perceivable color change due to changes in the interparticle spacing of the self-assembled nano-arrays. The observed spectral response of the nanofluid offers the possibility of rapid and selective detections of cations optically. Because the emulsion used is easy to produce and inexpensive, this approach may find several interesting applications in rapid detection of cations.

  2. Optoelectronic logic gates based on photovoltaic response of bacteriorhodopsin polymer composite thin films.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Mohit; Roy, Sukhdev

    2012-12-01

    We present designs of optoelectronic OR, AND, NOR, and NAND logic gates with multiple pulsed pump laser beams based on the photovoltaic response of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) molecules embedded in a polyvinyl matrix coated on ITO. A detailed experimental study of the photovoltaic response reveals that continuous pulsed exposure to 532 nm and 405 nm laser light results in a large photocurrent/photovoltage, due to rapid reprotonation and chromophore reisomerization, taking BR to the ground state in hundreds of nanoseconds. It also helps in sustaining the photovoltage at higher frequencies and in maintaining the shape of the photovoltage. It is shown experimentally that for a pulsed laser beam at 532 nm with peak pump intensity of 1.19 W/cm (2), a photovoltage of 50 mV is generated. A detailed numerical simulation of the photovoltaic response of BR has been carried out taking into account all the six states (B, K, L, M, N, and O) in the BR photocycle to ascertain the effect of various parameters such as lifetime of the M-state, the pump pulse-width, pump intensity, lifetime of excited protons, and rate constant of excited protons. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical simulations. The present study opens up new prospects for protein-based optoelectronic computing.

  3. Spectral response of Earth-like planets to orbital variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedelt, P.; Godolt, M.; Grenfell, J. L.; von Paris, P.; Rauer, H.; Schreier, F.; Selsis, F.; Trautmann, T.

    2011-10-01

    We present the spectral appearance of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of different main sequence (F, K and G-type) stars and their spectral response to small orbital distance variations. Using atmospheric profiles from a 1D atmosphere model, we compute transmission and emission spectra in the infrared using a cloud-free line-by-line radiative transfermodel. The orbital distanceswere chosen such that surface temperatures in the atmosphericmodel are in the range of 273K (outer run) to 303K (inner run). The spectra are then analyzed in light of current and future space telescopes like the JamesWebb Telescope (JWST), Spitzer and the ground based European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) in order to discuss the measurability of certain spectral features.

  4. Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Wen, Guoyong; Harder, Jerald W.; Pilewskie, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Two scenarios of spectral solar forcing, namely Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM)-based out-of-phase variations and conventional in-phase variations, are input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and to the GISS modelE. Both scenarios and models give maximum temperature responses in the upper stratosphere, decreasing to the surface. Upper stratospheric peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase forcing are approx.0.6 K and approx.0.9 K in RCM and modelE, approx.5 times larger than responses to in-phase forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI and UV variations, and resemble HALOE observed 11-year temperature variations. For in-phase forcing, ocean mixed layer response lags surface air response by approx.2 years, and is approx.0.06 K compared to approx.0.14 K for atmosphere. For out-of-phase forcing, lags are similar, but surface responses are significantly smaller. For both scenarios, modelE surface responses are less than 0.1 K in the tropics, and display similar patterns over oceanic regions, but complex responses over land.

  5. Electrically tuneable spectral responsivity in gated silicon photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, Kamran; Wang, Xingsheng; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Watson, Scott; Al-Hasani, Sulaiman; Rahman, Faiz

    2011-12-01

    We report the observation of electrically tuneable spectral responsivity in silicon-based photodetectors. The current flowing through a lateral p-i-n junction photodiode can be changed by changing either the gate bias or the intensity of incident light, with the devices exhibiting typical optical responsivities of 65 A/W. The peak sensitivity of the device can be changed over the entire visible region by changing the gate voltage in a 5 V range. This happens because with increasing gate bias, an accumulation layer of holes is pulled closer to the Si-SiO2 interface, enhancing the blue response of the device.

  6. Photovoltaic response and values of state dipole moments in single-layered pyrazoloquinoline/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Gondek, E; Kityk, I V; Danel, A; Sanetra, J

    2008-06-01

    We report the photovoltaic response of composite films formed by polymer transport matrices poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT) and poly(3-decylthiophene) (PDT) with incorporated 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline (PAQ) chromophore (see the first figure). The photovoltage (PV) data were obtained for different substituted PAQ possessing different state dipole moments. The photovoltaic cells were formed between ITO and aluminum electrodes. We found that the PV signal of polymer/PAQ substantially depends on the state dipole moments of the pyrazoloquinoline chromophore. This fact indicates on a possibility of significant enhancement of PV efficiency by appropriate variations of the state dipole moments of chromophore. This results in photoinduced electron transfer from polymer serving as donors to PAQ being the electron acceptor. Despite an efficiency of the PV devices is below 1%, however, it may be substantially enhanced in future varying the chromophore state dipole moments appropriately.

  7. Superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; So, L. C.; Leburton, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel class of photovoltaic cascade structures is introduced which features multijunction upper subcells. These superstructure high efficiency photovoltaics (SHEP's) exhibit enhanced upper subcell spectral response because of the additional junctions which serve to reduce bulk recombination losses by decreasing the mean collection distance for photogenerated minority carriers. Two possible electrical configurations were studied and compared: a three-terminal scheme that allows both subcells to be operated at their individual maximum power points and a two-terminal configuration with an intercell ohmic contact for series interconnection. The three-terminal devices were found to be superior both in terms of beginning-of-life expectancy and radiation tolerance. Realistic simulations of three-terminal AlGaAs/GaAs SHEP's show that one sun AMO efficiencies in excess of 26 percent are possible.

  8. Absolute spectral response measurements of different photodiodes useful for applications in the UV spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzo, Maria G.; Ceccherini, Paolo; Garoli, Denis; Masut, Pietro; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio

    2004-09-01

    Long UV radiation exposure can result in damages of biological tissues, as burns, skin aging, erythema and even melanoma cancer. In the past years an increase of melanoma cancer has been observed and associated to the atmospheric ozone deployment. Attendance of sun tanning unit centers has become a huge social phenomena, and the maximum UV radiation dose that a human being can receive is regulated by law. On the other side, UV radiation is largely used for therapeutic and germicidal purposes. In all these areas, spectroradiometer and radiomenter are needed for monitoring UVA (315-400 nm), UVB (280-315 nm) and UVC (100-280 nm) irradiance. We have selected some commercial photodiodes which can be used as solid state detectors in these instruments. We have characterized them by measuring their absolute spectral response in the 200 - 400 nm spectral range.

  9. Effect of photometric detector spectral response quality on white LED spectral mismatch correction factors.

    PubMed

    Rosas, E; Estrada-Hernández, A

    2016-07-01

    Light-emitting-diode (LED)-based solid-state lighting has become a real option for private and public lighting after achieving high total luminous flux (TLF) and luminous efficacy levels, thus promoting the development of energy efficient use regulation to be fulfilled by LED lamps and LED luminaires. Here, we propose a photometer-quality-based fast-checking criterion. This allows photometric technicians to perform a quick evaluation of the photometric head spectral response quality effect on the LED source spectral mismatch correction factor-when determining the TLF and luminous efficacy minimum approved levels-performance parameters subject to mandatory verification by the conformity assessment procedures technically supporting the corresponding regulation. The proposed criterion applies for a wide range of photometric detector heads' qualities (2.6%≤f1'≤36.4%).

  10. Photocurrent of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeler, Seth; McIntyre, Max; Cossel, Raquel; Bowser, Chris; Tzolov, Marian

    Photovoltaic cells can be used to harness clean, renewable energy from light. Examined in this project were photovoltaic cells based on a bulk heterojunction between PCPDTBT and PCBM sandwiched between an ITO anode and an Al cathode. Current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectra for multiple photovoltaic devices were taken under varying DC electrical bias and different level of illumination. This data was interpreted in terms of an equivalent circuit with linear elements, e.g. capacitance, series resistance, and parallel resistance. A physical interpretation of each circuit element will be presented. The spectral response of the devices was characterized by optical transmission and photocurrent spectroscopy using a spectrometer in the spectral range from 300 to 900 nm. The DC measurements confirmed that the devices are electrically rectifying. The AC measurements allowed modeling of the devices as a dielectric between two electrodes with injection current passing through it. The characteristic peaks for both PCBDTBT and PCBM are clearly visible in both the photocurrent and transmission data. The good correlation between the photocurrent and transmission data indicates photocurrent generation due to absorption in both materials constituting the heterojunction.

  11. Spectral characteristics of ventricular response to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hayano, J; Yamasaki, F; Sakata, S; Okada, A; Mukai, S; Fujinami, T

    1997-12-01

    To investigate the spectral characteristics of the fluctuation in ventricular response during atrial fibrillation (AF), R-R interval time series obtained from ambulatory electrocardiograms were analyzed in 45 patients with chronic AF and in 30 age-matched healthy subjects with normal sinus rhythm (SR). Although the 24-h R-R interval spectrum during SR showed a 1/f noise-like downsloping linear pattern when plotted as log power against log frequency, the spectrum during AF showed an angular shape with a breakpoint at a frequency of 0.005 +/- 0.002 Hz, by which the spectrum was separated into long-term and short-term components with different spectral characteristics. The short-term component showed a white noise-like flat spectrum with a spectral exponent (absolute value of the regression slope) of 0.05 +/- 0.08 and an intercept at 10(-2) Hz of 4.9 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz). The long-term component had a 1/f noise-like spectrum with a spectral exponent of 1.26 +/- 0.40 and an intercept at 10(-4) Hz of 7.0 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz), which did not differ significantly from those for the spectrum during SR in the same frequency range [spectral exponent, 1.36 +/- 0.06; intercept at 10(-4) Hz, 7.1 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz)]. The R-R intervals during AF may be a sequence of uncorrelated values over the short term (within several minutes). Over the longer term, however, the R-R interval fluctuation shows the long-range negative correlation suggestive of underlying regulatory processes, and spectral characteristics indistinguishable from those for SR suggest that the long-term fluctuations during AF and SR may originate from similar dynamics of the cardiovascular regulatory systems.

  12. A geostatistical approach to mapping site response spectral amplifications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, H.

    2010-01-01

    If quantitative estimates of the seismic properties do not exist at a location of interest then the site response spectral amplifications must be estimated from data collected at other locations. Currently, the most common approach employs correlations of site class with maps of surficial geology. Analogously, correlations of site class with topographic slope can be employed where the surficial geology is unknown. Our goal is to identify and validate a method to estimate site response with greater spatial resolution and accuracy for regions where additional effort is warranted. This method consists of three components: region-specific data collection, a spatial model for interpolating seismic properties, and a theoretical method for computing spectral amplifications from the interpolated seismic properties. We consider three spatial interpolation schemes: correlations with surficial geology, termed the geologic trend (GT), ordinary kriging (OK), and kriging with a trend (KT). We estimate the spectral amplifications from seismic properties using the square root of impedance method, thereby linking the frequency-dependent spectral amplifications to the depth-dependent seismic properties. Thus, the range of periods for which this method is applicable is limited by the depth of exploration. A dense survey of near-surface S-wave slowness (Ss) throughout Kobe, Japan shows that the geostatistical methods give more accurate estimates of Ss than the topographic slope and GT methods, and the OK and KT methods perform equally well. We prefer the KT model because it can be seamlessly integrated with geologic maps that cover larger regions. Empirical spectral amplifications show that the region-specific data achieve more accurate estimates of observed median short-period amplifications than the topographic slope method. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  14. Assessing Cd-induced stress from plant spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancheva, Rumiana; Georgiev, Georgi

    2014-10-01

    Remote sensing plays a significant role in local, regional and global monitoring of land covers. Ecological concerns worldwide determine the importance of remote sensing applications for the assessment of soil conditions, vegetation health and identification of stress-induced changes. The extensive industrial growth and intensive agricultural land-use arise the serious ecological problem of environmental pollution associated with the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Soil contamination is a reason for degradation processes and temporary or permanent decrease of the productive capacity of land. Heavy metals are among the most dangerous pollutants because of their toxicity, persistent nature, easy up-take by plants and long biological half-life. This paper takes as its focus the study of crop species spectral response to Cd pollution. Ground-based experiments were performed, using alfalfa, spring barley and pea grown in Cd contaminated soils and in different hydroponic systems under varying concentrations of the heavy metal. Cd toxicity manifested itself by inhibition of plant growth and synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. Multispectral reflectance, absorbance and transmittance, as well as red and far red fluorescence were measured and examined for their suitability to detect differences in plant condition. Statistical analysis was performed and empirical relationships were established between Cd concentration, plant growth variables and spectral response Various spectral properties proved to be indicators of plant performance and quantitative estimators of the degree of the Cd-induced stress.

  15. Structural spectral response tuning in organic deep ultraviolet photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lu; Wang, Wen-Shuo; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Xi-Qing; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrated novel organic deep ultraviolet photodetectors with structural spectral response tuning through bulk heterojunctions (HJs) and mixed planar-bulk HJs (PBHJs), respectively. TAPC and BAlq were utilized as the electron donor and acceptor, as well as polymer PEDOT:PSS was present as the transparent anode. The mixed PBHJs and bulk HJs reveal extremely low dark current of 3.35 × 10-8 and 2.94 × 10-8 A/cm2, and high photocurrent of 3.01 × 10-5 and 9.55 × 10-5 A/cm2 at -10 V under 260 nm light illumination with an intensity of 0.91 mW/cm2, respectively. A peak response of 33.6 mA/W at ˜260 nm and a detectivity of 3.24 × 1011 cm Hz1/2 W-1 are achieved in the mixed PBHJs. The bulk HJs exhibit a maximum response of 100.8 mA/W at ˜280 nm and a detectivity of 1.04 × 1012 cm Hz1/2 W-1. The photophysics involved in structural spectral response tuning are also discussed in detail.

  16. Spectral responses of gravel beaches to tidal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2017-01-01

    Tides have been recognized as a major driving forcing affecting coastal aquifer system, and deterministic modeling has been very effective in elucidating mechanisms caused by tides. However, such modeling does not lend itself to capture embedded information in the signal, and rather focuses on the primary processes. Here, using yearlong data sets measured at beaches in Alaska Prince William Sound, we performed spectral and correlation analyses to identify temporal behavior of pore-water pressure, temperature and salinity. We found that the response of the beach system was characterized by fluctuations of embedded diurnal, semidiurnal, terdiurnal and quarterdiurnal tidal components. Hydrodynamic dispersion of salinity and temperature, and the thermal conductivity greatly affected pore water signals. Spectral analyses revealed a faster dissipation of the semi-diurnal component with respect to the diurnal components. Correlation functions showed that salinity had a relatively short memory of the tidal signal when inland freshwater recharge was large. In contrast, the signature of the tidal signal on pore-water temperature persisted for longer times, up to a week. We also found that heterogeneity greatly affected beach response. The response varied from a simple linear mapping in the frequency domain to complete modulation and masking of the input frequencies.

  17. Spectral responses of gravel beaches to tidal signals

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2017-01-01

    Tides have been recognized as a major driving forcing affecting coastal aquifer system, and deterministic modeling has been very effective in elucidating mechanisms caused by tides. However, such modeling does not lend itself to capture embedded information in the signal, and rather focuses on the primary processes. Here, using yearlong data sets measured at beaches in Alaska Prince William Sound, we performed spectral and correlation analyses to identify temporal behavior of pore-water pressure, temperature and salinity. We found that the response of the beach system was characterized by fluctuations of embedded diurnal, semidiurnal, terdiurnal and quarterdiurnal tidal components. Hydrodynamic dispersion of salinity and temperature, and the thermal conductivity greatly affected pore water signals. Spectral analyses revealed a faster dissipation of the semi-diurnal component with respect to the diurnal components. Correlation functions showed that salinity had a relatively short memory of the tidal signal when inland freshwater recharge was large. In contrast, the signature of the tidal signal on pore-water temperature persisted for longer times, up to a week. We also found that heterogeneity greatly affected beach response. The response varied from a simple linear mapping in the frequency domain to complete modulation and masking of the input frequencies. PMID:28084455

  18. Photovoltaic response in pristine WSe{sub 2} layers modulated by metal-induced surface-charge-transfer doping

    SciTech Connect

    Wi, Sungjin; Chen, Mikai; Li, Da; Nam, Hongsuk; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2015-08-10

    We obtained photovoltaic response in pristine multilayer WSe{sub 2} by sandwiching WSe{sub 2} between top and bottom metals. In this structure, the work-function difference between the top metal and WSe{sub 2} plays a critical role in generating built-in potentials and photovoltaic responses. Our devices with Zn as top metal exhibit photo-conversion efficiencies up to 6.7% under 532 nm illumination and external quantum efficiencies in the range of 40%–83% for visible light. This work provides a method for generating photovoltaic responses in layered semiconductors without detrimental doping or exquisite heterostructures, and also advances the physics for modulating the band structures of such emerging semiconductors.

  19. Indoor calibration of Sky Quality Meters: Linearity, spectral responsivity and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravettoni, M.; Strepparava, D.; Cereghetti, N.; Klett, S.; Andretta, M.; Steiger, M.

    2016-09-01

    The indoor calibration of brightness sensors requires extremely low values of irradiance in the most accurate and reproducible way. In this work the testing equipment of an ISO 17025 accredited laboratory for electrical testing, qualification and type approval of solar photovoltaic modules was modified in order to test the linearity of the instruments from few mW/cm2 down to fractions of nW/cm2, corresponding to levels of simulated brightness from 6 to 19 mag/arcsec2. Sixteen Sky Quality Meter (SQM) produced by Unihedron, a Canadian manufacturer, were tested, also assessing the impact of the ageing of their protective glasses on the calibration coefficients and the drift of the instruments. The instruments are in operation on measurement points and observatories at different sites and altitudes in Southern Switzerland, within the framework of OASI, the Environmental Observatory of Southern Switzerland. The authors present the results of the calibration campaign: linearity; brightness calibration, with and without protective glasses; transmittance measurement of the glasses; and spectral responsivity of the devices. A detailed uncertainty analysis is also provided, according to the ISO 17025 standard.

  20. A neural mass model of spectral responses in electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Moran, R.J.; Kiebel, S.J.; Stephan, K.E.; Reilly, R.B.; Daunizeau, J.; Friston, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    We present a neural mass model of steady-state membrane potentials measured with local field potentials or electroencephalography in the frequency domain. This model is an extended version of previous dynamic causal models for investigating event-related potentials in the time-domain. In this paper, we augment the previous formulation with parameters that mediate spike-rate adaptation and recurrent intrinsic inhibitory connections. We then use linear systems analysis to show how the model's spectral response changes with its neurophysiological parameters. We demonstrate that much of the interesting behaviour depends on the non-linearity which couples mean membrane potential to mean spiking rate. This non-linearity is analogous, at the population level, to the firing rate–input curves often used to characterize single-cell responses. This function depends on the model's gain and adaptation currents which, neurobiologically, are influenced by the activity of modulatory neurotransmitters. The key contribution of this paper is to show how neuromodulatory effects can be modelled by adding adaptation currents to a simple phenomenological model of EEG. Critically, we show that these effects are expressed in a systematic way in the spectral density of EEG recordings. Inversion of the model, given such non-invasive recordings, should allow one to quantify pharmacologically induced changes in adaptation currents. In short, this work establishes a forward or generative model of electrophysiological recordings for psychopharmacological studies. PMID:17632015

  1. Spectral response data for development of cool coloured tile coverings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbra, Antonio; Tarozzi, Luca; Muscio, Alberto; Corticelli, Mauro A.

    2011-03-01

    Most ancient or traditional buildings in Italy show steep-slope roofs covered by red clay tiles. As the rooms immediately below the roof are often inhabited in historical or densely urbanized centres, the combination of low solar reflectance of tile coverings and low thermal inertia of either wooden roof structures or sub-tile insulation panels makes summer overheating a major problem. The problem can be mitigated by using tiles coated with cool colours, that is colours with the same spectral response of clay tiles in the visible, but highly reflecting in the near infrared range, which includes more than half of solar radiation. Cool colours can yield the same visible aspect of common building surfaces, but higher solar reflectance. Studies aimed at developing cool colour tile coverings for traditional Italian buildings have been started. A few coating solutions with the typical red terracotta colour have been produced and tested in the laboratory, using easily available materials. The spectral response and the solar reflectance have been measured and compared with that of standard tiles.

  2. Cosensitization with Vat-Based Organic Dyes for Enhanced Spectral Response of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinnezhad, Mozhgan

    2017-04-01

    Cosensitization using two organic dyes with supplementary absorption spectra on a photoelectrode is an effective method for improving the photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. Two organic dyes based on indigo and thioindigo have been synthesized, purified, and used to sensitize solar cells with spectral response extending across the entire visible region. To improve their photoelectric properties, different molar ratios were investigated, yielding total efficiency of 6.17% at dye 1:dye 2 = 4:6. The effect of the concentration of Cheno antiaggregation agent on the performance of the dye-sensitized solar cells was also considered. The results demonstrate that higher conversion efficiency ( η = 6.82%) was achieved with 10 × 10-3 M Cheno. Finally, the performance of cosensitized solar cells was measured at different temperatures between 10°C and 50°C. The results indicated that J sc decreased with increasing temperature, directly affecting the conversion efficiency.

  3. Spectral Sensitivity Measured with Electroretinogram Using a Constant Response Method

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Fernando Allan de Farias; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Martins, Sonia Limara; Aguiar, Renata Genaro; de Souza, John Manuel; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-01-01

    A new method is presented to determine the retinal spectral sensitivity function S(λ) using the electroretinogram (ERG). S(λ)s were assessed in three different species of myomorph rodents, Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), Wistar rats (Ratus norvegicus), and mice (Mus musculus). The method, called AC Constant Method, is based on a computerized automatic feedback system that adjusts light intensity to maintain a constant-response amplitude to a flickering stimulus throughout the spectrum, as it is scanned from 300 to 700 nm, and back. The results are presented as the reciprocal of the intensity at each wavelength required to maintain a constant peak to peak response amplitude. The resulting S(λ) had two peaks in all three rodent species, corresponding to ultraviolet and M cones, respectively: 359 nm and 511 nm for mice, 362 nm and 493 nm for gerbils, and 362 nm and 502 nm for rats. Results for mouse and gerbil were similar to literature reports of S(λ) functions obtained with other methods, confirming that the ERG associated to the AC Constant-Response Method was effective to obtain reliable S(λ) functions. In addition, due to its fast data collection time, the AC Constant Response Method has the advantage of keeping the eye in a constant light adapted state. PMID:26800521

  4. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K.

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  5. Band-structure tailoring and surface passivation for highly efficient near-infrared responsive PbS quantum dot photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ru; Niu, Haihong; Ji, Fengwei; Wan, Lei; Mao, Xiaoli; Guo, Huier; Xu, Jinzhang; Cao, Guozhong

    2016-11-01

    PbS is a promising light harvester for near-infrared (NIR) responsive quantum dot (QD) photovoltaics due to its narrow bulk band gap (0.41 eV) and large exciton Bohr radius (18 nm). However, the relatively low conduction band (CB) and high-density surface defects of PbS as two major drawbacks for its use in solar cells severely hamper the photovoltaic performance enhancement. In this work, a modified solution-based successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) utilizing mixed cationic precursors of Pb2+ and Cd2+ is explored, and such a scheme offers two benefits, band-structure tailoring and surface passivation. In-situ deposited CdS suppresses the excessive growth of PbS in the mesopores, thereby facilitating the favorable electron injection from PbS to TiO2 in view of the up-shifted CB level of QDs; the intimate interpenetration of two sulfides with each other leads to superior passivation of trap state defects on PbS, which suppresses the interfacial charge recombination. With the construction of photovoltaics based on such a hybrid (Pb,Cd)S/CdS configuration, impressive power conversion efficiency up to 4.08% has been reached, outperforming that of the conventional PbS/CdS pattern (2.95%). This work highlights the great importance of band-structure tailoring and surface passivation for constructing highly efficient PbS QD photovoltaics.

  6. Cortical responses elicited by photovoltaic subretinal prostheses exhibit similarities to visually evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Yossi; Goetz, Georges; Lavinsky, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore; Manivanh, Richard; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We have previously developed a wireless photovoltaic retinal prosthesis, in which camera-captured images are projected onto the retina using pulsed near-IR light. Each pixel in the subretinal implant directly converts pulsed light into local electric current to stimulate the nearby inner retinal neurons. Here we report that implants having pixel sizes of 280, 140 and 70μm implanted in the subretinal space in rats with normal and degenerate retina elicit robust cortical responses upon stimulation with pulsed near-IR light. Implant-induced eVEP has shorter latency than visible light-induced VEP, its amplitude increases with peak irradiance and pulse duration, and decreases with frequency in the range of 2-20Hz, similar to the visible light response. Modular design of the arrays allows scalability to a large number of pixels, and combined with the ease of implantation, offers a promising approach to restoration of sight in patients blinded by retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23778557

  7. New PTB Setup for the Absolute Calibration of the Spectral Responsivity of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt, K.; Zelenjuk, A.; Taubert, D. R.; Keawprasert, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-02-01

    The paper describes the new experimental setup assembled at the PTB for the absolute spectral responsivity measurement of radiation thermometers. The concept of this setup is to measure the relative spectral responsivity of the radiation thermometer using the conventional monochromator-based spectral comparator facility also used for the calibration of filter radiometers. The absolute spectral responsivity is subsequently measured at one wavelength, supplied by the radiation of a diode laser, using the new setup. The radiation of the diode laser is guided with an optical fiber into an integrating sphere source that is equipped with an aperture of absolutely known area. The spectral radiance of this integrating sphere source is determined via the spectral irradiance measured by a trap detector with an absolutely calibrated spectral responsivity traceable to the primary detector standard of the PTB, the cryogenic radiometer. First results of the spectral responsivity calibration of the radiation thermometer LP3 are presented, and a provisional uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity is given.

  8. Iterative method for optimal design of flat-spectral-response arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Woong; Park, Yohan; Yi, Yun; Kim, Hwi

    2013-10-20

    A novel iterative projection-type optimal design algorithm of arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) with a flat spectral response is proposed based on the Fourier optics model of AWG. The enhancement of the spectral-response flatness of the AWG is demonstrated, with an analysis on the trade-off relationship between band flatness and crosstalk.

  9. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. ESTIMATION OF RESPONSE-SPECTRAL VALUES AS FUNCTIONS OF MAGNITUDE, DISTANCE, AND SITE CONDITIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, D.M.; ,

    1983-01-01

    Horizontal pseudo-velocity response was analyzed for twelve shallow earthquakes in western North America. Estimation of response-spectral values was related to magnitude, distance and site conditions. Errors in the methods are analyzed.

  11. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Du, Yujie; Chang, Benkang; Yunsheng, Qian

    2006-08-20

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode. First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-O photocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses. The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  12. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Du, Yujie; Chang, Benkang; Yunsheng, Qian

    2006-08-01

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode. First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-O photocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses. The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  13. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lei; Du Yujie; Chang Benkang; Yunsheng Qian

    2006-08-20

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode.First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-Ophotocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses.The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  14. Optical technique for photovoltaic spatial current response measurements using compressive sensing and random binary projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashmore, Matt. T.; Koutsourakis, George; Gottschalg, Ralph; Hall, Simon. R. G.

    2016-04-01

    Compressive sensing has been widely used in image compression and signal recovery techniques in recent years; however, it has received limited attention in the field of optical measurement. This paper describes the use of compressive sensing for measurements of photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, using fully random sensing matrices, rather than mapping an orthogonal basis set directly. Existing compressive sensing systems optically image the surface of the object under test, this contrasts with the method described, where illumination patterns defined by precalculated sensing matrices, probe PV devices. We discuss the use of spatially modulated light fields to probe a PV sample to produce a photocurrent map of the optical response. This allows for faster measurements than would be possible using traditional translational laser beam induced current techniques. Results produced to a 90% correlation to raster scanned measurements, which can be achieved with under 25% of the conventionally required number of data points. In addition, both crack and spot type defects are detected at resolutions comparable to electroluminescence techniques, with 50% of the number of measurements required for a conventional scan.

  15. Extended short-wavelength spectral response from InGaAs focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelter, Theodore R.; Barton, Jeffrey B.

    2003-09-01

    InGaAs detector material used in near infrared focal plane arrays (NIR FPAs) has typically been limited in spectral response to a range from approximately 900 nm to 1700 nm. Through special processing techniques, the spectral response can be extended down through the visible spectrum and into the ultraviolet. Test results showing preliminary spectral response from 350nm to 1700 nm, responsivity, sensitivity, corrected uniformity and simultaneous imaging of NIR and visible signals will be presented along with a discussion of anticipated applications for this new sensor technology.

  16. A Cryogenic Radiometry Based Spectral Responsivity Scale at the National Metrology Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gan; Huang, Xuebo

    This paper describes the spectral responsivity scale established at the National Metrology Centre (NMC) based on cryogenic radiometry. A primary standard - a mechanically pumped cryogenic radiometer together with a set of intensity-stabilised lasers provides traceability for optical power measurement with an uncertainty in the order of 10-4 at 14 discrete wavelengths in the spectral range from 350 nm to 800 nm. A silicon trap detector, with its absolute responsivity calibrated against the cryogenic radiometer is used as a transfer standard for the calibration of other detectors using a specially built spectral comparator. The relative spectral responsivity of a detector at other wavelengths can be determined through the use of a cavity pyroelectric detector and the extrapolation technique. With this scale, NMC is capable to calibrate the spectral responsivity of different type of photo detectors from 250 nm to 1640 nm with an uncertainty range from 3.7% to 0.3%.

  17. Spectral amplification models for response spectrum addressing the directivity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, Saed; Akkar, Sinan

    2017-04-01

    Ground motions with forward directivity effects are known with their significantly large spectral ordinates in medium-to-long periods. The large spectral ordinates stem from the impulsive characteristics of the forward directivity ground motions. The quantification of these spectral amplifications requires the identification of major seismological parameters that play a role in their generation. After running a suite of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, Moghimi and Akkar (2016) have shown that fault slip rate, fault characteristic magnitude, fault-site geometry as well as mean annual exceedance rate are important parameters that determine the level of spectral amplification due to directivity. These parameters are considered to develop two separate spectral amplification equations in this study. The proposed equations rely on Shahi and Baker (SHB11; 2011) and Chiou and Spudich (CHS13; Spudic et al., 2013) narrow-band forward directivity models. The presented equations only focus on the estimation of maximum spectral amplifications that occur at the ends of the fault segments. This way we eliminate the fault-site parameter in our equations for simplification. The proposed equations show different trends due to differences in the narrow-band directivity models of SHB11 and CHS13. The equations given in this study can form bases for describing forward directivity effects in seismic design codes. REFERENCES Shahi. S., Baker, J.W. (2011), "An Empirically Calibrated Framework for Including the Effects of Near-Fault Directivity in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis", Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 101(2): 742-755. Spudich, P., Watson-Lamprey, J., Somerville, P., Bayless, J., Shahi, S. K., Baker, J. W., Rowshandel, B., and Chiou, B. (2013), "Final Report of the NGA-West2 Directivity Working Group", PEER Report 2013/09. Moghimi. S., Akkar, S. (2016), "Implications of Forward Directivity Effects on Design Ground Motions", Seismological Society of

  18. Designing spectrum-splitting dichroic filters to optimize current-matched photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Miles, Alexander; Cocilovo, Byron; Wheelwright, Brian; Pan, Wei; Tweet, Doug; Norwood, Robert A

    2016-03-10

    We have developed an approach for designing a dichroic coating to optimize performance of current-matched multijunction photovoltaic cells while diverting unused light. By matching the spectral responses of the photovoltaic cells and current matching them, substantial improvement to system efficiencies is shown to be possible. A design for use in a concentrating hybrid solar collector was produced by this approach, and is presented. Materials selection, design methodology, and tilt behavior on a curved substrate are discussed.

  19. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  20. Spectral response measurements of multijunction solar cells with low shunt resistance and breakdown voltages.

    PubMed

    Babaro, Juan P; West, Kevin G; Hamadani, Behrang H

    2016-11-01

    Spectral response measurements of germanium-based triple-junction solar cells were performed under a variety of light and voltage bias conditions. Two of the three junctions exhibited voltage and light bias dependent artifacts in their measured responses, complicating the true spectral response of these junctions. To obtain more insight into the observed phenomena, a set of current-voltage measurement combinations were also performed on the solar cells under identical illumination conditions, and the data were used in the context of a diode-based analytical model to calculate and predict the spectral response behavior of each junction as a function of voltage. The analysis revealed that both low shunt resistance and low breakdown voltages in two of the three junctions influenced the measured quantum efficiency of all three junctions. The data and the modeling suggest that combination of current-voltage measurements under various light bias sources can reveal important information about the spectral response behavior in multijunction solar cells.

  1. Higher values of spectral response, absorption coefficient and external quantum efficiency of solar cell in the form of pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a study on spectral response, absorption coefficient and external quantum efficiency of solar cell in the form of pyramid [1, 2]. We investigate to what extent and under what conditions we want to take advantage of ray incidence Seven times [3, 4]. It is found that these analyses can be used to determine the optimal surface texture which provides the best light trapping for solar cells in terms of the total internal reflection occurring in the high-index medium at incidence angles larger than the nominal critical angle [3-9]. One of the main contributions of this paper is the analysis and quantification of the influence of the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids in textured surface for solar cells and its application on the photovoltaic parameters. In this model we show that the material can have seven successive incident ray absorptions instead of five currently, where we changed the direction of the reflected ray, by identifying and install the angle between the two neighbouring pyramids, the incidence angle, the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids and their height. Thus, with an angle between the two neighbouring pyramid fixed at 12° and for angle of incidence fixed at 84°. For these values of the angle between the two neighbouring pyramids and incidence angle, the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids fixed at 2.10 μm for a pyramid height of 10 μm. This leads to the largest possible increase in optical efficiency, such as spectral response, Absorption Coefficient and External Quantum Efficiency. The results are in good agreement with the available literature.

  2. Photovoltaic nanocrystal scintillators hybridized on Si solar cells for enhanced conversion efficiency in UV.

    PubMed

    Mutlugun, Evren; Soganci, Ibrahim Murat; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2008-03-17

    We propose and demonstrate semiconductor nanocrystal based photovoltaic scintillators integrated on solar cells to enhance photovoltaic device parameters including spectral responsivity, open circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor, and solar conversion efficiency in the ultraviolet. Hybridizing (CdSe)ZnS core-shell quantum dots of 2.4 nm in diameter on multi-crystalline Si solar cells for the first time, we show that the solar conversion efficiency is enhanced 2 folds under white light illumination similar to the solar spectrum. Such nanocrystal scintillators provide the ability to extend the photovoltaic activity towards UV.

  3. [Comparative investigation of locust's phototactic visual spectrum effect and phototactic response to spectral illumination].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi-Hang; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    To provide theoretical support for determining locust's phototactic spectrum, and explore locust's phototactic mechanism stimulated by light, utilizing AvaSpec fiber-optic spectrometer system and AvaLight-DHS, the investigation of locust's phototactic visual spectrum effect after light energy stimulated locust's vision system was carried out and on this basis, utilizing the investigated device of locust's phototactic response to spectral illumination, the discrepancy of locust's phototactic response to spectral illumination was certificated comparatively. The results show that the degree of locust's vision system absorbing the single spectrum photon of 430, 545 and 610 nm is significant and there exists difference, and the behavioral response to orange, violet, green, and blue spectral light has the difference in selective sensitivity, with the intensity of response to violet light being the strongest. The degree of response to orange light is the maximum, simultaneously, locust's vision system absorbing spectral photon energy has selective difference and requirement of illumination time, moreover, the sensitive degree of locust's visual system to spectrum and the strength of the lighting energy, influencing locust's phototactic response degree, and the micro-response of locust's phototactic vision physiology, led by the photoelectric effect of locust absorbing sensitive photon and converting photon energy, is the reason for locust's phototactic orientation response. In addition, locust's phototactic visual spectrum effect, only when the biological photoelectric effect of locust's visual system is stimulated by spectral illumination, can present the sensitivity of the spectral absorption effect, so, using the stronger ultraviolet stimulation characteristic of violet light, the different sensitive stimulation of orange, green, blue spectral light on locust's phototactic vision, and combining orange, violet, green, blue spectral light field mechanism reasonably, can

  4. Spectral Responses in Zebrafish Horizontal Cells Include a Tetraphasic Response and a Novel UV-Dominated Triphasic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Zebrafish are tetrachromats with red (R, 570 nm), green (G, 480 nm), blue (B, 415 nm), and UV (U, 362 nm) cones. Although neurons in other cyprinid retinas are rich in color processing neural circuitry, spectral responses of individual neurons in zebrafish retina, a genetic model for vertebrate color vision, are yet to be studied. Using dye-filled sharp microelectrodes, horizontal cell voltage responses to light stimuli of different wavelengths and irradiances were recorded in a superfused eyecup. Spectral properties were assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Six spectral classes of horizontal cell were distinguished. Two monophasic response types (L1 and L2) hyperpolarized at all wavelengths. L1 sensitivities peaked at 493 nm, near the G cone absorbance maximum. Modeled spectra suggest equally weighted inputs from both R and G cones and, in addition, a “hidden opponency” from blue cones. These were classified as R−/G−/(b+). L2 sensitivities were maximal at 563 nm near the R cone absorbance peak; modeled spectra were dominated by R cones, with lesser G cone contributions. B and UV cone signals were small or absent. These are R−/g−. Four chromatic (C-type) horizontal cells were either depolarized (+) or hyperpolarized (−) depending on stimulus wavelength. These types are biphasic (R+/G−/B−) with peak excitation at 467 nm, between G and B cone absorbance peaks, UV triphasic (r−/G+/U−) with peak excitation at 362 nm similar to UV cones, and blue triphasic (r−/G+/B−/u−) and blue tetraphasic (r−/G+/B−/u+), with peak excitation at 409 and 411 nm, respectively, similar to B cones. UV triphasic and blue tetraphasic horizontal cell spectral responses are unique and were not anticipated in previous models of distal color circuitry in cyprinids. PMID:20610786

  5. Study Of Remote Sensor Spectral Responses And Data Processing Algorithms For Feature Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, F. O.; Davis, R. E.; Fales, C. L.; Ardiuni, R. F.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-10-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in remote sensing is used to study and compare the performance of sensor spectral responses and data processing algorithms for classifying spectral features. The simulated spectral responses include those of the U.S. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the French Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT). The simulated data processing algorithms include the computationally simple boundary approximation method (BAM) to discriminate between general target categories such as vegetation, bare land, water, snow, and clouds, and the maximum likelihood (MLH) and mean-square distance (MSD) classifications to discriminate between specific targets such as various crop types.

  6. Development of New Photovoltaic Devices Based on Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    response is registered in all the photon spectral range studied. The new kind of Graetzel-like solar cell device was built without dye and TiO2 , showing...response is registered in all the photon spectral range studied. - The new kind of Graetzel (DSSC, Dye Synthesized Solar Cell ) built without Dye and TiO2 ...an IPCE up to 20%. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, organic solar cells , photovoltaics, carbon nanotubes 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  7. Revealing the spectral response of a plasmonic lens using low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuiyan; Le Moal, Eric; Bigourdan, Florian; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge; Dujardin, Gérald; Boer-Duchemin, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Plasmonic lenses, even of simple design, may have intricate spectral behavior. The spectral response of a plasmonic lens to a local, broadband excitation has rarely been studied despite its central importance in future applications. Here we use the unique combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved optical spectroscopy to probe the spectral response of a plasmonic lens. Such a lens consists of a series of concentric circular slits etched in a thick gold film. Spectrally broad, circular surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waves are electrically launched from the STM tip at the plasmonic lens center, and these waves scatter at the slits into a narrow, out-of-plane, light beam. We show that the angular distribution of the emitted light results from the interplay of the size of the plasmonic lens and the spectral width of the SPP nanosource. We then propose simple design rules for optimized light beaming with the smallest possible footprint. The spectral distribution of the emitted light depends not only on the SPP nanosource, but on the local density of electromagnetic states (EM-LDOS) at the nanosource position, which in turn depends on the cavity modes of the plasmonic microstructure. The key parameters for tailoring the spectral response of the plasmonic lens are the period of the slits forming the lens, the number of slits, and the lens inner diameter.

  8. Spectral responsivity calibrations of two types of pyroelectric radiometers using three different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J.; Eppeldauer, G. P.; Hanssen, L. M.; Podobedov, V. B.

    2012-06-01

    Spectral responsivity calibrations of two different types of pyroelectric radiometers have been made in the infrared region up to 14 μm in power mode using three different calibration facilities at NIST. One pyroelectric radiometer is a temperature-controlled low noise-equivalent-power (NEP) single-element pyroelectric radiometer with an active area of 5 mm in diameter. The other radiometer is a prototype using the same type of pyroeletric detector with dome-input optics, which was designed to increase absorptance and to minimize spectral structures to obtain a constant spectral responsivity. Three calibration facilities at NIST were used to conduct direct and indirect responsivity calibrations tied to absolute scales in the infrared spectral regime. We report the calibration results for the single-element pyroelectric radiometer using a new Infrared Spectral Comparator Facility (IRSCF) for direct calibration. Also, a combined method using the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIS) facility and single wavelength laser tie-points are described to calibrated standard detectors with an indirect approach. For the dome-input pyroelectric radiometer, the results obtained from another direct calibration method using a circular variable filter (CVF) spectrometer and the FTIS are also presented. The inter-comparison of different calibration methods enables us to improve the responsivity uncertainty performed by the different facilities. For both radiometers, consistent results of the spectral power responsivity have been obtained applying different methods from 1.5 μm to 14 μm with responsivity uncertainties between 1 % and 2 % (k = 2). Relevant characterization results, such as spatial uniformity, linearity, and angular dependence of responsivity, are shown. Validation of the spectral responsivity calibrations, uncertainty sources, and improvements for each method will also be discussed.

  9. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics are on the verge of revolutionizing building-integrated photovoltaics. For other applications, however, several basic open scientific questions need answering to, in particular, further improve energy-conversion efficiency and lifetime.

  10. All-silicon spherical-Mie-resonator photodiode with spectral response in the infrared region.

    PubMed

    Garín, M; Fenollosa, R; Alcubilla, R; Shi, L; Marsal, L F; Meseguer, F

    2014-03-10

    Silicon is the material of choice for visible light photodetection and solar cell fabrication. However, due to the intrinsic band gap properties of silicon, most infrared photons are energetically useless. Here, we show the first example of a photodiode developed on a micrometre scale sphere made of polycrystalline silicon whose photocurrent shows the Mie modes of a classical spherical resonator. The long dwell time of resonating photons enhances the photocurrent response, extending it into the infrared region well beyond the absorption edge of bulk silicon. It opens the door for developing solar cells and photodetectors that may harvest infrared light more efficiently than silicon photovoltaic devices that are so far developed.

  11. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  12. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  13. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  14. Photovoltaic responses in ionically self-assembled nanostructures containing conjugated polymers and fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brands, Charles; Piok, T.; Neyman, Patrick J.; Erlacher, A.; Soman, C.; Murray, M. A.; Schroeder, Raoul; Heflin, James R.; Graupner, Wilhelm; Marciu, Daniela; Drake, Adam; Miller, Michael B.; Wang, Hong; Gibson, Harry W.; Dorn, Harry C.; Leising, Guenther; Guzy, M.; Davis, Rick M.

    2000-04-01

    We use the technique of ironically self-assembled monolayers (ISAMs) to produce photovoltaic devices of well-controlled thickness and composition. The ISAM nanostructure fabrication method simply involves the alternate dipping of a charged substrate into aqueous cationic and anionic solutions at room temperature. We have employed several approaches to combine the tetrahydrothiophenium precursor of PPV with fullerenes and other organic materials .We apply modulation spectroscopy for the electro-optical characterization of the ISAM-devices. Analyzing the thickness dependence of the recorded photocurrent action spectra allows us to identify the photoactive region within the devices. The modulation frequency dependence of the photocurrent can be assigned to the influence of trapped charges taking part in the photovoltaic process. By utilizing the ability to control both thickness and composition of the organic layer at a nanometer level of precision, the composition and concentration of these defects has ben systematically varied.

  15. UV-VIS-IR Spectral Responsivity Measurement System for Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Field, H.

    1998-11-12

    NREL's PV Cell and Module Performance Characterization group has built a new spectral responsivity measurement system for solar cells. It uses a xenon arc lamp source, a single, grating monochrometer, and a fiber-optic bundle to couple the monochromatic light to the test device. The system has a spectral bandwidth of 2 nm, minimum spot diameter of 1.6 mm, a spectral range of 280-1330 nm, and uncertainty better than {+-}3% over most of this range. It is capable of incorporating light bias with intensities exceeding one sun. This paper discusses the system's features, capabilities, calibration, and measurement uncertainties.

  16. Variation of surface water spectral response as a function of in situ sampling technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Hodgson, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were carried out to determine the spectral variation contributed by a particular sampling technique. A portable radiometer was used to measure the surface water spectral response. Variation due to the reflectance of objects near the radiometer (i.e., the boat side) during data acquisition was studied. Consideration was also given to the variation due to the temporal nature of the phenomena (i.e., wave activity).

  17. Frequency Response of Multipoint Chemical Shift Based Spectral Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Ethan K.; Chebrolu, Venkata V.; Block, Walter F.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To provide a framework for characterizing the frequency response of multi-point chemical shift based species separation techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS Multi-point chemical shift based species separation techniques acquire complex images at multiple echo times and perform maximum likelihood estimation to decompose signal from different species into separate images. In general, after a non-linear process of estimating and demodulating the field map, these decomposition methods are linear transforms from the echo-time domain to the chemical-shift-frequency domain, analogous to the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). In this work, we describe a technique for finding the magnitude and phase of chemical shift decomposition for input signals over a range of frequencies using numerical and experimental modeling and examine several important cases of species separation. RESULTS Simple expressions can be derived to describe the response to a wide variety of input signals. Agreement between numerical modeling and experimental results is very good. CONCLUSION Chemical shift based species separation is linear, and therefore can be fully described by the magnitude and phase curves of the frequency response. The periodic nature of the frequency response has important implications for the robustness of various techniques for resolving ambiguities in field inhomogeneity. PMID:20882625

  18. Photovoltaic detector based on type II heterostructure with deep AlSb/InAsSb/AlSb quantum well in the active region for the midinfrared spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailova, M. P. Andreev, I. A.; Moiseev, K. D.; Ivanov, E. V.; Konovalov, G. G.; Mikhailov, M. Yu.; Yakovlev, Yu. P.

    2011-02-15

    Photodetectors for the spectral range 2-4 {mu}m, based on an asymmetric type-II heterostructure p-InAs/AlSb/InAsSb/AlSb/(p, n)GaSb with a single deep quantum well (QW) or three deep QWs at the heterointerface, have been grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and analyzed. The transport, luminescent, photoelectric, current-voltage, and capacitance-voltage characteristics of these structures have been examined. A high-intensity positive and negative luminescence was observed in the spectral range 3-4 {mu}m at high temperatures (300-400 K). The photosensitivity spectra were in the range 1.2-3.6 {mu}m (T = 77 K). Large values of the quantum yield ({eta} = 0.6-0.7), responsivity (S{sub {lambda}} = 0.9-1.4 A W{sup -1}), and detectivity (D*{sub {lambda}} = 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 10} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup -1}) were obtained at T = 77-200 K. The small capacitance of the structures (C = 7.5 pF at V = -1 V and T = 300 K) enabled an estimate of the response time of the photodetector at {tau} = 75 ps, which corresponds to a bandwidth of about 6 GHz. Photodetectors of this kind are promising for heterodyne detection of the emission of quantum-cascade lasers and IR spectroscopy.

  19. Analysis of the spectral response of Tamarix spp vegetation to the soil salinity based on ground spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiapaer, Guli; Chen, Xi; Bao, Anming

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the field-derived hyperspecral reflectance of the Tamarix spp vegetation and background soil parameters (soluble salt content and eight base ions) of associated saline soil at the lower reaches of the Tarim River were measured and studied. The spectral responses of the Tamarix spp canopy with different level saline soil, and the relationship between soil salt variables and vegetation spectral indices were analyzed in order to understand the sensitive bands and the appropriate vegetation spectral indices. The results revealed that:(1) the spectra at band ranges 600-750nm,1350-1550nm change regularly with the increasing salt content of the background soil. (2) The removal continuum reflectance shows that the three absorb troughs with band ranges 460-560nm, 560-760nm,1050-1300nm, 1300-1700nm, can play an important role in indicating increasing changes of soil salt. Theses sensitive bands just reflect the characteristics of the chlorophyll content, moisture content of the vegetation. It presents a negative correction between the absorption valley changing trend and the salt content in the background soil. When the soil salinity content is higher, the corresponding absorption valley value that reflects vegetation growth condition characteristic is not more obvious. (3) Further analysis are conducted on the absorption width at the band range 1300-1700nm, the absorption width at the band range 560-760nm, λred, absorption depth at the band range 1050-1300nm, R1450, MSAVI, trough area of the band range 560-760nm, λred and the absorption depth at the band range 560-760nm, these nine indices can be used to predict salt values of saline soil and evaluate the degree of soil salinity.

  20. Effects of Spectral Degradation on Attentional Modulation of Cortical Auditory Responses to Continuous Speech.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Somarowthu, Ala; Ding, Nai

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of spectral degradation on cortical speech encoding in complex auditory scenes. Young normal-hearing listeners were simultaneously presented with two speech streams and were instructed to attend to only one of them. The speech mixtures were subjected to noise-channel vocoding to preserve the temporal envelope and degrade the spectral information of speech. Each subject was tested with five spectral resolution conditions (unprocessed speech, 64-, 32-, 16-, and 8-channel vocoder conditions) and two target-to-masker ratio (TMR) conditions (3 and 0 dB). Ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) responses and speech comprehension were measured in each spectral and TMR condition for each subject. Neural tracking of each speech stream was characterized by cross-correlating the EEG responses with the envelope of each of the simultaneous speech streams at different time lags. Results showed that spectral degradation and TMR both significantly influenced how top-down attention modulated the EEG responses to the attended and unattended speech. That is, the EEG responses to the attended and unattended speech streams differed more for the higher (unprocessed, 64 ch, and 32 ch) than the lower (16 and 8 ch) spectral resolution conditions, as well as for the higher (3 dB) than the lower TMR (0 dB) condition. The magnitude of differential neural modulation responses to the attended and unattended speech streams significantly correlated with speech comprehension scores. These results suggest that severe spectral degradation and low TMR hinder speech stream segregation, making it difficult to employ top-down attention to differentially process different speech streams.

  1. Upscaling of spectral induced polarization response using random tube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maineult, Alexis; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian; Florsch, Nicolas; Titov, Konstantin

    2017-02-01

    In order to upscale the induced polarization (IP) response of porous media, from the pore scale to the sample scale, we implement a procedure to compute the macroscopic complex resistivity response of random tube networks. A network is made of a 2D square-meshed grid of connected tubes, which obey to a given tube radius distribution. In a simplified approach, the electrical impedance of each tube follows a local Pelton resistivity model, with identical resistivity, chargeability and Cole-Cole exponent values for all the tubes - only the time constant varies, as it depends on the radius of each tube and on a diffusion coefficient also identical for all the tubes. By solving the conservation law for the electrical charge, the macroscopic IP response of the network is obtained. We fit successfully the macroscopic complex resistivity also by a Pelton resistivity model. Simulations on uncorrelated and correlated networks, for which the tube radius distribution is so that the decimal logarithm of the radius is normally distributed, evidence that the local and macroscopic model parameters are the same, except the Cole-Cole exponent: its macroscopic value diminishes with increasing heterogeneity (i.e., with increasing standard deviation of the radius distribution), compared to its local value. The methodology is also applied to six siliciclastic rock samples, for which the pore radius distributions from mercury porosimetry are available. These samples exhibit the same behaviour as synthetic media, i.e., the macroscopic Cole-Cole exponent is always lower than the local one. As a conclusion, the pore network method seems to be a promising tool for studying the upscaling of the IP response of porous media.

  2. Correlated Particle Motion and THz Spectral Response of Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiechowski, Maciej; Schran, Christoph; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of supercritical water reveal distinctly different distance-dependent modulations of dipolar response and correlations in particle motion compared to ambient conditions. The strongly perturbed H-bond network of water at supercritical conditions allows for considerable translational and rotational freedom of individual molecules. These changes give rise to substantially different infrared spectra and vibrational density of states at THz frequencies for densities above and below the Widom line that separates percolating liquidlike and clustered gaslike supercritical water.

  3. Investigation on spectral response of micro-cavity structure by symmetrical tapered fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yang; Yan, Xiaojun; Li, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a micro-cavity structure made of symmetrical tapered fiber tips. The waist of a conventional fiber taper fabricated from heating and stretching technique is symmetrically cleaved, and the aligned fiber tips with air gap constitute a Fabry-Perot micro-cavity due to the reflection at the tip facet. The spectral responses of such micro-cavity structure have been investigated both in beam propagation models and experiments. The multibeam interference in the micro-cavity and the impact of the waist diameter and cavity length on the spectral response has been successfully demonstrated. And a micro-cavity structure with 45 μm waist diameter was experimentally achieved, the measured spectra agree well with the simulation ones, indicating that the spectral response of the micro-cavity structure is contributed by both the multibeam interference and the Fabry-Perot micro-cavity.

  4. Absolute spectral responsivity measurements of solar cells by a hybrid optical technique.

    PubMed

    Hamadani, Behrang H; Roller, John; Dougherty, Brian; Persaud, Fiona; Yoon, Howard W

    2013-07-20

    An irradiance mode, absolute differential spectral response measurement system for solar cells is presented. The system is based on combining the monochromator-based approach of determining the power mode spectral responsivity of cells with an LED-based measurement to construct a curve representing the light-overfilled absolute spectral response of the entire cell. This curve can be used to predict the short-circuit current (I(sc)) of the cell under the AM 1.5 standard reference spectrum. The measurement system is SI-traceable via detectors with primary calibrations linked to the NIST absolute cryogenic radiometer. An uncertainty analysis of the methodology places the relative uncertainty of the calculated I(sc) at better than ±0.8%.

  5. Spectral responsivity calibration of silicon photodetectors using monochromator-based cryogenic radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Lin, Yandong; Gan, Haiyong; Li, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic radiometer is the most accurate measurement setup for optical power measurement, underpinning the radiometry and photometry standards in many countries around the world. Typically cryogenic radiometers are designed for laser injection, and the measurement uncertainty at the laser wavelengths can reach 10-4. The National Institute of Metrology China has used the laser cryogenic radiometer to realize the absolute spectral responsivity of the detectors. In order to achieve spectral responsivity measurement ability in a wider spectral range, we establish the new spectral type cryogenic radiometer system using a supercontinuum white light source and a double monochromator, covering spectral range of 400 nm - 1100 nm. Establishment of the new cryogenic radiometer will greatly enhance the entire optical radiation measurement capablities, such as radiation illuminance and luminance measurement. A series of experiments have been undertaken, including measurement of noise level, heating equivalence, wavelength calibration, power stabilization, detector characteristics measurement, and different light source spectral radiation power measurement. The measurement uncertainties are analyzed and presented.

  6. Increased power, pulse length, and spectral purity free-electron laser for inverse-Compton X-ray production and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of thin film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M.

    The free-electron laser (FEL) system can be configured to produce X-ray or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light via Compton backscattering and to perform many types of spectroscopy including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In it's most common incarnation, the FEL is limited by three major factors: average laser power, laser spectral purity, and laser pulse length. Some examples of the limitations that these shortcomings give rise to include limiting the range of remote spectroscopy, degrading spectroscopic precision, and lowering the attainable x-ray flux, respectively. In this work, we explored three methods of improving the FEL. First, a beam expanding optic dubbed the TIRBBE was designed, built, and tested to prevent laser damage to the resonator mirrors and allow for higher average power. This optic had the added benefit of increasing the spectral purity. Second, a intra-cavity etalon filter dubbed the FROZEN FISH was designed, built, and tested to increase spectral purity and eliminate the frequency pulling (tendency of an FEL to pull towards longer wavelengths during a macropulse) all in a high damage threshold, fully wavelength adjustable package. Finally, a laser cooling scheme which allows for extension of the electron beam macropulse used to create the FEL light by counter-acting electron back-heating was explored. The first measurements of the back-heating temperature rise were taken, calculations of the required laser parameters were made, design of the full system was completed, and construction has begun. Experimental work using LIBS to characterize thin film solar cells was also completed in anticipation of using the improved FEL to better characterize such materials. The frequency tunability and picosecond micropulse width of the FEL will allow for exploration of the frequency response of LIBS ablation and fine resolution of the make up of these materials with depth unattainable with a conventional fixed frequency nanosecond pulse laser.

  7. Variation of spectral response curves of GaAs photocathodes in activation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jijun; Chang, Benkang; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Gao, Pin

    2006-09-01

    The spectral response curves of reflection-mode GaAs (100) photocathodes are measured in activation chamber by multi-information measurement system at RT, and by applying quantum efficiency formula, the variation of spectral response curves have been studied. Reflection-mode GaAs photocathodes materials are grown over GaAs wafer (100) by MBE with p-type beryllium doping, doping concentration is 1×10 19 cm -3 and the active layer thickness is 1.6μm. During the high-temperature activation process, the spectral response curves varied with activation time are measured. After the low-temperature activation, the photocathode is illuminated by a white light source, and the spectral response curves varied with illumination time are measured every other hour. Experimental results of both high-temperature and low-temperature activations show that the spectral response curve shape of photocathodes is a function of time. We use traditional quantum efficiency formulas of photocathodes, in which only the Γ photoemission is considered, to fit experimental spectral response curves, and find the theoretical curves are not in agreement with the experimental curves, the reason is other valley and hot-electron yields are necessary to be included in yields of reflection-mode photocathodes. Based on the two-minima diffusion model and the fit of escape probability, we modified the quantum efficiency formula of reflection-mode photocathodes, the modified formula can be used to explain the variation of yield curves of reflection-mode photocathodes very well.

  8. Biocrust spectral response as affected by changing climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Guirado, Emilio; Escribano, Paula; Reyes, Andres; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Drylands are characterized by scarce vegetation coverage and low rates of biological activity, both constrained by water scarcity. Under these conditions, biocrusts form key players of ecosystem functioning. They comprise complex poikilohydric communities of cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and bryophytes together with heterotrophic bacteria, archaea and fungi, which cover the uppermost soil layer. Biocrusts can cope with prolonged phases of drought, being rapidly re-activated when water becomes available again. Upon reactivation, biocrusts almost immediately turn green, fixing atmospheric carbon and nitrogen and increasing ecosystem productivity. However, due to their inconspicuous growth they have only rarely been analysed and spatially and temporally continuous information on their response to water pulses is missing. These data are particularly important under changing climatic conditions predicting an increase in aridity and variations in precipitation patterns within most of the dryland regions. In the present study, we used multi-temporal series of NDVI obtained from LANDSAT images to analyze biocrust and vegetation response to water pulses within the South African Succulent Karoo and we predicted their future response under different climate change scenarios. The results showed that biocrust and vegetation greenness are controlled by aridity, solar radiation and soil water content, showing similar annual patterns, with minimum values during dry periods that increased within the rainy season and decreased again after the onset of drought. However, biocrusts responded faster to water availability and turned green almost immediately after small rains, producing a small NDVI peak only few days after rainfall, whereas more time was needed for vegetation to grow new green tissue. However, once the photosynthetic tissue of vegetation was restored, it caused the highest increase of NDVI values after the rain. Predicted changes in precipitation patterns and aridity

  9. Wave spectral response to sudden changes in wind direction in finite depth waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-14

    Virtual Special Issue Ocean Surface Waves Wave spectral response to sudden changes in wind direction in finite-depth waters Saima Aijaz a , ∗, W...Revised 22 October 2015 Accepted 2 November 2015 Available online 14 November 2015 Keywords: Wave modelling Wind shift Wave response...Whitecapping dissipation Swell dissipation Bottom friction a b s t r a c t The response of a wind -sea spectrum to sudden changes in wind directions of 180

  10. A method extracting solar cell parameters from spectral response by inverse laplace transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuominen, E.; Acerbis, M.; Hovinen, A.; Siirtola, T.; Sinkkonen, J.

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical method to interpret spectral responses measured from solar cells has been developed. Taking an inverse Laplace transform from the spectral response of a solar cell the spatial dependent collection efficiency of the cell can be obtained. Several important material parameters of the solar cell can be extracted from this function. Applying this method the properties of the solar cell can be investigated without applying characterization methods to the cell itself. We have applied the method both to simulated solar cells andto real solar cells.

  11. Photovoltaic nanopillar radial junction diode architecture enhanced by integrating semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals as light harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güzeltürk, Burak; Mutlugün, Evren; Wang, Xiaodong; Pey, Kin Leong; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2010-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate colloidal quantum dot hybridized, radial p-n junction based, nanopillar solar cells with photovoltaic performance enhanced by intimately integrating nanocrystals to serve as light harvesting agents around the light trapping pillars. By furnishing Si based nanopillar photovoltaic diodes with CdSe quantum dots, we experimentally showed up to sixfold enhancement in UV responsivity and ˜13% enhancement in overall solar conversion efficiency. The maximum responsivity enhancement achieved by incorporation of nanocrystals in the nanopillar architecture is found to be spectrally more than four times larger than the responsivity enhancement obtained using planar architecture of the same device.

  12. Radiometry for characterizing photovoltaic devices in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Field, H.

    1995-09-01

    A variety of radiometric instruments are used in the laboratory to characterize the performance of photovoltaic (PV) devices. Specific applications include calibrating spectral-response measurement systems and setting the intensity of solar simulators. Radiometers can use thermal or semiconductor sensors. The most appropriate radiometer for a particular measurement depends on the goal of the measurement. It is important to understand the characteristics of the radiometer to minimize errors and uncertainty in measurement results.

  13. Synthesis and spectral characterization of environmentally responsive fluorescent deoxycytidine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Elmehriki, Adam AH; Suchý, Mojmír; Chicas, Kirby J; Wojciechowski, Filip; Hudson, Robert HE

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the synthesis and spectroscopic properties of five novel pyrrolodeoxycytidine analogs, and the related 5-(1-pyrenylethynyl)-2’-deoxycytidine analog; as well as fluorescence characterization of 5-(p-methoxyphenylethynyl)-2’-deoxyuridine. Within this series of compounds, rigidification of the structure from 6-phenylpyrrolodeoxycytidine to 5,6-benzopyrroldeoxycytidine made remarkable improvement of the fluorescence quantum yield (Φ ~1, EtOH) and substantially increased the Stokes shift. Exchange of the phenyl group of 6-phenylpyrrolodeoxycytidine for other heterocycles (benzofuryl or indolyl) produced an increase in the extinction coefficient at the excitation wavelength while preserving high quantum yields. The steady-state fluorescence response to the environment was determined by sensitivity of Stokes shift to solvent polarity. The effect of solvent polarity on fluorescence emission intensity was concurrently examined and showed that 5,6-benzopyrrolodeoxycytidine is highly sensitive to the presence of water. On the other hand, the previously synthesized 5-(p-methoxyphenylethynyl)-2’-deoxyuridine was found to be sensitive to solvent viscosity indicating molecular rotor behavior. PMID:25483932

  14. Synthesis and spectral characterization of environmentally responsive fluorescent deoxycytidine analogs.

    PubMed

    Elmehriki, Adam A H; Suchý, Mojmír; Chicas, Kirby J; Wojciechowski, Filip; Hudson, Robert H E

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the synthesis and spectroscopic properties of five novel pyrrolodeoxycytidine analogs, and the related 5-(1-pyrenylethynyl)-2'-deoxycytidine analog; as well as fluorescence characterization of 5-(p-methoxyphenylethynyl)-2'-deoxyuridine. Within this series of compounds, rigidification of the structure from 6-phenylpyrrolodeoxycytidine to 5,6-benzopyrroldeoxycytidine made remarkable improvement of the fluorescence quantum yield (Φ ~1, EtOH) and substantially increased the Stokes shift. Exchange of the phenyl group of 6-phenylpyrrolodeoxycytidine for other heterocycles (benzofuryl or indolyl) produced an increase in the extinction coefficient at the excitation wavelength while preserving high quantum yields. The steady-state fluorescence response to the environment was determined by sensitivity of Stokes shift to solvent polarity. The effect of solvent polarity on fluorescence emission intensity was concurrently examined and showed that 5,6-benzopyrrolodeoxycytidine is highly sensitive to the presence of water. On the other hand, the previously synthesized 5-(p-methoxyphenylethynyl)-2'-deoxyuridine was found to be sensitive to solvent viscosity indicating molecular rotor behavior.

  15. Plasmonic Backscattering Enhanced Inverted Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Roberts, B.; Ku, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    A plasmonic nanoparticle incorporated inverted organic photovoltaic structure was demonstrated where a monolayer of Ag nanoparticles acted as a wavelength selective reflector. Enhanced light harvesting via plasmonic backscattering into the photovoltaic absorber was observed, resulting in a two-fold improvement in the photocurrent and increased open-circuit voltage. Further, utilizing an optical spacer, the plasmonic backscattering was spectrally controlled, thereby modulating the external quantum efficiency and the photocurrent. Unlike a regular thin-film metallic back reflector, excellent off-resonance optical transmission in excess of 80% was observed from the Ag nanoparticles, making this structure highly suitable for semi-transparent and multi-junction photovoltaic applications.

  16. Spectral response measurements of multijunction solar cells with low shunt resistance and breakdown voltages

    PubMed Central

    Babaro, Juan P.; West, Kevin G.; Hamadani, Behrang H.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral response measurements of germanium-based triple-junction solar cells were performed under a variety of light and voltage bias conditions. Two of the three junctions exhibited voltage and light bias dependent artifacts in their measured responses, complicating the true spectral response of these junctions. To obtain more insight into the observed phenomena, a set of current-voltage measurement combinations were also performed on the solar cells under identical illumination conditions, and the data were used in the context of a diode-based analytical model to calculate and predict the spectral response behavior of each junction as a function of voltage. The analysis revealed that both low shunt resistance and low breakdown voltages in two of the three junctions influenced the measured quantum efficiency of all three junctions. The data and the modeling suggest that combination of current-voltage measurements under various light bias sources can reveal important information about the spectral response behavior in multijunction solar cells. PMID:28133534

  17. Proposal for superstructure based high efficiency photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; Leburton, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A novel class of cascade structures is proposed which features multijunction upper subcells, referred to as superstructure high-efficiency photovoltaics (SHEPs). The additional junctions enhance spectral response and improve radiation tolerance by reducing bulk recombination losses. This is important because ternary III-V alloys, which tend to have short minority-carrier diffusion lengths, are the only viable materials for the high-bandgap upper subcells required for cascade solar cells. Realistic simulations of AlGaAs SHEPs show that one-sun AM0 efficiencies in excess of 26 percent are possible.

  18. [High-spectral responses of Myrica rubra seedlings to UV-B radiation stress].

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jian; Shi, Qi-Long; Zhang, Qian-Qian

    2012-12-01

    A simulated field experiment with three treatments, i. e., ambient light (control), reduced UV-B radiation, and enhanced UV-B radiation, was conducted to evaluate the effects of solar ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation on the seedlings of Myrica rubra, a typical woody species in subtropical region. The leaf chlorophyll content, spectral reflectance and spectral characteristic parameters were measured and analyzed. As compared with the control, enhanced UV-B radiation decreased the seedling chlorophyll content while reduced UV-B radiation significantly increased the chlorophyll content, and these effects reflected in the spectral reflectance. Under the effects of the three gradients of UV-B radiation, the differences in the reflectance at visible region mainly occurred around the green peak and red edge on the reflectance curve, and the peak wavelength of the red edge shifted to longer wavelength. Enhanced UV-B radiation had an accumulated temporal effect on M. rubra. The inverted-Gaussian model parameters R0, lambda0, lambda(p), Rs, and 6 were the useful guides to reveal the spectral responses of M. rubra seedlings under UV-B radiation stress, among which, Rs performed the best. The differences in the spectral reflectance under different UV-B radiation levels could be effectively distinguished with the vegetation indices composed of the spectral reflectance of narrow wave bands or the reflectance at specific wavelengths.

  19. Reconstructing spectral cues for sound localization from responses to rippled noise stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Vliegen, Joyce; Van Esch, Thamar

    2017-01-01

    Human sound localization in the mid-saggital plane (elevation) relies on an analysis of the idiosyncratic spectral shape cues provided by the head and pinnae. However, because the actual free-field stimulus spectrum is a-priori unknown to the auditory system, the problem of extracting the elevation angle from the sensory spectrum is ill-posed. Here we test different spectral localization models by eliciting head movements toward broad-band noise stimuli with randomly shaped, rippled amplitude spectra emanating from a speaker at a fixed location, while varying the ripple bandwidth between 1.5 and 5.0 cycles/octave. Six listeners participated in the experiments. From the distributions of localization responses toward the individual stimuli, we estimated the listeners’ spectral-shape cues underlying their elevation percepts, by applying maximum-likelihood estimation. The reconstructed spectral cues resulted to be invariant to the considerable variation in ripple bandwidth, and for each listener they had a remarkable resemblance to the idiosyncratic head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). These results are not in line with models that rely on the detection of a single peak or notch in the amplitude spectrum, nor with a local analysis of first- and second-order spectral derivatives. Instead, our data support a model in which the auditory system performs a cross-correlation between the sensory input at the eardrum-auditory nerve, and stored representations of HRTF spectral shapes, to extract the perceived elevation angle. PMID:28333967

  20. Measured Polarized Spectral Responsivity of JPSS J1 VIIRS Using the NIST T-SIRCUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntire, Jeff; Young, James B.; Moyer, David; Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2015-01-01

    Recent pre-launch measurements performed on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) J1 Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Traveling Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations Using Uniform Sources (T-SIRCUS) monochromatic source have provided wavelength dependent polarization sensitivity for select spectral bands and viewing conditions. Measurements were made at a number of input linear polarization states (twelve in total) and initially at thirteen wavelengths across the bandpass (later expanded to seventeen for some cases). Using the source radiance information collected by an external monitor, a spectral responsivity function was constructed for each input linear polarization state. Additionally, an unpolarized spectral responsivity function was derived from these polarized measurements. An investigation of how the centroid, bandwidth, and detector responsivity vary with polarization state was weighted by two model input spectra to simulate both ground measurements as well as expected on-orbit conditions. These measurements will enhance our understanding of VIIRS polarization sensitivity, improve the design for future flight models, and provide valuable data to enhance product quality in the post-launch phase.

  1. Where can I find spectral response information for the MISR bands?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... of "out-of-band" light (less than 2% of the integrated energy), and the ARP_INFLTCAL file provides spectral response information for both the in-band region of each filter as well as for the total band. MISR: General Questions ...

  2. Enhancing the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared photovoltaic responses of crystalline-silicon solar cell by using aluminum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fei; Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Ma, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Lu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    We report to apply Al nanoparticles (NPs) to enhance the photovoltaic response of crystalline- or c-Si solar cell from the ultraviolet (UV) throughout the visible and near infrared (NIR) regimes. Al NPs were induced by solid thermal annealing and embedded in a SiO2 layer that was to passivate the front side of solar cell. Upon the excitation of surface plasmons (SPs) on the Al NPs under light illumination, an enhancement of broadband absorption of the solar cell was observed. The incorporation of Al NPs led to a relative 13.8% increase in photoelectric conversion efficiency of c-Si solar cell, and an external quantum efficiency enhancement from the UV throughout the visible and NIR regimes. The improvement of c-Si solar cell performance was attributed to both effects of absorption and scattering by SPs.

  3. Photovoltaic response around a unique 180° ferroelectric domain wall in single-crystalline BiFe O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouzon, C.; Chauleau, J.-Y.; Mougin, A.; Fusil, S.; Viret, M.

    2016-09-01

    Using an experimental setup designed to scan a submicron sized light spot and collect the photogenerated current through larger electrodes, we map the photovoltaic response in ferroelectric BiFe O3 single crystals. We study the effect produced by a unique 180° ferroelectric domain wall (DW) and show that the photocurrent maps are significantly affected by its presence and shape. The effect is large in its vicinity and in the Schottky barriers at the interface with the Au electrodes, but no extra photocurrent is observed when the illuminating spot touches the DW, indicating that this particular entity is not the heart of specific photoelectric properties. Using 3D modeling, we argue that the measured effect is due to the spatial distribution of internal fields which are significantly affected by the charge of the DW due to its distortion.

  4. AIM results for space-qualified HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors from 0.9-μm to 13-μm spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiml, M.; Bauer, A.; Bitterlich, H.; Bruder, M.; Hofmann, K.; Lutz, H.; Mai, M.; Nothaft, H.-P.; Rühlich, I.; Wendler, J.; Wiedmann, T.; Wollrab, R.; Ziegler, J.

    2006-09-01

    Remote sensing from space is an emerging market for applications in security, climate research, weather forecast, and global environmental monitoring, to mention a few. In particular, next generation systems demand for large, two-dimensional arrays in the short (SWIR, 0.9-2.5 μm) and the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) spectral range up to 15 μm. AIM's developments for space applications benefit from AIM's experiences in high-performance thermal imaging and seeker-head applications. AIM has delivered a 13 μm cut-off demonstrator for a high resolution Fourier-transform imaging spectrometer in limb geometry. For this 256 x 256 VLWIR sensor we measured a responsivity of 100 LSB/K and a noise equivalent temperature difference of 22 mK with 14 bit ADCs at 880 Hz full frame-rate. The substrate and epitaxial layer grown at AIM exhibit very good uniformity and low dark currents. Currently, AIM develops a 1024 x 256 SWIR detector (0.9-2.5 μm) with a capacitance transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) for hyperspectral imaging. The radiation hardness of AIM's FPA technology (MCT sensor and Silicon read-out integrated circuit) has been successfully tested by a total ionization dose (TID) experiment using ESTEC's 60Co γ-source. Our reference module withstands 30 krad TID. For enhanced reliability of the IDCA, AIM has developed a compact 1 W pulse-tube cooler with flexure bearing compressor, which induces also a very low vibration output. In summary, AIM will be able to supply space qualified detector modules covering the spectral range from 0.9 to 13 μm in the near future.

  5. Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    2010-05-01

    We apply two scenarios of 11-year solar spectral forcing, namely SIM-based out-of-phase variations and proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM. For both scenarios, and both models, we find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, and temperature responses decrease downward to the surface. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of ~5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature response to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing resembles 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two scenarios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., one based on 11-year cycles with background [Lean 2000] and the second from flux transport that has much less background change [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide a range of variations of TSI on centennial time scales. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI. The spectral solar forcing is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provides a first-order estimate of climate response. We report the different responses of stratosphere, troposphere, and ocean surface to these 4 scenarios of centennial spectral solar forcing. We further discuss the mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere

  6. Analysis of spectral response of optical switching devices based on chalcogenide bistable fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, Lubomír.; Müllerová, Jarmila

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are novel and promising devices for all-optical switching, ADD/DROP multiplexers, AND gates, switches, all-optical memory elements. Optical switching based on optical Kerr effects induced with high pump laser light incident on the FBGs cause the change of spectral characteristics of grating depending on the incident power. In this paper numerical studies of the nonlinear FBGs are presented. Optical switching based on the optical bistability in nonlinear chalcogenide FBGs is investigated. The spectral response of nonlinear FBGs is discussed from theoretical viewpoint. The simulations are based on the nonlinear coupled mode theory.

  7. The spectral response of the SCUBA-2 850- and 450-micron photometric bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, David A.; Gom, Brad G.; Abdelazim, Sherif; Friberg, Per; Bintley, Daniel; Holland, Wayne S.; MacIntosh, Michael J.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Tucker, Carole E.

    2014-07-01

    SCUBA-2 is a wide-field submillimeter bolometer camera operating at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The camera has twin focal planes, each with 5120 superconducting Transition Edge Sensors, which provide simultaneous images in two filter bands at 450 and 850 microns matched to the atmospheric windows. Detailed knowledge of the optical filter profiles that define these bands is important for estimating potential contamination from the prevalent CO J = 3-2 and CO 6-5 line emission, and correctly interpreting the effects of the source spectral index on photometric observations. We present measurements of the spectral response of SCUBA-2 obtained with FTS-2, the ancillary Fourier transform spectrometer instrument at the JCMT. The spectral measurements will be compared with the predicted filter profile determined from the linear combination of the individual filter profiles present in the SCUBA-2 optical train.

  8. Computed lateral rate and acceleration power spectral response of conventional and STOL airplanes to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Power-spectral-density calculations were made of the lateral responses to atmospheric turbulence for several conventional and short take-off and landing (STOL) airplanes. The turbulence was modeled as three orthogonal velocity components, which were uncorrelated, and each was represented with a one-dimensional power spectrum. Power spectral densities were computed for displacements, rates, and accelerations in roll, yaw, and sideslip. In addition, the power spectral density of the transverse acceleration was computed. Evaluation of ride quality based on a specific ride quality criterion was also made. The results show that the STOL airplanes generally had larger values for the rate and acceleration power spectra (and, consequently, larger corresponding root-mean-square values) than the conventional airplanes. The ride quality criterion gave poorer ratings to the STOL airplanes than to the conventional airplanes.

  9. Photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  10. Improved spectral radiance responsivity calibration of charge-coupled-device (CCD) imaging spectrometer with an internally illuminated integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-rong; Zhang, Zhen-duo; Li, Fu-tian; Yang, Xiao-hu

    2009-07-01

    A technique for calibrating the spectral radiance responsivity of the CCD imaging spectrometer with an internally illuminated integrating sphere is described. The spectral radiance of the integrating sphere is obtained by two steps. Firstly, a Spectralon panel diffuser and an ultraviolet spectrometer are combined into a new spectral radiometer which transfers the spectral irradiance of a NIST standard of spectral irradiance to that of the receiving aperture of the integrating sphere. Subsequently, the spectral radiance of the integrating sphere is derived from heat transfer theory for Lambertian radiators. The overall uncertainty of determining the spectral radiance of the integrating sphere is +/-2.3%. On the basis of known spectral radiance, the radiance calibration of an available Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer in our laboratory has been completed in 200-400nm with an uncertainty of about +/-2.7%.

  11. Spectral scaling of hydrochemical responses - decomposition of water quality time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riml, Joakim; Wörman, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the different processes affecting the biogeochemical cycling of compounds transported with water, such as nutrients, contaminants and different forms of organically and inorganically bound carbon, is fundamental for understanding and assessing the water quality of any given surface water systems. However, these governing processes are often difficult to quantify, partly due to the complex dynamics of the governing physical and biogeochemical mechanisms, which span over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Here we present a recently developed analytical technique that separates the spectrum of time scales in a physically based transport model by relating the fluctuations in the forcing boundary conditions (i.e. the load function) to the water quality response. By transforming the transport problem from the time domain into the frequency domain, closed-form solutions were obtained and used to derive compound specific formal expressions of the power spectral response for different hydrological systems including both a single stream reach and a network of interconnected transport pathways. The frequency dependent response, defined as the spectral scaling function, was subsequently used to evaluate concentration time series of water quality parameters on different spatial scales. This spectral decomposition attributes the water quality response in specific intervals of frequencies to governing processes and provides an opportunity to investigate/quantify the competing processes affecting the different compounds important for the water quality response.

  12. Enhanced Visible Photovoltaic Response of TiO₂ Thin Film with an All-Inorganic Donor-Acceptor Type Polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Sheng; Sang, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Lan-Cui; Zhu, Zai-Ming; Ma, Teng-Ying; Su, Zhong-Min; Wang, En-Bo

    2015-06-24

    In the field of material chemistry, it is of great significance to develop abundant and sustainable materials for solar energy harvesting and management. Herein, after evaluating the energy band characteristics of 13 kinds of polyoxometalates (POMs), the trisubstituted POM compound K6H4[α-SiW9O37Co3(H2O)3]·17H2O (SiW9Co3) was first studied due to its relatively smaller band gap (2.23 eV) and higher lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level (-0.63 V vs NHE). Additionally, the preliminary computational modeling indicated that SiW9Co3 exhibited the donor-acceptor (D-A) structure, in which the cobalt oxygen clusters and tungsten skeletons act as the electron donor and electron acceptor, respectively. By employing SiW9Co3 to modify the TiO2 film, the visible photovoltaic and photocurrent response were both enhanced, and the light-induced photocurrent at 420 nm was improved by 7.1 times. Moreover, the highly dispersive and small sized SiW9Co3 nanoclusters loading on TiO2 were successfully achieved by fabricating the nanocomposite film of {TiO2/SiW9Co3}3 with the layer-by-layer method, which can result in the photovoltaic performance enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), of which the overall power conversion efficiency was improved by 25.6% from 6.79% to 8.53% through the synergistic effect of POMs and Ru-complex.

  13. Examining Interindividual Differences in Cyclicity of Pleasant and Unpleasant Affects Using Spectral Analysis and Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Nilam; Chow, Sy-Miin; Bowles, Ryan P.; Wang, Lijuan; Grimm, Kevin; Fujita, Frank; Nesselroade, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Weekly cycles in emotion were examined by combining item response modeling and spectral analysis approaches in an analysis of 179 college students' reports of daily emotions experienced over 7 weeks. We addressed the measurement of emotion using an item response model. Spectral analysis and multilevel sinusoidal models were used to identify…

  14. Spectral response of (CH) x-CdZnS heterojunction: Application of Onsager's theory of geminate recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplaze, D.; Youm, I.; Cohen-Solal, G. W.; Cadene, M.

    1987-12-01

    The Onsager's theory of geminate recombination is used to fit experimental photoresponse of (CH) x-CdZnS heterojunctions. This model, which depends upon three adjustable parameters, gives good agreement between experimental and calculated spectral response in zero bias conditions and lead to a simple interpretation of the change of spectral response under reverse bias.

  15. Predicting the effective response of bulk polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics via improved spectral phase field methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyasagar, A.; Tan, W. L.; Kochmann, D. M.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the electromechanical response of bulk polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics requires scale-bridging approaches. Recent advances in fast numerical methods to compute the homogenized mechanical response of materials with heterogeneous microstructure have enabled the solution of hitherto intractable systems. In particular, the use of a Fourier-based spectral method as opposed to the traditional finite element method has gained significant interest in the homogenization of periodic microstructures. Here, we solve the periodic, electro-mechanically-coupled boundary value problem at the mesoscale of polycrystalline ferroelectrics in order to extract the effective response of barium titanate (BaTiO3) and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) under applied electric fields. Results include the effective electric hysteresis and the associated butterfly curve of strain vs. electric field for mean stress-free electric loading. Computational predictions of the 3D polycrystalline response show convincing agreement with our experimental electric cycling and strain hysteresis data for PZT-5A. In addition to microstructure-dependent effective physics, we also show how finite-difference-based approximations in the spectral solution scheme significantly reduce instability and ringing phenomena associated with spectral techniques and lead to spatial convergence with h-refinement, which have been major challenges when modeling high-contrast systems such as polycrystals.

  16. Hydraulic Units Associated with Unconsolidated Sediments and Spectral Electrical Response Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadu, B.

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of the hydraulic properties of unconsolidated materials (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) from non-invasive geophysical measurements is appealing to geoscientists involved in the hydrological characterization of the earth's subsurface. There is the need to understand the quantitative relationship between measurable geophysical attributes and hydraulic parameters of sediments or soils. Clustering sediments in hydraulic units help in relating parameters characterizing spectral electrical response (SER) measurements and hydraulic conductivity. The SER of soils is modeled with a multi-Cole-cole model considering soils as a heterogeneous multi-phase system. The validity and usefulness of the relations between the electrical parameters and the hydraulic units were assessed using laboratory measurements of the spectral electrical response(0.01Hz to 10 kHz) of over 30 soil samples with wide variability in physical properties. The soils are fully characterized: hydraulic conductivity, porosity, grain size distribution and moisture content of each soil sample were measured. The SER measurements are utilized to estimate the hydraulic unit characterizing the potential flow zones the soils. The intrinsic parameters, which describe the response of the model are retrieved by inversion schemes and are used in establishing the relations. Such relationships between parameters characterizing the spectral electrical response of soils and their hydraulic units may provide versatile and relaible non-invasive methodology of obtaining hydraulic properties information of soils from geophysical measurements.

  17. Spectral integration in the inferior colliculus: role of glycinergic inhibition in response facilitation.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J; Leroy, S A

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the contribution of glycinergic inhibition to the time-sensitive spectral integration performed by neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii). These neurons are sometimes called combination-sensitive because they display facilitatory (or inhibitory) responses to the combination of distinct spectral elements in sonar or social vocalizations. Present in a wide range of vertebrates, their temporally and spectrally selective integration is thought to endow them with the ability to discriminate among social vocalizations or to analyze particular cues concerning sonar targets. The mechanisms that underlie these responses or the sites in the auditory system where they are created are not known. We examined combination-sensitive neurons that are facilitated by the presentation of two different harmonic elements of the bat's sonar call and echo. Responses of 24 single units were recorded before and during local application of strychnine, an antagonist of glycinergic inhibition. For each of the 24 units, strychnine application eliminated or greatly reduced temporally sensitive facilitation. There was no difference in this effect for neurons tuned to frequencies associated with the frequency-modulated or the constant-frequency sonar components. These results are unusual because glycine is considered to be an inhibitory neurotransmitter, but here it appears to be essential for the expression of combination-sensitive facilitation. The findings provide strong evidence that facilitatory combination-sensitive response properties present throughout the mustached bat's auditory midbrain, thalamus, and cortex originate through neural interactions in the inferior colliculus.

  18. Statistical correlation of fractional oscillator response by complex spectral moments and state variable expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnola, Francesco Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The statistical characterization of the oscillator response with non-integer order damping under Gaussian noise represents an important challenge in the modern stochastic mechanics. In fact, this kind of problem appears in several issues of different type (wave propagation in viscoelastic media, Brownian motion, fluid dynamics, RLC circuit, etc.). The aim of this paper is to provide a stochastic characterization of the stationary response of linear fractional oscillator forced by normal white noise. In particular, this paper shows a new method to obtain the correlation function by exact complex spectral moments. These complex quantities contain all the information to describe the random processes but in the considered case their analytical evaluation needs some mathematical manipulations. For this reason such complex spectral moment characterization is used in conjunction with a fractional-order state variable analysis. This kind of analysis permits to find the exact expression of complex spectral moments, and the correlation function by using the Mellin transform. Moreover, the proposed approach provides an analytical expression of the response variance of the fractional oscillator. Capability and efficiency of the present method are shown in the numerical examples in which correlation and variance of fractional oscillator response are found and compared with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Comparison of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity measurement techniques using wavelength-tunable lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ahtee, Ville; Brown, Steven W.; Larason, Thomas C.; Lykke, Keith R.; Ikonen, Erkki; Noorma, Mart

    2007-07-10

    Independent methods for measuring the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of detectors have been compared between the calibration facilities at two national metrology institutes, the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), Finland, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The emphasis is on the comparison of two different techniques for generating a uniform irradiance at a reference plane using wavelength-tunable lasers. At TKK's Laser Scanning Facility (LSF) the irradiance is generated by raster scanning a single collimated laser beam, while at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS), lasers are introduced into integrating spheres to generate a uniform irradiance at a reference plane. The laser-based irradiance responsivity results are compared to a traditional lamp-monochromator-based irradiance responsivity calibration obtained at the NIST Spectral Comparator Facility (SCF). A narrowband filter radiometer with a24 nm bandwidth and an effective band-center wavelength of 801 nm was used as the artifact. The results of the comparison between the different facilities, reported for the first time in the near-infrared wavelength range, demonstrate agreement at the uncertainty level of less than 0.1%. This result has significant implications in radiation thermometry and in photometry as well as in radiometry.

  20. Reflective arrayed waveguide gratings based on Sagnac loop reflectors with custom spectral response.

    PubMed

    Gargallo, Bernardo; Muñoz, Pascual; Baños, Rocío; Giesecke, Anna Lena; Bolten, Jens; Wahlbrink, Thorsten; Kleinjans, Herbert

    2014-06-16

    In this paper, a model for the analysis and design of a reflective Arrayed Waveguide Grating is presented. The device consists of one half of a regular AWG where each arm waveguide in the array is terminated with a phase shifter and a Sagnac loop reflector. By individually adjusting the phase shifter and Sagnac reflectivity in each arm, additional functionality to that previously reported in the literature is attained, since this enables tailoring the spectral response of the AWG. The design and experimental demonstration of Gaussian pass-band shape devices in Silicon-on-Insulator technology are reported. Methods to obtain flattened and arbitrary spectral responses are described and supported by simulation results.

  1. Analysis of the spectral response of fractal antennas related with its geometry and current paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, Alexander; López-Alonso, José M.; Martínez-Antón, Juan C.; Ezquerro, José M.; González, Francisco J.; Alda, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Fractal antennas have been proposed to improve the bandwidth of resonant structures and optical antennas. Their multiband characteristics are of interest in radiofrequency and microwave technologies. In this contribution we link the geometry of the current paths built-in the fractal antenna with the spectral response. We have seen that the actual currents owing through the structure are not limited to the portion of the fractal that should be geometrically linked with the signal. This fact strongly depends on the design of the fractal and how the different scales are arranged within the antenna. Some ideas involving materials that could actively respond to the incoming radiation could be of help to spectrally select the response of the multiband design.

  2. Comparison of spectral radiance responsivity calibration techniques used for backscatter ultraviolet satellite instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, M. G.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-02-01

    Methods of absolute radiometric calibration of backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite instruments are compared as part of an effort to minimize pre-launch calibration uncertainties. An internally illuminated integrating sphere source has been used for the Shuttle Solar BUV, Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Ozone Mapping Instrument, and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 using standardized procedures traceable to national standards. These sphere-based spectral responsivities agree to within the derived combined standard uncertainty of 1.87% relative to calibrations performed using an external diffuser illuminated by standard irradiance sources, the customary spectral radiance responsivity calibration method for BUV instruments. The combined standard uncertainty for these calibration techniques as implemented at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Radiometric Calibration and Development Laboratory is shown to less than 2% at 250 nm when using a single traceable calibration standard.

  3. Regularities in the response of spectral lines to small perturbations in physical quantities in the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharovskii, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to establish a number of dependencies between small perturbations in physical quantities in the photosphere and small variations in the Stokes profiles of spectral lines. A perturbation of any physical quantity in the model photosphere shifts every point in a line profile in the direction perpendicular to the tangent to the profile at that point. The actions on the wing of a spectral line of perturbations in the magnetic field and radial velocity are equivalent for a particular ratio of these perturbations (if the line is fully split in the magnetic field). If the response of part of a line wing is considered as a shift in wavelength, the area under the curve representing the response to perturbations in the magnetic field and radial velocity has a simple physical meaning.

  4. Photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Perez-Albuerne, E A; Tyan, Y S

    1980-05-23

    Solid-state photovoltaic cells are feasible devices for converting solar energy directly to electricity. Recent cost reductions have spurred an incipient industry, but further advances in materials science and technology are needed before photovoltaic cells can compete with other sources for the supply of large amounts of energy. In this article energy loss mechanisms in solid-state photovoltaic cells are examined and related to materials properties. Various systems under development are reviewed which illustrate some key concepts, opportunities, and problems of this most promising emerging technology. Areas where contributions from innovative materials research would have a significant effect are also indicated.

  5. Detector level ABI spectral response function: FM4 analysis and comparison for different ABI modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, Boryana; Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Frank; Wu, Xiangqian

    2016-09-01

    A new generation of imaging instruments Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is to be launched aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites - R Series (GOES-R). Four ABI flight modules (FM) are planned to be launched on GOES-R,S,T,U, the first one in the fall of 2016. Pre-launch testing is on-going for FM3 and FM4. ABI has 16 spectral channels, six in the visible/near infrared (VNIR 0.47 - 2.25 μm), and ten in the thermal infrared (TIR 3.9 - 13.3 μm) spectral regions, to be calibrated on-orbit by observing respectively a solar diffuser and a blackbody. Each channel has hundreds of detectors arranged in columns. Operationally one Analytic Generation of Spectral Response (ANGEN) function will be used to represent the spectral response function (SRF) of all detectors in a band. The Vendor conducted prelaunch end-to-end SRF testing to compare to ANGEN; detector specific SRF data was taken for: i) best detector selected (BDS) mode - for FM 2,3, and 4; and ii) all detectors (column mode) - for four spectral bands in FM3 and FM4. The GOES-R calibration working group (CWG) has independently used the SRF test data for FM2 and FM3 to study the potential impact of detector-to-detector SRF differences on the ABI detected Earth view radiances. In this paper we expand the CWG analysis to include the FM4 SRF test data - the results are in agreement with the Vendor analysis, and show excellent instrument performance and compare the detector-to-detector SRF differences and their potential impact on the detected Earth view radiances for all of the tested ABI modules.

  6. Revised wavelength and spectral response calibrations for AKARI near-infrared grism spectroscopy: Cryogenic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Isobe, Naoki; Usui, Fumihiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Onaka, Takashi; Yano, Kenichi; Kochi, Chihiro

    2016-04-01

    We perform revised spectral calibrations for the AKARI near-infrared grism to correct quantitatively for the effect of the wavelength-dependent refractive index. The near-infrared grism covering the wavelength range of 2.5-5.0 μm, with a spectral resolving power of 120 at 3.6 μm, is found to be contaminated by second-order light at wavelengths longer than 4.9 μm, which is especially serious for red objects. First, we present the wavelength calibration considering the refractive index of the grism as a function of the wavelength for the first time. We find that the previous solution is positively shifted by up to 0.01 μm compared with the revised wavelengths at 2.5-5.0 μm. In addition, we demonstrate that second-order contamination occurs even with a perfect order-sorting filter owing to the wavelength dependence of the refractive index. Secondly, the spectral responses of the system from the first- and second-order light are simultaneously obtained from two types of standard objects with different colors. The response from the second-order light suggests leakage of the order-sorting filter below 2.5 μm. The relations between the output of the detector and the intensities of the first- and second-order light are formalized by a matrix equation that combines the two orders. The removal of the contaminating second-order light can be achieved by solving the matrix equation. The new calibration extends the available spectral coverage of the grism mode from 4.9 μm up to 5.0 μm. The revision can be used to study spectral features falling in these extended wavelengths, e.g., the carbon monoxide fundamental ro-vibrational absorption within nearby active galactic nuclei.

  7. Evaluation of the accuracy of BOTDA systems based on the phase spectral response.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gil, Alexia; Soto, Marcelo A; Angulo-Vinuesa, Xabier; Dominguez-Lopez, Alejandro; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Thévenaz, Luc; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2016-07-25

    We evaluate the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) determination error when utilizing the Brillouin phase spectrum (BPS) instead of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) in BOTDA systems. Systems based on the BPS perform the determination of the BFS through a linear fit around the zero de-phase frequency region. An analytical expression of the error obtained in the BFS determination as a function of the different experimental parameters is provided and experimentally validated. The experimental results show a good agreement with the theoretical predictions as a function of the number of sampling points, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Brillouin spectral linewidth. For an equal SNR and linewidth, the phase response only provides a better BFS estimation than the gain response when the fit is performed over a restricted frequency range around the center of the spectral profile. This may reduce the measurement time of specific BOTDA systems requiring a narrow frequency scanning. When the frequency scan covers most of the Brillouin spectral profile, gain and phase responses give very similar estimations of the BFS and the BPS offers no crucial benefit.

  8. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  9. Modeling the Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Wen, G.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric temperature responses to decadal solar variations are computed for two scenarios of solar spectral irradiance (SSI), SIM-based out-of-phase and proxy-based in-phase variations, using a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also GISS modelE (GCM.) For both scenarios and both models, maximum responses occur in upper stratosphere, decreasing downward to the surface. Upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over tropics in GCM, ~5x as large as responses to in-phase forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). Modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to SIM-based forcing are similar to 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). For both RCM and GCM, surface responses to the two scenarios are significantly smaller than stratospheric responses. On centennial timescales, SSI variations are poorly known. However, two scenarios of reconstructed TSI, one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other on flux transport with much less background [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005], provide a potential range of TSI variations. We apply phase relations among different SSI bands both from SIM observations and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive associated historical SSI, which then drives the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provide a first order estimate of temperature responses to SSI variations on centennial time scales. We discuss potential mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere-troposphere couplings responsible for the climate responses to spectral solar variations.

  10. Modeling the Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    We apply two scenarios of external forcing, namely the SIM-based out-of-phase variations and the proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM, to compute climate responses to solar variation on decadal time scale. We find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, while temperature response decreases downward to the surface for both scenarios, and both models. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are 0.6 K in RCM and 0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of 5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing are similar to the HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) observed 11-year temperature variations. Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to the stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two sce-narios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., the one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other one from flux transport that has much less background component [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide potential range of variations of TSI on centennial time scale. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive the as-sociated historical SSI. The historical SSI is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean will provide the first order estimate of temperature response to SSI variation on centennial time scales. We anticipate the stratosphere, troposphere, and

  11. On the spectral response of thick piezoelectric capacitive sensors for arrays in imagenology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Ramírez, B.; Garcia-Segundo, C.; García-Valenzuela, A.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the spectral response of capacitive sensors with 28 μm thick Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) films operating in the piezoelectric mode. We present spectra of signals obtained from laser-induced photoacoustic emissions in several materials. We examine the sensor response to direct laser pulses and to ultrasonic signals generated by laser pulses interacting with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms, neoprene slabs and a composite of PVA phantom with a hidden slab of neoprene. We exhibit the sensor's sensitivity to the phantom thickness, affecting the amplitude and bandwidth of the ultrasonic output signal. The sensors fabricated and tested under water achieved an operational frequency bandwidth ranging from 1 to 50 MHz.

  12. Photovoltaic roofing tile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, B.

    The integration of photovoltaic (PV) systems in architecture is discussed. A PV-solar roofing tile system with polymer concrete base; PV-roofing tile with elastomer frame profiles and aluminum profile frames; contact technique; and solar cell modules measuring technique are described. Field tests at several places were conducted on the solar generator, electric current behavior, battery station, electric installation, power conditioner, solar measuring system with magnetic bubble memory technique, data transmission via telephone modems, and data processing system. The very favorable response to the PV-compact system proves the commercial possibilities of photovoltaic integration in architecture.

  13. Spectral and fluorescence imaging of immune system and tissue response to an immunogenic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-05-01

    Imaging of immune system and tissue response to immunogenic agents can be important to the development of new biomaterials. Additionally, quantitative functional imaging can be useful for testing and evaluation of methods to alter or control the immune system response to implanted materials. In this preliminary study, we employ spectral imaging and fluorescence imaging to measure immune system and tissue response to implanted immunogenic agents. Poly (D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with a 50:50 composition was used to create immunogenic microparticles (MPs). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) encapsulated in the MPs was used to provoke a tissue immune response in mice and encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to fluorescently label the MPs for imaging. Control MPs did not contain LPS. The MPs were delivered at 50 particles/μL in a total volume of 20μL by subcutaneous injection in the skin of a nude mouse in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber preparation. Cultured immune cells from a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line were exogenously labeled with the fluorescent dye DiD in solution at a concentration of 8000cells/μL. Immediately after window chamber surgery and implantation of the MPs, 100μL of the fluorescent macrophage solution was administered via the tail vein. Fluorescence imaging was used to track MPs and macrophages while spectral imaging was used for imaging and measurement of hemoglobin saturation in the tissue microvasculature. Imaging was performed periodically over about three days. The spectral and fluorescence imaging combination enabled detailed observations of the macrophage response and functional effects on the tissue.

  14. Spectral distribution of local field potential responses to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yan T.; Halupka, Kerry; Kameneva, Tatiana; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Grayden, David B.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Meffin, Hamish; Shivdasani, Mohit N.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) have been shown to reflect neuronal activity occurring at varying cortical scales. As such, recordings of the LFP may offer a novel way to test the efficacy of neural prostheses and allow improvement of stimulation strategies via neural feedback. Here we use LFP measurements from visual cortex to characterize neural responses to electrical stimulation of the retina. We aim to show that the LFP is a viable signal that contains sufficient information to optimize the performance of sensory neural prostheses. Approach. Clinically relevant electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of one eye in four felines. LFPs were simultaneously recorded in response to stimulation of individual electrodes using penetrating microelectrode arrays from the visual cortex. The frequency response of each electrode was extracted using multi-taper spectral analysis and the uniqueness of the responses was determined via a linear decoder. Main results. We found that cortical LFPs are reliably modulated by electrical stimulation of the retina and that the responses are spatially localized. We further characterized the spectral distribution of responses, with maximum information being contained in the low and high gamma bands. Finally, we found that LFP responses are unique to a large range of stimulus parameters (∼40) with a maximum conveyable information rate of 6.1 bits. Significance. These results show that the LFP can be used to validate responses to electrical stimulation of the retina and we provide the first steps towards using these responses to provide more efficacious stimulation strategies.

  15. Spectral response of rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves to Fe(2+) stress.

    PubMed

    Chi, GuangYu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi; Liu, XinHui

    2009-08-01

    In the management of lake eutrophication, the regulation effect of Fe is considered, in addition to the controlling nitrogen- and phosphorus input. Based on the "Fe hypothesis", this paper tentatively applied plant spectral response to the remote sensing early-warning mechanism of lake eutrophication. A laboratory water culture experiment with rice (Oryza sativa L.) was conducted to study Fe uptake by plants and the chlorophyll concentration and visible-near infrared spectrum of vegetable leaves as well as their interrelations under Fe(2+) stress. Three spectral indices, i.e., A (1) (integral value of the changes of spectral reflectivity in the range 460-670 nm under Fe(2+) stress), A (2) (integral value of the changes of spectral reflectivity in the range of 760-1000 nm under Fe(2+) stress) and S (blue-shift range of red edge curve under Fe(2+) stress), were used to establish quantitative models about the relationships between the rice leaf spectrum and Fe(2+) stress. With the increase of Fe(2+) in a culture solution, the Fe content in rice plants increased, while the chlorophyll concentration in vegetative leaves decreased. The spectral reflectivity of vegetable leaves increased in the visible light band but decreased in the near infrared band, and the blue-shift range of the red edge curve increased. The indices A (1), A (2) and S all had significant correlations with the Fe content in rice leaves, the correlation coefficient being respectively 0.951 (P < 0.01), -0.988 (P < 0.01) and 0.851 (P < 0.01), and simulated (multiple correlation coefficients R (2) > 0.96) and predict the Fe level in rice leaves.

  16. JPSS-1 VIIRS version 2 at-launch relative spectral response characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Chris; Schwarting, Tom; McIntire, Jeff; Moyer, David I.; Zeng, Jinan

    2016-09-01

    The relative spectral response (RSR) characterization of the JPSS-1 VIIRS spectral bands has achieved "at launch" status in the VIIRS Data Analysis Working Group February 2016 Version 2 RSR release. The Version 2 release improves upon the June 2015 Version 1 release by including December 2014 NIST TSIRCUS spectral measurements of VIIRS VisNIR bands in the analysis plus correcting CO2 influence on the band M13 RSR. The T-SIRCUS based characterization is merged with the summer 2014 SpMA based characterization of VisNIR bands (Version 1 release) to yield a "fused" RSR for these bands, combining the strengths of the T-SIRCUS and the SpMA measurement systems. The M13 RSR is updated by applying a model-based correction to mitigate CO2 attenuation of the SpMA source signal that occurred during M13 spectral measurements. The Version 2 release carries forward the Version 1 RSR for those bands that were not updated (M8-M12, M14-M16A/B, I3-I5, DNBMGS). The Version 2 release includes band average (over all detectors and subsamples) RSR plus supporting RSR for each detector and subsample. The at-launch band average RSR have been used to populate Look-Up Tables supporting the sensor data record and environmental data record at-launch science products. Spectral performance metrics show that JPSS-1 VIIRS RSR are compliant on specifications with a few minor exceptions. The Version 2 release, which replaces the Version 1 release, is currently available on the password-protected NASA JPSS-1 eRooms under EAR99 control.

  17. VIIRS F1 "best" relative spectral response characterization by the government team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Chris; McIntire, Jeff; Schwarting, Tom; Moyer, Dave

    2011-10-01

    The VIIRS Flight 1 (F1) instrument completed sensor level testing, including relative spectral response (RSR) characterization in 2009 and is moving forward towards a launch on the NPP platform late in 2011. As part of its mandate to produce analyses of F1 performance essentials, the VIIRS Government Team, consisting of NASA, Aerospace Corp., and MIT/Lincoln Lab elements, has produced an independent (from that of industry) analysis of F1 RSR. The test data used to derive RSR for all VIIRS spectral bands was collected in the TVAC environment using the Spectral Measurement Assembly (SpMA), a dual monochromator system with tungsten and ceramic glow bar sources. These spectrally contiguous measurements were analyzed by the Government Team to produce a complete in-band + out-of-band RSR for 21 of the 22 VIIRS bands (exception of the Day-Night Band). The analysis shows that VIIRS RSR was well measured in the pre-launch test program for all bands, although the measurement noise floor is high on the thermal imager band I5. The RSR contain expected detector to detector variation resulting from the VIIRS non-telecentric optical design, and out-of-band features are present in some bands; non-compliances on the integrated out-of-band spectral performance metric are noted in M15 and M16A,B bands and also for several VisNIR bands, though the VisNIR non-compliances were expected due to known scattering in the VisNIR integrated filter assembly. The Government Team "best" RSR have been released into the public domain for use by the science community in preparation for the post-launch era of VIIRS F1.

  18. Techniques for estimating the unknown functions of incomplete experimental spectral and correlation response matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Borsoi, Laurent; Delaune, Xavier; Piteau, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose analytical and numerical straightforward approximate methods to estimate the unknown terms of incomplete spectral or correlation matrices, when the cross-spectra or cross-correlations available from multiple measurements do not cover all pairs of transducer locations. The proposed techniques may be applied whenever the available data includes the auto-spectra at all measurement locations, as well as selected cross-spectra which implicates all measurement locations. The suggested methods can also be used for checking the consistency between the spectral or correlation functions pertaining to measurement matrices, in cases of suspicious data. After presenting the proposed spectral estimation formulations, we discuss their merits and limitations. Then we illustrate their use on a realistic simulation of a multi-supported tube subjected to turbulence excitation from cross-flow. Finally, we show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques by extracting the modal responses of the simulated flow-excited tube, using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) method, from an incomplete response matrix 1

  19. Rationale and methodology for generating an airborne emergency response spectral reference library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is currently operating an airborne hyperspectral remote infrared spectrometer for the purpose of providing near real-time chemical data to first responders and other response agencies. This system has been designed to fulfill Agency data collection requirements for both traditional chemical emergency response and counter - terrorism activities. The platform consists of a high speed long-wave and mid-wave spectrometer and a multi-spectral infrared line scanner integrated into a mid-sized twin-engine aircraft. Through the use of onboard data processing and short haul data links, chemical information can be relayed to the end user in about ten minutes. An important component of this system is the development of the spectral reference library used to query the incoming data stream. A balance must be reached in providing a library set that is robust enough to provide useful information for the majority of accidents without the overhead of voluminous amounts of rarely used spectral library data. The end goal of the program is to generate a library set which permits a reasonable number of compounds to be automativally processed as data is streamed through the system. This paper will describe the selection technique used to develop the critical list of compounds contained in the library. This paper will likewise describe how this library is integrated into the overall system and the type of data processing and products that are produced.

  20. Rationale and methodology for generating an airborne emergency response spectral reference library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Mark J.

    2003-12-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is currently operating an airborne hyperspectral remote infrared spectrometer for the purpose of providing near real-time chemical data to first responders and other response agencies. This system has been designed to fulfill Agency data collection requirements for both traditional chemical emergency response and counter - terrorism activities. The platform consists of a high speed long-wave and mid-wave spectrometer and a multi-spectral infrared line scanner integrated into a mid-sized twin-engine aircraft. Through the use of onboard data processing and short haul data links, chemical information can be relayed to the end user in about ten minutes. An important component of this system is the development of the spectral reference library used to query the incoming data stream. A balance must be reached in providing a library set that is robust enough to provide useful information for the majority of accidents without the overhead of voluminous amounts of rarely used spectral library data. The end goal of the program is to generate a library set which permits a reasonable number of compounds to be automativally processed as data is streamed through the system. This paper will describe the selection technique used to develop the critical list of compounds contained in the library. This paper will likewise describe how this library is integrated into the overall system and the type of data processing and products that are produced.

  1. Study of Site Response in the Seattle and Tacoma Basins, Washington, Using Spectral Ratio Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshvardoost, R.; Wolf, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Sedimentary basins are known to have a pronounced influence on earthquake-generated ground motions, affecting both predominant frequencies and wave amplification. These site characteristics are important elements in estimating ground shaking and seismic hazard. In this study, we use three-component broadband and strong motion seismic data from three recent earthquakes to determine site response characteristics in the Seattle and Tacoma basins, Washington. Resonant frequencies and relative amplification of ground motions were determined using Fourier spectral ratios of velocity and acceleration records from the 2012 Mw 6.1 Vancouver Island earthquake, the 2012 Mw 7.8 Queen Charlotte Island earthquake, and the 2014 Mw 6.6 Vancouver Island earthquake. Recordings from sites within and adjacent to the Seattle and Tacoma basins were selected for the study based on their signal to noise ratios. Both the Standard Spectral Ratio (SSR) and the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) methods were used in the analysis, and results from each were compared to examine their agreement and their relation to local geology. Although 57% of the sites (27 out of 48) exhibited consistent results between the two methods, other sites varied considerably. In addition, we use data from the Seattle Liquefaction Array (SLA) to evaluate the site response at 4 different depths. Results indicate that resonant frequencies remain the same at different depths but amplification decreases significantly over the top 50 m.

  2. Estimating Cosmic Ray Spectral Parameters From Simulated Detector Responses With Detector Design Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index alpha (sub 1), is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at knee energy E(sub k) to a steeper spectral index alpha(sub 2) greater than alpha(sub 1) above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  3. Saccadic suppression of achromatic and chromatic responses measured by increment-threshold spectral sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, Keiji; Sato, Masayuki

    1995-04-01

    We measured spectral-sensitivity functions during saccadic eye movement by the increment-threshold method to test whether saccades selectively suppressed achromatic or chromatic responses. A circular monochromatic test stimulus of 12-deg diameter was presented for 10 ms on a 62 deg X 43 deg white background, and observations were made 6-deg saccades, and immediately after saccades. In two additional conditions the test stimulus was made to move during fixation and during 6-deg saccades at the same speed and in the same direction as the saccades. The during-fixation spectral-sensitivity function was found to resemble the relative luminous efficiency V( lambda ) function in shape except for the case of short wavelengths, whereas the during-saccade spectral-sensitivity function showed lower sensitivity for all wavelengths and had three prominent peaks at approximately 440, 530, and 600 nm. These characteristics did not depend on whether the stimulus was stationary or moving. These results indicated that saccadic suppression was greater for achromatic than for chromatic response. A possible suppression mechanism was discussed involving the magno and parvo pathways.

  4. Application of Spectral Ratio Methods to an Investigation of Site Response in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, R.; Polet, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well established that sedimentary basins can increase the amplification and duration of earthquake ground motion. Past earthquakes have shown that site effects have a major influence on seismic damage and loss in urban areas. However, the response at any given site can vary significantly, even within the LA basin. We aim to investigate site response within the LA Basin through the application of the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio method. This method was applied to 3-component broadband waveforms from the Los Angeles Syncline Seismic Interferometry Experiment (LASSIE). LASSIE is a collaborative, temporary, and dense array of 73 broadband seismometers that were active for a two month period starting October 2014 until November 2014, transecting the Los Angeles basin from Long Beach to La Puente. We use the Geopsy software to measure the fundamental frequency and minimum site amplification at each station. Data analysis and interpretation were conducted in accordance to the Site Effects Assessment Using Ambient Excitations (SESAME) guidelines for implementing the H/V ratio technique for investigations of site effects. Results from our initial data analysis indicate an average fundamental period at the basin center of 6 s - 12 s and peaks in the spectral ratio curves at much shorter periods for sites the basin edge of. We will show maps of the amplification and fundamental frequencies based on our spectral ratio analysis of the LASSIE data and compare our results with damage patterns of historic earthquakes, as well as models of the LA basin.

  5. Estimating Cosmic-Ray Spectral Parameters from Simulated Detector Responses with Detector Design Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2001-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index (alpha-1) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at knee energy (E(sub k)) to a steeper spectral index alpha-2 > alpha-1 above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  6. Spectral response of dielectric nano-antennas in the far- and near-field regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Y.; Barreda, Á. I.; González, F.; Moreno, F.

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies show that the spectral behaviour of localized surface plasmon resonances (LPSRs) in metallic nanoparticles suffer from both a redshift and a broadening in the transition from the far- to the near-field regimes. An interpretation of this effect was given in terms of the evanescent and propagating components of the angular spectrum representation of the radiated field. Due to the increasing interest awakened by magnetodielectric materials as a both low-loss material option for nanotechnology applications, and also for their particular scattering properties, here we study the spectral response of a magnetodielectric nanoparticle as a basic element of a dielectric nano-antenna. This study is made by analyzing the changes suffered by the scattered electromagnetic field when propagating from the surface of this dielectric nanostructure to the far-zone in terms of propagating and evanescent plane wave components of the radiated fields.

  7. Study Of Sensor Spectral Responses And Data Processing Algorithms And Architectures For Onboard Feature Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, F. O.; Davis, R. E.; Fales, C. L.; Aherron, R. M.

    1982-11-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in remote sensing is used to study spectral feature identification techniques for real-time onboard processing of data acquired with advanced Earth-resources sensors. Preliminary results indicate that: Narrow spectral responses are advantageous; signal normalization improves mean-square distance (MDS) classification accuracy but tends to degrade maximum-likelihood (MLH) classification accuracy; and MSD classification of normalized signals performs better than the computationally more complex MLH classification when imaging conditions change appreciably from those conditions during which reference data were acquired. The results also indicate that autonomous categorization of TM signals into vegetation, bare land, water, snow and clouds can be accomplished with adequate reliability for many applications over a reasonably wide range of imaging conditions. However, further analysis is required to develop computationally efficient boundary approximation algorithms for such categorization.

  8. Study of sensor spectral responses and data processing algorithms and architectures for onboard feature identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Davis, R. E.; Fales, C. L.; Aherron, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in remote sensing is used to study spectral feature identification techniques for real-time onboard processing of data acquired with advanced earth-resources sensors. Preliminary results indicate that: Narrow spectral responses are advantageous; signal normalization improves mean-square distance (MSD) classification accuracy but tends to degrade maximum-likelihood (MLH) classification accuracy; and MSD classification of normalized signals performs better than the computationally more complex MLH classification when imaging conditions change appreciably from those conditions during which reference data were acquired. The results also indicate that autonomous categorization of TM signals into vegetation, bare land, water, snow and clouds can be accomplished with adequate reliability for many applications over a reasonably wide range of imaging conditions. However, further analysis is required to develop computationally efficient boundary approximation algorithms for such categorization.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of spectral alteration in ultrasonic waves resulting from nonlinear elastic response in rock

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; McCall, K.R.; Meegan, G.D. Jr.

    1993-11-01

    Experiments in rock show a large nonlinear elastic wave response, far greater than that of gases, liquids and most other solids. The large response is attributed to structural defects in rock including microcracks and grain boundaries. In the earth, a large nonlinear response may be responsible for significant spectral alteration at amplitudes and distances currently considered to be well within the linear elastic regime.

  10. Effect of bath concentration on the growth and photovoltaic response of SILAR-deposited CuO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visalakshi, S.; Kannan, R.; Valanarasu, S.; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Kathalingam, A.; Chandramohan, R.

    2015-09-01

    Solar cell property of p-CuO/n-Si heterojunction was investigated using SILAR-deposited CuO thin films. The effects of copper salt concentration on the growth of CuO films and its effect on the efficiency in solar cell conversion were investigated. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical studies of the CuO thin films deposited at 90 °C with different copper sulphate concentrations are reported. Crystallinity of the film is found to increase with the increase in copper sulphate concentration. The measured Raman spectrum of the deposited film showed peaks corresponding to CuO phase. It is observed by the SEM that the film is homogeneous fully covering the substrate. The optical band gap of the deposited film has exhibited a decrease in band gap from 1.76 to 1.57 eV with the increase in copper sulphate concentration. Solar cell device was constructed using the p-CuO film deposited on n-silicon substrate, and its photovoltaic response was measured. It showed increasing photoresponse with increasing concentration of copper sulphate.

  11. Use of a radiative transfer model to simulate the postfire spectral response to burn severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvieco, E.; RiañO, D.; Danson, F. M.; Martin, P.

    2006-12-01

    Burn severity is related to fire intensity and fire duration and provides a quantitative measure related to fire impact and biomass consumption. Traditional field-based methods to estimate burn severity are time consuming, labor intensive, and normally limited in spatial extent. Remotely sensed data may provide a means to estimate severity levels across large areas, but it is critical to understand the causes of variability in spectral response with variations in burn severity. To address this issue, a combined leaf (Prospect) and canopy (Kuusk) reflectance model was used to simulate the spectral response of a range of vegetation canopies with different burn severity levels. The key aspects examined in the simulations were change in soil color, change in foliage color from green to brown (burned), and change in leaf area index (LAI). For each simulation the composite burn index (CBI) was determined using the same rules used in the field to estimate burn severity levels. Statistical analyses examined the strength of the correlations between CBI and reflectance in individual wave bands in the 400-2500 nm range and CBI and a range of spectral indices combining pairs of wave bands. The results showed that wave bands in the near infrared (NIR) were most strongly related to the CBI of the simulated canopies because of their sensitivity to reduction in LAI. Spectral indices combining reflectance in wave bands in the NIR and shortwave infrared and red edge region showed stronger correlations with CBI. Forward stepwise regression with two to six terms selected wave bands in these regions and accounted for more than 90% of the variation in CBI.

  12. Modelling and studies of the spectral response of some optoelectronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, André; Bortoli, Daniele; Tlemçani, Mouhaydine; Joyce, António

    2016-10-01

    Solar radiation takes in today's world, an increasing importance. Different devices are used to carry out spectral and integrated measurements of solar radiation. Thus the sensors can be divided into the fallow types: Calorimetric, Thermomechanical, Thermoelectric and Photoelectric. The first three categories are based on components converting the radiation to temperature (or heat) and then into electrical quantity. On the other hand, the photoelectric sensors are based on semiconductor or optoelectronic elements that when irradiated change their impedance or generate a measurable electric signal. The response function of the sensor element depends not only on the intensity of the radiation but also on its wavelengths. The radiation sensors most widely used fit in the first categories, but thanks to the reduction in manufacturing costs and to the increased integration of electronic systems, the use of the photoelectric-type sensors became more interesting. In this work we present a study of the behavior of different optoelectronic sensor elements. It is intended to verify the static response of the elements to the incident radiation. We study the optoelectronic elements using mathematical models that best fit their response as a function of wavelength. As an input to the model, the solar radiation values are generated with a radiative transfer model. We present a modeling of the spectral response sensors of other types in order to compare the behavior of optoelectronic elements with other sensors currently in use.

  13. Modeling Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Forcing on Centennial and Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R.; Rind, D.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a series of experiments to explore clima responses to two types of solar spectral forcing on decadal and centennial time scales - one based on prior reconstructions, and another implied by recent observations from the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral 1rradiance Monitor). We apply these forcings to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global/Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM). that couples atmosphere with ocean, and has a model top near the mesopause, allowing us to examine the full response to the two solar forcing scenarios. We show different climate responses to the two solar forCing scenarios on decadal time scales and also trends on centennial time scales. Differences between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions are highlighted, including impacts of the time lagged reSponse of the lower atmosphere and ocean. This contrasts with studies that assume separate equilibrium conditions at solar maximum and minimum. We discuss model feedback mechanisms involved in the solar forced climate variations.

  14. Broad spectral response photodetector based on individual tin-doped CdS nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weichang; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Dongsheng

    2014-12-01

    High purity and tin-doped 1D CdS micro/nano-structures were synthesized by a convenient thermal evaporation method. SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM were used to examine the morphology, composition, phase structure and crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Raman spectrum was used to confirm tin doped into CdS effectively. The effect of impurity on the photoresponse properties of photodetectors made from these as-prepared pure and tin-doped CdS micro/nano-structures under excitation of light with different wavelength was investigated. Various photoconductive parameters such as responsivity, external quantum efficiency, response time and stability were analyzed to evaluate the advantage of doped nanowires and the feasibility for photodetector application. Comparison with pure CdS nanobelt, the tin-doped CdS nanowires response to broader spectral range while keep the excellect photoconductive parameters. Both trapped state induced by tin impurity and optical whispering gallery mode microcavity effect in the doped CdS nanowires contribute to the broader spectral response. The micro-photoluminescence was used to confirm the whispering gallery mode effect and deep trapped state in the doped CdS nanowires.

  15. Broad spectral response photodetector based on individual tin-doped CdS nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Weichang E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Dongsheng E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    High purity and tin-doped 1D CdS micro/nano-structures were synthesized by a convenient thermal evaporation method. SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM were used to examine the morphology, composition, phase structure and crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Raman spectrum was used to confirm tin doped into CdS effectively. The effect of impurity on the photoresponse properties of photodetectors made from these as-prepared pure and tin-doped CdS micro/nano-structures under excitation of light with different wavelength was investigated. Various photoconductive parameters such as responsivity, external quantum efficiency, response time and stability were analyzed to evaluate the advantage of doped nanowires and the feasibility for photodetector application. Comparison with pure CdS nanobelt, the tin-doped CdS nanowires response to broader spectral range while keep the excellect photoconductive parameters. Both trapped state induced by tin impurity and optical whispering gallery mode microcavity effect in the doped CdS nanowires contribute to the broader spectral response. The micro-photoluminescence was used to confirm the whispering gallery mode effect and deep trapped state in the doped CdS nanowires.

  16. Effects of Posture and Stimulus Spectral Composition on Peripheral Physiological Responses to Loud Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Jennifer; Flemming, Jan; Zeffiro, Thomas; Rufer, Michael; Orr, Scott P.; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In the “loud-tone” procedure, a series of brief, loud, pure-tone stimuli are presented in a task-free situation. It is an established paradigm for measuring autonomic sensitization in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Successful use of this procedure during fMRI requires elicitation of brain responses that have sufficient signal-noise ratios when recorded in a supine, rather than sitting, position. We investigated the modulating effects of posture and stimulus spectral composition on peripheral psychophysiological responses to loud sounds. Healthy subjects (N = 24) weekly engaged in a loud-tone-like procedure that presented 500 msec, 95 dB sound pressure level, pure-tone or white-noise stimuli, either while sitting or supine and while peripheral physiological responses were recorded. Heart rate, skin conductance, and eye blink electromyographic responses were larger to white-noise than pure-tone stimuli (p’s < 0.001, generalized eta squared 0.073–0.076). Psychophysiological responses to the stimuli were similar in the sitting and supine position (p’s ≥ 0.082). Presenting white noise, rather than pure-tone, stimuli may improve the detection sensitivity of the neural concomitants of heightened autonomic responses by generating larger responses. Recording in the supine position appears to have little or no impact on psychophysiological response magnitudes to the auditory stimuli. PMID:27583659

  17. Effects of Posture and Stimulus Spectral Composition on Peripheral Physiological Responses to Loud Sounds.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jennifer; Flemming, Jan; Zeffiro, Thomas; Rufer, Michael; Orr, Scott P; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In the "loud-tone" procedure, a series of brief, loud, pure-tone stimuli are presented in a task-free situation. It is an established paradigm for measuring autonomic sensitization in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Successful use of this procedure during fMRI requires elicitation of brain responses that have sufficient signal-noise ratios when recorded in a supine, rather than sitting, position. We investigated the modulating effects of posture and stimulus spectral composition on peripheral psychophysiological responses to loud sounds. Healthy subjects (N = 24) weekly engaged in a loud-tone-like procedure that presented 500 msec, 95 dB sound pressure level, pure-tone or white-noise stimuli, either while sitting or supine and while peripheral physiological responses were recorded. Heart rate, skin conductance, and eye blink electromyographic responses were larger to white-noise than pure-tone stimuli (p's < 0.001, generalized eta squared 0.073-0.076). Psychophysiological responses to the stimuli were similar in the sitting and supine position (p's ≥ 0.082). Presenting white noise, rather than pure-tone, stimuli may improve the detection sensitivity of the neural concomitants of heightened autonomic responses by generating larger responses. Recording in the supine position appears to have little or no impact on psychophysiological response magnitudes to the auditory stimuli.

  18. Spectral indices of human cerebral blood flow control: responses to augmented blood pressure oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hamner, J W; Cohen, Michael A; Mukai, Seiji; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Taylor, J Andrew

    2004-09-15

    We set out to fully examine the frequency domain relationship between arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow. Oscillatory lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) was used to create consistent blood pressure oscillations of varying frequency and amplitude to rigorously test for a frequency- and/or amplitude-dependent relationship between arterial pressure and cerebral flow. We also examined the predictions from OLBNP data for the cerebral flow response to the stepwise drop in pressure subsequent to deflation of ischaemic thigh cuffs. We measured spectral powers, cross-spectral coherence, and transfer function gains and phases in arterial pressure and cerebral flow during three amplitudes (0, 20, and 40 mmHg) and three frequencies (0.10, 0.05, and 0.03 Hz) of OLBNP in nine healthy young volunteers. Pressure fluctuations were directly related to OLBNP amplitude and inversely to OLBNP frequency. Although cerebral flow oscillations were increased, they did not demonstrate the same frequency dependence seen in pressure oscillations. The overall pattern of the pressure-flow relation was of decreasing coherence and gain and increasing phase with decreasing frequency, characteristic of a high-pass filter. Coherence between pressure and flow was increased at all frequencies by OLBNP, but was still significantly lower at frequencies below 0.07 Hz despite the augmented pressure input. In addition, predictions of thigh cuff data from spectral estimates were extremely inconsistent and highly variable, suggesting that cerebral autoregulation is a frequency-dependent mechanism that may not be fully characterized by linear methods.

  19. Origin of the Ultrafast Response of the Lateral Photovoltaic Effect in Amorphous MoS2/Si Junctions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chang; Wang, Xianjie; Miao, Peng; Zhang, Lingli; Song, Bingqian; Liu, Weilong; Lv, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Sui, Yu; Tang, Jinke; Yang, Yanqiang; Song, Bo; Xu, Ping

    2017-05-31

    The lateral photovoltaic (LPV) effect has attracted much attention for a long time because of its application in position-sensitive detectors (PSD). Here, we report the ultrafast response of the LPV in amorphous MoS2/Si (a-MoS2/Si) junctions prepared by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Different orientations of the built-in field and the breakover voltages are observed for a-MoS2 films deposited on p- and n-type Si wafers, resulting in the induction of positive and negative voltages in the a-MoS2/n-Si and a-MoS2/p-Si junctions upon laser illumination, respectively. The dependence of the LPV on the position of the illumination shows very high sensitivity (183 mV mm(-1)) and good linearity. The optical relaxation time of LPV with a positive voltage was about 5.8 μs in a-MoS2/n-Si junction, whereas the optical relaxation time of LPV with a negative voltage was about 2.1 μs in a-MoS2/p-Si junction. Our results clearly suggested that the inversion layer at the a-MoS2/Si interface made a good contribution to the ultrafast response of the LPV in a-MoS2/Si junctions. The large positional sensitivity and ultrafast relaxation of LPV may promise the a-MoS2/Si junction's applications in fast position-sensitive detectors.

  20. Study on the SPR responses of various DNA probe concentrations by parallel scan spectral SPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Lu, Weiping; Zhang, Yaou; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2008-12-01

    SPR sensors have become a high sensitive and label free method for characterizing and quantifying chemical and biochemical interactions. However, the relations between the SPR refractive index response and the property (such as concentrations) of biochemical probes are still lacking. In this paper, an experimental study on the SPR responses of varies concentrations of Legionella pneumophila mip DNA probes is presented. We developed a novel two-dimensional SPR sensing technique-parallel scan spectral SPR imaging-to detect an array of mip gene probes. This technique offers quantitative refractive index information with a high sensing throughput. By detecting mip DNA probes with different concentrations, we obtained the relations between the SPR refractive index response and the concentrations of mip DNA probes. These results are valuable for design and developing SPR based mip gene biochips.

  1. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  2. The Effect of Disseminated Ironsands on the Spectral Induced Polarization Response of New Zealand Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, M.

    2016-12-01

    The host sands of shallow aquifers on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand can contain significant fractions of titanomagnetite resulting from erosion of volcanic rocks. The potential use of spectral induced polarization (SIP) to measure the hydraulic properties of these aquifers therefore requires an understanding of the effect that the disseminated magnetic fraction has on the SIP response. To study this, laboratory measurements in the frequency range 0.001 - 1000 Hz have been made on samples consisting of different mixtures of clean silica sand and ironsand, as well as on a typical aquifer sand both before and after removal of the magnetic fraction. The results suggest that although the presence of the titanomagnetite has a significant effect on the high frequency SIP response, there is no effect on the SIP response at frequencies regarded as indicative of the hydraulic properties. Results are compared with previously proposed mechanistic models for the effect of a disseminated semiconductor on SIP measurements.

  3. Characterization of spectral responses of humic substances upon UV irradiation using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Jung, Ka-Young; Jung, Young Mee

    2011-04-01

    The spectral responses of a leaf litter derived humic substance (LLHS) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) upon ultraviolet (UV) A irradiation were characterized using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) based on the absorption and the synchronous fluorescence spectra at different irradiation times. A 12 day irradiation on the humic substances (HS) resulted in higher reduction of the absorbance relative to the dissolved organic carbon concentration, suggesting that aromatic chromophores were preferentially oxidized and/or non UV-absorbing compounds were generated by the photobleaching. Synchronous fluorescence spectra revealed the preferential removal of fulvic-like and humic-like fluorophores and delayed response of protein-like fluorescence upon the irradiation. The spectral features at long wavelengths (>430 nm) appear to be affected by intra-molecular interactions of the individual chromophores associated with shorter wavelengths. Absorption-based 2D-COS demonstrated that there are three types of absorption bands for the two HS, which changed sequentially in the order of 290-400 nm → 200-250 nm → 250-290 nm. In addition, two or three distinctive fluorescence bands in response to the irradiation were identified from 2D-COS. The sequential orders and the associated wavelength bands were possibly explained by the irradiation wavelengths and the differences between direct and indirect photochemical reactions. The interpretation of the 2D-COS results was very consistent with the kinetic rate constants individually calculated at several discrete wavelengths. Our study demonstrated that 2D-COS could be used as a powerful tool in identifying distinctive bands of HS that have dissimilar behavior and the associated sequential orders by visualizing the spectral changes at continuous wavelengths.

  4. Hybrid quantum dot-tin disulfide field-effect transistors with improved photocurrent and spectral responsivity

    DOE PAGES

    Cotlet, Mircea; Huang, Yuan Zang; Chen, Jia -Shiang; ...

    2016-03-24

    We report an improved photosensitivity in few-layer tin disulfide (SnS2) field-effect transistors(FETs) following doping with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots(QDs). The hybrid QD-SnS2 FET devices achieve more than 500% increase in the photocurrent response compared with the starting SnS2-only FET device and a spectral responsivity reaching over 650 A/W at 400 nm wavelength. The negligible electrical conductance in a control QD-only FET device suggests that the energy transfer between QDs and SnS2 is the main mechanism responsible for the sensitization effect, which is consistent with the strong spectral overlap between QDphotoluminescence and SnS2 optical absorption as well as the large nominalmore » donor-acceptor interspacing between QD core and SnS2. Furthermore, we also find enhanced charge carrier mobility in hybrid QD-SnS2 FETs which we attribute to a reduced contact Schottky barrier width due to an elevated background charge carrier density.« less

  5. Hybrid quantum dot-tin disulfide field-effect transistors with improved photocurrent and spectral responsivity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Zang, Huidong; Nam, Chang-Yong E-mail: cynam@bnl.gov; Chen, Jia-Shiang; Cotlet, Mircea E-mail: cynam@bnl.gov; Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W. E-mail: cynam@bnl.gov

    2016-03-21

    We report an improved photosensitivity in few-layer tin disulfide (SnS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors (FETs) following doping with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs). The hybrid QD-SnS{sub 2} FET devices achieve more than 500% increase in the photocurrent response compared with the starting SnS{sub 2}-only FET device and a spectral responsivity reaching over 650 A/W at 400 nm wavelength. The negligible electrical conductance in a control QD-only FET device suggests that the energy transfer between QDs and SnS{sub 2} is the main mechanism responsible for the sensitization effect, which is consistent with the strong spectral overlap between QD photoluminescence and SnS{sub 2} optical absorption as well as the large nominal donor-acceptor interspacing between QD core and SnS{sub 2}. We also find enhanced charge carrier mobility in hybrid QD-SnS{sub 2} FETs which we attribute to a reduced contact Schottky barrier width due to an elevated background charge carrier density.

  6. Hybrid quantum dot-tin disulfide field-effect transistors with improved photocurrent and spectral responsivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, Mircea; Huang, Yuan Zang; Chen, Jia -Shiang; Huidong Zang; Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.; Nam, Chang -Yong

    2016-03-24

    We report an improved photosensitivity in few-layer tin disulfide (SnS2) field-effect transistors(FETs) following doping with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots(QDs). The hybrid QD-SnS2 FET devices achieve more than 500% increase in the photocurrent response compared with the starting SnS2-only FET device and a spectral responsivity reaching over 650 A/W at 400 nm wavelength. The negligible electrical conductance in a control QD-only FET device suggests that the energy transfer between QDs and SnS2 is the main mechanism responsible for the sensitization effect, which is consistent with the strong spectral overlap between QDphotoluminescence and SnS2 optical absorption as well as the large nominal donor-acceptor interspacing between QD core and SnS2. Furthermore, we also find enhanced charge carrier mobility in hybrid QD-SnS2 FETs which we attribute to a reduced contact Schottky barrier width due to an elevated background charge carrier density.

  7. Spectral response of polarization properties of fiber Bragg grating under local pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Baofu; Zhou, Hua; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    A study of the spectral characterization of polarization properties of locally pressed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is presented. The evolutions of the first Stokes (s1) parameter of a FBG as function of the incident angle, the load magnitude, the loaded position and the loaded length of the grating are investigated. The numerical simulation based on the modified transfer matrix method is used to calculate the s1 response and the state of polarization (SOP) of the FBG. The theoretical analysis and numerical simulation demonstrate that the evolutions of polarization dependent parameters contain the information about the transverse load and have potential applications for distributed diametric load sensor.

  8. Mapping Site Response Parameters on Cal Poly Pomona Campus Using the Spectral Ratio Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, K. Y. K.; Polet, J.

    2014-12-01

    Site characteristics are an important factor in earthquake hazard assessment. To better understand site response differences on a small scale, as well as the seismic hazard of the area, we develop site response parameter maps of Cal Poly Pomona campus. Cal Poly Pomona is located in southern California about 40 km east of Los Angeles, within 50 km of San Andreas Fault. The campus is situated on top of the San Jose Fault. With about twenty two thousand students on campus, it is important to know the site response in this area. To this end, we apply the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio technique, which is an empirical method that can be used in an urban environment with no environmental impact. This well-established method is based on the computation of the ratio of vertical ambient noise ground motion over horizontal ambient noise ground motion as a function of frequency. By applying the spectral ratio method and the criteria from Site Effects Assessment Using Ambient Excitations (SESAME) guidelines, we can determine fundamental frequency and a minimum site amplification factor. We installed broadband seismometers throughout the Cal Poly Pomona campus, with an initial number of about 15 sites. The sites are approximately 50 to 150 meters apart and about two hours of waveforms were recorded at each site. We used the Geopsy software to make measurements of the peak frequency and the amplitude of the main peak from the spectral ratio. These two parameters have been determined to be estimates of fundamental frequency and a minimum site amplification factor, respectively. Based on the geological map from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and our data collected from Cal Poly Pomona campus, our preliminary results suggest that the area of campus that is covered by alluvial fan material tends to have a single significant spectral peak with a fundamental frequency of ~1Hz and a minimum amplification factor of ~3.7. The minimum depth of the surface layer is about 56

  9. Analytic Solutions for the Spectral Responses of RCA-Grating-Based Waveguide Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiang-Kai; Wei, Lai

    2012-12-01

    Analytic solutions (ASs) for the spectral responses of waveguide devices with raised-cosine-apodized (RCA) gratings are presented. The waveguide devices include short- and long-period RCA-gratings, RCA-grating-based interferometers as Fabry—Perot, Mach—Zehnder and Michelson interferometers. The calculations based on the analytic solutions are demonstrated and compared with those based on the transfer matrix (TM) method preferred, which has confirmed that the AS-based analysis is with enough accuracy and several thousands times the efficiency of the TM method.

  10. The effect of spectral filters on VEP and alpha-wave responses.

    PubMed

    Willeford, Kevin T; Fimreite, Vanessa; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Spectral filters are used to treat light sensitivity in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the effect of these filters on normal visual function has not been elucidated. Thus, the current study aimed to determine the effect of spectral filters on objectively-measured visual-evoked potential (VEP) and alpha-wave responses in the visually-normal population. The full-field (15°H×17°V), pattern-reversal VEP (20' check size, mean luminance 52cd/m(2)) was administered to 20 visually-normal individuals. They were tested with four Intuitive-Colorimeter-derived, broad-band, spectral filters (i.e., gray/neutral density, blue, yellow, and red), which produced similar luminance values for the test stimulus. The VEP N75 and P100 latencies, and VEP amplitude, were recorded. Power spectrum analysis was used to derive the respective powers at each frequency, and peak frequency, for the selected 9-11Hz components of the alpha band. Both N75 and P100 latencies increased with the addition of each filter when compared to baseline. Additionally, each filter numerically reduced intra-session amplitude variability relative to baseline. There were no significant effects on either the mean VEP amplitude or alpha wave parameters. The Intuitive Colorimeter filters significantly increased both N75 and P100 latencies, an effect which is primarily attributable (∼75%) to luminance, and in some cases, specific spectral effects (e.g., blue and red). VEP amplitude and alpha power were not significantly affected. These findings provide an important reference to which either amplitude or power changes in light-sensitive, younger clinical groups can be compared. Copyright © 2015 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Photovoltaic Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute through David Scheiman and Phillip Jenkins provided the Photovoltaics Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with expertise in photovoltaic (PV) research, flight experiments and solar cell calibration. NASA GRC maintains the only world-class solar cell calibration and measurement facility within NASA. GRC also has a leadership role within the solar cell calibration community, and is leading the effort to develop ISO standards for solar cell calibration. OAI scientists working under this grant provided much of the expertise and leadership in this area.

  12. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  13. Dynamic sweating response of man to infrared irradiation in various spectral regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tokuo; Sugenoya, Junichi; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Natsume, Keiko; Ochiai, Megumi; Nishida, Motohiko; Shinoda, Norihiko; Katoh, Kenichi; Imamura, Ritsuko

    1991-03-01

    In an attempt to detect differences in the thermal effect of infrared irradiation of different wavelengths, transient sweating response to infrared irradiation in various spectral regions was examined. In Series 1, the ventral or dorsal surface of the nude subject was irradiated repetitively for a period of 4 min (2 min on, 2 min off) by each of three kinds of infrared heaters with main emissivity in ‘near-infrared’ (NIR; 0.7 2.8 μm), ‘intermediate-infrared’ (MIR; 1.5 5.8 μm), and ‘far-infrared’ (FIR; 2.8 25 μm) regions. The sweating response on a non-irradiated area tended to be the greatest with MIR, while the magnitude of the sweating response on the irradiated area showed no consistent differences among various wavelengths. The results infer that MIR stimulated cutaneous thomoreceptors most effectively, while its direct effect on local sweat gland activity was minimal. In Series 2, the effects of 9 12 min irradiations in more restricted ranges of wavelength were compared by the combination of the three kinds of heaters with filters (translucent to wavelength ranges of 1.3 2.7, 2.7 3.5, 3.6 8.0 μm, respectively). The sweating response on a remote area was predominantly greater with the range of 2.7 3.5 μm than with the other wavelength ranges, while the local effect on sweating was minimal with this range. The results of Series 2 reinforce those of Series 1, indicating that the degree of stimulation of cutaneous thermoreceptors and of direct thermal effect on sweat gland activity differ with spectral regions incident on the skin, thus affecting local and remote effects on the sweating response.

  14. Stability of the spectral responsivity of cryogenically cooled InSb infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharous, Evangelos

    2005-10-10

    The spectral responsivity of two cryogenically cooled InSb detectors was observed to drift slowly with time. The origin of these drifts was investigated and was shown to occur due to a water-ice thin film that was deposited onto the active areas of the cold detectors. The presence of the ice film (which is itself a dielectric film) modifies the transmission characteristics of the antireflection coatings deposited on the active areas of the detectors, thus giving rise to the observed drifts. The magnitude of the drifts was drastically reduced by evacuating the detector dewars while baking them at 50 deg. C for approximately 48 h. All InSb detectors have antireflection coatings to reduce the Fresnel reflections and therefore enhance their spectral responsivity. This work demonstrates that InSb infrared detectors should be evacuated and baked at least annually and in some cases (depending on the quality of the dewar and the measurement uncertainty required) more frequently. These observations are particularly relevant to InSb detectors mounted in dewars that use rubber O rings since the ingress of moisture was found to be particularly serious in this type of dewar.

  15. Processing Pipeline of Sugarcane Spectral Response to Characterize the Fallen Plants Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Agustín; Kemerer, Alejandra; Hadad, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, in agronomic systems it is possible to make a variable management of inputs to improve the efficiency of agronomic industry and optimize the logistics of the harvesting process. In this way, it was proposed for sugarcane culture the use of remote sensing tools and computational methods to identify useful areas in the cultivated lands. The objective was to use these areas to make variable management of the crop. When at the moment of harvesting the sugarcane there are fallen stalks, together with them some strange material (vegetal or mineral) is collected. This strange material is not millable and when it enters onto the sugar mill it causes important looses of efficiency in the sugar extraction processes and affects its quality. Considering this issue, the spectral response of sugarcane plants in aerial multispectral images was studied. The spectral response was analyzed in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. Then, the aerial images were segmented to obtain homogeneous regions useful for producers to make decisions related to the use of inputs and resources according to the variability of the system (existence of fallen cane and standing cane). The obtained segmentation results were satisfactory. It was possible to identify regions with fallen cane and regions with standing cane with high precision rates.

  16. Simulating charge transport to understand the spectral response of Swept Charge Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athiray, P. S.; Sreekumar, P.; Narendranath, S.; Gow, J. P. D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Swept Charge Devices (SCD) are novel X-ray detectors optimized for improved spectral performance without any demand for active cooling. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft used an array of SCDs to map the global surface elemental abundances on the Moon using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The successful demonstration of SCDs in C1XS spurred an enhanced version of the spectrometer on Chandrayaan-2 using the next-generation SCD sensors. Aims: The objective of this paper is to demonstrate validation of a physical model developed to simulate X-ray photon interaction and charge transportation in a SCD. The model helps to understand and identify the origin of individual components that collectively contribute to the energy-dependent spectral response of the SCD. Furthermore, the model provides completeness to various calibration tasks, such as generating spectral matrices (RMFs - redistribution matrix files), estimating efficiency, optimizing event selection logic, and maximizing event recovery to improve photon-collection efficiency in SCDs. Methods: Charge generation and transportation in the SCD at different layers related to channel stops, field zones, and field-free zones due to photon interaction were computed using standard drift and diffusion equations. Charge collected in the buried channel due to photon interaction in different volumes of the detector was computed by assuming a Gaussian radial profile of the charge cloud. The collected charge was processed further to simulate both diagonal clocking read-out, which is a novel design exclusive for SCDs, and event selection logic to construct the energy spectrum. Results: We compare simulation results of the SCD CCD54 with measurements obtained during the ground calibration of C1XS and clearly demonstrate that our model reproduces all the major spectral features seen in calibration data. We also describe our understanding of interactions at

  17. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  18. Observed acoustic and aeroelastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, N. D.; Mckenna, H. E.; Jacobs, E. W.

    1995-01-01

    Early results from a recent experiment designed to directly evaluate the aeroacoustic/elastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence-induced unsteady blade loads are discussed. The experimental procedure consisted of flying a hot-film anemometer from a tethered balloon in the turbine inflow and simultaneously measuring the fluctuating airload and aeroelastic response at two blade span stations (65% and 87% spans) using surface-mounted, subminiature pressure transducers and standard strain gage instrumentation. The radiated acoustic pressure field was measured with a triad of very-low-frequency microphones placed at ground level, 1.5 rotor diameters upwind of the disk. Initial transfer function estimates for acoustic radiation, blade normal forces, flapwise acceleration/displacement, and chord/flapwise moments are presented.

  19. Spectral and spatial dependence of
diffuse optical signals in response to
peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Debbie K.; Erb, M. Kelley; Tong, Yunjie; Yu, Yang; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.; Fantini, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Using non-invasive, near-infrared spectroscopy we have previously reported optical signals measured at or around peripheral nerves in response to their stimulation. Such optical signals featured amplitudes on the order of 0.1% and peaked about 100 ms after peripheral nerve stimulation in human subjects. Here, we report a study of the spatial and spectral dependence of the optical signals induced by stimulation of the human median and sural nerves, and observe that these optical signals are: (1) unlikely due to either dilation or constriction of blood vessels, (2) not associated with capillary bed hemoglobin, (3) likely due to blood vessel(s) displacement, and (4) unlikely due to fiber-skin optical coupling effects. We conclude that the most probable origin of the optical response to peripheral nerve stimulation is from displacement of blood vessels within the optically probed volume, as a result of muscle twitch in adjacent areas. PMID:21258519

  20. Evaluation and modeling of the topographic effect on the spectral response from NADIR pointing sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Justice, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    A field experiment, using a hand-held radiometer, was designed and conducted to assess a simple theoretical incidence model for simulating the topographic effect of a uniform sand surface. Seven data sets were taken to compare effects of solar elevation and azimuth encountered at different times of year. Analysis of these data showed considerable variation in radiance values for different slope angles and aspects and that these values varied considerably with changes in solar elevation and azimuth. The field measured variations in spectral response were found to have generally strong correlations with the theoretical model. The reason for the occurrence of lower correlations are given and methods for improving the model are suggested. A model to simulate LANDSAT sensor response was applied to two subsets of the field data to establish the magnitude of the topographic effect on satellite data.

  1. Photovoltaic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. photovoltaic industry enjoyed a growth rate of 30 percent in sales for the second year in a row. This sends a message that the way we think about electricity is changing. Instead of big energy projects that perpetuate environmental and economic damage, there is a growing trend toward small renewable technologies that are well matched to end-user needs and operating conditions. As demand grows and markets expand, investment capital will be drawn to the industry and new growth trends will emerge. The photovoltaic industry around the world achieved record shipments also. Worldwide shipments of photovoltaic (PV) modules for 1989 totaled more than 40 megawatts (MW), nearly a 20 percent increase over last year's shipments. The previous two years showed increases in worldwide shipments of 23 and 25 percent, respectively. If this growth rate continues through the 1990s, as industry back orders would indicate, 300 to 1000 MW of PV-supplied power could be on line by 2000. Photovoltaic systems have low environmental impact and they are inexpensive to operate and maintain. Using solid-state technology, PV systems directly convert sunlight to electricity without high-temperature fluids or moving parts that could cause mechanical failure. This makes the technology very reliable.

  2. Photovoltaic concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A status report on photovoltaic (PV) concentrators technology is presented. The major topics covered are as follows: (1) current PV concentrator arrays; designs, performances, and costs; (2) current PV concentrator array components; cells and cell assemblies, optical concentrators, support structures, tracking, and drive; (3) design of PV concentrator arrays; and (4) array manufacturing technology.

  3. Improved photovoltaic response of nanocrystalline CdS-sensitized solar cells through interface control.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Lee, Sang-A; Lee, Yong Hui; Seok, Sang-Il

    2010-05-01

    Nanocrystalline CdS-sensitized solar cells (CdS-SSCs) based on mesoporous TiO(2) were fabricated by the spray pyrolysis deposition method. The energy conversion efficiency of these cells was drastically increased (156%) by modifying the junction structure through post-treatment that included soaking in a dilute TiCl(4) aqueous solution and subsequent thermal annealing. We propose that the post-treatment is responsible for an increased number of interconnections between TiO(2) and CdS, as well as surface passivation of the CdS sensitizer. The increase in the cell efficiency is attributed to the improved charge carrier transport, suppression of photoelectron recombination with holes both in the same sensitizer particle and in nearby ones, and suppression of photoelectron capture by the electrolyte.

  4. Uncertainty Analysis of Spectral Irradiance Reference Standards Used for NREL Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Campanelli, M.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-05-01

    Spectral irradiance produced by lamp standards such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) FEL-type tungsten halogen lamps are used to calibrate spectroradiometers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Spectroradiometers are often used to characterize spectral irradiance of solar simulators, which in turn are used to characterize photovoltaic device performance, e.g., power output and spectral response. Therefore, quantifying the calibration uncertainty of spectroradiometers is critical to understanding photovoltaic system performance. In this study, we attempted to reproduce the NIST-reported input variables, including the calibration uncertainty in spectral irradiance for a standard NIST lamp, and quantify uncertainty for measurement setup at the Optical Metrology Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  5. Exceptional ultraviolet photovoltaic response of 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuhua; Tang, Libin; Xiang, Jinzhong; Ji, Rongbin; Zhao, Jun; Yuan, Jun; Duan, Yu; Hu, Yanbo; Tai, Yunjian; Zhao, Jianhong

    2015-09-01

    UV photodetector is a kind of important optoelectronic devices that has vital applications in both scientific and engineering fields. The development of UV photodetectors has been impeded because of lacking stable p-type wide-gap semiconductor which is crucial for high-performance, low-cost, large-array UV photovoltaic detector. In this paper, we report a novel UV photovoltaic detector fabricated using 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as a sole photoactive material. The highest detectivity (D*) reaches 9.02 × 1011 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at -1 V bias voltage at room temperature under 365 nm illumination for the un-optimized BCP based detector (without using pre-amplifier), which is the highest value for the sole UV organic photoactive material based photovoltaic detector. The optical, electrical, and photovoltaic properties, including the UV absorption, photoluminescence (PL) emission, PL excitation, I-V, C-V, and photoresponse, have been systematically investigated to disclose the internal mechanism. The present study paves the way for developing high-performance, low-cost UV focal plane array detectors.

  6. Photovoltaic characteristics of diffused P/+N bulk GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrego, J. M.; Keeney, R. P.; Bhat, I. B.; Bhat, K. N.; Sundaram, L. G.; Ghandhi, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of P(+)N junction solar cells fabricated on bulk GaAs by an open tube diffusion technique are described in this paper.Spectral response measurements were analyzed in detail and compared to a computer simulation in order to determine important material parameters. It is projected that proper optimization of the cell parameters can increase the efficiency of the cells from 12.2 percent to close to 20 percent.

  7. Extracting the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches in measured head related impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raykar, Vikas C.; Duraiswami, Ramani; Yegnanarayana, B.

    2005-07-01

    The head related impulse response (HRIR) characterizes the auditory cues created by scattering of sound off a person's anatomy. The experimentally measured HRIR depends on several factors such as reflections from body parts (torso, shoulder, and knees), head diffraction, and reflection/diffraction effects due to the pinna. Structural models (Algazi et al., 2002; Brown and Duda, 1998) seek to establish direct relationships between the features in the HRIR and the anatomy. While there is evidence that particular features in the HRIR can be explained by anthropometry, the creation of such models from experimental data is hampered by the fact that the extraction of the features in the HRIR is not automatic. One of the prominent features observed in the HRIR, and one that has been shown to be important for elevation perception, are the deep spectral notches attributed to the pinna. In this paper we propose a method to robustly extract the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches from the measured HRIR, distinguishing them from other confounding features. The method also extracts the resonances described by Shaw (1997). The techniques are applied to the publicly available CIPIC HRIR database (Algazi et al., 2001c). The extracted notch frequencies are related to the physical dimensions and shape of the pinna.

  8. Multipolar response of nonspherical silicon nanoparticles in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Pavel D.; Baryshnikova, Kseniia V.; Artemyev, Yuriy A.; Karabchevsky, Alina; Shalin, Alexander S.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.

    2017-07-01

    Spectral multipole resonances of parallelepiped-, pyramid-, and cone-like shaped silicon nanoparticles excited by linearly polarized light waves are theoretically investigated. The numerical finite element method is applied for the calculations of the scattering cross sections as a function of the nanoparticles geometrical parameters. The roles of multipole moments (up to the third order) in the scattering process are analyzed using the semianalytical multipole decomposition approach. The possibility of scattering pattern configuration due to the tuning of the multipole contributions to the total scattered waves is discussed and demonstrated. It is shown that cubic nanoparticles can provide a strong isotropic side scattering with minimization of the scattering in forward and backward directions. In the case of the pyramidal and conical nanoparticles the total suppression of the side scattering can be obtained. It was found that due to the shape factor of the pyramidal and conical nanoparticles their electric toroidal dipole resonance can be excited in the spectral region of the first electric and magnetic dipole resonances. The influence of the incident light directions on the optical response of the pyramidal and conical nanoparticles is discussed. The obtained results provide important information that can be used for the development of nanoantennas with improved functionality due to the directional scattering effects.

  9. Objective Assessment of Spectral Ripple Discrimination in Cochlear Implant Listeners Using Cortical Evoked Responses to an Oddball Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Valdes, Alejandro; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Viani, Laura; Walshe, Peter; Smith, Jaclyn; Zeng, Fan-Gang; Reilly, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) can partially restore functional hearing in deaf individuals. However, multiple factors affect CI listener's speech perception, resulting in large performance differences. Non-speech based tests, such as spectral ripple discrimination, measure acoustic processing capabilities that are highly correlated with speech perception. Currently spectral ripple discrimination is measured using standard psychoacoustic methods, which require attentive listening and active response that can be difficult or even impossible in special patient populations. Here, a completely objective cortical evoked potential based method is developed and validated to assess spectral ripple discrimination in CI listeners. In 19 CI listeners, using an oddball paradigm, cortical evoked potential responses to standard and inverted spectrally rippled stimuli were measured. In the same subjects, psychoacoustic spectral ripple discrimination thresholds were also measured. A neural discrimination threshold was determined by systematically increasing the number of ripples per octave and determining the point at which there was no longer a significant difference between the evoked potential response to the standard and inverted stimuli. A correlation was found between the neural and the psychoacoustic discrimination thresholds (R2 = 0.60, p<0.01). This method can objectively assess CI spectral resolution performance, providing a potential tool for the evaluation and follow-up of CI listeners who have difficulty performing psychoacoustic tests, such as pediatric or new users. PMID:24599314

  10. Spectral Response and Diagnostics of Biological Activity of Hydroxyl-Containing Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Mayer, G. V.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.

    2016-08-01

    Using IR Fourier spectra and employing quantum-chemical calculations of electronic structure, spectra, and proton-acceptor properties, synthetic derivatives of aminophenol exhibiting biological activity in the suppression of herpes, influenza, and HIV viruses have been investigated from a new perspective, with the aim of establishing the spectral response of biological activity of the molecules. It has been experimentally established that the participation of the aminophenol hydroxyl group in intramolecular hydrogen bonds is characteristic of structures with antiviral properties. A quantum-chemical calculation of the proton-acceptor ability of the investigated aminophenol derivatives has shown that biologically active structures are characterized by a high proton-acceptor ability of oxygen of the hydroxyl group. A correlation that has been obtained among the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond, high proton-acceptor ability, and antiviral activity of substituted aminophenols enables us to predict the pharmacological properties of new medical preparations of the given class of compounds.

  11. Spectral response of atmospheric electric field measurements near AC high voltage power lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Matthews, J. C.; Wright, M. D.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    To understand the influence of corona ion emission on the atmospheric electrical field, measurements were made near to two AC high voltage power lines. A JCI 131 field-mill recorded the atmospheric electric field over one year. Meteorological measurements were also taken. The data series is divided in four zones (dependent on wind direction): whole zones, Z0; zone 1, Z1; zone 2, Z2; zone 3, Z3. Z3 is the least affected by corona ion emission and for that reason it is used as a reference against Z1 and Z2, which are strongly influenced by this phenomena. Analysis was undertaken for all weather days and dry days only. The Lomb-Scargle strategy developed for unevenly spaced time-series is used to calculate the spectral response of the aforementioned zones. Only frequencies above 1 minute are considered.

  12. Tunable spectral response by hydrogen irradiation of Ga(AsN) superlattice diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, N. E-mail: amalia.patane@nottingham.ac.uk; Makarovsky, O.; Patanè, A. E-mail: amalia.patane@nottingham.ac.uk; Pettinari, G.; Hopkinson, M.

    2014-06-16

    We report on the tuning of the spectral response of superlattice (SL) diodes based on dilute nitride Ga(AsN) alloys by post-growth hydrogenation. Hydrogen is incorporated into the superlattice where it neutralizes the electronic activity of nitrogen by forming N-H complexes. We exploit the controlled thermal dissociation of the complexes to tune the energy of the SL photocurrent absorption and electroluminescence emission; also, by annealing a submicron spot with a focused laser beam we create a preferential path for the injection of carriers, thus activating a nanoscale light emitting region. This method can be used for fabricating planar diode arrays with distinct optical active regions, all integrated onto a single substrate.

  13. Spectral response of localized surface plasmon in resonance with mid-infrared light

    SciTech Connect

    Kusa, Fumiya; Ashihara, Satoshi

    2014-10-21

    We study spectral responses of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in gold nanorods, which resonate at mid-infrared frequencies, by transmission spectroscopy and electromagnetic field analyses. The resonance linewidth is found to be linearly proportional to the resonance frequency, indicating that the dephasing due to Drude relaxation is suppressed and that the overall dephasing is dominated by radiative damping. Owing to the reduced radiative/non-radiative damping and large geometrical length of the nanorod, near-field intensity enhancement exceeds several hundred times. Nonetheless the resonance linewidth is comparable with or larger than the bandwidth of a 100-fs pulse, and therefore the enhanced near-field as short as 100-fs can be created upon pulsed excitation. The large enhancements with appropriate bandwidths make LSPs promising for enhanced nonlinear spectroscopies, coherent controls, and strong-field light-matter interactions in the mid-infrared range.

  14. Variation in spectral response of soybeans with respect to illumination, view, and canopy geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Comparisons of the spectral response for incomplete (well-defined row structure) and complete (overlapping row structure) canopies of soybeans indicated a greater dependence on Sun and view geometry for the incomplete canopies. Red and near-IR reflectance for the incomplete canopy decreased as solar zenith angle increased for a nadir view angle until the soil between the plant rows was completely shaded. Thereafter for increasing solar zenith angle, the red reflectance leveled off and the near-IR reflectance increased. A 'hot spot' effect was evident for the red and near-IR reflectance factors. The 'hot spot' effect was more pronounced for the red band based on relative reflectance value changes. The ratios of off-nadir to nadir acquired data reveal that off-nadir red band reflectance factors more closely approximated straightdown measurements for time periods away from solar noon. Normalized difference generally approximated straightdown measurements during the middle portion of the day.

  15. Effect of laser parameters and assist gas on spectral response of silicon fibrous nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Alubiady, M.; Tan, Bo

    2010-11-15

    This article report, for the first time, the influence of laser parameters on the spectral response of weblike silicon fibrous nanostructures. These nanostructures are formed by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz pulse frequency under atmosphere and nitrogen ambient. The observed decreasing in reflectance is correlated with the density of fibrous nanostructures and the size of the agglomerated nanoparticles. Compared to bulk silicon, Raman spectra of fibrous nanostructures shows a downward shift and asymmetric broadening at the first order phonon peak. The shift and broadening are attributed to phonon confinement of fibrous nanostructure. Polarization and nitrogen gas modify the morphology of generated nanomaterials but does not have effect on light absorptance. Pulsewidth and pulse frequency do not have significant effect on light absorptance.

  16. A simple framework for modelling the photochemical response to solar spectral irradiance variability in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muncaster, R.; Bourqui, M. S.; Chabrillat, S.; Viscardy, S.; Melo, S. M. L.; Charbonneau, P.

    2012-08-01

    The stratosphere is thought to play a central role in the atmospheric response to solar irradiance variability. Recent observations suggest that the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variability involves significant time-dependent spectral variations, with variable degrees of correlation between wavelengths, and new reconstructions are being developed. In this paper, we propose a simplified modelling framework to characterise the effect of short term SSI variability on stratospheric ozone. We focus on the pure photochemical effect, for it is the best constrained one. The photochemical effect is characterised using an ensemble simulation approach with multiple linear regression analysis. A photochemical column model is used with interactive photolysis for this purpose. Regression models and their coefficients provide a characterisation of the stratospheric ozone response to SSI variability and will allow future inter-comparisons between different SSI reconstructions. As a first step in this study, and to allow comparison with past studies, we take the representation of SSI variability from the Lean (1997) solar minimum and maximum spectra. First, solar maximum-minimum response is analysed for all chemical families and partitioning ratios, and is compared with past studies. The ozone response peaks at 0.18 ppmv (approximately 3%) at 37 km altitude. Second, ensemble simulations are regressed following two linear models. In the simplest case, an adjusted coefficient of determination R2 larger than 0.97 is found throughout the stratosphere using two predictors, namely the previous day's ozone perturbation and the current day's solar irradiance perturbation. A better accuracy (R2 larger than 0.9992) is achieved with an additional predictor, the previous day's solar irradiance perturbation. The regression models also provide simple parameterisations of the ozone

  17. Estimation of response-spectral values as functions of magnitude, distance, and site conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical predictive equations for the horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5-percent damping for 12 different periods from 0.1 to 4.0 s. Using a multiple linear-regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity, we analyzed response spectra period by period for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. The resulting predictive equations show amplification of the response values at soil sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.5 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 1.5 s. For periods less than 0.5 s there is no statistically significant difference between rock sites and the soil sites represented in the data set. These results are consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predictive equations is that the response values at different periods are different functions of magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Trifunac and Anderson). The slope of the least-squares straight line relating log response to moment magnitude ranges from 0.21 at a period of 0.1 s to greater than 0.5 at periods of 1 s and longer. This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficients for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 5 km

  18. SNPP VIIRS spectral bands co-registration and spatial response characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Tilton, James C.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tewari, Krishna P.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on 28 October 2011. The VIIRS has 5 imagery spectral bands (I-bands), 16 moderate resolution spectral bands (M-bands) and a panchromatic day/night band (DNB). Performance of the VIIRS spatial response and band-to-band co-registration (BBR) was measured through intensive pre-launch tests. These measurements were made in the non-aggregated zones near the start (or end) of scan for the I-bands and M-bands and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB in order to test requirement compliance. This paper presents results based on a recently re-processed pre-launch test data. Sensor (detector) spatial impulse responses in the scan direction are parameterized in terms of ground dynamic field of view (GDFOV), horizontal spatial resolution (HSR), modulation transfer function (MTF), ensquared energy (EE) and integrated out-of-pixel (IOOP) spatial response. Results are presented for the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones for the I-bands and M-bands, and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB. On-orbit GDFOVs measured for the 5 I-bands in the scan direction using a straight bridge are also presented. Band-to-band co-registration (BBR) is quantified using the prelaunch measured band-to-band offsets. These offsets may be expressed as fractions of horizontal sampling intervals (HSIs), detector spatial response parameters GDFOV or HSR. BBR bases on HSIs in the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones are presented. BBR matrices based on scan direction GDFOV and HSR are compared to the BBR matrix based on HSI in the non-aggregation zone. We demonstrate that BBR based on GDFOV is a better representation of footprint overlap and so this definition should be used in BBR requirement specifications. We propose that HSR not be used as the primary image quality indicator, since we

  19. SNPP VIIRS Spectral Bands Co-Registration and Spatial Response Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Tilton, James C.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tewari, Krishna P.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on 28 October 2011. The VIIRS has 5 imagery spectral bands (I-bands), 16 moderate resolution spectral bands (M-bands) and a panchromatic day/night band (DNB). Performance of the VIIRS spatial response and band-to-band co-registration (BBR) was measured through intensive pre-launch tests. These measurements were made in the non-aggregated zones near the start (or end) of scan for the I-bands and M-bands and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB in order to test requirement compliance. This paper presents results based on a recently re-processed pre-launch test data. Sensor (detector) spatial impulse responses in the scan direction are parameterized in terms of ground dynamic field of view (GDFOV), horizontal spatial resolution (HSR), modulation transfer function (MTF), ensquared energy (EE) and integrated out-of-pixel (IOOP) spatial response. Results are presented for the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones for the I-bands and M-bands, and for a limited number of aggregation modes for the DNB. On-orbit GDFOVs measured for the 5 I-bands in the scan direction using a straight bridge are also presented. Band-to-band co-registration (BBR) is quantified using the prelaunch measured band-to-band offsets. These offsets may be expressed as fractions of horizontal sampling intervals (HSIs), detector spatial response parameters GDFOV or HSR. BBR bases on HSIs in the non-aggregation, 2-sample and 3-sample aggregation zones are presented. BBR matrices based on scan direction GDFOV and HSR are compared to the BBR matrix based on HSI in the non-aggregation zone. We demonstrate that BBR based on GDFOV is a better representation of footprint overlap and so this definition should be used in BBR requirement specifications. We propose that HSR not be used as the primary image quality indicator, since we

  20. Development of Response Spectral Ground Motion Prediction Equations from Empirical Models for Fourier Spectra and Duration of Ground Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, S. S.; Scherbaum, F.; Kuehn, N. M.; Stafford, P.; Edwards, B.

    2014-12-01

    In a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) framework, it still remains a challenge to adjust ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for application in different seismological environments. In this context, this study presents a complete framework for the development of a response spectral GMPE easily adjustable to different seismological conditions; and which does not suffer from the technical problems associated with the adjustment in response spectral domain. Essentially, the approach consists of an empirical FAS (Fourier Amplitude Spectrum) model and a duration model for ground motion which are combined within the random vibration theory (RVT) framework to obtain the full response spectral ordinates. Additionally, FAS corresponding to individual acceleration records are extrapolated beyond the frequency range defined by the data using the stochastic FAS model, obtained by inversion as described in Edwards & Faeh, (2013). To that end, an empirical model for a duration, which is tuned to optimize the fit between RVT based and observed response spectral ordinate, at each oscillator frequency is derived. Although, the main motive of the presented approach was to address the adjustability issues of response spectral GMPEs; comparison, of median predicted response spectra with the other regional models indicate that presented approach can also be used as a stand-alone model. Besides that, a significantly lower aleatory variability (σ<0.5 in log units) in comparison to other regional models, at shorter periods brands it to a potentially viable alternative to the classical regression (on response spectral ordinates) based GMPEs for seismic hazard studies in the near future. The dataset used for the presented analysis is a subset of the recently compiled database RESORCE-2012 across Europe, Middle East and the Mediterranean region.

  1. Photovoltaic Roofs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, R. W., Jr.; Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar cells perform two functions: waterproofing roof and generating electricity. Sections through horizontal and slanting joints show overlapping modules sealed by L-section rubber strips and side-by-side modules sealed by P-section strips. Water seeping through seals of slanting joints drains along channels. Rooftop photovoltaic array used watertight south facing roof, replacing shingles, tar, and gravel. Concept reduces cost of residential solar-cell array.

  2. Photovoltaic fabrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-22

    during wire fabrication. Weaving was demonstrated for both military-type nylon -cotton blend (NYCO) warp fibers and cotton-polyester warp fibers. A...Lowell, MA 01852 14. ABSTRACT This report describes a project to improve photovoltaic fabrics. It had four objectives: 1) Efficiency – make PV wires on...a continuous basis that exhibit 7% efficiency; 2) Automated Welding – demonstrate an automated means of interconnecting the electrodes of one wire

  3. MODIS Aqua Optical Throughput Degradation Impact on Relative Spectral Response and Calibration on Ocean Color Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shihyan; Meister, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Since Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua's launch in 2002, the radiometric system gains of the reflective solar bands have been degrading, indicating changes in the systems optical throughput. To estimate the optical throughput degradation, the electronic gain changes were estimated and removed from the measured system gain. The derived optical throughput degradation shows a rate that is much faster in the shorter wavelengths than the longer wavelengths. The wavelength-dependent optical throughput degradation modulated the relative spectral response (RSR) of the bands. In addition, the optical degradation is also scan angle-dependent due to large changes in response versus the scan angle over time. We estimated the modulated RSR as a function of time and scan angles and its impacts on sensor radiometric calibration for the ocean science. Our results show that the calibration bias could be up to 1.8 % for band 8 (412 nm) due to its larger out-of-band response. For the other ocean bands, the calibration biases are much smaller with magnitudes at least one order smaller.

  4. Spectral function and responsivity of resonant tunneling and superlattice quantum dot infrared photodetectors using Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naser, M. A.; Deen, M. J.; Thompson, D. A.

    2007-10-01

    Theoretical modeling of resonant tunneling (RT) and superlattice (SL) quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) using Green's function is reported. The RT QDIP gives very low dark current which improves the detectivity of the device and allows for high temperature operation. The SL QDIP gives high responsivity and is suitable for low-level signal detection. The theoretical model is based on Green's function method which is used to calculate the spectral function and the density of states of the two detectors. The kinetic equation that governs Green's functions is solved numerically using the method of finite differences. From the information obtained from the density of states, the possible energy transitions are obtained. The bound states are calculated by solving the eigenvalue problem using the method of finite differences, while the continuum states localized in the quantum dot region are calculated using Green's functions. Using the first order dipole approximation and Fermi golden rule, the eigenstates are used to calculate the responsivity of the detectors which is compared with available experimental results. The theoretical model is then used for studying the effect of changing the quantum dot height-to-diameter ratio on the normal incidence responsivity of the SL structure.

  5. A practical implementation of high resolution relative spectral response measurement of CMOS IRFPAs using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, Catherine; Lepot, Thierry; Ramamonjisoa, Michael; Fradcourt, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    The accurate knowledge of IR detectors specifications becomes of higher importance whatever the application. Among these specifications is the relative spectral response. The usual method of relative spectral response measurement uses a source spectrally defined by the wavelength selection through a grating-based monochromator. This simple and proven method has a limited spectral resolution since the signal received by the tested detector is proportional to the width of the wavelength selection slit i.e. the spectral resolution. Another method consists in using a Fourier Transform IR Spectrometer (FTIR) easily allowing a 1 cm-1 spectral resolution even in the Long Wave IR range. However, the implementation of this method requires a meticulous analysis of all the elements of the bench and all the parameters to avoid any misinterpretation of the results. Among the potential traps are the frequency dependence of the signals and the parasitic fringes effect on the curves. Practical methods to correct the frequency dependence of the reference detector and to remove parasitic interference fringes are presented in this paper.

  6. Prediction of Mass Spectral Response Factors from Predicted Chemometric Data for Druglike Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Christopher J.; Johnson, Joshua L.; Kamel, Amin M.

    2017-02-01

    A method is developed for the prediction of mass spectral ion counts of drug-like molecules using in silico calculated chemometric data. Various chemometric data, including polar and molecular surface areas, aqueous solvation free energies, and gas-phase and aqueous proton affinities were computed, and a statistically significant relationship between measured mass spectral ion counts and the combination of aqueous proton affinity and total molecular surface area was identified. In particular, through multilinear regression of ion counts on predicted chemometric data, we find that log10(MS ion counts) = -4.824 + c 1•PA + c 2•SA, where PA is the aqueous proton affinity of the molecule computed at the SMD(aq)/M06-L/MIDI!//M06-L/MIDI! level of electronic structure theory, SA is the total surface area of the molecule in its conjugate base form, and c 1 and c 2 have values of -3.912 × 10-2 mol kcal-1 and 3.682 × 10-3 Å-2. On a 66-molecule training set, this regression exhibits a multiple R value of 0.791 with p values for the intercept, c 1, and c 2 of 1.4 × 10-3, 4.3 × 10-10, and 2.5 × 10-6, respectively. Application of this regression to an 11-molecule test set provides a good correlation of prediction with experiment ( R = 0.905) albeit with a systematic underestimation of about 0.2 log units. This method may prove useful for semiquantitative analysis of drug metabolites for which MS response factors or authentic standards are not readily available.

  7. Wave spectral response to sudden changes in wind direction in finite-depth waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aijaz, Saima; Rogers, W. Erick; Babanin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The response of a wind-sea spectrum to sudden changes in wind directions of 180° and 90° is investigated. Numerical simulations using the third-generation wave spectral model SWAN have been undertaken at micro timescales of 30 s and fine spatial resolution of less than 10 m. The results have been validated against the wave data collected during the field campaign at Lake George, Australia. The newly implemented 'ST6' physics in the SWAN model has been evaluated using a selection of bottom-friction terms and the two available functions for the nonlinear energy transfer: (1) exact solution of the nonlinear term (XNL), and (2) discrete interactions approximation (DIA) that parameterizes the nonlinear term. Good agreement of the modelled data is demonstrated directly with the field data and through the known experimental growth curves obtained from the extensive Lake George data set. The modelling results show that of the various combinations of models tested, the ST6/XNL model provides the most reliable computations of integral and spectral wave parameters. When the winds and waves are opposing (180° wind turn), the XNL is nearly twice as fast in the aligning the young wind-sea with the new wind direction than the DIA. In this case, the young wind-sea gradually decouples from the old waves and forms a new secondary peak. Unlike the 180° wind turn, there is no decoupling in the 90° wind turn and the entire spectrum rotates smoothly in the new direction. In both cases, the young wind-sea starts developing in the new wind direction within 10 min of the wind turn for the ST6 while the directional response of the default physics lags behind with a response time that is nearly double of ST6. The modelling results highlight the differences in source term balance among the different models in SWAN. During high wind speeds, the default settings provide a larger contribution from the bottom-friction dissipation than the whitecapping. In contrast, the whitecapping

  8. Response to soil moisture of spectral indexes derived from bidirectional reflectance in Thematic Mapper wavebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, H. Brad; Pelletier, Ramona E.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory reflectance measurements of 10 soils were used to determine the relationship between soil moisture and three spectral indices: the TM5/7 ratio and the Wetness(R) and Brightness(R) features of the reflectance factor TM Tasseled Cap transformation. Response of the indices to dry mass water percentage was approximately linear for individual soils, except for Wetness(R) and Brightness(R) at high moisture content. Soil differences in the slopes of the Wetness(R)- and Brightness(R)-moisture content relationships were almost entirely eliminated by expressing water content as the percentage of water retained at 0.1 bar (10 kPa) tension (relative water content). The resultant soil lines were offset from one another by the differences in dry soil index value. Slope of the TM5/7 response was not completely normalized by expressing moisture status as relative water content, because slope appeared to vary with dry soil ratio value. Sensitivity to the effects of illumination angle was negligible for the TM5/7 ratio, somewhat greater for Wetness(R) and greatest for Brightness(R).

  9. Advanced Rainbow Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Shields, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays of the rainbow type, equipped with light-concentrator and spectral-beam-splitter optics, have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, high-efficiency solar electric power sources. This investigation has contributed to a revival of the concept of the rainbow photovoltaic array, which originated in the 1950s but proved unrealistic at that time because the selection of solar photovoltaic cells was too limited. Advances in the art of photovoltaic cells since that time have rendered the concept more realistic, thereby prompting the present development effort. A rainbow photovoltaic array comprises side-by-side strings of series-connected photovoltaic cells. The cells in each string have the same bandgap, which differs from the bandgaps of the other strings. Hence, each string operates most efficiently in a unique wavelength band determined by its bandgap. To obtain maximum energy-conversion efficiency and to minimize the size and weight of the array for a given sunlight input aperture, the sunlight incident on the aperture is concentrated, then spectrally dispersed onto the photovoltaic array plane, whereon each string of cells is positioned to intercept the light in its wavelength band of most efficient operation. The number of cells in each string is chosen so that the output potentials of all the strings are the same; this makes it possible to connect the strings together in parallel to maximize the output current of the array. According to the original rainbow photovoltaic concept, the concentrated sunlight was to be split into multiple beams by use of an array of dichroic filters designed so that each beam would contain light in one of the desired wavelength bands. The concept has since been modified to provide for dispersion of the spectrum by use of adjacent prisms. A proposal for an advanced version calls for a unitary concentrator/ spectral-beam-splitter optic in the form of a parabolic curved Fresnel-like prism

  10. GISS GCMAM Modeled Climate Responses to Total and Spectral Solar Forcing on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert; Rind, David; Jonas, Jeffrey; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    We examine the influence of the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor) observed spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variations on Earth's climate. We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM based, the other based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model) to examine the climate responses on decadal and centennial time scales. We show that the atmosphere has different temperature, ozone, and dynamic responses to the two solar spectral forcing scenarios, even when the variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) are the same. We find that solar variations under either scenario contribute a small fraction of the observed temperature increase since the industrial revolution. The trend of global averaged surface air temperature response to the SIM-based solar forcing is 0.02 °C/century, about half of the temperature trend to the SATIRE-based SSI. However the temporal variation of the surface air temperature for the SIM-based solar forcing scenario is much larger compared to its SATIRE counterpart. Further research is required to examine TSI and SSI variations in the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, to assess their implications for the solar influence on climate.

  11. GISS GCMAM Modeled Climate Responses to Total and Spectral Solar Forcing on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R. F.; Rind, D. H.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.; Krivova, N.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the influence of the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor) observed spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variations on Earth's climate. We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM based, the other based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model) to examine the climate responses on decadal and centennial time scales. We show that the atmosphere has different temperature, ozone, and dynamic responses to the two solar spectral forcing scenarios, even when the variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) are the same. We find that solar variations under either scenario contribute a small fraction of the observed temperature increase since the industrial revolution. The trend of global averaged surface air temperature response to the SIM-based solar forcing is 0.02 °C/century, about half of the temperature trend to the SATIRE-based SSI. However the temporal variation of the surface air temperature for the SIM-based solar forcing scenario is much larger compared to its SATIRE counterpart. Further research is required to examine TSI and SSI variations in the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, to assess their implications for the solar influence on climate.

  12. Contribution of Jahn-Teller and charge transfer excitations to the photovoltaic effect of manganite/titanite heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifland, Benedikt; Hoffmann, Joerg; Kressdorf, Birte; Roddatis, Vladimir; Seibt, Michael; Jooss, Christian

    2017-06-01

    The effect of correlation effects on photovoltaic energy conversion at manganite/titanite heterojunctions is investigated. As a model system we choose a heterostructure consisting of the small polaron absorber Pr0.66Ca0.34MnO3 (PCMO) epitaxially grown on single-crystalline Nb-doped SrTi0.998Nb0.002O3 (STNO) substrates. The high structural and chemical quality of the interfaces is proved by detailed characterization using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) studies. Spectrally resolved and temperature-dependent photovoltaic measurements show pronounced contributions of both the Jahn-Teller (JT) excitations and the charge transfer (CT) transitions to the photovoltaic effect at different photon energies. A linear temperature dependence of the open-circuit voltage for an excitation in the PCMO manganite is only observed below the charge-ordering temperature, indicating that the diffusion length of the photocarrier exceeds the size of the space charge region. The photovoltaic response is compared to that of a heterojunction of lightly doped Pr0.05Ca0.95MnO3 (CMO)/STNO, where the JT transition is absent. Here, significant contributions of the CT transition to the photovoltaic effect set in below the Neel temperature. We conclude that polaronic correlations and ordering effects are essentials for photovoltaic energy conversion in manganites.

  13. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Cammin, Jochen E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Xu, Jennifer; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi et al., “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011

  14. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    PubMed Central

    Cammin, Jochen; Xu, Jennifer; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi , “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011)]. The

  15. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  16. Basic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, K.

    1984-01-01

    Here is a photovoltaics guide that converts highly technical information into language that can be understood by both scientists and non-scientists. It provides an introduction to solar cell technology, explaining how PV cells work, how they are manufactured, and how they are put together into effective energy-producing systems. The authors investigate a new PV technology based on an altered form of silicon capable of producing conversion efficiencies of 10% to 15%. They explain the PV effect, loss mechanisms, and advances in fabrication methods.

  17. [Preparation and spectral characterization of Lumogen coatings for UV-responsive CCD image sensors].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Wei; Tian, Xin; Huang, Yuan-Shen; Ni, Zheng-Ji; Zhuang, Song-Lin

    2010-05-01

    Traditional charge-coupled devices (usually front-illuminated CCDs) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) have lower response in ultraviolet region particularly. The reason is that polysilicon gate material absorbs the ultraviolet radiation highly, which leads to a barricade of the radiation penetrating the gate to the channel of CCD. To enhance the detective responsibility of CCD in the ultraviolet region, a feasible method is to coat the surface of CCD polysilicon gate with a thin film. The thin film should have the ability of converting the ultraviolet to visible in order to enable the UV radiation to "penetrate" the polysilicon gate. An organic coating to convert the UV radiation to visible has been developed in the present paper. Lumogen thin films were deposited on fused silica substrates by vacuum evaporation of an organic dye called Lumogen Yellow S0790. Analysis of organic functional groups was used to study the luminescence mechanism of Lumogen. The optical constants of coatings were calculated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results indicate that Lumogen exhibits photoluminescence continuously owing to four kinds of double bonds in each Lumogen molecule. The refractive index of Lumogen film was approximately 1.3, which indicates that this film could be considered an antireflection coating. Finally, the spectral properties of Lumogen coatings were characterized by transmission, absorption, photoluminescence emission, and excitation spectra. It is showed that these coatings were transmitted well in visible region (lambda > 470 nm), and emitted a yellowish green glow centered at approximately 523 nm together with a wide excitation spectrum field from 240 nm to 490 nm. The synthesis shows that Lumogen coatings match accurately with the detected spectrum of conventional silicon-based image sensors, which makes this kind of thin films an ultraviolet responsive coating for sensors.

  18. Ultrahigh-Responsivity Photodetectors from Perovskite Nanowire Arrays for Sequentially Tunable Spectral Measurement.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Huang, Liming; Xu, Xiuzhen; Zhang, Xiujuan; Jin, Xiangcheng; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Jie, Jiansheng

    2017-04-12

    Compared with polycrystalline films, single-crystalline methylammonium lead halide (MAPbX3, X = halogen) perovskite nanowires (NWs) with well-defined structure possess superior optoelectronic properties for optoelectronic applications. However, most of the prepared perovskite NWs exhibit properties below expectations due to poor crystalline quality and rough surfaces. It also remains a challenge to achieve aligned growth of single-crystalline perovskite NWs for integrated device applications. Here, we report a facile fluid-guided antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization (FGAVC) method for large-scale fabrication of high-quality single-crystalline MAPb(I1-xBrx)3 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) NW arrays. The resultant perovskite NWs showed smooth surfaces due to slow crystallization process and moisture-isolated growth environment. Significantly, photodetectors made from the NW arrays exhibited outstanding performance in respect of ultrahigh responsivity of 12 500 A W(-1), broad linear dynamic rang (LDR) of 150 dB, and robust stability. The responsivity represents the best value ever reported for perovskite-based photodetectors. Moreover, the spectral response of the MAPb(I1-xBrx)3 NW arrays could be sequentially tuned by varying the content of x = 0-0.4. On the basis of this feature, the NW arrays were monolithically integrated to form a unique system for directly measuring light wavelength. Our work would open a new avenue for the fabrication of high-performance, integrated optoelectronic devices from the perovskite NW arrays.

  19. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of biodegraded oil in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aal, Gamal Z.; Atekwana, Estella A.

    2014-02-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of different oil saturation (0.2-0.8), wetting conditions (water-wet and oil-wet), and the addition of asphaltene on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of biodegraded and fresh crude oil in sand columns. In the water-wet case, no significant differences were observed for both the fresh and biodegraded oil and both displayed an increase in the magnitude of the phase (ϕ) and decrease in the magnitudes of the real (σ') and imaginary (σ'') conductivity components with increasing oil saturation. In this instance the SIP response is most likely controlled by the conduction and polarization of the electric double layer at the mineral-water interface. However, when oil is the wetting phase there were considerable differences in the magnitude of the SIP parameters between the fresh and biodegraded oil. The magnitude of ϕ and σ'' increased with increasing oil saturation, whereas σ' decreased. The magnitude of σ' and σ'' for the biodegraded oil-wetted sands were relatively higher compared to fresh oil-wetted sands. In experiments with fresh and biodegraded oil-wet sand, the addition of 1 per cent asphaltene increased σ' and σ'' with the biodegraded oil showing the highest magnitude. Asphaltenes are the most dipolar fraction of crude oil and increase in concentration with increasing biodegradation. Asphaltene creates a surface charge due to the ionization and complexation reactions of functional groups at interfaces. Therefore, the enhancement in the conduction and polarization observed with the biodegraded oil-wetted sands may be due to the increase in polar components (e.g. asphaltene) from the biodegradation process and the interactions of the polar components with the surfaces of water and mineral grains. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of other components in biodegraded oil such as resins, trace metals, biogenic metallic minerals (e.g. magnetite) and organic

  20. Sensitivity studies of SREM instrument response and spectral unfolding to particle environment anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdas, Wojtek; Xiao, Hualin; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-04-01

    The Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) is installed on several ESA satellites to monitor space radiation environment of protons and electrons [1]. With its 15 spectroscopy channels the monitor can distinguish between particle species and provide information on their energy spectra. Measurements are based on three sensors located behind different shielding materials. Two of them are arranged into a telescope. All SREM instruments have been carefully calibrated and modelled during laboratory preparation phase. Space data are unfolded using a wide range of methods ranging from simple fit functions to response matrix inversions [2]. Cross comparisons often show discrepancies reaching even an order of magnitude. They are usually attributed to the particle environment anisotropy. Due to various thicknesses of the shielding given by SREM itself and the spacecraft mass distributions the response functions show directional sensitivity. Knowing the spacecraft orientation with respect to the magnetic field allows for more accurate spectral measurements [3]. It is not always possible as only some spacecraft with SREM on board provide such information. This study utilizes pitch angle distributions of particles in the radiation belts for improved unfolding of the SREM energy spectra. Both, random and known SREM orientations with respect to the magnetic field are investigated. Results are given for wide range of numerical studies and for space measurements based on the PROBA1 mission [4]. They contribute to improved accuracy of SREM spectral measurements and give valuable inputs to design of new spacecraft radiation instruments. Literature [1 A. Hajdas, P. Bühler, C. Eggel, P. Favre, A. Mchedlishvili, and A. Zehnder, "Radiation environment along the INTEGRAL orbit measured with the IREM monitor," Astro. Astrophys., vol. 411, pp. L43-L47, 2003. [2] I. Sandberg, I. A. Daglis, A. Anastasiadis, P. Bühler, P. Nieminen, and H. Evans, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. vol. 59, no. 4

  1. Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

  2. Eddy covariance measurements with a new fast-response, enclosed-path analyzer: Spectral characteristics and cross-system comparisons

    Treesearch

    K. Novick; J. Walker; W.S. Chan; A. Schmidt; C. Sobek; J.M. Vose

    2013-01-01

    A new class of enclosed path gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance applications combines the advantages of traditional closed-path systems (small density corrections, good performance in poor weather) and open-path systems (good spectral response, low power requirements), and permits estimates of instantaneous gas mixing ratio. Here, the extent to which these...

  3. On the detection and monitoring of reduced water content in plants using spectral responses in the visible domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.; Van Leeuwen, Spencer; Chen, Tenn F.

    2016-05-01

    The water status of cultivated plants can have a significant impact not only on food production, but also on the appropriate usage of increasingly scarce freshwater supplies. Accordingly, the cost-effective detection and monitoring of changes in their water content are longstanding remote sensing goals. Existing procedures employed to achieve these goals are largely based on the spectral responses of plant leaves in the infrared domain where the light absorption within the foliar tissues is dominated by water. Recently, it has been suggested that such procedures could be implemented using spectral responses, more specifically spectral subsurface reflectance to transmittance ratios, obtained in the visible domain. The basis for this proposition resides on the premise that a reduced water content (RWC) can result in histological changes whose effects on the foliar optical properties may not be limited to the infrared domain. However, the experiments leading to this proposition were performed on detached leaves, which were not influenced by the whole plant's adaptation mechanisms to water stress. In this work, we investigate whether the spectral responses of living plant leaves in the visible domain can lead to reliable RWC estimations. We employ measured biophysical data and predictive light transport simulations in order to extend qualitatively and quantitatively the scope of previous studies in this area. Our findings indicate that the living specimens' physiological responses to water stress should be taken into account in the design of new procedures for the cost-effective RWC estimation using visible subsurface reflectance to transmittance ratios.

  4. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Clews, Peggy J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-08

    A process including forming a photovoltaic solar cell on a substrate, the photovoltaic solar cell comprising an anchor positioned between the photovoltaic solar cell and the substrate to suspend the photovoltaic solar cell from the substrate. A surface of the photovoltaic solar cell opposite the substrate is attached to a receiving substrate. The receiving substrate may be bonded to the photovoltaic solar cell using an adhesive force or a metal connecting member. The photovoltaic solar cell is then detached from the substrate by lifting the receiving substrate having the photovoltaic solar cell attached thereto and severing the anchor connecting the photovoltaic solar cell to the substrate. Depending upon the type of receiving substrate used, the photovoltaic solar cell may be removed from the receiving substrate or remain on the receiving substrate for use in the final product.

  5. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N.

    2013-09-11

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  6. Effects of interdigitated platinum finger geometry on spectral response characteristics of germanium metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun-Duk; Janardhanam, V; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2014-10-01

    We fabricated interdigitated germanium (Ge) metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors (MSM PDs) with interdigitated platinum (Pt) finger electrodes and investigated the effects of Pt finger width and spacing on their spectral response. An increase in the incident optical power enhances the creation of electron-hole pairs, resulting in a significant increase in photo current. Lowering of the Schottky barrier could be a main cause of the increase in both photo and dark current with increasing applied bias. The manufactured Ge MSM PDs exhibited a considerable spectral response for wavelengths in the range of 1.53-1.56 μm, corresponding to the entire C-band spectrum range. A reduction in the area fraction of the Pt finger electrode in the active region by decreasing and increasing finger width and spacing, respectively, led to an increase in illuminated active area and suppression of dark current, which was responsible for the improvement in responsivity and quantum efficiency of Ge MSM PDs.

  7. The relationship of spectral sensitivity with growth and reproductive response in avian breeders (Gallus gallus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye-Feng; Jiang, Jing-Song; Pan, Jin-Ming; Ying, Yi-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Ming-Li; Lu, Min-Si; Chen, Xian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that birds that are exposed to light at night develop advanced reproductive systems. However, spectrum might also affect the photoperiodic response of birds. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of spectral composition on the growth and reproductive physiology of female breeders, using pure light-emitting diode spectra. A total of 1,000 newly hatched female avian breeders (Gallus gallus) were equally allocated to white-, red-, yellow-, green- and blue-light treated groups. We found that blue-light treated birds had a greater and faster weight gain than did red- and yellow-light treated birds (P = 0.02 and 0.05). The red light expedited the sexual maturation of the chicks, whose age at sexual maturity was 7 and 14 days earlier than that of the green- and blue-light treated birds, respectively. The accumulative egg production of the red-light treated birds was 9 and 8 eggs more than that of the blue- and green-light treated birds. The peak lay rate of the red-light treated groups was significantly greater than the blue-light treated birds (P = 0.028). In conclusion, exposure to short-wavelength light appears to promote growth of female breeder birds, whereas exposure to long-wavelength light appears to accelerate reproductive performance.

  8. The relationship of spectral sensitivity with growth and reproductive response in avian breeders (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ye-Feng; Jiang, Jing-Song; Pan, Jin-Ming; Ying, Yi-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Ming-Li; Lu, Min-Si; Chen, Xian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that birds that are exposed to light at night develop advanced reproductive systems. However, spectrum might also affect the photoperiodic response of birds. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of spectral composition on the growth and reproductive physiology of female breeders, using pure light-emitting diode spectra. A total of 1,000 newly hatched female avian breeders (Gallus gallus) were equally allocated to white-, red-, yellow-, green- and blue-light treated groups. We found that blue-light treated birds had a greater and faster weight gain than did red- and yellow-light treated birds (P = 0.02 and 0.05). The red light expedited the sexual maturation of the chicks, whose age at sexual maturity was 7 and 14 days earlier than that of the green- and blue-light treated birds, respectively. The accumulative egg production of the red-light treated birds was 9 and 8 eggs more than that of the blue- and green-light treated birds. The peak lay rate of the red-light treated groups was significantly greater than the blue-light treated birds (P = 0.028). In conclusion, exposure to short-wavelength light appears to promote growth of female breeder birds, whereas exposure to long-wavelength light appears to accelerate reproductive performance. PMID:26765747

  9. The relationship of spectral sensitivity with growth and reproductive response in avian breeders (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye-Feng; Jiang, Jing-Song; Pan, Jin-Ming; Ying, Yi-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Ming-Li; Lu, Min-Si; Chen, Xian-Hui

    2016-01-14

    A previous study demonstrated that birds that are exposed to light at night develop advanced reproductive systems. However, spectrum might also affect the photoperiodic response of birds. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of spectral composition on the growth and reproductive physiology of female breeders, using pure light-emitting diode spectra. A total of 1,000 newly hatched female avian breeders (Gallus gallus) were equally allocated to white-, red-, yellow-, green- and blue-light treated groups. We found that blue-light treated birds had a greater and faster weight gain than did red- and yellow-light treated birds (P = 0.02 and 0.05). The red light expedited the sexual maturation of the chicks, whose age at sexual maturity was 7 and 14 days earlier than that of the green- and blue-light treated birds, respectively. The accumulative egg production of the red-light treated birds was 9 and 8 eggs more than that of the blue- and green-light treated birds. The peak lay rate of the red-light treated groups was significantly greater than the blue-light treated birds (P = 0.028). In conclusion, exposure to short-wavelength light appears to promote growth of female breeder birds, whereas exposure to long-wavelength light appears to accelerate reproductive performance.

  10. Ultrawide Spectral Response of CIGS Solar Cells Integrated with Luminescent Down-Shifting Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho-Jung; Kim, Ye-Chan; Lee, Soo Kyung; Jeong, Yonkil; Song, Jin-Won; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2017-08-02

    Conventional Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells exhibit poor spectral response due to parasitic light absorption in the window and buffer layers at the short wavelength range between 300 and 520 nm. In this study, the CdSe/CdZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) acting as a luminescent down-shifting (LDS) layer were inserted between the MgF2 antireflection coating and the window layer of the CIGS solar cell to improve light harvesting in the short wavelength range. The LDS layer absorbs photons in the short wavelength range and re-emits photons in the 609 nm range, which are transmitted through the window and buffer layer and absorbed in the CIGS layer. The average external quantum efficiency in the parasitic light absorption region (300-520 nm) was enhanced by 51%. The resulting short circuit current density of 34.04 mA/cm(2) and power conversion efficiency of 14.29% of the CIGS solar cell with the CdSe/CdZnS QDs were improved by 4.35 and 3.85%, respectively, compared with those of the conventional solar cells without QDs.

  11. Metal-organic semiconductor interfacial barrier height determination from internal photoemission signal in spectral response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Iyer, S. Sundar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and convenient evaluation methods of the interfacial barrier ϕb for charge carriers in metal semiconductor (MS) junctions are important for designing and building better opto-electronic devices. This becomes more critical for organic semiconductor devices where a plethora of molecules are in use and standardised models applicable to myriads of material combinations for the different devices may have limited applicability. In this paper, internal photoemission (IPE) from spectral response (SR) in the ultra-violet to near infra-red range of different MS junctions of metal-organic semiconductor-metal (MSM) test structures is used to determine more realistic MS ϕb values. The representative organic semiconductor considered is [6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, and the metals considered are Al and Au. The IPE signals in the SR measurement of the MSM device are identified and separated before it is analysed to estimate ϕb for the MS junction. The analysis of IPE signals under different bias conditions allows the evaluation of ϕb for both the front and back junctions, as well as for symmetric MSM devices.

  12. MoS2-InGaZnO Heterojunction Phototransistors with Broad Spectral Responsivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaehyun; Kwak, Hyena; Lee, Youngbin; Kang, Yu-Seon; Cho, Mann-Ho; Cho, Jeong Ho; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Park, Seongjun; Lee, Hoo-Jeong; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2016-04-06

    We introduce an amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) heterostructure phototransistor consisting of solution-based synthetic molybdenum disulfide (few-layered MoS2, with a band gap of ∼1.7 eV) and sputter-deposited a-IGZO (with a band gap of ∼3.0 eV) films as a novel sensing element with a broad spectral responsivity. The MoS2 and a-IGZO films serve as a visible light-absorbing layer and a high mobility channel layer, respectively. Spectroscopic measurements reveal that appropriate band alignment at the heterojunction provides effective transfer of the visible light-induced electrons generated in the few-layered MoS2 film to the underlying a-IGZO channel layer with a high carrier mobility. The photoresponse characteristics of the a-IGZO transistor are extended to cover most of the visible range by forming a heterojunction phototransistor that harnesses a visible light responding MoS2 film with a small band gap prepared through a large-area synthetic route. The MoS2-IGZO heterojunction phototransistors exhibit a photoresponsivity of approximately 1.7 A/W at a wavelength of 520 nm (an optical power of 1 μW) with excellent time-dependent photoresponse dynamics.

  13. The impact of changing night vision goggle spectral response on night vision imaging system lighting compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, Harry L.; Marasco, Peter L.

    2004-09-01

    The defining document outlining night-vision imaging system (NVIS) compatible lighting, MIL-L-85762A, was written in the mid 1980's, based on what was then the state of the art in night vision and image intensification. Since that time there have been changes in the photocathode sensitivity and the minus-blue coatings applied to the objective lenses. Specifically, many aviation night-vision goggles (NVGs) in the Air Force are equipped with so-called "leaky green" or Class C type objective lens coatings that provide a small amount of transmission around 545 nanometers so that the displays that use a P-43 phosphor can be seen through the NVGs. However, current NVIS compatibility requirements documents have not been updated to include these changes. Documents that followed and replaced MIL-L-85762A (ASC/ENFC-96-01 and MIL-STD-3009) addressed aspects of then current NVIS technology, but did little to change the actual content or NVIS radiance requirements set forth in the original MIL-L-85762A. This paper examines the impact of spectral response changes, introduced by changes in image tube parameters and objective lens minus-blue filters, on NVIS compatibility and NVIS radiance calculations. Possible impact on NVIS lighting requirements is also discussed. In addition, arguments are presented for revisiting NVIS radiometric unit conventions.

  14. Organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  15. [Change of LAI and spectral response for rice under flood and waterlogging stress].

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Gu, Xiao-He; Meng, Lu-Min; Qiu, He; Wang, Hui-Fang

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide the foundational theoretical support for flood loss estimation of rice with RS, the change of leaf area index (LAI) and canopy spectral response during four developmental stages and three waterlogging depths were studied, and the LAI estimation model was established with spectra characteristics parameter using regression analysis method. The results show that LAI value decreases as water depth increases in tillering, jointing and heading stages, and LAI value under complete submergence decreased by 36. 36% than CK in jointing stages. "Double-Peak" presented in the canopy first derivative spectra of 680-760 nm where the red edge parameters existed, and the main peak is located in the 724-737 nm with 701 and 718 nm exhibiting secondary peak. With water depth increasing, "Triple-Peak" emerges especially. The red edge position moves to long-wavelength direction in each developmental stage. Blue shift of red edge amplitude and red edge area was detected in tillering, jointing and filling stages, while red shift appeared in heading stage. The relationship between spectra characteristics parameters and LAI were investigated during 4 growth stages, results were not consistently significant at any wavelengths, and the leaf area indices were significantly correlative to the spectra parameters before heading stage, so the spectra parameters before heading stage can be used to estimate the leaf area indices, and a regression model based on parameter D(lambda737)/D(lambda718) was recommended. Therefore the variation range of LAI for rice could response to the stress intensity directly, and the regression model LAI= 3. 138(D(lambda737)/D(lambda718))-0. 806 can precisely estimate the leaf area index under flooding and waterlogging stress.

  16. Simulation and analysis of grating-integrated quantum dot infrared detectors for spectral response control and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh Kim, Jun; Ku, Zahyun; Krishna, Sanjay; Kang, Sang-Woo; Jun Lee, Sang; Chul Jun, Young; Urbas, Augustine

    2014-04-01

    We propose and analyze a novel detector structure for pixel-level multispectral infrared imaging. More specifically, we investigate the device performance of a grating-integrated quantum dots-in-a-well photodetector under backside illumination. Our design uses 1-dimensional grating patterns fabricated directly on a semiconductor contact layer and, thus, adds a minimal amount of additional effort to conventional detector fabrication flows. We show that we can gain wide-range control of spectral response as well as large overall detection enhancement by adjusting grating parameters. For small grating periods, the spectral responsivity gradually changes with parameters. We explain this spectral tuning using the Fabry-Perot resonance and effective medium theory. For larger grating periods, the responsivity spectra get complicated due to increased diffraction into the active region, but we find that we can obtain large enhancement of the overall detector performance. In our design, the spectral tuning range can be larger than 1 μm, and, compared to the unpatterned detector, the detection enhancement can be greater than 92% and 148% for parallel and perpendicular polarizations. Our work can pave the way for practical, easy-to-fabricate detectors, which are highly useful for many infrared imaging applications.

  17. Simulation and analysis of grating-integrated quantum dot infrared detectors for spectral response control and performance enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Oh Kim, Jun; Ku, Zahyun; Urbas, Augustine E-mail: Augustine.Urbas@wpafb.af.mil; Krishna, Sanjay; Kang, Sang-Woo; Jun Lee, Sang; Chul Jun, Young E-mail: Augustine.Urbas@wpafb.af.mil

    2014-04-28

    We propose and analyze a novel detector structure for pixel-level multispectral infrared imaging. More specifically, we investigate the device performance of a grating-integrated quantum dots-in-a-well photodetector under backside illumination. Our design uses 1-dimensional grating patterns fabricated directly on a semiconductor contact layer and, thus, adds a minimal amount of additional effort to conventional detector fabrication flows. We show that we can gain wide-range control of spectral response as well as large overall detection enhancement by adjusting grating parameters. For small grating periods, the spectral responsivity gradually changes with parameters. We explain this spectral tuning using the Fabry–Perot resonance and effective medium theory. For larger grating periods, the responsivity spectra get complicated due to increased diffraction into the active region, but we find that we can obtain large enhancement of the overall detector performance. In our design, the spectral tuning range can be larger than 1 μm, and, compared to the unpatterned detector, the detection enhancement can be greater than 92% and 148% for parallel and perpendicular polarizations. Our work can pave the way for practical, easy-to-fabricate detectors, which are highly useful for many infrared imaging applications.

  18. Simulation for spectral response of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shiwei; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduced how to build a physical model of refer to the device structure and parameters. Simulations for solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes spectral characteristics were conducted in use of Silvaco TCAD, where device structure and parameters are comprehensively considered. In simulation, the effects of polarization, Urbach tail, mobility, saturated velocities and lifetime in AlGaN device was considered. Especially, we focused on how the concentration-dependent Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination model affects simulation results. By simulating, we analyzed the effects in spectral response caused by TAUN0 and TAUP0, and got the values of TAUN0 and TAUP0 which can bring a result coincides with test results. After that, we changed their values and made the simulation results especially the part under 255 nm performed better. In conclusion, the spectral response between 200 nm and 320 nm of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes were simulated and compared with test results. We also found that TAUN0 and TAUP0 have a large impact on spectral response of AlGaN material.

  19. Radiometric instrumentation and measurements guide for photovoltaic performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.

    1997-04-01

    The Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs indoor and outdoor standardization, testing, and monitoring of the performance of a wide range of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion devices and systems. The PV Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team (PVSRME) within that project is responsible for measurement and characterization of natural and artificial optical radiation which stimulates the PV effect. The PV manufacturing and research and development community often approaches project members for technical information and guidance. A great area of interest is radiometric instrumentation, measurement techniques, and data analysis applied to understanding and improving PV cell, module, and system performance. At the Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Workshop conducted by the PVSRME team in July 1995, the need to communicate knowledge of solar and optical radiometric measurements and instrumentation, gained as a result of NREL`s long-term experiences, was identified as an activity that would promote improved measurement processes and measurement quality in the PV research and manufacturing community. The purpose of this document is to address the practical and engineering need to understand optical and solar radiometric instrument performance, selection, calibration, installation, and maintenance applicable to indoor and outdoor radiometric measurements for PV calibration, performance, and testing applications. An introductory section addresses radiometric concepts and definitions. Next, concepts essential to spectral radiometric measurements are discussed. Broadband radiometric instrumentation and measurement concepts are then discussed. Each type of measurement serves as an important component of the PV cell, module, and system performance measurement and characterization process.

  20. Spectral representation: a core aspect of modelling the response characteristics of time-domain EMI mine detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, G. F.; Bailey, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    Most modern EMI mine detectors can detect the very small conductive and/or ferromagnetic parts of typical mines with relative ease. However, they also respond significantly to certain soils that contain lossy ferromagnetic minerals. In some special environments such as ocean beaches, conductivity of the host soil may also cause a response. Characterizing and modelling both the various target response mechanisms and the EMI detectors quantitatively would be relatively straightforward if it were not for the fact that most modern EMI detectors operate in time domain and use different current waveforms and time gates to observe response. Furthermore, much of the information about targets and interferences and even instrumental spectral limitations is observational rather than analytical data. In this paper, we put forward a spectral representation method that can be incorporated into both EMI data gathering and instrument modelling and which facilitates efficient quantitative simulation of arbitrary time- domain detection systems. The methodology and examples of its use are presented. Pure induction response from the ground is modelled with a sum-over-N-elements transfer function in which the kernel elements are single pole, pure damping responses which are log-spaced over the spectral range of interest. Instrument transfer functions can be described with a standard sparse pole and zero representation (located anywhere in the damped frequency half plane), if required. Model fitting techniques employing generalized inversion controls are used to go back and forth between frequency and time domain and the set of model parameters.

  1. Temporal relationships between spectral response and agronomic variables of a corn canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Markham, B. L.; Tucker, C. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to an experiment in which spectral radiance data collected in three spectral regions are related to corn canopy variables. The study extends the work of Tucker et al. (1979) in that more detailed measurements of corn canopy variables were made using quantitative techniques. Wet and dry green leaf biomass is considered along with the green leaf area index, chlorotic leaf biomass, chlorotic leaf area, and leaf water content. In addition, spectral data were collected with a hand-held radiometer having Landsat-D Thematic Mapper (TM) bands TM3 (0.63-0.69 micrometers), TM4 (0.76-0.90 micrometers), and TM5 (1.55-1.75 micrometers). TM3, TM4, and TM5 seem to be well situated spectrally for making remotely sensed measurements related to chlorophyll concentration, leaf density, and leaf water content.

  2. Temporal relationships between spectral response and agronomic variables of a corn canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Markham, B. L.; Tucker, C. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to an experiment in which spectral radiance data collected in three spectral regions are related to corn canopy variables. The study extends the work of Tucker et al. (1979) in that more detailed measurements of corn canopy variables were made using quantitative techniques. Wet and dry green leaf biomass is considered along with the green leaf area index, chlorotic leaf biomass, chlorotic leaf area, and leaf water content. In addition, spectral data were collected with a hand-held radiometer having Landsat-D Thematic Mapper (TM) bands TM3 (0.63-0.69 micrometers), TM4 (0.76-0.90 micrometers), and TM5 (1.55-1.75 micrometers). TM3, TM4, and TM5 seem to be well situated spectrally for making remotely sensed measurements related to chlorophyll concentration, leaf density, and leaf water content.

  3. The effect of organic acid on the spectral-induced polarization response of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Shalem, T.; Furman, A.

    2014-04-01

    In spectral-induced polarization (SIP) studies of sites contaminated by organic hydrocarbons, it was shown that biodegradation by-products in general, and organic acids in particular, significantly alter the SIP signature of the subsurface. Still a systematic study that considers the effect of organic acid on the physicochemical and electrical (SIP) properties of the soil is missing. The goal of this work is to relate between the effect of organic acid on the physicochemical properties of the soil, and the soil electrical properties. To do so, we measured the temporal changes of the soil chemical (ion content) and electrical (low-frequency SIP) properties in response to influx of organic acid at different concentrations, gradually altering the soil pH. Our results show that organic acid reduces the soil pH, enhances mineral weathering and consequently reduces both the in-phase and quadrature conductivity. At the pH range where mineral weathering is most significant (pH 6-4.5) a negative linear relation between the soil pH and the soil formation factor was found, suggesting that mineral weathering changes the pore space geometry and hence affecting the in-phase electrical conductivity. In addition, we attribute the reduction in the quadrature conductivity to an exchange process between the natural cation adsorbed on the mineral surface and hydronium, and to changes in the width of the pore bottleneck that results from the mineral weathering. Overall, our results allow a better understanding of the SIP signature of soil undergoing acidification process in general and as biodegradation process in particular.

  4. Consequences of the spectral response of an a-Si EPID and implications for dosimetric calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkby, C.; Sloboda, R.

    2005-08-15

    One of the attractive features of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) as dosimetric tools is that for open fields they are known to exhibit a generally linear relation between pixel value and incident energy fluence as measured by an ion chamber. It has also been established that a-Si EPIDs incorporating high atomic number phosphors such as Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb exhibit a disproportionately large response to low-energy (<1 MeV) photons. The present work examines the consequences of this hypersensitivity in a commercially available EPID, the Varian aS500, with respect to energy fluence calibration in a 6 MV radiotherapy beam. EPIDs may be deployed in situations where the spectrum of the incident beam is modified by passing through a compensator or through a patient or phantom. By examining the specific case of a beam hardened by passage through compensator material, we show that the discrepancy between open and attenuated beam calibration curves can be as high as 8%. A Monte Carlo study using a comprehensive model of the aS500 shows that this difference can be explained by spectral changes, and further suggests that it can be reduced by the addition of an external copper plate. We consider configurations with the plate placed directly on top of the EPID cassette and 15 cm above the cassette, supported by Styrofoam. In order to reduce the maximum discrepancy to <4%, it was found that a copper thickness of {approx}0.7 cm was required in the elevated configuration. Improvement was minimal with the copper in the contact configuration. Adding 0.7 cm of copper in the elevated configuration reduced the contrast-to-noise ratio by 19% and the modulation transfer for a given spatial frequency by 30%.

  5. Photocurrent response wavelength up to 1.1 μm from photovoltaic cells based on narrow-band-gap conjugated polymer and fullerene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yangjun; Wang, Li; Deng, Xianyu; Li, Dongyun; Zhu, Xuhui; Cao, Yong

    2006-08-01

    An extremely narrow-band-gap conjugated polymer poly(5,7-bis(4-decanyl-2-thienyl)thieno[3,4-b]diathiazole-thiophene-2,5) (PDDTT) (Eg≈1.01eV) was synthesized by Stille coupling reaction, which absorbs the light from 330-1220nm in solid thin film and shows good solution processibility. The polymeric photovoltaic cells based on PDDTT/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester blend show the short circuit density of 0.83mA/cm2, open current voltage of 0.35V, and photocurrent spectra response from 330to1100nm under AM 1.5 simulator (100mW/cm2).

  6. A molecular spin-photovoltaic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiangnan; Vélez, Saül; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Parui, Subir; Zhu, Xiangwei; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2017-08-01

    We fabricated a C60 fullerene–based molecular spin-photovoltaic device that integrates a photovoltaic response with the spin transport across the molecular layer. The photovoltaic response can be modified under the application of a small magnetic field, with a magnetophotovoltage of up to 5% at room temperature. Device functionalities include a magnetic current inverter and the presence of diverging magnetocurrent at certain illumination levels that could be useful for sensing. Completely spin-polarized currents can be created by balancing the external partially spin-polarized injection with the photogenerated carriers.

  7. Spectral Kernel Approach to Study Radiative Response of Climate Variables and Interannual Variability of Reflected Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Loukachine, Constantin; Charlock, Thomas P.; Young, David; Noeel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The radiative kernel approach provides a simple way to separate the radiative response to different climate parameters and to decompose the feedback into radiative and climate response components. Using CERES/MODIS/Geostationary data, we calculated and analyzed the solar spectral reflectance kernels for various climate parameters on zonal, regional, and global spatial scales. The kernel linearity is tested. Errors in the kernel due to nonlinearity can vary strongly depending on climate parameter, wavelength, surface, and solar elevation; they are large in some absorption bands for some parameters but are negligible in most conditions. The spectral kernels are used to calculate the radiative responses to different climate parameter changes in different latitudes. The results show that the radiative response in high latitudes is sensitive to the coverage of snow and sea ice. The radiative response in low latitudes is contributed mainly by cloud property changes, especially cloud fraction and optical depth. The large cloud height effect is confined to absorption bands, while the cloud particle size effect is found mainly in the near infrared. The kernel approach, which is based on calculations using CERES retrievals, is then tested by direct comparison with spectral measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) (a different instrument on a different spacecraft). The monthly mean interannual variability of spectral reflectance based on the kernel technique is consistent with satellite observations over the ocean, but not over land, where both model and data have large uncertainty. RMS errors in kernel ]derived monthly global mean reflectance over the ocean compared to observations are about 0.001, and the sampling error is likely a major component.

  8. Spectral Kernel Approach to Study Radiative Response of Climate Variables and Interannual Variability of Reflected Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Loukachine, Constantin; Charlock, Thomas P.; Young, David; Noeel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The radiative kernel approach provides a simple way to separate the radiative response to different climate parameters and to decompose the feedback into radiative and climate response components. Using CERES/MODIS/Geostationary data, we calculated and analyzed the solar spectral reflectance kernels for various climate parameters on zonal, regional, and global spatial scales. The kernel linearity is tested. Errors in the kernel due to nonlinearity can vary strongly depending on climate parameter, wavelength, surface, and solar elevation; they are large in some absorption bands for some parameters but are negligible in most conditions. The spectral kernels are used to calculate the radiative responses to different climate parameter changes in different latitudes. The results show that the radiative response in high latitudes is sensitive to the coverage of snow and sea ice. The radiative response in low latitudes is contributed mainly by cloud property changes, especially cloud fraction and optical depth. The large cloud height effect is confined to absorption bands, while the cloud particle size effect is found mainly in the near infrared. The kernel approach, which is based on calculations using CERES retrievals, is then tested by direct comparison with spectral measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) (a different instrument on a different spacecraft). The monthly mean interannual variability of spectral reflectance based on the kernel technique is consistent with satellite observations over the ocean, but not over land, where both model and data have large uncertainty. RMS errors in kernel ]derived monthly global mean reflectance over the ocean compared to observations are about 0.001, and the sampling error is likely a major component.

  9. Photovoltaic Effect and Evidence of Carrier Multiplication in Graphene Vertical Homojunctions with Asymmetrical Metal Contacts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Jing; Wang, Qinsheng; Meng, Jie; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bie, Ya-Qing; Liu, Junku; Liu, Kaihui; Liao, Zhi-Min; Sun, Dong; Yu, Dapeng

    2015-09-22

    Graphene exhibits exciting potentials for high-speed wideband photodetection and high quantum efficiency solar energy harvest because of its broad spectral absorption, fast photoelectric response, and potential carrier multiplication. Although photocurrent can be generated near a metal-graphene interface in lateral devices, the photoactive area is usually limited to a tiny one-dimensional line-like interface region. Here, we report photoelectric devices based on vertical graphene two-dimensional homojunction, which is fabricated via vertically stacking four graphene monolayers with asymmetric metal contacts. The devices show excellent photovoltaic output with excitation wavelength ranging from visible light to mid-infrared. The wavelength dependence of the internal quantum efficiency gives direct evidence of the carrier multiplication effect in graphene. The simple fabrication process, easy scale-up, large photoresponsive active area, and broadband response of the vertical graphene device are very promising for practical applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  10. Photovoltaic Detector Based on Type II Heterostructure with Deep AlSb/InAsSb/AlSb Quantum Well in the Active Region for the Mid-Infrared Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, G. G.; Mikhailova, M. P.; Andreev, I. A.; Moiseev, K. D.; Ivanov, E. V.; Mikhailov, M. Yu; Yakovlev, Yu P.

    2013-08-01

    Photodetectors for the spectral range 2-4 μm, based on an asymmetric type-II heterostructure p-InAs/AlSb/InAsSb/AlSb/(p, n)-GaSb with a single deep quantum well (QW) or three deep QWs at the heterointerface, have been grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and analysed. The transport, luminescent, photoelectric, current-voltage, and capacitance-voltage characteristics of these structures have been examined. A high-intensity positive and negative luminescence was observed in the spectral range 3-4 μm at high temperatures (300-400 K). The photosensitivity spectra were in the range 1.2-3.6 μm (T = 77 K). Large values of quantum efficiency (η = 0.6-0.7), responsivity (Sλ = 0.9-1.4 A·W1), and detectivity D*λ 3.5·1011 to 1010 cm·Hz1/2·W-1) were obtained at T = 77-200 K. The small capacitance of the structures (C = 1.5 pF at V = -1 V and T = 300 K) enabled an estimate of the response time of the photodetector at τ = 75 ps, which corresponds to a bandwidth of about 6 GHz. Photodetectors of this kind are promising for heterodyne detection of the emission of quantum-cascade lasers and IR spectroscopy.

  11. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Jaw-Won

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times, by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ~Vm) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation. Supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (no. 2013K1A3A1A32035429 and 2015R1A1A1A05027681).

  12. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-H; Bae, J; Lee, S W; Jang, J-W

    2015-11-07

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times (2530%), by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light (λ = 425-475 nm) illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ∼ V(m)) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation under blue light illumination. These results prove that the performance of non-single crystallized polymer nanowire devices can also be improved by plasmonic enhancement.

  13. Photovoltaic fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, P.; Jones, J.; Glenn, B.; Cook, G.; Billman, L.; Adcock, R.

    1991-09-01

    This booklet describes how PV devices and systems work. It also describes the specific materials and devices that are most widely used commercially as of 1990 and those that have the brightest prospects. Students, engineers, scientists, and others needing an introduction to basic PV technology, and manufacturers and consumers who want more information about PV systems should find this booklet helpful. We begin with an overview and then explain the rudimentary physical process of the technology, the photovoltaic effect. Next, we consider how scientists and engineers have harnessed this process to generate electricity in silicon solar cells, thin-film devices, and high-efficiency cells. We then look at how these devices are incorporated into modules, arrays, and power-producing systems. We have written and designed this book so that the reader may approach the subject on three different levels. First, for the person who is in a hurry or needs a very cursory overview, in the margins of each page we generalize the important points of that page. Second, for a somewhat deeper understanding, we have provided ample illustrations, photographs, and captions. And third, for a thorough introduction to the subject, the reader can resort to reading the text.

  14. Thermionic photovoltaic energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermionic photovoltaic energy conversion device comprises a thermionic diode mounted within a hollow tubular photovoltaic converter. The thermionic diode maintains a cesium discharge for producing excited atoms that emit line radiation in the wavelength region of 850 nm to 890 nm. The photovoltaic converter is a silicon or gallium arsenide photovoltaic cell having bandgap energies in this same wavelength region for optimum cell efficiency.

  15. Photovoltaic device and method

    DOEpatents

    Cleereman, Robert; Lesniak, Michael J.; Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K.; Boven, Michelle L.

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  16. Photovoltaic device and method

    DOEpatents

    Cleereman, Robert J; Lesniak, Michael J; Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joe A; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K; Boven, Michelle L

    2015-01-27

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  17. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  18. High density photovoltaic

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, R.E.; Jacobson, G.F.; Wojtczuk, S.

    1997-10-14

    Photovoltaic technology can directly generate high voltages in a solid state material through the series interconnect of many photovoltaic diodes. We are investigating the feasibility of developing an electrically isolated, high-voltage power supply using miniature photovoltaic devices that convert optical energy to electrical energy.

  19. Novel UV-Visible Photodetector in Photovoltaic Mode with Fast Response and Ultrahigh Photosensitivity Employing Se/TiO2 Nanotubes Heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lingxia; Hu, Kai; Teng, Feng; Fang, Xiaosheng

    2017-02-01

    A feasible strategy for hybrid photodetector by integrating an array of self-ordered TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) and selenium is demonstrated to break the compromise between the responsivity and response speed. Novel heterojunction between the TiO2 NTs and Se in combination with the surface trap states at TiO2 help regulate the electron transport and facilitate the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs under photovoltaic mode (at zero bias), leading to a high responsivity of ≈100 mA W(-1) at 620 nm light illumination and the ultrashort rise/decay time (1.4/7.8 ms). The implanting of intrinsic p-type Se into TiO2 NTs broadens the detection range to UV-visible (280-700 nm) with a large detectivity of over 10(12) Jones and a high linear dynamic range of over 80 dB. In addition, a maximum photocurrent of ≈10(7) A is achieved at 450 nm light illumination and an ultrahigh photosensitivity (on/off ratio up to 10(4) ) under zero bias upon UV and visible light illumination is readily achieved. The concept of employing novel heterojunction geometry holds great potential to pave a new way to realize high performance and energy-efficient optoelectronic devices for practical applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Energy Return on Energy Invested (ERoEI) for photovoltaic solar systems in regions of moderate insolation: A comprehensive response

    DOE PAGES

    Raugei, Marco; Sgouridis, Sgouris; Murphy, David; ...

    2017-01-01

    A recent paper by Ferroni and Hopkirk (2016) asserts that the ERoEI (also referred to as EROI) of photovoltaic (PV) systems is so low that they actually act as net energy sinks, rather than delivering energy to society. Such claim, if accurate, would call into question many energy investment decisions. In the same paper, a comparison is also drawn between PV and nuclear electricity. We have carefully analysed this paper, and found methodological inconsistencies and calculation errors that, in combination, render its conclusions not scientifically sound. Ferroni and Hopkirk adopt 'extended' boundaries for their analysis of PV without acknowledging thatmore » such choice of boundaries makes their results incompatible with those for all other technologies that have been analysed using more conventional boundaries, including nuclear energy with which the authors engage in multiple inconsistent comparisons. In addition, they use out-dated information, make invalid assumptions on PV specifications and other key parameters, and conduct calculation errors, including double counting. Here in this paper, we provide revised EROI calculations for PV electricity in Switzerland, adopting both conventional and 'extended' system boundaries, to contrast with their results, which points to an order-of-magnitude underestimate of the EROI of PV in Switzerland by Ferroni and Hopkirk.« less

  1. Charge-density-based analysis of the current–voltage response of polythiophene/fullerene photovoltaic devices

    PubMed Central

    Shuttle, C. G.; Hamilton, R.; O’Regan, B. C.; Nelson, J.; Durrant, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for organic electronics research is to develop device models that correctly account for the structural and energetic disorder typically present in such materials. In this paper we report an approach to analyze the electrical performance of an organic electronic device based upon charge extraction measurements of charge densities and transient optoelectronic measurements of charge carrier dynamics. This approach is applied to a poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT)/6,6 phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend photovoltaic device. These measurements are employed to determine the empirical rate law for bimolecular recombination losses, with the energetic disorder present in the materials being accounted for by a charge-density-dependent recombination coefficient. This rate law is then employed to simulate the current/voltage curve. This simulation assumes the only mechanism for the loss of photogenerated charges is bimolecular recombination and employs no fitting parameters. Remarkably the simulation is in good agreement with the experimental current/voltage data over a wide range of operating conditions of the solar cell. We thus demonstrate that the primary determinant of both the open-circuit voltage and fill factor of P3HT∶PCBM devices is bimolecular recombination. We go on to discuss the applicability of this analysis approach to other materials systems, and particularly to emphasize the effectiveness of this approach where the presence of disorder complicates the implementation of more conventional, voltage-based analyses such as the Shockley diode equation. PMID:20823262

  2. Energy Return on Energy Invested (ERoEI) for photovoltaic solar systems in regions of moderate insolation: A comprehensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Raugei, Marco; Sgouridis, Sgouris; Murphy, David; Fthenakis, Vasilis; Frischknecht, Rolf; Breyer, Christian; Bardi, Ugo; Barnhart, Charles; Buckley, Alastair; Carbajales-Dale, Michael; Csala, Denes; de Wild-Scholten, Mariska; Heath, Garvin; Jæger-Waldau, Arnulf; Jones, Christopher; Keller, Arthur; Leccisi, Enrica; Mancarella, Pierluigi; Pearsall, Nicola; Siegel, Adam; Sinke, Wim; Stolz, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    A recent paper by Ferroni and Hopkirk (2016) asserts that the ERoEI (also referred to as EROI) of photovoltaic (PV) systems is so low that they actually act as net energy sinks, rather than delivering energy to society. Such claim, if accurate, would call into question many energy investment decisions. In the same paper, a comparison is also drawn between PV and nuclear electricity. We have carefully analysed this paper, and found methodological inconsistencies and calculation errors that, in combination, render its conclusions not scientifically sound. Ferroni and Hopkirk adopt 'extended' boundaries for their analysis of PV without acknowledging that such choice of boundaries makes their results incompatible with those for all other technologies that have been analysed using more conventional boundaries, including nuclear energy with which the authors engage in multiple inconsistent comparisons. In addition, they use out-dated information, make invalid assumptions on PV specifications and other key parameters, and conduct calculation errors, including double counting. Here in this paper, we provide revised EROI calculations for PV electricity in Switzerland, adopting both conventional and 'extended' system boundaries, to contrast with their results, which points to an order-of-magnitude underestimate of the EROI of PV in Switzerland by Ferroni and Hopkirk.

  3. Calcium-doping effects on photovoltaic response and structure in multiferroic BiFeO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, C. S.; Hung, C.-M.; Xu, Z.-R.; Schmidt, V. H.; Ting, Y.; Chien, R. R.; Peng, Y.-T.; Anthoninappen, J.

    2013-09-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) effects, power-conversion efficiencies, and structures have been systematically measured in (Bi1-xCax)FeO3-δ ceramics for x = 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15. The heterostructures of indium tin oxide (ITO) film/(Bi1-xCax)FeO3-δ ceramics/Au film exhibit significant PV effects under illumination of λ = 405 nm. The maximum power-conversion efficiency in the ITO/(Bi0.90Ca0.10)FeO2.95 (BFO10C)/Au can reach 0.0072%, which is larger than 0.0025% observed in the graphene/polycrystalline BFO/Pt films [Zang et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 132904 (2011)]. A theoretical model based on optically excited current in the depletion region between ITO film and Ca-doped BFO ceramics is used to describe the I-V characteristic, open-circuit voltage, and short-circuit current density as a function of illumination intensity. This work suggests that the Ca-substitution can reduce the rhombohedral distortion and stabilize the single-phase structure.

  4. Comparison of the single-wavelength and spectral-reconstruction methods for determining the solvation-response function

    SciTech Connect

    Gardecki, J.A.; Maroncelli, M.

    1999-03-04

    A comparison of the solvation/spectral-response functions obtained by two independent techniques, the single-wavelength and spectral-reconstruction methods, is reported. Determination of the best wavelengths for application of the linear-single-wavelength approximation for the solute coumarin 153 (C153) is achieved using radiative rate data and steady-state emission spectra in a series of 36 different solvents at room temperature. The optimal linear wavelength is found to be 555 nm. (This wavelength, which is on the red side of the spectrum, yields superior results when compared to the more traditional choice of 470--480 nm, on the blue side.) Response functions determined using both 560- and 470-nm observation wavelengths are compared to previously reported spectral-reconstruction results in 24 solvents. A comparison of the characteristic times indicates that the linear-single-wavelength method can be used to predict solvation times with an accuracy of roughly {+-}30--40% (1 standard deviation) using suitably scaled data collected at {approximately}560 nm. Application of a nonlinear version of the single-wavelength method does not provide increased accuracy.

  5. Effect of the lithium diffusion into n-type silicon on the spectral response of the Schottky photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keffous, A.; Siad, M.; Belkacem, Y.; Zitouni, M. A.; Benrakaa, N.; Menari, H.; Dahmani, A.; Chergui, W.; Cheriet, A.

    2003-07-01

    Silicon Schottky photodiode is a good candidate for UV-Vis light detection and ideal for high speed applications, where it has many advantages. One of them is the inherent absence of any component associated with minority carrier effects, and it appears to have a good quantum efficiency in the UV-Vis spectral range. In this work, Schottky contact of different gold thickness film was fabricated by thermal evaporation on highly resistive n-type silicon. A thin gold layer (Au) around 10 nm was used to fabricate the Schottky photodiode which has a good optical properties. These results show a good spectral response value of 0.014 and 0.22 A/W at 350 and 550 nm wavelength, respectively. The results were obtained under 0 V reverse bias voltage and without using an anti-reflection coating. A second measure of the spectral response taken after storing the photodiode in air for several days (30 days) shows a decrease of about 20-50% from the initial value. The decrease was due essentially to the diffusion of lithium from the back side to the front side. In addition, to the absence of surface photodiode edge protection.

  6. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  7. Measurement of normalized spectral responsivity of digital imaging devices by using a LED-based tunable uniform source.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Khaled; Park, Seongchong; Park, Seung-Nam; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2013-02-20

    We present an instrumentation solution for measurement of normalized spectral responsivity of digital imaging sensors and cameras. The instrument consists of multiple light-emitting diodes (LEDs), a single-grating monochromator, and a small-size integrating sphere. Wavelength tuning is achieved by a proper selection of LED in accordance with the monochromator setting in a range from 380 to 900 nm. High spectral purity with a bandwidth of 5 nm is realized without using double gratings and order-sorting filters. Experimental characteristics and calibration of the instrument are described with the related error and uncertainty sources. The performance is demonstrated by measuring a monochrome charge-coupled device and a trichromatic complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor device. The measurement uncertainty is evaluated to be less than 1% (k=2) except several wavelengths with low LED power.

  8. Evaluation of the response and healing effect after laser hair removal using a multi-spectral dermatoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; Kuijer, Ellen; de Groot, Ilva; de Roode, Rowland; Rem, Alex; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2009-02-01

    A multi-spectral dermatoscope was used to investigate the effect of laser hair removal. Ten volunteers underwent three laser treatments, 6 weeks apart. In a subsequent trial, three volunteers received one laser treatment after which the skin region was imaged at short intervals. Practical solutions were developed to re-locate the investigated skin area. After exact matching using rigid and elastic registration software, the images showed acute and delayed effects on the hairs, pigment and vasculature after laser hair removal and subsequent healing response. The multi-spectral dermatoscope provides a perfect tool to study the efficacy and side effects of laser hair removal procedures and can be used to optimize the treatment plan.

  9. Biological Response to the Dynamic Spectral-Polarized Underwater Light Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    spectral-polarized light field interacts with cells within the skin (Kattawar). Using both field- studied and model organisms, we will employ three...acclimation studies with Flounder completed in the lab in April (Cummings). h) Additional radiance sensor was installed on the CCNY polarization probe...polarized light from seagrasses and Sargassum sp. (Fig 13). (vi) (Cummings) Underwater videopolarimetry measurements of the background Angle of Linear

  10. Photovoltaics: electricity from sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The role of photovoltaic power in the world's energy mix is discussed. The role of the US federal government in the research and development of photovoltaic technology is described as one of undertaking long-range, high-risk research and development in areas that industry is not likely to pursue because of the costs and risks involved. The commercial growth of photovoltaic technology is alluded to briefly, and the basic operating theory of photovoltaic conversion is introduced. Numerous applications of photovoltaic technology are described, including uses in communications, rural electrification, waer pumping, corrosion protectio, navigational aids, and railroads, as well as utility network power. The economics of photovoltaic power are discussed, and the products and technology of the US photovoltaic industry are described. (LEW)

  11. Structural and spectral response of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent proteins to chromophore fluorination.

    PubMed

    Pal, Prajna P; Bae, Jae Hyun; Azim, M Kamran; Hess, Petra; Friedrich, Rainer; Huber, Robert; Moroder, Luis; Budisa, Nediljko

    2005-03-15

    Global replacements of tyrosine by 2- and 3-fluorotyrosine in "enhanced green" and "enhanced yellow" mutants of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent proteins (avGFPs) provided protein variants with novel biophysical properties. While crystallographic and modeled structures of these proteins are indistinguishable from those of their native counterparts (i.e., they are perfectly isomorphous), there are considerable differences in their spectroscopic properties. The fluorine being an integral part of the avGFP chromophore induces changes in the titration curves, variations in the intensity of the absorbance and fluorescence, and spectral shifts in the emission maxima. Furthermore, targeted fluorination in close proximity to the fluorinated chromophore yielded additional variants with considerably enhanced spectral changes. These unique spectral properties are intrinsic features of the fluorinated avGFPs, in the context of the rigid chromophore-microenvironment interactions. The availability of the isomorpohous crystal structures of fluorinated avGFPs allowed mapping of novel, unusual interaction distances created by the presence of fluorine atoms. In addition, fluorine atoms in the ortho position of the chromophore tyrosyl moiety exhibit a single conformation, while in the meta position two conformer states were observed in the crystalline state. Such global replacements in chromophores of avGFPs and similar proteins result in "atomic mutations" (i.e., H --> F replacements) in the structures, offering unprecedented opportunities to understand and manipulate the relationships between protein structure and spectroscopic properties.

  12. Spectrally monitoring the response of the biocrust moss Syntrichia caninervis to altered precipitation regimes.

    PubMed

    Young, Kristina E; Reed, Sasha C

    2017-02-06

    Climate change is expected to impact drylands worldwide by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns. These effects have known feedbacks to the functional roles of dryland biological soil crust communities (biocrusts), which are expected to undergo significant climate-induced changes in community structure and function. Nevertheless, our ability to monitor the status and physiology of biocrusts with remote sensing is limited due to the heterogeneous nature of dryland landscapes and the desiccation tolerance of biocrusts, which leaves them frequently photosynthetically inactive and difficult to assess. To address this critical limitation, we subjected a dominant biocrust species Syntrichia caninervis to climate-induced stress in the form of small, frequent watering events, and spectrally monitored the dry mosses' progression towards mortality. We found points of spectral sensitivity responding to experimentally-induced stress in desiccated mosses, indicating that spectral imaging is an effective tool to monitor photosynthetically inactive biocrusts. Comparing the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Simple Ratio (SR), and the Normalized Pigment Chlorophyll Index (NPCI), we found NDVI minimally effective at capturing stress in precipitation-stressed dry mosses, while the SR and NPCI were highly effective. Our results suggest the strong potential for utilizing spectroscopy and chlorophyll-derived indices to monitor biocrust ecophysiological status, even when biocrusts are dry, with important implications for improving our understanding of dryland functioning.

  13. Spectrally monitoring the response of the biocrust moss Syntrichia caninervis to altered precipitation regimes

    DOE PAGES

    Young, Kristina E.; Reed, Sasha C.

    2017-02-06

    Climate change is expected to impact drylands worldwide by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns. These effects have known feedbacks to the functional roles of dryland biological soil crust communities (biocrusts), which are expected to undergo significant climate-induced changes in community structure and function. Nevertheless, our ability to monitor the status and physiology of biocrusts with remote sensing is limited due to the heterogeneous nature of dryland landscapes and the desiccation tolerance of biocrusts, which leaves them frequently photosynthetically inactive and difficult to assess. To address this critical limitation, we subjected a dominant biocrust species Syntrichia caninervis to climate-induced stressmore » in the form of small, frequent watering events, and spectrally monitored the dry mosses’ progression towards mortality. We found points of spectral sensitivity responding to experimentally-induced stress in desiccated mosses, indicating that spectral imaging is an effective tool to monitor photosynthetically inactive biocrusts. Comparing the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Simple Ratio (SR), and the Normalized Pigment Chlorophyll Index (NPCI), we found NDVI minimally effective at capturing stress in precipitation-stressed dry mosses, while the SR and NPCI were highly effective. Lastly, our results suggest the strong potential for utilizing spectroscopy and chlorophyll-derived indices to monitor biocrust ecophysiological status, even when biocrusts are dry, with important implications for improving our understanding of dryland functioning.« less

  14. Spectrally monitoring the response of the biocrust moss Syntrichia caninervis to altered precipitation regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Kristina E.; Reed, Sasha C.

    2017-02-01

    Climate change is expected to impact drylands worldwide by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns. These effects have known feedbacks to the functional roles of dryland biological soil crust communities (biocrusts), which are expected to undergo significant climate-induced changes in community structure and function. Nevertheless, our ability to monitor the status and physiology of biocrusts with remote sensing is limited due to the heterogeneous nature of dryland landscapes and the desiccation tolerance of biocrusts, which leaves them frequently photosynthetically inactive and difficult to assess. To address this critical limitation, we subjected a dominant biocrust species Syntrichia caninervis to climate-induced stress in the form of small, frequent watering events, and spectrally monitored the dry mosses’ progression towards mortality. We found points of spectral sensitivity responding to experimentally-induced stress in desiccated mosses, indicating that spectral imaging is an effective tool to monitor photosynthetically inactive biocrusts. Comparing the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Simple Ratio (SR), and the Normalized Pigment Chlorophyll Index (NPCI), we found NDVI minimally effective at capturing stress in precipitation-stressed dry mosses, while the SR and NPCI were highly effective. Our results suggest the strong potential for utilizing spectroscopy and chlorophyll-derived indices to monitor biocrust ecophysiological status, even when biocrusts are dry, with important implications for improving our understanding of dryland functioning.

  15. Spectrally monitoring the response of the biocrust moss Syntrichia caninervis to altered precipitation regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Kristina E.; Reed, Sasha C.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is expected to impact drylands worldwide by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns. These effects have known feedbacks to the functional roles of dryland biological soil crust communities (biocrusts), which are expected to undergo significant climate-induced changes in community structure and function. Nevertheless, our ability to monitor the status and physiology of biocrusts with remote sensing is limited due to the heterogeneous nature of dryland landscapes and the desiccation tolerance of biocrusts, which leaves them frequently photosynthetically inactive and difficult to assess. To address this critical limitation, we subjected a dominant biocrust species Syntrichia caninervis to climate-induced stress in the form of small, frequent watering events, and spectrally monitored the dry mosses’ progression towards mortality. We found points of spectral sensitivity responding to experimentally-induced stress in desiccated mosses, indicating that spectral imaging is an effective tool to monitor photosynthetically inactive biocrusts. Comparing the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Simple Ratio (SR), and the Normalized Pigment Chlorophyll Index (NPCI), we found NDVI minimally effective at capturing stress in precipitation-stressed dry mosses, while the SR and NPCI were highly effective. Our results suggest the strong potential for utilizing spectroscopy and chlorophyll-derived indices to monitor biocrust ecophysiological status, even when biocrusts are dry, with important implications for improving our understanding of dryland functioning.

  16. Spectrally monitoring the response of the biocrust moss Syntrichia caninervis to altered precipitation regimes

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kristina E.; Reed, Sasha C.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is expected to impact drylands worldwide by increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns. These effects have known feedbacks to the functional roles of dryland biological soil crust communities (biocrusts), which are expected to undergo significant climate-induced changes in community structure and function. Nevertheless, our ability to monitor the status and physiology of biocrusts with remote sensing is limited due to the heterogeneous nature of dryland landscapes and the desiccation tolerance of biocrusts, which leaves them frequently photosynthetically inactive and difficult to assess. To address this critical limitation, we subjected a dominant biocrust species Syntrichia caninervis to climate-induced stress in the form of small, frequent watering events, and spectrally monitored the dry mosses’ progression towards mortality. We found points of spectral sensitivity responding to experimentally-induced stress in desiccated mosses, indicating that spectral imaging is an effective tool to monitor photosynthetically inactive biocrusts. Comparing the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Simple Ratio (SR), and the Normalized Pigment Chlorophyll Index (NPCI), we found NDVI minimally effective at capturing stress in precipitation-stressed dry mosses, while the SR and NPCI were highly effective. Our results suggest the strong potential for utilizing spectroscopy and chlorophyll-derived indices to monitor biocrust ecophysiological status, even when biocrusts are dry, with important implications for improving our understanding of dryland functioning. PMID:28165505

  17. Synthesis and photovoltaic response of a solution-processable dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-based molecular semiconductor with thienylvinylthienyl endgroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Hui; Tan, Wan-Yi; Wang, Li-Ping; Li, Qing-Duan; Zhou, Rui; Huang, Ju; Wei, Xin-Feng; Xia, Yan; He, Yi-Feng; Zhu, Xu-Hui; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and preliminary photovoltaic performance of a solution-processable organic small-molecule electron donor DT that consists of dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole (DT-DPP) as the core and thienylvinylthiophene (TVT) as the endgroups. The new compound is a crystalline solid with a Tm of approximately 216°C. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that DT exhibits two quasi-reversible one-electron oxidation waves at ca. 0.68 and 0.90 V versus an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, respectively, leading to an estimated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of about -5.08 eV. Introducing the branched 2-hexyldecyl side chain provides DT with a high solubility in chloroform up to ca. 36 mg mL-1 at room temperature. Thermal annealing increases the crystallinity of the as-cast film from chloroform solution, thereby rendering slightly red-shifted charge-transfer absorption maxima. Fitting the space-charge-limited current characteristics of the thermally annealed thin film yields an improved hole mobility of ˜2.14×10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1 at low voltages versus ˜1.46×10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1 of the as-cast film. A first characterization of the solar cell [ITO/PEDOT: PSS/DT: PC61BM/Al] produces a power conversion efficiency of ˜3% with VOC≈0.78 V, JSC≈7.91 mA cm-2, and FF≈48.7%, under simulated AM1.5G with an illumination intensity of 100 mW cm-2. It should be noted that the thermal effect on the thin film absorption of DT does not seem to be completely similar to the molecular donor DPP reported earlier, which bears 6-fluoronaphthyl endgroups.

  18. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  19. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and

  20. The effect of variations in relative spectral response on the retrieval of land surface parameters from multiple sources of remotely sensed imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.J.; Chander, G.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) images , collected over Sioux Falls, South Dakota, were used to quantify the effect of spectral response on different surface materials and to develop spectral "figures-of-merit" for spectral responses covering similar, but not identical spectral bands. In this simulation, AVIRIS images were converted to radiance, then spectrally resampled to six wavelength bands commonly used for terrestrial observation. Preliminary results indicate that differences between the simulations can be attributed to variations in surface reflectance within spectral bands, and suggest influences due to water vapor absorption. Radiance simulated from the spectrally narrow Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Relative Spectral Responses (RSR) was generally higher than that using the broader Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) RSRs over most targets encountered over the test area. This is consistent with many MODIS bands being biased toward shorter wavelengths compared to corresponding ETM+ bands when viewing targets whose radiance decreases with wavelength. In some cases the higher radiance values appeared to occur where the MODIS RSR is better situated over peak reflected wavelengths. Simulation differences between MODIS & ETM+ bands in the near-infrared indicated higher MODIS radiance values that suggest the influence of water vapor absorption at 820 nanometers. This result agreed with water vapor values retrieved from the AVIRIS images themselves at around 2.7 cm precipitable water, and measurements made at a nearby AERONET node at around 2.8cm during the AVIRIS overflight ?? 2007 IEEE.

  1. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-H.; Bae, J.; Lee, S. W.; Jang, J.-W.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times (2530%), by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light (λ = 425-475 nm) illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ~ Vm) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation under blue light illumination. These results prove that the performance of non-single crystallized polymer nanowire devices can also be improved by plasmonic enhancement.In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times

  2. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report reviews the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) Program from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993 (fiscal year [FY] 1993). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The FY 1993 budget authority (BA) for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $40.1 million in operating funds and $0.9 million in capital equipment funds. An additional $4.8 million in capital equipment funds were made available for the new Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) that will house the in-house PV laboratories beginning in FY 1994. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with more than $23.7 million (nearly 59%) of the FY 1993 operating funds going to 70 subcontractors. In FY 1993, DOE assigned certain other PV subcontracting efforts to the DOE Golden Field Office (DOE/GO), and assigned responsibility for their technical support to the NREL PV Program. An example is the PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) Project. These DOE/GO efforts are also reported in this document.

  3. Spectral response of the coral rubble, living corals, and dead corals: study case on the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin, Nurjannah; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Yamano, Hiroya; Arafat, Gulam; Rani, Chair; Akbar AS, M.

    2012-10-01

    Coral reefs play important ecological services such as providing foods, biodiversity, nutrient recycling etc. for human society. On the other hand, they are threatened by human impacts such as illegal fishing and environmental changes such as rises of sea water temperature and sea level due to global warming. Thus, it is very important to monitor dynamic spatial distributions of coral reefs and related habitats such as coral rubble, dead coral, bleached corals, seagrass, etc. Hyperspectral data, in particular, offer high potential for characterizing and mapping coral reefs because of their capability to identify individual reef components based on their detailed spectral response. We studied the optical properties by measuring in situ spectra of living corals, dead coral and coral rubble covered with algae. Study site was selected in Spermonde archipelago, South Sulawesi, Indonesia because this area is included in the highest diversity of corals in the world named as Coral Triangle, which is recognized as the global centre of marine biodiversity and a global priority for conservation. Correlation analysis and cluster analysis support that there are distinct differences in reflectance spectra among categories. Common spectral characteristic of living corals, dead corals and coral rubble covered with algae was a reflectance minimum at 674 nm. Healthy corals, dead coral covered with algae and coral rubble covered with algae showed high similarity of spectral reflectance. It is estimated that this is due to photsynthetic pigments.

  4. Remote Sensing Strategies for Enhancing the Spectral Response of Geology in ASTER Images of the Colima Volcano Region, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, J. L.; Gaonach, H.

    2004-05-01

    The Fuego de Colima is the most active volcano in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This mountainous region contains recent volcanic and sedimentary deposits as well as older Mesozoic to Tertiary lithological units. Different types of vegetation such as varied crops, bushy savannahs, deciduous forest and coniferous forest also cover the study area. The surface rocks and deposits are affected by various degrees of weathering such as alteration of silicate minerals and oxidation of iron bearing minerals. In this subtropical region, it is difficult to find unvegetated outcrops, except for very recent volcanic deposits. Hence, studying such volcanic environment on a synoptic remotely sensed perspective implies better understanding the resulting mixing spectral response of geology and vegetation. An ASTER satellite image from 2001 was acquired to map and characterize the geology, the flora and the weathering of this volcanic environment. The wide range of wavelength covered by all nine VNIR and SWIR spectral bands allows us to detect spectral features that are specific to each element of the image. In this study, two types of image manipulations are presented: 1) Band Ratioing is a useful tool enabling us to highlight interesting surface elements while reducing shadow effects. 2) Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is another powerful tool to manipulate multidimensional data sets such as multispectral images. With the addition of recent field data I will discuss the resulting images that distinguish the various volcanic deposits as well as the vegetation covers related to the underlying geology.

  5. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  6. Anomalous spectral response in heterojunction PbTe/PbSnTe infrared detectors - A new effect: Two Peak Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Shuxing; Chen Boliang; Yuan Shixin )

    1991-03-01

    In the measurements of the spectral responses of PbTe/PbSnTe p-n heterojunction infrared detectors, the authors have discovered that there is an anomalous phenomenon in a few detectors when reverse bias is applied: there is not only a response peak in the 8-14 {mu}m long-wavelength range, but also another response peak in the 3-6 {mu}m short-wavelength range. They have also discovered that when reverse bias is increased, the heights of both spectral peaks can be adjusted, and the height of short-wavelength peak may be quickly increased, even if its long-wavelength peak is exceeded. This is an unreported new phenomenon up to now. It is shortly called anomalous phenomenon,' or Two Peak Effect' (TPE). This paper describes the new effect TPE' firstly, and makes a theoretical explanation. On the basis of this effect, it would be possible to make a new type of IR detector, which is quite different from the available detectors.

  7. Biological Response to the Dynamic Spectral-Polarized Underwater Light Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2) Quantify the biological response in fish and cephalopods to these dynamic underwater optical environments (3) Identify the internal...controls and structural mechanisms that coordinate the camouflage response in fish and cephalopods APPROACH Our first aim is to measure and model...response (Cummings). Through these approaches we will characterize the internal control features regulating camouflage in both fish and cephalopods

  8. Monte Carlo modelling of a-Si EPID response: The effect of spectral variations with field size and position

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Fielding, Andrew; Dance, David R.

    2006-12-15

    This study focused on predicting the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) image of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields in the absence of attenuation material in the beam with Monte Carlo methods. As IMRT treatments consist of a series of segments of various sizes that are not always delivered on the central axis, large spectral variations may be observed between the segments. The effect of these spectral variations on the EPID response was studied with fields of various sizes and off-axis positions. A detailed description of the EPID was implemented in a Monte Carlo model. The EPID model was validated by comparing the EPID output factors for field sizes between 1x1 and 26x26 cm{sup 2} at the isocenter. The Monte Carlo simulations agreed with the measurements to within 1.5%. The Monte Carlo model succeeded in predicting the EPID response at the center of the fields of various sizes and offsets to within 1% of the measurements. Large variations (up to 29%) of the EPID response were observed between the various offsets. The EPID response increased with field size and with field offset for most cases. The Monte Carlo model was then used to predict the image of a simple test IMRT field delivered on the beam axis and with an offset. A variation of EPID response up to 28% was found between the on- and off-axis delivery. Finally, two clinical IMRT fields were simulated and compared to the measurements. For all IMRT fields, simulations and measurements agreed within 3%--0.2 cm for 98% of the pixels. The spectral variations were quantified by extracting from the spectra at the center of the fields the total photon yield (Y{sub total}), the photon yield below 1 MeV (Y{sub low}), and the percentage of photons below 1 MeV (P{sub low}). For the studied cases, a correlation was shown between the EPID response variation and Y{sub total}, Y{sub low}, and P{sub low}.

  9. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  10. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. R.; MacConochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1980-10-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  11. ASTM Photovoltaic Performance Standards: Their Use at the National Renewable Energy Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.

    2007-07-01

    The performance of photovoltaic devices is typically rated in terms of their peak power with respect to a specific spectrum, total irradiance and temperature. The PV Cell and Module Performance Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., has been measuring the performance of cells and modules for the U.S. terrestrial PV community since 1980. NREL typically calibrates 200 cells and modules per month. The laboratory follows the procedures described in ASTM International standards for calibrating its primary reference cells (E 1125), spectral responsivity measurements (E 1021), secondary reference cells (E 948), secondary modules (E 1036), concentrator modules (E 2527), and multi-junction cells and modules (E 2236).

  12. Photovoltaics: The endless spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presented. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  13. Residential photovoltaic system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A project to develop Residential Photovoltaic Systems has begun at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory with the construction and testing of five Prototype Systems. All of these systems utilize a roof-mounted photovoltaic array and allow excess solar-generated electric energy to be fed back to the local utility grid, eliminating the need for on-site storage. Residential photovoltaic system design issues are discussed and specific features of the five Prototype Systems now under test are presented.

  14. Photovoltaic technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the history of photovoltaic devices and a discussion of the cost goals set for photovoltaic modules, the status of photovoltaic technology is assessed. Included are discussions of: current applications, present industrial production, low-cost silicon production techniques, energy payback periods for solar cells, advanced materials research and development, concentrator systems, balance-of-system components. Also discussed are some nontechnical aspects, including foreign markets, US government program approach, and industry attitudes and approaches. (LEW)

  15. Spectral responsivity calibration of the reference radiation thermometer at KRISS by using a super-continuum laser-based high-accuracy monochromatic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Yong Shim; Kim, Gun Jung; Park, Seongchong; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Bong-Hak

    2016-12-01

    We report on the calibration of the relative spectral responsivity of the reference radiation thermometer, model LP4, which is used for the experimental realisation of the international temperature scale of 1990 above 960 °C at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. The relative spectral responsivity of LP4 is measured by using a monochromatic source consisting of a super-continuum laser and a double-grating monochromator. By monitoring the wavelength of the output beam directly with a calibrated wavelength-meter, we achieved a high-accuracy measurement of spectral responsivity with a maximum wavelength error of less than 3 pm, a narrow spectral bandwidth of less than 0.4 nm, and a high dynamic range over 8 decades. We evaluated the contributions of various uncertainty components of the spectral responsivity measurement to the uncertainty of the temperature scale based on a practical estimation approach, which numerically calculates the maximal effects of the variations of each component. As a result, we evaluate the uncertainty contribution from the spectral responsivity measurement to the temperature scale to be less than 64 mK (k  =  1) in a range from 660 °C to 2749 °C for the LP4 with a filter at 650 nm.

  16. Evaluation of laser treatment response of vascular skin disorders in relation to skin properties using multi-spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roode, Rowland; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Rem, Alex; Couwenberg, Sharon; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2008-02-01

    There can be a large variation in response between laser treatments of vascular malformations like port-wine stains even in one patient. This could be ascribed to variations in the skin properties like tint (melanin) and perfusion (redness) which will influence the effectiveness of the laser dosimetry. To obtain a better understanding of the relation between skin properties just before treatment, laser dosimetry and clinical response, a multi-spectral dermatoscope is applied. A sequence of calibrated images is captured from 400 to 720 nm. Images at the treatment laser wavelength (532 nm) show the absorbing structures during laser exposure. Images of different treatment sessions of one patient were matched with dedicated registration software to quantify the results of the laser treatment (change in blood vessels structure, effect on pigment). For feasibility, images were collected from 5 patients and used to determine the optimal wavelength combination strategies. The image matching software gives an objective impression of the improvement, e.g. the clearing of the port-wine stain over time or pigment reactions, which will facilitate the discussion with the patient about the end point of treatment. The multi-spectral dermatoscope and software developed enables the evaluation of large patient series which will result in objective data to advise the dermatologist on the optimal laser dosimetry in future in relation to the skin properties.

  17. Modelling the spectral response of the desert tree Prosopis tamarugo to water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez, R. O.; Clevers, J. G. P. W.; Herold, M.; Ortiz, M.; Acevedo, E.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we carried out a laboratory experiment to study changes in canopy reflectance of Tamarugo plants under controlled water stress. Tamarugo (Prosopis tamarugo Phil.) is an endemic and endangered tree species adapted to the hyper-arid conditions of the Atacama Desert, Northern Chile. Observed variation in reflectance during the day (due to leaf movements) as well as changes over the experimental period (due to water stress) were successfully modelled by using the Soil-Leaf-Canopy (SLC) radiative transfer model. Empirical canopy reflectance changes were mostly explained by the parameters leaf area index (LAI), leaf inclination distribution function (LIDF) and equivalent water thickness (EWT) as shown by the SLC simulations. Diurnal leaf movements observed in Tamarugo plants (as adaptation to decrease direct solar irradiation at the hottest time of the day) had an important effect on canopy reflectance and were explained by the LIDF parameter. The results suggest that remote sensing based assessment of this desert tree should consider LAI and canopy water content (CWC) as water stress indicators. Consequently, we tested fifteen different vegetation indices and spectral absorption features proposed in literature for detecting changes of LAI and CWC, considering the effect of LIDF variations. A sensitivity analysis was carried out using SLC simulations with a broad range of LAI, LIDF and EWT values. The Water Index was the most sensitive remote sensing feature for estimating CWC for values less than 0.036 g/cm2, while the area under the curve for the spectral range 910-1070 nm was most sensitive for values higher than 0.036 g/cm2. The red-edge chlorophyll index (CIred-edge) performed the best for estimating LAI. Diurnal leaf movements had an effect on all remote sensing features tested, particularly on those for detecting changes in CWC.

  18. Modeling of the Temperature-dependent Spectral Response of In(1-x)Ga(x)Sb Infrared Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalex-Cuevas, Juan A.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2006-01-01

    A model of the spectral responsivity of In(1-x) Ga(x) Sb p-n junction infrared photodetectors has been developed. This model is based on calculations of the photogenerated and diffusion currents in the device. Expressions for the carrier mobilities, absorption coefficient and normal-incidence reflectivity as a function of temperature were derived from extensions made to Adachi and Caughey-Thomas models. Contributions from the Auger recombination mechanism, which increase with a rise in temperature, have also been considered. The responsivity was evaluated for different doping levels, diffusion depths, operating temperatures, and photon energies. Parameters calculated from the model were compared with available experimental data, and good agreement was obtained. These theoretical calculations help to better understand the electro-optical behavior of In(1-x) Ga(x) Sb photodetectors, and can be utilized for performance enhancement through optimization of the device structure.

  19. High spectral response of self-driven GaN-based detectors by controlling the contact barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Dabing; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren; Miao, Guoqing; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    High spectral response of self-driven GaN-based ultraviolet detectors with interdigitated finger geometries were realized using interdigitated Schottky and near-ohmic contacts. Ni/GaN/Cr, Ni/GaN/Ag, and Ni/GaN/Ti/Al detectors were designed with zero bias responsivities proportional to the Schottky barrier difference between the interdigitated contacts of 0.037 A/W, 0.083 A/W, and 0.104 A/W, respectively. Voltage-dependent photocurrent was studied, showing high gain under forward bias. Differences between the electron and hole mobility model and the hole trapping model were considered to be the main photocurrent gain mechanism. These detectors operate in photoconductive mode with large photocurrent gain and depletion mode with high speed, and can extend GaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal detector applications.

  20. Spectral response of solvent-cast polyvinyl chloride (PVC) thin film used as a long-term UV dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Amar, Abdurazaq; Parisi, Alfio V

    2013-08-05

    The spectral response of solvent-cast polyvinyl chloride (PVC) thin film suitable for use as a long-term UV dosimeter has been determined by measuring the UV induced change in the 1064 cm(-1) peak intensity of the PVC's infrared (IR) spectra as a function of the wavelength of the incident radiation. Measurements using cut-off filters, narrow band-pass filters and monochromatic radiation showed that the 16 μm PVC film responds mainly to the UVB band. The maximum response was at 290 nm and decreasing exponentially with wavelength up to about 340 nm independent of temperature and exposure dose. The most suitable concentration (W/V%) of PVC/Tetrahydrofuran solution was found to be 10% and the best thickness for the dosimeter was determined as 16 μm.

  1. High spectral response of self-driven GaN-based detectors by controlling the contact barrier height

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Dabing; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren; Miao, Guoqing; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    High spectral response of self-driven GaN-based ultraviolet detectors with interdigitated finger geometries were realized using interdigitated Schottky and near-ohmic contacts. Ni/GaN/Cr, Ni/GaN/Ag, and Ni/GaN/Ti/Al detectors were designed with zero bias responsivities proportional to the Schottky barrier difference between the interdigitated contacts of 0.037 A/W, 0.083 A/W, and 0.104 A/W, respectively. Voltage-dependent photocurrent was studied, showing high gain under forward bias. Differences between the electron and hole mobility model and the hole trapping model were considered to be the main photocurrent gain mechanism. These detectors operate in photoconductive mode with large photocurrent gain and depletion mode with high speed, and can extend GaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal detector applications.

  2. Coherent response of a stochastic nonlinear oscillator to a driving force: analytical characterization of the spectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a classical nonlinear oscillator subject to noise and driven by a sinusoidal force. In particular, we give an analytical identification of the mechanisms responsible for the supernarrow peaks observed recently in the spectrum of a mechanical realization of the system. Our approach, based on the application of averaging techniques, simulates standard detection schemes used in practice. The spectral peaks, detected in a range of parameters corresponding to the existence of two attractors in the deterministic system, are traced to characteristics already present in the linearized stochastic equations. It is found that, for specific variations of the parameters, the characteristic frequencies near the attractors converge on the driving frequency and, as a consequence, the widths of the peaks in the spectrum are significantly reduced. The implications of the study to the control of the observed coherent response of the system are discussed.

  3. Photovoltaic development in Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrin, E.M.; Duran, J.C.; Frigerio, A.; Moragues, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A critical assessment of the photovoltaic program in Argentina is presented. Research and development activities on photovoltaic cells as well as industrial and technological development are still in the initial stages. Activities accomplished by the Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the Institute of Technology Development for the Chemical industry (INTEC) are briefly described. The evolution of photovoltaic installations in Argentina is analyzed and accumulative data up to 1993 are given. A summary of the potential market for photovoltaic systems in the short and medium term is presented.

  4. Spectral Selectivity Applied To Hybrid Concentration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdy, M. A.; Luttmann, F.; Osborn, D. E.; Jacobson, M. R.; MacLeod, H. A.

    1985-12-01

    The efficiency of conversion of concentrated solar energy can be improved by separating the solar spectrum into portions matched to specific photoquantum processes and the balance used for photothermal conversion. The basic approaches of spectrally selective beam splitters are presented. A detailed simulation analysis using TRNSYS is developed for a spectrally selective hybrid photovoltaic/photothermal concentrating system. The analysis shows definite benefits to a spectrally selective approach.

  5. Broad-Spectrum Solution-Processed Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Alexander Halley

    High global demand for energy coupled with dwindling fossil fuel supply has driven the development of sustainable energy sources such as solar photovoltaics. Emerging solar technologies aim for low-cost, solution-processable materials which would allow wide deployment. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are such a materials system which exhibits the ability to absorb across the entire solar spectrum, including in the infrared where many technologies cannot harvest photons. However, due to their nanocrystalline nature, CQDs are susceptible to surface-associated electronic traps which greatly inhibit performance. In this thesis, surface engineering of CQDs is presented through a combined ligand approach which improves the passivation of surface trap states. A metal halide treatment is found to passivate quantum dot surfaces in solution, while bifunctional organic ligands produce a dense film in solid state. This approach reduced midgap trap states fivefold compared with conventional passivation strategies and led to solar cells with a record certified 7.0% power conversion efficiency. The effect of this process on the electronic structure is studied through photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that while the halide provides deep trap passivation, the nature of the metal cation on the CQD surface affects the density of band tail states. This effect is explored further through a wide survey of materials, and it is found that the coordination ability of the metal cation is responsible for the suppression of shallow traps. With this understanding of CQD surface passivation, broad spectral usage is then explored through a study of visible-absorbing organolead halide perovskite materials as well as narrow-bandgap CQD solar cells. Control over growth conditions and modification of electrode interfaces resulted in efficient perovskite devices with effective usages of visible photons. For infrared-absorbing CQDs, it is found that, in addition to providing surface trap

  6. Natural and artificial spectral edges in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Technological civilizations may rely upon large-scale photovoltaic arrays to harness energy from their host star. Photovoltaic materials, such as silicon, possess distinctive spectral features, including an 'artificial edge' that is characteristically shifted in wavelength shortwards of the 'red edge' of vegetation. Future observations of reflected light from exoplanets would be able to detect both natural and artificial edges photometrically, if a significant fraction of the planet's surface is covered by vegetation or photovoltaic arrays, respectively. The stellar energy thus tapped can be utilized for terraforming activities by transferring heat and light from the day side to the night side on tidally locked exoplanets, thereby producing detectable artefacts.

  7. Photovoltaic measurements in single-nanowire silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kelzenberg, Michael D; Turner-Evans, Daniel B; Kayes, Brendan M; Filler, Michael A; Putnam, Morgan C; Lewis, Nathan S; Atwater, Harry A

    2008-02-01

    Single-nanowire solar cells were created by forming rectifying junctions in electrically contacted vapor-liquid-solid-grown Si nanowires. The nanowires had diameters in the range of 200 nm to 1.5 microm. Dark and light current-voltage measurements were made under simulated Air Mass 1.5 global illumination. Photovoltaic spectral response measurements were also performed. Scanning photocurrent microscopy indicated that the Si nanowire devices had minority carrier diffusion lengths of approximately 2 microm. Assuming bulk-dominated recombination, this value corresponds to a minimum carrier lifetime of approximately 15 ns, or assuming surface-dominated recombination, to a maximum surface recombination velocity of approximately 1350 cm s(-1). The methods described herein comprise a valuable platform for measuring the properties of semiconductor nanowires, and are expected to be instrumental when designing an efficient macroscopic solar cell based on arrays of such nanostructures.

  8. Multijunction upper subcell cascade photovoltaics for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Educato, J. L.; Wagner, M.; Leburton, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    A new class of cascade high-efficiency photovoltaics designed for space-based applications is proposed. The design improves upper subcell performance and avoids electrical and optical losses associated with an intercell ohmic contact. Multijunction upper subcells reduce bulk recombination of photogenerated minority carriers by decreasing the average collection distance, yielding improved spectral response and radiation tolerance. A three-terminal design is employed which circumvents the need for a monolithic intercell contact and, thus, the losses associated with such a contact. Problems related to array interconnection of three-terminal devices may be solved by creating a two-terminal cell from complementary pairs (n-p-n and p-n-p) of three-terminal cells. Simulations of lattice-matched AlGaAs-GaAs and lattice-mismatched AlGaAs-InGaAs cascade cells show that one-sun AM0 efficiencies in excess of 26 and 28 percent, respectively, are possible.

  9. Polymer heterostructures with embedded carbon nanotubes for efficient photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previti, F.; Patanè, S.; Allegrini, M.

    2009-09-01

    Polymer photovoltaic cells (PVC) are intensely investigated because of their potential advantages over Si-based PVCs. Their present drawbacks are low conversion efficiency, limited exciton diffusion length, poor hole carriers transport and short lifetime. The highest conversion efficiency achieved so far in spin-coated polymer blends is close to 5%. Recently, efficiency growing has been demonstrated in multilayer architectures involving a donor/acceptor bulk heterojunction. Alternatively, a nanomaterial has been added to the polymer active layer to facilitate excitons dissociation and carriers transport through the polymer matrix. In this work we investigate both these approaches, first embedding single wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) in the polymeric matrix to improve the electrical transport and second studying the optical absorption of different polymer thin films to optimize the spectral response of the donor/acceptor heterojunction.

  10. Spectral responses of the human circadian system depend on the irradiance and duration of exposure to light.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Brainard, George C; Kronauer, Richard E; Czeisler, Charles A; Lockley, Steven W

    2010-05-12

    In humans, modulation of circadian rhythms by light is thought to be mediated primarily by melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells, not rods or cones. Melanopsin cells are intrinsically blue light-sensitive but also receive input from visual photoreceptors. We therefore tested in humans whether cone photoreceptors contribute to the regulation of circadian and neuroendocrine light responses. Dose-response curves for melatonin suppression and circadian phase resetting were constructed in subjects exposed to blue (460 nm) or green (555 nm) light near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion. At the beginning of the intervention, 555-nm light was equally effective as 460-nm light at suppressing melatonin, suggesting a significant contribution from the three-cone visual system (lambda(max) = 555 nm). During the light exposure, however, the spectral sensitivity to 555-nm light decayed exponentially relative to 460-nm light. For phase-resetting responses, the effects of exposure to low-irradiance 555-nm light were too large relative to 460-nm light to be explained solely by the activation of melanopsin. Our findings suggest that cone photoreceptors contribute substantially to nonvisual responses at the beginning of a light exposure and at low irradiances, whereas melanopsin appears to be the primary circadian photopigment in response to long-duration light exposure and at high irradiances. These results suggest that light therapy for sleep disorders and other indications might be optimized by stimulating both photoreceptor systems.

  11. Changes in spectral reflectance of wheat leaves in response to specific macronutrient deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Beyl, Caula A.

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants, deficiency of an essential element may drastically affect growth, appearance, and most importantly yield. Wheat, the focus of this study, is one of the crops studied in the CELSS program. Information about nutrient deficiencies in crops grown in controlled environment is essential to optimize food productivity. The main objective of this study was to determine whether deficiency of Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Calcium (Ca) and Magnesium (M) alters spectral reflectance properties of wheat leaves. Plants were grown in the greenhouse and growth chamber, in a modified Hoagland’s nutrient solution. Spectral reflectance of fully expanded wheat leaves from 280 to 1100 nm, nutrient concentrations (N, P, K, and Ca) and chlorophyll (Chl) were determined when deficiency symptoms were first evident (≈6 7 weeks). Chlorophyll content and fresh and dry weight, were used to assess the severity of the nutrient stress. All nutrient deficiencies affected chlorophyll content and generally increased reflectance in the visible (VIS) 400 700 nm and infrared (IR) 700 1100 nm ranges. Magnesium and nitrogen deficiencies had the most pronounced effect on chlorophyll concentration height, and reflectance. All macronutrient deficiencies tested reduced chlorophyll concentration, increase reflectance in the visible range and caused a shift in the position of the red edge (the point of maximum slope on the reflectance spectrum of vegetation between red and near-infrared wavelengths) toward shorter or longer wavelengths; depending upon the element. In the greenhouse, N and Mg induced the greatest increase in reflectance of 33% and 25% in the VI range and 86% and 53% in the IR range, respectively. However, in the growth chamber, an increase of 97% and 25% occurred in the VI range, and 20% and 33% in the IR range, respectively. In the IR range in the growth chamber, P, K, and Ca deficiency caused a reduction in reflectance (412 770 nm

  12. Response of spectral vegetation indices to soil moisture in grasslands and shrublands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Li; Ji, Lei; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships between satellite-derived vegetation indices (VIs) and soil moisture are complicated because of the time lag of the vegetation response to soil moisture. In this study, we used a distributed lag regression model to evaluate the lag responses of VIs to soil moisture for grasslands and shrublands at Soil Climate Analysis Network sites in the central and western United States. We examined the relationships between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived VIs and soil moisture measurements. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) showed significant lag responses to soil moisture. The lag length varies from 8 to 56 days for NDVI and from 16 to 56 days for NDWI. However, the lag response of NDVI and NDWI to soil moisture varied among the sites. Our study suggests that the lag effect needs to be taken into consideration when the VIs are used to estimate soil moisture.

  13. Measurements of spectral responses for developing fiber-optic pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Heo, Ji Yeon; Jang, Kyoung Won; Seo, Jeong Ki; Moon, Jin Soo; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have fabricated a fiber-optic pH sensor, which is composed of a light source, a pH-sensing probe, plastic optical fibers and a spectrometer, for determining the degree of infection by Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. As pH indicators, phenol red and m-cresol purple are used, and pH liquid solutions are prepared by mixing phenol red or m-cresol purple solutions and various kinds of pH buffer solutions. The light emitted by a light source is guided by plastic optical fibers to the pH liquid solution, and the optical characteristic of a reflected light is changed according to the color variations of the pH indicator in the pH-sensing probe. Therefore, we have measured the intensities and wavelength shifts of the reflected lights, which change according to the color variations of indicators at different pH values, by using a spectrometer for spectral analysis. Also, the relationships between the pH values of liquid solutions and the optical properties of the modulated lights are obtained on the basis of the changes of the colors of indicators.

  14. Spectral analysis of white ash response to emerald ash borer infestations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandra, Laura

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive insect that has killed over 50 million ash trees in the US. The goal of this research was to establish a method to identify ash trees infested with EAB using remote sensing techniques at the leaf-level and tree crown level. First, a field-based study at the leaf-level used the range of spectral bands from the WorldView-2 sensor to determine if there was a significant difference between EAB-infested white ash (Fraxinus americana) and healthy leaves. Binary logistic regression models were developed using individual and combinations of wavelengths; the most successful model included 545 and 950 nm bands. The second half of this research employed imagery to identify healthy and EAB-infested trees, comparing pixel- and object-based methods by applying an unsupervised classification approach and a tree crown delineation algorithm, respectively. The pixel-based models attained the highest overall accuracies.

  15. Crucial influence of crystal site disorder on dynamical spectral response in artificial magnetoplumbites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, E. S.; Mikheykin, A. S.; Torgashev, V. I.; Bush, A. A.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.; Sashin, A. E.; Prokhorov, A. S.; Dressel, M.; Gorshunov, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    High quality PbFe12O19 single crystals were grown by a solution-melt crystallization technique and characterized by synchrotron radiation diffraction structural studies, Mössbauer, Raman and infrared spectral measurements. In the terahertz and sub-terahertz range two absorption bands are observed, which are associated with the dynamics of structurally disordered lead and iron ions. We develop a structural model that comprises Fe2+ ions at the (1/2 × 4e) (0, 0, z) position with bipyramidal oxygen environment, and Pb ions at the (24l) (x, y, z) position with generic strongly distorted 12 vertex polyhedron of oxygen. The atomic displacement ellipsoids of the oxygen surrounding the lead ion are stretched towards the Pb ion within the plane perpendicular to the hexagonal axis. The suggested model is in full agreement with the local symmetry of the Fe2 and Pb ions and with the chemical composition of the sample determined by X-ray analysis.

  16. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, James; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Ted; Wang, Lele; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Sher, Alexander; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight to patients suffering from retinal degenerative disorders. Implanted electrode arrays apply patterned electrical stimulation to surviving retinal neurons, producing visual sensations. All current designs employ inductively coupled coils to transmit power and/or data to the implant. We present here the design and initial testing of a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis fabricated with a pixel density of up to 177 pixels/mm2. Photodiodes within each pixel of the subretinal array directly convert light to stimulation current, avoiding the use of bulky coil implants, decoding electronics, and wiring, and thereby reducing surgical complexity. A goggles-mounted camera captures the visual scene and transmits the data stream to a pocket processor. The resulting images are projected into the eyes by video goggles using pulsed, near infrared (~900 nm) light. Prostheses with three pixel densities (15, 55, and 177 pix/mm2) are being fabricated, and tests indicate a charge injection limit of 1.62 mC/cm2 at 25Hz. In vitro tests of the photovoltaic retinal stimulation using a 512-element microelectrode array have recorded stimulated spikes from the ganglion cells, with latencies in the 1-100ms range, and with peak irradiance stimulation thresholds varying from 0.1 to 1 mW/mm2. With 1ms pulses at 25Hz the average irradiance is more than 100 times below the IR retinal safety limit. Elicited retinal response disappeared upon the addition of synaptic blockers, indicating that the inner retina is stimulated rather than the ganglion cells directly, and raising hopes that the prosthesis will preserve some of the retina's natural signal processing.

  17. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    PubMed

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers.

  18. Spectral radiometric instrumentation and modelling for PV applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, T.W.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes issues dealing with instrumentation and atmospheric transmission modelling for determining solar spectral irradiance for outdoor photovoltaic (PV) applications. The relevance of these determinations to PV testing and evaluation is discussed with examples.

  19. Linearity Testing of Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinegar, S.; Nalley, D.; Emery, K.

    2006-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices are rated in terms of their power output or efficiency with respect to a specific spectrum, total irradiance, and temperature. In order to rate photovoltaic devices, a reference detector whose response is linear with total irradiance is needed. This procedure documents a procedure to determine if a detector is linear over the irradiance range of interest. Testing the short circuit current versus the total irradiance is done by illuminating a reference cell candidate with two lamps that are fitted with programmable filter wheels. The purpose is to reject nonlinear samples as determined by national and international standards from being used as primary reference cells. A calibrated linear reference cell tested by the two lamp method yields a linear result.

  20. Monitoring cancer treatment response using photoacoustic and ultrasound spectral analysis in combination with oxygenation measurements (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; May, Jonathan P.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    At clinically-relevant depths, the frequency content of photoacoustic signals encodes information about the size, concentration and spatial distribution of non-resolvable blood vessels. This study evaluates whether photoacoustics can detect cancer therapy-induced vascular perturbations. Photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) spectral analysis was combined with functional, PA-based oxygenation and power Doppler (PD) perfusion estimates to assess treatment response. Co-registered, in-vivo US/PA/PD imaging of mice bearing breast cancer tumors was performed pre-treatment and 30m/2h/5h/24h/7d post-treatment (VevoLAZR, Fujifilm VisualSonics). Hyperthermia treatment (1h, 43C) was performed after systemic injections of doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive liposomes (TSL, n=13) or free doxorubicin (DOX, n=11). Response was classified according to 2h, PA-based oxygenation drop and endpoint (>9d), caliper-based volume reduction. At all time-points/wavelengths (750/850nm), the spectral-slope (SS) was computed from the normalized US/PA power spectra using depth-matched reference phantoms. The percent-vascularity (PV) was estimated for the animal with the largest oxygenation-drop at 2h. TLS-treated responders decreased their PA-SS by 1.9x @750nm and 5.8x @850nm 30m post-treatment and remained constant for 24h; tumor oxygenation followed the same trend. Non-responding SS remained unchanged for 24h. The 750nm SS was 18.7x lower than 850nm suggesting the TSL is sensitive vessel oxygenation. Responder PV decreased 100% when the 30m oxygenation dropped 15% and increased 7x when the 7d oxygenation increased 20%. DOX-responders exhibited similar trends to TSL-responders although the 750nm PA-SS was 1.6x smaller and post-treatment PV was 50% higher. The US-SS remained unchanged until 7d post-treatment suggesting its sensitivity to tumor cell-death. These findings suggest that PA spectral analysis has potential in monitoring cancer treatment response.

  1. Spectral response of crystalline acetanilide and N -methylacetamide: Vibrational self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, Julian; Hamm, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied to compare the spectral response of the amide I band and the NH-stretching band of acetanilide (ACN) and N -methylacetamide (NMA), as well as their deuterated derivatives. Both molecules form hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals that are regarded to be model systems for polypeptides and proteins. The amide I bands of both ACN and NMA show a temperature-dependent sideband, while the NH bands are accompanied by a sequence of equidistantly spaced satellite peaks. These spectral anomalies are interpreted as a signature of vibrational self-trapping. Two different types of states can be identified in both crystals in the pump-probe signal: a delocalized free-exciton state and a set of localized self-trapped states. The phonons that mediate self-trapping in ACN and deuterated ACN are identified by their temperature dependence, confirming our previous results. The study shows that the substructure of the NH band in NMA (amide A and amide B bands) originates, at least partly, from vibrational self-trapping and not, as often assumed, from a Fermi resonance.

  2. Federal policies to promote the widespread utilization of photovoltaic systems. Supplement: Review and critique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Review comments of the Congressional report entitled 'Federal Policies to Promote the Widespread Utilization of Photovoltaic Systems' are presented. Responses to the review comments by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, preparer of the Congressional report, are also presented. The Congressional report discussed various issues related to promoting the deployment of photovoltaic systems through the Federal Photovoltaic Program. Various program strategies and funding levels were examined.

  3. Assessment of UV biological spectral weighting functions for phenolic metabolites and growth responses in silver birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, Titta; Venäläinen, Tuulia; Tegelberg, Riitta; Lindfors, Anders; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Sutinen, Sirkka; O'Hara, Robert B; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2009-01-01

    In research concerning stratospheric ozone depletion, action spectra are used as biological spectral weighting functions (BSWFs) for describing the effects of UV radiation on plant responses. Our aim was to evaluate the appropriateness of six frequently used BSWFs that differ in effectiveness with increasing wavelength. The evaluation of action spectra was based on calculating the effective UV radiation doses according to 1-2) two formulations of the generalized plant action spectrum, 3) a spectrum for ultraviolet induced erythema in human skin, 4) a spectrum for the accumulation of a flavonol in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, 5) a spectrum for DNA damage in alfalfa seedlings and 6) the plant growth action spectrum. We monitored effects of UV radiation on the concentration of individual UV absorbing metabolites and chlorophyll concentrations in leaves and growth responses of silver birch (Betula pendula) seedlings. Experiments were conducted outdoors using plastic films attenuating different parts of the UV spectrum. Chlorophyll concentrations and growth were not affected by the UV treatments. The response to UV radiation varied between and within groups of phenolics. In general, the observed responses of phenolic groups and individual flavonoids were best predicted by action spectra extending into the UV-A region with moderate effectiveness.

  4. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  5. Photovoltaics for residential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)

  6. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  7. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  8. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  9. Characterization of Photovoltaic Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values…

  10. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2016-07-12

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  11. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2012-07-02

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  12. Photovoltaics industry profile

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  13. Characterization of Photovoltaic Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values…

  14. The transpiration and the spectral response of non-irrigated Haloxylon ammodendron at canopy scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao-ming; Wang, Juan-le; Gao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Mao-si

    2012-10-01

    Transpiration, an essential component of surface evapotranspiration, is particularly important in the research of surface evapotranspiration in arid areas. The paper explores the spectral information of the arid vegetal evapotranspiration from a semi-empirical perspective by the measured data and the up-scaling method. The paper inverted the transpiration of Haloxylon ammodendronat at the canopy, pixel and regional scales in the southern edge of the Gurbantunggut desert in Xinjiang, China. The results are as follows: At the canopy scale, the optimal exponential model of the sap flow based on the hyperspectrum is Y = 3.65× SR(1580,1600) + 0.76, R2 = 0.72. At the pixel scale, there was a good linear relationship between the sap flow and the SR index, with a linear relationship of Y = 0.0787 X - 0.0724, R2 = 0.604. At the regional scale, based on the optimal exponential model and the EO-1 Hyperion remote sensing data, the transpiration of the study area was inverted. Comparing the results of the SEBAL and SEBS models, the errors of the simulation results were 12.66% and 11.68%. The paper made full use of the knowledge flow at different scales, bridging the scale difference in canopy and remote sensing images to avoid the information bottleneck in the up-scaling. However, there is much limit in the data acquirement, the endmembers determine, the temporal-spatial up-scaling, and the accuracy assessment to be improved in the future studies.

  15. Photo- and thermo-activated electron transfer system based on a luminescent europium organic framework with spectral response from UV to visible range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hengjun; Zheng, Guiming; Li, Min; Wang, Yifang; Song, Yang; Han, Conghui; Dai, Jingcao; Fu, Zhiyong

    2014-11-14

    A dual stimuli-responsive system was constructed by introducing methyl viologen into a luminescent europium-organic framework with a compact packing mode. In addition to absorption and emission properties that are sensitive to both light and heat involving electron/energy transfer processes, the photoactive MOF has a spectral response from UV to the visible region.

  16. Ionic and spectral mechanisms of the off response to light in hyperpolarizing photoreceptors of the clam, Lima scabra.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, M C; Gorman, A L

    1983-12-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from distal photoreceptor cells of the file clam Lima scabra in order to examine the ionic and spectral mechanisms which underly the response to light decrement. These receptors are primary sensory neurons that generate nerve impulses in the optic nerve upon light termination without benefit of synaptic interconnections between photoreceptor cells. Microelectrode measurements were made on these cells. Membrane conductance changes were assessed by measuring membrane voltage changes elicited under different conditions while passing constant-current pulses through the microelectrode from an active bridge amplifier. Responses of membrane potential in light and darkness in different concentrations of external potassium ions were fitted to a simplified form of the constant field equation. This analysis allowed an estimation of internal potassium activity (281 mM) as well as changes in PNa/PK in darkness and light. PNa/PK changed from 0.09 in darkness to 0.03 at the peak of the light response. A persistent decrease in membrane conductance at the termination of light is associated with a depolarization that overshoots the dark resting membrane potential. This transient depolarization is dependent on the intensity and duration of the preceding period of light. The amplitude of the dark-dependent depolarization is related to the absorbance of light during the preceding period of light by a long wavelength intermediate of rhodopsin bleaching (metarhodopsin). The frequency of discharge of action potentials with rapid kinetics which occurs following light is proportional to the amplitude of the after depolarizing response. The delay to onset of the discharge is inversely proportional to the amplitude of the after depolarizing response. The sensitivity (response/photon) of distal cells can be modified by background light which passes through a screening pigment found in cells that surround the eye. These data, taken together, provide an

  17. Spectral responses of the human circadian system depend on the irradiance and duration of exposure to light

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Joshua J; Rajaratnam, Shantha M; Brainard, George C; Kronauer, Richard E; Czeisler, Charles A; Lockley, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    In humans, circadian responses to light are thought to be mediated primarily by melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells, not rods or cones. Melanopsin cells are intrinsically blue-light sensitive, but also receive input from visual photoreceptors. We therefore tested in humans whether cone photoreceptors contribute to the regulation of circadian and neuroendocrine light responses. Dose-response curves for melatonin suppression and circadian phase resetting were constructed in subjects exposed to blue (460 nm) or green (555 nm) light near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion. At the beginning of the intervention, 555 nm light was just as effective as 460 nm light at suppressing melatonin, suggesting a significant contribution from the three-cone visual system (lambdamax 555 nm). During light exposure, however, the spectral sensitivity to 555 nm light decayed exponentially relative to 460 nm light. For phase-resetting responses, the effects of exposure to low irradiance 555 nm light were too large relative to 460 nm light to be explained solely by the activation of melanopsin. Our findings suggest that cone photoreceptors contribute substantially to non-visual responses at the beginning of a light exposure and at low irradiances, whereas melanopsin appears to be the primary circadian photopigment in response to long-duration light exposure and at high irradiances. These results are consistent with a non-redundant role for visual photoreceptors and melanopsin in mediating human non-visual photoreception and suggest that light therapy for circadian rhythm sleep disorders and other indications might be optimized by stimulating both the melanopsin- and cone-driven photoreceptor systems. PMID:20463367

  18. Biological Response to the Dynamic Spectral-Polarized Underwater Light Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Gilly). We identify the internal control of these field- studied organisms and structural mechanisms that coordinate the camouflage response by...frames/s) to study fast changing processes in water (Gilerson) 3 e) Completed 5 field campaigns in different locations: Texas (Cummings, Seibel...was observed in the Sargassum crab, P. sayi, using hyperspectral imaging (Fig 7; Dierssen) (6) Behavioral testing of the Atlantic needlefish

  19. Black silicon n-type photodiodes with high response over wide spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Juha; Juntunen, Mikko A.; Laine, Hannu S.; Vähänissi, Ville; Repo, Päivikki; Dönsberg, Timo; Savin, Hele

    2017-05-01

    Commercial photodiodes suffer from reflection losses and different recombination losses that reduce the collection efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. Recently, we realized a near-ideal silicon photodiode, which steps closer to the physical performance limits of silicon photodiodes than any other silicon photodiode realized before. Our device exhibits an external quantum efficiency above 95% over the wavelength range of 235 - 980 nm, and provides a very high response at incident angles of up to 70 degrees. The high quantum efficiency is reached by 1) virtually eliminating front surface reflectance by forming a "black silicon" nanostructured surface having dimensions in the range of wavelength of optical light and 2) using an induced junction for signal collection, formed by negatively charged alumina, instead of a conventional doped p-n junction. Here, we describe the latest efforts in further development of the photodiode technology. In particular, we report improvements both in the short wavelength response via better control of the surface quality, and superior response to photons with energies close to the silicon bandgap.

  20. Temporal and spectral dynamics underlying cognitive control modulated by task-irrelevant stimulus-response learning.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanan; Cao, Xiangyi; Yue, Zhenzhu; Wang, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Behavioral and recent neuroimaging findings have shown reversal of interference effects due to manipulating proportion congruency (PC), which suggests that task-irrelevant stimulus-response (S-R) associations are strengthened and applied to predict responses. However, it is unclear how the strengthened S-R associations are represented and applied in the brain. We investigated with a between-subjects PC paradigm of the Hedge and Marsh task using electroencephalography (EEG). The behavioral results showed the reversal of the conflict effects, suggesting that task-irrelevant S-R associations were strengthened and used to prepare responses. The EEG results revealed the PC-related reversal of the conflict effects in the frontocentral N2 and parietal P3b amplitudes. Time-frequency analyses showed more pronounced PC-related reversal of the conflict effects in theta band (4-8 Hz) activity in frontocentral sites. These results suggest that the strengthened S-R associations due to PC manipulation modulated cognitive control. Importantly, the amplitude of lateralized readiness potential was higher in the high-PC condition than in the low-PC condition, suggesting that the strengthened short-term-memory spatial S-R associations that modulated cognitive control were applied similarly to long-term-memory spatial S-R associations.

  1. Which way is up? Asymmetric spectral input along the dorsal-ventral axis influences postural responses in an amphibious annelid.

    PubMed

    Jellies, John

    2014-11-01

    Medicinal leeches are predatory annelids that exhibit countershading and reside in aquatic environments where light levels might be variable. They also leave the water and must contend with terrestrial environments. Yet, leeches generally maintain a dorsal upward position despite lacking statocysts. Leeches respond visually to both green and near-ultraviolet (UV) light. I used LEDs to test the hypothesis that ventral, but not dorsal UV would evoke compensatory movements to orient the body. Untethered leeches were tested using LEDs emitting at red (632 nm), green (513 nm), blue (455 nm) and UV (372 nm). UV light evoked responses in 100 % of trials and the leeches often rotated the ventral surface away from it. Visible light evoked no or modest responses (12-15 % of trials) and no body rotation. Electrophysiological recordings showed that ventral sensilla responded best to UV, dorsal sensilla to green. Additionally, a higher order interneuron that is engaged in a variety of parallel networks responded vigorously to UV presented ventrally, and both the visible and UV responses exhibited pronounced light adaptation. These results strongly support the suggestion that a dorsal light reflex in the leech uses spectral comparisons across the dorsal-ventral axis rather than, or in addition to, luminance.

  2. High-sensitivity photovoltaic responses in manganite-based heterojunctions on Si substrates for weak light detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S S; Ni, H; Zhao, K; Zhao, S Q; Kong, Y C; Wong, H K

    2011-06-10

    We have fabricated and characterized a weak light photodetector in a heterojunction composed of manganite La0.4Ca0.6MnO3 and n-type Si. High-sensitivity photoresponse properties were investigated. The responsivities of open-circuit photovoltage and short-circuit photocurrent reach ∼1000  V/mJ and ∼30  A/mJ, respectively, without any amplification bias under irradiation by 20-ps-wide and 355, 532, and 1064-nm-wavelength laser pulses in nanojoule to microjoule order. The present results demonstrate that the manganite-based heterojunction on Si substrate has potential applications in weak light detection from ultraviolet to near-infrared light.

  3. Simulation of reflectometry Bragg backscattering spectral responses in the absence of a cutoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, F. da; Graca, S. da; Conway, G. D.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-10-15

    Experimental reflectometry signals obtained in the absence of a cutoff layer, with the possibility of interferometric operation excluded, show a coherent and recurrent frequency spectrum signature similar to an Alfven cascade signature. A possible explanation resides in the modulation of a resonant Bragg backscattering response by an Alfven mode structure located at the center of the plasma whose frequency of oscillation modulates the backscattered signal in a conformable way. This situation is modeled and simulated using an O-mode full-wave Maxwell finite-difference time-domain code and the resulting signatures are discussed.

  4. Ultrathin ternary semiconductor TlGaSe2 phototransistors with broad-spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengxue; Wu, Minghui; Wang, Hui; Cai, Hui; Huang, Li; Jiang, Chengbao; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2017-09-01

    Ternary layered III-III-VI2-type metal chalcogenides are a comparatively new group of semiconductors and have attracted strong interest due to their distinct optical and electrical properties in view of potential applications in nonlinear optical, acousto-optical and optoelectronic devices. Here, we report on the fabrication of two-terminal phototransistors based on ultrathin direct-bandgap TlGaSe2 sheets for the first time. Devices exhibit typical p-type conducting behaviors with current on/off ratio of ~102 and gate-tunable transport characteristics. The photocurrent presents stable and reproducible response for various wavelengths of light from ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared region, confirming the broadband photodetection capability. Photoresponsive behavior of ultrathin TlGaSe2 phototransistors can be modulated by the incident optical power density or wavelength, as well as bias or back-gate voltages. Owing to the presence of direct bandgap, devices possess high photoresponsivity (270 mA W-1) under white light in vacuum, and it is higher than that of single-layer MoS2 phototransistor and graphene photodetectors, accompanying by a fast response time of ~0.2 s. Our studies introduce ternary alloy monochalcogenides phototransistors, and expand the library of ultrathin flexible semiconductors.

  5. Photovoltaic Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Elliot

    1986-11-01

    To demonstrate technical viability of photovoltaic modules in central, grid connected energy systems, ARCO Solar, Inc. has designed, installed and is operating two photovoltaic power plants on the megawatt scale. These systems use two-axis tracking. The first generation plant in Lugo (Hesperia), California, with a nominal rating of one MWpk (DC)" was installed in 1982 in the Southern California Edison Company grid. The second system, rated at 6.4 MWDk (DC), is located in the Carrisa Plain in California and connected to the Pacific Gas and Electric Company grid. Based on the cost and performance data from these installations, an assessment of the current status and future needs of large scale photovoltaic energy systems is made. With each new system, improved techniques of design, installation and system integration have been developed. Expectations have been confirmed as to the performance and adaptability of solar cells, especially the ease of incremental increases in capacity when needed. Modular photovoltaic systems have been found to be easy to build and operate, and to be highly reliable. Prologue: Technological advancement usually requires good science and logical engineering. In the main, faith, persistence and feel are also required. Rule: The balance-of-system costs for photovoltaic energy systems equal photovoltaic module costs. Photovoltaic systems have progressed to their current stage of high promise because of faith, persistence, feel and belief in this rule.

  6. A molecular spin-photovoltaic device.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiangnan; Vélez, Saül; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Parui, Subir; Zhu, Xiangwei; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E

    2017-08-18

    We fabricated a C60 fullerene-based molecular spin-photovoltaic device that integrates a photovoltaic response with the spin transport across the molecular layer. The photovoltaic response can be modified under the application of a small magnetic field, with a magnetophotovoltage of up to 5% at room temperature. Device functionalities include a magnetic current inverter and the presence of diverging magnetocurrent at certain illumination levels that could be useful for sensing. Completely spin-polarized currents can be created by balancing the external partially spin-polarized injection with the photogenerated carriers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Magneto-optical responses of microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals in the infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, Reza; Sattari, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    The magneto-optical responses and photonic band gap properties of the microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals were numerically studied. The structure consists of a graphene sheet embedded between two mirror symmetric Bragg reflectors, under the influence of an external static magnetic field. The properties of the microcavity resonance mode were investigated, considering the right- and left-handed circular polarization transmission coefficients and their phases, together with the Faraday rotation angle and ellipticity of the output light. The effects of the repetition number of the Bragg reflectors, thickness of the microcavity central layer and refractive indices of the graphene adjacent layers were considered. The obtained results revealed that a pure linear polarized output light with no ellipticity and high transmittance enhanced Faraday rotation can be achieved. These results can be utilized in designing a variety of graphene based photonic devices and magneto-optical integrated elements, such as miniaturized isolators or circulators.

  8. Photovoltaic systems perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, P. D.; Jones, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes the elements of photovoltaic power system and clarifies the terminology currently used. The relationship of system efficiency and cost is described particularly for the Balance of Photovoltaic System (BOPS) area. The current status of the BOPS development activity is described. The photovoltaic systems terminology is found to be on the road to standardization. Power conditioning, energy storage, and support structure are found to be BOPS cost and/or efficiency drivers. Although the current BOPS activity has identified low-cost/high-efficiency components, further development work is necessary.

  9. Dependence of the Startle Response on Temporal and Spectral Characteristics of Acoustic Modulatory Influences in Rats and Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Steube, Natalie; Nowotny, Manuela; Pilz, Peter K. D.; Gaese, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (ASR) and its modulation by non-startling prepulses, presented shortly before the startle-eliciting stimulus, is a broadly applied test paradigm to determine changes in neural processing related to auditory or psychiatric disorders. Modulation by a gap in background noise as a prepulse is especially used for tinnitus assessment. However, the timing and frequency-related aspects of prepulses are not fully understood. The present study aims to investigate temporal and spectral characteristics of acoustic stimuli that modulate the ASR in rats and gerbils. For noise-burst prepulses, inhibition was frequency-independent in gerbils in the test range between 4 and 18 kHz. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) by noise-bursts in rats was constant in a comparable range (8–22 kHz), but lower outside this range. Purely temporal aspects of prepulse–startle-interactions were investigated for gap-prepulses focusing mainly on gap duration. While very short gaps had no (rats) or slightly facilitatory (gerbils) influence on the ASR, longer gaps always had a strong inhibitory effect. Inhibition increased with durations up to 75 ms and remained at a high level of inhibition for durations up to 1000 ms for both, rats and gerbils. Determining spectral influences on gap-prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI) revealed that gerbils were unaffected in the limited frequency range tested (4–18 kHz). The more detailed analysis in rats revealed a variety of frequency-dependent effects. Gaps in pure-tone background elicited constant and high inhibition (around 75%) over a broad frequency range (4–32 kHz). For gaps in noise-bands, on the other hand, a clear frequency-dependency was found: inhibition was around 50% at lower frequencies (6–14 kHz) and around 70% at high frequencies (16–20 kHz). This pattern of frequency-dependency in rats was specifically resulting from the inhibitory effect by the gaps, as revealed by detailed analysis of the underlying startle amplitudes. An

  10. Characterization of spectral responses of dissolved organic matter (DOM) for atrazine binding during the sorption process onto black soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zhang, Xing; Meng, Qingjuan; Gao, Fengjie; Zhang, Ying

    2017-08-01

    This study was aim to investigate the interaction between soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) and atrazine as a kind of pesticides during the sorption process onto black soil. According to the experimental data, the adsorption capacity of Soil + DOM, Soil and DOM were 41.80, 31.45 and 9.35 mg kg(-1), separately, which indicated that DOM significantly enhanced the adsorption efficiency of atrazine by soil. Data implied that the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation could well explain the adsorption process. The adsorption isotherms (R(2) > 0.99) had a satisfactory fit in both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM), synchronous fluorescence, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were selected to analyze the interaction between DOM and atrazine. 3D-EEM showed that humic acid-like substances were the main component of DOM. The fluorescence of DOM samples were gradually quenched with the increased of atrazine concentrations. Synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that static fluorescence quenching was the main quenching process. 2D-COS indicated that the order of the spectral changes were as following: 336 nm > 282 nm. Furthermore, the fluorescence quenching of humic-like fraction occurred earlier than that of protein-like fraction under atrazine surroundings. FT-IR spectra indicated that main compositions of soil DOM include proteins, polysaccharides and humic substances. The findings of this study are significant to reveal DOM played an important role in the environmental fate of pesticides during sorption process onto black soil and also provide more useful information for understanding the interaction between DOM and pesticides by using spectral responses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Proposal for a new parameterisation of the instrumental spectral response function in DOAS retrievals and application to satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, Steffen; Lampel, Johannes; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The instrumental spectral response function (ISRF) is a key quantity in spectroscopy. Within DOAS retrievals, the ISRF is needed for an accurate wavelength calibration and for the convolution of trace gas cross-sections to instrumental resolution. DOAS analysis software like QDOAS or DOASIS allow the fitting of a high resolution solar spectrum to a measured spectrum based on a parameterized ISRF with predefined shape (e.g. Gauss, Lorentz, Voigt). For OMI, a more advanced ISRF ("broadened Gauss") was determined which allows for flat-top and asymmetric ISRF; however, this ISRF model is computationally expensive due to the high number of parameters. Here we propose a "Super Gaussian" as further model function for the ISRF, which is similar to a Gaussian, but with the exponent ξ as additional free parameter: F(x) = A ∗ exp(-(|x|/w)ξ) The parameter w determines the width of F , while ξ basically determines the shape. Optionally, different values for ξ and w can be allowed for the left vs. right branch of F to construct asymmetric ISRFs. This model function was found to be a good compromise between good fit results (i.e., F represents the actual ISRF much better than a Gaussian) for a wide range of tested ISRF shapes on the one hand, and robustness of the fit and low computation time on the other hand due to the low number of free parameters. A further advantage of this description of the ISRF is that the two partial derivatives, representing changes of shape and width, respectively, allow to mimic potential spectral structures caused by temporal changes of the ISRF (e.g. due to changes of the detector temperature) by adding pseudo-absorbers in the DOAS analysis. We investigate how far this affects different trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements.

  12. High performance and bendable few-layered InSe photodetectors with broad spectral response.

    PubMed

    Tamalampudi, Srinivasa Reddy; Lu, Yi-Ying; Kumar U, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Liao, Chun-Da; Moorthy B, Karukanara; Cheng, Che-Hsuan; Chou, Fang Cheng; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2014-05-14

    Two-dimensional crystals with a wealth of exotic dimensional-dependent properties are promising candidates for next-generation ultrathin and flexible optoelectronic devices. For the first time, we demonstrate that few-layered InSe photodetectors, fabricated on both a rigid SiO2/Si substrate and a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film, are capable of conducting broadband photodetection from the visible to near-infrared region (450-785 nm) with high photoresponsivities of up to 12.3 AW(-1) at 450 nm (on SiO2/Si) and 3.9 AW(-1) at 633 nm (on PET). These photoresponsivities are superior to those of other recently reported two-dimensional (2D) crystal-based (graphene, MoS2, GaS, and GaSe) photodetectors. The InSe devices fabricated on rigid SiO2/Si substrates possess a response time of ∼50 ms and exhibit long-term stability in photoswitching. These InSe devices can also operate on a flexible substrate with or without bending and reveal comparable performance to those devices on SiO2/Si. With these excellent optoelectronic merits, we envision that the nanoscale InSe layers will not only find applications in flexible optoelectronics but also act as an active component to configure versatile 2D heterostructure devices.

  13. Waveguide based compact silicon Schottky photodetector with enhanced responsivity in the telecom spectral band.

    PubMed

    Goykhman, Ilya; Desiatov, Boris; Khurgin, Jacob; Shappir, Joseph; Levy, Uriel

    2012-12-17

    We experimentally demonstrate an on-chip compact and simple to fabricate silicon Schottky photodetector for telecom wavelengths operating on the basis of internal photoemission process. The device is realized using CMOS compatible approach of local-oxidation of silicon, which enables the realization of the photodetector and low-loss bus photonic waveguide at the same fabrication step. The photodetector demonstrates enhanced internal responsivity of 12.5mA/W for operation wavelength of 1.55µm corresponding to an internal quantum efficiency of 1%, about two orders of magnitude higher than our previously demonstrated results [22]. We attribute this improved detection efficiency to the presence of surface roughness at the boundary between the materials forming the Schottky contact. The combination of enhanced quantum efficiency together with a simple fabrication process provides a promising platform for the realization of all silicon photodetectors and their integration with other nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic structures towards the construction of monolithic silicon opto-electronic circuitry on-chip.

  14. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  15. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magsi, Komal

    some doubt on the Foster Resonant Energy Transfer mechanism since energy relay dye architecture-photosensitizer mixtures do not broaden the response of solar cells. Spectral absorption characterization of chromophore-Chlorophyll solutions in varying solvent polarity confirm the lack of cooperative absorption via a Foster-like mechanism and point the way to new concepts of cooperative absorption in natural systems and the development of a new photovoltaic paradigm.

  16. Photoprotective Response in Plants Impacts Estimation of Biophysical Parameters Using Spectral Reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Walter-Shea, E.

    2014-12-01

    Previously, we reported that reflectance increased across the whole PAR spectrum when plants were subjected to water stress. This effect was shown to exist in maize grown under greenhouse conditions and under field conditions. Greenhouse experiments showed that, in addition to leaf water content, the effect was strongly correlated with incident light intensity. Further, through the use of an integrating sphere, we demonstrated that the change in reflectance was due to a change in absorption rather than in a change scattering or other optical path effect. Time lapse microscopy showed lightening between leaf veins analogous to effects measured by researchers observing cross sections of stressed C4 plants. To further refine our study, additional leaf level and canopy level studies were undertaken. Excised leaf sections were separately exposed to red and white light in the laboratory as the leaf dried. Increasing reflectance and transmittance were observed for the section exposed to white light, while little change was observed under red light. Each of these observations can be explained by chloroplast avoidance movement, a photoprotective response causing chloroplasts to aggregate along cell walls effectively hiding chlorophyll from observation. Chloroplast movement, for example, is driven by blue light; explaining the lack of observed change under red light. Estimation of biophysical parameters, such as chlorophyll content and greenness, are affected by the difference between the "apparent" chlorophyll content and the actual chlorophyll content of leaves and canopies. Up to 30% changes in the VARI remote sensing index have been observed morning to afternoon in field-grown maize. Ten percent changes in chlorophyll estimates have been observed in greenhouse maize. We will report on further research and on the extension of our work to include the impact of chloroplast avoidance on remote sensing of C3 plants, specifically soybean, at leaf and canopy levels.

  17. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    DOEpatents

    Wares, Brian S.

    2014-09-02

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame. A plurality of individual male alignment features and a plurality of individual female alignment features are included on each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by multiple individual male alignment features on a first module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules fitting into and being surrounded by corresponding individual female alignment features on a second module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  18. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  19. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  20. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  1. Enhancing mid-infrared spectral response at the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interface by magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xin; Zhao, Kun Xi, Jian-Feng; Xiang, Wen-Feng; Lu, Zhi-Qing; Sun, Qi; Wu, Shi-Xiang; Ni, Hao

    2014-12-15

    Many unexpected properties have been found in the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterostructure, but the interaction of the many ground states at its interface remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate an optical property of this n-type heterostructure where the mid-infrared spectral responsivity at the interface is enhanced by an external magnetic field. The field intensity ranged from 0.8 to 6 kOe at a low temperature (19 K) as measured with our spectral response measurement system. Two spectral peaks related to the spin-orbit coupling effect were also observed at wavelengths 2400 nm and 3700 nm. The intriguing phenomena relate to changes in the crystallographic structure and subband structure at the interface.

  2. Photovoltaic systems and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations given at a project review meeting held at Albuquerque, NM. The proceedings cover the past accomplishments and current activities of the Photovoltaic Systems Research, Balance-of-System Technology Development and System Application Experiments Projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The status of intermediate system application experiments and residential system analysis is emphasized. Some discussion of the future of the Photovoltaic Program in general, and the Sandia projects in particular is also presented.

  3. Solar photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Department of Energy's photovoltaic program is outlined. The main objective of the program is the development of low cost reliable terrestrial photovoltaic systems. A second objective is to foster widespread use of the system in residential, industrial and commercial application. The system is reviewed by examining each component; silicon solar cell, silicon solar cell modules, advanced development modules and power systems. Cost and applications of the system are discussed.

  4. Concentrating photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, A.

    1982-11-01

    Various configurations for concentrating photovoltaic systems are described and their operating principles are explained. The effects of temperature and series resistance on system efficiency are discussed. As an example, the french family of photovoltaic concentrating systems, SOPHOCLE, is described. The SOPHOCLE family of generators is characterized by the use of a heliostat with altazimuth mounting and by the choice of medium concentration (C=45) by fresnel lenses on silicon cells.

  5. Spectral solar radiation data base documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordan, Carol J.; Myers, Daryl R.; Hulstrom, Roland L.

    1990-01-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Electric Power Research Institute, Florida Solar Energy Center, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company cooperated to produce a spectral solar radiation data base representing a range of atmospheric conditions. These data will help to characterize the neutral variability in the spectral (color) content to outdoor solar radiation so that the sensitivity of spectrally selective solar devices (such as photovoltaics) to these variations can be studied quantitatively. Volume 1 documents the history, approach, content, and format of the data base; Volume 2 contains graphs and field notes for each of the spectral data sets. The data reside on magnetic tape at SERI.

  6. Customized color patterning of photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Lentine, Anthony L.; Resnick, Paul J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2016-11-15

    Photovoltaic cells and photovoltaic modules, as well as methods of making and using such photovoltaic cells and photovoltaic modules, are disclosed. More particularly, embodiments of the photovoltaic cells selectively reflect visible light to provide the photovoltaic cells with a colorized appearance. Photovoltaic modules combining colorized photovoltaic cells may be used to harvest solar energy while providing a customized appearance, e.g., an image or pattern.

  7. FEMP Renewable Energy Fact Sheet: Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Photovoltaic energy systems, which convert sunlight to electricity, can meet many different needs in Federal facilities. This fact sheet describes how photovoltaic (PV) energy systems can be used to provide electricity for lighting, communications, refrigeration, fans, signs, pumps, drilling equipment, emergency power packs, and cathodic (corrosion) protection, among others. Applications for PV power in Federal facilities include staff housing, parking areas, campgrounds, marinas, visitor centers, roadside communications equipment, ranger stations, underground pipelines, irrigation and disinfecting systems, and disaster response units. PV systems are particularly suitable and cost-effective for facilities that now use diesel power or that are in remote areas far from electric power lines.

  8. Spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sayantan; Chatterjee, Avigyan; Biswas, Ashim Kumar; Sinha, Amitabha

    2016-10-01

    Recently, attempts have been made by some researchers to improve the efficiency of quantum dot solar cells by incorporating different types of quantum dots. In this paper, the photocurrent density has been obtained considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots. The effects of quantum dot size dispersion on the spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell have been studied. The dependence of the spectral response of this region on the size of quantum dots of such solar cell has also been investigated. The investigation shows that for smaller quantum dot size dispersion, the spectral response of the intrinsic region of the cell increases significantly. It is further observed that by enlarging the quantum dot size it is possible to enhance the spectral response of such solar cells as it causes better match between absorption spectra of the quantum dots and the solar spectrum. These facts indicate the significant role of quantum dot size and size dispersion on the performance of such devices. Also, the power conversion efficiency of such solar cell has been studied under 1 sun, AM 1.5 condition.

  9. Optimized infra-red spectral response of surfaces for sub-ambient sky cooling as a function of humidity and operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, A. R.; Smith, G. B.

    2010-05-01

    The preferred surface spectral response for sub-ambient sky cooling varies according to the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere and the operating difference (Ta-Ts) between ambient and emitter surface temperatures. While all good candidates average high emittance from 7.9 μm to 13 μm, where the atmosphere is most transparent (the IR "sky window"), the preferred spectral response in the remainder of the Planck spectrum depends on a number of factors. Emittances E in studies to date have been near the two extremes of a high E ~ 0.85 to 0.95, and an E value between 0.3 to 0.4 for surfaces which emit strongly only in the sky window. Cooling rates and ideal spectral properties vary with operating conditions. The reasons behind this will be explained for select different coatings, using spectral densities for emitted outgoing radiation, which is Ts dependent, and the incoming radiation that is absorbed, which is fixed unless the atmosphere changes. Higher E surfaces always work best above and just below ambient but external factors that reduce incoming radiation from the atmosphere, including very low humidity or heat mirror apertures, extend this preference down to lower surface temperatures. Sky window spectrally selective coatings do not benefit as much because they already absorb little incoming radiation, but always have the potential to achieve very much colder temperatures if non-radiative heat gains are kept low.

  10. Design principles for shift current photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ashley M.; M. Fregoso, Benjamin; de Juan, Fernando; Coh, Sinisa; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-01-01

    While the basic principles of conventional solar cells are well understood, little attention has gone towards maximizing the efficiency of photovoltaic devices based on shift currents. By analysing effective models, here we outline simple design principles for the optimization of shift currents for frequencies near the band gap. Our method allows us to express the band edge shift current in terms of a few model parameters and to show it depends explicitly on wavefunctions in addition to standard band structure. We use our approach to identify two classes of shift current photovoltaics, ferroelectric polymer films and single-layer orthorhombic monochalcogenides such as GeS, which display the largest band edge responsivities reported so far. Moreover, exploring the parameter space of the tight-binding models that describe them we find photoresponsivities that can exceed 100 mA W−1. Our results illustrate the great potential of shift current photovoltaics to compete with conventional solar cells. PMID:28120823

  11. Design principles for shift current photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ashley M; M Fregoso, Benjamin; de Juan, Fernando; Coh, Sinisa; Moore, Joel E

    2017-01-25

    While the basic principles of conventional solar cells are well understood, little attention has gone towards maximizing the efficiency of photovoltaic devices based on shift currents. By analysing effective models, here we outline simple design principles for the optimization of shift currents for frequencies near the band gap. Our method allows us to express the band edge shift current in terms of a few model parameters and to show it depends explicitly on wavefunctions in addition to standard band structure. We use our approach to identify two classes of shift current photovoltaics, ferroelectric polymer films and single-layer orthorhombic monochalcogenides such as GeS, which display the largest band edge responsivities reported so far. Moreover, exploring the parameter space of the tight-binding models that describe them we find photoresponsivities that can exceed 100 mA W(-1). Our results illustrate the great potential of shift current photovoltaics to compete with conventional solar cells.

  12. Design principles for shift current photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ashley M.; M. Fregoso, Benjamin; de Juan, Fernando; Coh, Sinisa; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-01-01

    While the basic principles of conventional solar cells are well understood, little attention has gone towards maximizing the efficiency of photovoltaic devices based on shift currents. By analysing effective models, here we outline simple design principles for the optimization of shift currents for frequencies near the band gap. Our method allows us to express the band edge shift current in terms of a few model parameters and to show it depends explicitly on wavefunctions in addition to standard band structure. We use our approach to identify two classes of shift current photovoltaics, ferroelectric polymer films and single-layer orthorhombic monochalcogenides such as GeS, which display the largest band edge responsivities reported so far. Moreover, exploring the parameter space of the tight-binding models that describe them we find photoresponsivities that can exceed 100 mA W-1. Our results illustrate the great potential of shift current photovoltaics to compete with conventional solar cells.

  13. Nanoantennas for nanowire photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Alisafaee, Hossein; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2014-09-15

    We consider the use of plasmonic nanoantenna elements, hemispherical and cylindrical, for application in semiconductor nanowire (NW) vertical arrays. Using Mie theory and a finite element method, scattering and absorption efficiencies are obtained for the desired enhancement of interaction with light in the NWs. We find an optimal mixture of nanoantennae for efficient scattering of solar spectrum in the NW array. Spectral radiation patterns of scattered light are computed, and, for representing the total response of the nanoantenna-equipped NWs to the solar AM1.5G spectrum, the weighted average of scattering patterns for unpolarized normal incidence is obtained showing an advantageous overall directivity toward the NWs.

  14. The EUV spectrum of the Sun: long-term variations in the SOHO CDS NIS spectral responsivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Andretta, V.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Thompson, W. T.

    2010-07-01

    We present SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) normal incidence, extreme-ultraviolet spectra of the Sun taken from the beginning of the mission in 1996 until now. We use various methods to study the performance of the instrument during such a long time span. Assuming that the basal chromospheric-transition region emission in the quiet parts of the Sun does not vary over the cycle, we find a slow decrease in the instrument sensitivity over time. We applied a correction to the NIS (Normal Incidence Spectrograph) data, using as a starting reference the NIS absolute calibration obtained from a comparison with a rocket flight in May 1997. We then obtained NIS full-Sun spectral irradiances from observations in 2008 and compared them with the EUV irradiances obtained from the rocket that flew on April 14, 2008 a prototype of the Solar Dynamics Observatory EVE instrument. Excellent agreement is found between the EUV irradiances from NIS and from the EVE-prototype, confirming the NIS radiometric calibration. The NIS instrument over 13 years has performed exceptionally well, with only a factor of about 2 decrease in responsivity for most wavelengths.

  15. Final report on EUROMET PR-K2.b: Comparison on spectral responsivity (300 nm to 1000 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Joaquin; Pons, Alicia; Blattner, Peter; Dubard, Jimmy; Bastie, Jean; Litwiniuk, Lukasz; Pietrzykowski, Jerzy; Smid, Marek; Mihai, Sim; Bos, Daniel; Gran, Jarle; Bazkir, Ozcan; Fäldt, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    This report contains the results of the regional comparison EUROMET PR-K2.b (registered in the KCDB under the identifier EURAMET.PR-K2.b). Ten laboratories took part in it, including the pilot. In general the results are consistent, with a few exceptions as explained in the report. The comparison gives international linkage in spectral responsivity from 300 nm to 1000 nm to seven European laboratories: Bundesamt für Metrologie und Akkreditierung (METAS), Norwegian Metrology and Accreditation Service (Justervesenet), Central Office of Measures (GUM), National Institute of Metrology (INM-Romania), Optics Laboratory of TUBITAK-UME (UME), Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) and Swedish National Testing and Research Institute (SP). Three laboratories provided the link to CCPR-K2.b: Bureau National de Metrologie (BNM-INM/CNAM), Instituto de Optica 'Daza de Valdés' (IO-CSIC, acting as pilot) and NMi Van Swinden Laboratorium BV (NMi-VSL). Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCPR, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Determination of spectral markers of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using in vitro Raman microspectroscopy: cellular responses to polyamidoamine dendrimer exposure.

    PubMed

    Efeoglu, Esen; Casey, Alan; Byrne, Hugh J

    2017-09-12

    Although consumer exposure to nanomaterials is ever increasing, with potential increased applications in areas such as drug and/or gene delivery, contrast agents and diagnosis, the determination of the cyto- and geno-toxic effects of nanomaterials on human health and the environment still remains challenging. Although many techniques have been established and adapted to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nano-sized materials, these techniques remain limited by the number of assays required, total cost, and use of labels and they struggle to explain the underlying interaction mechanisms. In this study, Raman microspectroscopy is employed as an in vitro label-free, high content screening technique to observe toxicological changes within the cell in a multi-parametric fashion. The evolution of spectral markers as a function of time and applied dose has been used to elucidate the mechanism of action of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers associated with cytotoxicity and their impact on nuclear biochemistry. PAMAM dendrimers are chosen as a model nanomaterial due to their widely studied cytotoxic and genotoxic properties and commercial availability. Point spectra were acquired from the cytoplasm to monitor the cascade of toxic events occurring in the cytoplasm upon nanoparticle exposure, whereas the spectra acquired from the nucleus and the nucleolus were used to explore PAMAM-nuclear material interaction as well as genotoxic responses.

  17. NDT response of spectral analysis of surface wave method to multi-layer thin high-strength concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young S

    2002-05-01

    This study presents the results of the non-destructive testing using spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) based on high-strength concrete materials. This SASW method was used to evaluate the compressive strength of single-layer high-strength concrete slabs through a correlation with the surface wave velocities. This paper also presents the relationship between the theoretical and experimental compact dispersion curves when the SASW test is applied to multi-layer thin high-strength concrete slab systems with a finite thickness. The test results show that the surface wave velocity profile obtained from the theoretical dispersion curve has lower values than the profile obtained from the experimental compact dispersion curve under the condition of a finite thickness due to different boundary conditions and reflections from the boundaries. Based on the measured response, an experimental study was conducted to examine if the dispersive characteristics of Rayleigh wave exist in the multi-layer high-strength concrete slab systems. This study can be utilized in examining structural elements of high-strength concrete structures and can also be applied in the integrity analysis of high-strength concrete structures with a finite thickness.

  18. Quantification of Petrophysical Properties and Their Correlations with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Spectral Induced Polarization Responses in Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Zhang, C.

    2016-12-01

    Carbonate rocks are well known for their highly complex petrophysical behaviors due to their intrinsically heterogeneous pore geometry. This laboratory study focuses on integrating two geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to determine porosity, pore size distribution, and permeability of various carbonate rock samples. Carbonate samples from Pennsylvanian and Mississippian reservoir are selected from four classes (mudstones, packstones, wackstones and grainstones), with distinct depositional fabrics and pore system. NMR measures the relaxation of hydrogen nuclei at pore scale, and SIP determines dielectric property of a sample and is sensitive to the interfacial properties at mineral-fluid. Samples were fully saturated for T2 relaxation and complex conductivity measurements. The permeability and porosity were also obtained from Klinkenberg K-air tests. Additionally, the results from thin section, mercury intrusion, and gas adsorption will be used to calibrate NMR and SIP datasets and further analyze the control of porosity, pore size distribution, and specific surface on NMR and SIP signals. Comparing T2 relaxation and complex conductivity with petrographic and analytical data on pore attributes, our results elucidate how porosity, pore size distribution, and permeability correlate in carbonate pore system. Porosity (phi)-permeability (K)-T2,ML plots illustrate the general distribution of samples' petrophysical properties. Clusters of four rock classes, as well as linear correlations between phi-K, and phi-T2 can be identified from these plots. Furthermore, variations of peak frequencies of phase changes in samples indicate that pore size distribution has the critical impact on SIP responses. As the first attempt to characterize carbonates with integrated NMR and SIP method, these results would help establish correlations among pore attributes, permeability and NMR/SIP responses, and provide reasonable

  19. The influence of cochlear spectral processing on the timing and amplitude of the speech-evoked auditory brain stem response.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Helen E; Moore, David R; Barry, Johanna G; Krumbholz, Katrin; de Boer, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    The speech-evoked auditory brain stem response (speech ABR) is widely considered to provide an index of the quality of neural temporal encoding in the central auditory pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which the speech ABR is shaped by spectral processing in the cochlea. High-pass noise masking was used to record speech ABRs from delimited octave-wide frequency bands between 0.5 and 8 kHz in normal-hearing young adults. The latency of the frequency-delimited responses decreased from the lowest to the highest frequency band by up to 3.6 ms. The observed frequency-latency function was compatible with model predictions based on wave V of the click ABR. The frequency-delimited speech ABR amplitude was largest in the 2- to 4-kHz frequency band and decreased toward both higher and lower frequency bands despite the predominance of low-frequency energy in the speech stimulus. We argue that the frequency dependence of speech ABR latency and amplitude results from the decrease in cochlear filter width with decreasing frequency. The results suggest that the amplitude and latency of the speech ABR may reflect interindividual differences in cochlear, as well as central, processing. The high-pass noise-masking technique provides a useful tool for differentiating between peripheral and central effects on the speech ABR. It can be used for further elucidating the neural basis of the perceptual speech deficits that have been associated with individual differences in speech ABR characteristics. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. The influence of cochlear spectral processing on the timing and amplitude of the speech-evoked auditory brain stem response

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, Helen E.; Moore, David R.; Barry, Johanna G.; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    The speech-evoked auditory brain stem response (speech ABR) is widely considered to provide an index of the quality of neural temporal encoding in the central auditory pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which the speech ABR is shaped by spectral processing in the cochlea. High-pass noise masking was used to record speech ABRs from delimited octave-wide frequency bands between 0.5 and 8 kHz in normal-hearing young adults. The latency of the frequency-delimited responses decreased from the lowest to the highest frequency band by up to 3.6 ms. The observed frequency-latency function was compatible with model predictions based on wave V of the click ABR. The frequency-delimited speech ABR amplitude was largest in the 2- to 4-kHz frequency band and decreased toward both higher and lower frequency bands despite the predominance of low-frequency energy in the speech stimulus. We argue that the frequency dependence of speech ABR latency and amplitude results from the decrease in cochlear filter width with decreasing frequency. The results suggest that the amplitude and latency of the speech ABR may reflect interindividual differences in cochlear, as well as central, processing. The high-pass noise-masking technique provides a useful tool for differentiating between peripheral and central effects on the speech ABR. It can be used for further elucidating the neural basis of the perceptual speech deficits that have been associated with individual differences in speech ABR characteristics. PMID:25787954

  1. Melatonin in Glycyrrhiza uralensis: response of plant roots to spectral quality of light and UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Afreen, F; Zobayed, S M A; Kozai, T

    2006-09-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is known to be synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland in vertebrates. Evidence for the occurrence of melatonin in the roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis plants and the response of this plant to the spectral quality of light including red, blue and white light (control) and UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) for the synthesis of melatonin were investigated. Melatonin was extracted and quantified in seed, root, leaf and stem tissues and results revealed that the root tissues contained the highest concentration of melatonin; melatonin concentrations also increased with plant development. After 3 months of growth under red, blue and white fluorescent lamps, the melatonin concentrations were highest in red light exposed plants and varied depending on the wavelength of light spectrum in the following order red > blue > or = white light. Interestingly, in a more mature plant (6 months) melatonin concentration was increased considerably; the increments in concentration were X4, X5 and X3 in 6-month-old red, blue and white light exposed (control) plants, respectively. The difference in melatonin concentrations between blue and white light exposed (control) plants was not significant. The concentration of melatonin quantified in the root tissues was highest in the plants exposed to high intensity UV-B radiation for 3 days followed by low intensity UV-B radiation for 15 days. The reduction of melatonin under longer periods of UV-B exposure indicates that melatonin synthesis may be related to the integrated (intensity and duration) value of UV-B irradiation. Melatonin in G. uralensis plant is presumably for protection against oxidative damage caused as a response to UV irradiation.

  2. From ultraviolet to Prussian blue: a spectral response for the cyanotype process and a safe educational activity to explain UV exposure for all ages.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Parisi, A V; Downs, N; Lynch, M

    2014-12-01

    Engaging students and the public in understanding UV radiation and its effects is achievable using the real time experiment that incorporates blueprint paper, an "educational toy" that is a safe and easy demonstration of the cyanotype chemical process. The cyanotype process works through the presence of UV radiation. The blueprint paper was investigated to be used as not only engagement in discussion for public outreach about UV radiation, but also as a practical way to introduce the exploration of measurement of UV radiation exposure and as a consequence, digital image analysis. Tests of print methods and experiments, dose response, spectral response and dark response were investigated. Two methods of image analysis for dose response calculation are provided using easy to access software and two methods of pixel count analysis were used to determine spectral response characteristics. Variation in manufacture of the blueprint paper product indicates some variance between measurements. Most importantly, as a result of this investigation, a preliminary spectral response range for the radiation required to produce the cyanotype reaction is presented here, which has until now been unknown.

  3. A calibration method for the measurement of IR detector spectral responses using a FTIR spectrometer equipped with a DTGS reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravrand, Olivier; Wlassow, J.; Bonnefond, L.

    2014-07-01

    Various high performance IR detectors are today available on the market from QWIPs to narrow gap semiconductor photodiodes, which exhibit various spectral features. In the astrophysics community, the knowledge of the detector spectral shape is of first importance. This quantity (spectral QE or response) is usually measured by means of a monochromator followed by an integrating sphere and compared to a calibrated reference detector. This approach is usually very efficient in the visible range, where all optical elements are very well known, particularly the reference detector. This setup is also widely used in the near IR (up to 3μm) but as the wavelength increases, it becomes less efficient. For instance, the internal emittance of integrating spheres in the IR, and the bad knowledge of reference detectors for longer wavelengths tend to degrade the measurement reliability. Another approach may therefore be considered, using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer (FTIR). In this case, as opposed to the monochromator, the tested detector is not in low flux condition, the incident light containing a mix of different wavelengths. Therefore, the reference detector has to be to be sensitive (and known) in the whole spectral band of interest, because it will sense all those wavelengths at the same time. A popular detector used in this case is a Deuterated Triglycine Sulfate thermal detector (DTGS). Being a pyro detetector, the spectral response of such a detector is very flat, mainly limited by its window. However, the response of such a detector is very slow, highly depending on the temporal frequency of the input signal. Moreover, being a differential detector, it doesn't work in DC. In commercial FTIR spectrometers, the source luminance is usually continuously modulated by the moving interferometer, and the result is that the interferogram mixes optical spectral information (optical path difference) and temporal variations (temporal frequency) so that the temporal

  4. Tailoring porphyrin-based electron accepting materials for organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jeff; Stuart, Andrew C; You, Wei; Therien, Michael J

    2014-12-17

    The syntheses, potentiometric responses, optical spectra, electronic structural properties, and integration into photovoltaic devices are described for ethyne-bridged isoindigo-(porphinato)zinc(II)-isoindigo chromophores built upon either electron-rich 10,20-diaryl porphyrin (Ar-Iso) or electron-deficient 10,20-bis(perfluoroalkyl)porphyrin (Rf-Iso) frameworks. These supermolecules evince electrochemical responses that trace their geneses to their respective porphyrinic and isoindigoid subunits. The ethyne linkage motif effectively mixes the comparatively weak isoindigo-derived visible excitations with porphyrinic π-π* states, endowing Ar-Iso and Rf-Iso with high extinction coefficient (ε ∼ 10(5) M(-1)·cm(-1)) long-axis polarized absorptions. Ar-Iso and Rf-Iso exhibit total absorptivities per unit mass that greatly exceed that for poly(3-hexyl)thiophene (P3HT) over the 375-900 nm wavelength range where solar flux is maximal. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations highlight the delocalized nature of the low energy singlet excited states of these chromophores, demonstrating how coupled oscillator photophysics can yield organic photovoltaic device (OPV) materials having absorptive properties that supersede those of conventional semiconducting polymers. Prototype OPVs crafted from the poly(3-hexyl)thiophene (P3HT) donor polymer and these new materials (i) confirm that solar power conversion depends critically upon the driving force for photoinduced hole transfer (HT) from these low-band-gap acceptors, and (ii) underscore the importance of the excited-state reduction potential (E(-/*)) parameter as a general design criterion for low-band-gap OPV acceptors. OPVs constructed from Rf-Iso and P3HT define rare examples whereby the acceptor material extends the device operating spectral range into the NIR, and demonstrate for the first time that high oscillator strength porphyrinic chromophores, conventionally utilized as electron donors in OPVs, can also

  5. Calibration of spectral responsivity of IR detectors in the range from 0.6 μm to 24 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, Vyacheslav B.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Hanssen, Leonard M.; Larason, Thomas C.

    2016-05-01

    We report the upgraded performance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) facility for spectral responsivity calibrations of infrared (IR) detectors in both radiant power and irradiance measurement modes. The extension of the wavelength range of the previous scale, below 0.8 μm and above 19 μm in radiant power mode as well as above 5.3 μm in irradiance mode, became available as a result of multiple improvements. The calibration facility was optimized for low-level radiant flux. A significantly reduced noise-equivalent-power and a relatively constant spectral response were achieved recently on newly developed pyroelectric detectors. Also, an efficient optical geometry was developed for calibration of the spectral irradiance responsivity without using an integrating sphere. Simultaneously, the upgrade and maintenance of the NIST transfer standards, with an extended spectral range, were supported by spectral reflectance measurements of a transfer standard pyroelectric detector using a custom integrating sphere and a Fourier transform spectrometer. The sphere reflectance measurements performed in a relative mode were compared to a bare gold-coated mirror reference, separately calibrated at the Fourier transform Infrared Spectrophotometry facility to 18 μm. Currently, the reflectance data for the pyroelectric standard, available in the range up to 30 μm, are supporting the absolute power responsivity scale by the propagation of the reflectance curve to the absolute tie-spectrum in the overlapping range. Typical examples of working standard pyroelectric-, Si-, MCT-, InSb- and InGaAs- detectors are presented and their optimal use for scale dissemination is analyzed.

  6. Benchmarking concentrating photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Fabian; Muthirayan, Buvaneshwari; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-08-01

    Integral to photovoltaics is the need to provide improved economic viability. To achieve this goal, photovoltaic technology has to be able to harness more light at less cost. A large variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts has provided cause for pursuit. To obtain a detailed profitability analysis, a flexible evaluation is crucial for benchmarking the cost-performance of this variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts. To save time and capital, a way to estimate the cost-performance of a complete solar energy system is to use computer aided modeling. In this work a benchmark tool is introduced based on a modular programming concept. The overall implementation is done in MATLAB whereas Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) is used for ray tracing calculations. This allows for a flexible and extendable structuring of all important modules, namely an advanced source modeling including time and local dependence, and an advanced optical system analysis of various optical designs to obtain an evaluation of the figure of merit. An important figure of merit: the energy yield for a given photovoltaic system at a geographical position over a specific period, can be calculated.

  7. Laser generated nanoparticles based photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Petridis, C; Savva, K; Kymakis, E; Stratakis, E

    2017-03-01

    The exploitation of nanoparticles (NP), synthesized via laser ablation in liquids, in photovoltaic devices is reviewed. In particular, the impact of NPs' incorporation into various building blocks within the solar cell architecture on the photovoltaic performance and stability is presented and analysed for the current state of the art photovoltaic technologies.

  8. Modeling the seismic response of 2D models of asteroid 433 Eros, based on the spectral-element method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitz, Celine; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Lognonné, Philippe; Martin, Roland; Le Goff, Nicolas

    The understanding of the interior structure of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) is a fundamental issue to determine their evolution and origin, and also, to design possible mitigation techniques (Walker and Huebner, 2004). Indeed, if an oncoming Potentially Hazardous Object (PHO) were to threaten the Earth, numerous methods are suggested to prevent it from colliding our planet. Such mitigation techniques may involve nuclear explosives on or below the object surface, impact by a projectile, or concentration of solar energy using giant mirrors (Holsapple, 2004). The energy needed in such mitigation techniques highly depends on the porosity of the hazardous threatening object (asteroid or comet), as suggested by Holsapple, 2004. Thus, for a given source, the seismic response of a coherent homogeneous asteroid should be very different from the seismic response of a fractured or rubble-pile asteroid. To assess this hypothesis, we performed numerical simulations of wave propagation in different interior models of the Near Earth Asteroid 433 Eros. The simulations of wave propagation required a shape model of asteroid Eros, kindly provided by A. Cheng and O. Barnouin-Jha (personal communication). A cross-section along the longest axis has been chosen to define our 2D geometrical model, and we study two models of the interior: a homogeneous one, and a complex one characterized by fault networks below the main crosscut craters, and covered by a regolith layer of thickness ranging from 50 m to 150 m. To perform the numerical simulations we use the spectral-element method, which solves the variational weak form of the seismic wave equation (Komatitsch and Tromp, 1999) on the meshes of the 2D models of asteroid Eros. The homogeneous model is composed of an elastic material characterized by a pressure wave velocity Vp = 3000 m.s-1 , a shear wave velocity Vs = 1700 m.s-1 and a density of 2700 kg.m-3 . The fractured model possesses the same characteristics except for the presence of

  9. Solar simulator for concentrator photovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, César; Antón, Ignacio; Sala, Gabriel

    2008-09-15

    A solar simulator for measuring performance of large area concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules is presented. Its illumination system is based on a Xenon flash light and a large area collimator mirror, which simulates natural sun light. Quality requirements imposed by the CPV systems have been characterized: irradiance level and uniformity at the receiver, light collimation and spectral distribution. The simulator allows indoor fast and cost-effective performance characterization and classification of CPV systems at the production line as well as module rating carried out by laboratories.

  10. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program

    SciTech Connect

    Surek, Thomas; Catalano, Anthony

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  11. Nanowires enabling strained photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, J.; Bertagnolli, E.; Lugstein, A.; Birner, S.

    2014-04-21

    Photovoltaic nano-devices have largely been relying on charge separation in conventional p-n junctions. Junction formation via doping, however, imposes major challenges in process control. Here, we report on a concept for photovoltaic energy conversion at the nano scale without the need for intentional doping. Our approach relies on charge carrier separation in inhomogeneously strained germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). This concept utilizes the strain-induced gradient in bandgap along tapered NWs. Experimental data confirms the feasibility of strain-induced charge separation in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge NW devices with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼5%. The charge separation mechanism, though, is not inherently limited to a distinct material. Our work establishes a class of photovoltaic nano-devices with its opto-electronic properties engineered by size, shape, and applied strain.

  12. Designing future photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The large scale use of photovoltaic systems to generate our electricity is a dream for the future; but if this dream is to be realized, we must understand these systems today. As a result, there has been extensive research into the design and economic tradeoffs of utility interconnected photovoltaic applications. The understanding gained in this process has shown that photovoltaic system design can be a very simple and straight-forward endeavor. This paper reviews those past studies and shows how we have reached the present state of system design evolution. The concept of the utility interactive PV system with energy value determined by the utility's avoided cost will be explored. This concept simplifies the screening of potential applications for economic viability, and we will present several rules-of-thumb for this purpose.

  13. THE IMPACT OF THE SPECTRAL RESPONSE OF AN ACHROMATIC HALF-WAVE PLATE ON THE MEASUREMENT OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, C.; Gold, B.; Hanany, S.; Baccigalupi, C.; Leach, S.; Didier, J.; Johnson, B. R.; Miller, A.; Jaffe, A.; O'Dea, D.; Matsumura, T.

    2012-03-10

    We study the impact of the spectral dependence of the linear polarization rotation induced by an achromatic half-wave plate on measurements of cosmic microwave background polarization in the presence of astrophysical foregrounds. We focus on the systematic effects induced on the measurement of inflationary gravitational waves by uncertainties in the polarization and spectral index of Galactic dust. We find that for the experimental configuration and noise levels of the balloon-borne EBEX experiment, which has three frequency bands centered at 150, 250, and 410 GHz, a crude dust subtraction process mitigates systematic effects to below detectable levels for 10% polarized dust and tensor-to-scalar ratio of as low as r = 0.01. We also study the impact of uncertainties in the spectral response of the instrument. With a top-hat model of the spectral response for each band, characterized by band center and bandwidth, and with the same crude dust subtraction process, we find that these parameters need to be determined to within 1 and 0.8 GHz at 150 GHz; 9 and 2.0 GHz at 250 GHz; and 20 and 14 GHz at 410 GHz, respectively. The approach presented in this paper is applicable to other optical elements that exhibit polarization rotation as a function of frequency.

  14. Photovoltaic power systems and the National Electrical Code: Suggested practices

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, J.

    1996-12-01

    This guide provides information on how the National Electrical Code (NEC) applies to photovoltaic systems. The guide is not intended to supplant or replace the NEC; it paraphrases the NEC where it pertains to photovoltaic systems and should be used with the full text of the NEC. Users of this guide should be thoroughly familiar with the NEC and know the engineering principles and hazards associated with electrical and photovoltaic power systems. The information in this guide is the best available at the time of publication and is believed to be technically accurate; it will be updated frequently. Application of this information and results obtained are the responsibility of the user.

  15. Photovoltaic Powering And Control System For Electrochromic Windows

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Stephen C.; Michalski, Lech A.; Volltrauer, Hermann N.; Van Dine, John E.

    2000-04-25

    A sealed insulated glass unit is provided with an electrochromic device for modulating light passing through the unit. The electrochromic device is controlled from outside the unit by a remote control electrically unconnected to the device. Circuitry within the unit may be magnetically controlled from outside. The electrochromic device is powered by a photovoltaic cells. The photovoltaic cells may be positioned so that at least a part of the light incident on the cell passes through the electrochromic device, providing a form of feedback control. A variable resistance placed in parallel with the electrochromic element is used to control the response of the electrochromic element to changes in output of the photovoltaic cell.

  16. Photovoltaic systems in remote locations: An experience summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-05-01

    Since 1979, the NASA Lewis Research Center has been responsible for the design, installation and operational support of 58 photovoltaic systems located in 27 countries. Together these systems contain 77.1 kW of photovoltaic modules and provide power for a variety of loads ranging from single low-power street light systems to a utility type power system for a village of over 150 people. Systems installation, reliability, operation, maintenance and repair experience is given and major problem areas are listed. Experience indicates that photovoltaic system technology is a proven technology, but that developing countries need to better posture themselves to acquire and utilize the technology. Recommendations are given.

  17. Asphaltene based photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Chianelli, Russell R.; Castillo, Karina; Gupta, Vipin; Qudah, Ali M.; Torres, Brenda; Abujnah, Rajib E.

    2016-03-22

    Photovoltaic devices and methods of making the same, are disclosed herein. The cell comprises a photovoltaic device that comprises a first electrically conductive layer comprising a photo-sensitized electrode; at least one photoelectrochemical layer comprising metal-oxide particles, an electrolyte solution comprising at least one asphaltene fraction, wherein the metal-oxide particles are optionally dispersed in a surfactant; and a second electrically conductive layer comprising a counter-electrode, wherein the second electrically conductive layer comprises one or more conductive elements comprising carbon, graphite, soot, carbon allotropes or any combinations thereof.

  18. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    DOEpatents

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  19. A photovoltaic array simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachtsevanos, G. J.; Grimbas, E. J.

    A system simulating the output voltage-current characteristics of a photovoltaic array is described. The simulator may be used to test the performance of PV arrays and associated power conditioning equipment necessary for the autonomous or interconnected operation of photovoltaic energy sources. The simulator's main features include simplicity of construction, wide parametric variability and low cost. It is capable of reproducing the output characteristics of commercially available arrays at varying solar irradiation levels with sufficient accuracy. The design ensures the lowest possible power dissipation and minimal thermal drift. It is estimated that the cost of the simulator is an insignificant fraction of the actual array cost in the kilowatt power range.

  20. Photovoltaic power systems workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, H. J.; Given, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discussions are presented on apparent deficiencies in NASA planning and technology development relating to a standard power module (25-35 kW) and to future photovoltaic power systems in general. Topics of discussion consider the following: (1) adequate studies on power systems; (2) whether a standard power system module should be developed from a standard spacecraft; (3) identification of proper approaches to cost reduction; (4) energy storage avoidance; (5) attitude control; (6) thermal effects of heat rejection on solar array configuration stability; (7) assembly of large power systems in space; and (8) factoring terrestrial photovoltaic work into space power systems for possible payoff.

  1. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  2. Photovoltaic systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Selected photovoltaic systems currently under user-environment field test by the U.S. Department of Energy Photovoltaics Program are discussed, and operational results are summarized. There are many systems in the stand-alone sector that are cost effective now. As proven products become available, distributed residential, commercial, institutional and industrial on-site systems should be able to displace significant amounts of centrally-generated electricity throughout most of the United States. Finally, utilities should ultimately be able to augment their generating capacity with larger-scale systems. Field experience and industry interface has led to excellent overall product performance.

  3. Current topics in photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, T.J. ); Meakin, J.O. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1988-01-01

    Steady growth in the commercial application of solar cell systems has been achieved since the last volume of this series was published. In many parts of the world photovoltaics are being used in essential life sustaining or enhancing applications such as communications, water pumping, and vaccine refrigeration. Even in the more industrialized nations a growing number of uses are being found for photovoltaics, some of them far from essential, in areas which are surrounded by grid distribution systems. This book covers the latest advances in research and development, many of them in the amorphous field although progress continues with crystalline silicon and the II-VI and IIIV compounds.

  4. Current topics in photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, J.J. ); Meakin, J.O. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss the steady growth in the commercial application of solar cell systems. In many parts of the world photovoltaics are being used in essential life sustaining or enhancing applications such as communications, water pumping, and vaccine refrigeration. Even in the more industrialized nations a growing number of uses are being found for photovoltaics, in areas which are surrounded by grid distribution systems. This volume covers advances in research and development, many of them in the amorphous field, although progress continues with crystalline silicon and the II-VI and III-V compounds.

  5. High efficiency photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Guha, Subhendu; Yang, Chi C.; Xu, Xi Xiang

    1999-11-02

    An N-I-P type photovoltaic device includes a multi-layered body of N-doped semiconductor material which has an amorphous, N doped layer in contact with the amorphous body of intrinsic semiconductor material, and a microcrystalline, N doped layer overlying the amorphous, N doped material. A tandem device comprising stacked N-I-P cells may further include a second amorphous, N doped layer interposed between the microcrystalline, N doped layer and a microcrystalline P doped layer. Photovoltaic devices thus configured manifest improved performance, particularly when configured as tandem devices.

  6. The use of wavelength-selective plastic cladding materials in horticulture: understanding of crop and fungal responses through the assessment of biological spectral weighting functions.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nigel D; Jacobson, Rob J; Taylor, Anna; Wargent, Jason J; Moore, Jason P

    2005-01-01

    Plant responses to light spectral quality can be exploited to deliver a range of agronomically desirable end points in protected crops. This can be achieved using plastics with specific spectral properties as crop covers. We have studied the responses of a range of crops to plastics that have either (a) increased transmission of UV compared with standard horticultural covers, (b) decreased transmission of UV or (c) increased the ratio of red (R) : far-red (FR) radiation. Both the UV-transparent and R : FR increasing films reduced leaf area and biomass, offering potential alternatives to chemical growth regulators. The UV-opaque film increased growth, but while this may be useful in some crops, there were trade-offs with elements of quality, such as pigmentation and taste. UV manipulation may also influence disease control. Increasing UV inhibited not only the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea but also the disease biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum. Unlike B. cinerea, T. harzianum was highly sensitive to UV-A radiation. These fungal responses and those for plant growth in the growth room and the field under different plastics are analyzed in terms of alternative biological spectral weighting functions (BSWF). The role of BSWF in assessing general patterns of response to UV modification in horticulture is also discussed.

  7. Photovoltaic properties of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reucroft, P. J.; Ullal, H.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of metal electrode and film thickness on the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency in (1:1) mole ratio films of poly (N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone (TNF) has been investigated. Low work function metals increase the Schottky barrier height which leads to increases in the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency. A ten-fold decrease in film thickness produces a thousand-fold increase in photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency. A theoretical model which assumes that the photovoltaic current is limited by Child's law predicts photovoltaic efficiencies which are in good agreement with the measured efficiencies.

  8. Middle Atmosphere Response to Different Descriptions of the 11-Year Solar Cycle in Spectral Irradiance in a Chemistry-Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, W. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Oman, L. D.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    The 11-year solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM). The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3-6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7) in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response 50 using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOS CCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm and destruction at longer wavelengths, coincidentally corresponding to the wavelength regimes of the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on SORCE, respectively. A higher wavelength-resolution analysis of the spectral response could allow for a better prediction of the

  9. Spectral and spatial tuning of onset and offset response functions in auditory cortical fields A1 and CL of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Deepa L; Recanzone, Gregg H

    2016-12-07

    The mammalian auditory cortex is necessary for spectral and spatial processing of acoustic stimuli. Most physiological studies of single neurons in the auditory cortex have focused on the onset and sustained portions of evoked responses, but there have been far fewer studies on the relationship between onset and offset responses. In the current study, we compared spectral and spatial tuning of onset and offset responses of neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1) and the caudolateral (CL) belt area of awake macaque monkeys. Several different metrics were used to determine the relationship between onset and offset response profiles in both frequency and space domains. In the frequency domain, a substantial proportion of neurons in A1 and CL displayed highly dissimilar best stimuli for onset- and offset-evoked responses, though even for these neurons, there was usually a large overlap in the range of frequencies that elicited onset and offset responses and distributions of tuning overlap metrics were mostly unimodal. In the spatial domain, the vast majority of neurons displayed very similar best locations for onset- and offset-evoked responses, along with unimodal distributions of all tuning overlap metrics considered. Finally, for both spectral and spatial tuning, a slightly larger fraction of neurons in A1 displayed non-overlapping onset and offset response profiles, relative to CL, which supports hierarchical differences in the processing of sounds in the two areas. However, these differences are small compared to differences in proportions of simple cells (low overlap) and complex cells (high overlap) in primary and secondary visual areas.

  10. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, W. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Oman, L. D.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-03-01

    The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM). The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3-6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7) in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units F10.7 - 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOS CCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm and destruction at longer wavelengths, coincidentally corresponding to the wavelength regimes of the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on SORCE, respectively. A higher wavelength-resolution analysis of the spectral response could allow for a better prediction of the

  11. Automatic outdoor monitoring system for photovoltaic panels

    SciTech Connect

    Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    Long-term acquisition of solar panel performance parameters, for panels operated at maximum power point in their real environment, is of critical importance in the photovoltaic research sector. However, few options exist for the characterization of non-standard panels such as concentrated photovoltaic systems, heavily soiled or shaded panels or those operating under non-standard spectral illumination; certainly, it is difficult to find such a measurement system that is flexible and affordable enough to be adopted by the smaller research institutes or universities. We present here an instrument aiming to fill this gap, autonomously tracking and maintaining any solar panel at maximum power point while continuously monitoring its operational parameters and dissipating the produced energy without connection to the power grid. The instrument allows periodic acquisition of current-voltage curves to verify the employed maximum power point tracking approach. At the same time, with hardware schematics and software code being provided, it provides a flexible open development environment for the monitoring of non-standard generators like concentrator photovoltaic systems and to test novel power tracking approaches. The key issues, and the corresponding solutions, encountered in the design are analyzed in detail and the relevant schematics presented.

  12. Automatic outdoor monitoring system for photovoltaic panels.

    PubMed

    Stefancich, Marco; Simpson, Lin; Chiesa, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    Long-term acquisition of solar panel performance parameters, for panels operated at maximum power point in their real environment, is of critical importance in the photovoltaic research sector. However, few options exist for the characterization of non-standard panels such as concentrated photovoltaic systems, heavily soiled or shaded panels or those operating under non-standard spectral illumination; certainly, it is difficult to find such a measurement system that is flexible and affordable enough to be adopted by the smaller research institutes or universities. We present here an instrument aiming to fill this gap, autonomously tracking and maintaining any solar panel at maximum power point while continuously monitoring its operational parameters and dissipating the produced energy without connection to the power grid. The instrument allows periodic acquisition of current-voltage curves to verify the employed maximum power point tracking approach. At the same time, with hardware schematics and software code being provided, it provides a flexible open development environment for the monitoring of non-standard generators like concentrator photovoltaic systems and to test novel power tracking approaches. The key issues, and the corresponding solutions, encountered in the design are analyzed in detail and the relevant schematics presented.

  13. Applying photovoltaics to disaster relief

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. Jr.

    1996-11-01

    Hurricanes, floods, tornados, earthquakes and other disasters can happen at any time, often with little or no advance warning. They can be as destructive as Hurricane Andrew leaving several hundred-thousand people homeless or as minor as an afternoon thunderstorm knocking down local power lines to your home. Major disasters leave many people without adequate medical services, potable water, electrical service and communications. In response to a natural disaster, photovoltaic (solar electric) modules offer a source of quiet, safe, pollution-free electrical power. Photovoltaic (PV) power systems are capable of providing the electrical needs for vaccine refrigerators, microscopes, medical equipment, lighting, radios, fans, communications, traffic devices and other general electrical needs. Stand alone PV systems do not require refueling and operate for long period of time from the endless energy supplied by the sun, making them beneficial during recovery efforts. This report discusses the need for electrical power during a disaster, and the capability of PV to fill that need. Applications of PV power used during previous disaster relief efforts are also presented.

  14. Summary of theoretical and experimental investigation of grating type, silicon photovoltaic cells. [using p-n junctions on light receiving surface of base crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, L. Y.; Loferski, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental aspects are summarized for single crystal, silicon photovoltaic devices made by forming a grating pattern of p/n junctions on the light receiving surface of the base crystal. Based on the general semiconductor equations, a mathematical description is presented for the photovoltaic properties of such grating-like structures in a two dimensional form. The resulting second order elliptical equation is solved by computer modeling to give solutions for various, reasonable, initial values of bulk resistivity, excess carrier concentration, and surface recombination velocity. The validity of the computer model is established by comparison with p/n devices produced by alloying an aluminum grating pattern into the surface of n-type silicon wafers. Current voltage characteristics and spectral response curves are presented for cells of this type constructed on wafers of different resistivities and orientations.

  15. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  16. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  17. Photovoltaics technology program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    An adequate supply of energy at reasonable price is discussed. Economic efficiency and the following strategies to obtain it are suggested: (1) minimization of federal regulation in energy pricing; and (2) promote a balanced and mixed energy resource system. The development of photovoltaic energy conversion technology is summarized.

  18. BMDO photovoltaics program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Allen, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    This is an overview of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) Photovoltaic Program. Areas discussed are: (1) BMDO advanced Solar Array program; (2) Brilliant Eyes type satellites; (3) Electric propulsion; (4) Contractor Solar arrays; (5) Iofee Concentrator and Cell development; (6) Entech linear mini-dome concentrator; and (7) Flight test update/plans.

  19. Photovoltaics in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Report surveys status of research and development on photovoltaics in Japan. Report based on literature searches, private communications, and visits by author to Japanese facilities. Included in survey are Sunshine Project, national program to develop energy sources; industrial development at private firms; and work at academic institutions.

  20. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  1. Thin film photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Meakin, John D.; Bragagnolo, Julio

    1982-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic cell having a transparent electrical contact and an opaque electrical contact with a pair of semiconductors therebetween includes utilizing one of the electrical contacts as a substrate and wherein the inner surface thereof is modified by microroughening while being macro-planar.

  2. Solar photovoltaic residential project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-10-01

    Progress with technology transfer and the performance of photovoltaic power supplies in Northeastern and Southwestern residences are reported. Also, systems operation in Florida and Hawaii are discussed briefly. Technology development in the field of power conditioning and flywheel storage is described. Work on some non-residential field tests is also described. Project management data are summarized.

  3. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar photovoltaics (PV) domestically. The SunShot Initiative aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  4. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  5. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrig, L.

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986 to 1990. The reliability photovoltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warrantees available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the U.S., PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  6. Integrated photovoltaic electrolytic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, T.

    1982-10-05

    A photovoltaic-electrolytic unit is provided to produce an electric current from solar energy and utilize the current to produce hydrogen by the electrolysis of water. The unit floats in an aqueous medium so that photoelectric cells are exposed to solar radiation, and electrodes submerged in the medium produce oxygen which is vented and hydrogen which is collected in the unit.

  7. Formed photovoltaic module busbars

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Douglas; Daroczi, Shan; Phu, Thomas

    2015-11-10

    A cell connection piece for a photovoltaic module is disclosed herein. The cell connection piece includes an interconnect bus, a plurality of bus tabs unitarily formed with the interconnect bus, and a terminal bus coupled with the interconnect bus. The plurality of bus tabs extend from the interconnect bus. The terminal bus includes a non-linear portion.

  8. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 2: Quality assurance criteria for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Quality assurance criteria are described for manufacturers and installers of solar photovoltaic tests and applications. Quality oriented activities are outlined to be pursued by the contractor/subcontractor to assure the physical and operational quality of equipment produced is included. In the broad sense, guidelines are provided for establishing a QA organization if none exists. Mainly, criteria is provided to be considered in any PV quality assurance plan selected as appropriate by the responsible Field Center. A framework is established for a systematic approach to ensure that photovoltaic tests and applications are constructed in a timely and cost effective manner.

  9. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  10. Spectral Ratio Analysis of Microtremor Data Collected from a High Density Temporary Broadband Deployment for the Evaluation of Site Response in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, R.; Polet, J.

    2016-12-01

    Site response in sedimentary basins has been a topic of research interest for many decades due to the increased likelihood of earthquake damage from site amplification and resonance. We will present the results of our investigation of site response within the Los Angeles Basin through the application of the microtremor Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio method using the Geopsy software. This method was applied to 3-component broadband waveforms from the Los Angeles Syncline Seismic Interferometry Experiment (LASSIE). LASSIE is a collaborative, temporary, and dense array of 73 broadband seismometers that were active for a two-month period from October until November 2014, transecting the Los Angeles basin from Long Beach to La Puente. The data from this array enabled us to make measurements of small-scale lateral variations in the fundamental frequency, amplitude, and directional dependency of the H/V spectral ratio across this highly populated sedimentary basin. Data analysis and interpretation were conducted in accordance with the Site Effects Assessment Using Ambient Excitations (SESAME) guidelines. Our results show an average fundamental period at the basin center of 6-9.5 s and additional peaks in the spectral ratio curves at much shorter periods for sites at the basin edge. Long period H/V ratio peak amplitudes range from 2 - 5.5, with the highest values measured for the greater Long Beach area. We observe directional dependency in the frequency and amplitude of the long period peaks in the spectral ratio in proximity to the basin edge, which appears to correlate with the strike of the basin structure. We will show profiles of the H/V amplitudes and peak frequencies across the LA Basin and interpret our results in the context of site response results from other studies, as well as models of shallow and deeper basin structure.

  11. Modality-specific spectral dynamics in response to visual and tactile sequential shape information processing tasks: An MEG study using multivariate pattern classification analysis.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Bakul; Lee, Peter; Jeong, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Brain regions that respond to more than one sensory modality are characterized as multisensory regions. Studies on the processing of shape or object information have revealed recruitment of the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and other regions regardless of input sensory modalities. However, it remains unknown whether such regions show similar (modality-invariant) or different (modality-specific) neural oscillatory dynamics, as recorded using magnetoencephalography (MEG), in response to identical shape information processing tasks delivered to different sensory modalities. Modality-invariant or modality-specific neural oscillatory dynamics indirectly suggest modality-independent or modality-dependent participation of particular brain regions, respectively. Therefore, this study investigated the modality-specificity of neural oscillatory dynamics in the form of spectral power modulation patterns in response to visual and tactile sequential shape-processing tasks that are well-matched in terms of speed and content between the sensory modalities. Task-related changes in spectral power modulation and differences in spectral power modulation between sensory modalities were investigated at source-space (voxel) level, using a multivariate pattern classification (MVPC) approach. Additionally, whole analyses were extended from the voxel level to the independent-component level to take account of signal leakage effects caused by inverse solution. The modality-specific spectral dynamics in multisensory and higher-order brain regions, such as the lateral occipital cortex, posterior parietal cortex, inferior temporal cortex, and other brain regions, showed task-related modulation in response to both sensory modalities. This suggests modality-dependency of such brain regions on the input sensory modality for sequential shape-information processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterizing the marsh dieback spectral response at the plant and canopy level with hyperspectral and temporal remote sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, E.; Rangoonwala, A.

    2008-01-01

    We describe newly developed remote sensing tools to map the localized occurrences and regional distribution of the marsh dieback in coastal Louisiana (Fig. 1). As a final goal of our research and development, we identified what spectral features accompanied the onset of dieback and could be directly linked to the optical signal measured at the satellite. In order to accomplish our research goal, we carried out two interlinked objectives. First, we determined the spectral features within the hyperspectral spectra of the impacted plant that could be linked to the spectral return. This was accomplished by measuring the differences in leaf optical properties of impacted and non impacted marsh plants in such a way that the measured differences could be linked to the dieback onset and progression. The spectral analyses were constrained to selected wavelengths (bands of reflectance data) historically associated with changes in leaf composition and structure caused by changes in the plant biophysical environment. Second, we determined what changes in the canopy reflectance (canopy signal sensed at the satellite) could be linked to dieback onset and progression. Third, we transformed a suite of six Landsat Thematic Mapper images collected before, during, and in the final stages of dieback to maps of dieback occurrences. ??2008 IEEE.

  13. Phytochrome-like responses in Euglena: A low fluence response that reorganizes the spectral dependence of the high irradiance response in long-day photoperiodic induction of cell division.

    PubMed

    Bolige, Aoen; Goto, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Irradiance spectra change spatiotemporally, and angiosperms adapt accordingly, mainly through phytochromes. This study challenges the long-held belief that the flagellated alga Euglena gracilis lacks phytochromes and is therefore unaffected by spectral changes. We photoautotrophically cultured the alga under continuous light (LL), then transferred it to darkness. After about 26h in darkness, different irradiations for 3h enabled cell division in dark-arrested G2 cells evoking a high-irradiance response (HIR). The spectral characteristics of the irradiation during the LL period (pre-irradiation) defined the spectral sensitivity in the subsequent dark period. LL with light rich in the red spectrum led to a HIR to the red spectrum (R-HIR), whereas light rich in the far-red spectrum (FR) led to a FR-HIR. Finishing the period of pre-irradiation consisting of continuous cool-white fluorescent light (rich in R) by a FR pulse enhanced the characteristics of the FR-HIR 26h later. By contrast, a R pulse given at the end of the pre-irradiation rich in FR potentiated the R-HIR. The effects were completely photoreversible between R and FR with critical fluences of about 2mmolm(-2), satisfying the classic diagnostic feature of phytochromes. The action spectrum of the FR effect at the end of pre-irradiation consisting of continuous cool-white fluorescent light (rich in R) had a main peak at 740nm and a minor peak at 380nm, whereas antagonization of the FR effect had a main peak at 640nm and a minor peak at 480nm. Wavelengths of 610 and 670nm appeared in both spectra. We also demonstrated the photoreversibility of 380/640, 480/740, and (610 and 670)/(640 and 740) nm. We conclude that Euglena displays phytochrome-like responses similar to the 'shade avoidance' and 'end-of-day FR' effects reported in angiosperms.

  14. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL provide FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  15. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL format.

  16. VIIRS S-NPP Nighttime DNB Spectral Response Function (SRF): The At-launch Characteristics and How the SRF Changes with Time Due to Tungsten Oxides Chromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, B.; Lei, N.; Moeller, C.

    2015-12-01

    The VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) is designed with 3 gain stages: Low (LGS), Mid (MGS) and High (HGS) to span bright daytime to moonlit night earth scene signal levels. The published at-launch DNB relative spectral response (RSR) is based upon the LGS spectral measurements, since it was well measured in the pre-launch test program and the LGS can be calibrated by the on-board solar diffuser (MGS and HGS saturate on the SD). The LGS RSR however does not fully represent the spectral characteristics of nighttime DNB data from the MGS and HGS. Nighttime data users who apply the detailed DNB spectral characteristics in their analyses should use modulated RSR appropriate to the MGS and HGS observations. The RSR modulation is due to spectral darkening of the 4 mirrors of the S-NPP VIIRS telescope, which were contaminated with tungsten oxides in fabrication. These tungsten oxides are 'in family' with transition lenses on eyeglasses that darken when exposed to sunlight but do not recover when VIIRS goes into darkness because VIIRS in space is in a vacuum (transition lenses require atmospheric oxygen to recover). The on-going mirror darkening has caused a time-dependent shift in DNB RSR towards blue wavelengths. This presentation will provide access to the correct RSR to use for S-NPP DNB nighttime data over the mission time on-orbit. The changes in characteristics will be described in engineering terms to facilitate clear user understanding of how to handle RSR for nighttime observations over the mission lifetime.

  17. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Wares, Brian S.

    2012-09-04

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame having at least a top member and a bottom member. A plurality of alignment features are included on the top member of each frame, and a plurality of alignment features are included on the bottom member of each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by the alignment features on the top member of a lower module fitting together with the alignment features on the bottom member of an upper module. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  18. Microscopic Perspective on Photovoltaic Reciprocity in Ultrathin Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeberhard, Urs; Rau, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    The photovoltaic reciprocity theory relates the electroluminescence spectrum of a solar cell under applied bias to the external photovoltaic quantum efficiency of the device as measured at short circuit conditions. Its derivation is based on detailed balance relations between local absorption and emission rates in optically isotropic media with nondegenerate quasiequilibrium carrier distributions. In many cases, the dependence of density and spatial variation of electronic and optical device states on the point of operation is modest and the reciprocity relation holds. In nanostructure-based photovoltaic devices exploiting confined modes, however, the underlying assumptions are no longer justifiable. In the case of ultrathin absorber solar cells, the modification of the electronic structure with applied bias is significant due to the large variation of the built-in field. Straightforward use of the external quantum efficiency as measured at short circuit conditions in the photovoltaic reciprocity theory thus fails to reproduce the electroluminescence spectrum at large forward bias voltage. This failure is demonstrated here by numerical simulation of both spectral quantities at normal incidence and emission for an ultrathin GaAs p -i -n solar cell using an advanced quantum kinetic formalism based on nonequilibrium Green's functions of coupled photons and charge carriers. While coinciding with the semiclassical relations under the conditions of their validity, the theory provides a consistent microscopic relationship between absorption, emission, and charge carrier transport in photovoltaic devices at arbitrary operating conditions and for any shape of optical and electronic density of states.

  19. Microscopic Perspective on Photovoltaic Reciprocity in Ultrathin Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Aeberhard, Urs; Rau, Uwe

    2017-06-16

    The photovoltaic reciprocity theory relates the electroluminescence spectrum of a solar cell under applied bias to the external photovoltaic quantum efficiency of the device as measured at short circuit conditions. Its derivation is based on detailed balance relations between local absorption and emission rates in optically isotropic media with nondegenerate quasiequilibrium carrier distributions. In many cases, the dependence of density and spatial variation of electronic and optical device states on the point of operation is modest and the reciprocity relation holds. In nanostructure-based photovoltaic devices exploiting confined modes, however, the underlying assumptions are no longer justifiable. In the case of ultrathin absorber solar cells, the modification of the electronic structure with applied bias is significant due to the large variation of the built-in field. Straightforward use of the external quantum efficiency as measured at short circuit conditions in the photovoltaic reciprocity theory thus fails to reproduce the electroluminescence spectrum at large forward bias voltage. This failure is demonstrated here by numerical simulation of both spectral quantities at normal incidence and emission for an ultrathin GaAs p-i-n solar cell using an advanced quantum kinetic formalism based on nonequilibrium Green's functions of coupled photons and charge carriers. While coinciding with the semiclassical relations under the conditions of their validity, the theory provides a consistent microscopic relationship between absorption, emission, and charge carrier transport in photovoltaic devices at arbitrary operating conditions and for any shape of optical and electronic density of states.

  20. Increased photovoltaic power output via diffractive spectrum separation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ganghun; Dominguez-Caballero, Jose A; Lee, Howard; Friedman, Daniel J; Menon, Rajesh

    2013-03-22

    In this Letter, we report the preliminary demonstration of a new paradigm for photovoltaic power generation that utilizes a broadband diffractive-optical element (BDOE) to efficiently separate sunlight into laterally spaced spectral bands. These bands are then absorbed by single-junction photovoltaic cells, whose band gaps correspond to the incident spectral bands. We designed such BDOEs by utilizing a modified version of the direct-binary-search algorithm. Gray scale lithography was used to fabricate these multilevel optics. They were experimentally characterized with an overall optical efficiency of 70% over a wavelength range of 350-1100 nm, which was in excellent agreement with simulation predictions. Finally, two prototype devices were assembled: one with a pair of copper indium gallium selenide based photovoltaic devices, and another with GaAs and c-Si photovoltaic devices. These devices demonstrated an increase in output peak electrical power of ∼ 42% and ∼ 22%, respectively, under white-light illumination. Because of the optical versatility and manufacturability of the proposed BDOEs, the reported spectrum-splitting approach provides a new approach toward low-cost solar power.

  1. Increased Photovoltaic Power Output via Diffractive Spectrum Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ganghun; Dominguez-Caballero, Jose A.; Lee, Howard; Friedman, Daniel J.; Menon, Rajesh

    2013-03-01

    In this Letter, we report the preliminary demonstration of a new paradigm for photovoltaic power generation that utilizes a broadband diffractive-optical element (BDOE) to efficiently separate sunlight into laterally spaced spectral bands. These bands are then absorbed by single-junction photovoltaic cells, whose band gaps correspond to the incident spectral bands. We designed such BDOEs by utilizing a modified version of the direct-binary-search algorithm. Gray scale lithography was used to fabricate these multilevel optics. They were experimentally characterized with an overall optical efficiency of 70% over a wavelength range of 350-1100 nm, which was in excellent agreement with simulation predictions. Finally, two prototype devices were assembled: one with a pair of copper indium gallium selenide based photovoltaic devices, and another with GaAs and c-Si photovoltaic devices. These devices demonstrated an increase in output peak electrical power of ˜42% and ˜22%, respectively, under white-light illumination. Because of the optical versatility and manufacturability of the proposed BDOEs, the reported spectrum-splitting approach provides a new approach toward low-cost solar power.

  2. Performance Characterization of Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaics under Indoor Lighting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Jian, Zih-Hong; Huang, Shih-Han; Lee, Kun-Mu; Kao, Ming-Hsuan; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Min; Wang, Chin-Li; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Bo-Zhi; Lin, Ching-Yao; Chang, Ting-Kuang; Chi, Yun; Chi, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Wei-Ting; Tai, Yian; Lu, Ming-De; Tung, Yung-Liang; Chou, Po-Ting; Wu, Wen-Ti; Chow, Tahsin J; Chen, Peter; Luo, Xiang-Hao; Lee, Yuh-Lang; Wu, Chih-Chung; Chen, Chih-Ming; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Fan, Miao-Syuan; Peng, Jia-De; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Liu, Yu-Nan; Lee, Hsiao-Yi; Chen, Chien-Yu; Lin, Hao-Wu; Yen, Chia-Te; Huang, Yu-Ching; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Ting, Yu-Chien; Wei, Tzu-Chien; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2017-04-20

    Indoor utilization of emerging photovoltaics is promising; however, efficiency characterization under room lighting is challenging. We report the first round-robin interlaboratory study of performance measurement for dye-sensitized photovoltaics (cells and mini-modules) and one silicon solar cell under a fluorescent dim light. Among 15 research groups, the relative deviation in power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the samples reaches an unprecedented 152%. On the basis of the comprehensive results, the gap between photometry and radiometry measurements and the response of devices to the dim illumination are identified as critical obstacles to the correct PCE. Therefore, we use an illuminometer as a prime standard with a spectroradiometer to quantify the intensity of indoor lighting and adopt the reverse-biased current-voltage (I-V) characteristics as an indicator to qualify the I-V sampling time for dye-sensitized photovoltaics. The recommendations can brighten the prospects of emerging photovoltaics for indoor applications.

  3. Space applicable DOE photovoltaic technology: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J.; Stella, P.; Berman, P.

    1981-01-01

    Photovoltaic development projects applicable to space power are identified. When appropriate, the type of NASA support that would be necessary to implement these technologies for space use is indicated. It is conducted that the relatively small market and divergent operational requirements for space power are mainly responsible for the limited transfer of terrestrial technology to space applications. Information on the factors which control the cost and type of technology is provided. Terrestrial modules using semiconductor materials are investigated.

  4. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  5. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  6. Inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Chang; Meng, Tianyu; Yi, Chao; Gong, Xiong

    2016-05-21

    The advance in lifestyle, modern industrialization and future technological revolution are always at high expense of energy consumption. Unfortunately, there exist serious issues such as limited storage, high cost and toxic contamination in conventional fossil fuel energy sources. Instead, solar energy represents a renewable, economic and green alternative in the future energy market. Among the photovoltaic technologies, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) demonstrate a cheap, flexible, clean and easy-processing way to convert solar energy into electricity. However, OPVs with a conventional device structure are still far away from industrialization mainly because of their short lifetime and the energy-intensive deposition of top metal electrode. To address the stability and cost issue simultaneously, an inverted device structure has been introduced into OPVs, bridging laboratory research with practical application. In this review, recent progress in device structures, working mechanisms, functions and advances of each component layer as well their correlations with the efficiency and stability of inverted OPVs are reviewed and illustrated.

  7. Photovoltaic prospects in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, M. R.

    The economics of solar cells is reviewed with an eye to potential cost reductions in processing, and potential markets are explored. Current solar cell systems costs are noted to be on the road to achieving the U.S. DoE goals of $0.40/kWp by 1990. Continued progress will depend on technical developments in cheaper materials and processes, scaling up production, and the success of sales programs. Various consumer and professional markets are outlined, with a prediction that a 12 MWp deman will be reached as a steady state by 1995. Photovoltaic panels may conceivably replace conventional roofing materials, resulting in the projection that, if grid-supplied power continues to inflate in price, then all new European homes would be equipped with photovoltaics by the year 2000. Further, accomplishment of the cost goals could generate a 1 GWp/yr industrial market at the same time.

  8. Real-time automated spectral assessment of the BOLD response for neurofeedback at 3 and 7T.

    PubMed

    Koush, Yury; Elliott, Mark A; Scharnowski, Frank; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-09-15

    Echo-planar imaging is the dominant functional MRI data acquisition scheme for evaluating the BOLD signal. To date, it remains the only approach providing neurofeedback from spatially localized brain activity. Real-time functional single-voxel proton spectroscopy (fSVPS) may be an alternative for spatially specific BOLD neurofeedback at 7T because it allows for a precise estimation of the local T2* signal, EPI-specific artifacts may be avoided, and the signal contrast may increase. In order to explore and optimize this alternative neurofeedback approach, we tested fully automated real-time fSVPS spectral estimation procedures to approximate T2* BOLD signal changes from the unsuppressed water peak, i.e. lorentzian non-linear complex spectral fit (LNLCSF) in frequency and frequency-time domain. The proposed approaches do not require additional spectroscopic localizers in contrast to conventional T2* approximation based on linear regression of the free induction decay (FID). For methods comparison, we evaluated quality measures for signals from the motor and the visual cortex as well as a real-time feedback condition at high (3T) and at ultra-high (7T) magnetic field strengths. Using these methods, we achieved reliable and fast water peak spectral parameter estimations. At 7T, we observed an absolute increase of spectra line narrowing due to the BOLD effect, but quality measures did not improve due to artifactual line broadening. Overall, the automated fSVPS approach can be used to assess dynamic spectral changes in real-time, and to provide localized T2* neurofeedback at 3 and 7T. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Optoelectronic Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Solids for Photovoltaic Applications.

    PubMed

    Chistyakov, A A; Zvaigzne, M A; Nikitenko, V R; Tameev, A R; Martynov, I L; Prezhdo, O V

    2017-09-07

    Quantum dot (QD) solids represent a new type of condensed matter drawing high fundamental and applied interest. Quantum confinement in individual QDs, combined with macroscopic scale whole materials, leads to novel exciton and charge transfer features that are particularly relevant to optoelectronic applications. This Perspective discusses the structure of semiconductor QD solids, optical and spectral properties, charge carrier transport, and photovoltaic applications. The distance between adjacent nanoparticles and surface ligands influences greatly electrostatic interactions between QDs and, hence, charge and energy transfer. It is almost inevitable that QD solids exhibit energetic disorder that bears many similarities to disordered organic semiconductors, with charge and exciton transport described by the multiple trapping model. QD solids are synthesized at low cost from colloidal solutions by casting, spraying, and printing. A judicious selection of a layer sequence involving QDs with different size, composition, and ligands can be used to harvest sunlight over a wide spectral range, leading to inexpensive and efficient photovoltaic devices.

  10. Photovoltaic-thermal collectors

    DOEpatents

    Cox, III, Charles H.

    1984-04-24

    A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

  11. Photovoltaic panel support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.M.; Underwood, J.C.; Shingleton, J.

    1993-07-20

    A solar energy electrical power source is described comprising in combination at least two flat photovoltaic panels disposed side-by-side in co-planar relation with one another, a pivot shaft extending transversely across the panels, at least two supports spaced apart lengthwise of the pivot shaft, means for connecting the pivot shaft to the at least two supports, attachment means for connecting the at least two panels to the pivot shaft so that the panels can pivot about the longitudinal axis of the shaft, coupling means mechanically coupling all of the panels together so as to form a unified flat array, and selectively operable drive means for mechanically pivoting the unified flat array about the axis; wherein each of the flat photovoltaic panels comprises at least two modules each comprising a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells, the at least two modules being aligned along a line extending at a right angle to the pivot shaft, and the coupling means comprises (a) an elongate member extending parallel to and spaced from the pivot shaft and (b) means for attaching the elongate member to the panels; and further wherein each flat photovoltaic panel comprises a unitary frame consisting of a pair of end frame members extending parallel to the pivot shaft, a pair of side frame members extending between and connected to the end frame members, and a pair of spaced apart cross frame members, with one of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and a first one of each of the end and cross frame members, and the other of the two modules being embraced by and secured to the side frame members and the second one of each of the end and cross frame members, whereby the gap created by the spaced apart cross frame members allow air to pass between them in order to reduce the sail effect when the solar array is subjected to buffeting winds.

  12. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  13. Photovoltaics. III - Concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, C. E.

    1980-02-01

    Photovoltaic concentration systems that redirect sunlight falling on a surface to a smaller solar-cell surface concentrating the intensity of sunlight many times are examined. It is noted that solar cells for concentrating systems must be designed for low internal resistance as well as for high sunlight intensities. Two designs of silicon cells are presented that perform well at high concentrations; these are interdigitated back-contact cells and vertical multijunction cells. Attention is given to heat tapping of reemitted light.

  14. Spectral response modeling and analysis of p-n-p In0.53Ga0.47As/InP HPTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Lv, Jiabing

    2016-09-01

    We report our results on the modeling of the spectral response of the near-infrared (NIR) lattice-matched p-n-p In0.53Ga0.47As/InP heterojunction phototransistors (HPTs). The spectral response model is developed from the solution of the steady state continuity equations that dominate the excess optically generated minority-carriers in the active regions of the HPTs with accurate boundary conditions. In addition, a detailed optical-power absorption profile is constructed for the device modeling. The calculated responsivity is in good agreement with the measured one for the incident radiation at 980 nm, 1310 nm, and 1550 nm. Furthermore, the variation in the responsivity of the device with the base region width is analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61307044), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB619200), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20130321), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20133201120009), the Open Project of Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IIMDKFJJ-15-06), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, Ministry of Education of China, and the Research Innovation Program for College Graduates of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. SJLX15-0600).

  15. Vs30 and spectral response from collocated shallow, active- and passive-source Vs data at 27 sites in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jack K.; Stephenson, William J.; Williams, Robert A.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Shear‐wave velocity (VS) and time‐averaged shear‐wave velocity to 30 m depth (VS30) are the key parameters used in seismic site response modeling and earthquake engineering design. Where VS data are limited, available data are often used to develop and refine map‐based proxy models of VS30 for predicting ground‐motion intensities. In this paper, we present shallow VS data from 27 sites in Puerto Rico. These data were acquired using a multimethod acquisition approach consisting of noninvasive, collocated, active‐source body‐wave (refraction/reflection), active‐source surface wave at nine sites, and passive‐source surface‐wave refraction microtremor (ReMi) techniques. VS‐versus‐depth models are constructed and used to calculate spectral response plots for each site. Factors affecting method reliability are analyzed with respect to site‐specific differences in bedrock VS and spectral response. At many but not all sites, body‐ and surface‐wave methods generally determine similar depths to bedrock, and it is the difference in bedrock VS that influences site amplification. The predicted resonant frequencies for the majority of the sites are observed to be within a relatively narrow bandwidth of 1–3.5 Hz. For a first‐order comparison of peak frequency position, predictive spectral response plots from eight sites are plotted along with seismograph instrument spectra derived from the time series of the 16 May 2010 Puerto Rico earthquake. We show how a multimethod acquisition approach using collocated arrays compliments and corroborates VS results, thus adding confidence that reliable site characterization information has been obtained.

  16. Do photovoltaics have a future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    There is major concern as to the economic practicality of widespread terrestrial use because of the high cost of the photovoltaic arrays themselves. Based on their high efficiency, photovoltaic collectors should be one of the cheapest forms of energy generators known. Present photovoltaic panels are violating the trend of lower costs with increasing efficiency due to their reliance on expensive materials. A medium technology solution should provide electricity competitive with the existing medium to high technology energy generators such as oil, coal, gas, and nuclear fission thermal plants. Programs to reduce the cost of silicon and develop reliable thin film materials have a realistic chance of producing cost effective photovoltaic panels.

  17. Utility-scale photovoltaic concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The photovoltaics concentrators section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  18. Solar photovoltaics for development applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shepperd, L.W.; Richards, E.H.

    1993-08-01

    This document introduces photovoltaic technology to individuals and groups specializing in development activities. Examples of actual installations illustrate the many services supplied by photovoltaic systems in development applications, including water pumping, lighting, health care, refrigeration, communications, and a variety of productive uses. The various aspects of the technology are explored to help potential users evaluate whether photovoltaics can assist them in achieving their organizational goals. Basic system design, financing techniques, and the importance of infrastructure are included, along with additional sources of information and major US photovoltaic system suppliers.

  19. Solar photovoltaics for development applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepperd, L. W.; Richards, E. H.

    1993-08-01

    This document introduces photovoltaic technology to individuals and groups specializing in development activities. Examples of actual installations illustrate the many services supplied by photovoltaic systems in development applications including water pumping, lighting, health care, refrigeration, communications, and a variety of productive uses. The various aspects of the technology are explored to help potential users evaluate whether photovoltaics can assist them in achieving their organizational goals. Basic system design, financing techniques, and the importance of infrastructure are included, along with additional sources of information and major U.S. photovoltaic system suppliers.

  20. Plasmonics for improved photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Atwater, Harry A; Polman, Albert

    2010-03-01

    The emerging field of plasmonics has yielded methods for guiding and localizing light at the nanoscale, well below the scale of the wavelength of light in free space. Now plasmonics researchers are turning their attention to photovoltaics, where design approaches based on plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in photovoltaic devices, permitting a considerable reduction in the physical thickness of solar photovoltaic absorber layers, and yielding new options for solar-cell design. In this review, we survey recent advances at the intersection of plasmonics and photovoltaics and offer an outlook on the future of solar cells based on these principles.