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Sample records for physcomitrella patens ftsz

  1. Physcomitrella patens Activates Defense Responses against the Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Reboledo, Guillermo; del Campo, Raquel; Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Mara, Héctor; Ponce de León, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is a suitable model plant to analyze the activation of defense mechanisms after pathogen assault. In this study, we show that Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from symptomatic citrus fruit infects P. patens and cause disease symptoms evidenced by browning and maceration of tissues. After C. gloeosporioides infection, P. patens reinforces the cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and induces the expression of a Dirigent-protein-like encoding gene that could lead to the formation of lignin-like polymers. C. gloeosporioides-inoculated protonemal cells show cytoplasmic collapse, browning of chloroplasts and modifications of the cell wall. Chloroplasts relocate in cells of infected tissues toward the initially infected C. gloeosporioides cells. P. patens also induces the expression of the defense genes PAL and CHS after fungal colonization. P. patens reporter lines harboring the auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) fused to β-glucuronidase revealed an auxin response in protonemal tissues, cauloids and leaves of C. gloeosporioides-infected moss tissues, indicating the activation of auxin signaling. Thus, P. patens is an interesting plant to gain insight into defense mechanisms that have evolved in primitive land plants to cope with microbial pathogens. PMID:26389888

  2. Moss (Physcomitrella patens) GH3 proteins act in auxin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Jülke, Sabine; Bierfreund, Nicole M; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Auxins are hormones involved in many cellular, physiological and developmental processes in seed plants and in mosses such as Physcomitrella patens. Control of auxin levels is achieved in higher plants via synthesis of auxin conjugates by members of the GH3 family. The role of the two GH3-like proteins from P. patens for growth and auxin homeostasis was therefore analysed. The in vivo-function of the two P. patens GH3 genes was investigated using single and double knockout mutants. The two P. patens GH3 proteins were also heterologously expressed to determine their enzymatic activity. Both P. patens GH3 enzymes accepted the auxin indole acetic acid (IAA) as substrate, but with different preferences for the amino acid to which it is attached. Cytoplasmic localization was shown for PpGH3-1 tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Targeted knock-out of either gene exhibited an increased sensitivity to auxin, resulting in growth inhibition. On plain mineral media mutants had higher levels of free IAA and less conjugated IAA than the wild type, and this effect was enhanced when auxin was supplied. The DeltaPpGH3-1/DeltaPpGH3-2 double knockout had almost no IAA amide conjugates but still synthesized ester conjugates. Taken together, these data suggest a developmentally controlled involvement of P. patens GH3 proteins in auxin homeostasis by conjugating excess of physiologically active free auxin to inactive IAA-amide conjugates.

  3. Genotoxin induced mutagenesis in the model plant Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Holá, Marcela; Kozák, Jaroslav; Vágnerová, Radka; Angelis, Karel J

    2013-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is unique for the high frequency of homologous recombination, haploid state, and filamentous growth during early stages of the vegetative growth, which makes it an excellent model plant to study DNA damage responses. We used single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay to determine kinetics of response to Bleomycin induced DNA oxidative damage and single and double strand breaks in wild type and mutant lig4 Physcomitrella lines. Moreover, APT gene when inactivated by induced mutations was used as selectable marker to ascertain mutational background at nucleotide level by sequencing of the APT locus. We show that extensive repair of DSBs occurs also in the absence of the functional LIG4, whereas repair of SSBs is seriously compromised. From analysis of induced mutations we conclude that their accumulation rather than remaining lesions in DNA and blocking progression through cell cycle is incompatible with normal plant growth and development and leads to sensitive phenotype.

  4. Phototropism in gametophytic shoots of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Bao, Liang; Yamamoto, Kotaro T; Fujita, Tomomichi

    2015-01-01

    Shoot phototropism enables plants to position their photosynthetic organs in favorable light conditions and thus benefits growth and metabolism in land plants. To understand the evolution of this response, we established an experimental system to study phototropism in gametophores of the moss Physcomitrella patens. The phototropic response of gametophores occurs slowly; a clear response takes place more than 24 hours after the onset of unilateral light irradiation, likely due to the slow growth rate of gametophores. We also found that red and far-red light can induce phototropism, with blue light being less effective. These results suggest that plants used a broad range of light wavelengths as phototropic signals during the early evolution of land plants.

  5. Putting Physcomitrella Patens on the Tree of Life: The Evolution and Ecology of Mosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physcomitrella patens is an important model system for studies of genetics and physiology, and with its newly-sequenced genome, is perfectly placed phylogenetically to serve as a point of comparison for angiosperms. This chapter addresses three main questions. (1) How typical of a moss is P. patens...

  6. Desiccation sensitivity and tolerance in the moss Physcomitrella patens: assessing limits and damage.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is becoming the model of choice for functional genomic studies at the cellular level. Studies report that P. patens survives moderate osmotic and salt stress, and that desiccation tolerance can be induced by exogenous ABA. Our goal was to quantify the extent of dehydr...

  7. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Nan; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Moon, Hong S; Kapteyn, Jeremy; Zhuang, Xiaofeng; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Stewart, Neal C.; Gang, David R.; Chen, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5 lM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  8. Lichen secondary metabolites affect growth of Physcomitrella patens by allelopathy.

    PubMed

    Goga, Michal; Antreich, Sebastian J; Bačkor, Martin; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Lang, Ingeborg

    2016-09-19

    Lichen secondary metabolites can function as allelochemicals and affect the development and growth of neighboring bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, microorganisms, and even other lichens. Lichen overgrowth on bryophytes is frequently observed in nature even though mosses grow faster than lichens, but there is still little information on the interactions between lichens and bryophytes.In the present study, we used extracts from six lichen thalli containing secondary metabolites like usnic acid, protocetraric acid, atranorin, lecanoric acid, nortistic acid, and thamnolic acid. To observe the influence of these metabolites on bryophytes, the moss Physcomitrella patens was cultivated for 5 weeks under laboratory conditions and treated with lichen extracts. Toxicity of natural mixtures of secondary metabolites was tested at three selected doses (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 %). When the mixture contained substantial amounts of usnic acid, we observed growth inhibition of protonemata and reduced development of gametophores. Significant differences in cell lengths and widths were also noticed. Furthermore, usnic acid had a strong effect on cell division in protonemata suggesting a strong impact on the early stages of bryophyte development by allelochemicals contained in the lichen secondary metabolites.Biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites were confirmed in several studies such as antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antiherbivore, antioxidant, antipyretic, and analgetic action or photoprotection. This work aimed to expand the knowledge on allelopathic effects on bryophyte growth.

  9. Characterization of Arsenic Biotransformation by a Typical Bryophyte Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xixiang; Wang, Lihong; Liu, Yifei; Jiang, Tenglong; Gao, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that has created catastrophic human health and environmental problems around world. Physcomitrella patens is a potential model plant for the study of environmental monitoring, which exists in all kinds of ecosystems. In this study, arsenic metabolism was investigated by this moss. When supplied with different levels of arsenate (50, 100, 200 µmol/L) for a 4-week period, the total arsenic concentrations were up to 231.4-565.4 mg/kg DW in this moss. Arsenite concentration increased with increasing external arsenate concentrations, the proportion was up to 25.1-36.8% of the total As. An arsenate reductase, PpACR2, was identified and functionally characterized. Heterologous expression of PpACR2 in an As(V)-sensitive strain WC3110 (ΔarsC) of Escherichia coli conferred As(V) resistance. Purified PpACR2 protein exhibited the arsenate reductase activity. Given its powerful As accumulation ability, the bryophyte could be exploited in bioremediation of As-contaminated environments.

  10. Biosynthesis of C9-aldehydes in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Stumpe, Michael; Bode, Julia; Göbel, Cornelia; Wichard, Thomas; Schaaf, Andreas; Frank, Wolfgang; Frank, Markus; Reski, Ralf; Pohnert, Georg; Feussner, Ivo

    2006-03-01

    After wounding, the moss Physcomitrella patens emits fatty acid derived volatiles like octenal, octenols and (2E)-nonenal. Flowering plants produce nonenal from C18-fatty acids via lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase reactions, but the moss exploits the C20 precursor arachidonic acid for the formation of these oxylipins. We describe the isolation of the first cDNA (PpHPL) encoding a hydroperoxide lyase from a lower eukaryotic organism. The physiological pathway allocation and characterization of a downstream enal-isomerase gives a new picture for the formation of fatty acid derived volatiles from lower plants. Expression of a fusion protein with a yellow fluorescent protein in moss protoplasts showed that PpHPL was found in clusters in membranes of plastids. PpHPL can be classified as an unspecific hydroperoxide lyase having a substrate preference for 9-hydroperoxides of C18-fatty acids but also the predominant substrate 12-hydroperoxy arachidonic acid is accepted. Feeding experiments using arachidonic acid show an increase in the 12-hydroperoxide being metabolized to C8-aldehydes/alcohols and (3Z)-nonenal, which is rapidly isomerized to (2E)-nonenal. PpHPL knock out lines failed to emit (2E)-nonenal while formation of C8-volatiles was not affected indicating that in contrast to flowering plants, PpHPL is only involved in formation of a specific subset of volatiles.

  11. Physcomitrella patens has lipoxygenases for both eicosanoid and octadecanoid pathways.

    PubMed

    Anterola, Aldwin; Göbel, Cornelia; Hornung, Ellen; Sellhorn, George; Feussner, Ivo; Grimes, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Mosses have substantial amounts of long chain C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid, in addition to the shorter chain C18 alpha-linolenic and linoleic acids, which are typical substrates of lipoxygenases in flowering plants. To identify the fatty acid substrates used by moss lipoxygenases, eight lipoxygenase genes from Physcomitrella patens were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and then analyzed for lipoxygenase activity using linoleic, alpha-linolenic and arachidonic acids as substrates. Among the eight moss lipoxygenases, only seven were found to be enzymatically active in vitro, two of which selectively used arachidonic acid as the substrate, while the other five preferred alpha-linolenic acid. Based on enzyme assays using a Clark-type oxygen electrode, all of the active lipoxygenases had an optimum pH at 7.0, except for one with highest activity at pH 5.0. HPLC analyses indicated that the two arachidonic acid lipoxygenases form (12S)-hydroperoxy eicosatetraenoic acid as the main product, while the other five lipoxygenases produce mainly (13S)-hydroperoxy octadecatrienoic acid from alpha-linolenic acid. These results suggest that mosses may have both C20 and C18 based oxylipin pathways.

  12. The Physcomitrella patens Chloroplast Proteome Changes in Response to Protoplastation

    PubMed Central

    Fesenko, Igor; Seredina, Anna; Arapidi, Georgij; Ptushenko, Vasily; Urban, Anatoly; Butenko, Ivan; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Babalyan, Konstantin; Knyazev, Andrey; Khazigaleeva, Regina; Pushkova, Elena; Anikanov, Nikolai; Ivanov, Vadim; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant protoplasts are widely used for genetic manipulation and functional studies in transient expression systems. However, little is known about the molecular pathways involved in a cell response to the combined stress factors resulted from protoplast generation. Plants often face more than one type of stress at a time, and how plants respond to combined stress factors is therefore of great interest. Here, we used protoplasts of the moss Physcomitrella patens as a model to study the effects of short-term stress on the chloroplast proteome. Using label-free comparative quantitative proteomic analysis (SWATH-MS), we quantified 479 chloroplast proteins, 219 of which showed a more than 1.4-fold change in abundance in protoplasts. We additionally quantified 1451 chloroplast proteins using emPAI. We observed degradation of a significant portion of the chloroplast proteome following the first hour of stress imposed by the protoplast isolation process. Electron-transport chain (ETC) components underwent the heaviest degradation, resulting in the decline of photosynthetic activity. We also compared the proteome changes to those in the transcriptional level of nuclear-encoded chloroplast genes. Globally, the levels of the quantified proteins and their corresponding mRNAs showed limited correlation. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and components of the outer chloroplast membrane showed decreases in both transcript and protein abundance. However, proteins like dehydroascorbate reductase 1 and 2-cys peroxiredoxin B responsible for ROS detoxification increased in abundance. Further, genes such as thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase were induced at the transcriptional level but down-regulated at the proteomic level. Together, our results demonstrate that the initial chloroplast reaction to stress is due changes at the proteomic level. PMID:27867392

  13. The molecular and physiological responses of Physcomitrella patens to ultraviolet-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Luise; Rizzini, Luca; Stracke, Ralf; Ulm, Roman; Rensing, Stefan A

    2010-07-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation present in sunlight is an important trigger of photomorphogenic acclimation and stress responses in sessile land plants. Although numerous moss species grow in unshaded habitats, our understanding of their UV-B responses is very limited. The genome of the model moss Physcomitrella patens, which grows in sun-exposed open areas, encodes signaling and metabolic components that are implicated in the UV-B response in flowering plants. In this study, we describe the response of P. patens to UV-B radiation at the morphological and molecular levels. We find that P. patens is more capable of surviving UV-B stress than Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and describe the differential expression of approximately 400 moss genes in response to UV-B radiation. A comparative analysis of the UV-B response in P. patens and Arabidopsis reveals both distinct and conserved pathways.

  14. An ancient genome duplication contributed to the abundance of metabolic genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, Stefan A; Ick, Julia; Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Lang, Daniel; Zimmer, Andreas; Van de Peer, Yves; Reski, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Background: Analyses of complete genomes and large collections of gene transcripts have shown that most, if not all seed plants have undergone one or more genome duplications in their evolutionary past. Results: In this study, based on a large collection of EST sequences, we provide evidence that the haploid moss Physcomitrella patens is a paleopolyploid as well. Based on the construction of linearized phylogenetic trees we infer the genome duplication to have occurred between 30 and 60 million years ago. Gene Ontology and pathway association of the duplicated genes in P. patens reveal different biases of gene retention compared with seed plants. Conclusion: Metabolic genes seem to have been retained in excess following the genome duplication in P. patens. This might, at least partly, explain the versatility of metabolism, as described for P. patens and other mosses, in comparison to other land plants. PMID:17683536

  15. Generating Targeted Gene Knockout Lines in Physcomitrella patens to Study Evolution of Stress-Responsive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Maronova, Monika; Kalyna, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens possesses highly efficient homologous recombination allowing targeted gene manipulations and displays many features of the early land plants including high tolerance to abiotic stresses. It is therefore an invaluable model organism for studies of gene functions and comparative studies of evolution of stress responses in plants. Here, we describe a method for generating targeted gene knockout lines in P. patens using a polyethylene glycol-mediated transformation of protoplasts including basic in vitro growth, propagation, and maintenance techniques. PMID:26867627

  16. Effects of engineered iron nanoparticles on the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp, after foliar exposure.

    PubMed

    Canivet, L; Dubot, P; Garçon, G; Denayer, F-O

    2015-03-01

    The effects of iron nanoparticles on bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) were studied following foliar exposure. We used iron nanoparticles (Fe-NP) representative of industrial emissions from the metallurgical industries. After a characterization of iron nanoparticles and the validation of nanoparticle internalization in cells, the effects (cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation of membrane) of iron nanoparticles were determined through the axenic culturing of Physcomitrella patens exposed at five different concentrations (5 ng, 50 ng, 500 ng, 5 µg and 50 µg per plant). Following exposure, the plant health, measured as ATP concentrations, was not impacted. Moreover, we studied oxidative stress in three ways: through the measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, through malondialdehyde (MDA) production and also through glutathione regulation. At concentrations tested over a short period, the level of ROS, MDA and glutathione were not significantly disturbed.

  17. Prenylation is required for polar cell elongation, cell adhesion, and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Thole, Julie M; Perroud, Pierre-Francois; Quatrano, Ralph S; Running, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Protein prenylation is required for a variety of growth and developmental processes in flowering plants. Here we report the consequences of loss of function of all known prenylation subunits in the moss Physcomitrella patens. As in Arabidopsis, protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I are not required for viability. However, protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I activity is required for cell adhesion, polar cell elongation, and cell differentiation. Loss of protein geranylgeranyltransferase activity results in colonies of round, single-celled organisms that resemble unicellular algae. The loss of protein farnesylation is not as severe but also results in polar cell elongation and differentiation defects. The complete loss of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase activity appears to be lethal in P. patens. Labeling with antibodies to cell wall components support the lack of polarity establishment and the undifferentiated state of geranylgeranyltransferase type I mutant plants. Our results show that prenylated proteins play key roles in P. patens development and differentiation processes.

  18. Role of PP2C-mediated ABA signaling in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yoichi; Komatsu, Kenji; Taji, Teruaki; Tanaka, Shigeo

    2009-09-01

    Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is found in a wide range of land plants, from mosses to angiosperms. However, our knowledge concerning the function of ABA is limited to some angiosperm plant species. We have shown that the basal land plant Physcomitrella patens and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana share a conserved abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway mediated through ABI1-related type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis abi1-1, a dominant allele of ABI1 that functions as a negative regulator of ABA signaling, or targeted disruption of Physcomitrella ABI1-related gene (PpABI1A) resulted in altered ABA sensitivity and abiotic stress tolerance of Physcomitrella, as demonstrated by osmostress and freezing stress. Moreover, transgenic Physcomitrella overexpressing abi1-1 showed altered morphogenesis. These transgenic plants had longer stem lengths compared to the wild type, and continuous growth of archegonia (female organ) with few sporophytes under non-stress conditions. Our results suggest that PP2C-mediated ABA signaling is involved in both the abiotic stress responses and developmental regulation of Physcomitrella.

  19. Polyphenol oxidases in Physcomitrella: functional PPO1 knockout modulates cytokinin-dependent development in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hanna; Lieberei, Reinhard; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondrej; Gruz, Jiri; Rensing, Stefan A; von Schwartzenberg, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) are copper-binding enzymes of the plant secondary metabolism that oxidize polyphenols to quinones. Although PPOs are nearly ubiquitous in seed plants, knowledge on their evolution and function in other plant groups is missing. This study reports on the PPO gene family in the moss Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S.G. asan example for an early divergent plant. The P. patens PPO multigene family comprises 13 paralogues. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that plant PPOs evolved with the colonization of land and that PPO duplications within the monophyletic P. patens paralogue clade occurred after the separation of the moss and seed plant lineages. PPO functionality was demonstrated for recombinant PPO6. P. patens was analysed for phenolic compounds and six substances were detected intracellularly by LC-MS analysis: 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-cumaric acid, protocatechuic acid, salicylic acid, caffeic acid, and an ester of caffeic acid. Targeted PPO1 knockout (d|ppo1) plants were generated and plants lacking PPO1 exhibited only ~30% of the wild-type PPO activity in the culture medium, thus suggesting extracellular localization of PPO1, which is in contrast to the mostly plastidic PPO localization in seed plants. Further, d|ppo1 lines formed significantly more gametophores with a reduced areal plant size, which could be related to an increase of endogenously produced cytokinins and indicates an impact of PPO1 on plant development. d|ppo1 plants were less tolerant towards applied 4-methylcatechol compared to the wild type, which suggests a role of extracellular PPO1 in establishing appropriate conditions by the removal of inhibitory extracellular phenolic compounds.

  20. Polyphenol oxidases in Physcomitrella: functional PPO1 knockout modulates cytokinin-dependent developmentin the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) are copper-binding enzymes of the plant secondary metabolism that oxidize polyphenols to quinones. Although PPOs are nearly ubiquitous in seed plants, knowledge on their evolution and function in other plant groups is missing. This study reports on the PPO gene family in the moss Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S.G. asan example for an early divergent plant. The P. patens PPO multigene family comprises 13 paralogues. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that plant PPOs evolved with the colonization of land and that PPO duplications within the monophyletic P. patens paralogue clade occurred after the separation of the moss and seed plant lineages. PPO functionality was demonstrated for recombinant PPO6. P. patens was analysed for phenolic compounds and six substances were detected intracellularly by LC-MS analysis: 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-cumaric acid, protocatechuic acid, salicylic acid, caffeic acid, and an ester of caffeic acid. Targeted PPO1 knockout (d|ppo1) plants were generated and plants lacking PPO1 exhibited only ~30% of the wild-type PPO activity in the culture medium, thus suggesting extracellular localization of PPO1, which is in contrast to the mostly plastidic PPO localization in seed plants. Further, d|ppo1 lines formed significantly more gametophores with a reduced areal plant size, which could be related to an increase of endogenously produced cytokinins and indicates an impact of PPO1 on plant development. d|ppo1 plants were less tolerant towards applied 4-methylcatechol compared to the wild type, which suggests a role of extracellular PPO1 in establishing appropriate conditions by the removal of inhibitory extracellular phenolic compounds. PMID:22865913

  1. Identification and expression profile analysis of NUCLEAR FACTOR-Y families in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Han, Min; Lv, Qiang; Bao, Fang; He, Yikun

    2015-01-01

    NUCLEAR FACTOR Y transcription factors belong to a multimember family and consist of NF-YA/B/C subunits. Members of the NF-Y family have been reported to regulate physiological processes in plant. In this study, we identified and annotated two NF-YA, nine NF-B, and twelve NF-YC proteins in the genome of Physcomitrella patens. Analyses of conserved domains demonstrated that PpNF-YA/B/C shared the same conserved domains with their orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis, O. sativa and mouse. Expression profiles indicated that PpNF-Ys were widely expressed in different tissues and developmental stages of P. patens throughout protonema and gametophores. The majority of PpNF-Y genes were responsive to abiotic stress via either ABA-independent or -dependent pathways. Some of ABA-regulated PpNF-Y expression were mediated by ABI3. To our knowledge, this study was the first to evaluate NF-Y families in Physcomitrella patens, and provides a foundation to dissect the function of PpNF-Ys. PMID:26347760

  2. The potential of Physcomitrella patens as a platform for the production of plant-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Orellana-Escobedo, Lucía; Romero-Maldonado, Andrea; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens has a number of advantages for the production of biopharmaceuticals, including: i) availability of standardized conditions for cultivation in bioreactors; ii) not being part of the food chain; iii) high biosafety; iv) availability of highly efficient transformation methods; v) a haploid, fully sequenced genome providing genetic stability and uniform expression; vi) efficient gene targeting at the nuclear level allows for the generation of mutants with specific post-translational modifications (e.g., glycosylation patterns); and vii) oral formulations are a viable approach as no toxic effects are attributed to ingestion of this moss. In the light of this panorama, this opinion paper analyzes the possibilities of using P. patens for the production of oral vaccines and presents some specific cases where its use may represent significant progress in the field of plant-based vaccine development. The advantages represented by putative adjuvant effects of endogenous secondary metabolites and producing specific glycosylation patterns are highlighted.

  3. In vivo assembly of DNA-fragments in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    King, Brian Christopher; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Ikram, Nur Kusaira Binti Khairul; Schrøder, Josephine; Scharff, Lars B; Hamberger, Björn; Jensen, Poul Erik; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2016-04-29

    Direct assembly of multiple linear DNA fragments via homologous recombination, a phenomenon known as in vivo assembly or transformation associated recombination, is used in biotechnology to assemble DNA constructs ranging in size from a few kilobases to full synthetic microbial genomes. It has also enabled the complete replacement of eukaryotic chromosomes with heterologous DNA. The moss Physcomitrella patens, a non-vascular and spore producing land plant (Bryophyte), has a well-established capacity for homologous recombination. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo assembly of multiple DNA fragments in P. patens with three examples of effective genome editing: we (i) efficiently deleted a genomic locus for diterpenoid metabolism yielding a biosynthetic knockout, (ii) introduced a salt inducible promoter, and (iii) re-routed endogenous metabolism into the formation of amorphadiene, a precursor of high-value therapeutics. These proof-of-principle experiments pave the way for more complex and increasingly flexible approaches for large-scale metabolic engineering in plant biotechnology.

  4. Additional diterpenes from Physcomitrella patens synthesized by copalyl diphosphate/kaurene synthase (PpCPS/KS).

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xin; Bach, Søren Spanner; Hansen, Nikolaj Lervad; Lunde, Christina; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2015-11-01

    The bifunctional diterpene synthase, copalyl diphosphate/kaurene synthase from the moss Physcomitrella patens (PpCPS/KS), catalyses the formation of at least four diterpenes, including ent-beyerene, ent-sandaracopimaradiene, ent-kaur-16-ene, and 16-hydroxy-ent-kaurene. The enzymatic activity has been confirmed through generation of a targeted PpCPS/KS knock-out mutant in P. patens via homologous recombination, through transient expression of PpCPS/KS in Nicotiana benthamiana, and expression of PpCPS/KS in E. coli. GC-MS analysis of the knock-out mutant shows that it lacks the diterpenoids, supporting that all are products of PpCPS/KS as observed in N. benthamiana and E. coli. These results provide additional knowledge of the mechanism of this bifunctional diterpene synthase, and are in line with proposed reaction mechanisms in kaurene biosynthesis.

  5. Phototropins mediate blue and red light-induced chloroplast movements in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-07-01

    Phototropin is the blue-light receptor that mediates phototropism, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Blue and red light induce chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To study the photoreceptors for chloroplast movement in P. patens, four phototropin genes (PHOTA1, PHOTA2, PHOTB1, and PHOTB2) were isolated by screening cDNA libraries. These genes were classified into two groups (PHOTA and PHOTB) on the basis of their deduced amino acid sequences. Then phototropin disruptants were generated by homologous recombination and used for analysis of chloroplast movement. Data revealed that blue light-induced chloroplast movement was mediated by phototropins in P. patens. Both photA and photB groups were able to mediate chloroplast avoidance, as has been reported for Arabidopsis phot2, although the photA group contributed more to the response. Red light-induced chloroplast movement was also significantly reduced in photA2photB1photB2 triple disruptants. Because the primary photoreceptor for red light-induced chloroplast movement in P. patens is phytochrome, phototropins may be downstream components of phytochromes in the signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to show a function for the phototropin blue-light receptor in a response to wavelengths that it does not absorb.

  6. Comparing copper resistance in two bryophytes: Mielichhoferia elongata Hornsch. versus Physcomitrella patens Hedw.

    PubMed

    Sassmann, Stefan; Wernitznig, Stefan; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Lang, Ingeborg

    2010-10-01

    The bryophyte Mielichhoferia elongata is known to occur on copper-rich substrate, but the exact resistance level remained to be determined by in vitro experiments. Here, we tested its copper tolerance in graded copper solutions and compared the results to the moss Physcomitrella patens that is not known to inhabit heavy metal sites. Our results confirm the survival of M. elongata in classical resistance experiments of up to 10 mM Cu-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution. Interestingly, P. patens is equally resistant. Cultured on copper-enriched agar plates for over 5 weeks, P. patens survived even higher copper levels of up to 100 mM Cu-EDTA and an increment of growth was detected on all concentrations tested. Obviously, P. patens is able to withstand harmfully high levels of copper in both solution and substrate. In this short communication, we give a detailed description of the growth rates and discuss the results in comparison to other moss species and heavy metals.

  7. An Innate Immunity Pathway in the Moss Physcomitrella patens[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bressendorff, Simon; Azevedo, Raquel; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Ponce de León, Inés; Olsen, Jakob V.; Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Erbs, Gitte; Newman, Mari-Anne; Petersen, Morten; Mundy, John

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinase (MPK) cascades in Arabidopsis thaliana and other vascular plants are activated by developmental cues, abiotic stress, and pathogen infection. Much less is known of MPK functions in nonvascular land plants such as the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here, we provide evidence for a signaling pathway in P. patens required for immunity triggered by pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). This pathway induces rapid growth inhibition, a novel fluorescence burst, cell wall depositions, and accumulation of defense-related transcripts. Two P. patens MPKs (MPK4a and MPK4b) are phosphorylated and activated in response to PAMPs. This activation in response to the fungal PAMP chitin requires a chitin receptor and one or more MAP kinase kinase kinases and MAP kinase kinases. Knockout lines of MPK4a appear wild type but have increased susceptibility to the pathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassisicola. Both PAMPs and osmotic stress activate some of the same MPKs in Arabidopsis. In contrast, abscisic acid treatment or osmotic stress of P. patens does not activate MPK4a or any other MPK, but activates at least one SnRK2 kinase. Signaling via MPK4a may therefore be specific to immunity, and the moss relies on other pathways to respond to osmotic stress. PMID:27268428

  8. Gibberellin precursor is involved in spore germination in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Anterola, Aldwin; Shanle, Erin; Mansouri, Katayoun; Schuette, Scott; Renzaglia, Karen

    2009-03-01

    Gibberellins are ent-kaurene derived phytohormones that are involved in seed germination, stem elongation, and flower induction in seed plants, as well as in antheridia formation and spore germination in ferns. Although ubiquitous in vascular plants, the occurrence and potential function(s) of gibberellins in bryophytes have not yet been resolved. To determine the potential role of gibberellin and/or gibberellin-like compounds in mosses, the effect of AMO-1618 on spores of Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S.G. was tested. AMO-1618, which inhibited ent-kaurene and gibberellin biosynthesis in angiosperms, also inhibited the bifunctional copalyl diphosphate synthase (E.C. 5.5.1.13)/ent-kaurene synthase (E.C. 4.2.3.19) of P. patens. AMO-1618 also caused a decrease in spore germination rates of P. patens, and this inhibitory effect was less pronounced in the presence of ent-kaurene. These results suggest that ent-kaurene biosynthesis is required by P. patens spores to germinate, implying the presence of gibberellin-like phytohormones in mosses.

  9. Erwinia carotovora elicitors and Botrytis cinerea activate defense responses in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Ponce de León, Inés; Oliver, Juan Pablo; Castro, Alexandra; Gaggero, Carina; Bentancor, Marcel; Vidal, Sabina

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular plants respond to pathogens by activating a diverse array of defense mechanisms. Studies with these plants have provided a wealth of information on pathogen recognition, signal transduction and the activation of defense responses. However, very little is known about the infection and defense responses of the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens, to well-studied phytopathogens. The purpose of this study was to determine: i) whether two representative broad host range pathogens, Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora (E.c. carotovora) and Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), could infect Physcomitrella, and ii) whether B. cinerea, elicitors of a harpin (HrpN) producing E.c. carotovora strain (SCC1) or a HrpN-negative strain (SCC3193), could cause disease symptoms and induce defense responses in Physcomitrella. Results B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora were found to readily infect Physcomitrella gametophytic tissues and cause disease symptoms. Treatments with B. cinerea spores or cell-free culture filtrates from E.c. carotovoraSCC1 (CF(SCC1)), resulted in disease development with severe maceration of Physcomitrella tissues, while CF(SCC3193) produced only mild maceration. Although increased cell death was observed with either the CFs or B. cinerea, the occurrence of cytoplasmic shrinkage was only visible in Evans blue stained protonemal cells treated with CF(SCC1) or inoculated with B. cinerea. Most cells showing cytoplasmic shrinkage accumulated autofluorescent compounds and brown chloroplasts were evident in a high proportion of these cells. CF treatments and B. cinerea inoculation induced the expression of the defense-related genes: PR-1, PAL, CHS and LOX. Conclusion B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora elicitors induce a defense response in Physcomitrella, as evidenced by enhanced expression of conserved plant defense-related genes. Since cytoplasmic shrinkage is the most common morphological change observed in plant PCD, and that harpins and B. cinerea induce this

  10. In Silico and Biochemical Analysis of Physcomitrella patens Photosynthetic Antenna: Identification of Subunits which Evolved upon Land Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Caffarri, Stefano; Nogue, Fabien; Bassi, Roberto; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Background In eukaryotes the photosynthetic antenna system is composed of subunits encoded by the light harvesting complex (Lhc) multigene family. These proteins play a key role in photosynthesis and are involved in both light harvesting and photoprotection. The moss Physcomitrella patens is a member of a lineage that diverged from seed plants early after land colonization and therefore by studying this organism, we may gain insight into adaptations to the aerial environment. Principal Findings In this study, we characterized the antenna protein multigene family in Physcomitrella patens, by sequence analysis as well as biochemical and functional investigations. Sequence identification and analysis showed that some antenna polypeptides, such as Lhcb3 and Lhcb6, are present only in land organisms, suggesting they play a role in adaptation to the sub-aerial environment. Our functional analysis which showed that photo-protective mechanisms in Physcomitrella patens are very similar to those in seed plants fits with this hypothesis. In particular, Physcomitrella patens also activates Non Photochemical Quenching upon illumination, consistent with the detection of an ortholog of the PsbS protein. As a further adaptation to terrestrial conditions, the content of Photosystem I low energy absorbing chlorophylls also increased, as demonstrated by differences in Lhca3 and Lhca4 polypeptide sequences, in vitro reconstitution experiments and low temperature fluorescence spectra. Conclusions This study highlights the role of Lhc family members in environmental adaptation and allowed proteins associated with mechanisms of stress resistance to be identified within this large family. PMID:18446222

  11. Identification of a 4-coumarate:CoA ligase gene family in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Silber, Martina V; Meimberg, Harald; Ebel, Jürgen

    2008-10-01

    Since the early evolution of land plants from primitive green algae, phenylpropanoid compounds have played an important role. In the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL; EC 6.2.1.12) has a pivotal role at the divergence point from general phenylpropanoid metabolism to several major branch pathways. Although higher plant 4CLs have been extensively studied, little information is available on the enzymes from bryophytes. In Physcomitrella patens, we have identified a 4CL gene family consisting of four members, taking advantage of the available EST sequences and a draft sequence of the P. patens genome. The encoded proteins of three of the genes display similar substrate utilization profiles with highest catalytic efficiency towards 4-coumarate. Interestingly, the efficiency with cinnamate as substrate is in the same range as with caffeate and ferulate. The deduced proteins of the four genes share sequence identities between 78% and 86%. The intron/exon structures are pair wise similar. Pp4CL2 and Pp4CL3 each consists of four exons and three introns, whereas Pp4CL1 and Pp4CL4 are characterized each by five exons and four introns. Pp4CL1, Pp4CL2 and Pp4CL3 are expressed in both gametophore and protonema tissue of P. patens, unlike Pp4CL4 whose expression could not be demonstrated under the conditions employed. Phylogenetic analysis suggests an early evolutionary divergence of Pp4CL gene family members. Using Streptomyces coelicolor cinnamate:CoA ligase (ScCCL) as an outgroup, the P. patens 4CLs are clearly separated from the spermatophyte proteins, but are intercalated between the angiosperm 4CL class I and class II. A comparison of three P. patens subspecies from diverse geographical locations shows high sequence identities for the four 4CL isoforms.

  12. Hydroxyproline O-arabinosyltransferase mutants oppositely alter tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana and Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    MacAlister, Cora A; Ortiz-Ramírez, Carlos; Becker, Jörg D; Feijó, José A; Lippman, Zachary B

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyproline O-arabinosyltransferases (HPATs) are members of a small, deeply conserved family of plant-specific glycosyltransferases that add arabinose sugars to diverse proteins including cell wall-associated extensins and small signaling peptides. Recent genetic studies in flowering plants suggest that different HPAT homologs have been co-opted to function in diverse species-specific developmental contexts. However, nothing is known about the roles of HPATs in basal plants. We show that complete loss of HPAT function in Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens results in a shared defect in gametophytic tip cell growth. Arabidopsis hpat1/2/3 triple knockout mutants suffer from a strong male sterility defect as a consequence of pollen tubes that fail to fully elongate following pollination. Knocking out the two HPAT genes of Physcomitrella results in larger multicellular filamentous networks due to increased elongation of protonemal tip cells. Physcomitrella hpat mutants lack cell-wall associated hydroxyproline arabinosides and can be rescued with exogenous cellulose, while global expression profiling shows that cell wall-associated genes are severely misexpressed, implicating a defect in cell wall formation during tip growth. Our findings point to a major role for HPATs in influencing cell elongation during tip growth in plants.

  13. Functional cross-kingdom conservation of mammalian and moss (Physcomitrella patens) transcription, translation and secretion machineries.

    PubMed

    Gitzinger, Marc; Parsons, Juliana; Reski, Ralf; Fussenegger, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Plants and mammals are separated by a huge evolutionary distance. Consequently, biotechnology and genetics have traditionally been divided into 'green' and 'red'. Here, we provide comprehensive evidence that key components of the mammalian transcription, translation and secretion machineries are functional in the model plant Physcomitrella patens. Cross-kingdom compatibility of different expression modalities originally designed for mammalian cells, such as native and synthetic promoters and polyadenylation sites, viral and cellular internal ribosome entry sites, secretion signal peptides and secreted product proteins, and synthetic transactivators and transrepressors, was established. This mammalian expression portfolio enabled constitutive, conditional and autoregulated expression of different product genes in a multicistronic expression format, optionally adjusted by various trigger molecules, such as butyrolactones, macrolide antibiotics and ethanol. Capitalizing on a cross-kingdom-compatible expression platform, we pioneered a prototype biopharmaceutical manufacturing scenario using microencapsulated transgenic P. patens protoplasts cultivated in a Wave Bioreactor. Vascular endothelial growth factor 121 (VEGF(121)) titres matched those typically achieved by standard protonema populations grown in stirred-tank bioreactors. The full compatibility of mammalian expression systems in P. patens further promotes the use of moss as a cost-effective alternative for the manufacture of complex biopharmaceuticals, and as a valuable host system to advance synthetic biology in plants.

  14. A novel plant major intrinsic protein in Physcomitrella patens most similar to bacterial glycerol channels.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Sofia; Lebrun, Anne-Sophie; Nordén, Kristina; Chaumont, François; Johanson, Urban

    2005-09-01

    A gene encoding a novel fifth type of major intrinsic protein (MIP) in plants has been identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Phylogenetic analyses show that this protein, GlpF-like intrinsic protein (GIP1;1), is closely related to a subclass of glycerol transporters in bacteria that in addition to glycerol are highly permeable to water. A likely explanation of the occurrence of this bacterial-like MIP in P. patens is horizontal gene transfer. The expressed P. patens GIP1;1 gene contains five introns and encodes a unique C-loop extension of approximately 110 amino acid residues that has no obvious similarity with any other known protein. Based on alignments and structural comparisons with other MIPs, GIP1;1 is suggested to have retained the permeability for glycerol but not for water. Studies on heterologously expressed GIP1;1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirm the predicted substrate specificity. Interestingly, proteins of one of the plant-specific subgroups of MIPs, the NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, are also facilitating the transport of glycerol and have previously been suggested to have evolved from a horizontally transferred bacterial gene. Further studies on localization and searches for GIP1;1 homologs in other plants will clarify the function and significance of this new plant MIP.

  15. Unexpected complexity of the Aquaporin gene family in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Jonas ÅH; Johanson, Urban

    2008-01-01

    Background Aquaporins, also called major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), constitute an ancient superfamily of channel proteins that facilitate the transport of water and small solutes across cell membranes. MIPs are found in almost all living organisms and are particularly abundant in plants where they form a divergent group of proteins able to transport a wide selection of substrates. Results Analyses of the whole genome of Physcomitrella patens resulted in the identification of 23 MIPs, belonging to seven different subfamilies, of which only five have been previously described. Of the newly discovered subfamilies one was only identified in P. patens (Hybrid Intrinsic Protein, HIP) whereas the other was found to be present in a wide variety of dicotyledonous plants and forms a major previously unrecognized MIP subfamily (X Intrinsic Proteins, XIPs). Surprisingly also some specific groups within subfamilies present in Arabidopsis thaliana and Zea mays could be identified in P. patens. Conclusion Our results suggest an early diversification of MIPs resulting in a large number of subfamilies already in primitive terrestrial plants. During the evolution of higher plants some of these subfamilies were subsequently lost while the remaining subfamilies expanded and in some cases diversified, resulting in the formation of more specialized groups within these subfamilies. PMID:18430224

  16. Characterization of a PDK1 homologue from the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Anna C Nelson; Devarenne, Timothy P

    2012-02-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) is a highly conserved eukaryotic kinase that is a central regulator of many AGC kinase subfamily members. Through its regulation of AGC kinases, PDK1 controls many basic cellular processes, from translation to cell survival. While many of these PDK1-regulated processes are conserved across kingdoms, it is not well understood how PDK1 may have evolved within kingdoms. In order to better understand PDK1 evolution within plants, we have isolated and characterized the PDK1 gene from the moss Physcomitrella patens (PpPDK1), a nonvascular representative of early land plants. PpPDK1 is similar to other plant PDK1s in that it can functionally complement a yeast PDK1 knockout line. However, unlike PDK1 from other plants, the P. patens PDK1 protein does not bind phospholipids due to a lack of the lipid-binding pleckstrin homology domain, which is used for lipid-mediated regulation of PDK1 activity. Sequence analysis of several PDK1 proteins suggests that lipid regulation of PDK1 may not commonly occur in algae and nonvascular land plants. PpPDK1 can phosphorylate AGC kinase substrates from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and P. patens at the predicted PDK1 phosphorylation site, indicating that the PpPDK1 substrate phosphorylation site is conserved with higher plants. We have also identified residues within the PpPDK1 kinase domain that affect kinase activity and show that a mutant with highly reduced kinase activity can still confer cell viability in both yeast and P. patens. These studies lay the foundation for further analysis of the evolution of PDK1 within plants.

  17. Cloning and characterization of chalcone synthase from the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenguang; Schommer, Clark K; Kim, Sun Young; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2006-12-01

    Since the early evolution of land plants from primitive green algae, flavonoids have played an important role as UV protective pigments in plants. Flavonoids occur in liverworts and mosses, and the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthesis is catalyzed by chalcone synthase (CHS). Although higher plant CHSs have been extensively studied, little information is available on the enzymes from bryophytes. Here we report the cloning and characterization of CHS from the moss, Physcomitrella patens. Taking advantage of the available P. patens EST sequences, a CHS (PpCHS) was cloned from the gametophores of P. patens, and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. PpCHS exhibited similar kinetic properties and substrate preference profile to those of higher plant CHS. p-Coumaroyl-CoA was the most preferred substrate, suggesting that PpCHS is a naringenin chalcone producing CHS. Consistent with the evolutionary position of the moss, phylogenetic analysis placed PpCHS at the base of the plant CHS clade, next to the microorganism CHS-like gene products. Therefore, PpCHS likely represents a modern day version of one of the oldest CHSs that appeared on earth. Further, sequence analysis of the P. patens EST and genome databases revealed the presence of a CHS multigene family in the moss as well as the 3'-end heterogeneity of a CHS gene. Of the 19 putative CHS genes, 10 genes are expressed and have corresponding ESTs in the databases. A possibility of the functional divergence of the multiple CHS genes in the moss is discussed.

  18. The Molecular and Physiological Responses of Physcomitrella patens to Ultraviolet-B Radiation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Luise; Rizzini, Luca; Stracke, Ralf; Ulm, Roman; Rensing, Stefan A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation present in sunlight is an important trigger of photomorphogenic acclimation and stress responses in sessile land plants. Although numerous moss species grow in unshaded habitats, our understanding of their UV-B responses is very limited. The genome of the model moss Physcomitrella patens, which grows in sun-exposed open areas, encodes signaling and metabolic components that are implicated in the UV-B response in flowering plants. In this study, we describe the response of P. patens to UV-B radiation at the morphological and molecular levels. We find that P. patens is more capable of surviving UV-B stress than Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and describe the differential expression of approximately 400 moss genes in response to UV-B radiation. A comparative analysis of the UV-B response in P. patens and Arabidopsis reveals both distinct and conserved pathways. PMID:20427465

  19. The Moss Physcomitrella patens as a Model System to Study Interactions between Plants and Phytopathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Ponce de León, Inés

    2011-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens has a great potential as a model system to perform functional studies of plant interacting with microbial pathogens. P. patens is susceptible to fungal and oomycete infection, which colonize and multiply in plant tissues generating disease symptoms. In response to infection, P. patens activates defense mechanisms similar to those induced in flowering plants, including the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, cell death with hallmarks of programmed cell death, cell wall fortification, and induction of defense-related genes like PAL, LOX, CHS, and PR-1. Functional analysis of genes with possible roles in defense can be performed due to the high rate of homologous recombination present in this plant that enables targeted gene disruption. This paper reviews the current knowledge of defense responses activated in P. patens after pathogen assault and analyzes the advantages of using this plant to gain further insight into plant defense strategies. PMID:22567339

  20. A complementation assay for in vivo protein structure/function analysis in Physcomitrella patens (Funariaceae)

    DOE PAGES

    Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R.; Chaves, Arielle M.; Roberts, Alison W.

    2015-07-14

    Here, a method for rapid in vivo functional analysis of engineered proteins was developed using Physcomitrella patens. A complementation assay was designed for testing structure/function relationships in cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins. The components of the assay include (1) construction of test vectors that drive expression of epitope-tagged PpCESA5 carrying engineered mutations, (2) transformation of a ppcesa5 knockout line that fails to produce gametophores with test and control vectors, (3) scoring the stable transformants for gametophore production, (4) statistical analysis comparing complementation rates for test vectors to positive and negative control vectors, and (5) analysis of transgenic protein expression by Westernmore » blotting. The assay distinguished mutations that generate fully functional, nonfunctional, and partially functional proteins. In conclusion, compared with existing methods for in vivo testing of protein function, this complementation assay provides a rapid method for investigating protein structure/function relationships in plants.« less

  1. Simple and Efficient Targeting of Multiple Genes Through CRISPR-Cas9 in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Obando, Mauricio; Hoffmann, Beate; Géry, Carine; Guyon-Debast, Anouchka; Téoulé, Evelyne; Rameau, Catherine; Bonhomme, Sandrine; Nogué, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Powerful genome editing technologies are needed for efficient gene function analysis. The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted as an efficient gene-knock-out technology in a variety of species. However, in a number of situations, knocking out or modifying a single gene is not sufficient; this is particularly true for genes belonging to a common family, or for genes showing redundant functions. Like many plants, the model organism Physcomitrella patens has experienced multiple events of polyploidization during evolution that has resulted in a number of families of duplicated genes. Here, we report a robust CRISPR-Cas9 system, based on the codelivery of a CAS9 expressing cassette, multiple sgRNA vectors, and a cassette for transient transformation selection, for gene knock-out in multiple gene families. We demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated targeting of five different genes allows the selection of a quintuple mutant, and all possible subcombinations of mutants, in one experiment, with no mutations detected in potential off-target sequences. Furthermore, we confirmed the observation that the presence of repeats in the vicinity of the cutting region favors deletion due to the alternative end joining pathway, for which induced frameshift mutations can be potentially predicted. Because the number of multiple gene families in Physcomitrella is substantial, this tool opens new perspectives to study the role of expanded gene families in the colonization of land by plants. PMID:27613750

  2. Physcomitrella patens activates reinforcement of the cell wall, programmed cell death and accumulation of evolutionary conserved defense signals...upon Botrytis cinerea infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an evolutionarily basal model system suitable to analyze plant defense responses activated after pathogen assault. Upon infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), several defense mechanisms are induced in P. patens, including the fortification of t...

  3. A CELLULOSE SYNTHASE (CESA) gene essential for gametophore morphogenesis in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Goss, Chessa A; Brockmann, Derek J; Bushoven, John T; Roberts, Alison W

    2012-06-01

    In seed plants, different groups of orthologous genes encode the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE (CESA) proteins that are responsible for cellulose biosynthesis in primary and secondary cell walls. The seven CESA sequences of the moss Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B. S. G. form a monophyletic sister group to seed plant CESAs, consistent with independent CESA diversification and specialization in moss and seed plant lines. The role of PpCESA5 in the development of P. patens was investigated by targeted mutagenesis. The cesa5 knockout lines were tested for cellulose deficiency using carbohydrate-binding module affinity cytochemistry and the morphology of the leafy gametophores was analyzed by 3D reconstruction of confocal images. No defects were identified in the development of the filamentous protonema or in production of bud initials that normally give rise to the leafy gametophores. However, the gametophore buds were cellulose deficient and defects in subsequent cell expansion, cytokinesis, and leaf initiation resulted in the formation of irregular cell clumps instead of leafy shoots. Analysis of the cesa5 knockout phenotype indicates that a biophysical model of organogenesis can be extended to the moss gametophore shoot apical meristem.

  4. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of the sporophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Martin-Timothy; Chater, Caspar; Wallace, Simon; Gray, Julie E; Beerling, David J; Fleming, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    Bryophytes, the most basal of the extant land plants, diverged at least 450 million years ago. A major feature of these plants is the biphasic alternation of generations between a dominant haploid gametophyte and a minor diploid sporophyte phase. These dramatic differences in form and function occur in a constant genetic background, raising the question of whether the switch from gametophyte-to-sporophyte development reflects major changes in the spectrum of genes being expressed or alternatively whether only limited changes in gene expression occur and the differences in plant form are due to differences in how the gene products are put together. This study performed replicated microarray analyses of RNA from several thousand dissected and developmentally staged sporophytes of the moss Physcomitrella patens, allowing analysis of the transcriptomes of the sporophyte and early gametophyte, as well as the early stages of moss sporophyte development. The data indicate that more significant changes in transcript profile occur during the switch from gametophyte to sporophyte than recently reported, with over 12% of the entire transcriptome of P. patens being altered during this major developmental transition. Analysis of the types of genes contributing to these differences supports the view of the early sporophyte being energetically and nutritionally dependent on the gametophyte, provides a profile of homologues to genes involved in angiosperm stomatal development and physiology which suggests a deeply conserved mechanism of stomatal control, and identifies a novel series of transcription factors associated with moss sporophyte development.

  5. Eight types of stem cells in the life cycle of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kofuji, Rumiko; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-02-01

    Stem cells self-renew and produce cells that differentiate to become the source of the plant body. The moss Physcomitrella patens forms eight types of stem cells during its life cycle and serves as a useful model in which to explore the evolution of such cells. The common ancestor of land plants is inferred to have been haplontic and to have formed stem cells only in the gametophyte generation. A single stem cell would have been maintained in the ancestral gametophyte meristem, as occurs in extant basal land plants. During land plant evolution, stem cells diverged in the gametophyte generation to form different types of body parts, including the protonema and rhizoid filaments, leafy-shoot and thalloid gametophores, and gametangia formed in moss. A simplex meristem with a single stem cell was acquired in the sporophyte generation early in land plant evolution. Subsequently, sporophyte stem cells became multiple in the meristem and were elaborated further in seed plant lineages, although the evolutionary origin of niche cells, which maintain stem cells is unknown. Comparisons of gene regulatory networks are expected to give insights into the general mechanisms of stem cell formation and maintenance in land plants and provide information about their evolution. P. patens develops at least seven types of simplex meristem in the gametophyte and at least one type in the sporophyte generation and is a good material for regulatory network comparisons. In this review, we summarize recently revealed molecular mechanisms of stem cell initiation and maintenance in the moss.

  6. Giant peroxisomes in a moss (Physcomitrella patens) peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 mutant.

    PubMed

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Mitsuya, Shiro; El-Shami, Mahmoud; Knight, Celia D; Cuming, Andrew C; Baker, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 (PEX11) proteins are found in yeasts, mammals and plants, and play a role in peroxisome morphology and regulation of peroxisome division. The moss Physcomitrella patens has six PEX11 isoforms which fall into two subfamilies, similar to those found in monocots and dicots. We carried out targeted gene disruption of the Phypa_PEX11-1 gene and compared the morphological and cellular phenotypes of the wild-type and mutant strains. The mutant grew more slowly and the development of gametophores was retarded. Mutant chloronemal filaments contained large cellular structures which excluded all other cellular organelles. Expression of fluorescent reporter proteins revealed that the mutant strain had greatly enlarged peroxisomes up to 10 μm in diameter. Expression of a vacuolar membrane marker confirmed that the enlarged structures were not vacuoles, or peroxisomes sequestered within vacuoles as a result of pexophagy. Phypa_PEX11 targeted to peroxisome membranes could rescue the knock out phenotype and interacted with Fission1 on the peroxisome membrane. Moss PEX11 functions in peroxisome division similar to PEX11 in other organisms but the mutant phenotype is more extreme and environmentally determined, making P. patens a powerful system in which to address mechanisms of peroxisome proliferation and division.

  7. Endogenous Small-Noncoding RNAs and Potential Functions in Desiccation Tolerance in Physcomitrella Patens

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Xiaoqin; Perroud, Pierre-François; He, Yikun; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhang, Weixiong

    2016-01-01

    Early land plants like moss Physcomitrella patens have developed remarkable drought tolerance. Phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) protects seeds during water stress by activating genes through transcription factors such as ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE (ABI3). Small noncoding RNA (sncRNA), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small-interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), are key gene regulators in eukaryotes, playing critical roles in stress tolerance in plants. Combining next-generation sequencing and computational analysis, we profiled and characterized sncRNA species from two ABI3 deletion mutants and the wild type P. patens that were subject to ABA treatment in dehydration and rehydration stages. Small RNA profiling using deep sequencing helped identify 22 novel miRNAs and 6 genomic loci producing trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) including TAS3a to TAS3e and TAS6. Data from degradome profiling showed that ABI3 genes (ABI3a/b/c) are potentially regulated by the plant-specific miR536 and that other ABA-relevant genes are regulated by miRNAs and ta-siRNAs. We also observed broad variations of miRNAs and ta-siRNAs expression across different stages, suggesting that they could potentially influence desiccation tolerance. This study provided evidence on the potential roles of sncRNA in mediating desiccation-responsive pathways in early land plants. PMID:27443635

  8. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of the sporophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    O’Donoghue, Martin-Timothy; Chater, Caspar; Wallace, Simon; Gray, Julie E.; Beerling, David J.; Fleming, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Bryophytes, the most basal of the extant land plants, diverged at least 450 million years ago. A major feature of these plants is the biphasic alternation of generations between a dominant haploid gametophyte and a minor diploid sporophyte phase. These dramatic differences in form and function occur in a constant genetic background, raising the question of whether the switch from gametophyte-to-sporophyte development reflects major changes in the spectrum of genes being expressed or alternatively whether only limited changes in gene expression occur and the differences in plant form are due to differences in how the gene products are put together. This study performed replicated microarray analyses of RNA from several thousand dissected and developmentally staged sporophytes of the moss Physcomitrella patens, allowing analysis of the transcriptomes of the sporophyte and early gametophyte, as well as the early stages of moss sporophyte development. The data indicate that more significant changes in transcript profile occur during the switch from gametophyte to sporophyte than recently reported, with over 12% of the entire transcriptome of P. patens being altered during this major developmental transition. Analysis of the types of genes contributing to these differences supports the view of the early sporophyte being energetically and nutritionally dependent on the gametophyte, provides a profile of homologues to genes involved in angiosperm stomatal development and physiology which suggests a deeply conserved mechanism of stomatal control, and identifies a novel series of transcription factors associated with moss sporophyte development. PMID:23888066

  9. Immuno and Affinity Cytochemical Analysis of Cell Wall Composition in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Elizabeth A.; Tran, Mai L.; Dimos, Christos S.; Budziszek, Michael J.; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R.; Roberts, Alison W.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalactuonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants. PMID:27014284

  10. In vivo assembly of DNA-fragments in the moss, Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    King, Brian Christopher; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Ikram, Nur Kusaira Binti Khairul; Schrøder, Josephine; Scharff, Lars B.; Hamberger, Björn; Jensen, Poul Erik; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Direct assembly of multiple linear DNA fragments via homologous recombination, a phenomenon known as in vivo assembly or transformation associated recombination, is used in biotechnology to assemble DNA constructs ranging in size from a few kilobases to full synthetic microbial genomes. It has also enabled the complete replacement of eukaryotic chromosomes with heterologous DNA. The moss Physcomitrella patens, a non-vascular and spore producing land plant (Bryophyte), has a well-established capacity for homologous recombination. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo assembly of multiple DNA fragments in P. patens with three examples of effective genome editing: we (i) efficiently deleted a genomic locus for diterpenoid metabolism yielding a biosynthetic knockout, (ii) introduced a salt inducible promoter, and (iii) re-routed endogenous metabolism into the formation of amorphadiene, a precursor of high-value therapeutics. These proof-of-principle experiments pave the way for more complex and increasingly flexible approaches for large-scale metabolic engineering in plant biotechnology. PMID:27126800

  11. Immuno and Affinity Cytochemical Analysis of Cell Wall Composition in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    DOE PAGES

    Berry, Elizabeth A.; Tran, Mai L.; Dimos, Christos S.; ...

    2016-03-08

    In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into severalmore » different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalactuonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants.« less

  12. Immuno and Affinity Cytochemical Analysis of Cell Wall Composition in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Elizabeth A.; Tran, Mai L.; Dimos, Christos S.; Budziszek, Michael J.; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R.; Roberts, Alison W.

    2016-03-08

    In contrast to homeohydric vascular plants, mosses employ a poikilohydric strategy for surviving in the dry aerial environment. A detailed understanding of the structure, composition, and development of moss cell walls can contribute to our understanding of not only the evolution of overall cell wall complexity, but also the differences that have evolved in response to selection for different survival strategies. The model moss species Physcomitrella patens has a predominantly haploid lifecycle consisting of protonemal filaments that regenerate from protoplasts and enlarge by tip growth, and leafy gametophores composed of cells that enlarge by diffuse growth and differentiate into several different types. Advantages for genetic studies include methods for efficient targeted gene modification and extensive genomic resources. Immuno and affinity cytochemical labeling were used to examine the distribution of polysaccharides and proteins in regenerated protoplasts, protonemal filaments, rhizoids, and sectioned gametophores of P. patens. The cell wall composition of regenerated protoplasts was also characterized by flow cytometry. Crystalline cellulose was abundant in the cell walls of regenerating protoplasts and protonemal cells that developed on media of high osmolarity, whereas homogalactuonan was detected in the walls of protonemal cells that developed on low osmolarity media and not in regenerating protoplasts. Mannan was the major hemicellulose detected in all tissues tested. Arabinogalactan proteins were detected in different cell types by different probes, consistent with structural heterogneity. The results reveal developmental and cell type specific differences in cell wall composition and provide a basis for analyzing cell wall phenotypes in knockout mutants.

  13. RECA plays a dual role in the maintenance of chloroplast genome stability in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Odahara, Masaki; Inouye, Takayuki; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) encodes essential genes for chloroplast functions, including photosynthesis. Homologous recombination occurs frequently in cpDNA; however, its significance and underlying mechanism remain poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the role of a nuclear-encoded chloroplast-localized homolog of RecA recombinase, which is a key factor in homologous recombination in bacteria, in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Complete knockout (KO) of the P. patens chloroplast RecA homolog RECA2 caused a modest growth defect and conferred sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate and UV. The KO mutant exhibited low recovery of cpDNA from methyl methanesulfonate damage, suggesting that RECA2 knockout impairs repair of damaged cpDNA. The RECA2 KO mutant also exhibited reduced cpDNA copy number and an elevated level of cpDNA molecule resulting from aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats (13-63 bp), indicating that the RECA2 KO chloroplast genome was destabilized. Taken together, these data suggest a dual role for RECA2 in the maintenance of chloroplast genome stability: RECA2 suppresses aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats and promotes repair of damaged DNA.

  14. Defective Kernel 1 (DEK1) is required for three-dimensional growth in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Pierre-François; Demko, Viktor; Johansen, Wenche; Wilson, Robert C; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Quatrano, Ralph S

    2014-01-01

    Orientation of cell division is critical for plant morphogenesis. This is evident in the formation and function of meristems and for morphogenetic transitions. Mosses undergo such transitions: from two-dimensional tip-growing filaments (protonema) to the generation of three-dimensional leaf-like structures (gametophores). The Defective Kernel 1 (DEK1) protein plays a key role in the perception of and/or response to positional cues that specify the formation and function of the epidermal layer in developing seeds of flowering plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens contains the highly conserved DEK1 gene. Using efficient gene targeting, we generated a precise PpDEK1 deletion (Δdek1), which resulted in normal filamentous growth of protonema. Two distinct mutant phenotypes were observed: an excess of buds on the protonema, and abnormal cell divisions in the emerging buds resulting in developmental arrest and the absence of three-dimensional growth. Overexpression of a complete PpDEK1 cDNA, or the calpain domain of PpDEK1 alone, successfully complements both phenotypes. These results in P. patens demonstrate the morphogenetic importance of the DEK1 protein in the control of oriented cell divisions. As it is not for protonema, it will allow dissection of the structure/function relationships of the different domains of DEK1 using gene targeting in null mutant background. PMID:24844771

  15. Characterization of the GPI-anchored lipid transfer proteins in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Edstam, Monika M; Laurila, Maiju; Höglund, Andrey; Raman, Amitha; Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A; Edqvist, Johan; Blomqvist, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are characterized by a compact structure with a central hydrophobic cavity very suitable for binding hydrophobic ligands, such as lipids. The nsLTPs are encoded by large gene families in all land plant lineages, but seem to be absent from green algae. The nsLTPs are classified to different types based on molecular weight, sequence similarity, intron position or spacing between the cysteine residues. The Type G nsLTPs (LTPGs) have a GPI-anchor in the C-terminal region which may attach the protein to the exterior side of the plasma membrane. Here, we present the first characterization of nsLTPs from an early diverged plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss LTPGs were heterologously produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. The purified moss LTPGs were found to be extremely heat stable and showed a binding preference for unsaturated fatty acids. Structural modeling implied that high alanine content could be important for the heat stability. Lipid profiling revealed that cutin monomers, such as C16 and C18 mono- and di-hydroxylated fatty acids, could be identified in P. patens. Expression of a moss LTPG-YFP fusion revealed localization to the plasma membrane. The expressions of many of the moss LTPGs were found to be upregulated during drought and cold treatments.

  16. Identification and functional analysis of bifunctional ent-kaurene synthase from the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Notomi, Miho; Sakigi, Yuka; Matsuo, Akihiko; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2006-11-13

    ent-Kaurene is the key intermediate in biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs), plant hormones. In higher plants, ent-kaurene is synthesized successively by copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS) from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). On the other hand, fungal ent-kaurene synthases are bifunctional cyclases with both CPS and KS activity in a single polypeptide. The moss Physcomitrella patens is a model organism for the study of genetics and development in an early land plant. We identified ent-kaurene synthase (PpCPS/KS) from P. patens and analyzed its function. PpCPS/KS cDNA encodes a 101-kDa polypeptide, and shows high similarity with CPSs and abietadiene synthase from higher plants. PpCPS/KS is a bifunctional cyclase and, like fungal CPS/KS, directly synthesizes the ent-kaurene skeleton from GGDP. PpCPS/KS has two aspartate-rich DVDD and DDYFD motifs observed in CPS and KS, respectively. The mutational analysis of two conserved motifs in PpCPS/KS indicated that the DVDD motif is responsible for CPS activity (GGDP to CDP) and the DDYFD motif for KS activity (CDP to ent-kaurene and ent-16alpha-hydroxykaurene).

  17. A multifunctional lipoxygenase with fatty acid hydroperoxide cleaving activity from the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Senger, Toralf; Wichard, Thomas; Kunze, Susan; Göbel, Cornelia; Lerchl, Jens; Pohnert, Georg; Feussner, Ivo

    2005-03-04

    A complex mixture of fatty acid-derived aldehydes, ketones, and alcohols is released upon wounding of the moss Physcomitrella patens. To investigate the formation of these oxylipins at the molecular level we isolated a lipoxygenase from P. patens, which was identified in an EST library by sequence homology to lipoxygenases from plants. Sequence analysis of the cDNA showed that it exhibits a domain structure similar to that of type2 lipoxygenases from plants, harboring an N-terminal import signal for chloroplasts. The recombinant protein was identified as arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase and linoleate 13-lipoxygenase with a preference for arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. In contrast to any other lipoxygenase cloned so far, this enzyme exhibited in addition an unusual high hydroperoxidase and also a fatty acid chain-cleaving lyase activity. Because of these unique features the pronounced formation of (2Z)-octen-1-ol, 1-octen-3-ol, the dienal (5Z,8Z,10E)-12-oxo-dodecatrienoic acid and 12-keto eicosatetraenoic acid was observed when arachidonic acid was administered as substrate. 12-Hydroperoxy eicosatetraenoic acid was found to be only a minor product. Moreover, the P. patens LOX has a relaxed substrate tolerance accepting C(18)-C(22) fatty acids giving rise to even more LOX-derived products. In contrast to other lipoxygenases a highly diverse product spectrum is formed by a single enzyme accounting for most of the observed oxylipins produced by the moss. This single enzyme might, in a fast and effective way, be involved in the formation of signal and/or defense molecules thus contributing to the broad resistance of mosses against pathogens.

  18. Two novel Physcomitrella patens fatty acid elongases (ELOs): identification and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Eiamsa-Ard, Pradinunt; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit; Cahoon, Edgar B; Chodok, Pichit; Kaewsuwan, Sireewan

    2013-04-01

    The lower plant Physcomitrella patens synthesizes several long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) by a series of desaturation and elongation reactions. In the present study, the full-length cDNAs for two novel fatty acid elongases designated PpELO1 and PpELO2 were isolated from P. patens using a PCR-based cloning strategy. These cDNAs encoding proteins of 335 and 280 amino acids with predicted molecular masses of 38.7 and 32.9 kDa, respectively, are predicted to contain seven transmembrane domains with a possible localization in the subcellular endoplasmic reticulum. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that they are closely related to other LC-PUFA elongases of the lower eukaryotes such as the Δ(5)- and Δ(6)-elongases of Marchantia polymorpha as well as the Δ(6)-elongase of P. patens. Heterologous expression of the PpELO1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae led to the elongation of Δ(9)-, Δ(6)-C18, and Δ(5)-C20 LC-PUFAs, whereas only Δ(9)- and Δ(6)-C18 LC-PUFA substrates were used by PpELO2. Chimeric proteins were constructed to identify the amino acid regions most likely to be involved in the determination of the fatty acid substrate specificity. The expression of eight chimeric proteins in yeast revealed that substitution of the C-terminal 50 amino acids from PpELO1 into PpELO2 resulted in a high specificity for C20 fatty acid substrates. As a result, we suggest that the C-terminal region of PpELO1 is sufficient for C20 substrate elongation. Overall, these results provide important insights into the structural basis for substrate specificity of PUFA-generating ELO enzymes.

  19. An experimental method to facilitate the identification of hybrid sporophytes in the moss Physcomitrella patens using fluorescent tagged lines

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Pierre-François; Cove, David J.; Quatrano, Ralph S.; McDaniel, Stuart F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The sequencing of the Physcomitrella patens genome, combined with the high frequency of gene targeting in this species, makes it ideal for reverse genetic studies. For forward genetic studies, experimental crosses and genetic analysis of progeny are essential.Since P. patens is monoicous, producing both male and female gametes on the same gametophore, and undergoing self-fertilization at a high frequency, the identification of crossed sporophytes is difficult. Usually spores from many sporophytes from a mixed culture must be testsed for the production of recombinant progeny.Here, we describe the use of transgenic lines that express a fluorescent transgene constitutively, to provide a direct visual screen for hybrid sporophytes.We show that segregations in crosses obtained with this technique are as expected, and demonstrate its utility for the study of the rate of outcrossing between three isolates of P. patens. PMID:21366596

  20. Hormonal diterpenoids derived from ent-kaurenoic acid are involved in the blue-light avoidance response of Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid hormones that regulate growth and development in flowering plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens has part of the GA biosynthetic pathway from geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurenoic acid via ent-kaurene, but it does not produce GA. Disruption of the ent-kaurene synthase gene in P. patens suppressed caulonemal differentiation. Application of ent-kaurene or ent-kaurenoic acid restored differentiation, suggesting that derivative(s) of ent-kaurenoic acid, but not GAs, are endogenous regulator(s) of caulonemal cell differentiation. The protonemal growth of P. patens shows an avoidance response under unilateral blue light. Physiological studies using gene mutants involved in ent-kaurene biosynthesis confirmed that diterpenoid(s) regulate the blue-light response. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings, and provide data for the ent-kaurene oxidase gene-disrupted mutant.

  1. The chromatin landscape of the moss Physcomitrella patens and its dynamics during development and drought stress.

    PubMed

    Widiez, Thomas; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Luo, Chongyuan; Lam, Eric; Lawton, Michael; Rensing, Stefan A

    2014-07-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an important model organism for evo-devo studies. Here, we determined the genome-wide chromatin landscape of five important histone three (H3) modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3, H3K27Ac, H3K9Ac and H3K9me2) and describe the changes to these histone marks in two contrasted situations, developmental transition and abiotic (drought) stress. Integrative analysis of these histone H3 modifications revealed their preferential association into 15 chromatin states (CS) in genic regions of the P. patens genome. Synergistic relationships that influence expression levels were revealed for the three activating marks H3K4me3, H3K27Ac and H3K9Ac, while an antagonistic relationship was found between CS containing the H3K27me3 and H3K27Ac marks, suggesting that H3K27 is a key indexing residue regarding transcriptional output. Concerning the alteration of histone marks in response to developmental transition (juvenile to adult) and drought stress, the three activating marks H3K4me3, H3K27Ac and H3K9Ac show significant changes in both situations. However, changes to H3K27me3 are central only for genes differentially expressed during development. Interestingly, genes induced during drought stress show significant histone mark toggling during developmental transition. This situation suggests that drought induced adult (gametophore expressed) genes are primed to respond to this stress during the juvenile to adult transition.

  2. Strigolactones inhibit caulonema elongation and cell division in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Beate; Proust, Hélène; Belcram, Katia; Labrune, Cécile; Boyer, François-Didier; Rameau, Catherine; Bonhomme, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    In vascular plants, strigolactones (SLs) are known for their hormonal role and for their role as signal molecules in the rhizosphere. SLs are also produced by the moss Physcomitrella patens, in which they act as signaling factors for controlling filament extension and possibly interaction with neighboring individuals. To gain a better understanding of SL action at the cellular level, we investigated the effect of exogenously added molecules (SLs or analogs) in moss growth media. We used the previously characterized Ppccd8 mutant that is deficient in SL synthesis and showed that SLs affect moss protonema extension by reducing caulonema cell elongation and mainly cell division rate, both in light and dark conditions. Based on this effect, we set up bioassays to examine chemical structure requirements for SL activity in moss. The results suggest that compounds GR24, GR5, and 5-deoxystrigol are active in moss (as in pea), while other analogs that are highly active in the control of pea branching show little activity in moss. Interestingly, the karrikinolide KAR1, which shares molecular features with SLs, did not have any effect on filament growth, even though the moss genome contains several genes homologous to KAI2 (encoding the KAR1 receptor) and no canonical homologue to D14 (encoding the SL receptor). Further studies should investigate whether SL signaling pathways have been conserved during land plant evolution.

  3. AP2-type transcription factors determine stem cell identity in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Shigyo, Mikao; Kofuji, Rumiko; Kubo, Minoru; Ito, Motomi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2012-09-01

    Stem cells are formed at particular times and positions during the development of multicellular organisms. Whereas flowering plants form stem cells only in the sporophyte generation, non-seed plants form stem cells in both the sporophyte and gametophyte generations. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying stem cell formation in the sporophyte generation have been extensively studied, only a few transcription factors involved in the regulation of gametophyte stem cell formation have been reported. The moss Physcomitrella patens forms a hypha-like body (protonema) and a shoot-like body (gametophore) from a protonema apical cell and a gametophore apical cell, respectively. These apical cells have stem cell characteristics and are formed as side branches of differentiated protonema cells. Here, we show that four AP2-type transcription factors orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana AINTEGUMENTA, PLETHORA and BABY BOOM (APB) are indispensable for the formation of gametophore apical cells from protonema cells. Quadruple disruption of all APB genes blocked gametophore formation, even in the presence of cytokinin, which enhances gametophore apical cell formation in the wild type. All APB genes were expressed in emerging gametophore apical cells, but not in protonema apical cells. Heat-shock induction of an APB4 transgene driven by a heat-shock promoter increased the number of gametophores. Expression of all APB genes was induced by auxin but not by cytokinin. Thus, the APB genes function synergistically with cytokinin signaling to determine the identity of the two types of stem cells.

  4. Cell-specific transcriptomic analyses of three-dimensional shoot development in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Frank, Margaret H; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Haploid moss gametophytes harbor distinct stem cell types, including tip cells that divide in single planes to generate filamentous protonemata, and bud cells that divide in three planes to yield axial gametophore shoots. This transition from filamentous to triplanar growth occurs progressively during the moss life cycle, and is thought to mirror evolution of the first terrestrial plants from Charophycean green algal ancestors. The innovation of morphologically complex plant body plans facilitated colonization of the vertical landscape, and enabled development of complex vegetative and reproductive plant morphologies. Despite its profound evolutionary significance, the molecular programs involved in this transition from filamentous to triplanar meristematic plant growth are poorly understood. In this study, we used single-cell type transcriptomics to identify more than 4000 differentially expressed genes that distinguish uniplanar protonematal tip cells from multiplanar gametophore bud cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens. While the transcriptomes of both tip and bud cells show molecular signatures of proliferative cells, the bud cell transcriptome exhibits a wider variety of genes with significantly increased transcript abundances. Our data suggest that combined expression of genes involved in shoot patterning and asymmetric cell division accompanies the transition from uniplanar to triplanar meristematic growth in moss.

  5. Profilin is essential for tip growth in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Luis; Augustine, Robert C; Kleinman, Ken P; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2007-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is critical for tip growth in plants. Profilin is the main monomer actin binding protein in plant cells. The moss Physcomitrella patens has three profilin genes, which are monophyletic, suggesting a single ancestor for plant profilins. Here, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to determine the loss-of-function phenotype of profilin. Reduction of profilin leads to a complete loss of tip growth and a partial inhibition of cell division, resulting in plants with small rounded cells and fewer cells. We silenced all profilins by targeting their 3' untranslated region sequences, enabling complementation analyses by expression of profilin coding sequences. We show that any moss or a lily (Lilium longiflorum) profilin support tip growth. Profilin with a mutation in its actin binding site is unable to rescue profilin RNAi, while a mutation in the poly-l-proline binding site weakly rescues. We show that moss tip growing cells contain a prominent subapical cortical F-actin structure composed of parallel actin cables. Cells lacking profilin lose this structure; instead, their F-actin is disorganized and forms polarized cortical patches. Plants expressing the actin and poly-l-proline binding mutants exhibited similar F-actin disorganization. These results demonstrate that profilin and its binding to actin are essential for tip growth. Additionally, profilin is not needed for formation of F-actin, but profilin and its interactions with actin and poly-l-proline ligands are required to properly organize F-actin.

  6. An ancestral stomatal patterning module revealed in the non-vascular land plant Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Chater, Caspar C.; Kamisugi, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    The patterning of stomata plays a vital role in plant development and has emerged as a paradigm for the role of peptide signals in the spatial control of cellular differentiation. Research in Arabidopsis has identified a series of epidermal patterning factors (EPFs), which interact with an array of membrane-localised receptors and associated proteins (encoded by ERECTA and TMM genes) to control stomatal density and distribution. However, although it is well-established that stomata arose very early in the evolution of land plants, until now it has been unclear whether the established angiosperm stomatal patterning system represented by the EPF/TMM/ERECTA module reflects a conserved, universal mechanism in the plant kingdom. Here, we use molecular genetics to show that the moss Physcomitrella patens has conserved homologues of angiosperm EPF, TMM and at least one ERECTA gene that function together to permit the correct patterning of stomata and that, moreover, elements of the module retain function when transferred to Arabidopsis. Our data characterise the stomatal patterning system in an evolutionarily distinct branch of plants and support the hypothesis that the EPF/TMM/ERECTA module represents an ancient patterning system. PMID:27407102

  7. Physcomitrella patens DNA methyltransferase 2 is required for recovery from salt and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Arya, Deepshikha; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2016-02-01

    DNA methyltransferase 2 (DNMT2) unlike other members of the cytosine DNA methyltransferase gene family has dual substrate specificity and it methylates cytosines in both the DNA and transfer RNA (tRNA). Its role in plants, however, has remained obscure to date. In this study, we demonstrate that DNMT2 from Physcomitrella patens accumulates in a temporal manner under salt and osmotic stress showing maximum accumulation during recovery, i.e. 24 h after plants are transferred to normal growth medium. Therefore, to study its role in stress tolerance, we generated PpDNMT2 targeted knockout plants (ppdnmt2ko). Mutant plants show increased sensitivity to salt and osmotic stress and are unable to recover even after 21 days of growth on optimal growth media. ppdnmt2ko, however, accumulate normal levels of dehydrin-like and small heat shock protein encoding transcripts under stress but show dramatic reduction in levels of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) . The levels of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) , in contrast, increase ~ 25-30-fold in ppdnmt2ko under non-stress conditions and > 1200-fold in wild-type plants under stress. The role of PpDNMT2 in modulating biogenesis/stability of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) under salt and osmotic stress is discussed in the light of these observations.

  8. Chloroplast actin filaments organize meshwork on the photorelocated chloroplasts in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kanegae, Takeshi; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kadota, Akeo

    2011-02-01

    Cytoskeleton dynamics during phototropin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation movement was analyzed in protonemal cells of actin- and microtubule-visualized lines of Physcomitrella patens expressing GFP- or tdTomato-talin and GFP-tubulin. Using newly developed epi- and trans-microbeam irradiation systems that permit fluorescence observation of the cell under blue microbeam irradiation inducing chloroplast relocation, it was revealed that meshwork of actin filaments formed at the chloroplast-accumulating area both in the avoidance and accumulation movements. The structure disappeared soon when blue microbeam was turned off, and it was not induced under red microbeam irradiation that did not evoke chloroplast relocation movement. In contrast, no apparent change in microtubule organization was detected during the movements. The actin meshwork was composed of short actin filaments distinct from the cytoplasmic long actin cables and was present between the chloroplasts and plasma membrane. The short actin filaments emerged from around the chloroplast periphery towards the center of chloroplast. Showing highly dynamic behavior, the chloroplast actin filaments (cp-actin filaments) were rapidly organized into meshwork on the chloroplast surface facing plasma membrane. The actin filament configuration on a chloroplast led to the formation of actin meshwork area in the cell as the chloroplasts arrived at and occupied the area. After establishment of the meshwork, cp-actin filaments were still highly dynamic, showing appearance, disappearance, severing and bundling of filaments. These results indicate that the cp-actin filaments have significant roles in the chloroplast movement and positioning in the cell.

  9. Cytoplasmic Nucleation and Atypical Branching Nucleation Generate Endoplasmic Microtubules in Physcomitrella patens[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Yuki; Kimura, Akatsuki; Tani, Tomomi; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying microtubule (MT) generation in plants has been primarily studied using the cortical MT array, in which fixed-angled branching nucleation and katanin-dependent MT severing predominate. However, little is known about MT generation in the endoplasm. Here, we explored the mechanism of endoplasmic MT generation in protonemal cells of Physcomitrella patens. We developed an assay that utilizes flow cell and oblique illumination fluorescence microscopy, which allowed visualization and quantification of individual MT dynamics. MT severing was infrequently observed, and disruption of katanin did not severely affect MT generation. Branching nucleation was observed, but it showed markedly variable branch angles and was occasionally accompanied by the transport of nucleated MTs. Cytoplasmic nucleation at seemingly random locations was most frequently observed and predominated when depolymerized MTs were regrown. The MT nucleator γ-tubulin was detected at the majority of the nucleation sites, at which a single MT was generated in random directions. When γ-tubulin was knocked down, MT generation was significantly delayed in the regrowth assay. However, nucleation occurred at a normal frequency in steady state, suggesting the presence of a γ-tubulin-independent backup mechanism. Thus, endoplasmic MTs in this cell type are generated in a less ordered manner, showing a broader spectrum of nucleation mechanisms in plants. PMID:25616870

  10. Spectroscopic analysis of moss (Ceratodon purpureus and Physcomitrella patens) recombinant non-symbiotic hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Limón, Consuelo; Castro-Bustos, Saraí; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) are O2-binding proteins widely distributed in land plants, including primitive bryophytes. Little is known about the properties of bryophyte nsHbs. Here, we report the spectroscopic characterization of two moss recombinant nsHbs, CerpurnsHb of Ceratodon purpureus and PhypatnsHb of Physcomitrella patens. Spectra showed that the absorption maxima of the ferrous and ferric forms of recombinant CerpurnsHb are located at 418, 531 and 557 nm and 407, 537, 569 (shoulder) and 632 (shoulder) nm, respectively, and of PhypatnsHb are located at 422, 529 and 557 nm and 407, 531, 571 (shoulder) and 647 (shoulder) nm, respectively. These absorption maxima are similar to those of rice Hb1. Also, the absorption maxima of the oxygenated ferrous form of recombinant CerpurnsHb and PhypatnsHb are located at 412, 541 and 575 nm and 414, 541 and 574 nm, respectively, similar to those of oxygenated rice Hb1 and cowpea leghemoglobin II. This evidence indicates that CerpurnsHb and PhypatnsHb are mostly hexacoordinate and that they bind O2. PMID:23336017

  11. A Lin28 homologue reprograms differentiated cells to stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Sako, Yusuke; Imai, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Thompson, Kari; Kubo, Minoru; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Kabeya, Yukiko; Karlson, Dale; Wu, Shu-Hsing; Ishikawa, Masaki; Murata, Takashi; Benfey, Philip N.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Tamada, Yosuke; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2017-01-01

    Both land plants and metazoa have the capacity to reprogram differentiated cells to stem cells. Here we show that the moss Physcomitrella patens Cold-Shock Domain Protein 1 (PpCSP1) regulates reprogramming of differentiated leaf cells to chloronema apical stem cells and shares conserved domains with the induced pluripotent stem cell factor Lin28 in mammals. PpCSP1 accumulates in the reprogramming cells and is maintained throughout the reprogramming process and in the resultant stem cells. Expression of PpCSP1 is negatively regulated by its 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Removal of the 3′-UTR stabilizes PpCSP1 transcripts, results in accumulation of PpCSP1 protein and enhances reprogramming. A quadruple deletion mutant of PpCSP1 and three closely related PpCSP genes exhibits attenuated reprogramming indicating that the PpCSP genes function redundantly in cellular reprogramming. Taken together, these data demonstrate a positive role of PpCSP1 in reprogramming, which is similar to the function of mammalian Lin28. PMID:28128346

  12. The X-ray crystal structure of APR-B, an atypical adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase from Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Clare E M; Hughes, Richard K; McManus, Michael T; Lawson, David M; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2013-11-15

    Sulfonucleotide reductases catalyse the first reductive step of sulfate assimilation. Their substrate specificities generally correlate with the requirement for a [Fe4S4] cluster, where adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductases possess a cluster and 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductases do not. The exception is the APR-B isoform of APS reductase from the moss Physcomitrella patens, which lacks a cluster. The crystal structure of APR-B, the first for a plant sulfonucleotide reductase, is consistent with a preference for APS. Structural conservation with bacterial APS reductase rules out a structural role for the cluster, but supports the contention that it enhances the activity of conventional APS reductases.

  13. CHUP1 mediates actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Usami, Hiroka; Maeda, Takuma; Fujii, Yusuke; Oikawa, Kazusato; Takahashi, Fumio; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. CHUP1 (CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING1) is indispensable for this response in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, involvement of CHUP1 in light-induced chloroplast movement is unknown in other plants. In this study, CHUP1 orthologues were isolated from a moss, Physcomitrella patens, and a fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris, by cDNA library screening and PCR cloning based on the P. patens genome sequence. Functional motifs found in CHUP1 of A. thaliana were conserved among the CHUP1 orthologues. In addition to the putative functional regions, the C-terminal regions (approximately 250 amino acids), which are unique in CHUP1s, were highly conserved. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of P. patens CHUP1s (PpCHUP1A, PpCHUP1B and PpCHUP1C) were transiently expressed in protoplast cells. All GFP fusions were localized on the chloroplasts. Light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement of chup1 disruptants of P. patens was examined in the presence of cytoskeletal inhibitors because of the utilization of both microtubules and actin filaments for the movement in P. patens. When actin filaments were disrupted by cytochalasin B, the wild type (WT) and all chup1 disruptants showed chloroplast avoidance movement. However, when microtubules were disrupted by Oryzalin, chloroplasts in ∆chup1A and ∆chup1A/B rarely moved and stayed in the strong light-irradiated area. On the other hand, WT, ∆chup1B and ∆chup1C showed chloroplast avoidance movement. These results suggest that PpCHUP1A predominantly mediates the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement. This study reveals that CHUP1 functions on the chloroplasts and is involved in the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in P. patens.

  14. Role of DNA methylation in growth and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens and characterization of cytosine DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Malik, Garima; Dangwal, Meenakshi; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2012-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are known to regulate important developmental processes in higher eukaryotes. However, little is known about the necessity and role of this process in early land plants. Using the methyltransferase (MTase) inhibitor zebularine (1-(β-d-ribofuranosyl)-1,2-dihydropyrimidine-2-one), the impact of loss of genome-wide methylation on the overall development in Physcomitrella patens was analyzed. It is observed that various aspects of growth and differentiation during gametophyte development become aberrant. A search for the core molecular components of methylation machinery, cytosine DNA MTases, revealed the presence of seven loci in the P. patens genome. Five of the loci code for MTases that are similar to corresponding proteins in higher plants, while two MTases appear specific to P. patens and are closely related to human DNMT3a and DNMT3b, respectively. These proteins possess all the conserved catalytic motifs characteristic of MTases and a domain of unknown function, DUF3444. Association of these highly conserved motifs with a DUF has not been reported in any of the MTases known so far. All the seven genes are differentially but ubiquitously expressed in gametophytes at low levels. Subcellular localization of GFP-fused proteins shows patterns of distribution that can be correlated with their putative cellular functions. This work bridges the knowledge of MTases in P. patens and makes this simple model plant accessible for studies on epigenetic aspects that remain intractable in higher plants.

  15. Physcomitrella patens auxin conjugate synthetase (GH3) double knockout mutants are more resistant to Pythium infection than wild type.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jennifer; Šola, Ivana; Rusak, Gordana; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Auxin homeostasis is involved in many different plant developmental and stress responses. The auxin amino acid conjugate synthetases belonging to the GH3 family play major roles in the regulation of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels and the moss Physcomitrella patens has two GH3 genes in its genome. A role for IAA in several angiosperm--pathogen interactions was reported, however, in a moss--oomycete pathosystem it had not been published so far. Using GH3 double knockout lines we have investigated the role of auxin homeostasis during the infection of P. patens with the two oomycete species, Pythium debaryanum and Pythium irregulare. We show that infection with P. debaryanum caused stronger disease symptoms than with P. irregulare. Also, P. patens lines harboring fusion constructs of an auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) with a reporter (ß-glucuronidase) showed higher promoter induction after P. debaryanum infection than after P. irregulare, indicating a differential induction of the auxin response. Free IAA was induced upon P. debaryanum infection in wild type by 1.6-fold and in two GH3 double knockout (GH3-doKO) mutants by 4- to 5-fold. All GH3-doKO lines showed a reduced disease symptom progression compared to wild type. Since P. debaryanum can be inhibited in growth on medium containing IAA, these data might indicate that endogenous high auxin levels in P. patens GH3-doKO mutants lead to higher resistance against the oomycete.

  16. The Transcriptional Response to DNA-Double-Strand Breaks in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Whitaker, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens is unique among plants in supporting the generation of mutant alleles by facile homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting (GT). Reasoning that targeted transgene integration occurs through the capture of transforming DNA by the homology-dependent pathway for DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair, we analysed the genome-wide transcriptomic response to bleomycin-induced DNA damage and generated mutants in candidate DNA repair genes. Massively parallel (Illumina) cDNA sequencing identified potential participants in gene targeting. Transcripts encoding DNA repair proteins active in multiple repair pathways were significantly up-regulated. These included Rad51, CtIP, DNA ligase 1, Replication protein A and ATR in homology-dependent repair, Xrcc4, DNA ligase 4, Ku70 and Ku80 in non-homologous end-joining and Rad1, Tebichi/polymerase theta, PARP in microhomology-mediated end-joining. Differentially regulated cell-cycle components included up-regulated Rad9 and Hus1 DNA-damage-related checkpoint proteins and down-regulated D-type cyclins and B-type CDKs, commensurate with the imposition of a checkpoint at G2 of the cell cycle characteristic of homology-dependent DNA-DSB repair. Candidate genes, including ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling helicases associated with repair and recombination, were knocked out and analysed for growth defects, hypersensitivity to DNA damage and reduced GT efficiency. Targeted knockout of PpCtIP, a cell-cycle activated mediator of homology-dependent DSB resection, resulted in bleomycin-hypersensitivity and greatly reduced GT efficiency. PMID:27537368

  17. Functional analyses of the Physcomitrella patens phytochromes in regulating chloroplast avoidance movement.

    PubMed

    Uenaka, Hidetoshi; Kadota, Akeo

    2007-09-01

    Red light-induced chloroplast movement in Physcomitrella patens (Pp) is mediated by dichroic phytochrome in the cytoplasm. To analyze the molecular function of the photoreceptor in the cytoplasm, we developed a protoplast system in which chloroplast photomovement was exclusively dependent on the expression of phytochrome cDNA constructs introduced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) transformation. YFP was fused to the phytochrome constructs and their expression was detected by fluorescence. The chloroplast avoidance response was induced in the protoplasts expressing a YFP fusion of PHY1-PHY3, but not of PHY4 or YFP alone. Phy::yfp fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. No change in the location of phy1::yfp or phy2::yfp was revealed before and after photomovement. When phy1::yfp and phy2::yfp were targeted to the nucleus by fusing a nuclear localization signal to the constructs, red light avoidance was not induced. To determine the domains of PHY2 essential for avoidance response, various partially-deleted PHY2::YFP constructs were tested. The N-terminal extension domain (NTE) was found to be necessary but the C-terminal histidine kinase-related domain (HKRD) was dispensable. An avoidance response was not induced under expression of phytochrome N-terminal half domain [deleting both the PAS (Per, Arnt, Sim)-related domain (PRD) and HKRD]. GUS fusion of this N-terminal half domain, reported to be fully functional in Arabidopsis for several phyA- and phyB-regulated responses was not effective in chloroplast avoidance movement. Domain requirement and GUS fusion effect were also confirmed in PHY1. These results indicate that Pp phy1-Pp phy3 in the cytoplasm mediate chloroplast avoidance movement, and that NTE and PRD, but not HKRD, are required for their function.

  18. Endogenous diterpenes derived from ent-kaurene, a common gibberellin precursor, regulate protonema differentiation of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Horie, Keisuke; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hanada, Atsushi; Nakashima, Tamotsu; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Mander, Lewis N; Yamane, Hisakazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of diterpene-type plant hormones biosynthesized from ent-kaurene via ent-kaurenoic acid. GAs are ubiquitously present in seed plants. The GA signal is perceived and transduced by the GID1 GA receptor/DELLA repressor pathway. The lycopod Selaginella moellendorffii biosynthesizes GA and has functional GID1-DELLA signaling components. In contrast, no GAs or functionally orthologous GID1-DELLA components have been found in the moss Physcomitrella patens. However, P. patens produces ent-kaurene, a common precursor for GAs, and possesses a functional ent-kaurene synthase, PpCPS/KS. To assess the biological role of ent-kaurene in P. patens, we generated a PpCPS/KS disruption mutant that does not accumulate ent-kaurene. Phenotypic analysis demonstrates that the mutant has a defect in the protonemal differentiation of the chloronemata to caulonemata. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis shows that P. patens produces ent-kaurenoic acid, an ent-kaurene metabolite in the GA biosynthesis pathway. The phenotypic defect of the disruptant was recovered by the application of ent-kaurene or ent-kaurenoic acid, suggesting that ent-kaurenoic acid, or a downstream metabolite, is involved in protonemal differentiation. Treatment with uniconazole, an inhibitor of ent-kaurene oxidase in GA biosynthesis, mimics the protonemal phenotypes of the PpCPS/KS mutant, which were also restored by ent-kaurenoic acid treatment. Interestingly, the GA(9) methyl ester, a fern antheridiogen, rescued the protonemal defect of the disruption mutant, while GA(3) and GA(4), both of which are active GAs in angiosperms, did not. Our results suggest that the moss P. patens utilizes a diterpene metabolite from ent-kaurene as an endogenous developmental regulator and provide insights into the evolution of GA functions in land plants.

  19. A specific member of the Cab multigene family can be efficiently targeted and disrupted in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, A H; Codón, A C; Ivascu, C; Russo, V E; Knight, C; Cove, D; Schaefer, D G; Chakhparonian, M; Zrÿd, J P

    1999-02-01

    The analysis of phenotypic change resulting from gene disruption following homologous recombination provides a powerful technique for the study of gene function. This technique has so far been difficult to apply to plants because the frequency of gene disruption following transformation with constructs containing DNA homologous to genomic sequences is low (0.01 to 0.1%). It has recently been shown that high rates of gene disruption (up to 90%) can be achieved in the moss Physcomitrella patens using genomic sequences of unknown function. We have used this system to examine the specificity of gene disruption in Physcomitrella using a member of the Cab multigene family. We have employed the previously characterised Cab gene ZLAB1 and have isolated segments of 13 other closely related members of the Cab gene family. In the 199-bp stretch sequenced, the 13 new members of the Cab family show an average of 8.5% divergence from the DNA sequence of ZLAB1. We observed 304 silent substitutions and 16 substitutions that lead to a change in the amino acid sequence of the protein. We cloned 1029 bp of the coding region of ZLAB1 (including 177 of the 199 bp with high homology to the 13 new Cab genes) into a vector containing a selectable hygromycin resistance marker, and used this construct to transform P. patens. In three of nine stable transformants tested, the construct had inserted in, and disrupted, the ZLAB1 gene. There was no discernible phenotype associated with the disruption. We have therefore shown that gene disruption is reproducible in P. patens and that the requirement for sequence homology appears to be stringent, therefore allowing the role of individual members of a gene family to be analysed in land plants for the first time.

  20. Characterization of Phytochrome Interacting Factors from the Moss Physcomitrella patens Illustrates Conservation of Phytochrome Signaling Modules in Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Possart, Anja; Xu, Tengfei; Paik, Inyup; Hanke, Sebastian; Keim, Sarah; Hermann, Helen-Maria; Wolf, Luise; Hiß, Manuel; Becker, Claude; Huq, Enamul; Rensing, Stefan A; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Across the plant kingdom, phytochrome (PHY) photoreceptors play an important role during adaptive and developmental responses to light. In Arabidopsis thaliana, light-activated PHYs accumulate in the nucleus, where they regulate downstream signaling components, such as phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs). PIFs are transcription factors that act as repressors of photomorphogenesis; their inhibition by PHYs leads to substantial changes in gene expression. The nuclear function of PHYs, however, has so far been investigated in only a few non-seed plants. Here, we identified putative target genes of PHY signaling in the moss Physcomitrella patens and found light-regulated genes that are putative orthologs of PIF-controlled genes in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that an ancestral PIF-like gene was already present in streptophyte algae, i.e., before the water-to-land transition of plants. The PIF homologs in the genome of P. patens resemble Arabidopsis PIFs in their protein domain structure, molecular properties, and physiological effects, albeit with notable differences in the motif-dependent PHY interaction. Our results suggest that P. patens PIFs are involved in PHY signaling. The PHY-PIF signaling node that relays light signals to target genes has been largely conserved during land plant evolution, with evidence of lineage-specific diversification.

  1. Strigolactones regulate protonema branching and act as a quorum sensing-like signal in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Proust, Hélène; Hoffmann, Beate; Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Schaefer, Didier G; Yoneyama, Koichi; Nogué, Fabien; Rameau, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Strigolactones are a novel class of plant hormones controlling shoot branching in seed plants. They also signal host root proximity during symbiotic and parasitic interactions. To gain a better understanding of the origin of strigolactone functions, we characterised a moss mutant strongly affected in strigolactone biosynthesis following deletion of the CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 8 (CCD8) gene. Here, we show that wild-type Physcomitrella patens produces and releases strigolactones into the medium where they control branching of protonemal filaments and colony extension. We further show that Ppccd8 mutant colonies fail to sense the proximity of neighbouring colonies, which in wild-type plants causes the arrest of colony extension. The mutant phenotype is rescued when grown in the proximity of wild-type colonies, by exogenous supply of synthetic strigolactones or by ectopic expression of seed plant CCD8. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that Bryophytes (P. patens) produce strigolactones that act as signalling factors controlling developmental and potentially ecophysiological processes. We propose that in P. patens, strigolactones are reminiscent of quorum-sensing molecules used by bacteria to communicate with one another.

  2. The kinesin-like proteins, KAC1/2, regulate actin dynamics underlying chloroplast light-avoidance in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yen-Chen; Bibeau, Jeffrey P; Lemoi, Kyle P; Tüzel, Erkan; Vidali, Luis

    2015-01-01

    In plants, light determines chloroplast position; these organelles show avoidance and accumulation responses in high and low fluence-rate light, respectively. Chloroplast motility in response to light is driven by cytoskeletal elements. The actin cytoskeleton mediates chloroplast photorelocation responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. In contrast, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, both, actin filaments and microtubules can transport chloroplasts. Because of the surprising evidence that two kinesin-like proteins (called KACs) are important for actin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation in vascular plants, we wanted to determine the cytoskeletal system responsible for the function of these proteins in moss. We performed gene-specific silencing using RNA interference in P. patens. We confirmed existing reports using gene knockouts, that PpKAC1 and PpKAC2 are required for chloroplast dispersion under uniform white light conditions, and that the two proteins are functionally equivalent. To address the specific cytoskeletal elements responsible for motility, this loss-of-function approach was combined with cytoskeleton-targeted drug studies. We found that, in P. patens, these KACs mediate the chloroplast light-avoidance response in an actin filament-dependent, rather than a microtubule-dependent manner. Using correlation-decay analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics, we found that PpKAC stabilizes cortical actin filaments, but has no effect on microtubule dynamics.

  3. G6PDH activity highlights the operation of the cyclic electron flow around PSI in Physcomitrella patens during salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Zheng, Zhenbing; Huan, Li; Wang, Guangce

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic performances and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity in Physcomitrella patens changed greatly during salt stress and recovery. In P. patens, the cyclic electron flow around photosystem (PS) I was much more tolerant to high salt stress than PSII. After high salt stress, the PSII activity recovered much more slowly than that of PSI, which was rapidly restored to pretreatment levels even as PSII was almost inactivate. This result suggested that after salt stress the recovery of the cyclic electron flow around PSI was independent of PSII activity. In addition, G6PDH activity and NADPH content increased under high salt stress. When G6PDH activity was inhibited by glucosamine (Glucm, a G6PDH inhibitor), the cyclic electron flow around PSI and the NADPH content decreased significantly. Additionally, after recovery in liquid medium containing Glucm, the PSI activity was much lower than in liquid medium without Glucm. These results suggested the PSI activity was affected significantly by G6PDH activity and the NADPH content. Based on the above results, we propose that G6PDH in P. patens has a close relationship with the photosynthetic process, possibly providing NADPH for the operation of the cyclic electron flow around PSI during salt stress and promoting the restoration of PSI. PMID:26887288

  4. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora: a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence.

    PubMed

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2016-08-01

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for visualizing interactions with the pathogen over time using high-resolution microscopy. We tested four Phytophthora species for their ability to infect P. patens and showed that P. sojae and P. palmivora were only rarely capable to infect P. patens. In contrast, P. infestans and P. capsici frequently and successfully penetrated moss protonemal cells, showed intracellular hyphal growth and formed sporangia. Next to these successful invasions, many penetration attempts failed. Here the pathogen was blocked by a barrier of cell wall material deposited in papilla-like structures, a defence response that is common in higher plants. Another common response is the upregulation of defence-related genes upon infection and also in moss we observed this upregulation in tissues infected with Phytophthora. For more advanced analyses of the novel pathosystem we developed a special set-up that allowed live-cell imaging of subcellular defence processes by high-resolution microscopy. With this set-up, we revealed that Phytophthora infection of moss induces repositioning of the nucleus, accumulation of cytoplasm and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but not of microtubules.

  5. Moss Pathogenesis-Related-10 Protein Enhances Resistance to Pythium irregulare in Physcomitrella patens and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alexandra; Vidal, Sabina; Ponce de León, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to pathogen infection by activating signaling pathways leading to the accumulation of proteins with diverse roles in defense. Here, we addressed the functional role of PpPR-10, a pathogenesis-related (PR)-10 gene, of the moss Physcomitrella patens, in response to biotic stress. PpPR-10 belongs to a multigene family and encodes a protein twice the usual size of PR-10 proteins due to the presence of two Bet v1 domains. Moss PR-10 genes are differentially regulated during development and inoculation with the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Specifically, PpPR-10 transcript levels increase significantly by treatments with elicitors of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, spores of B. cinerea, and the defense hormone salicylic acid. To characterize the role of PpPR-10 in plant defense against pathogens, we conducted overexpression analysis in P. patens and in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that constitutive expression of PpPR-10 in moss tissues increased resistance against the oomycete Pythium irregulare. PpPR-10 overexpressing moss plants developed less symptoms and decreased mycelium growth than wild type plants. In addition, PpPR-10 overexpressing plants constitutively produced cell wall depositions in protonemal tissue. Ectopic expression of PpPR-10 in Arabidopsis resulted in increased resistance against P. irregulare as well, evidenced by smaller lesions and less cellular damage compared to wild type plants. These results indicate that PpPR-10 is functionally active in the defense against the pathogen P. irregulare, in both P. patens and Arabidopsis, two evolutionary distant plants. Thus, P. patens can serve as an interesting source of genes to improve resistance against pathogen infection in flowering plants.

  6. Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Is a Growth Repressor of Both Rhizoid and Gametophore Development in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Laura; Catarino, Rita; Heinz, Tobias; Heilmann, Ingo; Bezanilla, Magdalena; Malhó, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase implicated in cellular proliferation and survival. In animal cells, loss of PTEN leads to increased levels of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate, stimulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, cellular growth, and morphological changes (related to adaptation and survival). Intriguingly, in plants, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate has not been detected, and the enzymes that synthesize it were never reported. In this study we performed a genetic, biochemical, and functional characterization of the moss Physcomitrella patens PTEN gene family. P. patens has four PTENs, which are ubiquitously expressed during the entire moss life cycle. Using a knock-in approach, we show that all four genes are expressed in growing tissues, namely caulonemal and rhizoid cells. At the subcellular level, PpPTEN-green fluorescent protein fusions localized to the cytosol and the nucleus. Analysis of single and double knockouts revealed no significant phenotypes at different developmental stages, indicative of functional redundancy. However, compared with wild-type triple and quadruple pten knockouts, caulonemal cells grew faster, switched from the juvenile protonemal stage to adult gametophores earlier, and produced more rhizoids. Furthermore, analysis of lipid content and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data performed in quadruple mutants revealed altered phosphoinositide levels [increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,5)-bisphosphate and decrease in phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate] and up-regulation of marker genes from the synthesis phase of the cell cycle (e.g. P. patens proliferating cell nuclear antigen, ribonucleotide reductase, and minichromosome maintenance) and of the retinoblastoma-related protein gene P. patens retinoblastoma-related protein1. Together, these results suggest that PpPTEN is a suppressor of cell growth and morphogenic development in plants.

  7. Moss Pathogenesis-Related-10 Protein Enhances Resistance to Pythium irregulare in Physcomitrella patens and Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Alexandra; Vidal, Sabina; Ponce de León, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to pathogen infection by activating signaling pathways leading to the accumulation of proteins with diverse roles in defense. Here, we addressed the functional role of PpPR-10, a pathogenesis-related (PR)-10 gene, of the moss Physcomitrella patens, in response to biotic stress. PpPR-10 belongs to a multigene family and encodes a protein twice the usual size of PR-10 proteins due to the presence of two Bet v1 domains. Moss PR-10 genes are differentially regulated during development and inoculation with the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Specifically, PpPR-10 transcript levels increase significantly by treatments with elicitors of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, spores of B. cinerea, and the defense hormone salicylic acid. To characterize the role of PpPR-10 in plant defense against pathogens, we conducted overexpression analysis in P. patens and in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that constitutive expression of PpPR-10 in moss tissues increased resistance against the oomycete Pythium irregulare. PpPR-10 overexpressing moss plants developed less symptoms and decreased mycelium growth than wild type plants. In addition, PpPR-10 overexpressing plants constitutively produced cell wall depositions in protonemal tissue. Ectopic expression of PpPR-10 in Arabidopsis resulted in increased resistance against P. irregulare as well, evidenced by smaller lesions and less cellular damage compared to wild type plants. These results indicate that PpPR-10 is functionally active in the defense against the pathogen P. irregulare, in both P. patens and Arabidopsis, two evolutionary distant plants. Thus, P. patens can serve as an interesting source of genes to improve resistance against pathogen infection in flowering plants. PMID:27200053

  8. A complementation assay for in vivo protein structure/function analysis in Physcomitrella patens (Funariaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess R.; Chaves, Arielle M.; Roberts, Alison W.

    2015-07-14

    Here, a method for rapid in vivo functional analysis of engineered proteins was developed using Physcomitrella patens. A complementation assay was designed for testing structure/function relationships in cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins. The components of the assay include (1) construction of test vectors that drive expression of epitope-tagged PpCESA5 carrying engineered mutations, (2) transformation of a ppcesa5 knockout line that fails to produce gametophores with test and control vectors, (3) scoring the stable transformants for gametophore production, (4) statistical analysis comparing complementation rates for test vectors to positive and negative control vectors, and (5) analysis of transgenic protein expression by Western blotting. The assay distinguished mutations that generate fully functional, nonfunctional, and partially functional proteins. In conclusion, compared with existing methods for in vivo testing of protein function, this complementation assay provides a rapid method for investigating protein structure/function relationships in plants.

  9. MRE11 and RAD50, but not NBS1, are essential for gene targeting in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Schaefer, Didier G; Kozak, Jaroslav; Charlot, Florence; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Holá, Marcela; Angelis, Karel J; Cuming, Andrew C; Nogué, Fabien

    2012-04-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is unique among plant models for the high frequency with which targeted transgene insertion occurs via homologous recombination. Transgene integration is believed to utilize existing machinery for the detection and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We undertook targeted knockout of the Physcomitrella genes encoding components of the principal sensor of DNA DSBs, the MRN complex. Loss of function of PpMRE11 or PpRAD50 strongly and specifically inhibited gene targeting, whilst rates of untargeted transgene integration were relatively unaffected. In contrast, disruption of the PpNBS1 gene retained the wild-type capacity to integrate transforming DNA efficiently at homologous loci. Analysis of the kinetics of DNA-DSB repair in wild-type and mutant plants by single-nucleus agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that bleomycin-induced fragmentation of genomic DNA was repaired at approximately equal rates in each genotype, although both the Ppmre11 and Pprad50 mutants exhibited severely restricted growth and development and enhanced sensitivity to UV-B and bleomycin-induced DNA damage, compared with wild-type and Ppnbs1 plants. This implies that while extensive DNA repair can occur in the absence of a functional MRN complex; this is unsupervised in nature and results in the accumulation of deleterious mutations incompatible with normal growth and development.

  10. Functional analyses of chitinases in the moss Physcomitrella patens: chitin oligosaccharide-induced gene expression and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Kobaru, Saki; Tanaka, Ryusuke; Taira, Toki; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2016-12-01

    Plant chitinases play diverse roles including defense against pathogenic fungi. Using reverse-transcription quantitative PCR analysis, we found that six chitinase (PpChi) genes and two genes for chitin elicitor receptor kinases (PpCERKs) are expressed at considerable levels in the moss Physcomitrella patens subsp. patens. The expressed PpChis belonged to glycoside hydrolase family 19 (class I: PpChi-Ia and -Ib; class II: PpChi-IIa and -IIc; and class IV: PpChi-IV) and to glycoside hydrolase family 18 (class V: PpChi-Vb). Treatment with chitin tetramer or hexamer increased the expression of class I and IV PpChi genes and decreased that of class II PpChi genes. Recombinant PpChi-Ia, PpChi-IV, and PpChi-Vb were characterized. PpChi-IV exhibited higher activity against chitin tetramer and pentamer than PpChi-Ia did. PpChi-Vb showed transglycosylation activity and PpChi-Ia inhibited fungal growth. These results suggest that chitinases of different classes play different roles in defense mechanism of moss plant against fungal pathogens.

  11. Digital gene expression profiling by 5'-end sequencing of cDNAs during reprogramming in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Miyawaki, Kaori; Ohshima, Masumi; Thompson, Kari; Nagashima, Akitomo; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Kurata, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells self-renew and repeatedly produce differentiated cells during development and growth. The differentiated cells can be converted into stem cells in some metazoans and land plants with appropriate treatments. After leaves of the moss Physcomitrella patens are excised, leaf cells reenter the cell cycle and commence tip growth, which is characteristic of stem cells called chloronema apical cells. To understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, a digital gene expression profiling method using mRNA 5'-end tags (5'-DGE) was established. The 5'-DGE method produced reproducible data with a dynamic range of four orders that correlated well with qRT-PCR measurements. After the excision of leaves, the expression levels of 11% of the transcripts changed significantly within 6 h. Genes involved in stress responses and proteolysis were induced and those involved in metabolism, including photosynthesis, were reduced. The later processes of reprogramming involved photosynthesis recovery and higher macromolecule biosynthesis, including of RNA and proteins. Auxin and cytokinin signaling pathways, which are activated during stem cell formation via callus in flowering plants, are also activated during reprogramming in P. patens, although no exogenous phytohormone is applied in the moss system, suggesting that an intrinsic phytohormone regulatory system may be used in the moss.

  12. Structure and function of nucleoside hydrolases from Physcomitrella patens and maize catalyzing the hydrolysis of purine, pyrimidine, and cytokinin ribosides.

    PubMed

    Kopecná, Martina; Blaschke, Hanna; Kopecny, David; Vigouroux, Armelle; Koncitíková, Radka; Novák, Ondrej; Kotland, Ondrej; Strnad, Miroslav; Moréra, Solange; von Schwartzenberg, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of the nucleoside N-ribohydrolase (NRH) family in two model plants, Physcomitrella patens (PpNRH) and maize (Zea mays; ZmNRH), using in vitro and in planta approaches. We identified two NRH subclasses in the plant kingdom; one preferentially targets the purine ribosides inosine and xanthosine, while the other is more active toward uridine and xanthosine. Both subclasses can hydrolyze plant hormones such as cytokinin ribosides. We also solved the crystal structures of two purine NRHs, PpNRH1 and ZmNRH3. Structural analyses, site-directed mutagenesis experiments, and phylogenetic studies were conducted to identify the residues responsible for the observed differences in substrate specificity between the NRH isoforms. The presence of a tyrosine at position 249 (PpNRH1 numbering) confers high hydrolase activity for purine ribosides, while an aspartate residue in this position confers high activity for uridine. Bud formation is delayed by knocking out single NRH genes in P. patens, and under conditions of nitrogen shortage, PpNRH1-deficient plants cannot salvage adenosine-bound nitrogen. All PpNRH knockout plants display elevated levels of certain purine and pyrimidine ribosides and cytokinins that reflect the substrate preferences of the knocked out enzymes. NRH enzymes thus have functions in cytokinin conversion and activation as well as in purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

  13. In vitro synthesis of cellulose microfibrils by a membrane protein from protoplasts of the non-vascular plant Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hyun; Du, Juan; Sines, Ian; Poosarla, Venkata Giridhar; Vepachedu, Venkata; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Yong Bum; Kim, Seong H; Kumar, Manish; Nixon, B Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Plant cellulose synthases (CesAs) form a family of membrane proteins that are associated with hexagonal structures in the plasma membrane called CesA complexes (CSCs). It has been difficult to purify plant CesA proteins for biochemical and structural studies. We describe CesA activity in a membrane protein preparation isolated from protoplasts of Physcomitrella patens overexpressing haemagglutinin (HA)-tagged PpCesA5. Incubating the membrane preparation with UDP-glucose predominantly produced cellulose. Negative-stain EM revealed microfibrils. Cellulase bound to and degraded these microfibrils. Vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopic analysis detected the presence of crystalline cellulose in the microfibrils. Putative CesA proteins were frequently observed attached to the microfibril ends. Combined cross-linking and gradient centrifugation showed bundles of cellulose microfibrils with larger particle aggregates, possibly CSCs. These results suggest that P. patens is a useful model system for biochemical and structural characterization of plant CSCs and their components.

  14. Light-Harvesting Complex Stress-Related Proteins Catalyze Excess Energy Dissipation in Both Photosystems of Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Nevo, Reinat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Reich, Ziv

    2015-01-01

    Two LHC-like proteins, Photosystem II Subunit S (PSBS) and Light-Harvesting Complex Stress-Related (LHCSR), are essential for triggering excess energy dissipation in chloroplasts of vascular plants and green algae, respectively. The mechanism of quenching was studied in Physcomitrella patens, an early divergent streptophyta (including green algae and land plants) in which both proteins are active. PSBS was localized in grana together with photosystem II (PSII), but LHCSR was located mainly in stroma-exposed membranes together with photosystem I (PSI), and its distribution did not change upon high-light treatment. The quenched conformation can be preserved by rapidly freezing the high-light-treated tissues in liquid nitrogen. When using green fluorescent protein as an internal standard, 77K fluorescence emission spectra on isolated chloroplasts allowed for independent assessment of PSI and PSII fluorescence yield. Results showed that both photosystems underwent quenching upon high-light treatment in the wild type in contrast to mutants depleted of LHCSR, which lacked PSI quenching. Due to the contribution of LHCII, P. patens had a PSI antenna size twice as large with respect to higher plants. Thus, LHCII, which is highly abundant in stroma membranes, appears to be the target of quenching by LHCSR. PMID:26508763

  15. Dehydration stress-induced oscillations in LEA protein transcripts involves abscisic acid in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Nurul Islam, M; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2012-07-01

    Physcomitrella patens is a bryophyte belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period. Mosses are typically found in refugial habitats and can experience rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. The acquisition of dehydration tolerance by bryophytes is of fundamental importance as they lack water-conducting tissues and are generally one cell layer thick. • Here, we show that dehydration induced oscillations in the steady-state transcript abundances of two group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein genes in P. patens protonemata, and that the amplitudes of these oscillations are reflective of the severity of dehydration stress. • Dehydration stress also induced elevations in the concentrations of abscisic acid (ABA), and ABA alone can also induce dosage-dependent oscillatory increases in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts. Additionally, removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of these oscillatory increases. • Our data demonstrate that dehydration stress-regulated expression of LEA protein genes is temporally dynamic and highlight the importance of oscillations as a robust mechanism for optimal responses. Our results suggest that dehydration stress-induced oscillations in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts may constitute an important cellular strategy for adaptation to life in a constantly changing environment.

  16. A SABATH Methyltransferase from the moss Physcomitrella patens catalyzes S-methylation of thiols and has a role in detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Moon, Hong S; Kapteyn, Jeremy; Zhuang, Xiaofeng; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Stewart, C Neal; Gang, David R; Chen, Feng

    2012-09-01

    Known SABATH methyltransferases, all of which were identified from seed plants, catalyze methylation of either the carboxyl group of a variety of low molecular weight metabolites or the nitrogen moiety of precursors of caffeine. In this study, the SABATH family from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens was identified and characterized. Four SABATH-like sequences (PpSABATH1, PpSABATH2, PpSABATH3, and PpSABATH4) were identified from the P. patens genome. Only PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 showed expression in the leafy gametophyte of P. patens. Full-length cDNAs of PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were cloned and expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PpSABATH1 and PpSABATH2 were tested for methyltransferase activity with a total of 75 compounds. While showing no activity with carboxylic acids or nitrogen-containing compounds, PpSABATH1 displayed methyltransferase activity with a number of thiols. PpSABATH2 did not show activity with any of the compounds tested. Among the thiols analyzed, PpSABATH1 showed the highest level of activity with thiobenzoic acid with an apparent Km value of 95.5μM, which is comparable to those of known SABATHs. Using thiobenzoic acid as substrate, GC-MS analysis indicated that the methylation catalyzed by PpSABATH1 is on the sulfur atom. The mechanism for S-methylation of thiols catalyzed by PpSABATH1 was partially revealed by homology-based structural modeling. The expression of PpSABATH1 was induced by the treatment of thiobenzoic acid. Further transgenic studies showed that tobacco plants overexpressing PpSABATH1 exhibited enhanced tolerance to thiobenzoic acid, suggesting that PpSABATH1 have a role in the detoxification of xenobiotic thiols.

  17. Enhancement of non-photochemical quenching in the Bryophyte Physcomitrella patens during acclimation to salt and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Azzabi, Ghazi; Pinnola, Alberta; Betterle, Nico; Bassi, Roberto; Alboresi, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Drought and salt stress are major abiotic constraints affecting plant growth worldwide. Under these conditions, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common phenomenon taking place mainly in chloroplasts, peroxisomes, mitochondria and apoplasts, especially when associated with high light stress. ROS are harmful because of their high reactivity to cell components, thereby leading to cytotoxicity and cell death. During the Ordovician and early Devonian period, photosynthetic organisms colonized terrestrial habitats, and the acquisition of desiccation tolerance has been a major component of their evolution. We have studied the capacity for acclimation to drought and salt stress of the moss Physcomitrella patens, a representative of the early land colonization stage. Exposure to high concentrations of NaCl and sorbitol strongly affects chloroplast development, the Chl content and the thylakoid protein composition in this moss. Under sublethal conditions (0.2 M NaCl and 0.4 M sorbitol), the photosynthetic apparatus of P. patens responds to oxidative stress by increasing non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Surprisingly, the accumulation of PSBS and LHCSR, the two polypeptides essential for NPQ in P. patens, was not up-regulated in these conditions. Rather, an increased NPQ amplitude correlated with the overaccumulation of zeaxanthin and the presence of the enzyme violaxanthin de-epoxidase. These results suggest that the regulation of excess energy dissipation through control of PSBS and LHCSR is mainly driven by light conditions, while osmotic and salt stress act through acclimative regulation of the xanthophyll cycle. We conclude that regulation of the xanthophyll cycle is an important anticipatory strategy against photoinhibition by high light.

  18. The Chloroplast SRP Systems of Chaetosphaeridium globosum and Physcomitrella patens as Intermediates in the Evolution of SRP-Dependent Protein Transport in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ziehe, Dominik; Dünschede, Beatrix; Zenker, Mira; Funke, Silke; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Schünemann, Danja

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP) mediates the cotranslational targeting of membrane proteins and is a high affinity complex consisting of a SRP54 protein subunit (Ffh) and an SRP RNA. The chloroplast SRP (cpSRP) pathway has adapted throughout evolution to enable the posttranslational targeting of the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding proteins (LHCPs) to the thylakoid membrane. In spermatophytes (seed plants), the cpSRP lacks the SRP RNA and is instead formed by a high affinity interaction of the conserved 54-kD subunit (cpSRP54) with the chloroplast-specific cpSRP43 protein. This heterodimeric cpSRP recognizes LHCP and delivers it to the thylakoid membrane. However, in contrast to spermatophytes, plastid SRP RNAs were identified within all streptophyte lineages and in all chlorophyte branches. Furthermore, it was shown that cpSRP43 does not interact with cpSRP54 in chlorophytes (e.g., Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). In this study, we biochemically characterized the cpSRP system of the charophyte Chaetosphaeridium globosum and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. Interaction studies demonstrate low affinity binding of cpSRP54 to cpSRP43 (Kd ~10 μM) in Chaetosphaeridium globosum and Physcomitrella patens as well as relatively low affinity binding of cpSRP54 to cpSRP RNA (Kd ~1 μM) in Physcomitrella patens. CpSRP54/cpSRP43 complex formation in charophytes is supported by the finding that specific alterations in the second chromodomain of cpSRP43, that are conserved within charophytes and absent in land plants, do not interfere with cpSRP54 binding. Furthermore, our data show that the elongated apical loop structure of the Physcomitrella patens cpSRP RNA contributes to the low binding affinity between cpSRP54 and the cpSRP RNA. PMID:27861610

  19. Characterization of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases from the moss Physcomitrella patens: PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Laura; Balbi, Virginia; Dove, Stephen K; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Mikami, Koji; Sommarin, Marianne

    2009-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) play a major role in eukaryotic cells, despite being a minor component of most membranes. This is the first report on PI metabolism in a bryophyte, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss PI composition is similar to that of other land plants growing under normal conditions. In contrast to the large number of PIPK genes present in flowering plants, the P. patens genome encodes only two type I/II PIPK genes, PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2, which are very similar at both the nucleotide and protein product levels. However, the expression of the two genes is differentially regulated, and in vitro biochemical characterization shows that the resulting enzymes have different substrate specificities. PpPIPK1 uses PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P with similar preference and also metabolizes PtdIns(3,4)P(2) to produce PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), a PI not yet detected in intact plant cells. PpPIPK2 prefers PtdIns as substrate and is much less active towards PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P. Thus, PpPIPK2 shows properties reminiscent of both PtdInsP-kinase and PtdIns-kinases. Moreover, a substitution of glutamic acid by alanine in the activation loop drastically reduced PpPIPK1 activity and altered the substrate specificity to PtdIns5P being the preferred substrate compared with PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P. These findings demonstrate that the substrate specificity of plant PIPKs is determined in a plant-specific manner, which provides new insights into the regulatory modes of PIPK activity in plants.

  20. The DEK1 Calpain Linker Functions in Three-Dimensional Body Patterning in Physcomitrella patens1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Demko, Viktor; Mekhlif, Ahmed Khaleel

    2016-01-01

    The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) calpain is a conserved 240-kD key regulator of three-dimensional body patterning in land plants acting via mitotic cell plane positioning. The activity of the cytosolic C-terminal calpain protease is regulated by the membrane-anchored DEK1 MEM, which is connected to the calpain via the 600-amino acid residue Linker. Similar to the calpain and MEM domains, the Linker is highly conserved in the land plant lineage, the similarity dropping sharply compared with orthologous charophyte sequences. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we studied the effect on Physcomitrella patens development by deleting the Linker and two conserved Linker motifs. The results show that removal of the Linker has nearly the same effect as removal of the entire DEK1 gene. In contrast, deletion of the conserved Laminin_G3 (LG3) domain had a milder effect, perturbing leafy gametophore patterning and archegonia development. The LG3 domain from Marchantia polymorpha is fully functional in P. patens, whereas angiosperm sequences are not functional. Deletion of a C-terminal Linker subsegment containing a potential calpain autolytic site severely disturbs gametophore development. Finally, changing one of the three calpain active-site amino acid residues results in the same phenotype as deleting the entire DEK1 gene. Based on the conserved nature of animal and DEK1 calpains, we propose that the DEK1 MEM-Linker complex inactivates the calpain by forcing apart the two calpain subunits carrying the three amino acids of the active site. PMID:27506240

  1. Kinesins Have a Dual Function in Organizing Microtubules during Both Tip Growth and Cytokinesis in Physcomitrella patens[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hiwatashi, Yuji; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Doonan, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) play a crucial role in the anisotropic deposition of cell wall material, thereby affecting the direction of growth. A wide range of tip-growing cells display highly polarized cell growth, and MTs have been implicated in regulating directionality and expansion. However, the molecular machinery underlying MT dynamics in tip-growing plant cells remains unclear. Here, we show that highly dynamic MT bundles form cyclically in the polarized expansion zone of the moss Physcomitrella patens caulonemal cells through the coalescence of growing MT plus ends. Furthermore, the plant-specific kinesins (KINID1) that are is essential for the proper MT organization at cytokinesis also regulate the turnover of the tip MT bundles as well as the directionality and rate of cell growth. The plus ends of MTs grow toward the expansion zone, and KINID1 is necessary for the stability of a single coherent focus of MTs in the center of the zone, whose formation coincides with the accumulation of KINID1. We propose that KINID-dependent MT bundling is essential for the correct directionality of growth as well as for promoting growth per se. Our findings indicate that two localized cell wall deposition processes, tip growth and cytokinesis, previously believed to be functionally and evolutionarily distinct, share common and plant-specific MT regulatory components. PMID:24642939

  2. Enhancing the growth of Physcomitrella patens by combination of monochromatic red and blue light - a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Cerff, Martin; Posten, Clemens

    2012-04-01

    In the current work we demonstrate the relevance of monochromatic light conditions in moss plant cell culture. Light intensity and illumination wavelength are important cultivation parameters due to their impact on growth and chlorophyll formation kinetics of the moss Physcomitrella patens. This moss was chosen as a model organism due to its capability to produce complex recombinant pharmaceutical proteins. Filamentous moss cells were cultivated in mineral medium in shaking flasks. The flasks were illuminated by light emitting diodes (LED) providing nearly monochromatic red and blue light as well as white light as a reference. A maximum growth rate of 0.78 day((1) was achieved under additional CO(2) aeration and no growth inhibition was observed under high light illumination. The application of dual red and blue light is the most effective way to reach high growth and chlorophyll formation rates while minimizing energy consumption of the LEDs. These observations are discussed as effects of photo sensory pigments in the moss. The combination of monochromatic red and blue light should be considered when a large scale process is set up.

  3. BRICK1 is required for apical cell growth in filaments of the moss Physcomitrella patens but not for gametophore morphology.

    PubMed

    Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph S

    2008-02-01

    When BRK1, a member of the Wave/SCAR complex, is deleted in Physcomitrella patens (Deltabrk1), we report a striking reduction of filament growth resulting in smaller and fewer cells with misplaced cross walls compared with the normal protonemal cells. Using an inducible green fluorescent protein-talin to detect actin in living tissue, a characteristic broad accumulation of actin is observed at the tip of wild-type apical cells, whereas in Deltabrk1, smaller, more distinct foci of actin are present. Insertion of brk1-yfp into Deltabrk1 rescues the mutant phenotype and results in BRK1 being localized only in the tip of apical cells, the exclusive site of cell extension and division in the filament. Like BRK1, ARPC4 and At RABA4d are normally localized at the tip of apical cells and their localization is correlated with rapid tip growth in filaments. However, neither marker accumulates in apical cells of Deltabrk1 filaments. Although the Deltabrk1 phenotypes in protonema are severe, the leafy shoots or gametophores are normally shaped but stunted. These and other results suggest that BRK1 functions directly or indirectly in the selective accumulation/stabilization of actin and other proteins required for polar cell growth of filaments but not for the basic structure of the gametophore.

  4. Kinesins have a dual function in organizing microtubules during both tip growth and cytokinesis in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Hiwatashi, Yuji; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Doonan, John H

    2014-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs) play a crucial role in the anisotropic deposition of cell wall material, thereby affecting the direction of growth. A wide range of tip-growing cells display highly polarized cell growth, and MTs have been implicated in regulating directionality and expansion. However, the molecular machinery underlying MT dynamics in tip-growing plant cells remains unclear. Here, we show that highly dynamic MT bundles form cyclically in the polarized expansion zone of the moss Physcomitrella patens caulonemal cells through the coalescence of growing MT plus ends. Furthermore, the plant-specific kinesins (KINID1) that are is essential for the proper MT organization at cytokinesis also regulate the turnover of the tip MT bundles as well as the directionality and rate of cell growth. The plus ends of MTs grow toward the expansion zone, and KINID1 is necessary for the stability of a single coherent focus of MTs in the center of the zone, whose formation coincides with the accumulation of KINID1. We propose that KINID-dependent MT bundling is essential for the correct directionality of growth as well as for promoting growth per se. Our findings indicate that two localized cell wall deposition processes, tip growth and cytokinesis, previously believed to be functionally and evolutionarily distinct, share common and plant-specific MT regulatory components.

  5. Zeaxanthin Binds to Light-Harvesting Complex Stress-Related Protein to Enhance Nonphotochemical Quenching in Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Pinnola, Alberta; Dall’Osto, Luca; Gerotto, Caterina; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bassi, Roberto; Alboresi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) dissipates excess energy to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from excess light. The moss Physcomitrella patens exhibits strong NPQ by both algal-type light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR)–dependent and plant-type S subunit of Photosystem II (PSBS)-dependent mechanisms. In this work, we studied the dependence of NPQ reactions on zeaxanthin, which is synthesized under light stress by violaxanthin deepoxidase (VDE) from preexisting violaxanthin. We produced vde knockout (KO) plants and showed they underwent a dramatic reduction in thermal dissipation ability and enhanced photoinhibition in excess light conditions. Multiple mutants (vde lhcsr KO and vde psbs KO) showed that zeaxanthin had a major influence on LHCSR-dependent NPQ, in contrast with previous reports in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The PSBS-dependent component of quenching was less dependent on zeaxanthin, despite the near-complete violaxanthin to zeaxanthin exchange in LHC proteins. Consistent with this, we provide biochemical evidence that native LHCSR protein binds zeaxanthin upon excess light stress. These findings suggest that zeaxanthin played an important role in the adaptation of modern plants to the enhanced levels of oxygen and excess light intensity of land environments. PMID:24014548

  6. Quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial and plastid proteomes of the moss Physcomitrella patens reveals protein macrocompartmentation and microcompartmentation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefanie J; Lang, Daniel; Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Lang, Erika G E; Schuessele, Christian; Schmidt, Anton; Fluck, Melanie; Leisibach, Desirée; Niegl, Christina; Zimmer, Andreas D; Schlosser, Andreas; Reski, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    Extant eukaryotes are highly compartmentalized and have integrated endosymbionts as organelles, namely mitochondria and plastids in plants. During evolution, organellar proteomes are modified by gene gain and loss, by gene subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization, and by changes in protein targeting. To date, proteomics data for plastids and mitochondria are available for only a few plant model species, and evolutionary analyses of high-throughput data are scarce. We combined quantitative proteomics, cross-species comparative analysis of metabolic pathways, and localizations by fluorescent proteins in the model plant Physcomitrella patens in order to assess evolutionary changes in mitochondrial and plastid proteomes. This study implements data-mining methodology to classify and reliably reconstruct subcellular proteomes, to map metabolic pathways, and to study the effects of postendosymbiotic evolution on organellar pathway partitioning. Our results indicate that, although plant morphologies changed substantially during plant evolution, metabolic integration of organelles is largely conserved, with exceptions in amino acid and carbon metabolism. Retargeting or regulatory subfunctionalization are common in the studied nucleus-encoded gene families of organelle-targeted proteins. Moreover, complementing the proteomic analysis, fluorescent protein fusions revealed novel proteins at organelle interfaces such as plastid stromules (stroma-filled tubules) and highlight microcompartments as well as intercellular and intracellular heterogeneity of mitochondria and plastids. Thus, we establish a comprehensive data set for mitochondrial and plastid proteomes in moss, present a novel multilevel approach to organelle biology in plants, and place our findings into an evolutionary context.

  7. Both the transglycosylase and transpeptidase functions in plastid penicillin-binding protein are essential for plastid division in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Yoshiko; TAKECHI, Katsuaki; TAKIO, Susumu; TAKANO, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are active in the final step of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. They possess a transglycosylase (TG) domain to polymerize the glycan chains and a transpeptidase (TP) domain to catalyze peptide cross-linking. We reported that knockout of the Pbp gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens (ΔPpPbp) results in a macrochloroplast phenotype by affecting plastid division. Here, expression of PpPBP-GFP in ΔPpPbp restored the wild-type phenotype and GFP fluorescence was observed mainly in the periphery of each chloroplast. Stable transformants expressing Anabaena PBP with the plastid-targeting sequence, or PpPBP replacing the Anabaena TP domain exhibited partial recovery, while chloroplast number was recovered to that of wild-type plants in the transformant expressing PpPBP replacing the Anabaena TG domain. Transient expression experiments with site-directed mutagenized PpPBP showed that mutations in the conserved amino acids in both domains interfered with phenotype recovery. These results suggest that both TG and TP functions are essential for function of PpPBP in moss chloroplast division. PMID:27941308

  8. System for stable β-estradiol-inducible gene expression in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Minoru; Imai, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Masaki; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kurata, Tetsuya; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Reski, Ralf; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2013-01-01

    Inducible transgene expression provides a useful tool to analyze gene function. The moss Physcomitrellapatens is a model basal land plant with well-developed research tools, including a high efficiency of gene targeting and substantial genomics resources. However, current systems for controlled transgene expression remain limited. Here we report the development of an estrogen receptor mediated inducible gene expression system, based on the system used in flowering plants. After identifying the appropriate promoters to drive the chimeric transducer, we succeeded in inducing transcription over 1,000-fold after 24 h incubation with β-estradiol. The P. patens system was also effective for high-level long-term induction of gene expression; transcript levels of the activated gene were maintained for at least seven days on medium containing β-estradiol. We also established two potentially neutral targeting sites and a set of vectors for reproducible expression of two transgenes. This β-estradiol-dependent system will be useful to test genes individually or in combination, allowing stable, inducible transgenic expression in P. patens.

  9. The CYP701B1 of Physcomitrella patens is an ent-kaurene oxidase that resists inhibition by uniconazole-P.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Katsumata, Takumi; Natsume, Masahiro; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-06-23

    The moss Physcomitrella patens produces both ent-kaurene and ent-kaurenoic acid, which are intermediates of gibberellin biosynthesis in flowering plants. The CYP701 superfamily of cytochrome P450s functions as ent-kaurene oxidases in the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid. A candidate gene encoding ent-kaurene oxidase in P. patens, CYP701B1, was cloned and heterologously expressed in yeast to examine enzyme activities in vitro. The recombinant CYP701B1 protein catalyzed the oxidation reaction from ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid. CYP701B1 activity was highly resistant to the ent-kaurene oxidase inhibitor uniconazole-P (IC(50) 64 μM), even though the activity of Arabidopsis ent-kaurene oxidase (CYP701A3) was sensitive (IC(50) 0.26 μM).

  10. Two ancient classes of MIKC-type MADS-box genes are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Henschel, Katrin; Kofuji, Rumiko; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Saedler, Heinz; Münster, Thomas; Theissen, Günter

    2002-06-01

    Characterization of seven MADS-box genes, termed PPM1-PPM4 and PpMADS1-PpMADS3, from the moss model species Physcomitrella patens is reported. Phylogeny reconstructions and comparison of exon-intron structures revealed that the genes described here represent two different classes of homologous, yet distinct, MIKC-type MADS-box genes, termed MIKC(c)-type genes-"(c)" stands for "classic"-(PPM1, PPM2, PpMADS1) and MIKC(*)-type genes (PPM3, PPM4, PpMADS2, PpMADS3). The two gene classes deviate from each other in a characteristic way, especially in a sequence stretch termed intervening region. MIKC(c)-type genes are abundantly present in all land plants which have been investigated in this respect, and give rise to well-known gene types such as floral meristem and organ identity genes. In contrast, LAMB1 from the clubmoss Lycopodium annotinum was identified as the only other MIKC(*)-type gene published so far. Our findings strongly suggest that the most recent common ancestor of mosses and vascular plants contained at least one MIKC(c)-type and one MIKC(*)-type gene. Our studies thus reveal an ancient duplication of an MIKC-type gene that occurred before the separation of the lineages that led to extant mosses and vascular plants more than about 450 MYA. The identification of bona fide K-domains in both MIKC(*)-type and MIKC(c)-type proteins suggests that the K-domain is more ancient than is suggested by a recent alternative hypothesis. MIKC(*)-type genes may have escaped identification in ferns and seed plants so far. It seems more likely, however, that they represent a class of genes which has been lost in the lineage which led to extant ferns and seed plants. The high number of P. patens MADS-box genes and the presence of a K-box in the coding region and of some potential binding sites for MADS-domain proteins and other transcription factors in the putative promoter regions of these genes suggest that MADS-box genes in mosses are involved in complex gene regulatory

  11. Comprehensive Annotation of Physcomitrella patens Small RNA Loci Reveals That the Heterochromatic Short Interfering RNA Pathway Is Largely Conserved in Land Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Coruh, Ceyda; Cho, Sung Hyun; Shahid, Saima; Liu, Qikun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Axtell, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant small RNAs are sequence-specific negative regulators of target mRNAs and/or chromatin. In angiosperms, the two most abundant endogenous small RNA populations are usually 21-nucleotide microRNAs (miRNAs) and 24-nucleotide heterochromatic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Heterochromatic siRNAs are derived from repetitive regions and reinforce DNA methylation at targeted loci. The existence and extent of heterochromatic siRNAs in other land plant lineages has been unclear. Using small RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) of the moss Physcomitrella patens, we identified 1090 loci that produce mostly 23- to 24-nucleotide siRNAs. These loci are mostly in intergenic regions with dense DNA methylation. Accumulation of siRNAs from these loci depends upon P. patens homologs of DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3), RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE2, and the largest subunit of DNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IV, with the largest subunit of a Pol V homolog contributing to expression at a smaller subset of the loci. A MINIMAL DICER-LIKE (mDCL) gene, which lacks the N-terminal helicase domain typical of DCL proteins, is specifically required for 23-nucleotide siRNA accumulation. We conclude that heterochromatic siRNAs, and their biogenesis pathways, are largely identical between angiosperms and P. patens, with the notable exception of the P. patens-specific use of mDCL to produce 23-nucleotide siRNAs. PMID:26209555

  12. Functional divergence of the glutathione S-transferase supergene family in Physcomitrella patens reveals complex patterns of large gene family evolution in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jing; Han, Xue-Min; Ren, Lin-Ling; Yang, Hai-Ling; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2013-02-01

    Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional proteins encoded by a large gene family that play major roles in the detoxification of xenobiotics and oxidative stress metabolism. To date, studies on the GST gene family have focused mainly on vascular plants (particularly agricultural plants). In contrast, little information is available on the molecular characteristics of this large gene family in nonvascular plants. In addition, the evolutionary patterns of this family in land plants remain unclear. In this study, we identified 37 GST genes from the whole genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens, a nonvascular representative of early land plants. The 37 P. patens GSTs were divided into 10 classes, including two new classes (hemerythrin and iota). However, no tau GSTs were identified, which represent the largest class among vascular plants. P. patens GST gene family members showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, gene expression responses to abiotic stressors, enzymatic characteristics, and the subcellular locations of the encoded proteins. A joint phylogenetic analysis of GSTs from P. patens and other higher vascular plants showed that different class GSTs had distinct duplication patterns during the evolution of land plants. By examining multiple characteristics, this study revealed complex patterns of evolutionary divergence among the GST gene family in land plants.

  13. Crystal structures of Physcomitrella patens AOC1 and AOC2: insights into the enzyme mechanism and differences in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Piotr; Brodhun, Florian; Sauer, Kristin; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Hamberg, Mats; Brinkmann, Jens; Scholz, Julia; Dickmanns, Achim; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    In plants, oxylipins regulate developmental processes and defense responses. The first specific step in the biosynthesis of the cyclopentanone class of oxylipins is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC) that forms cis(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. The moss Physcomitrella patens has two AOCs (PpAOC1 and PpAOC2) with different substrate specificities for C₁₈- and C₂₀-derived substrates, respectively. To better understand AOC's catalytic mechanism and to elucidate the structural properties that explain the differences in substrate specificity, we solved and analyzed the crystal structures of 36 monomers of both apo and ligand complexes of PpAOC1 and PpAOC2. From these data, we propose the following intermediates in AOC catalysis: (1) a resting state of the apo enzyme with a closed conformation, (2) a first shallow binding mode, followed by (3) a tight binding of the substrate accompanied by conformational changes in the binding pocket, and (4) initiation of the catalytic cycle by opening of the epoxide ring. As expected, the substrate dihydro analog cis-12,13S-epoxy-9Z,15Z-octadecadienoic acid did not cyclize in the presence of PpAOC1; however, when bound to the enzyme, it underwent isomerization into the corresponding trans-epoxide. By comparing complex structures of the C₁₈ substrate analog with in silico modeling of the C₂₀ substrate analog bound to the enzyme allowed us to identify three major molecular determinants responsible for the different substrate specificities (i.e. larger active site diameter, an elongated cavity of PpAOC2, and two nonidentical residues at the entrance of the active site).

  14. Molecular characterization of three PRORP proteins in the moss Physcomitrella patens: nuclear PRORP protein is not essential for moss viability.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Chieko; Komura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Korechika; Kometani, Kazuki; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    RNase P is a ubiquitous endonuclease that removes the 5' leader sequence from pre-tRNAs in all organisms. In Arabidopsis thaliana, RNA-free proteinaceous RNase Ps (PRORPs) seem to be enzyme(s) for pre-tRNA 5'-end processing in organelles and the nucleus and are thought to have replaced the ribonucleoprotein RNase P variant. However, the evolution and function of plant PRORPs are not fully understood. Here, we identified and characterized three PRORP-like proteins, PpPPR_63, 67, and 104, in the basal land plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. PpPPR_63 localizes to the nucleus, while PpPPR_67 and PpPPR_104 are found in both the mitochondria and chloroplasts. The three proteins displayed pre-tRNA 5'-end processing activity in vitro. Mutants with knockout (KO) of the PpPPR_63 gene displayed growth retardation of protonemal colonies, indicating that, unlike Arabidopsis nuclear RPORPs, the moss nuclear PpPPR_63 is not essential for viability. In the KO mutant, nuclear-encoded tRNAAsp (GUC) levels were slightly decreased, whereas most nuclear-encoded tRNA levels were not altered. This indicated that most of the cytosolic mature tRNAs were produced normally without proteinaceous RNase P-like PpPPR_63. Single PpPPR_67 or 104 gene KO mutants displayed different phenotypes of protonemal growth and chloroplast tRNA(Arg) (ACG) accumulation. However, the levels of all other tRNAs were not altered in the KO mutants. In addition, in vitro RNase P assays showed that PpPPR_67 and PpPPR_104 efficiently cleaved chloroplast pre-tRNA(Arg) (CCG) and pre-tRNA(Arg) (UCU) but they cleaved pre-tRNA(Arg) (ACG) with different efficiency. This suggests that the two proteins have overlapping function but their substrate specificity is not identical.

  15. A stromal heat shock protein 70 system functions in protein import into chloroplasts in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70s (Hsp70s) are encoded by a multigene family and are located in different cellular compartments. They have broad-ranging functions, including involvement in protein trafficking, prevention of protein aggregation, and assistance in protein folding. Hsp70s work together with their cochaperones, J domain proteins and nucleotide exchange factors (e.g., GrpEs), in a functional cycle of substrate binding and release accompanied by ATP hydrolysis. We have taken advantage of the gene targeting capability of the moss Physcomitrella patens to investigate the functions of chloroplast Hsp70s. We identified four Hsp70 genes and two GrpE cochaperone homolog genes (CGE) in moss that encode chloroplast proteins. Disruption of one of the Hsp70 genes, that for Hsp70-2, caused lethality, and protein import into heat-shocked chloroplasts isolated from temperature-sensitive hsp70-2 mutants was appreciably impaired. Whereas the double cge null mutant was not viable, we recovered a cge1 null/cge2 knock down mutant in which Hsp70-2 was upregulated. Chloroplasts isolated from this mutant demonstrated a defect in protein import. In addition, two different precursors staged as early import intermediates could be immunoprecipitated with an Hsp70-2-specific antibody. This immunoprecipitate also contained Hsp93 and Tic40, indicating that it represents a precursor still in the Toc/Tic translocon. Together, these data indicate that a stromal Hsp70 system plays a crucial role in protein import into chloroplasts.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Three PRORP Proteins in the Moss Physcomitrella patens: Nuclear PRORP Protein Is Not Essential for Moss Viability

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Korechika; Kometani, Kazuki; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    RNase P is a ubiquitous endonuclease that removes the 5′ leader sequence from pre-tRNAs in all organisms. In Arabidopsis thaliana, RNA-free proteinaceous RNase Ps (PRORPs) seem to be enzyme(s) for pre-tRNA 5′-end processing in organelles and the nucleus and are thought to have replaced the ribonucleoprotein RNase P variant. However, the evolution and function of plant PRORPs are not fully understood. Here, we identified and characterized three PRORP-like proteins, PpPPR_63, 67, and 104, in the basal land plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. PpPPR_63 localizes to the nucleus, while PpPPR_67 and PpPPR_104 are found in both the mitochondria and chloroplasts. The three proteins displayed pre-tRNA 5′-end processing activity in vitro. Mutants with knockout (KO) of the PpPPR_63 gene displayed growth retardation of protonemal colonies, indicating that, unlike Arabidopsis nuclear RPORPs, the moss nuclear PpPPR_63 is not essential for viability. In the KO mutant, nuclear-encoded tRNAAsp (GUC) levels were slightly decreased, whereas most nuclear-encoded tRNA levels were not altered. This indicated that most of the cytosolic mature tRNAs were produced normally without proteinaceous RNase P-like PpPPR_63. Single PpPPR_67 or 104 gene KO mutants displayed different phenotypes of protonemal growth and chloroplast tRNAArg (ACG) accumulation. However, the levels of all other tRNAs were not altered in the KO mutants. In addition, in vitro RNase P assays showed that PpPPR_67 and PpPPR_104 efficiently cleaved chloroplast pre-tRNAArg (CCG) and pre-tRNAArg (UCU) but they cleaved pre-tRNAArg (ACG) with different efficiency. This suggests that the two proteins have overlapping function but their substrate specificity is not identical. PMID:25272157

  17. CHASE domain-containing receptors play an essential role in the cytokinin response of the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Lindner, Ann-Cathrin; Gruhn, Njuscha; Šimura, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Gonneau, Martine; Nogué, Fabien; Heyl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    While the molecular basis for cytokinin action is quite well understood in flowering plants, little is known about the cytokinin signal transduction in early diverging land plants. The genome of the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S. encodes three classical cytokinin receptors, the CHASE domain-containing histidine kinases, CHK1, CHK2, and CHK3. In a complementation assay with protoplasts of receptor-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana as well as in cytokinin binding assays, we found evidence that CHK1 and CHK2 receptors can function in cytokinin perception. Using gene targeting, we generated a collection of CHK knockout mutants comprising single (Δchk1, Δchk2, Δchk3), double (Δchk1,2, Δchk1,3, Δchk2,3), and triple (Δchk1,2,3) mutants. Mutants were characterized for their cytokinin response and differentiation capacities. While the wild type did not grow on high doses of cytokinin (1 µM benzyladenine), the Δchk1,2,3 mutant exhibited normal protonema growth. Bud induction assays showed that all three cytokinin receptors contribute to the triggering of budding, albeit to different extents. Furthermore, while the triple mutant showed no response in this bioassay, the remaining mutants displayed budding responses in a diverse manner to different types and concentrations of cytokinins. Determination of cytokinin levels in mutants showed no drastic changes for any of the cytokinins; thus, in contrast to Arabidopsis, revealing only small impacts of cytokinin signaling on homeostasis. In summary, our study provides a first insight into the molecular action of cytokinin in an early diverging land plant and demonstrates that CHK receptors play an essential role in bud induction and gametophore development. PMID:26596764

  18. The nitric oxide production in the moss Physcomitrella patens is mediated by nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Medina-Andrés, Rigoberto; Solano-Peralta, Alejandro; Saucedo-Vázquez, Juan Pablo; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Pimentel-Cabrera, Jaime Arturo; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Lira-Ruan, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years multiple roles of the nitric oxide gas (•NO) have been uncovered in plant growth, development and many physiological processes. In seed plants the enzymatic synthesis of •NO is mediated by a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity performed by a still unknown enzyme(s) and nitrate reductase (NR). In green algae the •NO production has been linked only to NR activity, although a NOS gene was reported for Ostreococcus tauri and O. lucimarinus, no other Viridiplantae species has such gene. As there is no information about •NO synthesis neither for non-vascular plants nor for non-seed vascular plants, the interesting question regarding the evolution of the enzymatic •NO production systems during land plant natural history remains open. To address this issue the endogenous •NO production by protonema was demonstrated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The •NO signal was almost eliminated in plants treated with sodium tungstate, which also reduced the NR activity, demonstrating that in P. patens NR activity is the main source for •NO production. The analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed endogenous NO production and showed that •NO signal is accumulated in the cytoplasm of protonema cells. The results presented here show for the first time the •NO production in a non-vascular plant and demonstrate that the NR-dependent enzymatic synthesis of •NO is common for embryophytes and green algae.

  19. The Nitric Oxide Production in the Moss Physcomitrella patens Is Mediated by Nitrate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Andrés, Rigoberto; Solano-Peralta, Alejandro; Saucedo-Vázquez, Juan Pablo; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Pimentel-Cabrera, Jaime Arturo; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.; Lira-Ruan, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years multiple roles of the nitric oxide gas (•NO) have been uncovered in plant growth, development and many physiological processes. In seed plants the enzymatic synthesis of •NO is mediated by a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like activity performed by a still unknown enzyme(s) and nitrate reductase (NR). In green algae the •NO production has been linked only to NR activity, although a NOS gene was reported for Ostreococcus tauri and O. lucimarinus, no other Viridiplantae species has such gene. As there is no information about •NO synthesis neither for non-vascular plants nor for non-seed vascular plants, the interesting question regarding the evolution of the enzymatic •NO production systems during land plant natural history remains open. To address this issue the endogenous •NO production by protonema was demonstrated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The •NO signal was almost eliminated in plants treated with sodium tungstate, which also reduced the NR activity, demonstrating that in P. patens NR activity is the main source for •NO production. The analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed endogenous NO production and showed that •NO signal is accumulated in the cytoplasm of protonema cells. The results presented here show for the first time the •NO production in a non-vascular plant and demonstrate that the NR-dependent enzymatic synthesis of •NO is common for embryophytes and green algae. PMID:25742644

  20. Sliced microRNA targets and precise loop-first processing of MIR319 hairpins revealed by analysis of the Physcomitrella patens degradome

    PubMed Central

    Addo-Quaye, Charles; Snyder, Jo Ann; Park, Yong Bum; Li, Yong-Fang; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Axtell, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Expression profiling of the 5′ ends of uncapped mRNAs (“degradome” sequencing) can be used to empirically catalog microRNA (miRNA) targets, to probe patterns of miRNA hairpin processing, to examine mRNA decay, and to analyze accumulation of endogenous short interfering RNA (siRNA) precursors. We sequenced and analyzed the degradome of the moss Physcomitrella patens, an important model system for functional genomic analyses in plant evolution. A total of 52 target mRNAs of 27 different Physcomitrella miRNA families were identified. Many targets of both more conserved and less conserved miRNA families encoded putative regulatory proteins. Remnants of MIRNA hairpin processing also populated the degradome data and indicated an unusual “loop-first” mode of precise processing for the MIR319 gene family. Precise loop-first processing was confirmed for native Physcomitrella, rice, and Arabidopsis MIR319 hairpins, as well as an Arabidopsis artificial MIRNA (aMIRNA) based upon a MIR319 backbone. MIR319 is thus a conserved exception to the general rule of loop-last processing of MIRNA hairpins. Loop-first MIR319 processing may contribute to the high efficacy of a widely used MIR319-based strategy for aMIRNA production in plants. PMID:19850910

  1. The knock-out of ARP3a gene affects F-actin cytoskeleton organization altering cellular tip growth, morphology and development in moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Finka, Andrija; Saidi, Younousse; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Zrÿd, Jean-Pierre; Schaefer, Didier G

    2008-10-01

    The seven subunit Arp2/3 complex is a highly conserved nucleation factor of actin microfilaments. We have isolated the genomic sequence encoding a putative Arp3a protein of the moss Physcomitrella patens. The disruption of this ARP3A gene by allele replacement has generated loss-of-function mutants displaying a complex developmental phenotype. The loss-of function of ARP3A gene results in shortened, almost cubic chloronemal cells displaying affected tip growth and lacking differentiation to caulonemal cells. In moss arp3a mutants, buds differentiate directly from chloronemata to form stunted leafy shoots having differentiated leaves similar to wild type. Yet, rhizoids never differentiate from stem epidermal cells. To characterize the F-actin organization in the arp3a-mutated cells, we disrupted ARP3A gene in the previously described HGT1 strain expressing conditionally the GFP-talin marker. In vivo observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton during P. patens development demonstrated that loss-of-function of Arp3a is associated with the disappearance of specific F-actin cortical structures associated with the establishment of localized cellular growth domains. Finally, we show that constitutive expression of the P. patens Arp3a and its Arabidopsis thaliana orthologs efficiently complement the mutated phenotype indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservation of the Arp3 function in land plants.

  2. Involvement of the CYP78A subfamily of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in protonema growth and gametophore formation in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Takumi; Fukazawa, Jutarou; Magome, Hiroshi; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Natsume, Masahiro; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2011-01-01

    CYP78 is a plant-specific family of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, some members of which regulate the plastochron length and organ size in angiosperms. The CYP78 family appears to be highly conserved in land plants, but there have been no reports on the role of CYP78s in bryophytes. The moss, Physcomitrella patens, possesses two CYP78As, CYP78A27 and CYP78A28. We produced single and double mutants and overexpression lines for CYP78A27 and CYP78A28 by gene targeting to investigate the function of CYP78As in P. patens. Neither the cyp78a27 nor cyp78a28 single mutant showed any obvious phenotype, while the double mutant exhibited severely retarded protonemal growth and gametophore development. The endogenous levels of some plant hormones were also altered in the double mutant. Transgenic lines that overexpressed CYP78A27 or CYP78A28 showed delayed and reduced bud formation. Our results suggest that CYP78As participate in the synthesis of a critical growth regulator in P. patens.

  3. Large-scale gene expression profiling data for the model moss Physcomitrella patens aid understanding of developmental progression, culture and stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Hiss, Manuel; Laule, Oliver; Meskauskiene, Rasa M; Arif, Muhammad A; Decker, Eva L; Erxleben, Anika; Frank, Wolfgang; Hanke, Sebastian T; Lang, Daniel; Martin, Anja; Neu, Christina; Reski, Ralf; Richardt, Sandra; Schallenberg-Rüdinger, Mareike; Szövényi, Peter; Tiko, Theodhor; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Wolf, Luise; Zimmermann, Philip; Rensing, Stefan A

    2014-08-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an important model organism for studying plant evolution, development, physiology and biotechnology. Here we have generated microarray gene expression data covering the principal developmental stages, culture forms and some environmental/stress conditions. Example analyses of developmental stages and growth conditions as well as abiotic stress treatments demonstrate that (i) growth stage is dominant over culture conditions, (ii) liquid culture is not stressful for the plant, (iii) low pH might aid protoplastation by reduced expression of cell wall structure genes, (iv) largely the same gene pool mediates response to dehydration and rehydration, and (v) AP2/EREBP transcription factors play important roles in stress response reactions. With regard to the AP2 gene family, phylogenetic analysis and comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana shows commonalities as well as uniquely expressed family members under drought, light perturbations and protoplastation. Gene expression profiles for P. patens are available for the scientific community via the easy-to-use tool at https://www.genevestigator.com. By providing large-scale expression profiles, the usability of this model organism is further enhanced, for example by enabling selection of control genes for quantitative real-time PCR. Now, gene expression levels across a broad range of conditions can be accessed online for P. patens.

  4. Overexpression of RelA/SpoT homologs, PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b, induces the growth suppression of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Sato, Michio; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Ochi, Kozo; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Nabeta, Kensuke; Takahashi, Kosaku

    2015-01-01

    Two genes encoding RelA/SpoT homologs, PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b, which are involved in the synthesis of bacterial alarmone guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) for the stringent response, were isolated from the moss, Physcomitrella patens. A complementary analysis of PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b in Escherichia coli showed that these genes had ppGpp biosynthetic activity. The recombinant PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b were also shown to synthesize ppGpp in vitro. Both proteins were localized to the chloroplasts of P. patens. Expression of the PpRSH genes was induced upon treatment with abscisic acid or abiotic stresses, such as dehydration and UV irradiation. Overexpression of PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b caused suppression of the growth in response to 1% (w/v) of glucose. The present study suggests the existence of a mechanism to regulate the growth of P. patens, which is governed by plant RSH in chloroplasts.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of pectin-related gene families in Physcomitrella patens and nine other plant species yields evolutionary insights into cell walls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pectins are acidic sugar-containing polysaccharides that are universally conserved components of the primary cell walls of plants and modulate both tip and diffuse cell growth. However, many of their specific functions and the evolution of the genes responsible for producing and modifying them are incompletely understood. The moss Physcomitrella patens is emerging as a powerful model system for the study of plant cell walls. To identify deeply conserved pectin-related genes in Physcomitrella, we generated phylogenetic trees for 16 pectin-related gene families using sequences from ten plant genomes and analyzed the evolutionary relationships within these families. Results Contrary to our initial hypothesis that a single ancestral gene was present for each pectin-related gene family in the common ancestor of land plants, five of the 16 gene families, including homogalacturonan galacturonosyltransferases, polygalacturonases, pectin methylesterases, homogalacturonan methyltransferases, and pectate lyase-like proteins, show evidence of multiple members in the early land plant that gave rise to the mosses and vascular plants. Seven of the gene families, the UDP-rhamnose synthases, UDP-glucuronic acid epimerases, homogalacturonan galacturonosyltransferase-like proteins, β-1,4-galactan β-1,4-galactosyltransferases, rhamnogalacturonan II xylosyltransferases, and pectin acetylesterases appear to have had a single member in the common ancestor of land plants. We detected no Physcomitrella members in the xylogalacturonan xylosyltransferase, rhamnogalacturonan I arabinosyltransferase, pectin methylesterase inhibitor, or polygalacturonase inhibitor protein families. Conclusions Several gene families related to the production and modification of pectins in plants appear to have multiple members that are conserved as far back as the common ancestor of mosses and vascular plants. The presence of multiple members of these families even before the divergence of other

  6. WOX13-like genes are required for reprogramming of leaf and protoplast cells into stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Keiko; Reisewitz, Pascal; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Friedrich, Thomas; Ando, Sayuri; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Tamada, Yosuke; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Kurata, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Masaki; Deguchi, Hironori; Rensing, Stefan A; Werr, Wolfgang; Murata, Takashi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Laux, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Many differentiated plant cells can dedifferentiate into stem cells, reflecting the remarkable developmental plasticity of plants. In the moss Physcomitrella patens, cells at the wound margin of detached leaves become reprogrammed into stem cells. Here, we report that two paralogous P. patens WUSCHEL-related homeobox 13-like (PpWOX13L) genes, homologs of stem cell regulators in flowering plants, are transiently upregulated and required for the initiation of cell growth during stem cell formation. Concordantly, Δppwox13l deletion mutants fail to upregulate genes encoding homologs of cell wall loosening factors during this process. During the moss life cycle, most of the Δppwox13l mutant zygotes fail to expand and initiate an apical stem cell to form the embryo. Our data show that PpWOX13L genes are required for the initiation of cell growth specifically during stem cell formation, in analogy to WOX stem cell functions in seed plants, but using a different cellular mechanism.

  7. Structure and Function of Nucleoside Hydrolases from Physcomitrella patens and Maize Catalyzing the Hydrolysis of Purine, Pyrimidine, and Cytokinin Ribosides1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kopečná, Martina; Blaschke, Hanna; Kopečný, David; Vigouroux, Armelle; Končitíková, Radka; Novák, Ondřej; Kotland, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Moréra, Solange; von Schwartzenberg, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of the nucleoside N-ribohydrolase (NRH) family in two model plants, Physcomitrella patens (PpNRH) and maize (Zea mays; ZmNRH), using in vitro and in planta approaches. We identified two NRH subclasses in the plant kingdom; one preferentially targets the purine ribosides inosine and xanthosine, while the other is more active toward uridine and xanthosine. Both subclasses can hydrolyze plant hormones such as cytokinin ribosides. We also solved the crystal structures of two purine NRHs, PpNRH1 and ZmNRH3. Structural analyses, site-directed mutagenesis experiments, and phylogenetic studies were conducted to identify the residues responsible for the observed differences in substrate specificity between the NRH isoforms. The presence of a tyrosine at position 249 (PpNRH1 numbering) confers high hydrolase activity for purine ribosides, while an aspartate residue in this position confers high activity for uridine. Bud formation is delayed by knocking out single NRH genes in P. patens, and under conditions of nitrogen shortage, PpNRH1-deficient plants cannot salvage adenosine-bound nitrogen. All PpNRH knockout plants display elevated levels of certain purine and pyrimidine ribosides and cytokinins that reflect the substrate preferences of the knocked out enzymes. NRH enzymes thus have functions in cytokinin conversion and activation as well as in purine and pyrimidine metabolism. PMID:24170203

  8. Insights from the cold transcriptome of Physcomitrella patens: global specialization pattern of conserved transcriptional regulators and identification of orphan genes involved in cold acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Beike, Anna K; Lang, Daniel; Zimmer, Andreas D; Wüst, Florian; Trautmann, Danika; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Beyer, Peter; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The whole-genome transcriptomic cold stress response of the moss Physcomitrella patens was analyzed and correlated with phenotypic and metabolic changes. Based on time-series microarray experiments and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we characterized the transcriptomic changes related to early stress signaling and the initiation of cold acclimation. Transcription-associated protein (TAP)-encoding genes of P. patens and Arabidopsis thaliana were classified using generalized linear models. Physiological responses were monitored with pulse-amplitude-modulated fluorometry, high-performance liquid chromatography and targeted high-performance mass spectrometry. The transcript levels of 3220 genes were significantly affected by cold. Comparative classification revealed a global specialization of TAP families, a transcript accumulation of transcriptional regulators of the stimulus/stress response and a transcript decline of developmental regulators. Although transcripts of the intermediate to later response are from evolutionarily conserved genes, the early response is dominated by species-specific genes. These orphan genes may encode as yet unknown acclimation processes. PMID:25209349

  9. Sequence analysis of expressed sequence tags from an ABA-treated cDNA library identifies stress response genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Machuka, J; Bashiardes, S; Ruben, E; Spooner, K; Cuming, A; Knight, C; Cove, D

    1999-04-01

    Partial cDNA sequencing was used to obtain 169 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the moss, Physcomitrella patens. The source of ESTs was a random cDNA library constructed from 7 day-old protonemata following treatment with 10(-4) M abscisic acid (ABA). Analysis of the ESTs identified 69% with homology to known sequences, 61% of which had significant homology to sequences of plant origin. More importantly, at least 11 ESTs had significant similarities to genes which are implicated in plant stress-responses, including responses which may involve ABA. These included a cDNA associated with desiccation tolerance, two heat shock protein genes, one cold acclimation protein cDNA and five others that may be involved in either oxidative or chemical stress or both, i.e., Zn/Cu-superoxide dismutase, NADPH protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (PorB), selenium binding protein, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S transferase. Analysis of codon usage between P. patens and seed plants indicated that although mosses and higher plants are to a large extent similar, minor variations also exists that may represent the distinctiveness of each group.

  10. Abiotic stress-induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels of Group 3 LEA protein genes in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Shinde, Rupali; Downey, Frances; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2013-01-01

    The moss, Physcomitrella patens is a non-seed land plant belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period in Earth's history. Evidence suggests that mosses can be highly tolerant of abiotic stress. We showed previously that dehydration stress and abscisic acid treatments induced oscillations in steady-state levels of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) protein transcripts, and that removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of oscillatory increases in transcript levels. Here, we show that other abiotic stresses like salt and osmotic stresses also induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels and that the amplitudes of the oscillatory increases in steady-state transcript levels are reflective of the severity of the abiotic stress treatment. Together, our results suggest that oscillatory increases in transcript levels in response to abiotic stresses may be a general phenomenon in P. patens and that temporally dynamic increases in steady-state transcript levels may be important for adaptation to life in constantly fluctuating environmental conditions.

  11. Knockout of GH3 genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens leads to increased IAA levels at elevated temperature and in darkness.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jennifer; Gabrielyan, Anastasia; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-12-01

    Two proteins of the GRETCHEN HAGEN3 (GH3) family of acyl acid amido synthetases from the moss Physcomitrella patens conjugate indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to a series of amino acids. The possible function of altered auxin levels in the moss in response to two different growth perturbations, elevated temperatures and darkness, was analyzed using a) the recently described double knockout lines in both P. patens GH3 genes (GH3-doKO) and b) a previously characterized line harboring an auxin-inducible soybean GH3 promoter::reporter fused to β-glucuronidase (G1-GUS). The GUS activity as marker of the auxin response increased at higher temperatures and after cultivation in the darkness for a period of up to four weeks. Generally, the double knockout plants grew more slowly than the wild type (WT). The altered growth conditions influenced the phenotypes of the double knockout lines differently from that of WT moss. Higher temperatures negatively affected GH3-doKO plants compared to WT which was shown by stronger loss of chlorophyll. On the other hand, a positive effect was found on the concentrations of free IAA which increased at 28 °C in the GH3-doKO lines compared to WT plants. A different factor, namely darkness vs. a light/dark cycle caused the adverse phenotype concerning chlorophyll concentrations. Mutant moss plants showed higher chlorophyll concentrations than WT and these correlated with higher free IAA in the plant population that was classified as green. Our data show that growth perturbations result in higher free IAA levels in the GH3-doKO mutants, but in one case - growth in darkness - the mutants could cope better with the condition, whereas at elevated temperatures the mutants were more sensitive than WT. Thus, GH3 function in P. patens WT could lie in the regulation of IAA concentrations under unfavorable environmental conditions.

  12. Genetic Analysis of DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 Loop Function in Three-Dimensional Body Patterning in Physcomitrella patens1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Demko, Viktor; Perroud, Pierre-François; Johansen, Wenche; Delwiche, Charles F.; Cooper, Endymion D.; Remme, Pål; Ako, Ako Eugene; Kugler, Karl G.; Mayer, Klaus F.X.; Quatrano, Ralph; Olsen, Odd-Arne

    2014-01-01

    DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) of higher plants plays an essential role in position-dependent signaling and consists of a large transmembrane domain (MEM) linked to a protease catalytic domain and a regulatory domain. Here, we show that the postulated sensory Loop of the MEM domain plays an important role in the developmental regulation of DEK1 activity in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Compared with P. patens lacking DEK1 (∆dek1), the dek1∆loop mutant correctly positions the division plane in the bud apical cell. In contrast with an early developmental arrest of ∆dek1 buds, dek1∆loop develops aberrant gametophores lacking expanded phyllids resulting from misregulation of mitotic activity. In contrast with the highly conserved sequence of the protease catalytic domain, the Loop is highly variable in land plants. Functionally, the sequence from Marchantia polymorpha fully complements the dek1∆loop phenotype, whereas sequences from maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) give phenotypes with retarded growth and affected phyllid development. Bioinformatic analysis identifies MEM as a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily, membrane transporters reacting to stimuli from the external environment. Transcriptome analysis comparing wild-type and ∆dek1 tissues identifies an effect on two groups of transcripts connected to dek1 mutant phenotypes: transcripts related to cell wall remodeling and regulation of the AINTEGUMENTA, PLETHORA, and BABY BOOM2 (APB2) and APB3 transcription factors known to regulate bud initiation. Finally, sequence data support the hypothesis that the advanced charophyte algae that evolved into ancestral land plants lost cytosolic calpains, retaining DEK1 as the sole calpain in the evolving land plant lineage. PMID:25185121

  13. DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 is involved in (m)CG and (m)CCG DNA methylation and is essential for sporophyte development in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yaari, Rafael; Noy-Malka, Chen; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Auerbach Gershovitz, Nitzan; Reski, Ralf; Katz, Aviva; Ohad, Nir

    2015-07-01

    DNA methylation has a crucial role in plant development regulating gene expression and silencing of transposable elements. Maintenance DNA methylation in plants occurs at symmetrical (m)CG and (m)CHG contexts ((m) = methylated) and is maintained by DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1) and CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT) DNA methyltransferase protein families, respectively. While angiosperm genomes encode for several members of MET1 and CMT families, the moss Physcomitrella patens, serving as a model for early divergent land plants, carries a single member of each family. To determine the function of P. patens PpMET we generated ΔPpmet deletion mutant which lost (m)CG and unexpectedly (m)CCG methylation at loci tested. In order to evaluate the extent of (m)CCG methylation by MET1, we reexamined the Arabidopsis thaliana Atmet1 mutant methylome and found a similar pattern of methylation loss, suggesting that maintenance of DNA methylation by MET1 is conserved through land plant evolution. While ΔPpmet displayed no phenotypic alterations during its gametophytic phase, it failed to develop sporophytes, indicating that PpMET plays a role in gametogenesis or early sporophyte development. Expression array analysis revealed that the deletion of PpMET resulted in upregulation of two genes and multiple repetitive sequences. In parallel, expression analysis of the previously reported ΔPpcmt mutant showed that lack of PpCMT triggers overexpression of genes. This overexpression combined with loss of (m)CHG and its pleiotropic phenotype, implies that PpCMT has an essential evolutionary conserved role in the epigenetic control of gene expression. Collectively, our results suggest functional conservation of MET1 and CMT families during land plant evolution. A model describing the relationship between MET1 and CMT in CCG methylation is presented.

  14. The GID1-Mediated Gibberellin Perception Mechanism Is Conserved in the Lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii but Not in the Bryophyte Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ko; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asano, Kenji; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kojima, Mikiko; Katoh, Etsuko; Xiang, Hongyu; Tanahashi, Takako; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Banks, Jo Ann; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kitano, Hidemi; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis thaliana, gibberellin (GA) signaling is mediated by GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1) and DELLA proteins in collaboration with a GA-specific F-box protein. To explore when plants evolved the ability to perceive GA by the GID1/DELLA pathway, we examined these GA signaling components in the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. An in silico search identified several homologs of GID1, DELLA, and GID2, a GA-specific F-box protein in rice, in both species. Sm GID1a and Sm GID1b, GID1 proteins from S. moellendorffii, showed GA binding activity in vitro and interacted with DELLA proteins from S. moellendorffii in a GA-dependent manner in yeast. Introduction of constitutively expressed Sm GID1a, Sm G1D1b, and Sm GID2a transgenes rescued the dwarf phenotype of rice gid1 and gid2 mutants. Furthermore, treatment with GA4, a major GA in S. moellendorffii, caused downregulation of Sm GID1b, Sm GA20 oxidase, and Sm GA3 oxidase and degradation of the Sm DELLA1 protein. These results demonstrate that the homologs of GID1, DELLA, and GID2 work in a similar manner in S. moellendorffii and in flowering plants. Biochemical studies revealed that Sm GID1s have different GA binding properties from GID1s in flowering plants. No evidence was found for the functional conservation of these genes in P. patens, indicating that GID1/DELLA-mediated GA signaling, if present, differs from that in vascular plants. Our results suggest that GID1/DELLA-mediated GA signaling appeared after the divergence of vascular plants from the moss lineage. PMID:17965273

  15. Reannotation and extended community resources for the genome of the non-seed plant Physcomitrella patens provide insights into the evolution of plant gene structures and functions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The moss Physcomitrella patens as a model species provides an important reference for early-diverging lineages of plants and the release of the genome in 2008 opened the doors to genome-wide studies. The usability of a reference genome greatly depends on the quality of the annotation and the availability of centralized community resources. Therefore, in the light of accumulating evidence for missing genes, fragmentary gene structures, false annotations and a low rate of functional annotations on the original release, we decided to improve the moss genome annotation. Results Here, we report the complete moss genome re-annotation (designated V1.6) incorporating the increased transcript availability from a multitude of developmental stages and tissue types. We demonstrate the utility of the improved P. patens genome annotation for comparative genomics and new extensions to the cosmoss.org resource as a central repository for this plant “flagship” genome. The structural annotation of 32,275 protein-coding genes results in 8387 additional loci including 1456 loci with known protein domains or homologs in Plantae. This is the first release to include information on transcript isoforms, suggesting alternative splicing events for at least 10.8% of the loci. Furthermore, this release now also provides information on non-protein-coding loci. Functional annotations were improved regarding quality and coverage, resulting in 58% annotated loci (previously: 41%) that comprise also 7200 additional loci with GO annotations. Access and manual curation of the functional and structural genome annotation is provided via the http://www.cosmoss.org model organism database. Conclusions Comparative analysis of gene structure evolution along the green plant lineage provides novel insights, such as a comparatively high number of loci with 5’-UTR introns in the moss. Comparative analysis of functional annotations reveals expansions of moss house-keeping and metabolic genes

  16. The Polycomb group protein CLF emerges as a specific tri-methylase of H3K27 regulating gene expression and development in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Pereman, Idan; Mosquna, Assaf; Katz, Aviva; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Lang, Daniel; Decker, Eva L; Tamada, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Takaaki; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Reski, Ralf; Ohad, Nir

    2016-07-01

    Packaging of eukaryotic DNA largely depends on histone modifications that affect the accessibility of DNA to transcriptional regulators, thus controlling gene expression. The Polycomb group (PcG) chromatin remodeling complex deposits a methyl group on lysine 27 of histone 3 leading to repressed gene expression. Plants encode homologs of the Enhancer of zeste (E(z)), a component of the PcG complex from Drosophila, one of which is a SET domain protein designated CURLY LEAF (CLF). Although this SET domain protein exhibits a strong correlation with the presence of the H3K27me3 mark in plants, the methyl-transferase activity and specificity of its SET domain have not been directly tested in-vivo. Using the evolutionary early-diverged land plant model species Physcomitrella patens we show that abolishment of a single copy gene PpCLF, as well as an additional member of the PcG complex, FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (PpFIE), results in a specific loss of tri-methylation of H3K27. Using site-directed mutagenesis of key residues, we revealed that H3K27 tri-methylation is mediated by the SET domain of the CLF protein. Moreover, the abolishment of H3K27me3 led to enhanced expression of transcription factor genes. This in turn led to the development of fertilization-independent sporophyte-like structures, as observed in PpCLF and PpFIE null mutants. Overall, our results demonstrate the role of PpCLF as a SET protein in tri-methylation of H3K27 in-vivo and the importance of this modification in regulating the expression of transcription factor genes involved in developmental programs of P. patens.

  17. Cytokinins in the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens: analyses of activity, distribution, and cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase overexpression reveal the role of extracellular cytokinins.

    PubMed

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Núñez, Marta Fernández; Blaschke, Hanna; Dobrev, Petre I; Novák, Ondrej; Motyka, Václav; Strnad, Miroslav

    2007-11-01

    Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to establish the cytokinin profile of the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S.G.; of 40 analyzed cytokinins, 20 were detected. cis-Zeatin-riboside-O-glucoside, N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenosine-5'-monophosphate (iPRMP), and trans-zeatin-riboside-O-glucoside were the most abundant intracellular cytokinins. In addition, the aromatic cytokinins N(6)-benzyladenosine (BAR), N(6)-benzyladenine, meta-, and ortho-topolin were detected. Unexpectedly, the most abundant extracellular cytokinin was the nucleotide iPRMP, and its identity was confirmed by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The effects of overexpressing a heterologous cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX; EC 1.4.3.18/1.5.99.12) gene (AtCKX2 from Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]) on the intracellular and extracellular distribution of cytokinins was assessed. In cultures of CKX-transformed plants, ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry measurements showed that there were pronounced reductions in the extracellular concentrations of N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenine (iP) and N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenosine (iPR), but their intracellular cytokinin concentrations were only slightly affected. In vitro and in vivo measured CKX activity was shown to be strongly increased in the transformants. Major phenotypic changes observed in the CKX-overexpressing plants included reduced and retarded budding, absence of sexual reproduction, and abnormal protonema cells. In bud-induction bioassays with wild-type Physcomitrella, the nucleotides iPRMP, trans-zeatin-riboside-5'-monophosphate, BAR monophosphate, and the cis-zeatin forms cZ and cZR had no detectable effects, while the activities displayed by other selected cytokinins were in the following order: iP > tZ > N(6)-benzyladenine > BAR > iPR > tZR > meta-topolin > dihydrozeatin > ortho-topolin. The results on wild type and CKX transgenics suggest that

  18. Recovery from heat, salt and osmotic stress in Physcomitrella patens requires a functional small heat shock protein PpHsp16.4

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant small heat shock proteins (sHsps) accumulate in response to various environmental stresses, including heat, drought, salt and oxidative stress. Numerous studies suggest a role for these proteins in stress tolerance by preventing stress-induced protein aggregation as well as by facilitating protein refolding by other chaperones. However, in vivo evidence for the involvement of sHsps in tolerance to different stress factors is still missing, mainly due to the lack of appropriate mutants in specific sHsp genes. Results In this study we characterized the function of a sHsp in abiotic stress tolerance in the moss Physcomitrella patens, a model for primitive land plants. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, we isolated an abscisic acid-upregulated gene from P. patens encoding a 16.4 kDa cytosolic class II sHsp. PpHsp16.4 was also induced by salicylic acid, dithiothreitol (DTT) and by exposure to various stimuli, including osmotic and salt stress, but not by oxidative stress-inducing compounds. Expression of the gene was maintained upon stress relief, suggesting a role for this protein in the recovery stage. PpHsp16.4 is encoded by two identical genes arranged in tandem in the genome. Targeted disruption of both genes resulted in the inability of plants to recover from heat, salt and osmotic stress. In vivo localization studies revealed that PpHsp16.4 localized in cytosolic granules in the vicinity of chloroplasts under non stress conditions, suggesting possible distinct roles for this protein under stress and optimal growth. Conclusions We identified a member of the class II sHsp family that showed hormonal and abiotic stress gene regulation. Induction of the gene by DTT treatment suggests that damaged proteins may act as signals for the stress-induction of PpHsp16.4. The product of this gene was shown to localize in cytosolic granules near the chloroplasts, suggesting a role for the protein in association with these organelles. Our study

  19. Genetic Analysis of Physcomitrella patens Identifies ABSCISIC ACID NON-RESPONSIVE, a Regulator of ABA Responses Unique to Basal Land Plants and Required for Desiccation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Sean R; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Trinh, Chi H; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry W; Grimwood, Jane; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; Rensing, Stefan A; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J; Li, Fay-Wei; Larsson, Anders; Wong, Gane K-S; Edwards, Thomas A; Cuming, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    The anatomically simple plants that first colonized land must have acquired molecular and biochemical adaptations to drought stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) coordinates responses leading to desiccation tolerance in all land plants. We identified ABA nonresponsive mutants in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and genotyped a segregating population to map and identify the ABA NON-RESPONSIVE (ANR) gene encoding a modular protein kinase comprising an N-terminal PAS domain, a central EDR domain, and a C-terminal MAPKKK-like domain. anr mutants fail to accumulate dehydration tolerance-associated gene products in response to drought, ABA, or osmotic stress and do not acquire ABA-dependent desiccation tolerance. The crystal structure of the PAS domain, determined to 1.7-Å resolution, shows a conserved PAS-fold that dimerizes through a weak dimerization interface. Targeted mutagenesis of a conserved tryptophan residue within the PAS domain generates plants with ABA nonresponsive growth and strongly attenuated ABA-responsive gene expression, whereas deleting this domain retains a fully ABA-responsive phenotype. ANR orthologs are found in early-diverging land plant lineages and aquatic algae but are absent from more recently diverged vascular plants. We propose that ANR genes represent an ancestral adaptation that enabled drought stress survival of the first terrestrial colonizers but were lost during land plant evolution.

  20. Homologues of the Arabidopsis thaliana SHI/STY/LRP1 genes control auxin biosynthesis and affect growth and development in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Eklund, D Magnus; Thelander, Mattias; Landberg, Katarina; Ståldal, Veronika; Nilsson, Anders; Johansson, Monika; Valsecchi, Isabel; Pederson, Eric R A; Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Ljung, Karin; Ronne, Hans; Sundberg, Eva

    2010-04-01

    The plant hormone auxin plays fundamental roles in vascular plants. Although exogenous auxin also stimulates developmental transitions and growth in non-vascular plants, the effects of manipulating endogenous auxin levels have thus far not been reported. Here, we have altered the levels and sites of auxin production and accumulation in the moss Physcomitrella patens by changing the expression level of homologues of the Arabidopsis SHI/STY family proteins, which are positive regulators of auxin biosynthesis genes. Constitutive expression of PpSHI1 resulted in elevated auxin levels, increased and ectopic expression of the auxin response reporter GmGH3pro:GUS, and in an increased caulonema/chloronema ratio, an effect also induced by exogenous auxin application. In addition, we observed premature ageing and necrosis in cells ectopically expressing PpSHI1. Knockout of either of the two PpSHI genes resulted in reduced auxin levels and auxin biosynthesis rates in leafy shoots, reduced internode elongation, delayed ageing, a decreased caulonema/chloronema ratio and an increased number of axillary hairs, which constitute potential auxin biosynthesis sites. Some of the identified auxin functions appear to be analogous in vascular and non-vascular plants. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal expression of the PpSHI genes and GmGH3pro:GUS strongly overlap, suggesting that local auxin biosynthesis is important for the regulation of auxin peak formation in non-vascular plants.

  1. Auxin promotes the transition from chloronema to caulonema in moss protonema by positively regulating PpRSL1and PpRSL2 in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Jang, Geupil; Dolan, Liam

    2011-10-01

    Protonemata are multicellular filamentous networks that develop following the germination of a haploid moss spore and comprise two different cell types - chloronema and caulonema. The ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1 (PpRSL1) and PpRSL2 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and auxin promote the development of caulonema in Physcomitrella patens but the mechanism by which these regulators interact during development is unknown. We characterized the role of auxin in regulating the function of PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 in the chloronema-to-caulonema transition during protonema development. Here, we showed that a gradient of cell identity developed along protonemal filaments; cells were chloronemal in proximal regions near the site of spore germination becoming progressively more caulonemal distally as filaments elongated. Auxin controlled this transition by positively regulating the expression of PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 genes. Auxin did not induce caulonemal development in Pprsl1 Pprsl2 double mutants that lack PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 gene activity while constitutive co-expression of PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 in the absence of auxin was sufficient to program constitutive caulonema development. Together, these data indicate that auxin positively regulates PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 whose expression is sufficient to promote caulonema differentiation in moss protonema.

  2. The PpCMT chromomethylase affects cell growth and interacts with the homolog of LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Dangwal, Meenakshi; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2014-02-01

    Chromomethylases (CMTs) are plant-specific cytosine DNA methyltransferases that are involved in maintenance of CpNpG methylation. In seed plants, histone methylation and interaction of CMT with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (LHP1) is essential for recruitment of CMT to target sites. LHP1 has been characterized as a putative component of the POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 (PRC1) in plants, and functions downstream of PRC2 to maintain genes in repressed state for orchestrated development. In the present study, we show that targeted disruption of PpCMT results in an approximately 50% reduction in global cytosine methylation levels. This affects growth of apical cells, predominantly growth of side branch initials emerging from chloronema cells. In some places, these cells develop thick walls with plasmolyzed cellular contents. Transcript accumulation patterns of genes involved in apical cell extension and metabolism of hemicelluloses, such as xyloglucans, in the primary cell walls decreased many fold in ppcmt mutant lines, as determined by real-time PCR. Using yeast two-hybrid method and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we show that PpCMT and PpLHP1 interact through their chromo domains, while PpLHP1 homodimerizes through its chromo shadow domain. The results presented in this study provide insight into the role of the single chromomethylase, PpCMT, in proliferation of protonema filaments, and shed light on the evolutionary conservation of proteins interacting with these methylases in the early land plant, Physcomitrella patens.

  3. MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN65 is essential for maintenance of phragmoplast bipolarity and formation of the cell plate in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kosetsu, Ken; de Keijzer, Jeroen; Janson, Marcel E; Goshima, Gohta

    2013-11-01

    The phragmoplast, a plant-specific apparatus that mediates cytokinesis, mainly consists of microtubules (MTs) arranged in a bipolar fashion, such that their plus ends interdigitate at the equator. Membrane vesicles are thought to move along the MTs toward the equator and fuse to form the cell plate. Although several genes required for phragmoplast MT organization have been identified, the mechanisms that maintain the bipolarity of phragmoplasts remain poorly understood. Here, we show that engaging phragmoplast MTs in a bipolar fashion in protonemal cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens requires the conserved MT cross-linking protein MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN65 (MAP65). Simultaneous knockdown of the three MAP65s expressed in those cells severely compromised MT interdigitation at the phragmoplast equator after anaphase onset, resulting in the collapse of the phragmoplast in telophase. Cytokinetic vesicles initially localized to the anaphase midzone as normal but failed to further accumulate in the next several minutes, although the bipolarity of the MT array was preserved. Our data indicate that the presence of bipolar MT arrays is insufficient for vesicle accumulation at the equator and further suggest that MAP65-mediated MT interdigitation is a prerequisite for maintenance of bipolarity of the phragmoplast and accumulation and/or fusion of cell plate-destined vesicles at the equatorial plane.

  4. An ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Is Required for Cuticular Wax Deposition and Desiccation Tolerance in the Moss Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Gregory J.; Barnes, William J.; Fich, Eric A.; Park, Sungjin; Yeats, Trevor H.; Zhao, Lingxia; Domozych, David S.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant cuticle is thought to be a critical evolutionary adaptation that allowed the first plants to colonize land, because of its key roles in regulating plant water status and providing protection from biotic and abiotic stresses. Much has been learned about cuticle composition and structure through genetic and biochemical studies of angiosperms, as well as underlying genetic pathways, but little is known about the cuticles of early diverging plant lineages. Here, we demonstrate that the moss Physcomitrella patens, an extant relative of the earliest terrestrial plants, has a cuticle that is analogous in both structure and chemical composition to those of angiosperms. To test whether the underlying cuticle biosynthetic pathways were also shared among distant plant lineages, we generated a genetic knockout of the moss ATP binding cassette subfamily G (ABCG) transporter Pp-ABCG7, a putative ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana ABCG transporters involved in cuticle precursor trafficking. We show that this mutant is severely deficient in cuticular wax accumulation and has a reduced tolerance of desiccation stress compared with the wild type. This work provides evidence that the cuticle was an adaptive feature present in the first terrestrial plants and that the genes involved in their formation have been functionally conserved for over 450 million years. PMID:24163310

  5. The moss Physcomitrella patens contains cyclopentenones but no jasmonates: mutations in allene oxide cyclase lead to reduced fertility and altered sporophyte morphology.

    PubMed

    Stumpe, Michael; Göbel, Cornelia; Faltin, Bernd; Beike, Anna K; Hause, Bettina; Himmelsbach, Kiyoshi; Bode, Julia; Kramell, Robert; Wasternack, Claus; Frank, Wolfgang; Reski, Ralf; Feussner, Ivo

    2010-11-01

    • Two cDNAs encoding allene oxide cyclases (PpAOC1, PpAOC2), key enzymes in the formation of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor (9S,13S)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-(+)-OPDA), were isolated from the moss Physcomitrella patens. • Recombinant PpAOC1 and PpAOC2 show substrate specificity against the allene oxide derived from 13-hydroperoxy linolenic acid (13-HPOTE); PpAOC2 also shows substrate specificity against the allene oxide derived from 12-hydroperoxy arachidonic acid (12-HPETE). • In protonema and gametophores the occurrence of cis-(+)-OPDA, but neither JA nor the isoleucine conjugate of JA nor that of cis-(+)-OPDA was detected. • Targeted knockout mutants for PpAOC1 and for PpAOC2 were generated, while double mutants could not be obtained. The ΔPpAOC1 and ΔPpAOC2 mutants showed reduced fertility, aberrant sporophyte morphology and interrupted sporogenesis.

  6. Cloning and functional characterisation of an enzyme involved in the elongation of Delta6-polyunsaturated fatty acids from the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Zank, Thorsten K; Zähringer, Ulrich; Beckmann, Christoph; Pohnert, Georg; Boland, Wilhelm; Holtorf, Hauke; Reski, Ralf; Lerchl, Jens; Heinz, Ernst

    2002-08-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens contains high proportions of polyunsaturated very-long-chain fatty acids with up to 20 carbon atoms. Starting from preformed C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids, their biosynthesis involves a sequence of Delta6-desaturation, Delta6-elongation and Delta5-desaturation. In this report we describe for the first time the characterisation of a cDNA (PSE1) of plant origin with homology to the ELO-genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a component of the Delta6-elongase. Functional expression of PSE1 in S. cerevisiae led to the elongation of exogenously supplied Delta6-polyunsaturated fatty acids. By feeding experiments with different trienoic fatty acids of natural and synthetic origin, both substrate specificity and substrate selectivity of the enzyme were investigated. The activity of Pse1, when expressed in yeast, was not sensitive to the antibiotic cerulenin, which is an effective inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis and elongation. Furthermore, the PSE1 gene was disrupted in the moss by homologous recombination. This led to a complete loss of all C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids providing additional evidence for the function of the cDNA as coding for a component of the Delta6-elongase. The elimination of the elongase was not accompanied by a visible alteration in the phenotype, indicating that C20-PUFAs are not essential for viability of the moss under phytotron conditions.

  7. ATP requirement for chloroplast protein import is set by the Km for ATP hydrolysis of stromal Hsp70 in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; McNeilage, Robert T; Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    The 70-kD family of heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) is involved in a number of seemingly disparate cellular functions, including folding of nascent proteins, breakup of misfolded protein aggregates, and translocation of proteins across membranes. They act through the binding and release of substrate proteins, accompanied by hydrolysis of ATP. Chloroplast stromal Hsp70 plays a crucial role in the import of proteins into plastids. Mutations of an ATP binding domain Thr were previously reported to result in an increase in the Km for ATP and a decrease in the enzyme's kcat. To ask which chloroplast stromal chaperone, Hsp70 or Hsp93, both of which are ATPases, dominates the energetics of the motor responsible for protein import, we made transgenic moss (Physcomitrella patens) harboring the Km-altering mutation in the essential stromal Hsp70-2 and measured the effect on the amount of ATP required for protein import into chloroplasts. Here, we report that increasing the Km for ATP hydrolysis of Hsp70 translated into an increased Km for ATP usage by chloroplasts for protein import. This thus directly demonstrates that the ATP-derived energy long known to be required for chloroplast protein import is delivered via the Hsp70 chaperones and that the chaperone's ATPase activity dominates the energetics of the reaction.

  8. Strigolactone biosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved, regulated by phosphate starvation and contributes to resistance against phytopathogenic fungi in a moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Decker, Eva L; Alder, Adrian; Hunn, Stefan; Ferguson, Jenny; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Scheler, Bjoern; Kerres, Klaus L; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Safavi-Rizi, Vajiheh; Nordzieke, Steffen; Balakrishna, Aparna; Baz, Lina; Avalos, Javier; Valkonen, Jari P T; Reski, Ralf; Al-Babili, Salim

    2017-03-06

    In seed plants, strigolactones (SLs) regulate architecture and induce mycorrhizal symbiosis in response to environmental cues. SLs are formed by combined activity of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) 7 and 8 from 9-cis-β-carotene, leading to carlactone that is converted by cytochromes P450 (clade 711; MAX1 in Arabidopsis) into various SLs. As Physcomitrella patens possesses CCD7 and CCD8 homologs but lacks MAX1, we investigated if PpCCD7 together with PpCCD8 form carlactone and how deletion of these enzymes influences growth and interactions with the environment. We investigated the enzymatic activity of PpCCD7 and PpCCD8 in vitro, identified the formed products by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and LC-MS, and generated and analysed ΔCCD7 and ΔCCD8 mutants. We defined enzymatic activity of PpCCD7 as a stereospecific 9-cis-CCD and PpCCD8 as a carlactone synthase. ΔCCD7 and ΔCCD8 lines showed enhanced caulonema growth, which was revertible by adding the SL analogue GR24 or carlactone. Wild-type (WT) exudates induced seed germination in Orobanche ramosa. This activity was increased upon phosphate starvation and abolished in exudates of both mutants. Furthermore, both mutants showed increased susceptibility to phytopathogenic fungi. Our study reveals the deep evolutionary conservation of SL biosynthesis, SL function, and its regulation by biotic and abiotic cues.

  9. Genetic analysis of Physcomitrella patens identifies ABSCISIC ACID NON-RESPONSIVE, a regulator of ABA responses unique to basal land plants and required for desiccation tolerance

    DOE PAGES

    Stevenson, Sean Ross; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Trinh, Chi H.; ...

    2016-05-18

    The anatomically simple plants that first colonized land must have acquired molecular and biochemical adaptations to drought stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) coordinates responses leading to desiccation tolerance in all land plants. We identified ABA nonresponsive mutants in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and genotyped a segregating population to map and identify the ABA NON-RESPONSIVE (ANR) gene encoding a modular protein kinase comprising an N-terminal PAS domain, a central EDR domain, and a C-terminal MAPKKK-like domain. anr mutants fail to accumulate dehydration tolerance-associated gene products in response to drought, ABA, or osmotic stress and do not acquire ABA-dependent desiccation tolerance. Themore » crystal structure of the PAS domain, determined to 1.7-Å resolution, shows a conserved PAS-fold that dimerizes through a weak dimerization interface. Targeted mutagenesis of a conserved tryptophan residue within the PAS domain generates plants with ABA nonresponsive growth and strongly attenuated ABA-responsive gene expression, whereas deleting this domain retains a fully ABA-responsive phenotype. ANR orthologs are found in early-diverging land plant lineages and aquatic algae but are absent from more recently diverged vascular plants. Lastly, we propose that ANR genes represent an ancestral adaptation that enabled drought stress survival of the first terrestrial colonizers but were lost during land plant evolution.« less

  10. Physcomitrella patens activates reinforcement of the cell wall, programmed cell death and accumulation of evolutionary conserved defence signals, such as salicylic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, but not jasmonic acid, upon Botrytis cinerea infection.

    PubMed

    Ponce De León, Inés; Schmelz, Eric A; Gaggero, Carina; Castro, Alexandra; Álvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos

    2012-10-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an evolutionarily basal model system suitable for the analysis of plant defence responses activated after pathogen assault. Upon infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea, several defence mechanisms are induced in P. patens, including the fortification of the plant cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and the induced expression of related genes. Botrytis cinerea infection also activates the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and cell death with hallmarks of programmed cell death in moss tissues. Salicylic acid (SA) levels also increase after fungal infection, and treatment with SA enhances transcript accumulation of the defence gene phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) in P. patens colonies. The expression levels of the genes involved in 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) synthesis, including lipoxygenase (LOX) and allene oxide synthase (AOS), increase in P. patens gametophytes after pathogen assault, together with a rise in free linolenic acid and OPDA concentrations. However, jasmonic acid (JA) could not be detected in healthy or infected tissues of this plant. Our results suggest that, although conserved defence signals, such as SA and OPDA, are synthesized and are probably involved in the defence response of P. patens against B. cinerea infection, JA production appears to be missing. Interestingly, P. patens responds to OPDA and methyl jasmonate by reducing moss colony growth and rhizoid length, suggesting that jasmonate perception is present in mosses. Thus, P. patens can provide clues with regard to the evolution of different defence pathways in plants, including signalling and perception of OPDA and jasmonates in nonflowering and flowering plants.

  11. Identification of the single amino acid involved in quenching the ent-kauranyl cation by a water molecule in ent-kaurene synthase of Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kawaide, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kawanabe, Ryo; Sakigi, Yuka; Matsuo, Akihiko; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    ent-Kaurene is a tetracyclic diterpene hydrocarbon and a biosynthetic intermediate of the plant hormone gibberellins. In flowering plants, ent-kaurene is biosynthesized from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) by two distinct cyclases, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS). Recently, the moss Physcomitrella patens ent-kaurene biosynthetic gene was cloned and functionally characterized. The bifunctional ent-kaurene synthase [P. patens CPS/KS (PpCPS/KS)] produces both ent-kaurene and 16α-hydroxy-ent-kaurane from GGDP via ent-copalyl diphosphate. Here, we cloned and analyzed the function of a cDNA encoding bifunctional ent-kaurene synthase from the liverwort Jungermannia subulata [J. subulata CPS/KS (JsCPS/KS)]. JsCPS/KS catalyzes the cyclization reaction of GGDP to produce ent-kaurene but not 16α-hydroxy-ent-kaurane, even though the PpCPS/KS (881 amino acids) and JsCPS/KS (886 amino acids) sequences share 60% identity. To determine the regions and amino acids involved in 16α-hydroxy-ent-kaurane formation, we analyzed the enzymic functions of JsCPS/KS and PpCPS/KS chimeric proteins. When the C-terminal region of PpCPS/KS was exchanged with the JsCPS/KS C-terminal region, the chimeric cyclases produced only ent-kaurene. The replacement of PpCPS/KS Ala710 with Met or Phe produced a JsCPS/KS-type cyclase that converted GGDP to ent-kaurene as the sole product. In contrast, replacing Ala710 with Gly, Cys or Ser did not affect the PpCPS/KS product profile as much as replacement of Cys of JsCPS/KS by Ala. Thus, the hydrophobicity and size of the side chain residue at the PpCPS/KS amino acid 710 is responsible for quenching the ent-kauranyl cation by the addition of a water molecule.

  12. Crystal Structures of Physcomitrella patens AOC1 and AOC2: Insights into the Enzyme Mechanism and Differences in Substrate Specificity1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Piotr; Brodhun, Florian; Sauer, Kristin; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Hamberg, Mats; Brinkmann, Jens; Scholz, Julia; Dickmanns, Achim; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    In plants, oxylipins regulate developmental processes and defense responses. The first specific step in the biosynthesis of the cyclopentanone class of oxylipins is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC) that forms cis(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. The moss Physcomitrella patens has two AOCs (PpAOC1 and PpAOC2) with different substrate specificities for C18- and C20-derived substrates, respectively. To better understand AOC’s catalytic mechanism and to elucidate the structural properties that explain the differences in substrate specificity, we solved and analyzed the crystal structures of 36 monomers of both apo and ligand complexes of PpAOC1 and PpAOC2. From these data, we propose the following intermediates in AOC catalysis: (1) a resting state of the apo enzyme with a closed conformation, (2) a first shallow binding mode, followed by (3) a tight binding of the substrate accompanied by conformational changes in the binding pocket, and (4) initiation of the catalytic cycle by opening of the epoxide ring. As expected, the substrate dihydro analog cis-12,13S-epoxy-9Z,15Z-octadecadienoic acid did not cyclize in the presence of PpAOC1; however, when bound to the enzyme, it underwent isomerization into the corresponding trans-epoxide. By comparing complex structures of the C18 substrate analog with in silico modeling of the C20 substrate analog bound to the enzyme allowed us to identify three major molecular determinants responsible for the different substrate specificities (i.e. larger active site diameter, an elongated cavity of PpAOC2, and two nonidentical residues at the entrance of the active site). PMID:22987885

  13. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of the effects of sub-ambient atmospheric oxygen and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on gametophytes of the moss, Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Suhas; Behpouri, Ali; McElwain, Jennifer C.; Ng, Carl K.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that atmospheric O2 has played a key role in the development of life on Earth, as evident from the coincidence between the rise of atmospheric O2 concentrations in the Precambrian and biological evolution. Additionally, it has also been suggested that low atmospheric O2 is one of the major drivers for at least two of the five mass-extinction events in the Phanerozoic. At the molecular level, our understanding of the responses of plants to sub-ambient O2 concentrations is largely confined to studies of the responses of underground organs, e.g. roots to hypoxic conditions. Oxygen deprivation often results in elevated CO2 levels, particularly under waterlogged conditions, due to slower gas diffusion in water compared to air. In this study, changes in the transcriptome of gametophytes of the moss Physcomitrella patens arising from exposure to sub-ambient O2 of 13% (oxygen deprivation) and elevated CO2 (1500 ppmV) were examined to further our understanding of the responses of lower plants to changes in atmospheric gaseous composition. Microarray analyses revealed that the expression of a large number of genes was affected under elevated CO2 (814 genes) and sub-ambient O2 conditions (576 genes). Intriguingly, the expression of comparatively fewer numbers of genes (411 genes) was affected under a combination of both sub-ambient O2 and elevated CO2 condition (low O2–high CO2). Overall, the results point towards the effects of atmospheric changes in CO2 and O2 on transcriptional reprogramming, photosynthetic regulation, carbon metabolism, and stress responses. PMID:25948702

  14. Pseudo-response regulator (PRR) homologues of the moss Physcomitrella patens: insights into the evolution of the PRR family in land plants.

    PubMed

    Satbhai, Santosh B; Yamashino, Takafumi; Okada, Ryo; Nomoto, Yuji; Mizuno, Takeshi; Tezuka, Yuki; Itoh, Tomonori; Tomita, Mitsuru; Otsuki, Susumu; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2011-02-01

    The pseudo-response regulators (PRRs) are the circadian clock component proteins in the model dicot Arabidopsis thaliana. They contain a receiver-like domain (RLD) similar to the receiver domains of the RRs in the His-Asp phosphorelay system, but the RLDs lack the phosphoacceptor aspartic acid residue invariably conserved in the receiver domains. To study the evolution of PRR genes in plants, here we characterize their homologue genes, PpPRR1, PpPRR2, PpPRR3 and PpPRR4, from the moss Physcomitrella patens. In the phylogenetic analysis, PpPRRs cluster together, sister to an angiosperm PRR gene subfamily, illustrating their close relationships with the angiosperm PRRs. However, distinct from the angiosperm sequences, the RLDs of PpPRR2/3/4 exhibit a potential phosphoacceptor aspartic acid-aspartic acid-lysine (DDK) motif. Consistently, the PpPRR2 RLD had phosphotransfer ability in vitro, suggesting that PpPRR2 functions as an RR. The PpPRR1 RLD, on the other hand, shows a partially diverged DDK motif, and it did not show phosphotransfer ability. All PpPRRs were expressed in a circadian and light-dependent manner, with differential regulation between PpPRR2/4 and PpPRR1/3. Altogether, our results illustrate that PRRs originated from an RR(s) and that there are intraspecific divergences among PpPRRs. Finally, we offer scenarios for the evolution of the PRR family in land plants.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of the effects of sub-ambient atmospheric oxygen and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on gametophytes of the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Behpouri, Ali; McElwain, Jennifer C; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2015-07-01

    It is widely accepted that atmospheric O2 has played a key role in the development of life on Earth, as evident from the coincidence between the rise of atmospheric O2 concentrations in the Precambrian and biological evolution. Additionally, it has also been suggested that low atmospheric O2 is one of the major drivers for at least two of the five mass-extinction events in the Phanerozoic. At the molecular level, our understanding of the responses of plants to sub-ambient O2 concentrations is largely confined to studies of the responses of underground organs, e.g. roots to hypoxic conditions. Oxygen deprivation often results in elevated CO2 levels, particularly under waterlogged conditions, due to slower gas diffusion in water compared to air. In this study, changes in the transcriptome of gametophytes of the moss Physcomitrella patens arising from exposure to sub-ambient O2 of 13% (oxygen deprivation) and elevated CO2 (1500 ppmV) were examined to further our understanding of the responses of lower plants to changes in atmospheric gaseous composition. Microarray analyses revealed that the expression of a large number of genes was affected under elevated CO2 (814 genes) and sub-ambient O2 conditions (576 genes). Intriguingly, the expression of comparatively fewer numbers of genes (411 genes) was affected under a combination of both sub-ambient O2 and elevated CO2 condition (low O2-high CO2). Overall, the results point towards the effects of atmospheric changes in CO2 and O2 on transcriptional reprogramming, photosynthetic regulation, carbon metabolism, and stress responses.

  16. The MOSS Physcomitrella patens reproductive organ development is highly organized, affected by the two SHI/STY genes and by the level of active auxin in the SHI/STY expression domain.

    PubMed

    Landberg, Katarina; Pederson, Eric R A; Viaene, Tom; Bozorg, Behruz; Friml, Jirí; Jönsson, Henrik; Thelander, Mattias; Sundberg, Eva

    2013-07-01

    In order to establish a reference for analysis of the function of auxin and the auxin biosynthesis regulators SHORT INTERNODE/STYLISH (SHI/STY) during Physcomitrella patens reproductive development, we have described male (antheridial) and female(archegonial) development in detail, including temporal and positional information of organ initiation. This has allowed us to define discrete stages of organ morphogenesis and to show that reproductive organ development in P. patens is highly organized and that organ phyllotaxis differs between vegetative and reproductive development. Using the PpSHI1 and PpSHI2 reporter and knockout lines, the auxin reporters GmGH3(pro):GUS and PpPINA(pro):GFP-GUS, and the auxin-conjugating transgene PpSHI2(pro):IAAL, we could show that the PpSHI genes, and by inference also auxin, play important roles for reproductive organ development in moss. The PpSHI genes are required for the apical opening of the reproductive organs, the final differentiation of the egg cell, and the progression of canal cells into a cell death program. The apical cells of the archegonium, the canal cells, and the egg cell are also sites of auxin responsiveness and are affected by reduced levels of active auxin, suggesting that auxin mediates PpSHI function in the reproductive organs.

  17. Photoperiod-dependent regulation of cell growth by PpCCA1a and PpCCA1b genes encoding single-myb clock proteins in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryo; Satbhai, Santosh B; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2009-10-01

    The PpCCA1a and PpCCA1b genes of the moss Physcomitrella patens are functional homologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock genes CCA1/LHY. We made use of disruptant lines for PpCCA1a and/or PpCCA1b to elucidate the physiological significance of these genes in the growth of moss protonemal tissue under alternating day/night cycles. Protonemal cells of the double disruptant line, carrying neither of the two genes, grew faster than those of the wild-type plant (WT) in long days (LD), whereas no difference in the growth rate was detected between them in short days (SD). The double disruptant line also showed day length-dependent phenotypic changes in the PpCCA1b promoter activity: the diurnal profile of bioluminescence from the P(CCA1b)::LUC+ reporter strain was more significantly affected in LD than in SD. These observations are the first demonstration of a physiological function of the circadian clock in non-angiosperm land plants, and are consistent with recent findings that the clock controls hypocotyl elongation of A. thaliana in a photoperiod-dependent manner.

  18. PpASCL, the Physcomitrella patens Anther-Specific Chalcone Synthase-Like Enzyme Implicated in Sporopollenin Biosynthesis, Is Needed for Integrity of the Moss Spore Wall and Spore Viability

    PubMed Central

    Daku, Rhys M.; Rabbi, Fazle; Buttigieg, Josef; Coulson, Ian M.; Horne, Derrick; Martens, Garnet; Ashton, Neil W.; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin is the main constituent of the exine layer of spore and pollen walls. The anther-specific chalcone synthase-like (ASCL) enzyme of Physcomitrella patens, PpASCL, has previously been implicated in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the main constituent of exine and perine, the two outermost layers of the moss spore cell wall. We made targeted knockouts of the corresponding gene, PpASCL, and phenotypically characterized ascl sporophytes and spores at different developmental stages. Ascl plants developed normally until late in sporophytic development, when the spores produced were structurally aberrant and inviable. The development of the ascl spore cell wall appeared to be arrested early in microspore development, resulting in small, collapsed spores with altered surface morphology. The typical stratification of the spore cell wall was absent with only an abnormal perine recognisable above an amorphous layer possibly representing remnants of compromised intine and/or exine. Equivalent resistance of the spore walls of ascl mutants and the control strain to acetolysis suggests the presence of chemically inert, defective sporopollenin in the mutants. Anatomical abnormalities of late-stage ascl sporophytes include a persistent large columella and an air space incompletely filled with spores. Our results indicate that the evolutionarily conserved PpASCL gene is needed for proper construction of the spore wall and for normal maturation and viability of moss spores. PMID:26752629

  19. PpASCL, the Physcomitrella patens Anther-Specific Chalcone Synthase-Like Enzyme Implicated in Sporopollenin Biosynthesis, Is Needed for Integrity of the Moss Spore Wall and Spore Viability.

    PubMed

    Daku, Rhys M; Rabbi, Fazle; Buttigieg, Josef; Coulson, Ian M; Horne, Derrick; Martens, Garnet; Ashton, Neil W; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin is the main constituent of the exine layer of spore and pollen walls. The anther-specific chalcone synthase-like (ASCL) enzyme of Physcomitrella patens, PpASCL, has previously been implicated in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the main constituent of exine and perine, the two outermost layers of the moss spore cell wall. We made targeted knockouts of the corresponding gene, PpASCL, and phenotypically characterized ascl sporophytes and spores at different developmental stages. Ascl plants developed normally until late in sporophytic development, when the spores produced were structurally aberrant and inviable. The development of the ascl spore cell wall appeared to be arrested early in microspore development, resulting in small, collapsed spores with altered surface morphology. The typical stratification of the spore cell wall was absent with only an abnormal perine recognisable above an amorphous layer possibly representing remnants of compromised intine and/or exine. Equivalent resistance of the spore walls of ascl mutants and the control strain to acetolysis suggests the presence of chemically inert, defective sporopollenin in the mutants. Anatomical abnormalities of late-stage ascl sporophytes include a persistent large columella and an air space incompletely filled with spores. Our results indicate that the evolutionarily conserved PpASCL gene is needed for proper construction of the spore wall and for normal maturation and viability of moss spores.

  20. Genetic analysis of Physcomitrella patens identifies ABSCISIC ACID NON-RESPONSIVE, a regulator of ABA responses unique to basal land plants and required for desiccation tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Sean Ross; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Trinh, Chi H.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry W.; Grimwood, Jane; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Rensing, Stefan A.; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J.; Li, Fay -Wei; Larsson, Anders; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Edwards, Thomas A.; Cuming, Andrew C.

    2016-05-18

    The anatomically simple plants that first colonized land must have acquired molecular and biochemical adaptations to drought stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) coordinates responses leading to desiccation tolerance in all land plants. We identified ABA nonresponsive mutants in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and genotyped a segregating population to map and identify the ABA NON-RESPONSIVE (ANR) gene encoding a modular protein kinase comprising an N-terminal PAS domain, a central EDR domain, and a C-terminal MAPKKK-like domain. anr mutants fail to accumulate dehydration tolerance-associated gene products in response to drought, ABA, or osmotic stress and do not acquire ABA-dependent desiccation tolerance. The crystal structure of the PAS domain, determined to 1.7-Å resolution, shows a conserved PAS-fold that dimerizes through a weak dimerization interface. Targeted mutagenesis of a conserved tryptophan residue within the PAS domain generates plants with ABA nonresponsive growth and strongly attenuated ABA-responsive gene expression, whereas deleting this domain retains a fully ABA-responsive phenotype. ANR orthologs are found in early-diverging land plant lineages and aquatic algae but are absent from more recently diverged vascular plants. Lastly, we propose that ANR genes represent an ancestral adaptation that enabled drought stress survival of the first terrestrial colonizers but were lost during land plant evolution.

  1. Molecular evidence for convergent evolution and allopolyploid speciation within the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The moss Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp. is an important experimental model system for evolutionary-developmental studies. In order to shed light on the evolutionary history of Physcomitrella and related species within the Funariaceae, we analyzed the natural genetic diversity of the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex. Results Molecular analysis of the nuclear single copy gene BRK1 reveals that three Physcomitrium species feature larger genome sizes than Physcomitrella patens and encode two expressed BRK1 homeologs (polyploidization-derived paralogs), indicating that they may be allopolyploid hybrids. Phylogenetic analyses of BRK1 as well as microsatellite simple sequence repeat (SSR) data confirm a polyphyletic origin for three Physcomitrella lineages. Differences in the conservation of mitochondrial editing sites further support hybridization and cryptic speciation within the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex. Conclusions We propose a revised classification of the previously described four subspecies of Physcomitrella patens into three distinct species, namely Physcomitrella patens, Physcomitrella readeri and Physcomitrella magdalenae. We argue that secondary reduction of sporophyte complexity in these species is due to the establishment of an ecological niche, namely spores resting in mud and possible spore dispersal by migratory birds. Besides the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex, the Funariaceae are host to their type species, Funaria hygrometrica, featuring a sporophyte morphology which is more complex. Their considerable developmental variation among closely related lineages and remarkable trait evolution render the Funariaceae an interesting group for evolutionary and genetic research. PMID:25015729

  2. Two DYW subclass PPR proteins are involved in RNA editing of ccmFc and atp9 transcripts in the moss Physcomitrella patens: first complete set of PPR editing factors in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Mizuho; Sugita, Chieko; Yagi, Yusuke; Nakamura, Takahiro; Sugita, Mamoru

    2013-11-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens has 11 RNA editing sites in mitochondrial transcripts. We previously identified six DYW subclass pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins as RNA editing factors for nine out of 11 sites. In this study, we identified two novel DYW subclass PPR proteins, PpPPR_65 and PpPPR_98, as RNA editing factors. Disruption of the PpPPR_65 gene resulted in a complete loss of RNA editing at two neighboring sites, ccmFc-C103 and ccmFc-C122, in the mitochondrial ccmFc transcript. To confirm this result, we further generated PpPPR_65 knockdown (KD) mutants by an inducible RNA interference (RNAi) system. The generated RNAi lines displayed reduced levels of RNA editing at both ccmFc-C103 and ccmFc-C122 sites. Next, we characterized the function of PpPPR_98 by constructing a KD mutant of PpPPR_98 expression. The KD mutant showed a 30% reduction in the level of atp9-C92 editing. When PpPPR_98 cDNA was introduced into the KD mutant, RNA editing levels were restored to the wild-type level. This indicates that PpPPR_98 is an editing factor for the atp9-C92 site. The recombinant PpPPR_98 protein bound to the upstream sequence of the editing site that was created by splicing of atp9 transcript. This suggests that atp9 RNA editing occurs after splicing of atp9 transcript. Our present and previous data provide the first evidence that all 11 known editing events require at least eight DYW subclass PPR proteins in the moss mitochondria.

  3. Moss systems biology en route: phytohormones in Physcomitrella development.

    PubMed

    Decker, E L; Frank, W; Sarnighausen, E; Reski, R

    2006-05-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens has become a powerful model system in modern plant biology. Highly standardized cell culture techniques, as well as the necessary tools for computational biology, functional genomics and proteomics have been established. Large EST collections are available and the complete moss genome will be released soon. A simple body plan and the small number of different cell types in Physcomitrella facilitate the study of developmental processes. In the filamentous juvenile moss tissue, developmental decisions rely on the differentiation of single cells. Developmental steps are controlled by distinct phytohormones and integration of environmental signals. Especially the phytohormones auxin, cytokinin, and abscisic acid have distinct effects on early moss development. In this article, we review current knowledge about phytohormone influences on early moss development in an attempt to fully unravel the complex regulatory signal transduction networks underlying the developmental decisions of single plant cells in a holistic systems biology approach.

  4. The Physcomitrella genome reveals evolutionary insights into the conquest of land by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rensing, Stefan A.; Lang, Daniel; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Nishiyama, Tomaoki; Perroud, Pierre-Francois; Lindquist, Erika A.; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Tanahashi, Takako; Sakakibara, Keiko; Fujita, Tomomichi; Oishi, Kazuko; Shin, Tadasu; Kuroki, Yoko; Toyoda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Sugano, Sumio; Kohara, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Anterola, Aldwin; Aoki, Setsuyuki; Ashton, Neil; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Barker, Elizabeth; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Blankenship, Robert; Cho, Sung Hyun; Dutcher, Susan K.; Estelle, Mark; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Gundlach, Heidrum; Hanada, Kousuke; Melkozernov, Alexander; Murata, Takashi; Nelson, David R.; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Reiss, Bernd; Renner, Tanya; Rombauts, Stephane; Rushton, Paul J.; Sanderfoot, Anton; Schween, Gabriele; Shiu, Shin-Han; Stueber, Kurt; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Tu, Hank; Van de Peer, Yves; Verrier, Paul J.; Waters, Elizabeth; Wood, Andrew; Yang, Lixing; Cove, David; Cuming, Andrew C.; Hasebe, Mitsayasu; Lucas, Susan; Mishler, Brent D.; Reski, Ralf; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Quatrano, Rakph S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2007-09-18

    We report the draft genome sequence of the model moss Physcomitrella patens and compare its features with those of flowering plants, from which it is separated by more than 400 million years, and unicellular aquatic algae. This comparison reveals genomic changes concomitant with the evolutionary movement to land, including a general increase in gene family complexity; loss of genes associated with aquatic environments (e.g., flagellar arms); acquisition of genes for tolerating terrestrial stresses (e.g., variation in temperature and water availability); and the development of the auxin and abscisic acid signaling pathways for coordinating multicellular growth and dehydration response. The Physcomitrella genome provides a resource for phylogenetic inferences about gene function and for experimental analysis of plant processes through this plant's unique facility for reverse genetics.

  5. Physcomitrella HMGA-type proteins display structural differences compared to their higher plant counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Lyngaard, Carina; Stemmer, Christian; Stensballe, Allan; Graf, Manuela; Gorr, Gilbert; Decker, Eva; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2008-10-03

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGA family are chromatin-associated proteins that act as architectural factors in nucleoprotein structures involved in gene transcription. To date, HMGA-type proteins have been studied in various higher plant species, but not in lower plants. We have identified two HMGA-type proteins, HMGA1 and HMGA2, encoded in the genome of the moss model Physcomitrella patens. Compared to higher plant HMGA proteins, the two Physcomitrella proteins display some structural differences. Thus, the moss HMGA proteins have six (rather than four) AT-hook DNA-binding motifs and their N-terminal domain lacks similarity to linker histone H1. HMGA2 is expressed in moss protonema and it localises to the cell nucleus. Typical of HMGA proteins, HMGA2 interacts preferentially with A/T-rich DNA, when compared with G/C-rich DNA. In cotransformation assays in Physcomitrella protoplasts, HMGA2 stimulated reporter gene expression. In summary, our data show that functional HMGA-type proteins occur in Physcomitrella.

  6. Holophytochrome-Interacting Proteins in Physcomitrella: Putative Actors in Phytochrome Cytoplasmic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Anna Lena; Mailliet, Katharina; Hughes, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are the principle photoreceptors in light-regulated plant development, primarily acting via translocation of the light-activated photoreceptor into the nucleus and subsequent gene regulation. However, several independent lines of evidence indicate unambiguously that an additional cytoplasmic signaling mechanism must exist. Directional responses in filament tip cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens are steered by phy4 which has been shown to interact physically with the blue light receptor phototropin at the plasma membrane. This complex might perceive and transduce vectorial information leading to cytoskeleton reorganization and finally a directional growth response. We developed yeast two-hybrid procedures using photochemically functional, full-length phy4 as bait in Physcomitrella cDNA library screens and growth assays under different light conditions, revealing Pfr-dependent interactions possibly associated with phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling. Candidate proteins were then expressed in planta with fluorescent protein tags to determine their intracellular localization in darkness and red light. Of 14 candidates, 12 were confirmed to interact with phy4 in planta using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We also used database information to study their expression patterns relative to those of phy4. We discuss the likely functional characteristics of these holophytochrome-interacting proteins (HIP’s) and their possible roles in signaling. PMID:27242820

  7. FtsZ polymerization assays: simple protocols and considerations.

    PubMed

    Król, Ewa; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-11-16

    During bacterial cell division, the essential protein FtsZ assembles in the middle of the cell to form the so-called Z-ring. FtsZ polymerizes into long filaments in the presence of GTP in vitro, and polymerization is regulated by several accessory proteins. FtsZ polymerization has been extensively studied in vitro using basic methods including light scattering, sedimentation, GTP hydrolysis assays and electron microscopy. Buffer conditions influence both the polymerization properties of FtsZ, and the ability of FtsZ to interact with regulatory proteins. Here, we describe protocols for FtsZ polymerization studies and validate conditions and controls using Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis FtsZ as model proteins. A low speed sedimentation assay is introduced that allows the study of the interaction of FtsZ with proteins that bundle or tubulate FtsZ polymers. An improved GTPase assay protocol is described that allows testing of GTP hydrolysis over time using various conditions in a 96-well plate setup, with standardized incubation times that abolish variation in color development in the phosphate detection reaction. The preparation of samples for light scattering studies and electron microscopy is described. Several buffers are used to establish suitable buffer pH and salt concentration for FtsZ polymerization studies. A high concentration of KCl is the best for most of the experiments. Our methods provide a starting point for the in vitro characterization of FtsZ, not only from E. coli and B. subtilis but from any other bacterium. As such, the methods can be used for studies of the interaction of FtsZ with regulatory proteins or the testing of antibacterial drugs which may affect FtsZ polymerization.

  8. Orbital experiment ``Gravisensor'': phototropic reactions of the moss Physcomitrella patens to different types of LED lighting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Vladimir; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Skripnikov, Alexander; Zyablova, Natalya; Mukhoyan, Makar; Emelianov, Grigory

    The experiment was conducted on Russian Biological Satelite Bion-M #1 19.04-19.05 2013. Five transparent plastic cultural flasks were placed in five light isolated sections of Biocont-B2 cylindrical container with inner diameter of 120 mm and height of 230 mm. In four sections the flasks could be illuminated by top or side LED with wavelength of 458 nm, 630 nm, 730 nm, and white (color temperature 5000º К, peaks 453, 559 nm). Photon flux in each variant was 15 umol/(m2c). In the fifth section the flask with the shoots was in conditions of constant dark. Each section was equipped with its own video camera module. Cameras, video recorder and lighting were managed by micro controller. 12 days before launch, 5 tips of the moss shoots were explanted at each of the five flasks on the agar medium with nutrient components and were cultivated under white fluorescent lamps at 12 hour photo period till the launch. After entering the orbit and during next 14 days of flight top LEDs were turned on above the flasks. Then for the following 14 days of flight the side LEDs of similar wavelength were turned on. The moss gametophores were cultivated at 12-h photoperiod. During the experiment on an hourly basis a video recording of the moss was performed. Similar equipment was used for ground control. After the experiment video files were used to produce separate time-lapse films for each flask using AviSynth program. In flight the shoots demonstrated the maximum growth speed with far red lighting and slower speed with white lighting. With blue and red lighting after switching to side light stimuli the growth of shoots almost stopped. In the dark the shoots continued to grow until the 13 day after launch of the satellite, then their growth stopped. In ground control the relation of growth rate with various LEDs remained basically the same, with the exception of side blue lighting, where the shoots demonstrated considerable vertical growth. In flight the angle of inclination towards the light source was maximal (about 90º) with white lighting, and somewhat smaller with 730 nm. Under red and blue light the angle of phototropic inclination was difficult to measure due to poor growth of the shoots.In ground control the growth rate under blue light was several times higher, than in flight and final degree of inclination of the shoot tip came to about 10º. In ground control under side red lighting the growth was weak, while demonstrating a pronounced phototropic bend of 90º. In ground control in the dark a vertical growth of one shoot was observed with the rate somewhat larger, than in flight variant. Data on the dynamics of inclination of experimental and control plants are presented. The acquired data will be used to analyse the mechanisms of phototropic growth changes of moss shoots.

  9. Both chloronemal and caulonemal cells expand by tip growth in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Menand, Benoît; Calder, Grant; Dolan, Liam

    2007-01-01

    Tip growth is a mode of cell expansion in which all growth is restricted to a small area that forms a tip in an elongating cell. In green plants, tip growth has been shown to occur in root hairs, pollen tubes, rhizoids, and caulonema. Each of these cell types has a longitudinally elongated shape, longitudinally oriented microtubules and actin microfilaments, and a characteristic cytoplasmic organization at the growing tip which is required for growth. Chloronema are elongated cylindrical shaped cells that form during the development of the moss protonema. Since there are no published reports on the precise mode of chloronema elongation and conflicting interpretations of its cytology, the mechanism of cell growth has remained unclear. To determine if chloronema elongate by tip or diffuse growth, time-lapse light microscopy was employed to follow the movement of fluorescent microspheres attached to the surface of growing cells. It is shown here that chloronemal cells elongate by a form of tip growth. However, the slower growth of chloronema compared with caulonema is probably the result of differences in cytological organization of the growing tip.

  10. Enzymatic properties and mutational studies of chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2012-01-01

    PpCHS is a member of the type III polyketide synthase family and catalyses the synthesis of the flavonoid precursor naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Recent research reports the production of pyrone derivatives using either hexanoyl-CoA or butyryl-CoA as starter molecule. The Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad found in other plant chalcone synthase predicted polypeptides is conserved in PpCHS. Site directed mutagenesis involving these amino acids residing in the active-site cavity revealed that the cavity volume of the active-site plays a significant role in the selection of starter molecules as well as product formation. Substitutions of Cys 170 with Arg and Ser amino acids decreased the ability of the PpCHS to utilize hexanoyl-CoA as a starter molecule, which directly effected the production of pyrone derivatives (products). These substitutions are believed to have a restricted number of elongations of the growing polypeptide chain due to the smaller cavity volume of the mutant's active site.

  11. Enzymatic Properties and Mutational Studies of Chalcone Synthase from Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2012-01-01

    PpCHS is a member of the type III polyketide synthase family and catalyses the synthesis of the flavonoid precursor naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Recent research reports the production of pyrone derivatives using either hexanoyl-CoA or butyryl-CoA as starter molecule. The Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad found in other plant chalcone synthase predicted polypeptides is conserved in PpCHS. Site directed mutagenesis involving these amino acids residing in the active-site cavity revealed that the cavity volume of the active-site plays a significant role in the selection of starter molecules as well as product formation. Substitutions of Cys 170 with Arg and Ser amino acids decreased the ability of the PpCHS to utilize hexanoyl-CoA as a starter molecule, which directly effected the production of pyrone derivatives (products). These substitutions are believed to have a restricted number of elongations of the growing polypeptide chain due to the smaller cavity volume of the mutant’s active site. PMID:22949824

  12. Targeting the Bacterial Division Protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Katherine A; Santos, Thiago M A; Nepomuceno, Gabriella M; Huynh, Valerie; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-08-11

    Similar to its eukaryotic counterpart, the prokaryotic cytoskeleton is essential for the structural and mechanical properties of bacterial cells. The essential protein FtsZ is a central player in the cytoskeletal family, forms a cytokinetic ring at mid-cell, and recruits the division machinery to orchestrate cell division. Cells depleted of or lacking functional FtsZ do not divide and grow into long filaments that eventually lyse. FtsZ has been studied extensively as a target for antibacterial development. In this Perspective, we review the structural and biochemical properties of FtsZ, its role in cell biochemistry and physiology, the different mechanisms of inhibiting FtsZ, small molecule antagonists (including some misconceptions about mechanisms of action), and their discovery strategies. This collective information will inform chemists on different aspects of FtsZ that can be (and have been) used to develop successful strategies for devising new families of cell division inhibitors.

  13. FtsZ Placement in Nucleoid-Free Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Manuel; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar; Margolin, William; Natale, Paolo; Vicente, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We describe the placement of the cytoplasmic FtsZ protein, an essential component of the division septum, in nucleoid-free Escherichia coli maxicells. The absence of the nucleoid is accompanied in maxicells by degradation of the SlmA protein. This protein, together with the nucleoid, prevents the placement of the septum in the regions occupied by the chromosome by a mechanism called nucleoid occlusion (NO). A second septum placement mechanism, the MinCDE system (Min) involving a pole-to-pole oscillation of three proteins, nonetheless remains active in maxicells. Both Min and NO act on the polymerization of FtsZ, preventing its assembly into an FtsZ-ring except at midcell. Our results show that even in the total absence of NO, Min oscillations can direct placement of FtsZ in maxicells. Deletion of the FtsZ carboxyl terminal domain (FtsZ*), a central hub that receives signals from a variety of proteins including MinC, FtsA and ZipA, produces a Min-insensitive form of FtsZ unable to interact with the membrane-anchoring FtsA and ZipA proteins. This protein produces a totally disorganized pattern of FtsZ localization inside the maxicell cytoplasm. In contrast, FtsZ*-VM, an artificially cytoplasmic membrane-anchored variant of FtsZ*, forms helical or repetitive ring structures distributed along the entire length of maxicells even in the absence of NO. These results show that membrane anchoring is needed to organize FtsZ into rings and underscore the role of the C-terminal hub of FtsZ for their correct placement. PMID:24638110

  14. FtsZ placement in nucleoid-free bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Manuel; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar; Margolin, William; Natale, Paolo; Vicente, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We describe the placement of the cytoplasmic FtsZ protein, an essential component of the division septum, in nucleoid-free Escherichia coli maxicells. The absence of the nucleoid is accompanied in maxicells by degradation of the SlmA protein. This protein, together with the nucleoid, prevents the placement of the septum in the regions occupied by the chromosome by a mechanism called nucleoid occlusion (NO). A second septum placement mechanism, the MinCDE system (Min) involving a pole-to-pole oscillation of three proteins, nonetheless remains active in maxicells. Both Min and NO act on the polymerization of FtsZ, preventing its assembly into an FtsZ-ring except at midcell. Our results show that even in the total absence of NO, Min oscillations can direct placement of FtsZ in maxicells. Deletion of the FtsZ carboxyl terminal domain (FtsZ*), a central hub that receives signals from a variety of proteins including MinC, FtsA and ZipA, produces a Min-insensitive form of FtsZ unable to interact with the membrane-anchoring FtsA and ZipA proteins. This protein produces a totally disorganized pattern of FtsZ localization inside the maxicell cytoplasm. In contrast, FtsZ*-VM, an artificially cytoplasmic membrane-anchored variant of FtsZ*, forms helical or repetitive ring structures distributed along the entire length of maxicells even in the absence of NO. These results show that membrane anchoring is needed to organize FtsZ into rings and underscore the role of the C-terminal hub of FtsZ for their correct placement.

  15. Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends in Evolution1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Yu; Chung, Chun-I; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Hsing, Yue-Ie Caroline; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Searches of sequenced genomes of diverse organisms revealed that the moss Physcomitrella patens is the most primitive organism possessing oleosin genes. Microscopy examination of Physcomitrella revealed that oil bodies (OBs) were abundant in the photosynthetic vegetative gametophyte and the reproductive spore. Chromatography illustrated the neutral lipids in OBs isolated from the gametophyte to be largely steryl esters and triacylglycerols, and SDS-PAGE showed the major proteins to be oleosins. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed the expression of all three oleosin genes to be tissue specific. This tissue specificity was greatly altered via alternative splicing, a control mechanism of oleosin gene expression unknown in higher plants. During the production of sex organs at the tips of gametophyte branches, the number of OBs in the top gametophyte tissue decreased concomitant with increases in the number of peroxisomes and level of transcripts encoding the glyoxylate cycle enzymes; thus, the OBs are food reserves for gluconeogenesis. In spores during germination, peroxisomes adjacent to OBs, along with transcripts encoding the glyoxylate cycle enzymes, appeared; thus, the spore OBs are food reserves for gluconeogenesis and equivalent to seed OBs. The one-cell-layer gametophyte could be observed easily with confocal microscopy for the subcellular OBs and other structures. Transient expression of various gene constructs transformed into gametophyte cells revealed that all OBs were linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), that oleosins were synthesized in extended regions of the ER, and that two different oleosins were colocated in all OBs. PMID:19420327

  16. Ruthenium red-induced bundling of bacterial cell division protein, FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Beuria, Tushar K; Banerjee, Abhijit; Panda, Dulal

    2004-06-18

    The assembly of FtsZ plays a major role in bacterial cell division, and it is thought that the assembly dynamics of FtsZ is a finely regulated process. Here, we show that ruthenium red is able to modulate FtsZ assembly in vitro. In contrast to the inhibitory effects of ruthenium red on microtubule polymerization, we found that a substoichiometric concentration of ruthenium red strongly increased the light-scattering signal of FtsZ assembly. Further, sedimentable polymer mass was increased by 1.5- and 2-fold in the presence of 2 and 10 microm ruthenium red, respectively. In addition, ruthenium red strongly reduced the GTPase activity and prevented dilution-induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers. Electron microscopic analysis showed that 4-10 microm of ruthenium red produced thick bundles of FtsZ polymers. The significant increase in the light-scattering signal and pelletable polymer mass in the presence of ruthenium red seemed to be due to the bundling of FtsZ protofilaments into larger polymers rather than the actual increase in the level of polymeric FtsZ. Furthermore, ruthenium red was found to copolymerize with FtsZ, and the copolymerization of substoichiometric amounts of ruthenium red with FtsZ polymers promoted cooperative assembly of FtsZ that produced large bundles. Calcium inhibited the binding of ruthenium red to FtsZ. However, a concentration of calcium 1000-fold higher than that of ruthenium red was required to produce similar effects on FtsZ assembly. Ruthenium red strongly modulated FtsZ polymerization, suggesting the presence of an important regulatory site on FtsZ and suggesting that a natural ligand, which mimics the action of ruthenium red, may regulate the assembly of FtsZ in bacteria.

  17. Cationic lipid enhances assembly of bacterial cell division protein FtsZ: a possible role of bacterial membrane in FtsZ assembly dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kuchibhatla, Anuradha; Bellare, Jayesh; Panda, Dulal

    2011-11-01

    The assembly of FtsZ plays an important role in bacterial cell division. Lipids in the bacterial cell membrane have been suggested to play a role in directing the site of FtsZ assembly. Using lipid monolayer and bilayer (liposome) systems, we directly examined the effects of cationic lipids on FtsZ assembly. We found that cationic lipids enhanced the assembly of FtsZ in association with an increase in the GTPase activity of FtsZ. The system consisting of lipid monolayer and bilayer (liposome) may mimic the bacterial membrane and therefore, the data might indicate the influence of bacterial membrane on the assembly of FtsZ protofilaments.

  18. Polymer Stability Plays an Important Role in the Positional Regulation of FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Petra Anne; Schwartz, Rachel L.; Grossman, Alan D.

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments examining the effect of polymer stability on FtsZ localization dynamics in Bacillus subtilis. A loss-of-function mutation in ezrA, a putative polymer-destabilizing factor, suppresses the defects in FtsZ polymer stability associated with minCD overexpression. In addition, a mutation that is predicted to stabilize the FtsZ polymer leads to the formation of polar FtsZ rings. These data support the hypothesis that carefully balanced polymer stability is important for the assembly and localization of FtsZ during the bacterial cell cycle. PMID:11514533

  19. FtsZ filament capping by MciZ, a developmental regulator of bacterial division.

    PubMed

    Bisson-Filho, Alexandre W; Discola, Karen F; Castellen, Patrícia; Blasios, Valdir; Martins, Alexandre; Sforça, Maurício L; Garcia, Wanius; Zeri, Ana Carolina M; Erickson, Harold P; Dessen, Andréa; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J

    2015-04-28

    Cytoskeletal structures are dynamically remodeled with the aid of regulatory proteins. FtsZ (filamentation temperature-sensitive Z) is the bacterial homolog of tubulin that polymerizes into rings localized to cell-division sites, and the constriction of these rings drives cytokinesis. Here we investigate the mechanism by which the Bacillus subtilis cell-division inhibitor, MciZ (mother cell inhibitor of FtsZ), blocks assembly of FtsZ. The X-ray crystal structure reveals that MciZ binds to the C-terminal polymerization interface of FtsZ, the equivalent of the minus end of tubulin. Using in vivo and in vitro assays and microscopy, we show that MciZ, at substoichiometric levels to FtsZ, causes shortening of protofilaments and blocks the assembly of higher-order FtsZ structures. The findings demonstrate an unanticipated capping-based regulatory mechanism for FtsZ.

  20. Organization of FtsZ filaments in the bacterial division ring measured from polarized fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Si, Fangwei; Busiek, Kimberly; Margolin, William; Sun, Sean X

    2013-11-05

    Cytokinesis in bacteria is accomplished by a ring-shaped cell-division complex (the Z-ring). The primary component of the Z-ring is FtsZ, a filamentous tubulin homolog that serves as a scaffold for the recruitment of other cell-division-related proteins. FtsZ forms filaments and bundles. In the cell, it has been suggested that FtsZ filaments form the arcs of the ring and are aligned in the cell-circumferential direction. Using polarized fluorescence microscopy in live Escherichia coli cells, we measure the structural organization of FtsZ filaments in the Z-ring. The data suggest a disordered organization: a substantial portion of FtsZ filaments are aligned in the cell-axis direction. FtsZ organization in the Z-ring also appears to depend on the bacterial species. Taken together, the unique arrangement of FtsZ suggests novel unexplored mechanisms in bacterial cell division.

  1. Preferential cytoplasmic location of FtsZ, a protein essential for Escherichia coli septation.

    PubMed

    Pla, J; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Vicente, M; Aldea, M

    1991-07-01

    An ftsZ thermonull mutant has been constructed in which the ftsZ gene has been deleted from the Escherichia coli chromosome while maintaining a wild-type copy of the gene in a thermosensitive plasmid. Under conditions in which the ftsZ+ allele is unable to be replicated at the same pace as the chromosome, the cells become non-viable and grow as filaments, indicating that, contrary to other reports, FtsZ performs a function essential for cell survival. Antibodies raised against FtsZ have been used to detect the cellular location of FtsZ and its contents per cell. Fractionation experiments indicate that most of the total FtsZ present in the cell stays in the cytoplasm.

  2. FtsZ Condensates: An In Vitro Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Popp, David; Iwasa, Mitsusada; Narita, Akihiro; Erickson, Harold P.; Maéda, Yuichiro

    2009-01-01

    In vivo cell division protein FtsZ from E. coli forms rings and spirals which have only been observed by low resolution light microscopy. We show that these suprastructures are likely formed by molecular crowding which is a predominant factor in prokaryotic cells and enhances the weak lateral bonds between proto-filaments. Although FtsZ assembles into single proto-filaments in dilute aqueous buffer, with crowding agents above a critical concentration, it forms polymorphic supramolecular structures including rings and toroids (with multiple protofilaments) about 200 nm in diameter, similar in appearance to DNA toroids, and helices with pitches of several hundred nm as well as long, linear bundles. Helices resemble those observed in vivo, whereas the rings and toroids may represent a novel energy minimized state of FtsZ, at a later stage of Z-ring constriction. We shed light on the molecular arrangement of FtsZ filaments within these suprastructures using high resolution electron microscopy. PMID:19137575

  3. Localization of an evolutionarily conserved protein proton pyrophosphatase in evolutionarily distant plants oryza sativa and physcomitrella patens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proton Pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein that is prevalent in the plant kingdom. One of the salient features of H+-PPase expression pattern, at least in vascular plants like Arabidopsis, is its conspicuous localization in both actively dividing cells and the phl...

  4. NDK Interacts with FtsZ and Converts GDP to GTP to Trigger FtsZ Polymerisation - A Novel Role for NDK

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Saurabh; Jakkala, Kishor; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Arumugam, Muthu; Ranjeri, Raghavendra; Gupta, Prabuddha; Rajeswari, Haryadi; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK), conserved across bacteria to humans, synthesises NTP from NDP and ATP. The eukaryotic homologue, the NDPK, uses ATP to phosphorylate the tubulin-bound GDP to GTP for tubulin polymerisation. The bacterial cytokinetic protein FtsZ, which is the tubulin homologue, also uses GTP for polymerisation. Therefore, we examined whether NDK can interact with FtsZ to convert FtsZ-bound GDP and/or free GDP to GTP to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. Methods Recombinant and native NDK and FtsZ proteins of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as the experimental samples. FtsZ polymersation was monitored using 90° light scattering and FtsZ polymer pelleting assays. The γ32P-GTP synthesised by NDK from GDP and γ32P-ATP was detected using thin layer chromatography and quantitated using phosphorimager. The FtsZ bound 32P-GTP was quantitated using phosphorimager, after UV-crosslinking, followed by SDS-PAGE. The NDK-FtsZ interaction was determined using Ni2+-NTA-pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation of the recombinant and native proteins in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. Results NDK triggered instantaneous polymerisation of GDP-precharged recombinant FtsZ in the presence of ATP, similar to the polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) upon the direct addition of GTP. Similarly, NDK triggered polymerisation of recombinant FtsZ (not GDP-precharged) in the presence of free GDP and ATP as well. Mutant NDK, partially deficient in GTP synthesis from ATP and GDP, triggered low level of polymerisation of MsFtsZ, but not of MtFtsZ. As characteristic of NDK’s NTP substrate non-specificity, it used CTP, TTP, and UTP also to convert GDP to GTP, to trigger FtsZ polymerisation. The NDK of one mycobacterial species could trigger the polymerisation of the FtsZ of another mycobacterial species. Both the recombinant and the native NDK and FtsZ showed interaction with each other in vitro and ex vivo, alluding

  5. Energetics and Geometry of FtsZ Polymers: Nucleated Self-Assembly of Single Protofilaments☆

    PubMed Central

    Huecas, Sonia; Llorca, Oscar; Boskovic, Jasminka; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Valpuesta, José María; Andreu, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Essential cell division protein FtsZ is an assembling GTPase which directs the cytokinetic ring formation in dividing bacterial cells. FtsZ shares the structural fold of eukaryotic tubulin and assembles forming tubulin-like protofilaments, but does not form microtubules. Two puzzling problems in FtsZ assembly are the nature of protofilament association and a possible mechanism for nucleated self-assembly of single-stranded protofilaments above a critical FtsZ concentration. We assembled two-dimensional arrays of FtsZ on carbon supports, studied linear polymers of FtsZ with cryo-electron microscopy of vitrified unsupported solutions, and formulated possible polymerization models. Nucleated self-assembly of FtsZ from Escherichia coli with GTP and magnesium produces flexible filaments 4–6 nm-wide, only compatible with a single protofilament. This agrees with previous scanning transmission electron microscopy results and is supported by recent cryo-electron tomography studies of two bacterial cells. Observations of double-stranded FtsZ filaments in negative stain may come from protofilament accretion on the carbon support. Preferential protofilament cyclization does not apply to FtsZ assembly. The apparently cooperative polymerization of a single protofilament with identical intermonomer contacts is explained by the switching of one inactive monomer into the active structure preceding association of the next, creating a dimer nucleus. FtsZ behaves as a cooperative linear assembly machine. PMID:18024502

  6. Energetics and geometry of FtsZ polymers: nucleated self-assembly of single protofilaments.

    PubMed

    Huecas, Sonia; Llorca, Oscar; Boskovic, Jasminka; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Valpuesta, José María; Andreu, José Manuel

    2008-03-01

    Essential cell division protein FtsZ is an assembling GTPase which directs the cytokinetic ring formation in dividing bacterial cells. FtsZ shares the structural fold of eukaryotic tubulin and assembles forming tubulin-like protofilaments, but does not form microtubules. Two puzzling problems in FtsZ assembly are the nature of protofilament association and a possible mechanism for nucleated self-assembly of single-stranded protofilaments above a critical FtsZ concentration. We assembled two-dimensional arrays of FtsZ on carbon supports, studied linear polymers of FtsZ with cryo-electron microscopy of vitrified unsupported solutions, and formulated possible polymerization models. Nucleated self-assembly of FtsZ from Escherichia coli with GTP and magnesium produces flexible filaments 4-6 nm-wide, only compatible with a single protofilament. This agrees with previous scanning transmission electron microscopy results and is supported by recent cryo-electron tomography studies of two bacterial cells. Observations of double-stranded FtsZ filaments in negative stain may come from protofilament accretion on the carbon support. Preferential protofilament cyclization does not apply to FtsZ assembly. The apparently cooperative polymerization of a single protofilament with identical intermonomer contacts is explained by the switching of one inactive monomer into the active structure preceding association of the next, creating a dimer nucleus. FtsZ behaves as a cooperative linear assembly machine.

  7. Two types of FtsZ proteins in mitochondria and red-lineage chloroplasts: the duplication of FtsZ is implicated in endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Nishida, Keishin; Nishida, Keiji; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2004-03-01

    The ancestors of plastids and mitochondria were once free-living bacteria that became organelles as a result of endosymbiosis. According to this theory, a key bacterial division protein, FtsZ, plays a role in plastid division in algae and plants as well as in mitochondrial division in lower eukaryotes. Recent studies have shown that organelle division is a process that combines features derived from the bacterial division system with features contributed by host eukaryotic cells. Two nonredundant versions of FtsZ, FtsZ1 and FtsZ2, have been identified in green-lineage plastids, whereas most bacteria have a single ftsZ gene. To examine whether there is also more than one type of FtsZ in red-lineage chloroplasts (red algal chloroplasts and chloroplasts that originated from the secondary endosymbiosis of red algae) and in mitochondria, we obtained FtsZ sequences from the complete sequence of the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae and the draft sequence of the stramenopile (heterokont) Thalassiosira pseudonana. Phylogenetic analyses that included known FtsZ proteins identified two types of chloroplast FtsZ in red algae (FtsZA and FtsZB) and stramenopiles (FtsZA and FtsZC). These analyses also showed that FtsZB emerged after the red and green lineages diverged, while FtsZC arose by the duplication of an ftsZA gene that in turn descended from a red alga engulfed by the ancestor of stramenopiles. A comparison of the predicted proteins showed that like bacterial FtsZ and green-lineage FtsZ2, FtsZA has a short conserved C-termmal sequence (the C-terminal core domain), whereas FtsZB and FtsZC, like the green-lineage FtsZ1, lack this sequence. In addition, the Cyanidioschyzon and Dictyostelium genomes encode two types of mitochondrial FtsZ proteins, one of which lacks the C-terminal variable domain. These results suggest that the acquisition of an additional FtsZ protein with a modified C terminus was common to the primary and secondary endosymbioses that produced

  8. The development of FtsZ inhibitors as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Siti; Ma, Shutao

    2012-07-01

    The emergence and prevalence of bacterial resistance has resulted in a clear demand for novel antibacterial drugs. As a tubulin homologue, FtsZ is an essential cell-division protein in prokaryotic organisms and is showing increasing promise as a target for antibacterial drug discovery. This review describes the role of FtsZ in bacterial cytokinesis and various FtsZ inhibitors, with particular focus on their discovery, antibacterial activities, mechanisms of action, synthetic methods, and representative analogues.

  9. Super-resolution imaging of the bacterial cytokinetic protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Phoebe C; Cox, Guy C; Monahan, Leigh G; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2011-06-01

    The idea of a bacterial cytoskeleton arose just 10 years ago with the identification of the cell division protein, FtsZ, as a tubulin homolog. FtsZ plays a pivotal role in bacterial division, and is present in virtually all prokaryotes and in some eukaryotic organelles. The earliest stage of bacterial cell division is the assembly of FtsZ into a Z ring at the division site, which subsequently constricts during cytokinesis. FtsZ also assembles into dynamic helical structures along the bacterial cell, which are thought to act as precursors to the Z ring via a cell cycle-mediated FtsZ polymer remodelling. The fine structures of the FtsZ helix and ring are unknown but crucial for identifying the molecular details of Z ring assembly and its regulation. We now reveal using STED microscopy that the FtsZ helical structure in cells of the gram positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, is a highly irregular and discontinuous helix of FtsZ; very different to the smooth cable-like appearance observed by conventional fluorescence optics. STED also identifies a novel FtsZ helical structure of smaller pitch that is invisible to standard optical methods, identifying a possible third intermediate in the pathway to Z ring assembly, which commits bacterial cells to divide.

  10. Structure of the Z Ring-associated Protein, ZapD, Bound to the C-terminal Domain of the Tubulin-like Protein, FtsZ, Suggests Mechanism of Z Ring Stabilization through FtsZ Cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Huang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zeng, Wenjie; Janakiraman, Anuradha

    2017-03-03

    Cell division in most bacteria is mediated by the tubulin-like FtsZ protein, which polymerizes in a GTP-dependent manner to form the cytokinetic Z ring. A diverse repertoire of FtsZ-binding proteins affects FtsZ localization and polymerization to ensure correct Z ring formation. Many of these proteins bind the C-terminal domain (CTD) of FtsZ, which serves as a hub for FtsZ regulation. FtsZ ring-associated proteins, ZapA-D (Zaps), are important FtsZ regulatory proteins that stabilize FtsZ assembly and enhance Z ring formation by increasing lateral assembly of FtsZ protofilaments, which then form the Z ring. There are no structures of a Zap protein bound to FtsZ; therefore, how these proteins affect FtsZ polymerization has been unclear. Recent data showed ZapD binds specifically to the FtsZ CTD. Thus, to obtain insight into the ZapD-CTD interaction and how it may mediate FtsZ protofilament assembly, we determined the Escherichia coli ZapD-FtsZ CTD structure to 2.67 Å resolution. The structure shows that the CTD docks within a hydrophobic cleft in the ZapD helical domain and adopts an unusual structure composed of two turns of helix separated by a proline kink. FtsZ CTD residue Phe-377 inserts into the ZapD pocket, anchoring the CTD in place and permitting hydrophobic contacts between FtsZ residues Ile-374, Pro-375, and Leu-378 with ZapD residues Leu-74, Trp-77, Leu-91, and Leu-174. The structural findings were supported by mutagenesis coupled with biochemical and in vivo studies. The combined data suggest that ZapD acts as a molecular cross-linking reagent between FtsZ protofilaments to enhance FtsZ assembly.

  11. The GTPase Activity of Escherichia coli FtsZ Determines the Magnitude of the FtsZ Polymer Bundling by ZapA in Vitro†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    FtsZ polymerizes in a ring-like structure at mid cell to initiate cell division in Escherichia coli. The ring is stabilized by a number of proteins among which the widely conserved ZapA protein. Using antibodies against ZapA, we found surprisingly that the cellular concentration of ZapA is approximately equal to that of FtsZ. This raised the question of how the cell can prevent their interaction and thereby the premature stabilization of FtsZ protofilaments in nondividing cells. Therefore, we studied the FtsZ−ZapA interaction at the physiological pH of 7.5 instead of pH 6.5 (the optimal pH for FtsZ polymerization), under conditions that stimulate protofilament formation (5 mM MgCl2) and under conditions that stimulate and stabilize protofilaments (10 mM MgCl2). Using pelleting, light scattering, and GTPase assays, it was found that stabilization and bundling of FtsZ polymers by ZapA was inversely correlated to the GTPase activity of FtsZ. As GTP hydrolysis is the rate-limiting factor for depolymerization of FtsZ, we propose that ZapA will only enhance the cooperativity of polymer association during the transition from helical filament to mid cell ring and will not stabilize the short single protofilaments in the cytoplasm. All thus far published in vitro data on the interaction between FtsZ and ZapA have been obtained with His-ZapA. We found that in our case the presence of a His tag fused to ZapA prevented the protein to complement a ΔzapA strain in vivo and that it affected the interaction between FtsZ and ZapA in vitro. PMID:19842714

  12. Cytological Profile of Antibacterial FtsZ Inhibitors and Synthetic Peptide MciZ

    PubMed Central

    Araújo-Bazán, Lidia; Ruiz-Avila, Laura B.; Andreu, David; Huecas, Sonia; Andreu, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell division protein FtsZ is the organizer of the cytokinetic ring in almost all bacteria and a target for the discovery of new antibacterial agents that are needed to counter widespread antibiotic resistance. Bacterial cytological profiling, using quantitative microscopy, is a powerful approach for identifying the mechanism of action of antibacterial molecules affecting different cellular pathways. We have determined the cytological profile on Bacillus subtilis cells of a selection of small molecule inhibitors targeting FtsZ on different binding sites. FtsZ inhibitors lead to long undivided cells, impair the normal assembly of FtsZ into the midcell Z-rings, induce aberrant ring distributions, punctate FtsZ foci, membrane spots and also modify nucleoid length. Quantitative analysis of cell and nucleoid length combined, or the Z-ring distribution, allows categorizing FtsZ inhibitors and to distinguish them from antibiotics with other mechanisms of action, which should be useful for identifying new antibacterial FtsZ inhibitors. Biochemical assays of FtsZ polymerization and GTPase activity combined explain the cellular effects of the FtsZ polymer stabilizing agent PC190723 and its fragments. MciZ is a 40-aminoacid endogenous inhibitor of cell division normally expressed during sporulation in B. subtilis. Using FtsZ cytological profiling we have determined that exogenous synthetic MciZ is an effective inhibitor of B. subtilis cell division, Z-ring formation and localization. This finding supports our cell-based approach to screen for FtsZ inhibitors and opens new possibilities for peptide inhibitors of bacterial cell division. PMID:27752253

  13. Imaging-based identification of a critical regulator of FtsZ protofilament curvature in Caulobacter

    PubMed Central

    Goley, Erin D.; Dye, Natalie A.; Werner, John N.; Gitai, Zemer; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY FtsZ is an essential bacterial GTPase that polymerizes at midcell, recruits the division machinery, and may generate constrictive forces necessary for cytokinesis. However, many of the mechanistic details underlying these functions are unknown. We sought to identify FtsZ-binding proteins that influence FtsZ function in Caulobacter crescentus. Here, we present a microscopy-based screen through which we discovered two FtsZ-binding proteins, FzlA and FzlC. FzlA is conserved in α-proteobacteria and was found to be functionally critical for cell division in Caulobacter. FzlA altered FtsZ structure both in vivo and in vitro, forming stable higher order structures that were resistant to depolymerization by MipZ, a spatial determinant of FtsZ assembly. Electron microscopy revealed that FzlA organizes FtsZ protofilaments into striking helical bundles. The degree of curvature induced by FzlA depended on the nucleotide bound to FtsZ. Induction of FtsZ curvature by FzlA carries implications for regulating FtsZ function by modulating its superstructure. PMID:20864042

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of Quinazolines as Inhibitors of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno, Gabriella M; Chan, Katie M; Huynh, Valerie; Martin, Kevin S; Moore, Jared T; O'Brien, Terrence E; Pollo, Luiz A E; Sarabia, Francisco J; Tadeus, Clarissa; Yao, Zi; Anderson, David E; Ames, James B; Shaw, Jared T

    2015-03-12

    The bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is one of many potential targets for the development of novel antibiotics. Recently, zantrin Z3 was shown to be a cross-species inhibitor of FtsZ; however, its specific interactions with the protein are still unknown. Herein we report the synthesis of analogues that contain a more tractable core structure and an analogue with single-digit micromolar inhibition of FtsZ's GTPase activity, which represents the most potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli FtsZ reported to date. In addition, the zantrin Z3 core has been converted to two potential photo-cross-linking reagents for proteomic studies that could shed light on the molecular interactions between FtsZ and molecules related to zantrin Z3.

  15. Cloning and characterization of ftsZ and pyrF from the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaoi, T.; Laksanalamai, P.; Jiemjit, A.; Kagawa, H. K.; Alton, T.; Trent, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    To characterize cytoskeletal components of archaea, the ftsZ gene from Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and sequenced. In T. acidophilum ftsZ, which is involved in cell division, was found to be in an operon with the pyrF gene, which encodes orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC), an essential enzyme in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Both ftsZ and pyrF from T. acidophilum were expressed in Escherichia coli and formed functional proteins. FtsZ expression in wild-type E. coli resulted in the filamentous phenotype characteristic of ftsZ mutants. T. acidophilum pyrF expression in an E. coli mutant lacking pyrF complemented the mutation and rescued the strain. Sequence alignments of ODCs from archaea, bacteria, and eukarya reveal five conserved regions, two of which have homology to 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (HPS), suggesting a common substrate recognition and binding motif. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Doxorubicin inhibits E. coli division by interacting at a novel site in FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Panda, Pragnya; Taviti, Ashoka Chary; Satpati, Suresh; Kar, Mitali Madhusmita; Dixit, Anshuman; Beuria, Tushar Kant

    2015-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance has become a major health concern in recent times. It is therefore essential to identify novel antibacterial targets as well as discover and develop new antibacterial agents. FtsZ, a highly conserved bacterial protein, is responsible for the initiation of cell division in bacteria. The functions of FtsZ inside cells are tightly regulated and any perturbation in its functions leads to inhibition of bacterial division. Recent reports indicate that small molecules targeting the functions of FtsZ may be used as leads to develop new antibacterial agents. To identify small molecules targeting FtsZ and inhibiting bacterial division, we screened a U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug library of 800 molecules using an independent computational, biochemical and microbial approach. From this screen, we identified doxorubicin, an anthracycline molecule that inhibits Escherichia coli division and forms filamentous cells. A fluorescence-binding assay shows that doxorubicin interacts strongly with FtsZ. A detailed biochemical analysis demonstrated that doxorubicin inhibits FtsZ assembly and its GTPase activity through binding to a site other than the GTP-binding site. Furthermore, using molecular docking, we identified a probable doxorubicin-binding site in FtsZ. A number of single amino acid mutations at the identified binding site in FtsZ resulted in a severalfold decrease in the affinity of FtsZ for doxorubicin, indicating the importance of this site for doxorubicin interaction. The present study suggests the presence of a novel binding site in FtsZ that interacts with the small molecules and can be targeted for the screening and development of new antibacterial agents.

  17. FtsZ rings and helices: physical mechanisms for the dynamic alignment of biopolymers in rod-shaped bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Gov, Nir S.

    2012-02-01

    In many bacterial species, the protein FtsZ forms a cytoskeletal ring that marks the future division site and scaffolds the division machinery. In rod-shaped bacteria, most frequently membrane-attached FtsZ rings or ring fragments are reported and occasionally helices. By contrast, axial FtsZ clusters have never been reported. In this paper, we investigate theoretically how dynamic FtsZ aggregates align in rod-shaped bacteria. We study systematically different physical mechanisms that affect the alignment of FtsZ polymers using a computational model that relies on autocatalytic aggregation of FtsZ filaments at the membrane. Our study identifies a general tool kit of physical and geometrical mechanisms by which rod-shaped cells align biopolymer aggregates. Our analysis compares the relative impact of each mechanism on the circumferential alignment of FtsZ as observed in rod-shaped bacteria. We determine spontaneous curvature of FtsZ polymers and axial confinement of FtsZ on the membrane as the strongest factors. Including Min oscillations in our model, we find that these stabilize axial and helical clusters on short time scales, but promote the formation of an FtsZ ring at the cell middle at longer times. This effect could provide an explanation to the long standing puzzle of transiently observed oscillating FtsZ helices in Escherichia coli cells prior to cell division.

  18. Decomposition of saltmeadow cordgrass (Spartina patens) in Louisiana coastal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foote, A.L.; Reynolds, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    In Louisiana, plant production rates and associated decomposition rates may be important in offsetting high rates of land loss and subsidence in organic marsh soils. Decomposition of Spartina patens shoot and leaf material was studied by using litter bags in mesohaline marshes in the Barataria and Terrebonne basins of coastal Louisiana. Spartina patens decomposed very slowly with an average decay constant of 0.0007, and approximately 50% of the material remained after 2 years in the field. Material at the Barataria site decomposed faster than did Terrebonne material with trend differences apparent during the first 150 days. This difference might be explained by the higher content of phosphorus in the Barataria material or a flooding period experienced by the Barataria bags during their first 10 days of deployment. Nitrogen and carbon content of the plant material studied did not differ between the two basins. We detected no consistent significant differences in decomposition above, at, or below sediment/water level. Because S. patens is the dominant plant in these marshes, and because it is so slow to decompose, we believe that S. patens shoots are an important addition to vertical accretion and, therefore, marsh elevation.

  19. Transcription of ftsZ oscillates during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Garrido, T; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Aldea, M; Vicente, M

    1993-10-01

    The FtsZ protein is a key element controlling cell division in Escherichia coli. A powerful transcription titration assay was used to quantify the ftsZ mRNA present in synchronously dividing cells. The ftsZ mRNA levels oscillate during the cell cycle reaching a maximum at about the time DNA replication initiates. This cell cycle dependency is specifically due to the two proximal ftsZ promoters. A strain was constructed in which expression of ftsZ could be modulated by an exogenous inducer. In this strain cell size and cell division frequency were sensitive to the cellular FtsZ contents, demonstrating the rate-limiting role of this protein in cell division. Transcriptional activity of the ftsZ promoters was found to be independent of DnaA, indicating that DNA replication and cell division may be independently controlled at the time when new rounds of DNA replication are initiated. This suggests a parallelism between the prokaryotic cell cycle signals and the START point of eukaryotic cell cycles.

  20. Transcription of ftsZ oscillates during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, T; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Aldea, M; Vicente, M

    1993-01-01

    The FtsZ protein is a key element controlling cell division in Escherichia coli. A powerful transcription titration assay was used to quantify the ftsZ mRNA present in synchronously dividing cells. The ftsZ mRNA levels oscillate during the cell cycle reaching a maximum at about the time DNA replication initiates. This cell cycle dependency is specifically due to the two proximal ftsZ promoters. A strain was constructed in which expression of ftsZ could be modulated by an exogenous inducer. In this strain cell size and cell division frequency were sensitive to the cellular FtsZ contents, demonstrating the rate-limiting role of this protein in cell division. Transcriptional activity of the ftsZ promoters was found to be independent of DnaA, indicating that DNA replication and cell division may be independently controlled at the time when new rounds of DNA replication are initiated. This suggests a parallelism between the prokaryotic cell cycle signals and the START point of eukaryotic cell cycles. Images PMID:8404863

  1. Organization of FtsZ Filaments in the Bacterial Division Ring Measured from Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Si, Fangwei; Busiek, Kimberly; Margolin, William; Sun, Sean X.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis in bacteria is accomplished by a ring-shaped cell-division complex (the Z-ring). The primary component of the Z-ring is FtsZ, a filamentous tubulin homolog that serves as a scaffold for the recruitment of other cell-division-related proteins. FtsZ forms filaments and bundles. In the cell, it has been suggested that FtsZ filaments form the arcs of the ring and are aligned in the cell-circumferential direction. Using polarized fluorescence microscopy in live Escherichia coli cells, we measure the structural organization of FtsZ filaments in the Z-ring. The data suggest a disordered organization: a substantial portion of FtsZ filaments are aligned in the cell-axis direction. FtsZ organization in the Z-ring also appears to depend on the bacterial species. Taken together, the unique arrangement of FtsZ suggests novel unexplored mechanisms in bacterial cell division. PMID:24209842

  2. A Carbocyclic Curcumin Inhibits Proliferation of Gram-Positive Bacteria by Targeting FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Groundwater, Paul W; Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Liao, Vivian Wan Yu; Bhattacharya, Anusri; Srivastava, Shalini; Kunal, Kishore; Doddareddy, Munikumar; Oza, Pratik M; Mamidi, Ramesh; Marrs, Emma C L; Perry, John D; Hibbs, David E; Panda, Dulal

    2017-01-24

    Inhibition of FtsZ assembly has been found to stall bacterial cell division. Here, we report the identification of a potent carbocyclic curcumin analogue (2d) that inhibits Bacillus subtilis 168 cell proliferation by targeting the assembly of FtsZ. 2d also showed potent inhibitory activity (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 2-4 mg/L) against several clinically important species of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, 2d displayed a significantly reduced inhibitory effect on human cervical cancer cells in comparison to its effect on bacterial cells. Using live cell imaging of GFP-FtsZ by confocal microscopy, 2d was found to rapidly perturb the cytokinetic FtsZ rings in Bacillus subtilis cells. The immunofluorescence imaging of FtsZ also showed that 2d destroyed the Z-ring in bacteria within 5 min. Prolonged treatment with 2d produced filamentous bacteria, but 2d had no detectable effect either on the nucleoids or on the membrane potential of bacteria. 2d inhibited FtsZ assembly in vitro, whereas it had minimal effects on tubulin assembly. Interestingly, 2d strongly enhanced the GTPase activity of FtsZ and reduced the GTPase activity of tubulin. Furthermore, 2d bound to purified FtsZ with a dissociation constant of 4.0 ± 1.1 μM, and the binding of 2d altered the secondary structures of FtsZ. The results together suggested that the non-natural curcumin analogue 2d possesses powerful antibacterial activity against important pathogenic bacteria, and the evidence indicates that 2d inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting FtsZ.

  3. Synthetic inhibitors of bacterial cell division targeting the GTP-binding site of FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Avila, Laura B; Huecas, Sonia; Artola, Marta; Vergoñós, Albert; Ramírez-Aportela, Erney; Cercenado, Emilia; Barasoain, Isabel; Vázquez-Villa, Henar; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Chacón, Pablo; López-Rodríguez, María L; Andreu, José M

    2013-09-20

    Cell division protein FtsZ is the organizer of the cytokinetic Z-ring in most bacteria and a target for new antibiotics. FtsZ assembles with GTP into filaments that hydrolyze the nucleotide at the association interface between monomers and then disassemble. We have replaced FtsZ's GTP with non-nucleotide synthetic inhibitors of bacterial division. We searched for these small molecules among compounds from the literature, from virtual screening (VS), and from our in-house synthetic library (UCM), employing a fluorescence anisotropy primary assay. From these screens we have identified the polyhydroxy aromatic compound UCM05 and its simplified analogue UCM44 that specifically bind to Bacillus subtilis FtsZ monomers with micromolar affinities and perturb normal assembly, as examined with light scattering, polymer sedimentation, and negative stain electron microscopy. On the other hand, these ligands induce the cooperative assembly of nucleotide-devoid archaeal FtsZ into distinct well-ordered polymers, different from GTP-induced filaments. These FtsZ inhibitors impair localization of FtsZ into the Z-ring and inhibit bacterial cell division. The chlorinated analogue UCM53 inhibits the growth of clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. We suggest that these interfacial inhibitors recapitulate binding and some assembly-inducing effects of GTP but impair the correct structural dynamics of FtsZ filaments and thus inhibit bacterial division, possibly by binding to a small fraction of the FtsZ molecules in a bacterial cell, which opens a new approach to FtsZ-based antibacterial drug discovery.

  4. Effects of rhodomyrtone on Gram-positive bacterial tubulin homologue FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Saeloh, Dennapa; Wenzel, Michaela; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hamoen, Leendert Willem

    2017-01-01

    Rhodomyrtone, a natural antimicrobial compound, displays potent activity against many Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria, comparable to last-defence antibiotics including vancomycin and daptomycin. Our previous studies pointed towards effects of rhodomyrtone on the bacterial membrane and cell wall. In addition, a recent molecular docking study suggested that the compound could competitively bind to the main bacterial cell division protein FtsZ. In this study, we applied a computational approach (in silico), in vitro, and in vivo experiments to investigate molecular interactions of rhodomyrtone with FtsZ. Using molecular simulation, FtsZ conformational changes were observed in both (S)- and (R)-rhodomyrtone binding states, compared with the three natural states of FtsZ (ligand-free, GDP-, and GTP-binding states). Calculations of free binding energy showed a higher affinity of FtsZ to (S)-rhodomyrtone (−35.92 ± 0.36 kcal mol−1) than the GDP substrate (−23.47 ± 0.25 kcal mol−1) while less affinity was observed in the case of (R)-rhodomyrtone (−18.11 ± 0.11 kcal mol−1). In vitro experiments further revealed that rhodomyrtone reduced FtsZ polymerization by 36% and inhibited GTPase activity by up to 45%. However, the compound had no effect on FtsZ localization in Bacillus subtilis at inhibitory concentrations and cells also did not elongate after treatment. Higher concentrations of rhodomyrtone did affect localization of FtsZ and also affected localization of its membrane anchor proteins FtsA and SepF, showing that the compound did not specifically inhibit FtsZ but rather impaired multiple divisome proteins. Furthermore, a number of cells adopted a bean-like shape suggesting that rhodomyrtone possibly possesses further targets involved in cell envelope synthesis and/or maintenance. PMID:28168121

  5. Synthesis and Evaluation of Quinazolines as Inhibitors of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is one of many potential targets for the development of novel antibiotics. Recently, zantrin Z3 was shown to be a cross-species inhibitor of FtsZ; however, its specific interactions with the protein are still unknown. Herein we report the synthesis of analogues that contain a more tractable core structure and an analogue with single-digit micromolar inhibition of FtsZ’s GTPase activity, which represents the most potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli FtsZ reported to date. In addition, the zantrin Z3 core has been converted to two potential photo-cross-linking reagents for proteomic studies that could shed light on the molecular interactions between FtsZ and molecules related to zantrin Z3. PMID:25815151

  6. SB-RA-2001 inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting FtsZ assembly.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dipty; Bhattacharya, Anusri; Rai, Ankit; Dhaked, Hemendra Pal Singh; Awasthi, Divya; Ojima, Iwao; Panda, Dulal

    2014-05-13

    FtsZ has been recognized as a promising antimicrobial drug target because of its vital role in bacterial cell division. In this work, we found that a taxane SB-RA-2001 inhibited the proliferation of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Mycobacterium smegmatis cells with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 38 and 60 μM, respectively. Cell lengths of these microorganisms increased remarkably in the presence of SB-RA-2001, indicating that it inhibits bacterial cytokinesis. SB-RA-2001 perturbed the formation of the FtsZ ring in B. subtilis 168 cells and also affected the localization of the late cell division protein, DivIVA, at the midcell position. Flow cytometric analysis of the SB-RA-2001-treated cells indicated that the compound did not affect the duplication of DNA in B. subtilis 168 cells. Further, SB-RA-2001 treatment did not affect the localization of the chromosomal partitioning protein, Spo0J, along the two ends of the nucleoids and also had no discernible effect on the nucleoid segregation in B. subtilis 168 cells. The agent also did not appear to perturb the membrane potential of B. subtilis 168 cells. In vitro, SB-RA-2001 bound to FtsZ with modest affinity, promoted the assembly and bundling of FtsZ protofilaments, and reduced the GTPase activity of FtsZ. GTP did not inhibit the binding of SB-RA-2001 to FtsZ, suggesting that it does not bind to the GTP binding site on FtsZ. A computational analysis indicated that SB-RA-2001 binds to FtsZ in the cleft region between the C-terminal domain and helix H7, and the binding site of SB-RA-2001 on FtsZ resembled that of PC190723, a well-characterized inhibitor of FtsZ. The findings collectively suggested that SB-RA-2001 inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting the assembly dynamics of FtsZ, and this can be exploited further to develop potent FtsZ-targeted antimicrobials.

  7. FtsZ and the division of prokaryotic cells and organelles.

    PubMed

    Margolin, William

    2005-11-01

    Binary fission of many prokaryotes as well as some eukaryotic organelles depends on the FtsZ protein, which self-assembles into a membrane-associated ring structure early in the division process. FtsZ is homologous to tubulin, the building block of the microtubule cytoskeleton in eukaryotes. Recent advances in genomics and cell-imaging techniques have paved the way for the remarkable progress in our understanding of fission in bacteria and organelles.

  8. Transcription of the ftsZ gene and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Robin, A; Joseleau-Petit, D; D'Ari, R

    1990-01-01

    The ftsZ gene of Escherichia coli, which lies in a cluster of cell division genes at 2 min on the genetic map, codes for a protein which is thought to play a key role in triggering cell division. Using an ftsZ::lacZ operon fusion, we have studied the transcription of the ftsZ gene under conditions in which cell division was either inhibited or synchronized in the bacterial population. In ftsZ, ftsA, ftsQ, and ftsI (or pbpB) mutants, there was no change in the differential rate of expression of the ftsZ gene in nonpermissive conditions, when cell division was completely blocked. Although the FtsZ protein is thought to be limiting for cell division, in synchronized cultures the ftsZ gene was expressed not only at the moment of septation initiation but throughout the cell cycle. Its expression, however, was not exponential but linear, with a rapid doubling in rate at a specific cell age; this age, about 20 min after division in a 60-min cycle, was different from the age at which the ftsZ::lacZ operon was duplicated. However, it was close to the age at which replication initiated and at which the rate of phospholipid synthesis doubled. During the transient division inhibition after a nutritional shift-up, ftsZ transcription again became linear, with two doublings in rate at intervals equal to the mass doubling time in the rich medium; it adopted the exponential rate typical of rich medium about 60 min after the shift-up, just before the bacterial population resumed cell division. The doubling in the rate of ftsZ transcription once per cycle in synchronized cultures and once per mass doubling time during the transition period after a nutritional shift-up reflects a new cell cycle event. PMID:2106510

  9. FtsZ does not initiate membrane constriction at the onset of division

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Daniel O.; Skoglund, Ulf; Söderström, Bill

    2016-01-01

    The source of constriction required for division of a bacterial cell remains enigmatic. FtsZ is widely believed to be a key player, because in vitro experiments indicate that it can deform liposomes when membrane tethered. However in vivo evidence for such a role has remained elusive as it has been challenging to distinguish the contribution of FtsZ from that of peptidoglycan-ingrowth. To differentiate between these two possibilities we studied the early stages of division in Escherichia coli, when FtsZ is present at the division site but peptidoglycan synthesizing enzymes such as FtsI and FtsN are not. Our approach was to use correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM) to monitor the localization of fluorescently labeled FtsZ, FtsI or FtsN correlated with the septal ultra-structural geometry in the same cell. We noted that the presence of FtsZ at the division septum is not sufficient to deform membranes. This observation suggests that, although FtsZ can provide a constrictive force, the force is not substantial at the onset of division. Conversely, the presence of FtsN always correlated with membrane invagination, indicating that allosteric activation of peptidoglycan ingrowth is the trigger for constriction of the cell envelope during cell division in E. coli. PMID:27609565

  10. Charged Molecules Modulate the Volume Exclusion Effects Exerted by Crowders on FtsZ Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; Reija, Belén; Jiménez, Mercedes; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of protein crowders, either combined or individually, on the GTP-induced FtsZ cooperative assembly, crucial for the formation of the dynamic septal ring and, hence, for bacterial division. It was earlier demonstrated that high concentrations of inert polymers like Ficoll 70, used to mimic the crowded cellular interior, favor the assembly of FtsZ into bundles with slow depolymerization. We have found, by fluorescence anisotropy together with light scattering measurements, that the presence of protein crowders increases the tendency of FtsZ to polymerize at micromolar magnesium concentration, being the effect larger with ovomucoid, a negatively charged protein. Neutral polymers and a positively charged protein also diminished the critical concentration of assembly, the extent of the effect being compatible with that expected according to pure volume exclusion models. FtsZ polymerization was also observed to be strongly promoted by a negatively charged polymer, DNA, and by some unrelated polymers like PEGs at concentrations below the crowding regime. The influence of mixed crowders mimicking the heterogeneity of the intracellular environment on the tendency of FtsZ to assemble was also studied and nonadditive effects were found to prevail. Far from exactly reproducing the bacterial cytoplasm environment, this approach serves as a simplified model illustrating how its intrinsically crowded and heterogeneous nature may modulate FtsZ assembly into a functional Z-ring. PMID:26870947

  11. Modeling FtsZ ring formation in the bacterial cell—anisotropic aggregation via mutual interactions of polymer rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir

    2011-04-01

    The cytoskeletal protein FtsZ polymerizes to a ring structure (Z ring) at the inner cytoplasmic membrane that marks the future division site and scaffolds the division machinery in many bacterial species. FtsZ is known to polymerize in the presence of GTP into single-stranded protofilaments. In vivo, FtsZ polymers become associated with the cytoplasmic membrane via interaction with the membrane-binding proteins FtsA and ZipA. The FtsZ ring structure is highly dynamic and undergoes constantly polymerization and depolymerization processes and exchange with the cytoplasmic pool. In this theoretical study, we consider a scenario of Z ring self-organization via self-enhanced attachment of FtsZ polymers due to end-to-end interactions and lateral interactions of FtsZ polymers on the membrane. With the assumption of exclusively circumferential polymer orientations, we derive coarse-grained equations for the dynamics of the pool of cytoplasmic and membrane-bound FtsZ. To capture stochastic effects expected in the system due to low particle numbers, we simulate our computational model using a Gillespie-type algorithm. We obtain ring- and arc-shaped aggregations of FtsZ polymers on the membrane as a function of monomer numbers in the cell. In particular, our model predicts the number of FtsZ rings forming in the cell as a function of cell geometry and FtsZ concentration. We also calculate the time of FtsZ ring localization to the midplane in the presence of Min oscillations. Finally, we demonstrate that the assumptions and results of our model are confirmed by 3D reconstructions of fluorescently-labeled FtsZ structures in E. coli that we obtained.

  12. A novel membrane anchor for FtsZ is linked to cell wall hydrolysis in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elizabeth L; Razavi, Shiva; Inoue, Takanari; Goley, Erin D

    2016-07-01

    In most bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ forms an annulus at midcell (the Z-ring) which recruits the division machinery and regulates cell wall remodeling. Although both activities require membrane attachment of FtsZ, few membrane anchors have been characterized. FtsA is considered to be the primary membrane tether for FtsZ in bacteria, however in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsA arrives at midcell after stable Z-ring assembly and early FtsZ-directed cell wall synthesis. We hypothesized that additional proteins tether FtsZ to the membrane and demonstrate that in C. crescentus, FzlC is one such membrane anchor. FzlC associates with membranes directly in vivo and in vitro and recruits FtsZ to membranes in vitro. As for most known membrane anchors, the C-terminal peptide of FtsZ is required for its recruitment to membranes by FzlC in vitro and midcell recruitment of FzlC in cells. In vivo, overproduction of FzlC causes cytokinesis defects whereas deletion of fzlC causes synthetic defects with dipM, ftsE and amiC mutants, implicating FzlC in cell wall hydrolysis. Our characterization of FzlC as a novel membrane anchor for FtsZ expands our understanding of FtsZ regulators and establishes a role for membrane-anchored FtsZ in the regulation of cell wall hydrolysis.

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi ftsZ Plays a Role in Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lydia; Godfrey, Henry P.; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2006-01-01

    ftsZ is essential for cell division in many microorganisms. In Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, FtsZ plays a role in ring formation at the leading edge of the cell division septum. An ftsZ homologue is present in the Borrelia burgdorferi genome (ftsZBbu). Its gene product (FtsZBbu) is strongly homologous to other bacterial FtsZ proteins, but its function has not been established. Because loss-of-function mutants of ftsZBbu might be lethal, the tetR/tetO system was adapted for regulated control of this gene in B. burgdorferi. Sixty-two nucleotides of an ftsZBbu antisense DNA sequence under the control of a tetracycline-responsive modified hybrid borrelial promoter were cloned into pKFSS1. This construct was electroporated into a B. burgdorferi host strain carrying a chromosomally located tetR under the control of the B. burgdorferi flaB promoter. After induction by anhydrotetracycline, expression of antisense ftsZ RNA resulted in generation of filamentous B. burgdorferi that were unable to divide and grew more slowly than uninduced cells. To determine whether FtsZBbu could interfere with the function of E. coli FtsZ, ftsZBbu was amplified from chromosomal DNA and placed under the control of the tetracycline-regulated hybrid promoter. After introduction of the construct into E. coli and induction with anhydrotetracycline, overexpression of ftsZBbu generated a filamentous phenotype. This suggested interference of ftsZBbu with E. coli FtsZ function and confirmed the role of ftsZBbu in cell division. This is the first report of the generation of a B. burgdorferi conditional lethal mutant equivalent by tetracycline-controlled expression of antisense RNA. PMID:16484209

  14. BT-benzo-29 inhibits bacterial cell proliferation by perturbing FtsZ assembly.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shashikant; Jindal, Bhavya; Kunal, Kishore; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2015-10-01

    We have identified a potent antibacterial agent N-(4-sec-butylphenyl)-2-(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxamide (BT-benzo-29) from a library of benzimidazole derivatives that stalled bacterial division by inhibiting FtsZ assembly. A short (5 min) exposure of BT-benzo-29 disassembled the cytokinetic Z-ring in Bacillus subtilis cells without affecting the cell length and nucleoids. BT-benzo-29 also perturbed the localization of early and late division proteins such as FtsA, ZapA and SepF at the mid-cell. Further, BT-benzo-29 bound to FtsZ with a dissociation constant of 24 ± 3 μm and inhibited the assembly and GTPase activity of purified FtsZ. A docking analysis suggested that BT-benzo-29 may bind to FtsZ at the C-terminal domain near the T7 loop. BT-benzo-29 displayed significantly weaker inhibitory effects on the assembly and GTPase activity of two mutants (L272A and V275A) of FtsZ supporting the prediction of the docking analysis. Further, BT-benzo-29 did not appear to inhibit DNA duplication and nucleoid segregation and it did not perturb the membrane potential of B. subtilis cells. The results suggested that BT-benzo-29 exerts its potent antibacterial activity by inhibiting FtsZ assembly. Interestingly, BT-benzo-29 did not affect the membrane integrity of mammalian red blood cells. BT-benzo-29 bound to tubulin with a much weaker affinity than FtsZ and exerted significantly weaker effects on mammalian cells than on the bacterial cells indicating that the compound may have a strong antibacterial potential.

  15. Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ganhui; Daniels, Brian R; Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2009-01-06

    Forces are important in biological systems for accomplishing key cell functions, such as motility, organelle transport, and cell division. Currently, known force generation mechanisms typically involve motor proteins. In bacterial cells, no known motor proteins are involved in cell division. Instead, a division ring (Z-ring) consists of mostly FtsZ, FtsA, and ZipA is used to exerting a contractile force. The mechanism of force generation in bacterial cell division is unknown. Using computational modeling, we show that Z-ring formation results from the colocalization of FtsZ and FtsA mediated by the favorable alignment of FtsZ polymers. The model predicts that the Z-ring undergoes a condensation transition from a low-density state to a high-density state and generates a sufficient contractile force to achieve division. FtsZ GTP hydrolysis facilitates monomer turnover during the condensation transition, but does not directly generate forces. In vivo fluorescence measurements show that FtsZ density increases during division, in accord with model results. The mechanism is akin to van der Waals picture of gas-liquid condensation, and shows that organisms can exploit microphase transitions to generate mechanical forces.

  16. Cell division in a minimal bacterium in the absence of ftsZ.

    PubMed

    Lluch-Senar, Maria; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2010-10-01

    Mycoplasma genomes exhibit an impressively low amount of genes involved in cell division and some species even lack the ftsZ gene, which is found widespread in the microbial world and is considered essential for cell division by binary fission. We constructed a Mycoplasma genitalium ftsZ null mutant by gene replacement to investigate the role of this gene and the presence of alternative cell division mechanisms in this minimal bacterium. Our results demonstrate that ftsZ is non-essential for cell growth and reveal that, in the absence of the FtsZ protein, M. genitalium can manage feasible cell divisions and cytokinesis using the force generated by its motile machinery. This is an alternative mechanism, completely independent of the FtsZ protein, to perform cell division by binary fission in a microorganism. We also propose that the mycoplasma cytoskeleton, a complex network of proteins involved in many aspects of the biology of these microorganisms, may have taken over the function of many genes involved in cell division, allowing their loss in the regressive evolution of the streamlined mycoplasma genomes.

  17. Structural reorganization of the bacterial cell-division protein FtsZ from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takashi; Yamane, Junji; Mogi, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroto; Takemoto, Hiroshi; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2012-09-01

    FtsZ is a key molecule in bacterial cell division. In the presence of GTP, it polymerizes into tubulin-like protofilaments by head-to-tail association. Protofilaments of FtsZ seem to adopt a straight or a curved conformation in relation to the bound nucleotide. However, although several bacterial and archaeal FtsZ structures have been determined, all of the structures reported previously are considered to have a curved conformation. In this study, structures of FtsZ from Staphylococcus aureus (SaFtsZ) were determined in apo, GDP-bound and inhibitor-complex forms and it was found that SaFtsZ undergoes marked conformational changes. The accumulated evidence suggests that the GDP-bound structure has the features of the straight form. The structural change between the curved and straight forms shows intriguing similarity to the eukaryotic cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Furthermore, the structure of the apo form showed an unexpectedly large conformational change in the core region. FtsZ has also been recognized as a novel target for antibacterial drugs. The structure of the complex with the inhibitor PC190723, which has potent and selective antistaphylococcal activity, indicated that the inhibitor binds at the cleft between the two subdomains.

  18. Discovery of chlamydial peptidoglycan reveals bacteria with murein sacculi but without FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Biboy, Jacob; Gray, Joe; Kuru, Erkin; Hall, Edward; Brun, Yves V.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Horn, Matthias; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydiae are important pathogens and symbionts, with unique cell biology features. They lack the cell-division protein FtsZ, which functions in maintaining cell shape and orchestrating cell division in almost all other bacteria. In addition, the existence of peptidoglycan (PG) in chlamydial cell envelopes has been highly controversial. Using electron cryotomography, mass spectrometry and fluorescent labeling dyes, here we show that some environmental chlamydiae have cell-wall sacculi consisting of an unusual PG type. Treatment with fosfomycin (a PG synthesis inhibitor) leads to lower infection rates and aberrant cell shapes, suggesting that PG synthesis is crucial for the chlamydial life cycle. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of PG in a member of the Chlamydiae. They also present a unique example of a bacterium with a PG sacculus but without FtsZ, challenging the current hypothesis that it is the absence of a cell wall that renders FtsZ non-essential. PMID:24292151

  19. Treadmilling by FtsZ filaments drives peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Bisson-Filho, Alexandre W; Hsu, Yen-Pang; Squyres, Georgia R; Kuru, Erkin; Wu, Fabai; Jukes, Calum; Sun, Yingjie; Dekker, Cees; Holden, Seamus; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; Brun, Yves V; Garner, Ethan C

    2017-02-17

    The mechanism by which bacteria divide is not well understood. Cell division is mediated by filaments of FtsZ and FtsA (FtsAZ) that recruit septal peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes to the division site. To understand how these components coordinate to divide cells, we visualized their movements relative to the dynamics of cell wall synthesis during cytokinesis. We found that the division septum was built at discrete sites that moved around the division plane. FtsAZ filaments treadmilled circumferentially around the division ring and drove the motions of the peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes. The FtsZ treadmilling rate controlled both the rate of peptidoglycan synthesis and cell division. Thus, FtsZ treadmilling guides the progressive insertion of new cell wall by building increasingly smaller concentric rings of peptidoglycan to divide the cell.

  20. Evidence That Bacteriophage λ Kil Peptide Inhibits Bacterial Cell Division by Disrupting FtsZ Protofilaments and Sequestering Protein Subunits.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Alfonso, Carlos; Margolin, William; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2015-08-14

    The effects of Kil peptide from bacteriophage λ on the assembly of Escherichia coli FtsZ into one subunit thick protofilaments were studied using combined biophysical and biochemical methods. Kil peptide has recently been identified as the factor from bacteriophage λ responsible for the inhibition of bacterial cell division during lytic cycle, targeting FtsZ polymerization. Here, we show that this antagonist blocks FtsZ assembly into GTP-dependent protofilaments, producing a wide distribution of smaller oligomers compared with the average size of the intact protofilaments. The shortening of FtsZ protofilaments by Kil is detectable at concentrations of the peptide in the low micromolar range, the mid-point of the inhibition being close to its apparent affinity for GDP-bound FtsZ. This antagonist not only interferes with FtsZ assembly but also reverses the polymerization reaction. The negative regulation by Kil significantly reduces the GTPase activity of FtsZ protofilaments, and FtsZ polymers assembled in guanosine-5'-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate are considerably less sensitive to Kil. Our results suggest that, at high concentrations, Kil may use an inhibition mechanism involving the sequestration of FtsZ subunits, similar to that described for other inhibitors like the SOS response protein SulA or the moonlighting enzyme OpgH. This mechanism is different from those employed by the division site selection antagonists MinC and SlmA. This work provides new insight into the inhibition of FtsZ assembly by phages, considered potential tools against bacterial infection.

  1. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of Hamelia patens extracts.

    PubMed

    Perez-Meseguer, Jonathan; Delgado-Montemayor, Cecilia; Ortíz-Torres, Tania; Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Cordero-Perez, Paula; de Torres, Noemí Waksman

    2016-01-01

    Hamelia patens is widely used in the traditional medicine of Mexico and Central America for the treatment of illnesses associated with inflammatory processes. In this study, antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity were assayed on the methanolic crude (ME), hexane (HE), ethyl acetate (AE), and butanol (BE) extracts of H. patens. The total phenolic content (TPC) as mg of gallic acid equivalents per g of dry extract was determined by Folin-Ciocalteu's method (ME=141.58±11.99, HE=33.96±1.13, AE=375.18±13.09, BE=132.08±3.62), and antioxidant activity by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging method (EC(50) ME=77.87±5.67, HE=236.64±26.32, AE=45.87±2.24, BE=50.97±0.85μg/mL). Hepatoprotective activity was evaluated through AST activity on HepG2 cells subjected to damage with CCl(4) (ME=62.5±3.41, HE=72.25±2.87, AE=63.50±4.20, BE=43.74±4.03). BE showed the greater hepatoprotective activity and a good antioxidant capacity, while HE did not show hepatoprotective or antioxidant activity. Cytotoxicity was evaluated on Vero cells cultures; none showed significant toxicity.

  2. Screening and Development of New Inhibitors of FtsZ from M. Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Bini; Ross, Larry; Connelly, Michele C.; Lofton, Hava; Rajagopalan, Malini; Guy, R. Kiplin; Reynolds, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of commercial analogs and a newer series of Sulindac derivatives were screened for inhibition of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) in vitro and specifically as inhibitors of the essential mycobacterial tubulin homolog, FtsZ. Due to the ease of preparing diverse analogs and a favorable in vivo pharmacokinetic and toxicity profile of a representative analog, the Sulindac scaffold may be useful for further development against Mtb with respect to in vitro bacterial growth inhibition and selective activity for Mtb FtsZ versus mammalian tubulin. Further discovery efforts will require separating reported mammalian cell activity from both antibacterial activity and inhibition of Mtb FtsZ. Modeling studies suggest that these analogs bind in a specific region of the Mtb FtsZ polymer that differs from human tubulin and, in combination with a pharmacophore model presented herein, future hybrid analogs of the reported active molecules that more efficiently bind in this pocket may improve antibacterial activity while improving other drug characteristics. PMID:27768711

  3. Discovery of chlamydial peptidoglycan reveals bacteria with murein sacculi but without FtsZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilhofer, Martin; Aistleitner, Karin; Biboy, Jacob; Gray, Joe; Kuru, Erkin; Hall, Edward; Brun, Yves V.; Vannieuwenhze, Michael S.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Horn, Matthias; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-12-01

    Chlamydiae are important pathogens and symbionts with unique cell biological features. They lack the cell-division protein FtsZ, and the existence of peptidoglycan (PG) in their cell wall has been highly controversial. FtsZ and PG together function in orchestrating cell division and maintaining cell shape in almost all other bacteria. Using electron cryotomography, mass spectrometry and fluorescent labelling dyes, here we show that some environmental chlamydiae have cell wall sacculi consisting of a novel PG type. Treatment with fosfomycin (a PG synthesis inhibitor) leads to lower infection rates and aberrant cell shapes, suggesting that PG synthesis is crucial for the chlamydial life cycle. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of PG in a member of the Chlamydiae. They also present a unique example of a bacterium with a PG sacculus but without FtsZ, challenging the current hypothesis that it is the absence of a cell wall that renders FtsZ non-essential.

  4. Structure and Mutational Analyses of Escherichia coli ZapD Reveal Charged Residues Involved in FtsZ Filament Bundling

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Elyse J.; Wroblewski, Charles; Seidel, Laura; Berezuk, Alison M.; Brewer, Dyanne; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial cell division is an essential and highly coordinated process. It requires the polymerization of the tubulin homologue FtsZ to form a dynamic ring (Z-ring) at midcell. Z-ring formation relies on a group of FtsZ-associated proteins (Zap) for stability throughout the process of division. In Escherichia coli, there are currently five Zap proteins (ZapA through ZapE), of which four (ZapA, ZapB, ZapC, and ZapD) are small soluble proteins that act to bind and bundle FtsZ filaments. In particular, ZapD forms a functional dimer and interacts with the C-terminal tail of FtsZ, but little is known about its structure and mechanism of action. Here, we present the crystal structure of Escherichia coli ZapD and show it forms a symmetrical dimer with centrally located α-helices flanked by β-sheet domains. Based on the structure of ZapD and its chemical cross-linking to FtsZ, we targeted nine charged ZapD residues for modification by site-directed mutagenesis. Using in vitro FtsZ sedimentation assays, we show that residues R56, R221, and R225 are important for bundling FtsZ filaments, while transmission electron microscopy revealed that altering these residues results in different FtsZ bundle morphology compared to those of filaments bundled with wild-type ZapD. ZapD residue R116 also showed altered FtsZ bundle morphology but levels of FtsZ bundling similar to that of wild-type ZapD. Together, these results reveal that ZapD residues R116, R221, and R225 likely participate in forming a positively charged binding pocket that is critical for bundling FtsZ filaments. IMPORTANCE Z-ring assembly underpins the formation of the essential cell division complex known as the divisome and is required for recruitment of downstream cell division proteins. ZapD is one of several proteins in E. coli that associates with the Z-ring to promote FtsZ bundling and aids in the overall fitness of the division process. In the present study, we describe the dimeric structure of E. coli

  5. The bacterial tubulin FtsZ requires its intrinsically disordered linker to direct robust cell wall construction

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Kousik; Miguel, Amanda; Desmarais, Samantha M.; Meier, Elizabeth L.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Goley, Erin D.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial GTPase FtsZ forms a cytokinetic ring at midcell, recruits the division machinery, and orchestrates membrane and peptidoglycan cell wall invagination. However, the mechanism for FtsZ regulation of peptidoglycan metabolism is unknown. The FtsZ GTPase domain is separated from its membrane-anchoring C-terminal conserved (CTC) peptide by a disordered C-terminal linker (CTL). Here, we investigate CTL function in Caulobacter crescentus. Strikingly, production of FtsZ lacking the CTL (ΔCTL) is lethal: cells become filamentous, form envelope bulges, and lyse, resembling treatment with β-lactam antibiotics. This phenotype is produced by FtsZ polymers bearing the CTC and a CTL shorter than 14 residues. Peptidoglycan synthesis still occurs downstream of ΔCTL, however cells expressing ΔCTL exhibit reduced peptidoglycan crosslinking and longer glycan strands than wildtype. Importantly, midcell proteins are still recruited to sites of ΔCTL assembly. We propose that FtsZ regulates peptidoglycan metabolism through a CTL-dependent mechanism that extends beyond simple protein recruitment. PMID:26099469

  6. Antibacterial activity of alkyl gallates is a combination of direct targeting of FtsZ and permeabilization of bacterial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Król, Ewa; de Sousa Borges, Anabela; da Silva, Isabel; Polaquini, Carlos R.; Regasini, Luis O.; Ferreira, Henrique; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl gallates are compounds with reported antibacterial activity. One of the modes of action is binding of the alkyl gallates to the bacterial membrane and interference with membrane integrity. However, alkyl gallates also cause cell elongation and disruption of cell division in the important plant pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, suggesting that cell division proteins may be targeted by alkyl gallates. Here, we use Bacillus subtilis and purified B. subtilis FtsZ to demonstrate that FtsZ is a direct target of alkyl gallates. Alkyl gallates disrupt the FtsZ-ring in vivo, and cause cell elongation. In vitro, alkyl gallates bind with high affinity to FtsZ, causing it to cluster and lose its capacity to polymerize. The activities of a homologous series of alkyl gallates with alkyl side chain lengths ranging from five to eight carbons (C5–C8) were compared and heptyl gallate was found to be the most potent FtsZ inhibitor. Next to the direct effect on FtsZ, alkyl gallates also target B. subtilis membrane integrity—however the observed anti-FtsZ activity is not a secondary effect of the disruption of membrane integrity. We propose that both modes of action, membrane disruption and anti-FtsZ activity, contribute to the antibacterial activity of the alkyl gallates. We propose that heptyl gallate is a promising hit for the further development of antibacterials that specifically target FtsZ. PMID:25972861

  7. An analysis of FtsZ assembly using small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuchibhatla, Anuradha; Abdul Rasheed, A S; Narayanan, Janaky; Bellare, Jayesh; Panda, Dulal

    2009-04-09

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used for the first time to study the self-assembly of the bacterial cell division protein, FtsZ, with three different additives: calcium chloride, monosodium glutamate and DEAE-dextran hydrochloride in solution. The SAXS data were analyzed assuming a model form factor and also by a model-independent analysis using the pair distance distribution function. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used for direct observation of the FtsZ filaments. By sectioning and negative staining with glow discharged grids, very high bundling as well as low bundling polymers were observed under different assembly conditions. FtsZ polymers formed different structures in the presence of different additives and these additives were found to increase the bundling of FtsZ protofilaments by different mechanisms. The combined use of SAXS and TEM provided us a significant insight of the assembly of FtsZ and microstructures of the assembled FtsZ polymers.

  8. Dependency of Escherichia coli cell-division size, and independency of nucleoid segregation on the mode and level of ftsZ expression.

    PubMed

    Palacios, P; Vicente, M; Sánchez, M

    1996-06-01

    Expression of ftsZ in strain VIP205 is dissociated from its natural promoters, and is under the control of an inducible tac promoter. This abolishes the oscillation in ftsZ transcription observed in the wild type, allowing different levels of ftsZ expression. We demonstrate that this construction does not affect the expression of other genes, and has no effects on replication or nucleoid segregation. A shift in IPTG from 30 microM, that supports division at wild-type sizes, to lower (6 microM) or higher (100 microM) concentrations, indicates that VIP205 cells can divide within a broad range of FtsZ concentrations. Analysis of the morphological parameters during the transition from one IPTG concentration to another suggests that the correct timing of ftsZ expression, and the correct FtsZ concentration, are required for division to occur at normal cell sizes. After a transient division delay during the transition to lower IPTG concentrations, cells in which ftsZ is expressed continuously (yielding 80% of the wild-type FtsZ levels) divide with the same division time as the wild type, but at the expense of becoming 1.5 times larger. A precise control of ftsZ expression is required for normal division, but the existence of additional regulators to maintain the correct timing during the cell cycle cannot be ruled out.

  9. Architecture of the ring formed by the tubulin homologue FtsZ in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Szwedziak, Piotr; Wang, Qing; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Tsim, Matthew; Löwe, Jan

    2014-12-09

    Membrane constriction is a prerequisite for cell division. The most common membrane constriction system in prokaryotes is based on the tubulin homologue FtsZ, whose filaments in E. coli are anchored to the membrane by FtsA and enable the formation of the Z-ring and divisome. The precise architecture of the FtsZ ring has remained enigmatic. In this study, we report three-dimensional arrangements of FtsZ and FtsA filaments in C. crescentus and E. coli cells and inside constricting liposomes by means of electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography. In vivo and in vitro, the Z-ring is composed of a small, single-layered band of filaments parallel to the membrane, creating a continuous ring through lateral filament contacts. Visualisation of the in vitro reconstituted constrictions as well as a complete tracing of the helical paths of the filaments with a molecular model favour a mechanism of FtsZ-based membrane constriction that is likely to be accompanied by filament sliding.

  10. Estimating the bending modulus of a FtsZ bacterial-division protein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cytrynbaum, Eric N.; Li, Yongnan Devin; Allard, Jun F.; Mehrabian, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    FtsZ, a cytoskeletal protein homologous to tubulin, is the principle constituent of the division ring in bacterial cells. It is known to have force-generating capacity in vitro and has been conjectured to be the source of the constriction force in vivo. Several models have been proposed to explain the generation of force by the Z ring. Here we re-examine data from in vitro experiments in which Z rings formed and constricted inside tubular liposomes, and we carry out image analysis on previously published data with which to better estimate important model parameters that have proven difficult to measure by direct means. We introduce a membrane-energy-based model for the dynamics of multiple Z rings moving and colliding inside a tubular liposome and a fluid model for the drag of a Z ring as it moves through the tube. Using this model, we estimate an effective membrane bending modulus of 500-700 pNnm. If we assume that FtsZ force generation is driven by hydrolysis into a highly curved conformation, we estimate the FtsZ filament bending modulus to be 310-390 pNnm2. If we assume instead that force is generated by the non-hydrolysis-dependent intermediate curvature conformation, we find that Bf>1400pNnm2. The former value sits at the lower end of the range of previously estimated values and, if correct, may raise challenges for models that rely on filament bending to generate force.

  11. Studies on the Dissociation and Urea-Induced Unfolding of FtsZ Support the Dimer Nucleus Polymerization Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Montecinos-Franjola, Felipe; Ross, Justin A.; Sánchez, Susana A.; Brunet, Juan E.; Lagos, Rosalba; Jameson, David M.; Monasterio, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    FtsZ is a major protein in bacterial cytokinesis that polymerizes into single filaments. A dimer has been proposed to be the nucleating species in FtsZ polymerization. To investigate the influence of the self-assembly of FtsZ on its unfolding pathway, we characterized its oligomerization and unfolding thermodynamics. We studied the assembly using size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the unfolding using circular dichroism and two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The chromatographic analysis demonstrated the presence of monomers, dimers, and tetramers with populations dependent on protein concentration. Dilution experiments using fluorescent conjugates revealed dimer-to-monomer and tetramer-to-dimer dissociation constants in the micromolar range. Measurements of fluorescence lifetimes and rotational correlation times of the conjugates supported the presence of tetramers at high protein concentrations and monomers at low protein concentrations. The unfolding study demonstrated that the three-state unfolding of FtsZ was due to the mainly dimeric state of the protein, and that the monomer unfolds through a two-state mechanism. The monomer-to-dimer equilibrium characterized here (Kd = 9 μM) indicates a significant fraction (∼10%) of stable dimers at the critical concentration for polymerization, supporting a role of the dimeric species in the first steps of FtsZ polymerization. PMID:22824282

  12. Simple modeling of FtsZ polymers on flat and curved surfaces: correlation with experimental in vitro observations

    PubMed Central

    Paez, Alfonso; Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Hörger, Ines; Mingorance, Jesús; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel; Vélez, Marisela; Tarazona, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    FtsZ is a GTPase that assembles at midcell into a dynamic ring that constricts the membrane to induce cell division in the majority of bacteria, in many archea and several organelles. In vitro, FtsZ polymerizes in a GTP-dependent manner forming a variety of filamentous flexible structures. Based on data derived from the measurement of the in vitro polymerization of Escherichia coli FtsZ cell division protein we have formulated a model in which the fine balance between curvature, flexibility and lateral interactions accounts for structural and dynamic properties of the FtsZ polymers observed with AFM. The experimental results have been used by the model to calibrate the interaction energies and the values obtained indicate that the filaments are very plastic. The extension of the model to explore filament behavior on a cylindrical surface has shown that the FtsZ condensates promoted by lateral interactions can easily form ring structures through minor modulations of either filament curvature or longitudinal bond energies. The condensation of short, monomer exchanging filaments into rings is shown to produce enough force to induce membrane deformations. PACS codes: 87.15.ak, 87.16.ka, 87.17.Ee PMID:19849848

  13. The bacterial cell division proteins FtsA and FtsZ self-organize into dynamic cytoskeletal patterns.

    PubMed

    Loose, Martin; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cytokinesis is commonly initiated by the Z-ring, a cytoskeletal structure that assembles at the site of division. Its primary component is FtsZ, a tubulin superfamily GTPase, which is recruited to the membrane by the actin-related protein FtsA. Both proteins are required for the formation of the Z-ring, but if and how they influence each other's assembly dynamics is not known. Here, we reconstituted FtsA-dependent recruitment of FtsZ polymers to supported membranes, where both proteins self-organize into complex patterns, such as fast-moving filament bundles and chirally rotating rings. Using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical perturbations, we found that these large-scale rearrangements of FtsZ emerge from its polymerization dynamics and a dual, antagonistic role of FtsA: recruitment of FtsZ filaments to the membrane and negative regulation of FtsZ organization. Our findings provide a model for the initial steps of bacterial cell division and illustrate how dynamic polymers can self-organize into large-scale structures.

  14. Microenvironments created by liquid-liquid phase transition control the dynamic distribution of bacterial division FtsZ protein

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; Zorrilla, Silvia; Sobrinos-Sanguino, Marta; Keating, Christine D.; Rivas, Germán

    2016-01-01

    The influence of membrane-free microcompartments resulting from crowding-induced liquid/liquid phase separation (LLPS) on the dynamic spatial organization of FtsZ, the main component of the bacterial division machinery, has been studied using several LLPS systems. The GTP-dependent assembly cycle of FtsZ is thought to be crucial for the formation of the septal ring, which is highly regulated in time and space. We found that FtsZ accumulates in one of the phases and/or at the interface, depending on the system composition and on the oligomerization state of the protein. These results were observed both in bulk LLPS and in lipid-stabilized, phase-separated aqueous microdroplets. The visualization of the droplets revealed that both the location and structural arrangement of FtsZ filaments is determined by the nature of the LLPS. Relocation upon depolymerization of the dynamic filaments suggests the protein may shift among microenvironments in response to changes in its association state. The existence of these dynamic compartments driven by phase transitions can alter the local composition and reactivity of FtsZ during its life cycle acting as a nonspecific modulating factor of cell function. PMID:27725777

  15. Contribution of individual promoters in the ddlB-ftsZ region to the transcription of the essential cell-division gene ftsZ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Flärdh, K; Garrido, T; Vicente, M

    1997-06-01

    The essential cell-division gene ftsZ is transcribed in Escherichia coli from at least six promoters found within the coding regions of the upstream ddlB, ftsQ, and ftsA genes. The contribution of each one to the final yield of ftsZ transcription has been estimated using transcriptional lacZ fusions. The most proximal promoter, ftsZ2p, contributes less than 5% of the total transcription from the region that reaches ftsZ. The ftsZ4p and ftsZ3p promoters, both located inside ftsA, produce almost 37% of the transcription. An ftsAp promoter within the ftsQ gene yields nearly 12% of total transcription from the region. A large proportion of transcription (approximately 46%) derives from promoters ftsQ2p and ftsQ1p, which are located inside the upstream ddlB gene. Thus, the ftsQAZ genes are to a large extent transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA. However, we find that the ftsZ proximal region is necessary for full expression, which is in agreement with a recent report that mRNA cleavage by RNase E at the end of the ftsA cistron has a significant role in the contol of ftsZ expression.

  16. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of substituted oxazole-benzamide antibacterial inhibitors of FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Neil R; Baker, Nicola; Bennett, James M; Chauhan, Pramod K; Collins, Ian; Davies, David T; Gavade, Maruti; Kumar, Dushyant; Lancett, Paul; Macdonald, Rebecca; Macleod, Leanne; Mahajan, Anu; Mitchell, Jeffrey P; Nayal, Narendra; Nayal, Yashodanand Nandan; Pitt, Gary R W; Singh, Mahipal; Yadav, Anju; Srivastava, Anil; Czaplewski, Lloyd G; Haydon, David J

    2014-01-01

    The design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a series of oxazole-benzamide inhibitors of the essential bacterial cell division protein FtsZ are described. Compounds had potent anti-staphylococcal activity and inhibited the cytokinesis of the clinically-significant bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Selected analogues possessing a 5-halo oxazole also inhibited a strain of S. aureus harbouring the glycine-to-alanine amino acid substitution at residue 196 of FtsZ which conferred resistance to previously reported inhibitors in the series. Substitutions to the pseudo-benzylic carbon of the scaffold improved the pharmacokinetic properties by increasing metabolic stability and provided a mechanism for creating pro-drugs. Combining multiple substitutions based on the findings reported in this study has provided small-molecule inhibitors of FtsZ with enhanced in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy.

  17. Advances in the discovery of novel antimicrobials targeting the assembly of bacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Ma, Shutao

    2015-05-05

    Currently, wide-spread antimicrobials resistance among bacterial pathogens continues being a dramatically increasing and serious threat to public health, and thus there is a pressing need to develop new antimicrobials to keep pace with the bacterial resistance. Filamentous temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ), a prokaryotic cytoskeleton protein, plays an important role in bacterial cell division. It as a very new and promising target, garners special attention in the antibacterial research in the recent years. This review describes not only the function and dynamic behaviors of FtsZ, but also the known natural and synthetic inhibitors of FtsZ. In particular, the small molecules recently developed and the future directions of ideal candidates are highlighted.

  18. Bacterial division proteins FtsZ and ZipA induce vesicle shrinkage and cell membrane invagination.

    PubMed

    Cabré, Elisa J; Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; Carrara, Paolo; Ropero, Noelia; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar; Stano, Pasquale; Jiménez, Mercedes; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-09-13

    Permeable vesicles containing the proto-ring anchoring ZipA protein shrink when FtsZ, the main cell division protein, polymerizes in the presence of GTP. Shrinkage, resembling the constriction of the cytoplasmic membrane, occurs at ZipA densities higher than those found in the cell and is modulated by the dynamics of the FtsZ polymer. In vivo, an excess of ZipA generates multilayered membrane inclusions within the cytoplasm and causes the loss of the membrane function as a permeability barrier. Overproduction of ZipA at levels that block septation is accompanied by the displacement of FtsZ and two additional division proteins, FtsA and FtsN, from potential septation sites to clusters that colocalize with ZipA near the membrane. The results show that elementary constriction events mediated by defined elements involved in cell division can be evidenced both in bacteria and in vesicles.

  19. Bacterial Division Proteins FtsZ and ZipA Induce Vesicle Shrinkage and Cell Membrane Invagination*

    PubMed Central

    Cabré, Elisa J.; Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; Carrara, Paolo; Ropero, Noelia; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar; Stano, Pasquale; Jiménez, Mercedes; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Permeable vesicles containing the proto-ring anchoring ZipA protein shrink when FtsZ, the main cell division protein, polymerizes in the presence of GTP. Shrinkage, resembling the constriction of the cytoplasmic membrane, occurs at ZipA densities higher than those found in the cell and is modulated by the dynamics of the FtsZ polymer. In vivo, an excess of ZipA generates multilayered membrane inclusions within the cytoplasm and causes the loss of the membrane function as a permeability barrier. Overproduction of ZipA at levels that block septation is accompanied by the displacement of FtsZ and two additional division proteins, FtsA and FtsN, from potential septation sites to clusters that colocalize with ZipA near the membrane. The results show that elementary constriction events mediated by defined elements involved in cell division can be evidenced both in bacteria and in vesicles. PMID:23921390

  20. 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) induces bundling of Escherichia coli FtsZ polymers inhibiting the GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Nova, Esteban; Montecinos, Felipe; Brunet, Juan E; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2007-09-15

    FtsZ (Filamentous temperature sensitivity Z) cell division protein from Escherichia coli binds the fluorescence probe DAPI. Bundling of FtsZ was facilitated in the presence of DAPI, and the polymers in solution remained polymerized longer time than the protofilaments formed in the absence of DAPI. DAPI decreased both the maximal velocity of the GTPase activity and the Michaelis-Menten constant for GTP, indicating that behaves like an uncompetitive inhibitor of the GTPase activity favoring the GTP form of FtsZ in the polymers. The results presented in this work support a cooperative polymerization mechanism in which the binding of DAPI favors protofilament lateral interactions and the stability of the resulting polymers.

  1. [Effect of cinnamon and lavender oils on FtsZ gene expression in the Staphylococus aureus ATCC 29213].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of lavender and cinnamon oils on FtsZ gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213. The cinnamon and lavender oils at least partially results from the inhibition of FtsZ transcription and disruption of cell division process at the level of the septum synthesis, what is similar to mechanisms of drug action used in anti-staphylococcal therapies. The presented results could be an important background for the further detailed research, which is needed to clarify the effect of essential oils on FtsZ synthesis at the posttranscriptional level and other stages of cell division process of S. aureus and other pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Characterization of the FtsZ C-Terminal Variable (CTV) Region in Z-Ring Assembly and Interaction with the Z-Ring Stabilizer ZapD in E. coli Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Hsiang; Mychack, Aaron; Tchorzewski, Lukasz; Janakiraman, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization of a ring-like cytoskeletal structure, the Z-ring, at midcell is a highly conserved feature in virtually all bacteria. The Z-ring is composed of short protofilaments of the tubulin homolog FtsZ, randomly arranged and held together through lateral interactions. In vitro, lateral associations between FtsZ protofilaments are stabilized by crowding agents, high concentrations of divalent cations, or in some cases, low pH. In vivo, the last 4-10 amino acid residues at the C-terminus of FtsZ (the C-terminal variable region, CTV) have been implicated in mediating lateral associations between FtsZ protofilaments through charge shielding. Multiple Z-ring associated proteins (Zaps), also promote lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments to stabilize the FtsZ ring in vivo. Here we characterize the complementary role/s of the CTV of E. coli FtsZ and the FtsZ-ring stabilizing protein ZapD, in FtsZ assembly. We show that the net charge of the FtsZ CTV not only affects FtsZ protofilament bundling, confirming earlier observations, but likely also the length of the FtsZ protofilaments in vitro. The CTV residues also have important consequences for Z-ring assembly and interaction with ZapD in the cell. ZapD requires the FtsZ CTV region for interaction with FtsZ in vitro and for localization to midcell in vivo. Our data suggest a mechanism in which the CTV residues, particularly K380, facilitate a conformation for the conserved carboxy-terminal residues in FtsZ, that lie immediately N-terminal to the CTV, to enable optimal contact with ZapD. Further, phylogenetic analyses suggest a correlation between the nature of FtsZ CTV residues and the presence of ZapD in the β- γ-proteobacterial species.

  3. Characterization of the FtsZ C-Terminal Variable (CTV) Region in Z-Ring Assembly and Interaction with the Z-Ring Stabilizer ZapD in E. coli Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Hsiang; Mychack, Aaron; Tchorzewski, Lukasz; Janakiraman, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization of a ring-like cytoskeletal structure, the Z-ring, at midcell is a highly conserved feature in virtually all bacteria. The Z-ring is composed of short protofilaments of the tubulin homolog FtsZ, randomly arranged and held together through lateral interactions. In vitro, lateral associations between FtsZ protofilaments are stabilized by crowding agents, high concentrations of divalent cations, or in some cases, low pH. In vivo, the last 4–10 amino acid residues at the C-terminus of FtsZ (the C-terminal variable region, CTV) have been implicated in mediating lateral associations between FtsZ protofilaments through charge shielding. Multiple Z-ring associated proteins (Zaps), also promote lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments to stabilize the FtsZ ring in vivo. Here we characterize the complementary role/s of the CTV of E. coli FtsZ and the FtsZ-ring stabilizing protein ZapD, in FtsZ assembly. We show that the net charge of the FtsZ CTV not only affects FtsZ protofilament bundling, confirming earlier observations, but likely also the length of the FtsZ protofilaments in vitro. The CTV residues also have important consequences for Z-ring assembly and interaction with ZapD in the cell. ZapD requires the FtsZ CTV region for interaction with FtsZ in vitro and for localization to midcell in vivo. Our data suggest a mechanism in which the CTV residues, particularly K380, facilitate a conformation for the conserved carboxy-terminal residues in FtsZ, that lie immediately N-terminal to the CTV, to enable optimal contact with ZapD. Further, phylogenetic analyses suggest a correlation between the nature of FtsZ CTV residues and the presence of ZapD in the β- γ-proteobacterial species. PMID:27088231

  4. Variations in the Life Cycle of Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae) in Wild Populations of Canada.

    PubMed

    Kricsfalusy, Vladimir

    2016-06-30

    Based on a study of a perennial herb Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae) in a variety of natural habitats in Saskatchewan, Canada, eight life stages (seed, seedling, juvenile, immature, vegetative, generative, subsenile, and senile) are distinguished and characterized in detail. The species ontogenetic growth patterns are investigated. A. patens has a long life cycle that may last for several decades which leads to the formation of compact clumps. The distribution and age of clumps vary substantially in different environments with different levels of disturbance. The plant ontogeny includes the regular cycle with reproduction occurring through seeds. There is an optional subsenile vegetative disintegration at the end of the life span. The following variations in the life cycle of A. patens are identified: with slower development in young age, with an accelerated development, with omission of the generative stage, with retrogression to previous life stages in mature age, and with vegetative dormancy. The range of variations in the life cycle of A. patens may play an important role in maintaining population stability in different environmental conditions and management regimes.

  5. Variations in the Life Cycle of Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae) in Wild Populations of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Kricsfalusy, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Based on a study of a perennial herb Anemone patens L. (Ranunculaceae) in a variety of natural habitats in Saskatchewan, Canada, eight life stages (seed, seedling, juvenile, immature, vegetative, generative, subsenile, and senile) are distinguished and characterized in detail. The species ontogenetic growth patterns are investigated. A. patens has a long life cycle that may last for several decades which leads to the formation of compact clumps. The distribution and age of clumps vary substantially in different environments with different levels of disturbance. The plant ontogeny includes the regular cycle with reproduction occurring through seeds. There is an optional subsenile vegetative disintegration at the end of the life span. The following variations in the life cycle of A. patens are identified: with slower development in young age, with an accelerated development, with omission of the generative stage, with retrogression to previous life stages in mature age, and with vegetative dormancy. The range of variations in the life cycle of A. patens may play an important role in maintaining population stability in different environmental conditions and management regimes. PMID:27376340

  6. Promoting assembly and bundling of FtsZ as a strategy to inhibit bacterial cell division: a new approach for developing novel antibacterial drugs.

    PubMed

    Beuria, Tushar K; Singh, Parminder; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2009-09-14

    FtsZ plays an essential role in bacterial cell division. We have used the assembly of FtsZ as a screen to find antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. The effects of 81 compounds of 29 different structural scaffolds on FtsZ assembly in vitro were examined using a sedimentation assay. Out of these 81 compounds, OTBA (3-{5-[4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-thiazolidin-5-ylidenemethyl]-furan-2-yl}-benzoic acid) was found to promote FtsZ assembly in vitro. OTBA increased the assembly of FtsZ, caused bundling of FtsZ protofilaments, prevented dilution-induced disassembly of FtsZ protofilaments and decreased the GTPase activity in vitro. It bound to FtsZ with an apparent dissociation constant of 15+/-1.5 microM. Furthermore, OTBA inhibited the proliferation of Bacillus subtilis 168 cells with an MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) of 2 microM, whereas it exerted minimal effects on mammalian cell proliferation, indicating that it might have a potential use as an antibacterial drug. In the effective proliferation inhibitory concentration range, OTBA induced filamentation in bacteria and also perturbed the formation of the cytokinetic Z-rings in bacteria. However, the agent neither perturbed the membrane structures nor affected the nucleoid segregation in B. subtilis cells. The results suggested that the OTBA inhibited bacterial cytokinesis by perturbing the formation and functioning of the Z-ring via altering FtsZ assembly dynamics. The antibacterial mechanism of action of OTBA is similar to that of the widely used anticancer drug paclitaxel, which inhibits cancer cell proliferation by promoting the assembly of tubulin, a eukaryotic homologue of FtsZ.

  7. FtsZ Filament Dynamics at Steady State: Subunit Exchange with and without Nucleotide Hydrolysis†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaodong; Erickson, Harold P.

    2009-01-01

    We have measured three aspects of FtsZ filament dynamics at steady state: rates of GTP hydrolysis, subunit exchange between protofilaments, and disassembly induced by dilution or excess GDP. All three reactions were slowed with an increase in the potassium concentration from 100 to 500 mM, via replacement of potassium with rubidium, or with an increase in the magnesium concentration from 5 to 20 mM. Electron microscopy showed that the polymers assembled under the conditions of fastest assembly were predominantly short, one-stranded protofilaments, whereas under conditions of slower dynamics, the protofilaments tended to associate into long, thin bundles. We suggest that exchange of subunits between protofilaments at steady state involves two separate mechanisms: (1) fragmentation or dissociation of subunits from protofilament ends following GTP hydrolysis and (2) reversible association and dissociation of subunits from protofilament ends independent of hydrolysis. Exchange of nucleotides on these recycling subunits could give the appearance of exchange directly into the polymer. Several of our observations suggest that exchange of nucleotide can take place on these recycling subunits, but not directly into the FtsZ polymer. Annealing of protofilaments was demonstrated for the L68W mutant in EDTA buffer but not in Mg buffer, where rapid cycling of subunits may obscure the effect of annealing. We also reinvestigated the nucleotide composition of FtsZ polymers at steady state. We found that the GDP:GTP ratio was 50:50 for concentrations of GTP > 100 μM, significantly higher than the 20:80 ratio previously reported at 20 μM GTP. PMID:19527070

  8. Visualization of plastids in pollen grains: involvement of FtsZ1 in pollen plastid division.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lay Yin; Nagata, Noriko; Matsushima, Ryo; Chen, Yuling; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2009-04-01

    Visualizing organelles in living cells is a powerful method to analyze their intrinsic mechanisms. Easy observation of chlorophyll facilitates the study of the underlying mechanisms in chloroplasts, but not in other plastid types. Here, we constructed a transgenic plant enabling visualization of plastids in pollen grains. Combination of a plastid-targeted fluorescent protein with a pollen-specific promoter allowed us to observe the precise number, size and morphology of plastids in pollen grains of the wild type and the ftsZ1 mutant, whose responsible gene plays a central role in chloroplast division. The transgenic material presented in this work is useful for studying the division mechanism of pollen plastids.

  9. Asynchronous division by non-ring FtsZ in the gammaproteobacterial symbiont of Robbea hypermnestra.

    PubMed

    Leisch, Nikolaus; Pende, Nika; Weber, Philipp M; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Verheul, Jolanda; Vischer, Norbert O E; Abby, Sophie S; Geier, Benedikt; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-10-10

    The reproduction mode of uncultivable microorganisms deserves investigation as it can largely diverge from conventional transverse binary fission. Here, we show that the rod-shaped gammaproteobacterium thriving on the surface of the Robbea hypermnestra nematode divides by FtsZ-based, non-synchronous invagination of its poles-that is, the host-attached and fimbriae-rich pole invaginates earlier than the distal one. We conclude that, in a naturally occurring animal symbiont, binary fission is host-oriented and does not require native FtsZ to polymerize into a ring at any septation stage.

  10. The bacterial cell-division protein ZipA and its interaction with an FtsZ fragment revealed by X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Mosyak, Lidia; Zhang, Yan; Glasfeld, Elizabeth; Haney, Steve; Stahl, Mark; Seehra, Jasbir; Somers, William S.

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, FtsZ, a homologue of eukaryotic tubulins, and ZipA, a membrane-anchored protein that binds to FtsZ, are two essential components of the septal ring structure that mediates cell division. Recent data indicate that ZipA is involved in the assembly of the ring by linking FtsZ to the cytoplasmic membrane and that the ZipA–FtsZ interaction is mediated by their C-terminal domains. We present the X-ray crystal structures of the C-terminal FtsZ-binding domain of ZipA and a complex between this domain and a C-terminal fragment of FtsZ. The ZipA domain is a six-stranded β-sheet packed against three α-helices and contains the split β–α–β motif found in many RNA-binding proteins. The uncovered side of the sheet incorporates a shallow hydrophobic cavity exposed to solvent. In the complex, the 17-residue FtsZ fragment occupies this entire cavity of ZipA and binds as an extended β-strand followed by α-helix. An alanine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the FtsZ fragment was also performed, which shows that only a small cluster of the buried FtsZ side chains is critical in binding to ZipA. PMID:10880432

  11. Differential Regulation of ftsZ Transcription during Septation of Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jangyul; Dharmatilake, Amitha J.; Jiang, Hao; Kendrick, Kathleen E.

    2001-01-01

    Streptomyces has been known to form two types of septa. The data in this research demonstrated that Streptomyces griseus forms another type of septum near the base of sporogenic hyphae (basal septum). To understand the regulation of the septation machinery in S. griseus, we investigated the expression of the ftsZ gene. S1 nuclease protection assays revealed that four ftsZ transcripts were differentially expressed during morphological differentiation. The vegetative transcript (emanating from Pveg) is present at a moderate level during vegetative growth, but is switched off within the first 2 h of sporulation. Two sporulation-specific transcripts predominantly accumulated, and the levels increased by approximately fivefold together shortly before sporulation septa begin to form. Consistently, the sporulation-specific transcripts were expressed much earlier and more abundantly in a group of nonsporulating mutants that form their sporulation septa prematurely. Promoter-probe studies with two different reporter systems confirmed the activities of the putative promoters identified from the 5′ end point of the transcripts. The levels and expression timing of promoter activities were consistent with the results of nuclease protection assays. The aseptate phenotype of the Pspo mutant indicated that the increased transcription from Pspo is required for sporulation septation, but not for vegetative or basal septum formation. PMID:11489862

  12. Kinetic modeling of the assembly, dynamic steady state, and contraction of the FtsZ ring in prokaryotic cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Surovtsev, Ivan V; Morgan, Jeffrey J; Lindahl, Paul A

    2008-07-04

    Cytokinesis in prokaryotes involves the assembly of a polymeric ring composed of FtsZ protein monomeric units. The Z ring forms at the division plane and is attached to the membrane. After assembly, it maintains a stable yet dynamic steady state. Once induced, the ring contracts and the membrane constricts. In this work, we present a computational deterministic biochemical model exhibiting this behavior. The model is based on biochemical features of FtsZ known from in vitro studies, and it quantitatively reproduces relevant in vitro data. An essential part of the model is a consideration of interfacial reactions involving the cytosol volume, where monomeric FtsZ is dispersed, and the membrane surface in the cell's mid-zone where the ring is assembled. This approach allows the same chemical model to simulate either in vitro or in vivo conditions by adjusting only two geometrical parameters. The model includes minimal reactions, components, and assumptions, yet is able to reproduce sought-after in vivo behavior, including the rapid assembly of the ring via FtsZ-polymerization, the formation of a dynamic steady state in which GTP hydrolysis leads to the exchange of monomeric subunits between cytoplasm and the ring, and finally the induced contraction of the ring. The model gives a quantitative estimate for coupling between the rate of GTP hydrolysis and of FtsZ subunit turnover between the assembled ring and the cytoplasmic pool as observed. Membrane constriction is chemically driven by the strong tendency of GTP-bound FtsZ to self-assembly. The model suggests a possible mechanism of membrane contraction without a motor protein. The portion of the free energy of GTP hydrolysis released in cyclization is indirectly used in this energetically unfavorable process. The model provides a limit to the mechanistic complexity required to mimic ring behavior, and it highlights the importance of parallel in vitro and in vivo modeling.

  13. Preparation and characteristics of bio-oil from the marine brown alga Sargassum patens C. Agardh.

    PubMed

    Li, Demao; Chen, Limei; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Chen, Fangjian; Chen, Shulin

    2012-01-01

    The marine brown alga, Sargassum patens C. Agardh, floating on the Yellow Sea, was collected and converted to bio-oil through hydrothermal liquefaction with a modified reactor. A maximum yield of 32.1±0.2 wt.% bio-oil was obtained after 15 min at 340 °C, at a feedstock concentration of 15 g biomass/150 ml water, without using a catalyst. The bio-oil had a heating value of 27.1MJ/kg and contained water, lipid, alcohol, phenol, esters, ethers and aromatic compounds. The solid residue obtained had a high ash and oxygen content. The results suggest that S. patens C. Agardh has potential as biomass feedstock for fuel and chemical products.

  14. Structures of the nucleoid occlusion protein SlmA bound to DNA and the C-terminal domain of the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in most prokaryotes is mediated by FtsZ, which polymerizes to create the cytokinetic Z ring. Multiple FtsZ-binding proteins regulate FtsZ polymerization to ensure the proper spatiotemporal formation of the Z ring at the division site. The DNA-binding protein SlmA binds to FtsZ and prevents Z-ring formation through the nucleoid in a process called “nucleoid occlusion” (NO). As do most FtsZ-accessory proteins, SlmA interacts with the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) that is connected to the FtsZ core by a long, flexible linker. However, SlmA is distinct from other regulatory factors in that it must be DNA-bound to interact with the FtsZ CTD. Few structures of FtsZ regulator–CTD complexes are available, but all reveal the CTD bound as a helix. To deduce the molecular basis for the unique SlmA–DNA–FtsZ CTD regulatory interaction and provide insight into FtsZ–regulator protein complex formation, we determined structures of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera, and Klebsiella pneumonia SlmA–DNA–FtsZ CTD ternary complexes. Strikingly, the FtsZ CTD does not interact with SlmA as a helix but binds as an extended conformation in a narrow, surface-exposed pocket formed only in the DNA-bound state of SlmA and located at the junction between the DNA-binding and C-terminal dimer domains. Binding studies are consistent with the structure and underscore key interactions in complex formation. Combined, these data reveal the molecular basis for the SlmA–DNA–FtsZ interaction with implications for SlmA’s NO function and underscore the ability of the FtsZ CTD to adopt a wide range of conformations, explaining its ability to bind diverse regulatory proteins. PMID:27091999

  15. Roles of Arabidopsis PARC6 in Coordination of the Chloroplast Division Complex and Negative Regulation of FtsZ Assembly1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Froehlich, John E.; TerBush, Allan D.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast division is driven by the simultaneous constriction of the inner FtsZ ring (Z ring) and the outer DRP5B ring. The assembly and constriction of these rings in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are coordinated partly through the inner envelope membrane protein ACCUMULATION AND REPLICATION OF CHLOROPLASTS6 (ARC6). Previously, we showed that PARC6 (PARALOG OF ARC6), also in the inner envelope membrane, negatively regulates FtsZ assembly and acts downstream of ARC6 to position the outer envelope membrane protein PLASTID DIVISION1 (PDV1), which functions together with its paralog PDV2 to recruit DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN 5B (DRP5B) from a cytosolic pool to the outer envelope membrane. However, whether PARC6, like ARC6, also functions in coordination of the chloroplast division contractile complexes was unknown. Here, we report a detailed topological analysis of Arabidopsis PARC6, which shows that PARC6 has a single transmembrane domain and a topology resembling that of ARC6. The newly identified stromal region of PARC6 interacts not only with ARC3, a direct inhibitor of Z-ring assembly, but also with the Z-ring protein FtsZ2. Overexpression of PARC6 inhibits FtsZ assembly in Arabidopsis but not in a heterologous yeast system (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), suggesting that the negative regulation of FtsZ assembly by PARC6 is a consequence of its interaction with ARC3. A conserved carboxyl-terminal peptide in FtsZ2 mediates FtsZ2 interaction with both PARC6 and ARC6. Consistent with its role in the positioning of PDV1, the intermembrane space regions of PARC6 and PDV1 interact. These findings provide new insights into the functions of PARC6 and suggest that PARC6 coordinates the inner Z ring and outer DRP5B ring through interaction with FtsZ2 and PDV1 during chloroplast division. PMID:26527658

  16. Design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of isatin derivatives as FtsZ inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zhi-Min; Sun, Juan; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Seven isatin derivatives have been designed, and their chemical structures were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, 1H NMR, MS, and elemental analysis. Structural stabilization followed by intramolecular as well as intermolecular H-bonds makes these molecules as perfect examples in molecular recognition with self-complementary donor and acceptor units within a single molecule. These compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial activities. Docking simulations have been performed to position compounds into the FtsZ active site to determine their probable binding models. All of the compounds exhibited better antibacterial activities. Interestingly, compound 5c and 5d exhibited better antibacterial activities with IC50 values of 0.03 and 0.05 μmol/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. Compound 5g displays antibacterial activity with IC50 values of 0.672 and 0.830 μmol/mL against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively.

  17. WhmD promotes the assembly of Mycobacterium smegmatis FtsZ: A possible role of WhmD in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Dipanwita; Kumar, Ashutosh; Panda, Dulal

    2017-02-01

    WhmD is considered to have a role in the septation and division of Mycobacterium smegmatis cells. Since FtsZ is the central protein of the septum, we determined the effect of WhmD on the assembly of Mycobacterium smegmatis FtsZ (MsFtsZ) in vitro. WhmD increased both the rate and extent of the assembly of MsFtsZ in vitro. WhmD also increased the amount of polymerized MsFtsZ as evident from a sedimentation assay. Further, the assembly promoting activity of WhmD occurred in the presence of GTP. MsFtsZ polymerized to form thin filaments in the absence of WhmD while MsFtsZ formed thick filaments in the presence of WhmD suggesting that WhmD enhanced the bundling of MsFtsZ filaments. Interestingly, WhmD neither suppressed the dilution-induced disassembly of FtsZ filaments nor significantly altered the GTPase activity of FtsZ. Using size exclusion chromatography, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, WhmD was found to bind to MsFtsZ in vitro. The results showed that WhmD can promote the assembly of FtsZ and indicated that WhmD may play a role in the division of M. smegmatis cells by assisting the polymerization of FtsZ.

  18. Comparison of small molecule inhibitors of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ and identification of a reliable cross-species inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Kim, Michelle B; Moore, Jared T; O'Brien, Terrence E; Sorto, Nohemy A; Grove, Charles I; Lackner, Laura L; Ames, James B; Shaw, Jared T

    2012-11-16

    FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates cytokinesis in bacteria. FtsZ is homologous in structure to eukaryotic tubulin and polymerizes in a similar head-to-tail fashion. The study of tubulin's function in eukaryotic cells has benefited greatly from specific and potent small molecule inhibitors, including colchicine and taxol. Although many small molecule inhibitors of FtsZ have been reported, none has emerged as a generally useful probe for modulating bacterial cell division. With the goal of establishing a useful and reliable small molecule inhibitor of FtsZ, a broad biochemical cross-comparison of reported FtsZ inhibitors was undertaken. Several of these molecules, including phenolic natural products, are unselective inhibitors that seem to derive their activity from the formation of microscopic colloids or aggregates. Other compounds, including the natural product viriditoxin and the drug development candidate PC190723, exhibit no inhibition of GTPase activity using protocols in this work or under published conditions. Of the compounds studied, only zantrin Z3 exhibits good levels of inhibition, maintains activity under conditions that disrupt small molecule aggregates, and provides a platform for exploration of structure-activity relationships (SAR). Preliminary SAR studies have identified slight modifications to the two side chains of this structure that modulate the inhibitory activity of zantrin Z3. Collectively, these studies will help focus future investigations toward the establishment of probes for FtsZ that fill the roles of colchicine and taxol in studies of tubulin.

  19. Proteolysis-Dependent Remodeling of the Tubulin Homolog FtsZ at the Division Septum in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Marissa G.; LaBreck, Christopher J.; Conti, Joseph; Camberg, Jodi L.

    2017-01-01

    During bacterial cell division a dynamic protein structure called the Z-ring assembles at the septum. The major protein in the Z-ring in Escherichia coli is FtsZ, a tubulin homolog that polymerizes with GTP. FtsZ is degraded by the two-component ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Two regions of FtsZ, located outside of the polymerization domain in the unstructured linker and at the C-terminus, are important for specific recognition and degradation by ClpXP. We engineered a synthetic substrate containing green fluorescent protein (Gfp) fused to an extended FtsZ C-terminal tail (residues 317–383), including the unstructured linker and the C-terminal conserved region, but not the polymerization domain, and showed that it is sufficient to target a non-native substrate for degradation in vitro. To determine if FtsZ degradation regulates Z-ring assembly during division, we expressed a full length Gfp-FtsZ fusion protein in wild type and clp deficient strains and monitored fluorescent Z-rings. In cells deleted for clpX or clpP, or cells expressing protease-defective mutant protein ClpP(S97A), Z-rings appear normal; however, after photobleaching a region of the Z-ring, fluorescence recovers ~70% more slowly in cells without functional ClpXP than in wild type cells. Gfp-FtsZ(R379E), which is defective for degradation by ClpXP, also assembles into Z-rings that recover fluorescence ~2-fold more slowly than Z-rings containing Gfp-FtsZ. In vitro, ClpXP cooperatively degrades and disassembles FtsZ polymers. These results demonstrate that ClpXP is a regulator of Z-ring dynamics and that the regulation is proteolysis-dependent. Our results further show that FtsZ-interacting proteins in E. coli fine-tune Z-ring dynamics. PMID:28114338

  20. Domain folding and flexibility of Escherichia coli FtsZ determined by tryptophan site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Garcés, Andrea P.; Arbildua, José J.; Montecinos, Felipe; Brunet, Juan E.; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2007-01-01

    FtsZ has two domains, the amino GTPase domain with a Rossmann fold, and the carboxyl domain that resembles the chorismate mutase fold. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that the interdomain interaction is stronger than the interaction of the protofilament longitudinal interfaces. Crystal B factor analysis of FtsZ and detected conformational changes suggest a connection between these domains. The unfolding/folding characteristics of each domain of FtsZ were tested by introducing tryptophans into the flexible region of the amino (F135W) and the carboxyl (F275W and I294W) domains. As a control, the mutation F40W was introduced in a more rigid part of the amino domain. These mutants showed a native-like structure with denaturation and renaturation curves similar to wild type. However, the I294W mutant showed a strong loss of functionality, both in vivo and in vitro when compared to the other mutants. The functionality was recovered with the double mutant I294W/F275A, which showed full in vivo complementation with a slight increment of in vitro GTPase activity with respect to the single mutant. The formation of a stabilizing aromatic interaction involving a stacking between the tryptophan introduced at position 294 and phenylalanine 275 could account for these results. Folding/unfolding of these mutants induced by guanidinium chloride was compatible with a mechanism in which both domains within the protein show the same stability during FtsZ denaturation and renaturation, probably because of strong interface interactions. PMID:17656575

  1. Constitutive expression of ftsZ overrides the whi developmental genes to initiate sporulation of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Joost; Mommaas, A Mieke; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2012-03-01

    The filamentous soil bacteria Streptomyces undergo a highly complex developmental programme. Before streptomycetes commit themselves to sporulation, distinct morphological checkpoints are passed in the aerial hyphae that are subject to multi-level control by the whi sporulation genes. Here we show that whi-independent expression of FtsZ restores sporulation to the early sporulation mutants whiA, whiB, whiG, whiH, whiI and whiJ. Viability, stress resistance and high-resolution electron microscopy underlined that viable spores were formed. However, spores from sporulation-restored whiA and whiG mutants showed defects in DNA segregation/condensation, while spores from the complemented whiB mutant had increased stress sensitivity, perhaps as a result of changes in the spore sheath. In contrast to the whi mutants, normal sporulation of ssgB null mutants-which fail to properly localise FtsZ-could not be restored by enhancing FtsZ protein levels, forming spore-like bodies that lack spore walls. Our data strongly suggest that the whi genes control a decisive event towards sporulation of streptomycetes, namely the correct timing of developmental ftsZ transcription. The biological significance may be to ensure that sporulation-specific cell division will only start once sufficient aerial mycelium biomass has been generated. Our data shed new light on the longstanding question as to how whi genes control sporulation, which has intrigued scientists for four decades.

  2. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Rare and Endangered Plant Species Pulsatilla patens (L.) Mill in East Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Szczecińska, Monika; Sramko, Gabor; Wołosz, Katarzyna; Sawicki, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Pulsatilla patens s.s. is a one of the most endangered plant species in Europe. The present range of this species in Europe is highly fragmented and the size of the populations has been dramatically reduced in the past 50 years. The rapid disappearance of P. patens localities in Europe has prompted the European Commission to initiate active protection of this critically endangered species. The aim of this study was to estimate the degree and distribution of genetic diversity within European populations of this endangered species. We screened 29 populations of P. patens using a set of six microsatellite primers. The results of our study indicate that the analyzed populations are characterized by low levels of genetic diversity (Ho = 0.005) and very high levels of inbreeding (FIS = 0.90). These results suggest that genetic erosion could be partially responsible for the lower fitness in smaller populations of this species. Private allelic richness was very low, being as low as 0.00 for most populations. Average genetic diversity over loci and mean number of alleles in P. patens populations were significantly correlated with population size, suggesting severe genetic drift. The results of AMOVA point to higher levels of variation within populations than between populations.The results of Structure and PCoA analyses suggest that the genetic structure of the studied P. patens populations fall into three clusters corresponding to geographical regions. The most isolated populations (mostly from Romania) formed a separate group with a homogeneous gene pool located at the southern, steppic part of the distribution range. Baltic, mostly Polish, populations fall into two genetic groups which were not fully compatible with their geographic distribution.Our results indicate the serious genetic depauperation of P. patens in the western part of its range, even hinting at an ongoing extinction vortex. Therefore, special conservation attention is required to maintain the populations

  3. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Rare and Endangered Plant Species Pulsatilla patens (L.) Mill in East Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Szczecińska, Monika; Sramko, Gabor; Wołosz, Katarzyna; Sawicki, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Pulsatilla patens s.s. is a one of the most endangered plant species in Europe. The present range of this species in Europe is highly fragmented and the size of the populations has been dramatically reduced in the past 50 years. The rapid disappearance of P. patens localities in Europe has prompted the European Commission to initiate active protection of this critically endangered species. The aim of this study was to estimate the degree and distribution of genetic diversity within European populations of this endangered species. We screened 29 populations of P. patens using a set of six microsatellite primers. The results of our study indicate that the analyzed populations are characterized by low levels of genetic diversity (Ho = 0.005) and very high levels of inbreeding (FIS = 0.90). These results suggest that genetic erosion could be partially responsible for the lower fitness in smaller populations of this species. Private allelic richness was very low, being as low as 0.00 for most populations. Average genetic diversity over loci and mean number of alleles in P. patens populations were significantly correlated with population size, suggesting severe genetic drift. The results of AMOVA point to higher levels of variation within populations than between populations.The results of Structure and PCoA analyses suggest that the genetic structure of the studied P. patens populations fall into three clusters corresponding to geographical regions. The most isolated populations (mostly from Romania) formed a separate group with a homogeneous gene pool located at the southern, steppic part of the distribution range. Baltic, mostly Polish, populations fall into two genetic groups which were not fully compatible with their geographic distribution.Our results indicate the serious genetic depauperation of P. patens in the western part of its range, even hinting at an ongoing extinction vortex. Therefore, special conservation attention is required to maintain the populations

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) Anthers Reveals Candidate Genes for Tapetum and Pollen Wall Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Lin; Twell, David; Kuang, Yanfeng; Liao, Jingping; Zhou, Xianqiang

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the anther transcriptome on non-model plants without a known genome are surprisingly scarce. RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling provides a comprehensive approach to identify candidate genes contributing to developmental processes in non-model species. Here we built a transcriptome library of developing anthers of Hamelia patens and analyzed DGE profiles from each stage to identify genes that regulate tapetum and pollen development. In total 7,720 putative differentially expressed genes across four anther stages were identified. The number of putative stage-specific genes was: 776 at microspore mother cell stage, 807 at tetrad stage, 322 at uninucleate microspore stage, and the highest number (1,864) at bicellular pollen stage. GO enrichment analysis revealed 243 differentially expressed and 108 stage-specific genes that are potentially related to tapetum development, sporopollenin synthesis, and pollen wall. The number of expressed genes, their function and expression profiles were all significantly correlated with anther developmental processes. Overall comparisons of anther and pollen transcriptomes with those of rice and Arabidopsis together with the expression profiles of homologs of known anther-expressed genes, revealed conserved patterns and also divergence. The divergence may reflect taxon-specific differences in gene expression, the use RNA-seq as a more sensitive methodology, variation in tissue composition and sampling strategies. Given the lack of genomic sequence, this study succeeded in assigning putative identity to a significant proportion of anther-expressed genes and genes relevant to tapetum and pollen development in H. patens. The anther transcriptome revealed a molecular distinction between developmental stages, serving as a resource to unravel the functions of genes involved in anther development in H. patens and informing the analysis of other members of the Rubiaceae. PMID:28119704

  5. Considering the Different Roles of Ammophila breviligulata and Spartina patens in Coastal Foredune Formation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jass, T. L.; Moore, L. J.; Young, D. R.; Bruno, J. F.; Duran Vinent, O.; Goldstein, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal foredunes arise from interactions between vegetation and aeolian sand transport. Two of the most important grasses that influence dune growth and formation along the barrier islands of the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast are Ammophila breviligulata and Spartina patens. Variations in topography, distance to the shoreline and the associated biotic and abiotic stressors (e.g., salt spray, sand burial, soil chemistry, and competition from other plants) affect the survival of both species. Additionally, differences between the grasses in response to these stressors may directly control foredune morphology. Although a relationship between the cross-shore vegetation limit and maximum dune height has been developed (Durán and Moore 2013) we do not yet quantitatively understand how each grass affects dune formation and shape. We carried out a field experiment on Hog Island, VA and complementary model experiments to address gaps in our understanding of species control on vegetated foredunes. We transplanted 120 plants of each species along two cross-shore transects (from foredune crest to the shoreline) to investigate the effects of topography and distance to the shoreline on vegetation growth. Throughout the growing season, we monitored the longest leaf of each transplant, the frontal and basal area of each transplant, and elevation at each transplant site to quantify vegetative growth and aeolian accretion along the each transect. We used these data to improve the coastal dune model presented by Durán and Moore (2013) so that it includes two grasses which more closely represent the growth characteristics of A. breviligulata and S. patens, specifically, rather than a generic dune-building grass species. These additions allow us to conduct simulations of dune development under varying initial abundances of morphologically important species, ranging from a dune populated only with A. breviligulata to one populated only with S. patens. Results from this coupled field and

  6. Transcription of the Escherichia coli dcw cluster: evidence for distal upstream transcripts being involved in the expression of the downstream ftsZ gene.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, A; Palacios, P; Vicente, M

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains VIP596 and VIP597 have been constructed to compare the amount of transcription of the ftsZ gene derived from proximal promoters in the ddlB-ftsZ region with that originating in the upstream regions of the dcw cluster. Both strains have in common a beta-galactosidase reporter fusion located at the ddlB locus, but differ in that VIP597 has a transcription terminator Omega interposon located downstream from lacZ. In addition, these strains have the ddlB, ftsQ, ftsA and ftsZ genes under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter P(tac), allowing to control artificially ftsZ expression for normal cell division to take place. When beta-galactosidase activity was measured in VIP596 and VIP597 and compared to the levels measured in strain VIP407, in which the lacZ reporter fusion is located in the ftsZ gene, they were found to account for nearly 66% of the total transcription entering into ftsZ. This result indicates that the reduction in ftsZ transcription observed when the promoters in the ddlB-ftsA region are disconnected from the upstream sequences of the dcw cluster (as observed by Flärdh et al., Mol. Microbiol. 30 (1998) 305-316) in strain VIP490) is the direct consequence of the interruption in the transcription originated upstream and not due to the effect of such sequences on the promoters proximal to ftsZ.

  7. Chemical variability of Cleistopholis patens (Benth.) Engl. et Diels leaf oil from ivory coast.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Zana Adama; Boti, Jean Brice; Attioua, Koffi Barthelemy; Ahibo, Antoine Coffy; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix; Bighelli, Ange

    2013-11-01

    The chemical composition of 48 leaf oil samples isolated from individual plants of Cleistopholis patens (Benth.) Engl. et Diels harvested in four Ivoirian forests was investigated by GC-FID (determination of retention indices), GC/MS, and (13) C-NMR analyses. The main components identified were β-pinene (traces-59.1%), sabinene (traces-54.2%), (E)-β-caryophyllene (0.3-39.3%), linalool (0.1-38.5%), (E)-β-ocimene (0.1-33.2%), germacrene D (0.0-33.1%), α-pinene (0.1-32.3%), and germacrene B (0-21.2%). The 48 oil compositions were submitted to hierarchical clustering and principal components analyses, which allowed the distinction of three groups within the oil samples. The oil composition of the major group (GroupI, 33 samples) was dominated by (E)-β-caryophyllene and linalool. The oils of Group II (eight samples) contained mainly β-pinene and α-pinene, while those of Group III (seven samples) were dominated by sabinene, limonene, and β-phellandrene. Moreover, the compositions of the Ivoirian C. patens leaf oils differed from those of Nigerian and Cameroonian origins.

  8. Depolymerization dynamics of individual filaments of bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Paez, Alfonso; Hörger, Ines; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel; Tarazona, Pedro; Vélez, Marisela

    2012-05-22

    We report observation and analysis of the depolymerization filaments of the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ (filament temperature-sensitive Z) formed on a mica surface. At low concentration, proteins adsorbed on the surface polymerize forming curved filaments that close into rings that remain stable for some time before opening irreversibly and fully depolymerizing. The distribution of ring lifetimes (T) as a function of length (N), shows that the rate of ring aperture correlates with filament length. If this ring lifetime is expressed as a bond survival time, (T(b) ≡ NT), this correlation is abolished, indicating that these rupture events occur randomly and independently at each monomer interface. After rings open irreversibly, depolymerization of the remaining filaments is fast, but can be slowed down and followed using a nonhydrolyzing GTP analogue. The histogram of depolymerization velocities of individual filaments has an asymmetric distribution that can be fit with a computer model that assumes two rupture rates, a slow one similar to the one observed for ring aperture, affecting monomers in the central part of the filaments, and a faster one affecting monomers closer to the open ends. From the quantitative analysis, we conclude that the depolymerization rate is affected both by nucleotide hydrolysis rate and by its exchange along the filament, that all monomer interfaces are equally competent for hydrolysis, although depolymerization is faster at the open ends than in central filament regions, and that all monomer-monomer interactions, regardless of the nucleotide present, can adopt a curved configuration.

  9. Depolymerization dynamics of individual filaments of bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Paez, Alfonso; Hörger, Ines; Rivas, Germán; Vicente, Miguel; Tarazona, Pedro; Vélez, Marisela

    2012-01-01

    We report observation and analysis of the depolymerization filaments of the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ (filament temperature-sensitive Z) formed on a mica surface. At low concentration, proteins adsorbed on the surface polymerize forming curved filaments that close into rings that remain stable for some time before opening irreversibly and fully depolymerizing. The distribution of ring lifetimes (T) as a function of length (N), shows that the rate of ring aperture correlates with filament length. If this ring lifetime is expressed as a bond survival time, (Tb ≡ NT), this correlation is abolished, indicating that these rupture events occur randomly and independently at each monomer interface. After rings open irreversibly, depolymerization of the remaining filaments is fast, but can be slowed down and followed using a nonhydrolyzing GTP analogue. The histogram of depolymerization velocities of individual filaments has an asymmetric distribution that can be fit with a computer model that assumes two rupture rates, a slow one similar to the one observed for ring aperture, affecting monomers in the central part of the filaments, and a faster one affecting monomers closer to the open ends. From the quantitative analysis, we conclude that the depolymerization rate is affected both by nucleotide hydrolysis rate and by its exchange along the filament, that all monomer interfaces are equally competent for hydrolysis, although depolymerization is faster at the open ends than in central filament regions, and that all monomer–monomer interactions, regardless of the nucleotide present, can adopt a curved configuration. PMID:22566654

  10. Phytochemicals as inhibitors of bacterial cell division protein FtsZ: coumarins are promising candidates.

    PubMed

    Duggirala, Sridevi; Nankar, Rakesh P; Rajendran, Selvakumar; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-09-01

    Naturally occurring phytochemicals with reported antibacterial activity were screened for their ability to inhibit the bacterial cell division protein Escherichia coli FtsZ. Among the representative compounds, coumarins inhibit the GTPase and polymerization activities of this protein effectively. Further screening with ten coumarin analogs we identified two promising candidates, scopoletin and daphnetin. The former is found to inhibit the GTPase activity of the protein in a noncompetitive manner. Docking of these coumarins with the modeled protein indicate that they bind to T7 loop, which is different from the GTP-binding site (active site), thereby supporting the experimental data. Lowest binding energy is obtained with scopoletin. 3D QSAR indicates the need for groups such as hydroxyl, diethyl, or dimethyl amino in the 7th carbon for enhanced activity. None of the coumarins exhibited cytotoxicity against NIH/3T3 and human embryonic kidney cell lines. The length of Bacillus subtilis increases in the presence of these compounds probably due to the lack of septum formation. Results of this study indicate the role of coumarins in halting the first step of bacterial cell division process.

  11. Drug discovery targeting cell division proteins, microtubules and FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Iwao; Kumar, Kunal; Awasthi, Divya; Vineberg, Jacob G

    2014-09-15

    Eukaryotic cell division or cytokinesis has been a major target for anticancer drug discovery. After the huge success of paclitaxel and docetaxel, microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) appear to have gained a premier status in the discovery of next-generation anticancer agents. However, the drug resistance caused by MDR, point mutations, and overexpression of tubulin subtypes, etc., is a serious issue associated with these agents. Accordingly, the discovery and development of new-generation MSAs that can obviate various drug resistances has a significant meaning. In sharp contrast, prokaryotic cell division has been largely unexploited for the discovery and development of antibacterial drugs. However, recent studies on the mechanism of bacterial cytokinesis revealed that the most abundant and highly conserved cell division protein, FtsZ, would be an excellent new target for the drug discovery of next-generation antibacterial agents that can circumvent drug-resistances to the commonly used drugs for tuberculosis, MRSA and other infections. This review describes an account of our research on these two fronts in drug discovery, targeting eukaryotic as well as prokaryotic cell division.

  12. Structural and Biochemical Studies Reveal a Putative FtsZ Recognition Site on the Z-ring Stabilizer ZapD

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hwajung; Min, Kyungjin; Mikami, Bunzo; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    FtsZ, a tubulin homologue, is an essential protein of the Z-ring assembly in bacterial cell division. It consists of two domains, the N-terminal and C-terminal core domains, and has a conserved C-terminal tail region. Lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments and several Z-ring associated proteins (Zaps) are necessary for modulating Z-ring formation. ZapD, one of the positive regulators of Z-ring assembly, directly binds to the C-terminal tail of FtsZ and promotes stable Z-ring formation during cytokinesis. To gain structural and functional insights into how ZapD interacts with the C-terminal tail of FtsZ, we solved two crystal structures of ZapD proteins from Salmonella typhimurium (StZapD) and Escherichia coli (EcZapD) at a 2.6 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively. Several conserved residues are clustered on the concave sides of the StZapD and EcZapD dimers, the suggested FtsZ binding site. Modeled structures of EcZapD-EcFtsZ and subsequent binding studies using bio-layer interferometry also identified the EcFtsZ binding site on EcZapD. The structural insights and the results of bio-layer interferometry assays suggest that the two FtsZ binding sites of ZapD dimer might be responsible for the binding of ZapD dimer to two protofilaments to hold them together. PMID:27871169

  13. Characterization of the ftsZ cell division gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: expression in Escherichia coli and N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Salimnia, H; Radia, A; Bernatchez, S; Beveridge, T J; Dillon, J R

    2000-01-01

    We cloned the cell division gene ftsZ of the gram-negative coccus Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) strain CH811, characterized it genetically and phenotypically, and studied its localization in N. gonorrhoeae and Escherichia coli (Ec). The 1,179-bp ORF of ftsZ(Ng) encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 41.5 kDa. Protein sequence alignments indicate that FtsZ(Ng) is similar to other FtsZ proteins and contains the conserved GTP binding motif. FtsZ homologues were identified in several N. gonorrhoeae strains and in Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria polysaccharae and Neisseria cinerea either by Western blot or by PCR-Southern blot analysis. Attempts to inactivate the ftsZ(Ng) on the chromosome failed, indicating that it is essential for gonococcal growth. FtsZ(Ng) was synthesized in an in vitro transcription/translation system and was shown to be 43 kDa, the same size as in Western blots. Expression of the ftsZ(Ng) gene from nongonococcal promoters resulted in a filamentous phenotype in E. coli. Under controlled expression, the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein localized at the mid-cell division site in E. coli. E. coli expressing high levels of the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein formed filaments and exhibited different fluorescent structures including helices, spiral tubules extending from pole to pole, and regularly spaced dots or bands that did not localize at the middle of the cell. Expression of the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein in N. gonorrhoeae resulted in abnormal cell division as shown by electron microscopy. FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusions were also expressed in a gonococcal background using a unique shuttle vector.

  14. Metal-dependent SpoIIE oligomerization stabilizes FtsZ during asymmetric division in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Król, Ewa; de Sousa Borges, Anabela; Kopacz, Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    SpoIIE is a bifunctional protein involved in asymmetric septum formation and in activation of the forespore compartment-specific transcription factor σF through dephosphorylation of SpoIIAA-P. The phosphatase activity of SpoIIE requires Mn2+ as a metal cofactor. Here, we show that the presence of a metal cofactor also influences SpoIIE oligomerization and asymmetric septum formation. Absence of Mn2+ from sporulation medium results in a delay of the formation of polar FtsZ-rings, similar to a spoIIE null mutant. We purified the entire cytoplasmic part of the SpoIIE protein, and show that the protein copurifies with bound metals. Metal binding both stimulates SpoIIE oligomerization, and results in the formation of larger oligomeric structures. The presence of SpoIIE oligomers reduces FtsZ GTP hydrolysis activity and stabilizes FtsZ polymers in a light scattering assay. Combined, these results indicate that metal binding is not just required for SpoIIE phosphatase activity but also is important for SpoIIE's role in asymmetric septum formation. PMID:28358838

  15. SAR Studies on Trisubstituted Benzimidazoles as Inhibitors of Mtb FtsZ for the Development of Novel Antitubercular Agents

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Divya; Kumar, Kunal; Knudson, Susan E.; Slayden, Richard A.; Ojima, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    FtsZ, an essential protein for bacterial cell division, is a highly promising therapeutic target, especially for the discovery and development of new-generation anti-TB agents. Following up the identification of two lead 2,5,6-trisubstituted benzimidazoles, 1 and 2, targeting Mtb-FtsZ in our previous study, an extensive SAR study for optimization of these lead compounds was performed through systematic modification of the 5 and 6 positions. This study has successfully led to the discovery of a highly potent advanced lead 5f (MIC 0.06 µg/mL) and several other compounds with comparable potencies. These advanced lead compounds possess a dimethylamino group at the 6 position. The functional groups at the 5 position exhibit substantial effects on the antibacterial activity as well. In vitro experiments such as the FtsZ polymerization inhibitory assay and TEM analysis of Mtb-FtsZ treated with 5f and others indicate that Mtb-FtsZ is the molecular target for their antibacterial activity. PMID:24266862

  16. ARC3, a chloroplast division factor, is a chimera of prokaryotic FtsZ and part of eukaryotic phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masato; Kuroki, Kouta; Mochizuki, Mariko; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Masuda, Tatsuru; Takamiya, Ken-ichiro

    2004-08-01

    The arc3 (accumulation and replication of chloroplast) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana has a small number of abnormally large chloroplasts in the cell, suggesting that chloroplast division is arrested in the mutant and ARC3 has an important role in the initiation of chloroplast division. To elucidate the role of ARC3, first we identified the ARC3 gene, and determined the location of ARC3 protein during chloroplast division because the localization and spatial orientation of such division factors are vital for correct chloroplast division. Sequencing analysis showed that ARC3 was a fusion of the prokaryotic FtsZ and part of the eukaryotic phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) genes. The PIP5K-homologous region of ARC3 had no catalytic domain but a membrane-occupation-and-recognition-nexus (MORN) repeat motif. Immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blotting analysis and in vitro chloroplast import and protease protection assays revealed that ARC3 protein was soluble, and located on the outer surface of the chloroplast in a ring-like structure at the early stage of chloroplast division. Prokaryotes have one FtsZ as a gene for division but have no ARC3 counterparts, the chimera of FtsZ and PIP5K, suggesting that the ARC3 gene might have been generated from FtsZ as another division factor during the evolution of chloroplast by endosymbiosis.

  17. Creating an antibacterial with in vivo efficacy: synthesis and characterization of potent inhibitors of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ with improved pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Haydon, David J; Bennett, James M; Brown, David; Collins, Ian; Galbraith, Greta; Lancett, Paul; Macdonald, Rebecca; Stokes, Neil R; Chauhan, Pramod K; Sutariya, Jignesh K; Nayal, Narendra; Srivastava, Anil; Beanland, Joy; Hall, Robin; Henstock, Vincent; Noula, Caterina; Rockley, Chris; Czaplewski, Lloyd

    2010-05-27

    3-Methoxybenzamide (1) is a weak inhibitor of the essential bacterial cell division protein FtsZ. Alkyl derivatives of 1 are potent antistaphylococcal compounds with suboptimal drug-like properties. Exploration of the structure-activity relationships of analogues of these inhibitors led to the identification of potent antistaphylococcal compounds with improved pharmaceutical properties.

  18. FtsZ-less prokaryotic cell division as well as FtsZ- and dynamin-less chloroplast and non-photosynthetic plastid division

    PubMed Central

    Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Nakamura, Mami; Uzuka, Akihiro; Era, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is a mixture of a stromal FtsZ-based complex descended from a cyanobacterial ancestor of chloroplasts and a cytosolic dynamin-related protein (DRP) 5B-based complex derived from the eukaryotic host. Molecular genetic studies have shown that each component of the division machinery is normally essential for normal chloroplast division. However, several exceptions have been found. In the absence of the FtsZ ring, non-photosynthetic plastids are able to proliferate, likely by elongation and budding. Depletion of DRP5B impairs, but does not stop chloroplast division. Chloroplasts in glaucophytes, which possesses a peptidoglycan (PG) layer, divide without DRP5B. Certain parasitic eukaryotes possess non-photosynthetic plastids of secondary endosymbiotic origin, but neither FtsZ nor DRP5B is encoded in their genomes. Elucidation of the FtsZ- and/or DRP5B-less chloroplast division mechanism will lead to a better understanding of the function and evolution of the chloroplast division machinery and the finding of the as-yet-unknown mechanism that is likely involved in chloroplast division. Recent studies have shown that FtsZ was lost from a variety of prokaryotes, many of which lost PG by regressive evolution. In addition, even some of the FtsZ-bearing bacteria are able to divide when FtsZ and PG are depleted experimentally. In some cases, alternative mechanisms for cell division, such as budding by an increase of the cell surface-to-volume ratio, are proposed. Although PG is believed to have been lost from chloroplasts other than in glaucophytes, there is some indirect evidence for the existence of PG in chloroplasts. Such information is also useful for understanding how non-photosynthetic plastids are able to divide in FtsZ-depleted cells and the reason for the retention of FtsZ in chloroplast division. Here we summarize information to facilitate analyses of FtsZ- and/or DRP5B-less chloroplast and non-photosynthetic plastid division. PMID

  19. Network theory inspired analysis of time-resolved expression data reveals key players guiding P. patens stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Bao, Jie; Hanke, Sebastian T; Hiss, Manuel; Tiko, Theodhor; Rensing, Stefan A

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) often trigger developmental decisions, yet, their transcripts are often only moderately regulated and thus not easily detected by conventional statistics on expression data. Here we present a method that allows to determine such genes based on trajectory analysis of time-resolved transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we have analysed apical stem cells of filamentous moss (P. patens) protonemata that develop from leaflets upon their detachment from the plant. By our novel correlation analysis of the post detachment transcriptome kinetics we predict five out of 1,058 TFs to be involved in the signaling leading to the establishment of pluripotency. Among the predicted regulators is the basic helix loop helix TF PpRSL1, which we show to be involved in the establishment of apical stem cells in P. patens. Our methodology is expected to aid analysis of key players of developmental decisions in complex plant and animal systems.

  20. Control of ftsZ Expression, Cell Division, and Glutamine Metabolism in Luria-Bertani Medium by the Alarmone ppGpp in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Bradford S.; Court, Donald L.

    1998-01-01

    Inactivation of transcription factor ς54, encoded by rpoN (glnF), restores high-temperature growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium to strains containing the heat-sensitive cell division mutation ftsZ84. Mutational defects in three other genes involved in general nitrogen control (glnD, glnG, and glnL) also suppress lethal filamentation. Since addition of glutamine to LB medium fully blocks suppression by each mutation, the underlying cause of suppression likely derives from a stringent response to the limitation of glutamine. This model is supported by several observations. The glnL mutation requires RelA-directed synthesis of the nutrient alarmone ppGpp to suppress filamentation. Artificially elevated levels of ppGpp suppress ftsZ84, as do RNA polymerase mutations that reproduce global effects of the ppGpp-induced state. Both the glnF null mutation and an elevated copy number of the relA gene similarly affect transcription from the upstream (pQ) promoters of the ftsQAZ operon, and both of these genetic conditions increase the steady-state level of the FtsZ84 protein. Physiological suppression of ftsZ84 by a high salt concentration was also shown to involve RelA. Additionally, we found that the growth of a glnF or glnD strain on LB medium depends on RelA or supplemental glutamine in the absence of RelA function. These data expand the roles for ppGpp in the regulation of glutamine metabolism and the expression of FtsZ during cell division. PMID:9495742

  1. Ecogeomorphology of Spartina patens-dominated tidal marshes: Soil organic matter accumulation, marsh elevation dynamics, and disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Ford, M.A.; Hensel, P.F.; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Marani, Marco; Blum, Linda K.

    2004-01-01

    Marsh soil development and vertical accretion in Spartina patens (Aiton) Muhl.-dominated tidal marshes is largely dependent on soil organic matter accumulation from root-rhizome production and litter deposition. Yet there are few quantitative data sets on belowground production and the relationship between soil organic matter accumulation and soil elevation dynamics for this marsh type. Spartina patens marshes are subject to numerous stressors, including sea-level rise, water level manipulations (i.e., flooding and draining) by impoundments, and prescribed burning. These stressors could influence long-term marsh sustainability by their effect on root production, soil organic matter accumulation, and soil elevation dynamics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the interactions among vegetative production, soil organic matter accumulation and marsh elevation dynamics, or the ecogeomorphology, of Spartina patens-dominated tidal marshes. Additional studies are needed of belowground production/decomposition and soil elevation change (measured simultaneously) to better understand the links among soil organic matter accumulation, soil elevation change, and disturbance in this marsh type. From a management perspective, we need to better understand the impacts of disturbance stressors, both lethal and sub-lethal, and the interactive effect of multiple stressors on soil elevation dynamics in order to develop better management practices to safeguard marsh sustainability as sea level rises.

  2. FtsZ inhibition and redox modulation with one chemical scaffold: Potential use of dihydroquinolines against mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Duggirala, Sridevi; Napoleon, John Victor; Nankar, Rakesh P; Senu Adeeba, V; Manheri, Muraleedharan K; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-11-10

    The dual effect of FtsZ inhibition and oxidative stress by a group of 1,2-dihydroquinolines that culminate in bactericidal effect on mycobacterium strains is demonstrated. They inhibited the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2) 155 with MIC as low as 0.9 μg/mL and induced filamentation. Detailed studies revealed their ability to inhibit polymerization and GTPase activity of MtbFtsZ (Mycobacterial filamentous temperature sensitive Z) with an IC50 value of ∼40 μM. In addition to such target specific effects, these compounds exerted a global cellular effect by causing redox-imbalance that was evident from overproduction of ROS in treated cells. Such multi-targeting effect with one chemical scaffold has considerable significance in this era of emerging drug resistance and could offer promise in the development of new therapeutic agents against tuberculosis.

  3. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel 2,5,6-trisubstituted benzimidazoles targeting FtsZ as antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Bora; Awasthi, Divya; Chowdhury, Soumya R; Melief, Eduard H; Kumar, Kunal; Knudson, Susan E; Slayden, Richard A; Ojima, Iwao

    2014-05-01

    Filamenting temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ), an essential cell division protein, is a promising target for the drug discovery of new-generation antibacterial agents against various bacterial pathogens. As a part of SAR studies on benzimidazoles, we have synthesized a library of 376 novel 2,5,6-trisubstituted benzimidazoles, bearing ether or thioether linkage at the 6-position. In a preliminary HTP screening against Mtb H37Rv, 108 compounds were identified as hits at a cut off concentration of 5 μg/mL. Among those hits, 10 compounds exhibited MIC values in the range of 0.63-12.5 μg/mL. Light scattering assay and TEM analysis with the most potent compound 5a clearly indicate that its molecular target is Mtb-FtsZ. Also, the Kd of 5a with Mtb-FtsZ was determined to be 1.32 μM.

  4. Design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of cinnamaldehyde derivatives as inhibitors of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Sheng, Juzheng; Huang, Guihua; Ma, Ruixin; Yin, Fengxin; Song, Di; Zhao, Can; Ma, Shutao

    2015-06-05

    In an attempt to discover potential antibacterial agents against the increasing bacterial resistance, novel cinnamaldehyde derivatives as FtsZ inhibitors were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial activity against nine significant pathogens using broth microdilution method, and their cell division inhibitory activity against four representative strains. In the in vitro antibacterial activity, the newly synthesized compounds generally displayed better efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 than the others. In particular, compounds 3, 8 and 10 exerted superior or comparable activity to all the reference drugs. In the cell division inhibitory activity, all the compounds showed the same trend as their in vitro antibacterial activity, exhibiting better activity against S. aureus ATCC25923 than the other strains. Additionally, compounds 3, 6, 7 and 8 displayed potent cell division inhibitory activity with an MIC value of below 1 μg/mL, over 256-fold better than all the reference drugs.

  5. A Method for DNA Extraction from the Desert Cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis and Its Application to Identification of ftsZ

    PubMed Central

    Billi, Daniela; Grilli Caiola, Maria; Paolozzi, Luciano; Ghelardini, Patrizia

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed for extraction of DNA from Chroococcidiopsis that overcomes obstacles posed by bacterial contamination and the presence of a thick envelope surrounding the cyanobacterial cells. The method is based on the resistance of Chroococcidiopsis to lysozyme and consists of a lysozyme treatment followed by osmotic shock that reduces the bacterial contamination by 3 orders of magnitude. Then DNase treatment is performed to eliminate DNA from the bacterial lysate. Lysis of Chroococcidiopsis cells is achieved by grinding with glass beads in the presence of hot phenol. Extracted DNA is further purified by cesium-chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation. This method permitted the first molecular approach to the study of Chroococcidiopsis, and a 570-bp fragment of the gene ftsZ was cloned and sequenced. PMID:9758840

  6. Essential protein SepF of mycobacteria interacts with FtsZ and MurG to regulate cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shamba; Banerjee, Srijon Kaushik; Chatterjee, Ayan; Sharma, Arun Kumar; Kundu, Manikuntala; Basu, Joyoti

    2015-08-01

    Coordinated bacterial cell septation and cell wall biosynthesis require formation of protein complexes at the sites of division and elongation, in a temporally controlled manner. The protein players in these complexes remain incompletely understood in mycobacteria. Using in vitro and in vivo assays, we showed that Rv2147c (or SepF) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis interacts with the principal driver of cytokinesis, FtsZ. SepF also interacts with itself both in vitro and in vivo. Amino acid residues 189A, 190K and 215F are required for FtsZ-SepF interaction, and are conserved across Gram-positive bacteria. Using Mycobacterium smegmatis as a surrogate system, we confirmed that sepFMSMEG is essential. Knockdown of SepF led to cell elongation, defective growth and failure of FtsZ to localize to the site of division, suggesting that SepF assists FtsZ localization at the site of division. Furthermore, SepF interacted with MurG, a peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzyme, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that SepF could serve as a link between cell division and peptidoglycan synthesis. SepF emerges as a newly identified essential component of the cell division complex in mycobacteria.

  7. Direct interaction of FtsZ and MreB is required for septum synthesis and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Andrew K; Gerdes, Kenn

    2013-07-03

    How bacteria coordinate cell growth with division is not well understood. Bacterial cell elongation is controlled by actin-MreB while cell division is governed by tubulin-FtsZ. A ring-like structure containing FtsZ (the Z ring) at mid-cell attracts other cell division proteins to form the divisome, an essential protein assembly required for septum synthesis and cell separation. The Z ring exists at mid-cell during a major part of the cell cycle without contracting. Here, we show that MreB and FtsZ of Escherichia coli interact directly and that this interaction is required for Z ring contraction. We further show that the MreB-FtsZ interaction is required for transfer of cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes from the lateral to the mature divisome, allowing cells to synthesise the septum. Our observations show that bacterial cell division is coupled to cell elongation via a direct and essential interaction between FtsZ and MreB.

  8. Comparative phylogenomics of the CBL-CIPK calcium-decoding network in the moss Physcomitrella, Arabidopsis, and other green lineages.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Spencley, Andrew L; Luan, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved a host of anatomical and molecular adaptations for terrestrial growth. Many of these adaptations are believed to be elaborations of features that were present in their algal-like progenitors. In the model plant Arabidopsis, 10 Calcineurin B-Like proteins (CBLs) function as calcium sensors and modulate the activity of 26 CBL-Interacting Protein Kinases (CIPKs). The CBL-CIPK network coordinates environmental responses and helps maintain proper ion balances, especially during abiotic stress. We identified and analyzed CBL and CIPK homologs in green lineages, including CBLs and CIPKs from charophyte green algae, the closest living relatives of land plants. Phylogenomic evidence suggests that the network expanded from a small module, likely a single CBL-CIPK pair, present in the ancestor of modern plants and algae. Extreme conservation of the NAF motif, which mediates CBL-CIPK physical interactions, among all identified CIPKs supports the interpretation of CBL and CIPK homologs in green algae and early diverging land plants as functionally linked network components. We identified the full complement of CBL and CIPK loci in the genome of Physcomitrella, a model moss. These analyses demonstrate the strong effects of a recent moss whole genome duplication: CBL and CIPK loci appear in cognate pairs, some of which appear to be pseudogenes, with high sequence similarity. We cloned all full-length transcripts from these loci and performed yeast two-hybrid analyses to demonstrate CBL-CIPK interactions and identify specific connections within the network. Using phylogenomics, we have identified three ancient types of CBLs that are discernible by N-terminal localization motifs and a "green algal-type" clade of CIPKs with members from Physcomitrella and Arabidopsis.

  9. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Makoto T; Kojo, Kei H; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids.

  10. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel 4-bromo-1H-indazole derivatives as FtsZ inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yan, Mi; Ma, Ruixin; Ma, Shutao

    2015-04-01

    A series of novel 4-bromo-1H-indazole derivatives as filamentous temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ) inhibitors were designed, synthesized, and assayed for their in vitro antibacterial activity against various phenotypes of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and their cell division inhibitory activity. The results indicated that this series showed better antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes than the other tested strains. Among them, compounds 12 and 18 exhibited 256-fold and 256-fold more potent activity than 3-methoxybenzamide (3-MBA) against penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and compound 18 showed 64-fold better activity than 3-MBA but 4-fold weaker activity than ciprofloxacin in the inhibition of S. aureus ATCC29213. Particularly, compound 9 presented the best activity (4 µg/mL) against S. pyogenes PS, being 32-fold, 32-fold, and 2-fold more active than 3-MBA, curcumin, and ciprofloxacin, respectively, but it was four times less active than oxacillin sodium. In addition, some synthesized compounds displayed moderate inhibition of cell division against S. aureus ATCC25923, Escherichia coli ATCC25922, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853, sharing a minimum cell division concentration of 128 µg/mL.

  11. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen pools and surface flux under different brackish marsh vegetation types, common reed (Phragmites australis) and salt hay (Spartina patens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, L.

    2005-01-01

    The current expansion of Phragmites australis into the high marsh shortgrass (Spartina patens, Distichlis spicata) communities of eastern U.S. salt marshes provided an opportunity to identify the influence of vegetation types on pools and fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). Two brackish tidal marshes of the National Estuarine Research Reserve system were examined, Piermont Marsh of the Hudson River NERR in New York and Hog Island in the Jacques Coustaeu NERR of New Jersey. Pools of DIN in porewater and rates of DIN surface flux were compared in replicated pairs of recently-expanded P. australis and neighboring S. patens-dominated patches on the high marsh surface. Both marshes generally imported nitrate (NO3-) and exported ammonium (NH4+), such that overall DIN was exported. No differences in surface exchange of NO3- or NH4+ were observed between vegetation types. Depth-averaged porewater NH4+ concentrations over the entire growing season were 56% lower under P. australis than under S. patens (average 1.4 vs. 3.2 mg NH4+ L-1) with the most profound differences in November. Porewater profiles showed an accumulation of NH4+ at depth in S. patens and constant low concentrations in P. australis from the soil surface to 50 cm depth, with no significant differences in porewater salinity. Despite these profound differences in porewater, NH 4+ diffusion from soils of P. australis and S. patens were not measurably different, were similar to other published rates, and were well below estimated rates based on passive diffusion alone. Rapid adsorption and uptake by litter and microbes in surface soils of both communities may buffer NH4+ loss to flooding tides in both communities, thereby reducing the impact of P. australis invasion on NH4+ flux to flooding waters. ?? Springer 2005.

  12. ZapE is a novel cell division protein interacting with FtsZ and modulating the Z-ring dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marteyn, Benoit S; Karimova, Gouzel; Fenton, Andrew K; Gazi, Anastasia D; West, Nicholas; Touqui, Lhousseine; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Betton, Jean-Michel; Poyraz, Oemer; Ladant, Daniel; Gerdes, Kenn; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-03-04

    Bacterial cell division requires the formation of a mature divisome complex positioned at the midcell. The localization of the divisome complex is determined by the correct positioning, assembly, and constriction of the FtsZ ring (Z-ring). Z-ring constriction control remains poorly understood and (to some extent) controversial, probably due to the fact that this phenomenon is transient and controlled by numerous factors. Here, we characterize ZapE, a novel ATPase found in Gram-negative bacteria, which is required for growth under conditions of low oxygen, while loss of zapE results in temperature-dependent elongation of cell shape. We found that ZapE is recruited to the Z-ring during late stages of the cell division process and correlates with constriction of the Z-ring. Overexpression or inactivation of zapE leads to elongation of Escherichia coli and affects the dynamics of the Z-ring during division. In vitro, ZapE destabilizes FtsZ polymers in an ATP-dependent manner. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cell division has mainly been characterized in vitro. In this report, we could identify ZapE as a novel cell division protein which is not essential in vitro but is required during an infectious process. The bacterial cell division process relies on the assembly, positioning, and constriction of FtsZ ring (the so-called Z-ring). Among nonessential cell division proteins recently identified, ZapE is the first in which detection at the Z-ring correlates with its constriction. We demonstrate that ZapE abundance has to be tightly regulated to allow cell division to occur; absence or overexpression of ZapE leads to bacterial filamentation. As zapE is not essential, we speculate that additional Z-ring destabilizing proteins transiently recruited during late cell division process might be identified in the future.

  13. Defining restoration targets for water depth and salinity in wind-dominated Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. coastal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyman, J.A.; La Peyre, M.K.; Caldwell, A.; Piazza, S.; Thom, C.; Winslow, C.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal wetlands provide valued ecosystem functions but the sustainability of those functions often is threatened by artificial hydrologic conditions. It is widely recognized that increased flooding and salinity can stress emergent plants, but there are few measurements to guide restoration, management, and mitigation. Marsh flooding can be estimated over large areas with few data where winds have little effect on water levels, but quantifying flooding requires hourly measurements over long time periods where tides are wind-dominated such as the northern Gulf of Mexico. Estimating salinity of flood water requires direct daily measurements because coastal marshes are characterized by dynamic salinity gradients. We analyzed 399,772 hourly observations of water depth and 521,561 hourly observations of water salinity from 14 sites in Louisiana coastal marshes dominated by Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. Unlike predicted water levels, observed water levels varied monthly and annually. We attributed those observed variations to variations in river runoff and winds. In stable marshes with slow wetland loss rates, we found that marsh elevation averaged 1 cm above mean high water, 15 cm above mean water, and 32 cm above mean low water levels. Water salinity averaged 3.7 ppt during April, May, and June, and 5.4 ppt during July, August, and September. The daily, seasonal, and annual variation in water levels and salinity that were evident would support the contention that such variation be retained when designing and operating coastal wetland management and restoration projects. Our findings might be of interest to scientists, engineers, and managers involved in restoration, management, and restoration in other regions where S. patens or similar species are common but local data are unavailable. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Defining restoration targets for water depth and salinity in wind-dominated Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. coastal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyman, J.A.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Thom, C.; Winslow, C.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal wetlands provide valued ecosystem functions but the sustainability of those functions often is threatened by artificial hydrologic conditions. It is widely recognized that increased flooding and salinity can stress emergent plants, but there are few measurements to guide restoration, management, and mitigation. Marsh flooding can be estimated over large areas with few data where winds have little effect on water levels, but quantifying flooding requires hourly measurements over long time periods where tides are wind-dominated such as the northern Gulf of Mexico. Estimating salinity of flood water requires direct daily measurements because coastal marshes are characterized by dynamic salinity gradients. We analyzed 399,772 hourly observations of water depth and 521,561 hourly observations of water salinity from 14 sites in Louisiana coastal marshes dominated by Spartina patens (Ait.) Muhl. Unlike predicted water levels, observed water levels varied monthly and annually. We attributed those observed variations to variations in river runoff and winds. In stable marshes with slow wetland loss rates, we found that marsh elevation averaged 1 cm above mean high water, 15 cm above mean water, and 32 cm above mean low water levels. Water salinity averaged 3.7 ppt during April, May, and June, and 5.4 ppt during July, August, and September. The daily, seasonal, and annual variation in water levels and salinity that were evident would support the contention that such variation be retained when designing and operating coastal wetland management and restoration projects. Our findings might be of interest to scientists, engineers, and managers involved in restoration, management, and restoration in other regions where S. patens or similar species are common but local data are unavailable.

  15. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Makoto T.; Kojo, Kei H.; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D.

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids. PMID:26500667

  16. Biological activity of Pinus nigra terpenes--evaluation of FtsZ inhibition by selected compounds as contribution to their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Zorica; Matejić, Jelena S; Stojanović-Radić, Zorica Z; Veselinović, Jovana B; Džamić, Ana M; Bojović, Srdjan; Marin, Petar D

    2014-11-01

    In the current work, in vitro antioxidant, antibacterial, and antifungal activites of the needle terpenes of three taxa of Pinus nigra from Serbia (ssp. nigra, ssp. pallasiana, and var. banatica) were analyzed. The black pine essential oils showed generally weak antioxidative properties tested by two methods (DPPH and ABTS scavenging assays), where the highest activity was identified in P. nigra var. banatica (IC50=25.08 mg/mL and VitC=0.67 mg (vitamin C)/g when tested with the DPPH and ABTS reagents, respectively). In the antimicrobial assays, one fungal (Aspergilus niger) and two bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) showed sensitivity against essential oils of all three P. nigra taxa. The tested oils have been shown to possess inhibitory action in the range from 20.00 to 0.62 mg/mL, where var. banatica exhibited the highest and ssp. nigra the lowest antimicrobial action. In order to determine potential compounds that are responsible for alternative mode of action, molecular docking simulations inside FtsZ (a prokaryotic homolog of tubulin) were performed. Tested compounds were the most abundant terpenoid (germacrene D-4-ol) and its structurally similar terpene (germacrene D), both present in all three essential oils. It was determined that the oxygenated form of the molecule creates stable bonds with investigated enzyme FtsZ, and that this compound, through this mechanism of action participates in the antimicrobial activity.

  17. Comparison of the effectiveness of ISJ and SSR markers and detection of outlier loci in conservation genetics of Pulsatilla patens populations

    PubMed Central

    Szczecińska, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Background Research into the protection of rare and endangered plant species involves genetic analyses to determine their genetic variation and genetic structure. Various categories of genetic markers are used for this purpose. Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), are the most popular category of markers in population genetics research. In most cases, microsatellites account for a large part of the noncoding DNA and exert a neutral effect on the genome. Neutrality is a desirable feature in evaluations of genetic differences between populations, but it does not support analyses of a population’s ability to adapt to a given environment or its evolutionary potential. Despite the numerous advantages of microsatellites, non-neutral markers may supply important information in conservation genetics research. They are used to evaluate adaptation to specific environmental conditions and a population’s adaptive potential. The aim of this study was to compare the level of genetic variation in Pulsatilla patens populations revealed by neutral SSR markers and putatively adaptive ISJ markers (intron-exon splice junction). Methods The experiment was conducted on 14 Polish populations of P. patens and three P. patens populations from the nearby region of Vitebsk in Belarus. A total of 345 individuals were examined. Analyses were performed with the use of eight SSR primers specific to P. patens and three ISJ primers. Results SSR markers revealed a higher level of genetic variation than ISJ markers (He = 0.609, He = 0.145, respectively). An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that, the overall genetic diversity between the analyzed populations defined by parameters FST and ΦPT for SSR (20%) and ΦPT for ISJ (21%) markers was similar. Analysis conducted in the Structure program divided analyzed populations into two groups (SSR loci) and three groups (ISJ markers). Mantel test revealed correlations between the geographic distance and genetic

  18. Species and population variation to salinity stress in Panicum hemitomon, Spartina patens, and Spartina alterniflora: Morphological and physiological constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hester, M.W.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    Panicum hemitomon, Spartina patens, and Spartina alterniflora are wide-spread dominant grasses of fresh, brackish, and salt marsh plant communities, respectively. Our previous research identified significant intraspecific variation in salt tolerance and morphology among populations within each species. In this study our objectives were to determine shorter-term physiological/biochemical responses to salinity stress and identify potential indicators of salt tolerance, with the ultimate goal of discerning similarities and differences in the mechanisms of salinity stress resistance. We subjected a subset of six populations within each species, ranging from high to low salt tolerance, to sublethal salinity levels (4, 20, and 30 ppt, respectively, for species) and monitored physiological and growth responses after 1 week (early harvest) and 5 weeks (late harvest). In all three species sublethal salinity levels generally resulted in significantly reduced net CO2 assimilation, leaf expansion, midday leaf xylem pressure, water use efficiency, and live and total biomass; and significantly increased leaf Na+/K+ ratio, leaf proline, leaf glycine betaine, leaf sucrose, root-to-shoot ratio, and dead:total aboveground biomass ratio. All three species displayed significant population (intraspecific) variation in net CO2 assimilation, leaf expansion, water use efficiency, midday leaf xylem pressure, leaf proline, leaf glycine betaine (except Panicum, where it could not be accurately determined), leaf Na+/K+ ratio, leaf sucrose, total plant biomass, dead:total aboveground biomass ratio, and root-to-shoot ratio. General indicators of salt tolerance (regardless of species) included high net CO2 assimilation rates and water use efficiencies, and low ratios of root-to-shoot and dead:total aboveground biomass. Factor analysis and a-priori linear contrasts revealed some unique differences between species in terms of the relative importance of morphology and physiology in explaining

  19. Composition and Chemical Variability of Cleistopholis patens Trunk Bark Oil from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Zana A; Boti, Jean Brice; Ahibo, Coffy Antoine; Bekro, Yves-Alain; Janat, Mamyrbekova; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix; Bighelli, Ange

    2017-02-01

    The chemical composition of trunk bark oil from Cleistopholis patens (Benth.) Engl. & Diels, growing wild in Côte d'Ivoire, has been investigated by GC (FID) in combination with retention indices, GC/MS and (13) C-NMR. Moreover, one oil sample has been subjected to CC and all the fractions analyzed by GC (RI) and (13) C-NMR. In total, 61 components have been identified, including various sesquiterpene esters scarcely found in essential oils. (13) C-NMR was particularly efficient for the identification of a component not eluted on GC and for the quantification of heat-sensitive compounds. Then, 36 oil samples, isolated from trunk bark harvested in six Ivoirian forests have been analyzed. The content of the main components varied drastically from sample to sample: (E)-β-caryophyllene (0.4 - 69.1%), β-pinene (0 - 57%), α-phellandrene (0 - 33.2%), α-pinene (0.1 - 30.6%), β-elemol (0.1 - 29.9%), germacrene D (0 - 25.4%), juvenile hormone III (0 - 22.9%), germacrene B (0 - 20.6%) and sabinene (tr-20.3%). Statistical analysis, hierarchical clustering and principal components analysis, carried out on the 36 compositions evidenced a fair chemical variability of the stem bark oil of this species. Indeed, three clusters have been distinguished: the composition of group I (ten samples) was dominated by β-pinene and α-pinene, group II (nine samples) was represented by α-phellandrene and p-cymene and group III (16 samples) by β-elemol. A sample displayed an atypical composition dominated by (E)-β-caryophyllene.

  20. Pythium infection activates conserved plant defense responses in mosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens (P. patens) is a useful model to study abiotic stress responses since it is highly tolerant to drought, salt and osmotic stress. However, little is known about the defense mechanisms activated in this moss after pathogen assault. Here the induction of defense responses...

  1. Dynamic FtsA and FtsZ localization and outer membrane alterations during polar growth and cell division in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Zupan, John R; Cameron, Todd A; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2013-05-28

    Growth and cell division in rod-shaped bacteria have been primarily studied in species that grow predominantly by peptidoglycan (PG) synthesis along the length of the cell. Rhizobiales species, however, predominantly grow by PG synthesis at a single pole. Here we characterize the dynamic localization of several Agrobacterium tumefaciens components during the cell cycle. First, the lipophilic dye FM 4-64 predominantly stains the outer membranes of old poles versus growing poles. In cells about to divide, however, both poles are equally labeled with FM 4-64, but the constriction site is not. Second, the cell-division protein FtsA alternates from unipolar foci in the shortest cells to unipolar and midcell localization in cells of intermediate length, to strictly midcell localization in the longest cells undergoing septation. Third, the cell division protein FtsZ localizes in a cell-cycle pattern similar to, but more complex than, FtsA. Finally, because PG synthesis is spatially and temporally regulated during the cell cycle, we treated cells with sublethal concentrations of carbenicillin (Cb) to assess the role of penicillin-binding proteins in growth and cell division. Cb-treated cells formed midcell circumferential bulges, suggesting that interrupted PG synthesis destabilizes the septum. Midcell bulges contained bands or foci of FtsA-GFP and FtsZ-GFP and no FM 4-64 label, as in untreated cells. There were no abnormal morphologies at the growth poles in Cb-treated cells, suggesting unipolar growth uses Cb-insensitive PG synthesis enzymes.

  2. Inundation and salinity impacts to above- and belowground productivity in Spartina patens and Spartina alterniflora in the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain: implications for using river diversions as restoration tools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, Gregg A.; Cretini, Kari Foster; Patton, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Inundation and salinity directly affect plant productivity and processes that regulate vertical accretion in coastal wetlands, and are expected to increase as sea level continues to rise. In the Mississippi River deltaic plain, river diversions, which are being implemented as ecosystem restoration tools, can also strongly increase inundation in coastal wetlands. We used an in situ mesocosm approach to examine how varying salinity (two levels) and inundation rates (six levels) influenced end-of-season above- and belowground biomass of Spartina patens and Spartina alterniflora during the growing season (March–October) in 2011. Above- and belowground biomass was highest in both species at higher elevations when inundation was minimal, and decreased exponentially with decreased elevation and increased flood duration. This negative biomass response to flooding was more pronounced in S. patens than in S. alterniflora, and S. patens also showed stronger biomass reductions at higher salinities. This salinity effect was absent for belowground biomass in S. alterniflora. These findings suggest that even subtle increases in sea level may lead to substantial reductions in productivity and organic accretion, and also illustrate the importance of considering the inundation tolerance of co-dominant species in receiving areas when utilizing river diversions for delta restoration.

  3. Visualisation of plastids in endosperm, pollen and roots of transgenic wheat expressing modified GFP fused to transit peptides from wheat SSU RubisCO, rice FtsZ and maize ferredoxin III proteins.

    PubMed

    Primavesi, Lucia F; Wu, Huixia; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Day, Anil; Jones, Huw D

    2008-08-01

    The ability to target marker proteins to specific subcellular compartments is a powerful research tool to study the structure and development of organelles. Here transit sequences from nuclear-encoded, plastid proteins, namely rice FtsZ, maize non-photosynthetic ferredoxin III (FdIII) and the small subunit of RubisCO were used to target a modified synthetic GFP (S65G, S72A) to plastids. The localisations of the fusion proteins expressed in transgenic wheat plants and under the control of the rice actin promoter were compared to an untargeted GFP control. GFP fluorescence was localised to non-green plastids in pollen, roots and seed endosperm and detected in isolated leaf chloroplasts using a GFP-specific antibody. Transit peptides appeared to influence the relative fluorescence intensities of plastids in different tissues. This is consistent with differential targeting and/or turnover of GFP fusion proteins in different plastid types. Replacement of GFP sequences with alternative coding regions enables immediate applications of our vectors for academic research and commercial applications.

  4. Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy for wide-field fluorescence and 3D phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Xia, Peng; Matoba, Osamu; Nitta, Koichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy is a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and digital holographic microscopy, the main function of which is to obtain images from fluorescence intensity and quantified phase contrasts, simultaneously. The proposed system is mostly beneficial to biological studies, with the reason that often the studies are depending on fluorescent labeling techniques to detect certain intracellular molecules, while phase information reflecting properties of unstained transparent elements. This paper is presenting our latest researches on applications such as randomly moving micro-fluorescent beads and living cells of Physcomitrella patens. The experiments are succeeded on obtaining a succession of wide-field fluorescent images and holograms from micro-beads, and different depths focusing is realized via numerical reconstruction. Living cells of Physcomitrella patens are recorded in the static manner, the reconstruction distance indicates thickness of cellular structure. These results are implementing practical applications toward many biomedical science researches.

  5. PpASCL, a moss ortholog of anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzymes, is a hydroxyalkylpyrone synthase involved in an evolutionarily conserved sporopollenin biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Kim, Sung Soo; Posehn, Sarah E; Jepson, Christina; Kim, Sun Young; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Wee, Andrew G H; Douglas, Carl J; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2011-12-01

    Sporopollenin is the main constituent of the exine layer of spore and pollen walls. Recently, several Arabidopsis genes, including polyketide synthase A (PKSA), which encodes an anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzyme (ASCL), have been shown to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis. The genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens contains putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis sporopollenin biosynthesis genes. We analyzed available P.patens expressed sequence tag (EST) data for putative moss orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes of sporopollenin biosynthesis and studied the enzymatic properties and reaction mechanism of recombinant PpASCL, the P.patens ortholog of Arabidopsis PKSA. We also generated structure models of PpASCL and Arabidopsis PKSA to study their substrate specificity. Physcomitrella patens orthologs of Arabidopsis genes for sporopollenin biosynthesis were found to be expressed in the sporophyte generation. Similarly to Arabidopsis PKSA, PpASCL condenses hydroxy fatty acyl-CoA esters with malonyl-CoA and produces hydroxyalkyl α-pyrones that probably serve as building blocks of sporopollenin. The ASCL-specific set of Gly-Gly-Ala residues predicted by the models to be located at the floor of the putative active site is proposed to serve as the opening of an acyl-binding tunnel in ASCL. These results suggest that ASCL functions together with other sporophyte-specific enzymes to provide polyhydroxylated precursors of sporopollenin in a pathway common to land plants.

  6. Sporophyte Formation and Life Cycle Completion in Moss Requires Heterotrimeric G-Proteins1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Quatrano, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the functional characterization of heterotrimeric G-proteins from a nonvascular plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. In plants, G-proteins have been characterized from only a few angiosperms to date, where their involvement has been shown during regulation of multiple signaling and developmental pathways affecting overall plant fitness. In addition to its unparalleled evolutionary position in the plant lineages, the P. patens genome also codes for a unique assortment of G-protein components, which includes two copies of Gβ and Gγ genes, but no canonical Gα. Instead, a single gene encoding an extra-large Gα (XLG) protein exists in the P. patens genome. Here, we demonstrate that in P. patens the canonical Gα is biochemically and functionally replaced by an XLG protein, which works in the same genetic pathway as one of the Gβ proteins to control its development. Furthermore, the specific G-protein subunits in P. patens are essential for its life cycle completion. Deletion of the genomic locus of PpXLG or PpGβ2 results in smaller, slower growing gametophores. Normal reproductive structures develop on these gametophores, but they are unable to form any sporophyte, the only diploid stage in the moss life cycle. Finally, the mutant phenotypes of ΔPpXLG and ΔPpGβ2 can be complemented by the homologous genes from Arabidopsis, AtXLG2 and AtAGB1, respectively, suggesting an overall conservation of their function throughout the plant evolution. PMID:27550997

  7. Sequence analysis of the Hsp70 family in moss and evaluation of their functions in abiotic stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ting; Yu, Anmin; Li, Ping; Yang, Hong; Liu, Gaojing; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The 70-kD heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) are highly conserved molecular chaperones that play essential roles in cellular processes including abiotic stress responses. Physcomitrella patens serves as a representative of the first terrestrial plants and can recover from serious dehydration. To assess the possible relationship between P. patens Hsp70s and dehydration tolerance, we analyzed the P. patens genome and found at least 21 genes encoding Hsp70s. Gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved in each subfamily. The intron-exon structure of PpcpHsp70-2 was different from that of other PpcpHsp70s; this gene exhibits several forms of intron retention, indicating that introns may play important roles in regulating gene expression. We observed expansion of Hsp70s in P. patens, which may reflect adaptations related to development and dehydration tolerance, and results mainly from tandem and segmental duplications. Expression profiles of rice, Arabidopsis and P. patens Hsp70 genes revealed that more than half of the Hsp70 genes were responsive to ABA, salt and drought. The presence of overrepresented cis-elements (DOFCOREZM and GCCCORE) among stress-responsive Hsp70s suggests that they share a common regulatory pathway. Moss plants overexpressing PpcpHsp70-2 showed salt and dehydration tolerance, further supporting a role in adaptation to land. This work highlights directions for future functional analyses of Hsp70s. PMID:27644410

  8. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  9. Chloroplast genome sequence of the moss Tortula ruralis: gene content, polymorphism, and structural arrangement relative to other green plant chloroplast genomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tortula ruralis, a widely distributed species in the moss family Pottiaceae, is increasingly used as a model organism for the study of desiccation tolerance and mechanisms of cellular repair. In this paper, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of T. ruralis, only the second published chloroplast genome for a moss, and the first for a vegetatively desiccation-tolerant plant. Results The Tortula chloroplast genome is ~123,500 bp, and differs in a number of ways from that of Physcomitrella patens, the first published moss chloroplast genome. For example, Tortula lacks the ~71 kb inversion found in the large single copy region of the Physcomitrella genome and other members of the Funariales. Also, the Tortula chloroplast genome lacks petN, a gene found in all known land plant plastid genomes. In addition, an unusual case of nucleotide polymorphism was discovered. Conclusions Although the chloroplast genome of Tortula ruralis differs from that of the only other sequenced moss, Physcomitrella patens, we have yet to determine the biological significance of the differences. The polymorphisms we have uncovered in the sequencing of the genome offer a rare possibility (for mosses) of the generation of DNA markers for fine-level phylogenetic studies, or to investigate individual variation within populations. PMID:20187961

  10. Evolutionary processes during the formation of the plant-specific Dof transcription factor family.

    PubMed

    Shigyo, Mikao; Tabei, Nobumitsu; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    We found 19 putative genes for plant-specific Dof transcription factors in the moss Physcomitrella patens and one Dof gene in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but no identifiable Dof gene in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae and the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that the origin of the Dof transcription factors pre-dates the divergence of the green algae and the ancestors of terrestrial plants. The phylogenetic analyses contended that the Dof family in angiosperms formed through a series of evolutionary processes, including intensive duplications of a specific ancestral gene after the divergence of the moss and the angiosperm lineages.

  11. Plant genomes enclose footprints of past infections by giant virus relatives.

    PubMed

    Maumus, Florian; Epert, Aline; Nogué, Fabien; Blanc, Guillaume

    2014-06-27

    Nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) are eukaryotic viruses with large genomes (100 kb-2.5 Mb), which include giant Mimivirus, Megavirus and Pandoravirus. NCLDVs are known to infect animals, protists and phytoplankton but were never described as pathogens of land plants. Here, we show that the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii have open reading frames (ORFs) with high phylogenetic affinities to NCLDV homologues. The P. patens genes are clustered in DNA stretches (up to 13 kb) containing up to 16 NCLDV-like ORFs. Molecular evolution analysis suggests that the NCLDV-like regions were acquired by horizontal gene transfer from distinct but closely related viruses that possibly define a new family of NCLDVs. Transcriptomics and DNA methylation data indicate that the NCLDV-like regions are transcriptionally inactive and are highly cytosine methylated through a mechanism not relying on small RNAs. Altogether, our data show that members of NCLDV have infected land plants.

  12. Chloroplast movement: dissection of events downstream of photo- and mechano-perception.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kadota, Akeo; Wada, Masamitsu

    2003-02-01

    The study of chloroplast photorelocation movement is progressing rapidly now that mutants for chloroplast movement have become available in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, mechanistic approaches in cell biology still stand to elucidate the mechanisms and regulations of such movement. The fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the moss Physcomitrella patens are particularly suitable materials for analyzing the kinetics of intracellular chloroplast movement. In these plants, chloroplast movement is induced by red light as well as blue light, mediated by phytochrome and blue light receptor, respectively. In this paper, we review the unique force-generating system for chloroplast motility in P. patens. In addition to light-induced chloroplast movement, we also summarize mechanically induced chloroplast movement in these plants and the motility systems involved. Finally, the different dependency of mechano- and photo-relocation movement on external Ca(2+) is discussed.

  13. A single homeobox gene triggers phase transition, embryogenesis and asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Horst, Nelly A; Katz, Aviva; Pereman, Idan; Decker, Eva L; Ohad, Nir; Reski, Ralf

    2016-01-18

    Plants characteristically alternate between haploid gametophytic and diploid sporophytic stages. Meiosis and fertilization respectively initiate these two different ontogenies(1). Genes triggering ectopic embryo development on vegetative sporophytic tissues are well described(2,3); however, a genetic control of embryo development from gametophytic tissues remains elusive. Here, in the moss Physcomitrella patens we show that ectopic overexpression of the homeobox gene BELL1 induces embryo formation and subsequently reproductive diploid sporophytes from specific gametophytic cells without fertilization. In line with this, BELL1 loss-of-function mutants have a wild-type phenotype, except that their egg cells are bigger and unable to form embryos. Our results identify BELL1 as a master regulator for the gametophyte-to-sporophyte transition in P. patens and provide mechanistic insights into the evolution of embryos that can generate multicellular diploid sporophytes. This developmental innovation facilitated the colonization of land by plants about 500 million years ago(4) and thus shaped our current ecosystems.

  14. Adaptation Mechanisms in the Evolution of Moss Defenses to Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Ponce de León, Inés; Montesano, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Bryophytes, including mosses, liverworts and hornworts are early land plants that have evolved key adaptation mechanisms to cope with abiotic stresses and microorganisms. Microbial symbioses facilitated plant colonization of land by enhancing nutrient uptake leading to improved plant growth and fitness. In addition, early land plants acquired novel defense mechanisms to protect plant tissues from pre-existing microbial pathogens. Due to its evolutionary stage linking unicellular green algae to vascular plants, the non-vascular moss Physcomitrella patens is an interesting organism to explore the adaptation mechanisms developed in the evolution of plant defenses to microbes. Cellular and biochemical approaches, gene expression profiles, and functional analysis of genes by targeted gene disruption have revealed that several defense mechanisms against microbial pathogens are conserved between mosses and flowering plants. P. patens perceives pathogen associated molecular patterns by plasma membrane receptor(s) and transduces the signal through a MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade leading to the activation of cell wall associated defenses and expression of genes that encode proteins with different roles in plant resistance. After pathogen assault, P. patens also activates the production of ROS, induces a HR-like reaction and increases levels of some hormones. Furthermore, alternative metabolic pathways are present in P. patens leading to the production of a distinct metabolic scenario than flowering plants that could contribute to defense. P. patens has acquired genes by horizontal transfer from prokaryotes and fungi, and some of them could represent adaptive benefits for resistance to biotic stress. In this review, the current knowledge related to the evolution of plant defense responses against pathogens will be discussed, focusing on the latest advances made in the model plant P. patens. PMID:28360923

  15. Adaptation Mechanisms in the Evolution of Moss Defenses to Microbes.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, Inés; Montesano, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Bryophytes, including mosses, liverworts and hornworts are early land plants that have evolved key adaptation mechanisms to cope with abiotic stresses and microorganisms. Microbial symbioses facilitated plant colonization of land by enhancing nutrient uptake leading to improved plant growth and fitness. In addition, early land plants acquired novel defense mechanisms to protect plant tissues from pre-existing microbial pathogens. Due to its evolutionary stage linking unicellular green algae to vascular plants, the non-vascular moss Physcomitrella patens is an interesting organism to explore the adaptation mechanisms developed in the evolution of plant defenses to microbes. Cellular and biochemical approaches, gene expression profiles, and functional analysis of genes by targeted gene disruption have revealed that several defense mechanisms against microbial pathogens are conserved between mosses and flowering plants. P. patens perceives pathogen associated molecular patterns by plasma membrane receptor(s) and transduces the signal through a MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade leading to the activation of cell wall associated defenses and expression of genes that encode proteins with different roles in plant resistance. After pathogen assault, P. patens also activates the production of ROS, induces a HR-like reaction and increases levels of some hormones. Furthermore, alternative metabolic pathways are present in P. patens leading to the production of a distinct metabolic scenario than flowering plants that could contribute to defense. P. patens has acquired genes by horizontal transfer from prokaryotes and fungi, and some of them could represent adaptive benefits for resistance to biotic stress. In this review, the current knowledge related to the evolution of plant defense responses against pathogens will be discussed, focusing on the latest advances made in the model plant P. patens.

  16. Remote Sensing in Archeology: Classifying Bajos of the Paten, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, James D., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This project focuses on the adaptation of human populations to their environments from prehistoric times to the present. It emphasizes interdisciplinary research to develop ecological baselines through the use of remotely sensed imagery, in situ field work, and the modeling of human population dynamics. It utilizes cultural and biological data from dated archaeological sites to assess the subsistence and settlement patterns of human societies in response to changing climatic and environmental conditions. The utilization of remote sensing techniques in archaeology is relatively new, exciting, and opens many doors.

  17. Evolutionary conservation of plant gibberellin signalling pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbussche, Filip; Fierro, Ana C; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Background: Gibberellins (GA) are plant hormones that can regulate germination, elongation growth, and sex determination. They ubiquitously occur in seed plants. The discovery of gibberellin receptors, together with advances in understanding the function of key components of GA signalling in Arabidopsis and rice, reveal a fairly short GA signal transduction route. The pathway essentially consists of GID1 gibberellin receptors that interact with F-box proteins, which in turn regulate degradation of downstream DELLA proteins, suppressors of GA-controlled responses. Results: Arabidopsis sequences of the gibberellin signalling compounds were used to screen databases from a variety of plants, including protists, for homologues, providing indications for the degree of conservation of the pathway. The pathway as such appears completely absent in protists, the moss Physcomitrella patens shares only a limited homology with the Arabidopsis proteins, thus lacking essential characteristics of the classical GA signalling pathway, while the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii contains a possible ortholog for each component. The occurrence of classical GA responses can as yet not be linked with the presence of homologues of the signalling pathway. Alignments and display in neighbour joining trees of the GA signalling components confirm the close relationship of gymnosperms, monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants, as suggested from previous studies. Conclusion: Homologues of the GA-signalling pathway were mainly found in vascular plants. The GA signalling system may have its evolutionary molecular onset in Physcomitrella patens, where GAs at higher concentrations affect gravitropism and elongation growth. PMID:18047669

  18. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development.

    PubMed

    Bascom, Carlisle S; Wu, Shu-Zon; Nelson, Katherine; Oakey, John; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time.

  19. Spatio-temporal patterning of arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE) contributes to gametophytic development in a moss.

    PubMed

    Schuessele, Christian; Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Mueller, Stefanie J; Rodriguez-Franco, Marta; Lorenz, Timo; Lang, Daniel; Igloi, Gabor L; Reski, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    The importance of the arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE), the enzyme mediating post-translation arginylation of proteins in the N-end rule degradation (NERD) pathway of protein stability, was analysed in Physcomitrella patens and compared to its known functions in other eukaryotes. We characterize ATE:GUS reporter lines as well as ATE mutants in P. patens to study the impact and function of arginylation on moss development and physiology. ATE protein abundance is spatially and temporally regulated in P. patens by hormones and light and is highly abundant in meristematic cells. Further, the amount of ATE transcript is regulated during abscisic acid signalling and downstream of auxin signalling. Loss-of-function mutants exhibit defects at various levels, most severely in developing gametophores, in chloroplast starch accumulation and senescence. Thus, arginylation is necessary for moss gametophyte development, in contrast to the situation in flowering plants. Our analysis further substantiates the conservation of the N-end rule pathway components in land plants and highlights lineage-specific features. We introduce moss as a model system to characterize the role of the NERD pathway as an additional layer of complexity in eukaryotic development.

  20. Nonflowering Plants Possess a Unique Folate-Dependent Phenylalanine Hydroxylase That Is Localized in Chloroplasts[W

    PubMed Central

    Pribat, Anne; Noiriel, Alexandre; Morse, Alison M.; Davis, John M.; Fouquet, Romain; Loizeau, Karen; Ravanel, Stéphane; Frank, Wolfgang; Haas, Richard; Reski, Ralf; Bedair, Mohamed; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Tetrahydropterin-dependent aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAHs) are known from animals and microbes but not plants. A survey of genomes and ESTs revealed AAH-like sequences in gymnosperms, mosses, and algae. Analysis of full-length AAH cDNAs from Pinus taeda, Physcomitrella patens, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii indicated that the encoded proteins form a distinct clade within the AAH family. These proteins were shown to have Phe hydroxylase activity by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli Tyr auxotroph and by enzyme assays. The P. taeda and P. patens AAHs were specific for Phe, required iron, showed Michaelian kinetics, and were active as monomers. Uniquely, they preferred 10-formyltetrahydrofolate to any physiological tetrahydropterin as cofactor and, consistent with preferring a folate cofactor, retained activity in complementation tests with tetrahydropterin-depleted E. coli host strains. Targeting assays in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplasts using green fluorescent protein fusions, and import assays with purified Pisum sativum chloroplasts, indicated chloroplastic localization. Targeting assays further indicated that pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase, which regenerates the AAH cofactor, is also chloroplastic. Ablating the single AAH gene in P. patens caused accumulation of Phe and caffeic acid esters. These data show that nonflowering plants have functional plastidial AAHs, establish an unprecedented electron donor role for a folate, and uncover a novel link between folate and aromatic metabolism. PMID:20959559

  1. Activation of Defense Mechanisms against Pathogens in Mosses and Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    de León, Inés Ponce; Montesano, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    During evolution, plants have developed mechanisms to cope with and adapt to different types of stress, including microbial infection. Once the stress is sensed, signaling pathways are activated, leading to the induced expression of genes with different roles in defense. Mosses (Bryophytes) are non-vascular plants that diverged from flowering plants more than 450 million years ago, allowing comparative studies of the evolution of defense-related genes and defensive metabolites produced after microbial infection. The ancestral position among land plants, the sequenced genome and the feasibility of generating targeted knock-out mutants by homologous recombination has made the moss Physcomitrella patens an attractive model to perform functional studies of plant genes involved in stress responses. This paper reviews the current knowledge of inducible defense mechanisms in P. patens and compares them to those activated in flowering plants after pathogen assault, including the reinforcement of the cell wall, ROS production, programmed cell death, activation of defense genes and synthesis of secondary metabolites and defense hormones. The knowledge generated in P. patens together with comparative studies in flowering plants will help to identify key components in plant defense responses and to design novel strategies to enhance resistance to biotic stress. PMID:23380962

  2. Activation of Defense Mechanisms against Pathogens in Mosses and Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, Inés; Montesano, Marcos

    2013-02-04

    During evolution, plants have developed mechanisms to cope with and adapt to different types of stress, including microbial infection. Once the stress is sensed, signaling pathways are activated, leading to the induced expression of genes with different roles in defense. Mosses (Bryophytes) are non-vascular plants that diverged from flowering plants more than 450 million years ago, allowing comparative studies of the evolution of defense-related genes and defensive metabolites produced after microbial infection. The ancestral position among land plants, the sequenced genome and the feasibility of generating targeted knock-out mutants by homologous recombination has made the moss Physcomitrella patens an attractive model to perform functional studies of plant genes involved in stress responses. This paper reviews the current knowledge of inducible defense mechanisms in P. patens and compares them to those activated in flowering plants after pathogen assault, including the reinforcement of the cell wall, ROS production, programmed cell death, activation of defense genes and synthesis of secondary metabolites and defense hormones. The knowledge generated in P. patens together with comparative studies in flowering plants will help to identify key components in plant defense responses and to design novel strategies to enhance resistance to biotic stress.

  3. Role of ENA ATPase in Na(+) efflux at high pH in bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Fraile-Escanciano, Ana; Garciadeblás, Blanca; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alonso; Benito, Begoña

    2009-12-01

    Potassium or Na(+) efflux ATPases, ENA ATPases, are present in all fungi and play a central role in Na(+) efflux and Na(+) tolerance. Flowering plants lack ENA ATPases but two ENA ATPases have been identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens, PpENA1 and PpENA2. PpENA1 mediates Na(+) efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To propose a general function of ENA ATPases in bryophytes it was necessary to demonstrate that these ATPases mediate Na(+) efflux in planta and that they exist in more bryophytes than P. patens. For these demonstrations (1) we cloned a third ATPase from P. patens, PpENA3, and studied the expression pattern of the three PpENA genes; (2) we constructed and studied the single and double Deltappena1 and Deltappena2 mutants; and (3) we cloned two ENA ATPases from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, MpENA1 and MpENA2, and expressed them in S. cerevisiae. The results from the first two approaches revealed that the expression of ENA ATPases was greatly enhanced at high pH and that Na(+) efflux at high pH depended on PpENA1. The ENA1 ATPase of M. polymorpha suppressed the defective growth of a S. cerevisiae mutant at high K(+) or Na(+) concentrations, especially at high K(+).

  4. Moonlighting activity of presenilin in plants is independent of γ-secretase and evolutionarily conserved

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Abha; Chandu, Dilip; Roe, Catherine M.; Kopan, Raphael; Quatrano, Ralph S.

    2007-01-01

    Presenilins (PS) provide the catalytic activity for γ-secretase, which cleaves physiologically relevant substrates including Notch, ErbB4, and APP. Recent genetic studies indicated that the contribution of PS1 to mouse development includes γ-secretase-independent functions that cannot be easily explained by any of the demonstrated or hypothesized functions of this protein. To begin a nonbiased analysis of PS1 activity unencumbered by the dominant effect stemming from loss of Notch function, we characterized PS functions in the early land plant Physcomitrella patens, which lacks Notch, ErbB4, and APP. Removal of P. patens PS resulted in phenotypic abnormalities. Further assays performed to delineate the defective pathways in PS-deficient P. patens implicated improper function of the cytoskeletal network. Importantly, this characterization of a nonmetazoan PS uncovered a previously undescribed, evolutionarily conserved function (human PS1 can rescue the growth and light responses) that is γ-secretase-independent (mutants with substitutions of the catalytic aspartyl residues retain the activity). Introduction of PpPS into PS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts rescues normal growth rates, demonstrating that at least some metazoan functions of PS are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:17684101

  5. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time. PMID:27406170

  6. Acquisition, conservation, and loss of dual-targeted proteins in land plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Carrie, Chris; Law, Simon R; Murcha, Monika W; Whelan, James

    2013-02-01

    The dual-targeting ability of a variety of proteins from Physcomitrella patens, rice (Oryza sativa), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was tested to determine when dual targeting arose and to what extent it was conserved in land plants. Overall, the targeting ability of over 80 different proteins from rice and P. patens, representing 42 dual-targeted proteins in Arabidopsis, was tested. We found that dual targeting arose early in land plant evolution, as it was evident in many cases with P. patens proteins that were conserved in rice and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we found that the acquisition of dual-targeting ability is still occurring, evident in P. patens as well as rice and Arabidopsis. The loss of dual-targeting ability appears to be rare, but does occur. Ascorbate peroxidase represents such an example. After gene duplication in rice, individual genes encode proteins that are targeted to a single organelle. Although we found that dual targeting was generally conserved, the ability to detect dual-targeted proteins differed depending on the cell types used. Furthermore, it appears that small changes in the targeting signal can result in a loss (or gain) of dual-targeting ability. Overall, examination of the targeting signals within this study did not reveal any clear patterns that would predict dual-targeting ability. The acquisition of dual-targeting ability also appears to be coordinated between proteins. Mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly protein40, a protein involved in oxidative folding in mitochondria and peroxisomes, provides an example where acquisition of dual targeting is accompanied by the dual targeting of substrate proteins.

  7. Functional analysis and comparative genomics of expressed sequence tags from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Tanurdzic, Milos; Chapple, Clint

    2005-01-01

    Background The lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii is a member of one of the oldest lineages of vascular plants on Earth. Fossil records show that the lycophyte clade arose 400 million years ago, 150–200 million years earlier than angiosperms, a group of plants that includes the well-studied flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. S. moellendorffii has a genome size of approximately 100 Mbp, as small or smaller than that of A. thaliana. S. moellendorffii has the potential to provide significant comparative information to better understand the evolution of vascular plants. Results We sequenced 2181 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from a S. moellendorffii cDNA library. One thousand three hundred and one non-redundant sequences were assembled, containing 291 contigs and 1010 singletons. Approximately 75% of the ESTs matched proteins in the non-redundant protein database. Among 1301 clusters, 343 were categorized according to Gene Ontology (GO) hierarchy and were compared to the GO mapping of A. thaliana tentative consensus sequences. We compared S. moellendorffii ESTs to the A. thaliana and Physcomitrella patens EST databases, using the tBLASTX algorithm. Approximately 60% of the ESTs exhibited similarity with both A. thaliana and P. patens ESTs; whereas, 13% and 1% of the ESTs had exclusive similarity with A. thaliana and P. patens ESTs, respectively. A substantial proportion of the ESTs (26%) had no match with A. thaliana or P. patens ESTs. Conclusion We discovered 1301 putative unigenes in S. moellendorffii. These results give an initial insight into its transcriptome that will aid in the study of the S. moellendorffii genome in the near future. PMID:15938755

  8. Optical Property Analyses of Plant Cells for Adaptive Optics Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Yosuke; Murata, Takashi; Hattori, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Hayano, Yutaka; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-04-01

    In astronomy, adaptive optics (AO) can be used to cancel aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and to perform diffraction-limited observation of astronomical objects from the ground. AO can also be applied to microscopy, to cancel aberrations caused by cellular structures and to perform high-resolution live imaging. As a step toward the application of AO to microscopy, here we analyzed the optical properties of plant cells. We used leaves of the moss Physcomitrella patens, which have a single layer of cells and are thus suitable for optical analysis. Observation of the cells with bright field and phase contrast microscopy, and image degradation analysis using fluorescent beads demonstrated that chloroplasts provide the main source of optical degradations. Unexpectedly, the cell wall, which was thought to be a major obstacle, has only a minor effect. Such information provides the basis for the application of AO to microscopy for the observation of plant cells.

  9. LEAFY COTYLEDON1, a key regulator of seed development, is expressed in vegetative and sexual propagules of Selaginella moellendorffii.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, Ryan C; Fischer, Robert L; Harada, John J

    2013-01-01

    LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) is a central regulator of seed development that plays a key role in controlling the maturation phase during which storage macromolecules accumulate and the embryo becomes tolerant of desiccation. We queried the genomes of seedless plants and identified a LEC1 homolog in the lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, but not in the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens. Genetic suppression experiments indicated that Selaginella LEC1 is the functional ortholog of Arabidopsis LEC1. Together, these results suggest that LEC1 originated at least 30 million years before the first seed plants appeared in the fossil record. The accumulation of Selaginella LEC1 RNA primarily in sexual and asexual reproductive structures suggests its involvement in cellular processes similar to those that occur during the maturation phase of seed development.

  10. Smoke signals and seed dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Mark T; Nelson, David C

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein MAX2 has been discovered in four separate genetic screens, indicating that it has roles in leaf senescence, seedling photosensitivity, shoot outgrowth and seed germination. Both strigolactones and karrikins can regulate A. thaliana seed germination and seedling photomorphogenesis in a MAX2-dependent manner, but only strigolactones inhibit shoot branching. How MAX2 mediates specific responses to both classes of structurally-related signals, and the origin of its dual role remains unknown. The moss Physcomitrella patens utilizes strigolactones and MAX2 orthologs are present across the land plants, suggesting that this signaling system could have an ancient origin. The seed of parasitic Orobanchaceae species germinate preferentially in response to strigolactones over karrikins, and putative Orobanchaceae MAX2 orthologs form a sub-clade distinct from those of other dicots. These observations suggest that lineage-specific evolution of MAX2 may have given rise to specialized responses to these signaling molecules. PMID:22019642

  11. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions.

  12. Evolution of land plants: insights from molecular studies on basal lineages.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune

    2017-01-01

    The invasion of the land by plants, or terrestrialization, was one of the most critical events in the history of the Earth. The evolution of land plants included significant transformations in body plans: the emergence of a multicellular diploid sporophyte, transition from gametophyte-dominant to sporophyte-dominant life histories, and development of many specialized tissues and organs, such as stomata, vascular tissues, roots, leaves, seeds, and flowers. Recent advances in molecular genetics in two model basal plants, bryophytes Physcomitrella patens and Marchantia polymorpha, have begun to provide answers to several key questions regarding land plant evolution. This paper discusses the evolution of the genes and regulatory mechanisms that helped drive such significant morphological innovations among land-based plants.

  13. Widespread impact of horizontal gene transfer on plant colonization of land

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Sun, Hang; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    In complex multicellular eukaryotes such as animals and plants, horizontal gene transfer is commonly considered rare with very limited evolutionary significance. Here we show that horizontal gene transfer is a dynamic process occurring frequently in the early evolution of land plants. Our genome analyses of the moss Physcomitrella patens identified 57 families of nuclear genes that were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses. Many of these gene families were transferred to the ancestors of green or land plants. Available experimental evidence shows that these anciently acquired genes are involved in some essential or plant-specific activities such as xylem formation, plant defence, nitrogen recycling as well as the biosynthesis of starch, polyamines, hormones and glutathione. These findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer had a critical role in the transition of plants from aquatic to terrestrial environments. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of horizontal gene transfer mechanism in nonvascular and seedless vascular plants. PMID:23093189

  14. Widespread impact of horizontal gene transfer on plant colonization of land.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Sun, Hang; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    In complex multicellular eukaryotes such as animals and plants, horizontal gene transfer is commonly considered rare with very limited evolutionary significance. Here we show that horizontal gene transfer is a dynamic process occurring frequently in the early evolution of land plants. Our genome analyses of the moss Physcomitrella patens identified 57 families of nuclear genes that were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses. Many of these gene families were transferred to the ancestors of green or land plants. Available experimental evidence shows that these anciently acquired genes are involved in some essential or plant-specific activities such as xylem formation, plant defence, nitrogen recycling as well as the biosynthesis of starch, polyamines, hormones and glutathione. These findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer had a critical role in the transition of plants from aquatic to terrestrial environments. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of horizontal gene transfer mechanism in nonvascular and seedless vascular plants.

  15. KNOX2 genes regulate the haploid-to-diploid morphological transition in land plants.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Keiko; Ando, Sayuri; Yip, Hoichong Karen; Tamada, Yosuke; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Murata, Takashi; Deguchi, Hironori; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Bowman, John L

    2013-03-01

    Unlike animals, land plants undergo an alternation of generations, producing multicellular bodies in both haploid (1n: gametophyte) and diploid (2n: sporophyte) generations. Plant body plans in each generation are regulated by distinct developmental programs initiated at either meiosis or fertilization, respectively. In mosses, the haploid gametophyte generation is dominant, whereas in vascular plants-including ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms-the diploid sporophyte generation is dominant. Deletion of the class 2 KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX2) transcription factors in the moss Physcomitrella patens results in the development of gametophyte bodies from diploid embryos without meiosis. Thus, KNOX2 acts to prevent the haploid-specific body plan from developing in the diploid plant body, indicating a critical role for the evolution of KNOX2 in establishing an alternation of generations in land plants.

  16. Sesquiterpenes from the conifer root rot pathogen Heterobasidion occidentale.

    PubMed

    Hansson, David; Menkis, Audrius; Himmelstrand, Kajsa; Thelander, Mattias; Olson, Ke; Stenlid, Jan; Karlsson, Magnus; Broberg, Anders

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of the production of secondary metabolites of Heterobasidion occidentale led to the isolation and identification of six sesquiterpenes (illudolone A and B, illudolactone A and B, deoxyfomannosin A and B) along with the well-known sesquiterpene fomannosin and the previously described benzohydrofuran fomannoxin. The structures and relative configurations of the compounds were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis as well as by HRMS. Their absolute configuration and biosynthesis were suggested and discussed in relation to fomannosin. Four compounds showed growth inhibiting activity against several basidiomycetes, Phlebiopsis gigantea, Phanerochaete chrysosporium and H. occidentale, and toxicity towards the moss Physcomitrella patens. In addition, one compound displayed activity against the bacterium Variovorax paradoxus as well as against the ascomycete Fusarium oxysporum.

  17. Distinct phytochrome actions in nonvascular plants revealed by targeted inactivation of phytobilin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Rong; Su, Yi-shin; Tu, Shih-Long

    2012-01-01

    The red/far-red light photoreceptor phytochrome mediates photomorphological responses in plants. For light sensing and signaling, phytochromes need to associate with open-chain tetrapyrrole molecules as the chromophore. Biosynthesis of tetrapyrrole chromophores requires members of ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs). It was shown that LONG HYPOCOTYL 2 (HY2) is the only FDBR in flowering plants producing the phytochromobilin (PΦB) for phytochromes. However, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, we found a second FDBR that catalyzes the formation of phycourobilin (PUB), a tetrapyrrole pigment usually found as the protein-bound form in cyanobacteria and red algae. Thus, we named the enzyme PUB synthase (PUBS). Severe photomorphogenic phenotypes, including the defect of phytochrome-mediated phototropism, were observed in Physcomitrella patens when both HY2 and PUBS were disrupted by gene targeting. This indicates HY2 and PUBS function redundantly in phytochrome-mediated responses of nonvascular plants. Our studies also show that functional PUBS orthologs are found in selected lycopod and chlorophyte genomes. Using mRNA sequencing for transcriptome profiling, we demonstrate that expression of the majority of red-light-responsive genes are misregulated in the pubs hy2 double mutant. These studies showed that moss phytochromes rapidly repress expression of genes involved in cell wall organization, transcription, hormone responses, and protein phosphorylation but activate genes involved in photosynthesis and stress signaling during deetiolation. We propose that, in nonvascular plants, HY2 and PUBS produce structurally different but functionally similar chromophore precursors for phytochromes. Holophytochromes regulate biological processes through light signaling to efficiently reprogram gene expression for vegetative growth in the light. PMID:22566621

  18. Distribution and Phylogenetic Significance of the 71-kb Inversion in the Plastid Genome in Funariidae (Bryophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Goffinet, Bernard; Wickett, Norman J.; Werner, Olaf; Ros, Rosa Maria; Shaw, A. Jonathan; Cox, Cymon J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The recent assembly of the complete sequence of the plastid genome of the model taxon Physcomitrella patens (Funariaceae, Bryophyta) revealed that a 71-kb fragment, encompassing much of the large single copy region, is inverted. This inversion of 57% of the genome is the largest rearrangement detected in the plastid genomes of plants to date. Although initially considered diagnostic of Physcomitrella patens, the inversion was recently shown to characterize the plastid genome of two species from related genera within Funariaceae, but was lacking in another member of Funariidae. The phylogenetic significance of the inversion has remained ambiguous. Methods Exemplars of all families included in Funariidae were surveyed. DNA sequences spanning the inversion break ends were amplified, using primers that anneal to genes on either side of the putative end points of the inversion. Primer combinations were designed to yield a product for either the inverted or the non-inverted architecture. Key Results The survey reveals that exemplars of eight genera of Funariaceae, the sole species of Disceliaceae and three generic representatives of Encalyptales all share the 71-kb inversion in the large single copy of the plastid genome. By contrast, the plastid genome of Gigaspermaceae (Funariales) is characterized by a gene order congruent with that described for other mosses, liverworts and hornworts, and hence it does not possess this inversion. Conclusions The phylogenetic distribution of the inversion in the gene order supports a hypothesis only weakly supported by inferences from sequence data whereby Funariales are paraphyletic, with Funariaceae and Disceliaceae sharing a common ancestor with Encalyptales, and Gigaspermaceae sister to this combined clade. To reflect these relationships, Gigaspermaceae are excluded from Funariales and accommodated in their own order, Gigaspermales order nov., within Funariideae. PMID:17337480

  19. Selaginella moellendorffii has a reduced and highly conserved expansin superfamily with genes more closely related to angiosperms than to bryophytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Expansins are plant cell wall loosening proteins encoded by a large superfamily of genes, consisting of four families named EXPA, EXPB, EXLA, and EXLB. The evolution of the expansin superfamily is well understood in angiosperms, thanks to synteny-based evolutionary studies of the gene superfamily in Arabidopsis, rice, and Populus. Analysis of the expansin superfamily in the moss Physcomitrella patens revealed a superfamily without EXLA or EXLB genes that has evolved considerably and independently of angiosperm expansins. The sequencing of the Selaginella moellendorffii genome has allowed us to extend these analyses into an early diverging vascular plant. Results The expansin superfamily in Selaginella moellendorffii has now been assembled from genomic scaffolds. A smaller (and less diverse) superfamily is revealed, consistent with studies of other gene families in Selaginella. Selaginella has an expansin superfamily, which, like Physcomitrella, lacks EXLA or EXLB genes, but does contain two EXPA genes that are related to a particular Arabidopsis-rice clade involved in root hair development. Conclusions From sequence-based phylogenetic analysis, most Selaginella expansins lie outside the Arabidopsis-rice clades, leading us to estimate the minimum number of expansins present in the last common ancestor of Selaginella and angiosperms at 2 EXPA genes and 1 EXPB gene. These results confirm Selaginella as an important intermediary between bryophytes and angiosperms. PMID:23286898

  20. Phylogenetic inference rejects sporophyte based classification of the Funariaceae (Bryophyta): rapid radiation suggests rampant homoplasy in sporophyte evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Budke, Jessica M; Goffinet, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The moss family Funariaceae, which includes the model systems Funaria hygrometrica and Physcomitrella patens, comprises 15 genera, of which three accommodate approximately 95% of the 250-400 species. Generic concepts are drawn primarily from patterns in the diversity of morphological complexity of the sporophyte. Phylogenetic inferences from ten loci sampled across the three genomic compartments yield a hypothesis that is incompatible with the current circumscription of two of the speciose genera of the Funariaceae. The single clade, comprising exemplars of Funaria with a compound annulus, is congruent with the systematic concept proposed by Fife (1985). By contrast, Entosthodon and Physcomitrium are resolved as polyphyletic entities, and even the three species of Physcomitrella are confirmed to have diverged from distinct ancestors. Although the backbone relationships within the core clade of the Funariaceae remain unresolved, the polyphyly of these genera withstands alternative hypothesis testing. Consequently, the sporophytic characters that define these lineages are clearly homoplasious suggesting that selective pressures (or their relaxation) are in fact driving the diversification rather than the conservation of sporophytic architecture in the Funariaceae.

  1. Conservation of AtTZF1, AtTZF2, and AtTZF3 homolog gene regulation by salt stress in evolutionarily distant plant species

    PubMed Central

    D’Orso, Fabio; De Leonardis, Anna M.; Salvi, Sergio; Gadaleta, Agata; Ruberti, Ida; Cattivelli, Luigi; Morelli, Giorgio; Mastrangelo, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-rich tandem zinc-finger proteins (RR-TZF) participate in a wide range of plant developmental processes and adaptive responses to abiotic stress, such as cold, salt, and drought. This study investigates the conservation of the genes AtTZF1-5 at the level of their sequences and expression across plant species. The genomic sequences of the two RR-TZF genes TdTZF1-A and TdTZF1-B were isolated in durum wheat and assigned to chromosomes 3A and 3B, respectively. Sequence comparisons revealed that they encode proteins that are highly homologous to AtTZF1, AtTZF2, and AtTZF3. The expression profiles of these RR-TZF durum wheat and Arabidopsis proteins support a common function in the regulation of seed germination and responses to abiotic stress. In particular, analysis of plants with attenuated and overexpressed AtTZF3 indicate that AtTZF3 is a negative regulator of seed germination under conditions of salt stress. Finally, comparative sequence analyses establish that the RR-TZF genes are encoded by lower plants, including the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The regulation of the Physcomitrella AtTZF1-2-3-like genes by salt stress strongly suggests that a subgroup of the RR-TZF proteins has a function that has been conserved throughout evolution. PMID:26136754

  2. ARABIDILLO gene homologues in basal land plants: species-specific gene duplication and likely functional redundancy.

    PubMed

    Moody, Laura A; Saidi, Younousse; Smiles, Emma J; Bradshaw, Susan J; Meddings, Matthew; Winn, Peter J; Coates, Juliet C

    2012-12-01

    ARABIDILLO proteins regulate multicellular root development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Conserved ARABIDILLO homologues are present throughout land plants, even in early-evolving plants that do not possess complex root architecture, suggesting that ARABIDILLO genes have additional functions. Here, we have cloned and characterised ARABIDILLO gene homologues from two early-evolving land plants, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. We show that two of the PHYSCODILLO genes (PHYSCODILLO1A and -1B) exist as a tail-to-tail tandem array of two almost identical 12 kb sequences, while a third related gene (PHYSCODILLO2) is located elsewhere in the Physcomitrella genome. Physcomitrella possesses a very low percentage of tandemly arrayed genes compared with the later-evolving plants whose genomes have been sequenced to date. Thus, PHYSCODILLO1A and -1B genes represent a relatively unusual gene arrangement. PHYSCODILLO promoters are active largely in the haploid gametophyte, with additional activity at the foot of the sporophyte. The pattern of promoter activity is uniform in filamentous and leafy tissues, suggesting pleiotropic gene functions and likely functional redundancy: the latter possibility is confirmed by the lack of discernible phenotype in a physcodillo2 deletion mutant. Interestingly, the pattern of PHYSCODILLO promoter activity in female reproductive organs is strikingly similar to that of an Arabidopsis homologue, suggesting co-option of some PHYSCODILLO functions or regulation into both the sporophyte and gametophyte. In conclusion, our work identifies and characterises some of the earliest-evolving land plant ARABIDILLO homologues. We confirm that all land plant ARABIDILLO genes arose from a single common ancestor and suggest that PHYSCODILLO proteins have novel and pleiotropic functions, some of which may be conserved in later-evolving plants.

  3. Cloning, expression and purification of orthologous membrane proteins: a general protocol for preparation of the histidine sensor kinase ETR1 from different species.

    PubMed

    Classen, Elisa; Groth, Georg

    2012-03-01

    Orthologous proteins do not necessarily share the same function in all species and those sharing the same function might employ a modified catalytic mechanism. Thus, comparative analysis of homologous or orthologous proteins from different organisms can provide detailed information on the function and the mechanism of an entire protein family. The sensor kinase ETR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been well characterized by genetic, physiological and biochemical studies. However, as further model plants are coming into focus for plant hormone research, a general protocol for isolation and purification of orthologous ETR1 proteins seems instrumental for a detailed molecular analysis of this protein family. In this study, we describe the native purification of recombinant ETR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana by mild solubilization with the zwitter-ionic detergent Fos-Choline-14 and single-step purification by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. The same protocol was successfully applied for the purification of the orthologous proteins from the moss Physcomitrella patens subsp. patens and the tomato Lycopersicon esculentum. The successful transfer of the purification protocol to proteins of the same family which share sequence identity of 63-80% only suggests that this protocol presents a general purification strategy which is likely to apply also to the purification of other members of the sensor histidine kinase family.

  4. Moss-made pharmaceuticals: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Reski, Ralf; Parsons, Juliana; Decker, Eva L

    2015-10-01

    Over the past two decades, the moss Physcomitrella patens has been developed from scratch to a model species in basic research and in biotechnology. A fully sequenced genome, outstanding possibilities for precise genome-engineering via homologous recombination (knockout moss), a certified GMP production in moss bioreactors, successful upscaling to 500 L wave reactors, excellent homogeneity of protein glycosylation, remarkable batch-to-batch stability and a safe cryopreservation for master cell banking are some of the key features of the moss system. Several human proteins are being produced in this system as potential biopharmaceuticals. Among the products are tumour-directed monoclonal antibodies with enhanced antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), complement factor H (FH), keratinocyte growth factor (FGF7/KGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), asialo-erythropoietin (asialo-EPO, AEPO), alpha-galactosidase (aGal) and beta-glucocerebrosidase (GBA). Further, an Env-derived multi-epitope HIV protein as a candidate vaccine was produced, and first steps for a metabolic engineering of P. patens have been made. Some of the recombinant biopharmaceuticals from moss bioreactors are not only similar to those produced in mammalian systems such as CHO cells, but are of superior quality (biobetters). The first moss-made pharmaceutical, aGal to treat Morbus Fabry, is in clinical trials.

  5. Functional Conservation in the SIAMESE-RELATED Family of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narender; Harashima, Hirofumi; Kalve, Shweta; Bramsiepe, Jonathan; Wang, Kai; Sizani, Bulelani L; Bertrand, Laura L; Johnson, Matthew C; Faulk, Christopher; Dale, Renee; Simmons, L Alice; Churchman, Michelle L; Sugimoto, Keiko; Kato, Naohiro; Dasanayake, Maheshi; Beemster, Gerrit; Schnittger, Arp; Larkin, John C

    2015-11-01

    The best-characterized members of the plant-specific SIAMESE-RELATED (SMR) family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors regulate the transition from the mitotic cell cycle to endoreplication, also known as endoreduplication, an altered version of the cell cycle in which DNA is replicated without cell division. Some other family members are implicated in cell cycle responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the functions of most SMRs remain unknown, and the specific cyclin-dependent kinase complexes inhibited by SMRs are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a diverse group of SMRs, including an SMR from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, can complement an Arabidopsis thaliana siamese (sim) mutant and that both Arabidopsis SIM and P. patens SMR can inhibit CDK activity in vitro. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis SIM can bind to and inhibit both CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1. Finally, we show that SMR2 acts to restrict cell proliferation during leaf growth in Arabidopsis and that SIM, SMR1/LGO, and SMR2 play overlapping roles in controlling the transition from cell division to endoreplication during leaf development. These results indicate that differences in SMR function in plant growth and development are primarily due to differences in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, rather than to differences in fundamental biochemical function.

  6. Group A PP2Cs evolved in land plants as key regulators of intrinsic desiccation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Kenji; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kuwamura, Mayuri; Nishikawa, Yuri; Nakatani, Mao; Ohtawa, Hitomi; Takezawa, Daisuke; Seki, Motoaki; Tanaka, Maho; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Sakata, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative desiccation tolerance is common in bryophytes, although this character has been lost in most vascular plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens survives complete desiccation if treated with abscisic acid (ABA). Group A protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2C) are negative regulators of abscisic acid signalling. Here we show that the elimination of Group A PP2C is sufficient to ensure P. patens survival to full desiccation, without ABA treatment, although its growth is severely hindered. Microarray analysis shows that the Group A PP2C-regulated genes exclusively overlap with genes exhibiting a high level of ABA induction. Group A PP2C disruption weakly affects ABA-activated kinase activity, indicating Group A PP2C action downstream of these kinases in the moss. We propose that Group A PP2C emerged in land plants to repress desiccation tolerance mechanisms, possibly facilitating plants propagation on land, whereas ABA releases the intrinsic desiccation tolerance from Group A PP2C regulation.

  7. Cloning and functional expression of the first plant fatty acid elongase specific for Delta(6)-polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Zank, T K; Zähringer, U; Lerchl, J; Heinz, E

    2000-12-01

    In order to elucidate the biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in plants we searched for a cDNA encoding a Delta(6)-specific PUFA elongase from Physcomitrella patens, which is known to contain high proportions of arachidonic acid (20:4 Delta(5,8,11,14)). An EST clone from P. patens was identified by its low homology to the yeast gene ELO1, which is required for the elongation of medium-chain fatty acids. We functionally characterized this cDNA by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of several fatty acids. Analysis of the fatty acid profile of the transgenic yeast revealed that the cDNA encodes a protein that leads to the elongation of the C(18) Delta(6)-polyunsaturated fatty acids gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 Delta(6,9,12)) and stearidonic acid (18:4 Delta(6,9,12,15)), which were recovered to 45-51% as their elongation products. In contrast, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids were hardly elongated and we could not measure any elongation of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (including 18:1 Delta(6)), indicating that the elongase is highly specific for the polyunsaturated nature of the fatty acid acting as substrate.

  8. A new system for fast and quantitative analysis of heterologous gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Thévenin, J; Dubos, C; Xu, W; Le Gourrierec, J; Kelemen, Z; Charlot, F; Nogué, F; Lepiniec, L; Dubreucq, B

    2012-01-01

    • Large-scale analysis of transcription factor-cis-acting element interactions in plants, or the dissection of complex transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, requires rapid, robust and reliable systems for the quantification of gene expression. • Here, we describe a new system for transient expression analysis of transcription factors, which takes advantage of the fast and easy production and transfection of Physcomitrella patens protoplasts, coupled to flow cytometry quantification of a fluorescent protein (green fluorescent protein). Two small-sized and high-copy Gateway® vectors were specifically designed, although standard binary vectors can also be employed. • As a proof of concept, the regulation of BANYULS (BAN), a key structural gene involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, was used. In P. patens, BAN expression is activated by a complex composed of three proteins (TT2/AtMYB123, TT8/bHLH042 and TTG1), and is inhibited by MYBL2, a transcriptional repressor, as in Arabidopsis. Using this approach, two new regulatory sequences that are necessary and sufficient for specific BAN expression in proanthocyanidin-accumulating cells were identified. • This one hybrid-like plant system was successfully employed to quantitatively assess the transcriptional activity of four regulatory proteins, and to identify their target recognition sites on the BAN promoter.

  9. Electrical output of bryophyte microbial fuel cell systems is sufficient to power a radio or an environmental sensor

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Ross J.; Felder, Fabienne; Cooper, Matt B.; Royles, Jessica; Harrison, Susan T. L.; Smith, Alison G.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant microbial fuel cells are a recently developed technology that exploits photosynthesis in vascular plants by harnessing solar energy and generating electrical power. In this study, the model moss species Physcomitrella patens, and other environmental samples of mosses, have been used to develop a non-vascular bryophyte microbial fuel cell (bryoMFC). A novel three-dimensional anodic matrix was successfully created and characterized and was further tested in a bryoMFC to determine the capacity of mosses to generate electrical power. The importance of anodophilic microorganisms in the bryoMFC was also determined. It was found that the non-sterile bryoMFCs operated with P. patens delivered over an order of magnitude higher peak power output (2.6 ± 0.6 µW m−2) than bryoMFCs kept in near-sterile conditions (0.2 ± 0.1 µW m−2). These results confirm the importance of the microbial populations for delivering electrons to the anode in a bryoMFC. When the bryoMFCs were operated with environmental samples of moss (non-sterile) the peak power output reached 6.7 ± 0.6 mW m−2. The bryoMFCs operated with environmental samples of moss were able to power a commercial radio receiver or an environmental sensor (LCD desktop weather station). PMID:27853542

  10. Plant genomes enclose footprints of past infections by giant virus relatives

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, Florian; Epert, Aline; Nogué, Fabien; Blanc, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) are eukaryotic viruses with large genomes (100 kb–2.5 Mb), which include giant Mimivirus, Megavirus and Pandoravirus. NCLDVs are known to infect animals, protists and phytoplankton but were never described as pathogens of land plants. Here, we show that the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii have open reading frames (ORFs) with high phylogenetic affinities to NCLDV homologues. The P. patens genes are clustered in DNA stretches (up to 13 kb) containing up to 16 NCLDV-like ORFs. Molecular evolution analysis suggests that the NCLDV-like regions were acquired by horizontal gene transfer from distinct but closely related viruses that possibly define a new family of NCLDVs. Transcriptomics and DNA methylation data indicate that the NCLDV-like regions are transcriptionally inactive and are highly cytosine methylated through a mechanism not relying on small RNAs. Altogether, our data show that members of NCLDV have infected land plants. PMID:24969138

  11. The KAC family of kinesin-like proteins is essential for the association of chloroplasts with the plasma membrane in land plants.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Kasahara, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Takato; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Wada, Masamitsu

    2012-11-01

    Chloroplasts require association with the plasma membrane for movement in response to light and for appropriate positioning within the cell to capture photosynthetic light efficiently. In Arabidopsis, CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING 1 (CHUP1), KINESIN-LIKE PROTEIN FOR ACTIN-BASED CHLOROPLAST MOVEMENT 1 (KAC1) and KAC2 are required for both the proper movement of chloroplasts and the association of chloroplasts with the plasma membrane, through the reorganization of short actin filaments located on the periphery of the chloroplasts. Here, we show that KAC and CHUP1 orthologs (AcKAC1, AcCHUP1A and AcCHUP1B, and PpKAC1 and PpKAC2) play important roles in chloroplast positioning in the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the moss Physcomitrella patens. The knockdown of AcKAC1 and two AcCHUP1 genes induced the aggregation of chloroplasts around the nucleus. Analyses of A. capillus-veneris mutants containing perinuclear-aggregated chloroplasts confirmed that AcKAC1 is required for chloroplast-plasma membrane association. In addition, P. patens lines in which two KAC genes had been knocked out showed an aggregated chloroplast phenotype similar to that of the fern kac1 mutants. These results indicate that chloroplast positioning and movement are mediated through the activities of KAC and CHUP1 proteins, which are conserved in land plants.

  12. Heterologous Expression of Moss Light-harvesting Complex Stress-related 1 (LHCSR1), the Chlorophyll a-Xanthophyll Pigment-protein Complex Catalyzing Non-photochemical Quenching, in Nicotiana sp.*

    PubMed Central

    Pinnola, Alberta; Ghin, Leonardo; Gecchele, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Alboresi, Alessandro; Avesani, Linda; Pezzotti, Mario; Capaldi, Stefano; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms evolved mechanisms for thermal dissipation of energy absorbed in excess to prevent formation of reactive oxygen species. The major and fastest component, called non-photochemical quenching, occurs within the photosystem II antenna system by the action of two essential light-harvesting complex (LHC)-like proteins, photosystem II subunit S (PSBS) in plants and light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) in green algae and diatoms. In the evolutionary intermediate Physcomitrella patens, a moss, both gene products are active. These proteins, which are present in low amounts, are difficult to purify, preventing structural and functional analysis. Here, we report on the overexpression of the LHCSR1 protein from P. patens in the heterologous systems Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum using transient and stable nuclear transformation. We show that the protein accumulated in both heterologous systems is in its mature form, localizes in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes, and is correctly folded with chlorophyll a and xanthophylls but without chlorophyll b, an essential chromophore for plants and algal LHC proteins. Finally, we show that recombinant LHCSR1 is active in quenching in vivo, implying that the recombinant protein obtained is a good material for future structural and functional studies. PMID:26260788

  13. Electrical output of bryophyte microbial fuel cell systems is sufficient to power a radio or an environmental sensor.

    PubMed

    Bombelli, Paolo; Dennis, Ross J; Felder, Fabienne; Cooper, Matt B; Madras Rajaraman Iyer, Durgaprasad; Royles, Jessica; Harrison, Susan T L; Smith, Alison G; Harrison, C Jill; Howe, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Plant microbial fuel cells are a recently developed technology that exploits photosynthesis in vascular plants by harnessing solar energy and generating electrical power. In this study, the model moss species Physcomitrella patens, and other environmental samples of mosses, have been used to develop a non-vascular bryophyte microbial fuel cell (bryoMFC). A novel three-dimensional anodic matrix was successfully created and characterized and was further tested in a bryoMFC to determine the capacity of mosses to generate electrical power. The importance of anodophilic microorganisms in the bryoMFC was also determined. It was found that the non-sterile bryoMFCs operated with P. patens delivered over an order of magnitude higher peak power output (2.6 ± 0.6 µW m(-2)) than bryoMFCs kept in near-sterile conditions (0.2 ± 0.1 µW m(-2)). These results confirm the importance of the microbial populations for delivering electrons to the anode in a bryoMFC. When the bryoMFCs were operated with environmental samples of moss (non-sterile) the peak power output reached 6.7 ± 0.6 mW m(-2). The bryoMFCs operated with environmental samples of moss were able to power a commercial radio receiver or an environmental sensor (LCD desktop weather station).

  14. Conserved regulatory mechanism controls the development of cells with rooting functions in land plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Thomas Ho Yuen; Catarino, Bruno; Dolan, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Land plants develop filamentous cells—root hairs, rhizoids, and caulonemata—at the interface with the soil. Members of the group XI basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors encoded by LOTUS JAPONICUS ROOTHAIRLESS1-LIKE (LRL) genes positively regulate the development of root hairs in the angiosperms Lotus japonicus, Arabidopsis thaliana, and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that auxin promotes rhizoid and caulonema development by positively regulating the expression of PpLRL1 and PpLRL2, the two LRL genes in the Physcomitrella patens genome. Although the group VIII bHLH proteins, AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 and AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1, promote root-hair development by positively regulating the expression of AtLRL3 in A. thaliana, LRL genes promote rhizoid development independently of PpROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1 and PpROOT HAIR DEFECITVE SIX-LIKE2 (PpRSL1 and PpRSL2) gene function in P. patens. Together, these data demonstrate that both LRL and RSL genes are components of an ancient auxin-regulated gene network that controls the development of tip-growing cells with rooting functions among most extant land plants. Although this network has diverged in the moss and the angiosperm lineages, our data demonstrate that the core network acted in the last common ancestor of the mosses and angiosperms that existed sometime before 420 million years ago. PMID:26150509

  15. Occurrence of brassinosteroids in non-flowering land plants, liverwort, moss, lycophyte and fern.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takao; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Shibata, Kyomi; Asahina, Masashi; Nomura, Takahito; Fujita, Tomomichi; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2017-04-01

    Endogenous brassinosteroids (BRs) in non-flowering land plants were analyzed. BRs were found in a liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha), a moss (Physcomitrella patens), lycophytes (Selaginella moellendorffii and S. uncinata) and 13 fern species. A biologically active BR, castasterone (CS), was identified in most of these non-flowering plants but another biologically active BR, brassinolide, was not. It may be distinctive that levels of CS in non-flowering plants were orders of magnitude lower than those in flowering plants. 22-Hydroxycampesterol and its metabolites were identified in most of the non-flowering plants suggesting that the biosynthesis of BRs via 22-hydroxylation of campesterol occurs as in flowering plants. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that M. polymorpha, P. patens and S. moellendorffii have cytochrome P450s in the CYP85 clans which harbors BR biosynthesis enzymes, although the P450 profiles are simpler as compared with Arabidopsis and rice. Furthermore, these basal land plants were found to have multiple P450s in the CYP72 clan which harbors enzymes to catabolize BRs. These findings indicate that green plants were able to synthesize and inactivate BRs from the land-transition stage.

  16. Functional Conservation in the SIAMESE-RELATED Family of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Bertrand, Laura L.; Johnson, Matthew C.; Dale, Renee; Simmons, L. Alice; Sugimoto, Keiko; Kato, Naohiro; Dassanayake, Maheshi; Schnittger, Arp

    2015-01-01

    The best-characterized members of the plant-specific SIAMESE-RELATED (SMR) family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors regulate the transition from the mitotic cell cycle to endoreplication, also known as endoreduplication, an altered version of the cell cycle in which DNA is replicated without cell division. Some other family members are implicated in cell cycle responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the functions of most SMRs remain unknown, and the specific cyclin-dependent kinase complexes inhibited by SMRs are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a diverse group of SMRs, including an SMR from the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, can complement an Arabidopsis thaliana siamese (sim) mutant and that both Arabidopsis SIM and P. patens SMR can inhibit CDK activity in vitro. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis SIM can bind to and inhibit both CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1. Finally, we show that SMR2 acts to restrict cell proliferation during leaf growth in Arabidopsis and that SIM, SMR1/LGO, and SMR2 play overlapping roles in controlling the transition from cell division to endoreplication during leaf development. These results indicate that differences in SMR function in plant growth and development are primarily due to differences in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, rather than to differences in fundamental biochemical function. PMID:26546445

  17. Structure, function and inhibition of ent-kaurene synthase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenting; Feng, Xinxin; Zheng, Yingying; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Nakano, Chiaki; Hoshino, Tsutomu; Bogue, Shannon; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Cui, Yunfeng; Li, Jian; Wang, Iren; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2014-10-01

    We report the first X-ray crystal structure of ent-kaur-16-ene synthase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, together with the results of a site-directed mutagenesis investigation into catalytic activity. The structure is very similar to that of the α domains of modern plant terpene cyclases, a result that is of interest since it has been proposed that many plant terpene cyclases may have arisen from bacterial diterpene cyclases. The ent-copalyl diphosphate substrate binds to a hydrophobic pocket near a cluster of Asp and Arg residues that are essential for catalysis, with the carbocations formed on ionization being protected by Leu, Tyr and Phe residues. A bisphosphonate inhibitor binds to the same site. In the kaurene synthase from the moss Physcomitrella patens, 16-α-hydroxy-ent-kaurane as well as kaurene are produced since Leu and Tyr in the P. patens kaurene synthase active site are replaced by smaller residues enabling carbocation quenching by water. Overall, the results represent the first structure determination of a bacterial diterpene cyclase, providing insights into catalytic activity, as well as structural comparisons with diverse terpene synthases and cyclases which clearly separate the terpene cyclases from other terpene synthases having highly α-helical structures.

  18. Moss Chloroplasts Are Surrounded by a Peptidoglycan Wall Containing D-Amino Acids[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Takayuki; Tanidokoro, Koji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Sato, Momo; Tadano, Shinji; Ishikawa, Hayato; Takio, Susumu; Takechi, Katsuaki; Takano, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that the plastids in green plants lost peptidoglycan (i.e., a bacterial cell wall-containing d-amino acids) during their evolution from an endosymbiotic cyanobacterium. Although wall-like structures could not be detected in the plastids of green plants, the moss Physcomitrella patens has the genes required to generate peptidoglycan (Mur genes), and knocking out these genes causes defects in chloroplast division. Here, we generated P. patens knockout lines (∆Pp-ddl) for a homolog of the bacterial peptidoglycan-synthetic gene encoding d-Ala:d-Ala ligase. ∆Pp-ddl had a macrochloroplast phenotype, similar to other Mur knockout lines. The addition of d-Ala-d-Ala (DA-DA) to the medium suppressed the appearance of giant chloroplasts in ∆Pp-ddl, but the addition of l-Ala-l-Ala (LA-LA), DA-LA, LA-DA, or d-Ala did not. Recently, a metabolic method for labeling bacterial peptidoglycan was established using ethynyl-DA-DA (EDA-DA) and click chemistry to attach an azide-modified fluorophore to the ethynyl group. The ∆Pp-ddl line complemented with EDA-DA showed that moss chloroplasts are completely surrounded by peptidoglycan. Our findings strongly suggest that the moss plastids have a peptidoglycan wall containing d-amino acids. By contrast, no plastid phenotypes were observed in the T-DNA tagged ddl mutant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27325639

  19. Limited accumulation of copper in heavy metal adapted mosses.

    PubMed

    Antreich, Sebastian; Sassmann, Stefan; Lang, Ingeborg

    2016-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient but has toxic effects at high concentrations. Bryophytes are remarkably tolerant to elevated levels of copper but we wondered if this tolerance might be species dependent. Therefore, in three moss species, Physcomitrella patens, Mielichhoferia elongata and Pohlia drummondii, the accumulation of copper was compared with semiquantitative SEM-EDX analyses after six weeks of cultivation on copper containing media. We investigated the role of the copper-linked anion and applied copper as CuCl2, CuSO4 and CuEDTA, respectively. Line scans along the growth axis of moss gametophores allowed for a detailed analysis of copper detection from the base towards the tip. Mosses originating from metal-containing habitats (i.e. M. elongata and P. drummondii) revealed a lower accumulation of copper when compared to the non-adapted P. patens. CuEDTA had a shielding effect in all three species and copper levels differed greatly from CuCl2 or CuSO4. The detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), H2O2 and O2(-), was further used to indicate stress levels in the gametophore stems. ROS staining was increased along the whole stem and the tip in the non-adapted species P. patens whereas the tolerant species M. elongata and P. drummondii generally showed less staining located mainly at the base of the stem. We discuss the relation between metal accumulation and ROS production using indicator dyes in the three moss species. As moss gametophores are very delicate structures, ROS staining provide an excellent alternative to spectrophotometric analyses to estimate stress levels.

  20. Setting the Record Straight: The Selection, Subordination and Silencing of Maata Patene, Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Maxine

    2009-01-01

    Maori women teachers in nineteenth-century New Zealand have been little acknowledged in educational histories, and indeed, in some instances their contributions have been explicitly nullified. Those who have taken leadership roles have been no more visible. This article examines the silencing and exclusion from educational history of a young Maori…

  1. Sea level rise, drought and the decline of Spartina patens in New England marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Already heavily impacted by coastal development, estuarine vegetated habitats (seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangroves) are increasingly affected by climate change via accelerated sea level rise, changes in the frequency and intensity of precipitation and storms, and warmer ocean...

  2. Examining effects of sea level rise and marsh crabs on Spartina patens using mesocosms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal salt marshes provide essential ecosystem services but face increasing threats from habitat loss, eutrophication, changing precipitation patterns, and accelerating rates of sea level rise (SLR). Recent studies have suggested that herbivory and burrowing by native salt mars...

  3. Evolution of Plant Sucrose Uptake Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Anke; Sivitz, Alicia B.; Ward, John M.

    2012-01-01

    In angiosperms, sucrose uptake transporters (SUTs) have important functions especially in vascular tissue. Here we explore the evolutionary origins of SUTs by analysis of angiosperm SUTs and homologous transporters in a vascular early land plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and a non-vascular plant, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, the charophyte algae Chlorokybus atmosphyticus, several red algae and fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Plant SUTs cluster into three types by phylogenetic analysis. Previous studies using angiosperms had shown that types I and II are localized to the plasma membrane while type III SUTs are associated with vacuolar membrane. SUT homologs were not found in the chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean algae Chlorokybus atmosphyticus contains a SUT homolog (CaSUT1) and phylogenetic analysis indicated that it is basal to all other streptophyte SUTs analyzed. SUTs are present in both red algae and S. pombe but they are less related to plant SUTs than CaSUT1. Both Selaginella and Physcomitrella encode type II and III SUTs suggesting that both plasma membrane and vacuolar sucrose transporter activities were present in early land plants. It is likely that SUT transporters are important for scavenging sucrose from the environment and intracellular compartments in charophyte and non-vascular plants. Type I SUTs were only found in eudicots and we conclude that they evolved from type III SUTs, possibly through loss of a vacuolar targeting sequence. Eudicots utilize type I SUTs for phloem (vascular tissue) loading while monocots use type II SUTs for phloem loading. We show that HvSUT1 from barley, a type II SUT, reverted the growth defect of the Arabidopsis atsuc2 (type I) mutant. This indicates that type I and II SUTs evolved similar (and interchangeable) phloem loading transporter capabilities independently. PMID:22639641

  4. The putative moss 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase is a novel form of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase without an iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Fritzemeier, Kai; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf

    2007-08-03

    Sulfate assimilation provides reduced sulfur for synthesis of the amino acids cysteine and methionine and for a range of other metabolites. Sulfate has to be activated prior to reduction by adenylation to adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS). In plants, algae, and many bacteria, this compound is reduced to sulfite by APS reductase (APR); in fungi and some cyanobacteria and gamma-proteobacteria, a second activation step, phosphorylation to 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS), is necessary before reduction to sulfite by PAPS reductase (PAPR). We found previously that the moss Physcomitrella patens is unique among these organisms in possessing orthologs of both APR and PAPR genes (Koprivova, A., Meyer, A. J., Schween, G., Herschbach, C., Reski, R., and Kopriva, S. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 32195-32201). To assess the function of the two enzymes, we compared their biochemical properties by analysis of purified recombinant proteins. APR from Physcomitrella is very similar to the well characterized APRs from seed plants. On the other hand, we found that the putative PAPR preferentially reduces APS. Sequence analysis, analysis of UV-visible spectra, and determination of iron revealed that this new APR, named PpAPR-B, does not contain the FeS cluster, which was previously believed to determine the substrate specificity of the otherwise relatively similar enzymes. The lack of the FeS cluster in PpAPR-B catalysis is connected with a lower turnover rate but higher stability of the protein. These findings show that APS reduction without the FeS cluster is possible and that plant sulfate assimilation is predominantly dependent on reduction of APS.

  5. The valine and lysine residues in the conserved FxVTxK motif are important for the function of phylogenetically distant plant cellulose synthases.

    PubMed

    Slabaugh, Erin; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess; Chaves, Arielle; Wilson, Liza; Wilson, Carmen; Davis, Jonathan K; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Anderson, Charles T; Roberts, Alison W; Haigler, Candace H

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose synthases (CESAs) synthesize the β-1,4-glucan chains that coalesce to form cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls. In addition to a large cytosolic (catalytic) domain, CESAs have eight predicted transmembrane helices (TMHs). However, analogous to the structure of BcsA, a bacterial CESA, predicted TMH5 in CESA may instead be an interfacial helix. This would place the conserved FxVTxK motif in the plant cell cytosol where it could function as a substrate-gating loop as occurs in BcsA. To define the functional importance of the CESA region containing FxVTxK, we tested five parallel mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana CESA1 and Physcomitrella patens CESA5 in complementation assays of the relevant cesa mutants. In both organisms, the substitution of the valine or lysine residues in FxVTxK severely affected CESA function. In Arabidopsis roots, both changes were correlated with lower cellulose anisotropy, as revealed by Pontamine Fast Scarlet. Analysis of hypocotyl inner cell wall layers by atomic force microscopy showed that two altered versions of Atcesa1 could rescue cell wall phenotypes observed in the mutant background line. Overall, the data show that the FxVTxK motif is functionally important in two phylogenetically distant plant CESAs. The results show that Physcomitrella provides an efficient model for assessing the effects of engineered CESA mutations affecting primary cell wall synthesis and that diverse testing systems can lead to nuanced insights into CESA structure-function relationships. Although CESA membrane topology needs to be experimentally determined, the results support the possibility that the FxVTxK region functions similarly in CESA and BcsA.

  6. Transcriptomic evidence for the evolution of shoot meristem function in sporophyte-dominant land plants through concerted selection of ancestral gametophytic and sporophytic genetic programs.

    PubMed

    Frank, Margaret H; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Alternation of generations, in which the haploid and diploid stages of the life cycle are each represented by multicellular forms that differ in their morphology, is a defining feature of the land plants (embryophytes). Anciently derived lineages of embryophytes grow predominately in the haploid gametophytic generation from apical cells that give rise to the photosynthetic body of the plant. More recently evolved plant lineages have multicellular shoot apical meristems (SAMs), and photosynthetic shoot development is restricted to the sporophyte generation. The molecular genetic basis for this evolutionary shift from gametophyte-dominant to sporophyte-dominant life cycles remains a major question in the study of land plant evolution. We used laser microdissection and next generation RNA sequencing to address whether angiosperm meristem patterning genes expressed in the sporophytic SAM of Zea mays are expressed in the gametophytic apical cells, or in the determinate sporophytes, of the model bryophytes Marchantia polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens. A wealth of upregulated genes involved in stem cell maintenance and organogenesis are identified in the maize SAM and in both the gametophytic apical cell and sporophyte of moss, but not in Marchantia. Significantly, meiosis-specific genetic programs are expressed in bryophyte sporophytes, long before the onset of sporogenesis. Our data suggest that this upregulated accumulation of meiotic gene transcripts suppresses indeterminate cell fate in the Physcomitrella sporophyte, and overrides the observed accumulation of meristem patterning genes. A model for the evolution of indeterminate growth in the sporophytic generation through the concerted selection of ancestral meristem gene programs from gametophyte-dominant lineages is proposed.

  7. Proton Gradient Regulation5-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow Is Crucial for Acclimation to Anoxia and Complementary to Nonphotochemical Quenching in Stress Adaptation1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kukuczka, Bernadeta; Magneschi, Leonardo; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Steinbeck, Janina; Bald, Till; Powikrowska, Marta; Fufezan, Christian; Finazzi, Giovanni; Hippler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the functional importance of Proton Gradient Regulation5-Like1 (PGRL1) for photosynthetic performances in the moss Physcomitrella patens, we generated a pgrl1 knockout mutant. Functional analysis revealed diminished nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) as well as decreased capacity for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in pgrl1. Under anoxia, where CEF is induced, quantitative proteomics evidenced severe down-regulation of photosystems but up-regulation of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase complex, plastocyanin, and Ca2+ sensors in the mutant, indicating that the absence of PGRL1 triggered a mechanism compensatory for diminished CEF. On the other hand, proteins required for NPQ, such as light-harvesting complex stress-related protein1 (LHCSR1), violaxanthin de-epoxidase, and PSII subunit S, remained stable. To further investigate the interrelation between CEF and NPQ, we generated a pgrl1 npq4 double mutant in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacking both PGRL1 and LHCSR3 expression. Phenotypic comparative analyses of this double mutant, together with the single knockout strains and with the P. patens pgrl1, demonstrated that PGRL1 is crucial for acclimation to high light and anoxia in both organisms. Moreover, the data generated for the C. reinhardtii double mutant clearly showed a complementary role of PGRL1 and LHCSR3 in managing high light stress response. We conclude that both proteins are needed for photoprotection and for survival under low oxygen, underpinning a tight link between CEF and NPQ in oxygenic photosynthesis. Given the complementarity of the energy-dependent component of NPQ (qE) and PGRL1-mediated CEF, we suggest that PGRL1 is a capacitor linked to the evolution of the PSII subunit S-dependent qE in terrestrial plants. PMID:24948831

  8. An Ancestral Role for CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 Proteins in Both Ethylene and Abscisic Acid Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yasumura, Yuki; Pierik, Ronald; Kelly, Steven; Sakuta, Masaaki; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.; Harberd, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Land plants have evolved adaptive regulatory mechanisms enabling the survival of environmental stresses associated with terrestrial life. Here, we focus on the evolution of the regulatory CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) component of the ethylene signaling pathway that modulates stress-related changes in plant growth and development. First, we compare CTR1-like proteins from a bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (representative of early divergent land plants), with those of more recently diverged lycophyte and angiosperm species (including Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]) and identify a monophyletic CTR1 family. The fully sequenced P. patens genome encodes only a single member of this family (PpCTR1L). Next, we compare the functions of PpCTR1L with that of related angiosperm proteins. We show that, like angiosperm CTR1 proteins (e.g. AtCTR1 of Arabidopsis), PpCTR1L modulates downstream ethylene signaling via direct interaction with ethylene receptors. These functions, therefore, likely predate the divergence of the bryophytes from the land-plant lineage. However, we also show that PpCTR1L unexpectedly has dual functions and additionally modulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. In contrast, while AtCTR1 lacks detectable ABA signaling functions, Arabidopsis has during evolution acquired another homolog that is functionally distinct from AtCTR1. In conclusion, the roles of CTR1-related proteins appear to have functionally diversified during land-plant evolution, and angiosperm CTR1-related proteins appear to have lost an ancestral ABA signaling function. Our study provides new insights into how molecular events such as gene duplication and functional differentiation may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of regulatory mechanisms in plants. PMID:26243614

  9. Selaginella Genome Analysis – Entering the “Homoplasy Heaven” of the MADS World

    PubMed Central

    Gramzow, Lydia; Barker, Elizabeth; Schulz, Christian; Ambrose, Barbara; Ashton, Neil; Theißen, Günter; Litt, Amy

    2012-01-01

    In flowering plants, arguably the most significant transcription factors regulating development are MADS-domain proteins, encoded by Type I and Type II MADS-box genes. Type II genes are divided into the MIKCC and MIKC* groups. In angiosperms, these types and groups play distinct roles in the development of female gametophytes, embryos, and seeds (Type I); vegetative and floral tissues in sporophytes (MIKCC); and male gametophytes (MIKC*), but their functions in other plants are largely unknown. The complete set of MADS-box genes has been described for several angiosperms and a moss, Physcomitrella patens. Our examination of the complete genome sequence of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, revealed 19 putative MADS-box genes (13 Type I, 3 MIKCC, and 3 MIKC*). Our results suggest that the most recent common ancestor of vascular plants possessed at least two Type I and two Type II genes. None of the S. moellendorffii MIKCC genes were identified as orthologs of any floral organ identity genes. This strongly corroborates the view that the clades of floral organ identity genes originated in a common ancestor of seed plants after the lineage that led to lycophytes had branched off, and that expansion of MIKCC genes in the lineage leading to seed plants facilitated the evolution of their unique reproductive organs. The number of MIKC* genes and the ratio of MIKC* to MIKCC genes is lower in S. moellendorffii and angiosperms than in P. patens, correlated with reduction of the gametophyte in vascular plants. Our data indicate that Type I genes duplicated and diversified independently within lycophytes and seed plants. Our observations on MADS-box gene evolution echo morphological evolution since the two lineages of vascular plants appear to have arrived independently at similar body plans. Our annotation of MADS-box genes in S. moellendorffii provides the basis for functional studies to reveal the roles of this crucial gene family in basal vascular plants. PMID

  10. RECG Maintains Plastid and Mitochondrial Genome Stability by Suppressing Extensive Recombination between Short Dispersed Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Odahara, Masaki; Masuda, Yuichi; Sato, Mayuko; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Harada, Chizuru; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO) mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8–79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12–63 bp) in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions. PMID:25769081

  11. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanisms of abscisic acid signaling in land plants: characterization of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1-like type 2C protein phosphatase in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Tougane, Ken; Komatsu, Kenji; Bhyan, Salma Begum; Sakata, Yoichi; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2010-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is postulated to be a ubiquitous hormone that plays a central role in seed development and responses to environmental stresses of vascular plants. However, in liverworts (Marchantiophyta), which represent the oldest extant lineage of land plants, the role of ABA has been least emphasized; thus, very little information is available on the molecular mechanisms underlying ABA responses. In this study, we isolated and characterized MpABI1, an ortholog of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1 (ABI1), from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The MpABI1 cDNA encoded a 568-amino acid protein consisting of the carboxy-terminal protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) domain and a novel amino-terminal regulatory domain. The MpABI1 transcript was detected in the gametophyte, and its expression level was increased by exogenous ABA treatment in the gemma, whose growth was strongly inhibited by ABA. Experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs indicated that MpABI1 was mainly localized in the nucleus and that its nuclear localization was directed by the amino-terminal domain. Transient overexpression of MpABI1 in M. polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens cells resulted in suppression of ABA-induced expression of the wheat Em promoter fused to the beta -glucuronidase gene. Transgenic P. patens expressing MpABI1 and its mutant construct, MpABI1-d2, lacking the amino-terminal domain, had reduced freezing and osmotic stress tolerance, and associated with reduced accumulation of ABA-induced late embryogenesis abundant-like boiling-soluble proteins. Furthermore, ABA-induced morphological changes leading to brood cells were not prominent in these transgenic plants. These results suggest that MpABI1 is a negative regulator of ABA signaling, providing unequivocal molecular evidence of PP2C-mediated ABA response mechanisms functioning in liverworts.

  12. The ability of land plants to synthesize glucuronoxylans predates the evolution of tracheophytes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ameya R; Peña, Maria J; Avci, Utku; Mazumder, Koushik; Urbanowicz, Breeanna R; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Yin, Yanbin; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Roberts, Alison W; Hahn, Michael G; Xu, Ying; Darvill, Alan G; York, William S

    2012-03-01

    Glucuronoxylans with a backbone of 1,4-linked β-D-xylosyl residues are ubiquitous in the secondary walls of gymnosperms and angiosperms. Xylans have been reported to be present in hornwort cell walls, but their structures have not been determined. In contrast, the presence of xylans in the cell walls of mosses and liverworts remains a subject of debate. Here we present data that unequivocally establishes that the cell walls of leafy tissue and axillary hair cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens contain a glucuronoxylan that is structurally similar to glucuronoxylans in the secondary cell walls of vascular plants. Some of the 1,4-linked β-D-xylopyranosyl residues in the backbone of this glucuronoxylan bear an α-D-glucosyluronic acid (GlcpA) sidechain at O-2. In contrast, the lycopodiophyte Selaginella kraussiana synthesizes a glucuronoxylan substituted with 4-O-Me-α-D-GlcpA sidechains, as do many hardwood species. The monilophyte Equisetum hyemale produces a glucuronoxylan with both 4-O-Me-α-D-GlcpA and α-D-GlcpA sidechains, as does Arabidopsis. The seedless plant glucuronoxylans contain no discernible amounts of the reducing-end sequence that is characteristic of gymnosperm and eudicot xylans. Phylogenetic studies showed that the P. patens genome contains genes with high sequence similarity to Arabidopsis CAZy family GT8, GT43 and GT47 glycosyltransferases that are likely involved in xylan synthesis. We conclude that mosses synthesize glucuronoxylan that is structurally similar to the glucuronoxylans present in the secondary cell walls of lycopodiophytes, monilophytes, and many seed-bearing plants, and that several of the glycosyltransferases required for glucuronoxylan synthesis evolved before the evolution of tracheophytes.

  13. An Ancestral Role for CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 Proteins in Both Ethylene and Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Yuki; Pierik, Ronald; Kelly, Steven; Sakuta, Masaaki; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2015-09-01

    Land plants have evolved adaptive regulatory mechanisms enabling the survival of environmental stresses associated with terrestrial life. Here, we focus on the evolution of the regulatory CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) component of the ethylene signaling pathway that modulates stress-related changes in plant growth and development. First, we compare CTR1-like proteins from a bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (representative of early divergent land plants), with those of more recently diverged lycophyte and angiosperm species (including Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]) and identify a monophyletic CTR1 family. The fully sequenced P. patens genome encodes only a single member of this family (PpCTR1L). Next, we compare the functions of PpCTR1L with that of related angiosperm proteins. We show that, like angiosperm CTR1 proteins (e.g. AtCTR1 of Arabidopsis), PpCTR1L modulates downstream ethylene signaling via direct interaction with ethylene receptors. These functions, therefore, likely predate the divergence of the bryophytes from the land-plant lineage. However, we also show that PpCTR1L unexpectedly has dual functions and additionally modulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. In contrast, while AtCTR1 lacks detectable ABA signaling functions, Arabidopsis has during evolution acquired another homolog that is functionally distinct from AtCTR1. In conclusion, the roles of CTR1-related proteins appear to have functionally diversified during land-plant evolution, and angiosperm CTR1-related proteins appear to have lost an ancestral ABA signaling function. Our study provides new insights into how molecular events such as gene duplication and functional differentiation may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of regulatory mechanisms in plants.

  14. Oxylipins in moss development and defense

    PubMed Central

    de León, Inés Ponce; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acids that participate in plant development and defense against pathogen infection, insects, and wounding. Initial oxygenation of substrate fatty acids is mainly catalyzed by lipoxygenases (LOXs) and α-dioxygenases but can also take place non-enzymatically by autoxidation or singlet oxygen-dependent reactions. The resulting hydroperoxides are further metabolized by secondary enzymes to produce a large variety of compounds, including the hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and short-chain green leaf volatiles. In flowering plants, which lack arachidonic acid, oxylipins are produced mainly from oxidation of polyunsaturated C18 fatty acids, notably linolenic and linoleic acids. Algae and mosses in addition possess polyunsaturated C20 fatty acids including arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids, which can also be oxidized by LOXs and transformed into bioactive compounds. Mosses are phylogenetically placed between unicellular green algae and flowering plants, allowing evolutionary studies of the different oxylipin pathways. During the last years the moss Physcomitrella patens has become an attractive model plant for understanding oxylipin biosynthesis and diversity. In addition to the advantageous evolutionary position, functional studies of the different oxylipin-forming enzymes can be performed in this moss by targeted gene disruption or single point mutations by means of homologous recombination. Biochemical characterization of several oxylipin-producing enzymes and oxylipin profiling in P. patens reveal the presence of a wider range of oxylipins compared to flowering plants, including C18 as well as C20-derived oxylipins. Surprisingly, one of the most active oxylipins in plants, JA, is not synthesized in this moss. In this review, we present an overview of oxylipins produced in mosses and discuss the current knowledge related to the involvement of oxylipin-producing enzymes and their products in moss development and defense. PMID:26191067

  15. Oleosin of Subcellular Lipid Droplets Evolved in Green Algae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L.; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2013-01-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants. PMID:23391579

  16. A primary survey on bryophyte species reveals two novel classes of nucleotide-binding site (NBS) genes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jia-Yu; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ping; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Le-Tian; Pan, Xiao-Han; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2012-01-01

    Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK) domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL), reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL). Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants.

  17. Post-translational control of nitrate reductase activity responding to light and photosynthesis evolved already in the early vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Królicka, Adriana; Førland, Nina; Hansen, Margarita; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2013-05-01

    Regulation of nitrate reductase (NR) by reversible phosphorylation at a conserved motif is well established in higher plants, and enables regulation of NR in response to rapid fluctuations in light intensity. This regulation is not conserved in algae NR, and we wished to test the evolutionary origin of the regulatory mechanism by physiological examination of ancient land plants. Especially a member of the lycophytes is of interest since their NR is candidate for regulation by reversible phosphorylation based on sequence analysis. We compared Selaginella kraussiana, a member of the lycophytes and earliest vascular plants, with the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana, and also tested the moss Physcomitrella patens. Interestingly, optimization of assay conditions revealed that S. kraussiana NR used NADH as an electron donor like A. thaliana, whereas P. patens NR activity depended on NADPH. Examination of light/darkness effects showed that S. kraussiana NR was rapidly regulated similar to A. thaliana NR when a differential (Mg(2+) contra EDTA) assay was used to reveal activity state of NR. This implies that already existing NR enzyme was post-translationally activated by light in both species. Light had a positive effect also on de novo synthesis of NR in S. kraussiana, which could be shown after the plants had been exposed to a prolonged dark period (7 days). Daily variations in NR activity were mainly caused by post-translational modifications. As for angiosperms, the post-translational light activation of NR in S. kraussiana was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1*1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthesis and stomata opening. Evolutionary, a post-translational control mechanism for NR have occurred before or in parallel with development of vascular tissue in land plants, and appears to be part of a complex mechanisms for coordination of CO2 and nitrogen metabolism in these plants.

  18. Moss-Produced, Glycosylation-Optimized Human Factor H for Therapeutic Application in Complement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Michelfelder, Stefan; Parsons, Juliana; Bohlender, Lennard L; Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Niederkrüger, Holger; Busch, Andreas; Krieghoff, Nicola; Koch, Jonas; Fode, Benjamin; Schaaf, Andreas; Frischmuth, Thomas; Pohl, Martin; Zipfel, Peter F; Reski, Ralf; Decker, Eva L; Häffner, Karsten

    2016-12-08

    Genetic defects in complement regulatory proteins can lead to severe renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathies, and age-related macular degeneration. The majority of the mutations found in patients with these diseases affect the glycoprotein complement factor H, the main regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Therapeutic options are limited, and novel treatments, specifically those targeting alternative pathway activation, are highly desirable. Substitution with biologically active factor H could potentially treat a variety of diseases that involve increased alternative pathway activation, but no therapeutic factor H is commercially available. We recently reported the expression of full-length recombinant factor H in moss (Physcomitrella patens). Here, we present the production of an improved moss-derived recombinant human factor H devoid of potentially immunogenic plant-specific sugar residues on protein N-glycans, yielding approximately 1 mg purified moss-derived human factor H per liter of initial P. patens culture after a multistep purification process. This glycosylation-optimized factor H showed full in vitro complement regulatory activity similar to that of plasma-derived factor H and efficiently blocked LPS-induced alternative pathway activation and hemolysis induced by sera from patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, injection of moss-derived factor H reduced C3 deposition and increased serum C3 levels in a murine model of C3 glomerulopathy. Thus, we consider moss-produced recombinant human factor H a promising pharmaceutical product for therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from complement dysregulation.

  19. Oxylipins in moss development and defense.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, Inés; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acids that participate in plant development and defense against pathogen infection, insects, and wounding. Initial oxygenation of substrate fatty acids is mainly catalyzed by lipoxygenases (LOXs) and α-dioxygenases but can also take place non-enzymatically by autoxidation or singlet oxygen-dependent reactions. The resulting hydroperoxides are further metabolized by secondary enzymes to produce a large variety of compounds, including the hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and short-chain green leaf volatiles. In flowering plants, which lack arachidonic acid, oxylipins are produced mainly from oxidation of polyunsaturated C18 fatty acids, notably linolenic and linoleic acids. Algae and mosses in addition possess polyunsaturated C20 fatty acids including arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids, which can also be oxidized by LOXs and transformed into bioactive compounds. Mosses are phylogenetically placed between unicellular green algae and flowering plants, allowing evolutionary studies of the different oxylipin pathways. During the last years the moss Physcomitrella patens has become an attractive model plant for understanding oxylipin biosynthesis and diversity. In addition to the advantageous evolutionary position, functional studies of the different oxylipin-forming enzymes can be performed in this moss by targeted gene disruption or single point mutations by means of homologous recombination. Biochemical characterization of several oxylipin-producing enzymes and oxylipin profiling in P. patens reveal the presence of a wider range of oxylipins compared to flowering plants, including C18 as well as C20-derived oxylipins. Surprisingly, one of the most active oxylipins in plants, JA, is not synthesized in this moss. In this review, we present an overview of oxylipins produced in mosses and discuss the current knowledge related to the involvement of oxylipin-producing enzymes and their products in moss development and defense.

  20. Oleosin of subcellular lipid droplets evolved in green algae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-04-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants.

  1. Molecular Characterization of the Role of a Calcium Channel in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Schumaker

    2004-12-21

    A stimulus-induced change in cellular Ca2+ levels is a critical component of energy transduction in plant and animal development. Demonstrating Ca2+'s involvement in any developmental process requires identification of mechanisms that regulate these Ca2+ changes. In plants, biochemical studies have implicated the activity of Ca2+ channels in increases in cellular Ca2+ levels; however, molecular evidence for these transporters is lacking. Our studies used the mosses Physcomitrella patens and Funaria hygrometrica to establish a role for Ca2+ in hormone-induced morphogenesis and to use this developmental process to identify transporters responsible for increasing cytosolic Ca2+ levels. Using 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs), molecules that block Ca2+ movement through voltage-dependent channels in animal cells, we have shown that Ca2+ is important early in the transition from filamentous to meristematic-like growth that occurs in response to the plant hormone cytokinin. In addition to inhibiting moss growth (see below), these Ca2+ channel blockers prevent Ca2+ transport into moss cells (Schumaker and Gizinski, 1993) and bind specifically to two proteins in the moss plasma membrane (Schumaker and Gizinski, 1994; 1996; Dietrich et al., unpublished results). We used tandem mass spectrometry of the partially purified DHP-binding proteins with the goal of identifying the putative Ca2+ channel and providing sequence information for studies to understand channel expression, regulation, structure, and function during development. In addition, we used insertional mutagenesis to identify additional components of the pathway underlying hormone-induced morphogenesis.

  2. The Glycosyltransferase Repertoire of the Spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii and a Comparative Study of Its Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Harholt, Jesper; Sørensen, Iben; Fangel, Jonatan; Roberts, Alison; Willats, William G. T.; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Banks, Jo Ann; Ulvskov, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Spike mosses are among the most basal vascular plants, and one species, Selaginella moellendorffii, was recently selected for full genome sequencing by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are involved in many aspects of a plant life, including cell wall biosynthesis, protein glycosylation, primary and secondary metabolism. Here, we present a comparative study of the S. moellendorffii genome across 92 GT families and an additional family (DUF266) likely to include GTs. The study encompasses the moss Physcomitrella patens, a non-vascular land plant, while rice and Arabidopsis represent commelinid and non-commelinid seed plants. Analysis of the subset of GT-families particularly relevant to cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis was complemented by a detailed analysis of S. moellendorffii cell walls. The S. moellendorffii cell wall contains many of the same components as seed plant cell walls, but appears to differ somewhat in its detailed architecture. The S. moellendorffii genome encodes fewer GTs (287 GTs including DUF266s) than the reference genomes. In a few families, notably GT51 and GT78, S. moellendorffii GTs have no higher plant orthologs, but in most families S. moellendorffii GTs have clear orthologies with Arabidopsis and rice. A gene naming convention of GTs is proposed which takes orthologies and GT-family membership into account. The evolutionary significance of apparently modern and ancient traits in S. moellendorffii is discussed, as is its use as a reference organism for functional annotation of GTs. PMID:22567114

  3. Phylogeny and evolution of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (CNGC) gene family and functional analyses of tomato CNGCs

    PubMed Central

    Saand, Mumtaz Ali; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Li, Wen; Zhang, Xuan-Rui; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs) are calcium-permeable channels that are involved in various biological functions. Nevertheless, phylogeny and function of plant CNGCs are not well understood. In this study, 333 CNGC genes from 15 plant species were identified using comprehensive bioinformatics approaches. Extensive bioinformatics analyses demonstrated that CNGCs of Group IVa were distinct to those of other groups in gene structure and amino acid sequence of cyclic nucleotide-binding domain. A CNGC-specific motif that recognizes all identified plant CNGCs was generated. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CNGC proteins of flowering plant species formed five groups. However, CNGCs of the non-vascular plant Physcomitrella patens clustered only in two groups (IVa and IVb), while those of the vascular non-flowering plant Selaginella moellendorffii gathered in four (IVa, IVb, I and II). These data suggest that Group IV CNGCs are most ancient and Group III CNGCs are most recently evolved in flowering plants. Furthermore, silencing analyses revealed that a set of CNGC genes might be involved in disease resistance and abiotic stress responses in tomato and function of SlCNGCs does not correlate with the group that they are belonging to. Our results indicate that Group IVa CNGCs are structurally but not functionally unique among plant CNGCs. PMID:26546226

  4. Phylogeny and evolution of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (CNGC) gene family and functional analyses of tomato CNGCs.

    PubMed

    Saand, Mumtaz Ali; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Li, Wen; Zhang, Xuan-Rui; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs) are calcium-permeable channels that are involved in various biological functions. Nevertheless, phylogeny and function of plant CNGCs are not well understood. In this study, 333 CNGC genes from 15 plant species were identified using comprehensive bioinformatics approaches. Extensive bioinformatics analyses demonstrated that CNGCs of Group IVa were distinct to those of other groups in gene structure and amino acid sequence of cyclic nucleotide-binding domain. A CNGC-specific motif that recognizes all identified plant CNGCs was generated. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CNGC proteins of flowering plant species formed five groups. However, CNGCs of the non-vascular plant Physcomitrella patens clustered only in two groups (IVa and IVb), while those of the vascular non-flowering plant Selaginella moellendorffii gathered in four (IVa, IVb, I and II). These data suggest that Group IV CNGCs are most ancient and Group III CNGCs are most recently evolved in flowering plants. Furthermore, silencing analyses revealed that a set of CNGC genes might be involved in disease resistance and abiotic stress responses in tomato and function of SlCNGCs does not correlate with the group that they are belonging to. Our results indicate that Group IVa CNGCs are structurally but not functionally unique among plant CNGCs.

  5. The glycosyltransferase repertoire of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii and a comparative study of its cell wall.

    PubMed

    Harholt, Jesper; Sørensen, Iben; Fangel, Jonatan; Roberts, Alison; Willats, William G T; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Banks, Jo Ann; Ulvskov, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Spike mosses are among the most basal vascular plants, and one species, Selaginella moellendorffii, was recently selected for full genome sequencing by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are involved in many aspects of a plant life, including cell wall biosynthesis, protein glycosylation, primary and secondary metabolism. Here, we present a comparative study of the S. moellendorffii genome across 92 GT families and an additional family (DUF266) likely to include GTs. The study encompasses the moss Physcomitrella patens, a non-vascular land plant, while rice and Arabidopsis represent commelinid and non-commelinid seed plants. Analysis of the subset of GT-families particularly relevant to cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis was complemented by a detailed analysis of S. moellendorffii cell walls. The S. moellendorffii cell wall contains many of the same components as seed plant cell walls, but appears to differ somewhat in its detailed architecture. The S. moellendorffii genome encodes fewer GTs (287 GTs including DUF266s) than the reference genomes. In a few families, notably GT51 and GT78, S. moellendorffii GTs have no higher plant orthologs, but in most families S. moellendorffii GTs have clear orthologies with Arabidopsis and rice. A gene naming convention of GTs is proposed which takes orthologies and GT-family membership into account. The evolutionary significance of apparently modern and ancient traits in S. moellendorffii is discussed, as is its use as a reference organism for functional annotation of GTs.

  6. Application of Lectin Array Technology for Biobetter Characterization: Its Correlation with FcγRIII Binding and ADCC

    PubMed Central

    Roucka, Markus; Zimmermann, Klaus; Fido, Markus; Nechansky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Lectin microarray technology was applied to compare the glycosylation pattern of the monoclonal antibody MB311 expressed in SP2.0 cells to an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic effector function (ADCC)-optimized variant (MB314). MB314 was generated by a plant expression system that uses genetically modified moss protoplasts (Physcomitrella patens) to generate a de-fucosylated version of MB311. In contrast to MB311, no or very low interactions of MB314 with lectins Aspergillus oryzae l-fucose (AOL), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) were observed. These lectins are specific for mono-/biantennary N-glycans containing a core fucose residue. Importantly, this fucose indicative lectin-binding pattern correlated with increased MB314 binding to CD16 (FcγRIII; receptor for the constant region of an antibody)—whose affinity is mediated through core fucosylation—and stronger ADCC. In summary, these results demonstrate that lectin microarrays are useful orthogonal methods during antibody development and for characterization. PMID:28029136

  7. Glyco-engineering for biopharmaceutical production in moss bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Eva L.; Parsons, Juliana; Reski, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The production of recombinant biopharmaceuticals (pharmaceutical proteins) is a strongly growing area in the pharmaceutical industry. While most products to date are produced in mammalian cell cultures, namely Chinese hamster ovary cells, plant-based production systems gained increasing acceptance over the last years. Different plant systems have been established which are suitable for standardization and precise control of cultivation conditions, thus meeting the criteria for pharmaceutical production. The majority of biopharmaceuticals comprise glycoproteins. Therefore, differences in protein glycosylation between humans and plants have to be taken into account and plant-specific glycosylation has to be eliminated to avoid adverse effects on quality, safety, and efficacy of the products. The basal land plant Physcomitrella patens (moss) has been employed for the recombinant production of high-value therapeutic target proteins (e.g., Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Complement Factor H, monoclonal antibodies, Erythropoietin). Being genetically excellently characterized and exceptionally amenable for precise gene targeting via homologous recombination, essential steps for the optimization of moss as a bioreactor for the production of recombinant proteins have been undertaken. Here, we discuss the glyco-engineering approaches to avoid non-human N- and O-glycosylation on target proteins produced in moss bioreactors. PMID:25071817

  8. Characterization of maize roothairless6 which encodes a D-type cellulose synthase and controls the switch from bulge formation to tip growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Hey, Stefan; Liu, Sanzhen; Liu, Qiang; McNinch, Colton; Hu, Heng-Cheng; Wen, Tsui-Jung; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Bruce, Wesley; Schnable, Patrick S.; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are tubular extensions of the epidermis. Root hairs of the monogenic recessive maize mutant roothairless 6 (rth6) are arrested after bulge formation during the transition to tip growth and display a rough cell surface. BSR-Seq in combination with Seq-walking and subsequent analyses of four independently generated mutant alleles established that rth6 encodes CSLD5 a plasma membrane localized 129 kD D-type cellulose synthase with eight transmembrane domains. Cellulose synthases are required for the biosynthesis of cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer of plant cell walls. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that RTH6 is part of a monocot specific clade of D-type cellulose synthases. D-type cellulose synthases are highly conserved in the plant kingdom with five gene family members in maize and homologs even among early land plants such as the moss Physcomitrella patens or the clubmoss Selaginella moellendorffii. Expression profiling demonstrated that rth6 transcripts are highly enriched in root hairs as compared to all other root tissues. Moreover, in addition to the strong knock down of rth6 expression in young primary roots of the mutant rth6, the gene is also significantly down-regulated in rth3 and rth5 mutants, while it is up-regulated in rth2 mutants, suggesting that these genes interact in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:27708345

  9. Mutagenesis during plant responses to UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Holá, M; Vágnerová, R; Angelis, K J

    2015-08-01

    We tested an idea that induced mutagenesis due to unrepaired DNA lesions, here the UV photoproducts, underlies the impact of UVB irradiation on plant phenotype. For this purpose we used protonemal culture of the moss Physcomitrella patens with 50% of apical cells, which mimics actively growing tissue, the most vulnerable stage for the induction of mutations. We measured the UVB mutation rate of various moss lines with defects in DNA repair (pplig4, ppku70, pprad50, ppmre11), and in selected clones resistant to 2-Fluoroadenine, which were mutated in the adenosine phosphotrasferase gene (APT), we analysed induced mutations by sequencing. In parallel we followed DNA break repair and removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers with a half-life τ = 4 h 14 min determined by comet assay combined with UV dimer specific T4 endonuclease V. We show that UVB induces massive, sequence specific, error-prone bypass repair that is responsible for a high mutation rate owing to relatively slow, though error-free, removal of photoproducts by nucleotide excision repair (NER).

  10. The AFL subfamily of B3 transcription factors: evolution and function in angiosperm seeds.

    PubMed

    Carbonero, Pilar; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2016-12-21

    Seed development follows zygotic embryogenesis; during the maturation phase reserves accumulate and desiccation tolerance is acquired. This is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level and the AFL (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2) subfamily of B3 transcription factors (TFs) play a central role. They alter hormone biosynthesis, mainly in regards to abscisic acid and gibberellins, and also regulate the expression of other TFs and/or modulate their downstream activity via protein-protein interactions. This review deals with the origin of AFL TFs, which can be traced back to non-vascular plants such as Physcomitrella patens and achieves foremost expansion in the angiosperms. In green algae, like the unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or the pluricellular Klebsormidium flaccidum, a single B3 gene and four B3 paralogous genes are annotated, respectively. However, none of them present with the structural features of the AFL subfamily, with the exception of the B3 DNA-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis groups the AFL TFs into four Major Clusters of Ortologous Genes (MCOGs). The origin and function of these genes is discussed in view of their expression patterns and in the context of major regulatory interactions in seeds of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous species.

  11. Ferns: the missing link in shoot evolution and development

    PubMed Central

    Plackett, Andrew R. G.; Di Stilio, Verónica S.; Langdale, Jane A.

    2015-01-01

    Shoot development in land plants is a remarkably complex process that gives rise to an extreme diversity of forms. Our current understanding of shoot developmental mechanisms comes almost entirely from studies of angiosperms (flowering plants), the most recently diverged plant lineage. Shoot development in angiosperms is based around a layered multicellular apical meristem that produces lateral organs and/or secondary meristems from populations of founder cells at its periphery. In contrast, non-seed plant shoots develop from either single apical initials or from a small population of morphologically distinct apical cells. Although developmental and molecular information is becoming available for non-flowering plants, such as the model moss Physcomitrella patens, making valid comparisons between highly divergent lineages is extremely challenging. As sister group to the seed plants, the monilophytes (ferns and relatives) represent an excellent phylogenetic midpoint of comparison for unlocking the evolution of shoot developmental mechanisms, and recent technical advances have finally made transgenic analysis possible in the emerging model fern Ceratopteris richardii. This review compares and contrasts our current understanding of shoot development in different land plant lineages with the aim of highlighting the potential role that the fern C. richardii could play in shedding light on the evolution of underlying genetic regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26594222

  12. Accumulation response of chloroplasts induced by mechanical stimulation in bryophyte cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshikatsu; Wada, Masamitsu; Kadota, Akeo

    2003-03-01

    Chloroplast movement has been studied in many plants but mainly as a model system for light signaling. However, we recently showed that the avoidance response of chloroplasts is also induced by mechanical stimulation in fern protonemal cells. Here we report the discovery of a mechanically induced accumulation response of chloroplasts in bryophytes. When mechanical stimulation was directly applied with a capillary to a part of a cell, chloroplasts moved towards and accumulated at the pressed site within 30 min after the onset of stimulation in all species tested. The accumulation movement of chloroplasts was inhibited by Cremart but not by cytochalasin B in red-light-grown protonemata of Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B., S. & G. To determine the contribution of external Ca(2+) to the response, we examined the effects on the accumulation movement of gadolinium (Ga(3+)), an inhibitor of stretch-activated ion channels, and lanthanum (La(3+)), a potent inhibitor of calcium channels. Mechano-relocation of chloroplasts was abolished by these drugs, but no effects were observed on photo-relocation of chloroplasts, irrespective of light colors and intensity. These results suggest that influx of external Ca(2+) through the plasma membrane is essential for the early steps in signaling of mechano-relocation of chloroplasts whose motility system is dependent on microtubules.

  13. Chloroplast photorelocation movement mediated by phototropin family proteins in green plants.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2007-09-01

    Chloroplasts gather in areas irradiated with weak light to maximize photosynthesis (the accumulation response). They move away from areas irradiated with strong light to minimize damage of the photosynthetic apparatus (the avoidance response). The processes underlying these chloroplast movements can be divided into three parts: photoperception, signal transduction, and chloroplast movement. Photoreceptors for chloroplast movement have been identified recently in various plant species. A blue light receptor phototropin (phot) mediates chloroplast photorelocation movement in the seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris, the moss Physcomitrella patens and possibly the green alga Mougeotia scalaris. A chimeric photoreceptor between phytochrome and phototropin, neochrome (neo), was found in some advanced ferns and in the green alga M. scalaris. While the mechanism of chloroplast movement is not well understood, it is known that actin filaments play an important role in this process. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with chloroplast movement, several mutants were isolated in A. thaliana (jac1 and chup1) and the corresponding genes were cloned. In this review, recent progress in photoreceptor research into chloroplast movement in various plant species and the possible factors functioning in signal transduction or the regulation of actin filaments identified in A. thaliana is discussed.

  14. A Census of Nuclear Cyanobacterial Recruits in the Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuesheng; Chen, Mingjie; Yang, Zhaowan; Ma, Chuang; Guo, An-Yuan; Zhou, Yanhong; Chang, Junli; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2015-01-01

    The plastids and mitochondria of the eukaryotic cell are of endosymbiotic origin. These events occurred ~2 billion years ago and produced significant changes in the genomes of the host and the endosymbiont. Previous studies demonstrated that the invasion of land affected plastids and mitochondria differently and that the paths of mitochondrial integration differed between animals and plants. Other studies examined the reasons why a set of proteins remained encoded in the organelles and were not transferred to the nuclear genome. However, our understanding of the functional relations of the transferred genes is insufficient. In this paper, we report a high-throughput phylogenetic analysis to identify genes of cyanobacterial origin for plants of different levels of complexity: Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Physcomitrella patens, Populus trichocarpa, Selaginella moellendorffii, Sorghum bicolor, Oryza sativa, and Ostreococcus tauri. Thus, a census of cyanobacterial gene recruits and a study of their function are presented to better understand the functional aspects of plastid symbiogenesis. From algae to angiosperms, the GO terms demonstrated a gradual expansion over functionally related genes in the nuclear genome, beginning with genes related to thylakoids and photosynthesis, followed by genes involved in metabolism, and finally with regulation-related genes, primarily in angiosperms. The results demonstrate that DNA is supplied to the nuclear genome on a permanent basis with no regard to function, and only what is needed is kept, which thereby expands on the GO space along the related genes. PMID:25794152

  15. Organellar genome, nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit, and microsatellites isolated from a small-scale of 454 GS FLX sequencing on two mosses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Forrest, Laura L; Bainard, Jillian D; Budke, Jessica M; Goffinet, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Recent innovations in high-throughput DNA sequencing methodology (next generation sequencing technologies [NGS]) allow for the generation of large amounts of high quality data that may be particularly critical for resolving ambiguous relationships such as those resulting from rapid radiations. Application of NGS technology to bryology is limited to assembling entire nuclear or organellar genomes of selected exemplars of major lineages (e.g., classes). Here we outline how organellar genomes and the entire nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat can be obtained from minimal amounts of moss tissue via small-scale 454 GS FLX sequencing. We sampled two Funariaceae species, Funaria hygrometrica and Entosthodon obtusus, and assembled nearly complete organellar genomes and the whole nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S-IGS1-5S-IGS2) for both taxa. Sequence data from these species were compared to sequences from another Funariaceae species, Physcomitrella patens, revealing low overall degrees of divergence of the organellar genomes and nrDNA genes with substitutions spread rather evenly across their length, and high divergence within the external spacers of the nrDNA repeat. Furthermore, we detected numerous microsatellites among the 454 assemblies. This study demonstrates that NGS methodology can be applied to mosses to target large genomic regions and identify microsatellites.

  16. Efficient and Heritable Targeted Mutagenesis in Mosses Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshihisa; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Osakabe, Yuriko; Osakabe, Keishi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    Targeted genome modification by RNA-guided nucleases derived from the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system has seen rapid development in many organisms, including several plant species. In the present study, we succeeded in introducing the CRISPR/Cas9 system into the non-model organism Scopelophila cataractae, a moss that exhibits heavy metal tolerance, and the model organism Physcomitrella patens Utilizing the process by which moss plants regenerate from protoplasts, we conducted targeted mutagenesis by expression of single-chain guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 in protoplasts. Using this method, the acquisition rate of strains exhibiting phenotypic changes associated with the target genes was approximately 45-69%, and strains with phenotypic changes exhibited various insertion and deletion mutations. In addition, we report that our method is capable of multiplex targeted mutagenesis (two independent genes) and also permits the efficient introduction of large deletions (∼3 kbp). These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to accelerate investigations of bryology and land plant evolution.

  17. A Novel Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Required for Pollen Development and Sporopollenin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo Souza, Clarice; Kim, Sung Soo; Koch, Stefanie; Kienow, Lucie; Schneider, Katja; McKim, Sarah M.; Haughn, George W.; Kombrink, Erich; Douglas, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    Acyl-CoA Synthetase (ACOS) genes are related to 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) but have distinct functions. The Arabidopsis thaliana ACOS5 protein is in clade A of Arabidopsis ACOS proteins, the clade most closely related to 4CL proteins. This clade contains putative nonperoxisomal ACOS enzymes conserved in several angiosperm lineages and in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Although its function is unknown, ACOS5 is preferentially expressed in the flowers of all angiosperms examined. Here, we show that an acos5 mutant produced no pollen in mature anthers and no seeds by self-fertilization and was severely compromised in pollen wall formation apparently lacking sporopollenin or exine. The phenotype was first evident at stage 8 of anther development and correlated with maximum ACOS5 mRNA accumulation in tapetal cells at stages 7 to 8. Green fluorescent protein–ACOS5 fusions showed that ACOS5 is located in the cytoplasm. Recombinant ACOS5 enzyme was active against oleic acid, allowing kinetic constants for ACOS5 substrates to be established. Substrate competition assays indicated broad in vitro preference of the enzyme for medium-chain fatty acids. We propose that ACOS5 encodes an enzyme that participates in a conserved and ancient biochemical pathway required for sporopollenin monomer biosynthesis that may also include the Arabidopsis CYP703A2 and MS2 enzymes. PMID:19218397

  18. An event of alternative splicing affects the expression of the NTRC gene, encoding NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C, in seed plants.

    PubMed

    Nájera, Victoria A; González, María Cruz; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2017-05-01

    The NTRC gene encodes a NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase with a joint thioredoxin domain, exclusive of photosynthetic organisms. An updated search shows that although most species harbor a single copy of the NTRC gene, two copies were identified in different species of the genus Solanum, Glycine max and the moss Physcomitrella patens. The phylogenetic analysis of NTRCs from different sources produced a tree with the major groups of photosynthetic organisms: cyanobacteria, algae and land plants, indicating the evolutionary success of the NTRC gene among photosynthetic eukaryotes. An event of alternative splicing affecting the expression of the NTRC gene was identified, which is conserved in seed plants but not in algae, bryophytes and lycophytes. The alternative splicing event results in a transcript with premature stop codon, which would produce a truncated form of the enzyme. The standard splicing/alternative splicing (SS/AS) transcripts ratio was higher in photosynthetic tissues from Arabidopsis, Brachypodium and tomato, in line with the higher content of the NTRC polypeptide in these tissues. Moreover, environmental stresses such as cold or high salt affected the SS/AS ratio of the NTRC gene transcripts in Brachypodium seedlings. These results suggest that the alternative splicing of the NTRC gene might be an additional mechanism for modulating the content of NTRC in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic tissues of seed plants.

  19. Analysis of TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE Function in Arabidopsis thaliana Reveals a Previously Unknown, but Conserved, Biochemical Pathway in Sporopollenin Monomer Biosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Grienenberger, Etienne; Kim, Sung Soo; Lallemand, Benjamin; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Heitz, Thierry; Douglas, Carl J.; Legrand, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The precise structure of the sporopollenin polymer that is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall, remains poorly understood. Recently, characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana genes and corresponding enzymes involved in exine formation has demonstrated the role of fatty acid derivatives as precursors of sporopollenin building units. Fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are condensed with malonyl-CoA by POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB to yield α-pyrone polyketides required for exine formation. Here, we show that two closely related genes encoding oxidoreductases are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the reductases displayed a range of pollen exine layer defects, depending on the mutant allele. Phylogenetic studies indicated that the two reductases belong to a large reductase/dehydrogenase gene family and cluster in two distinct clades with putative orthologs from several angiosperm lineages and the moss Physcomitrella patens. Recombinant proteins produced in bacteria reduced the carbonyl function of tetraketide α-pyrone compounds synthesized by PKSA/B, and the proteins were therefore named TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 (previously called DRL1 and CCRL6, respectively). TKPR activities, together with those of ACOS5 and PKSA/B, identify a conserved biosynthetic pathway leading to hydroxylated α-pyrone compounds that were previously unknown to be sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193572

  20. Life at the boundary: photosynthesis at the soil-fluid interface. A synthesis focusing on mosses.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Colmer, Timothy D

    2016-03-01

    Mosses are among the earliest branching embryophytes and probably originated not later than the early Ordovician when atmospheric CO2 was higher and O2 was lower than today. The C3 biochemistry and physiology of their photosynthesis suggests, by analogy with tracheophytes, that growth of extant bryophytes in high CO2 approximating Ordovician values would increase the growth rate. This occurs for many mosses, including Physcomitrella patens in suspension culture, although recently published transcriptomic data on this species at high CO2 and present-day CO2 show down-regulation of the transcription of several genes related to photosynthesis. It would be useful if transcriptomic (and proteomic) data comparing growth conditions are linked to measurements of growth and physiology on the same, or parallel, cultures. Mosses (like later-originating embryophytes) have been subject to changes in bulk atmospheric CO2 and O2 throughout their existence, with evidence, albeit limited, for positive selection of moss Rubisco. Extant mosses are subject to a large range of CO2 and O2 concentrations in their immediate environments, especially aquatic mosses, and mosses are particularly influenced by CO2 generated by, and O2 consumed by, soil chemoorganotrophy from organic C produced by tracheophytes (if present) and bryophytes.

  1. Polyamine biosynthetic diversity in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Fuell, Christine; Elliott, Katherine A; Hanfrey, Colin C; Franceschetti, Marina; Michael, Anthony J

    2010-07-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis in plants differs from other eukaryotes because of the contribution of genes from the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast. Plants possess an additional biosynthetic route for putrescine formation from arginine, consisting of the enzymes arginine decarboxylase, agmatine iminohydrolase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase, derived from the cyanobacterial ancestor. They also synthesize an unusual tetraamine, thermospermine, that has important developmental roles and which is evolutionarily more ancient than spermine in plants and algae. Single-celled green algae have lost the arginine route and are dependent, like other eukaryotes, on putrescine biosynthesis from the ornithine. Some plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens have lost ornithine decarboxylase and are thus dependent on the arginine route. With its dependence on the arginine route, and the pivotal role of thermospermine in growth and development, Arabidopsis represents the most specifically plant mode of polyamine biosynthesis amongst eukaryotes. A number of plants and algae are also able to synthesize unusual polyamines such as norspermidine, norspermine and longer polyamines, and biosynthesis of these amines likely depends on novel aminopropyltransferases similar to thermospermine synthase, with relaxed substrate specificity. Plants have a rich repertoire of polyamine-based secondary metabolites, including alkaloids and hydroxycinnamic amides, and a number of polyamine-acylating enzymes have been recently characterised. With the genetic tools available for Arabidopsis and other model plants and algae, and the increasing capabilities of comparative genomics, the biological roles of polyamines can now be addressed across the plant evolutionary lineage.

  2. Novel fatty acid elongases and their use for the reconstitution of docosahexaenoic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Astrid; Kirsch, Helene; Domergue, Frédéric; Abbadi, Amine; Sperling, Petra; Bauer, Jörg; Cirpus, Petra; Zank, Thorsten K; Moreau, Hervé; Roscoe, Thomas J; Zähringer, Ulrich; Heinz, Ernst

    2004-10-01

    In algae, the biosynthesis of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6omega3; DHA) proceeds via the elongation of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5omega3; EPA) to 22:5omega3, which is required as a substrate for the final Delta4 desaturation. To isolate the elongase specific for this step, we searched expressed sequence tag and genomic databases from the algae Ostreococcus tauri and Thalassiosira pseudonana, from the fish Oncorhynchus mykiss, from the frog Xenopus laevis, and from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis using as a query the elongase sequence PpPSE1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens. The open reading frames of the identified elongase candidates were expressed in yeast for functional characterization. By this, we identified two types of elongases from O. tauri and T. pseudonana: one specific for the elongation of (Delta6-)C18-PUFAs and one specific for (Delta5-)C20-PUFAs, showing highest activity with EPA. The clones isolated from O. mykiss, X. laevis, and C. intestinalis accepted both C18- and C20-PUFAs. By coexpression of the Delta6- and Delta5-elongases from T. pseudonana and O. tauri, respectively, with the Delta5- and Delta4-desaturases from two other algae we successfully implemented DHA synthesis in stearidonic acid-fed yeast. This may be considered an encouraging first step in future efforts to implement this biosynthetic sequence into transgenic oilseed crops.

  3. Is membrane occupation and recognition nexus domain functional in plant phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases?

    PubMed

    Mikami, Koji; Saavedra, Laura; Sommarin, Marianne

    2010-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) catalyzes a key step controlling cellular contents of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], a critical intracellular messenger involved in vesicle trafficking and modulation of actin cytoskeleton and also a substrate of phospholipase C to produce the two intracellular messengers, diacylglycerol and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. In addition to the conserved C-terminal PIPK catalytic domain, plant PIPKs contain a unique structural feature consisting of a repeat of membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN) motifs, called the MORN domain, in the N-terminal half. The MORN domain has previously been proposed to regulate plasma membrane localization and phosphatidic acid (PA)-inducible activation. Recently, the importance of the catalytic domain, but not the MORN domain, in these aspects was demonstrated. These conflicting data raise the question about the function of the MORN domain in plant PIPKs. We therefore performed analyses of PpPIPK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens to elucidate the importance of the MORN domain in the control of enzymatic activity; however, we found no effect on either enzymatic activity or activation by PA. Taken together with our previous findings of lack of function in plasma membrane localization, there is no positive evidence indicating roles of the MORN domain in enzymatic and functional regulations of PpPIPK1. Therefore, further biochemical and reverse genetic analyses are necessary to understand the biological significance of the MORN domain in plant PIPKs.

  4. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-11

    The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1-3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions-from nutrient acquisition to reproduction-derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6-9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10-12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water.

  5. Evolution of photoprotection mechanisms upon land colonization: evidence of PSBS-dependent NPQ in late Streptophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Gerotto, Caterina; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2013-12-01

    Light is the energy source for photosynthetic organisms but, if absorbed in excess, it can drive to the formation of reactive oxygen species and photoinhibition. One major mechanism to avoid oxidative damage in plants and algae is the dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat, called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Eukaryotic algae and plants, however, rely on two different proteins for NPQ activation, the former mainly depending on LHCSR (Lhc-like protein Stress Related; previously called Li818, Light Induced protein 818), whereas in the latter the major role is played by a distinct protein, PSBS (photosystem II subunit S). In the moss Physcomitrella patens, which diverged from vascular plants early after land colonization, both these proteins were found to be present and active in inducing NPQ, suggesting that during plants evolution both mechanisms co-existed. In order to investigate in more detail NPQ adaptation toward land colonization, we analyzed Streptophyte algae, the latest organisms to diverge from the land plants ancestors. Among them we found evidence of a PSBS-dependent NPQ in species belonging to Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, the latest groups to diverge from land plants ancestors. On the contrary earlier diverging algae, as Mesostigmatales and Klebsormidiales, likely rely on LHCSR for their NPQ activation. Presented evidence thus suggests that PSBS-dependent NPQ, although possibly present in some Chlorophyta, was stably acquired in the Cambrian period about 500 million years ago, before late Streptophyte algae diverged from plants ancestors.

  6. Molecular evolution and gene expression differences within the HD-Zip transcription factor family of Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hude; Yu, Lijuan; Li, Zhanjie; Liu, Hui; Han, Ran

    2016-04-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factors regulate developmental processes and stress responses in plants, and they vary widely in gene number and family structure. In this study, 55 predicted maize HD-Zip genes were systematically analyzed with respect to their phylogenetic relationships, molecular evolution, and gene expression in order to understand the functional diversification within the family. Phylogenetic analysis of HD-Zip proteins from Zea mays, Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera, and Physcomitrella patens showed that they group into four classes. We inferred that the copy numbers of classes I and III genes were relatively conserved in all five species. The 55 maize HD-Zip genes are distributed randomly on the ten chromosomes, with 15 segmental duplication and 4 tandem duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplications were the major contributors in the expansion of the maize HD-Zip gene family. Expression analysis of the 55 maize HD-Zip genes in different tissues and drought conditions revealed differences in the expression levels and patterns between the four classes. Promoter analysis revealed that a number of stress response-, hormone response-, light response-, and development-related cis-acting elements were present in their promoters. Our results provide novel insights into the molecular evolution and gene expression within the HD-Zip gene family in maize, and provide a solid foundation for future functional study of the HD-Zip genes in maize.

  7. Conservation of Male Sterility 2 function during spore and pollen wall development supports an evolutionarily early recruitment of a core component in the sporopollenin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Simon; Chater, Caspar C; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Cuming, Andrew C; Wellman, Charles H; Beerling, David J; Fleming, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The early evolution of plants required the acquisition of a number of key adaptations to overcome physiological difficulties associated with survival on land. One of these was a tough sporopollenin wall that enclosed reproductive propagules and provided protection from desiccation and UV-B radiation. All land plants possess such walled spores (or their derived homologue, pollen). We took a reverse genetics approach, consisting of knock-out and complementation experiments to test the functional conservation of the sporopollenin-associated gene MALE STERILTY 2 (which is essential for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis thaliana) in the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. Knock-outs of a putative moss homologue of the A. thaliana MS2 gene, which is highly expressed in the moss sporophyte, led to spores with highly defective walls comparable to that observed in the A. thaliana ms2 mutant, and extremely compromised germination. Conversely, the moss MS2 gene could not rescue the A. thaliana ms2 phenotype. The results presented here suggest that a core component of the biochemical and developmental pathway required for angiosperm pollen wall development was recruited early in land plant evolution but the continued increase in pollen wall complexity observed in angiosperms has been accompanied by divergence in MS2 gene function.

  8. Quantitative imaging of directional transport through plasmodesmata in moss protonemata via single-cell photoconversion of Dendra2.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Munenori; Fujita, Tomomichi

    2013-07-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of molecules in plants must be properly regulated for plant growth and development. One specialized mechanism that plants have evolved involves transport through plasmodesmata (PD), but when and how transport of molecules via PD is regulated among individual cells remains largely unknown, particularly at the single-cell level. Here, we developed a tool for quantitatively analyzing cell-to-cell transport via PD at a single-cell level using protonemata of Physcomitrella patens and a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, Dendra2. In the filamentous protonemal tissues, one-dimensional intercellular communication can be observed easily. Using this system, we found that Dendra2 was directionally transported toward the apex of the growing protonemata. However, this directional transport could be eliminated by incubation in the dark or treatment with a metabolic inhibitor. Thus, we propose that directional transport of macromolecules can occur via PD in moss protonemata, and may be affected by the photosynthetic and metabolic activity of cells.

  9. Live-cell visualization of excitation energy dynamics in chloroplast thylakoid structures

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Masakazu; Yokono, Makio; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Ichihara, Akira; Nakano, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    The intricate molecular processes underlying photosynthesis have long been studied using various analytic approaches. However, the three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of such photosynthetic processes remain unexplored due to technological limitations related to investigating intraorganellar mechanisms in vivo. By developing a system for high-speed 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy combined with high-sensitivity multiple-channel detection, we visualized excitation energy dynamics in thylakoid structures within chloroplasts of live Physcomitrella patens cells. Two distinct thylakoid structures in the chloroplast, namely the grana and stroma lamellae, were visualized three-dimensionally in live cells. The simultaneous detection of the shorter (than ~670 nm) and longer (than ~680 nm) wavelength regions of chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence reveals different spatial characteristics—irregular and vertical structures, respectively. Spectroscopic analyses showed that the shorter and longer wavelength regions of Chl fluorescence are affected more by free light-harvesting antenna proteins and photosystem II supercomplexes, respectively. The high-speed 3D time-lapse imaging of the shorter and longer wavelength regions also reveals different structural dynamics—rapid and slow movements within 1.5 seconds, respectively. Such structural dynamics of the two wavelength regions of Chl fluorescence would indicate excitation energy dynamics between light-harvesting antenna proteins and photosystems, reflecting the energetically active nature of photosynthetic proteins in thylakoid membranes. PMID:27416900

  10. Targeted gene disruption identifies three PPR-DYW proteins involved in RNA editing for five editing sites of the moss mitochondrial transcripts.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shotaro; Ichinose, Mizuho; Tasaki, Eiji; Aoki, Yoshiaki; Komura, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Mamoru

    2010-11-01

    In plant organelles, RNA editing frequently occurs in many transcripts, but little is known about its molecular mechanism. Eleven RNA editing sites are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens mitochondria. Recently PpPPR_71, one member of 10 DYW-subclass pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR-DYW) proteins, has been identified as a site-specific recognition factor for RNA editing in the mitochondrial transcript. In this study, we disrupted three genes encoding a PPR-DYW protein-PpPPR_56, PpPPR_77, and PpPPR_91-to investigate whether they are involved in RNA editing. Transient expression of an N-terminal amino acid sequence fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) suggests that the three PPR-DYW proteins are targeted to mitochondria. Disruption of each gene by homologous recombination revealed that PpPPR_56 was involved in RNA editing at the nad3 and nad4 sites, PpPPR_77 at the cox2 and cox3 sites, and PpPPR_91 at the nad5-2 site in the mitochondrial transcripts. The nucleotide sequences surrounding the two editing sites targeted by a single PPR-DYW protein share 42 to 56% of their identities. Thus, moss PPR-DYW proteins seem to be site-specific factors for RNA editing in mitochondrial transcripts.

  11. Peculiar Evolutionary History of miR390-Guided TAS3-Like Genes in Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krasnikova, Maria S.; Goryunov, Denis V.; Troitsky, Alexey V.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Ozerova, Lydmila V.; Morozov, Sergey Y.

    2013-01-01

    PCR-based approach was used as a phylogenetic profiling tool to probe genomic DNA samples from representatives of evolutionary distant moss taxa, namely, classes Bryopsida, Tetraphidopsida, Polytrichopsida, Andreaeopsida, and Sphagnopsida. We found relatives of all Physcomitrella patens miR390 and TAS3-like loci in these plant taxa excluding Sphagnopsida. Importantly, cloning and sequencing of Marchantia polymorpha genomic DNA showed miR390 and TAS3-like sequences which were also found among genomic reads of M. polymorpha at NCBI database. Our data suggest that the ancient plant miR390-dependent TAS molecular machinery firstly evolved to target AP2-like mRNAs in Marchantiophyta and only then both ARF- and AP2-specific mRNAs in mosses. The presented analysis shows that moss TAS3 families may undergone losses of tasiAP2 sites during evolution toward ferns and seed plants. These data confirm that miR390-guided genes coding for ARF- and AP2-specific ta-siRNAs have been gradually changed during land plant evolution. PMID:24302881

  12. Choice of tracks, microtubules and/or actin filaments for chloroplast photo-movement is differentially controlled by phytochrome and a blue light receptor.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Wada, M; Kadota, A

    2001-01-01

    Light induced chloroplast movement has been studied as a model system for photoreception and actin microfilament (MF)-based intracellular motilities in plants. Chloroplast photo-accumulation and -avoidance movement is mediated by phytochrome as well as blue light (BL) receptor in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here we report the discovery of an involvement of a microtubule (MT)-based system in addition to an MF-based system in photorelocation of chloroplasts in this moss. In the dark, MTs provided tracks for rapid movement of chloroplasts in a longitudinal direction and MFs contributed the tracks for slow movement in any direction. We found that phytochrome responses utilized only the MT-based system, while BL responses had an alternative way of moving, either along MTs or MFs. MT-based systems were mediated by both photoreceptors, but chloroplasts showed movements with different velocity and pattern between them. No apparent difference in the behavior of chloroplast movement between the accumulation and avoidance movement was detected in phytochrome responses or BL responses, except for the direction of the movement. The results presented here demonstrate that chloroplasts use both MTs and MFs for motility and that phytochrome and a BL receptor control directional photo-movement of chloroplasts through the differential regulation of these motile systems.

  13. In Vivo Identification of Photosystem II Light Harvesting Complexes Interacting with PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT S1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Cinzia; Arrigoni, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Light is the primary energy source for photosynthetic organisms, but in excess, it can generate reactive oxygen species and lead to cell damage. Plants evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate light use efficiency depending on illumination intensity to thrive in a highly dynamic natural environment. One of the main mechanisms for protection from intense illumination is the dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat, a process called nonphotochemical quenching. In plants, nonphotochemical quenching induction depends on the generation of a pH gradient across thylakoid membranes and on the presence of a protein called PHOTOSYSTEM II SUBUNIT S (PSBS). Here, we generated Physcomitrella patens lines expressing histidine-tagged PSBS that were exploited to purify the native protein by affinity chromatography. The mild conditions used in the purification allowed copurifying PSBS with its interactors, which were identified by mass spectrometry analysis to be mainly photosystem II antenna proteins, such as LIGHT-HARVESTING COMPLEX B (LHCB). PSBS interaction with other proteins appears to be promiscuous and not exclusive, although the major proteins copurified with PSBS were components of the LHCII trimers (LHCB3 and LHCBM). These results provide evidence of a physical interaction between specific photosystem II light-harvesting complexes and PSBS in the thylakoids, suggesting that these subunits are major players in heat dissipation of excess energy. PMID:26069151

  14. Heterotrophic Production of Omega-3 Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids by Trophically Converted Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Mary L.; Powers, Stephen; Napier, Johnathan A.; Sayanova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    We have created via metabolic engineering a heterotrophic strain of Phaeodactylum tricornutum that accumulates enhanced levels of the high value omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFAs) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). This was achieved by generation of transgenic strains in which the Δ5-elongase from Ostreococcus tauri was co-expressed with a glucose transporter from the moss Physcomitrella patens. This double transformant has the capacity to grow in the dark in liquid medium supplemented with glucose and accumulate substantial levels of omega-3 LC-PUFAs. The effects of glucose concentrations on growth and LC-PUFA production of wild type and transformed strains cultivated in the light and dark were studied. The highest omega-3 LC-PUFAs accumulation was observed in cultures grown under mixotrophic conditions in the presence of 1% glucose (up to 32.2% of total fatty acids, TFA). Both DHA and EPA are detected at high levels in the neutral lipids of transgenic cells grown under phototrophic conditions, averaging 36.5% and 23.6% of TFA, respectively. This study demonstrates the potential for P. tricornutum to be developed as a viable commercial strain for both EPA and DHA production under mixo- and heterotrophic conditions. PMID:27005636

  15. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-05

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+).

  16. ABA in bryophytes: how a universal growth regulator in life became a plant hormone?

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Kenji; Sakata, Yoichi

    2011-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is not a plant-specific compound but one found in organisms across kingdoms from bacteria to animals, suggesting that it is a ubiquitous and versatile substance that can modulate physiological functions of various organisms. Recent studies have shown that plants developed an elegant system for ABA sensing and early signal transduction mechanisms to modulate responses to environmental stresses for survival in terrestrial conditions. ABA-induced increase in stress tolerance has been reported not only in vascular plants but also in non-vascular bryophytes. Since bryophytes are the key group of organisms in the context of plant evolution, clarification of their ABA-dependent processes is important for understanding evolutionary adaptation of land plants. Molecular approaches using Physcomitrella patens have revealed that ABA plays a role in dehydration stress tolerance in mosses, which comprise a major group of bryophytes. Furthermore, we recently reported that signaling machinery for ABA responses is also conserved in liverworts, representing the most basal members of extant land plant lineage. Conservation of the mechanism for ABA sensing and responses in angiosperms and basal land plants suggests that acquisition of this mechanism for stress tolerance in vegetative tissues was one of the critical evolutionary events for adaptation to the land. This review describes the role of ABA in basal land plants as well as non-land plant organisms and further elaborates on recent progress in molecular studies of model bryophytes by comparative and functional genomic approaches.

  17. Differential proteomics of dehydration and rehydration in bryophytes: evidence towards a common desiccation tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cruz DE Carvalho, Ricardo; Bernardes DA Silva, Anabela; Soares, Renata; Almeida, André M; Coelho, Ana Varela; Marques DA Silva, Jorge; Branquinho, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    All bryophytes evolved desiccation tolerance (DT) mechanisms during the invasion of terrestrial habitats by early land plants. Are these DT mechanisms still present in bryophytes that colonize aquatic habitats? The aquatic bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. was subjected to two drying regimes and alterations in protein profiles and sucrose accumulation during dehydration and rehydration were investigated. Results show that during fast dehydration, there is very little variation in protein profiles, and upon rehydration proteins are leaked. On the other hand, slow dehydration induces changes in both dehydration and rehydration protein profiles, being similar to the protein profiles displayed by the terrestrial bryophytes Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch and Schimp. and, to what is comparable with Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F. Weber and D. Mohr. During dehydration there was a reduction in proteins associated with photosynthesis and the cytoskeleton, and an associated accumulation of proteins involved in sugar metabolism and plant defence mechanisms. Upon rehydration, protein accumulation patterns return to control values for both photosynthesis and cytoskeleton whereas proteins associated with sugar metabolism and defence proteins remain high. The current results suggest that bryophytes from different ecological adaptations may share common DT mechanisms.

  18. The role of the DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (DOF) transcription factor family in plants.

    PubMed

    Noguero, Mélanie; Atif, Rana Muhammad; Ochatt, Sergio; Thompson, Richard D

    2013-08-01

    The DOF (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) family of transcription factors is involved in many fundamental processes in higher plants, including responses to light and phytohormones as well as roles in seed maturation and germination. DOF transcription factor genes are restricted in their distribution to plants, where they are in many copies in both gymnosperms and angiosperms and also present in lower plants such as the moss Physcomitrella patens and in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which possesses a single DOF gene. DOF transcription factors bind to their promoter targets at the consensus sequence AAAG. This binding depends upon the presence of the highly conserved DOF domain in the protein. Depending on the target gene, DOF factor binding may activate or repress transcription. DOF factors are expressed in most if not all tissues of higher plants, but frequently appear to be functionally redundant. Recent next-generation sequencing data provide a more comprehensive survey of the distribution of DOF sequence classes among plant species and within tissue types, and clues as to the evolution of functions assumed by this transcription factor family. DOFs do not appear to be implicated in the initial differentiation of the plant body plan into organs via the resolution of meristematic zones, in contrast to MADS-box and homeobox transcription factors, which are found in other non-plant eukaryotes, and this may reflect a more recent evolutionary origin.

  19. The family of DOF transcription factors: from green unicellular algae to vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Risueno, Miguel Angel; Martínez, Manuel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Carbonero, Pilar

    2007-04-01

    This article deals with the origin and evolution of the DOF transcription factor family through a phylogenetic analysis of those DOF sequences identified from a variety of representative organisms from different taxonomic groups: the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the moss Physcomitrella patens, the fern Selaginella moellendorffii, the gymnosperm Pinus taeda, the dicotyledoneous Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocotyledoneous angiosperms Oryza sativa and Hordeum vulgare. In barley, we have identified 26 different DOF genes by sequence analyses of clones isolated from the screening of genomic libraries and of ESTs, whereas a single DOF gene was identified by bioinformatics searches in the Chlamydomonas genome. The phylogenetic analysis groups all these genes into six major clusters of orthologs originated from a primary basal grade. Our results suggest that duplications of an ancestral DOF, probably formed in the photosynthetic eukaryotic ancestor, followed by subsequent neo-, sub-functionalization and pseudogenization processes would have triggered the expansion of the DOF family. Loss, acquisition and shuffling of conserved motifs among the new DOFs likely underlie the mechanism of formation of the distinct subfamilies.

  20. A Dibasic Amino Acid Pair Conserved in the Activation Loop Directs Plasma Membrane Localization and Is Necessary for Activity of Plant Type I/II Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Koji; Saavedra, Laura; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Uji, Toshiki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Sommarin, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) is an enzyme involved in the regulation of cellular levels of phosphoinositides involved in various physiological processes, such as cytoskeletal organization, ion channel activation, and vesicle trafficking. In animals, research has focused on the modes of activation and function of PIPKs, providing an understanding of the importance of plasma membrane localization. However, it still remains unclear how this issue is regulated in plant PIPKs. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain, which contains the activation loop, is sufficient for plasma membrane localization of PpPIPK1, a type I/II B PIPK from the moss Physcomitrella patens. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain for plasma membrane localization was confirmed with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtPIP5K1. Our findings, in which substitution of a conserved dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop of PpPIPK1 completely prevented plasma membrane targeting and abolished enzymatic activity, demonstrate its critical role in these processes. Placing our results in the context of studies of eukaryotic PIPKs led us to conclude that the function of the dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop in type I/II PIPKs is plant specific. PMID:20427464

  1. Dynamic Interplay between Nucleoid Segregation and Genome Integrity in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Odahara, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Nishimura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast (cp) genome is organized as nucleoids that are dispersed throughout the cp stroma. Previously, a cp homolog of bacterial recombinase RecA (cpRECA) was shown to be involved in the maintenance of cp genome integrity by repairing damaged chloroplast DNA and by suppressing aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here, overexpression and knockdown analysis of cpRECA in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed that cpRECA was involved in cp nucleoid dynamics as well as having a role in maintaining cp genome integrity. Overexpression of cpRECA tagged with yellow fluorescent protein or hemagglutinin resulted in the formation of giant filamentous structures that colocalized exclusively to chloroplast DNA and cpRECA localized to cp nucleoids in a heterogenous manner. Knockdown of cpRECA led to a significant reduction in cp nucleoid number that was accompanied by nucleoid enlargement. This phenotype resembled those of gyrase inhibitor-treated cells and monokaryotic chloroplast mutant cells and suggested that cpRECA was involved in organizing cp nucleoid dynamics. The cp genome also was destabilized by induced recombination between short dispersed repeats in cpRECA-knockdown cells and gyrase inhibitor-treated cells. Taken together, these results suggest that cpRECA and gyrase are both involved in nucleoid dynamics and the maintenance of genome integrity and that the mechanisms underlying these processes may be intimately related in C. reinhardtii cps. PMID:27756821

  2. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Jie; Wang, Wei; Yang, Hai-Ling; Li, Yue; Kang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana). In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA) can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants.

  3. A family of ROP proteins that suppresses actin dynamics, and is essential for polarized growth and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Graham M; Baskin, Tobias I; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2015-07-15

    In plants, the ROP family of small GTPases has been implicated in the polarized growth of tip-growing cells, such as root hairs and pollen tubes; however, most of the data derive from overexpressing ROP genes or constitutively active and dominant-negative isoforms, whereas confirmation by using loss-of-function studies has generally been lacking. Here, in the model moss Physcomitrella patens, we study ROP signaling during tip growth by using a loss-of-function approach based on RNA interference (RNAi) to silence the entire moss ROP family. We find that plants with reduced expression of ROP genes, in addition to failing to initiate tip growth, have perturbed cell wall staining, reduced cell adhesion and have increased actin-filament dynamics. Although plants subjected to RNAi against the ROP family also have reduced microtubule dynamics, this reduction is not specific to loss of ROP genes, as it occurs when actin function is compromised chemically or genetically. Our data suggest that ROP proteins polarize the actin cytoskeleton by suppressing actin-filament dynamics, leading to an increase in actin filaments at the site of polarized secretion.

  4. Peculiar evolutionary history of miR390-guided TAS3-like genes in land plants.

    PubMed

    Krasnikova, Maria S; Goryunov, Denis V; Troitsky, Alexey V; Solovyev, Andrey G; Ozerova, Lydmila V; Morozov, Sergey Y

    2013-01-01

    PCR-based approach was used as a phylogenetic profiling tool to probe genomic DNA samples from representatives of evolutionary distant moss taxa, namely, classes Bryopsida, Tetraphidopsida, Polytrichopsida, Andreaeopsida, and Sphagnopsida. We found relatives of all Physcomitrella patens miR390 and TAS3-like loci in these plant taxa excluding Sphagnopsida. Importantly, cloning and sequencing of Marchantia polymorpha genomic DNA showed miR390 and TAS3-like sequences which were also found among genomic reads of M. polymorpha at NCBI database. Our data suggest that the ancient plant miR390-dependent TAS molecular machinery firstly evolved to target AP2-like mRNAs in Marchantiophyta and only then both ARF- and AP2-specific mRNAs in mosses. The presented analysis shows that moss TAS3 families may undergone losses of tasiAP2 sites during evolution toward ferns and seed plants. These data confirm that miR390-guided genes coding for ARF- and AP2-specific ta-siRNAs have been gradually changed during land plant evolution.

  5. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Jie; Wang, Wei; Yang, Hai-Ling; Li, Yue; Kang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana). In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA) can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants. PMID:26684301

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from moss, lycophyte and vascular plant lineages reveals that GRAS genes arose and underwent substantial diversification in the ancestral lineage common to bryophytes and vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    GRAS genes are a large family of streptophyte specific transcription factors that function in a diverse set of physiological and developmental processes. GRAS proteins of the HAIRY MERISTEM (HAM) sub-family are required for maintenance of shoot and root indeterminacy. The transcriptional targets of HAM proteins and the signaling inputs regulating HAM activity are completely unknown. Understanding the relationship of HAM proteins to other members of the GRAS family may inform hypotheses relating to cellular level HAM functions. Here I report a phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins employing the complete set of known and probable GRAS proteins from the sequenced genomes of the flowering plants Arabidopsis and Rice, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. HAM proteins are most closely related to DELLA proteins, key components of gibberellin perception. However, GRAS proteins diversified into a minimum of 12 discreet monophyletic lineages, including the HAM and DELLA subfamilies, prior to divergence of the moss and flowering plant lineages. Substantial diversification of GRAS proteins at so early a point in land plant evolution suggests that relative relatedness among GRAS protein sub-families may not substantially reflect shared protein function. PMID:21543899

  7. Evolutionary origin of phytochrome responses and signaling in land plants.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keisuke; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2017-01-18

    Phytochromes comprise one of the major photoreceptor families in plants, and they regulate many aspects of plant growth and development throughout the plant life cycle. A canonical land plant phytochrome originated in the common ancestor of streptophytes. Phytochromes have diversified in seed plants and some basal land plants because of lineage-specific gene duplications that occurred during the course of land plant evolution. Molecular genetic analyses using Arabidopsis thaliana suggested that there are two types of phytochromes in angiosperms, light-labile type I and light-stable type II, which have different signaling mechanisms and which regulate distinct responses. In basal land plants, little is known about molecular mechanisms of phytochrome signaling, although red light/far-red photoreversible physiological responses and the distribution of phytochrome genes are relatively well documented. Recent advances in molecular genetics using the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha revealed that basal land plants show far-red-induced responses and that the establishment of phytochrome-mediated transcriptional regulation dates back to at least the common ancestor of land plants. In this review, we summarize our knowledge concerning functions of land plant phytochromes, especially in basal land plants, and discuss subfunctionalization/neofunctionalization of phytochrome signaling during the course of land plant evolution.

  8. Plasma Membrane Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Calcium Channels Control Land Plant Thermal Sensing and Acquired Thermotolerance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Finka, Andrija; Cuendet, America Farinia Henriquez; Maathuis, Frans J.M.; Saidi, Younousse; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Typically at dawn on a hot summer day, land plants need precise molecular thermometers to sense harmless increments in the ambient temperature to induce a timely heat shock response (HSR) and accumulate protective heat shock proteins in anticipation of harmful temperatures at mid-day. Here, we found that the cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel (CNGC) CNGCb gene from Physcomitrella patens and its Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog CNGC2, encode a component of cyclic nucleotide gated Ca2+ channels that act as the primary thermosensors of land plant cells. Disruption of CNGCb or CNGC2 produced a hyper-thermosensitive phenotype, giving rise to an HSR and acquired thermotolerance at significantly milder heat-priming treatments than in wild-type plants. In an aequorin-expressing moss, CNGCb loss-of-function caused a hyper-thermoresponsive Ca2+ influx and altered Ca2+ signaling. Patch clamp recordings on moss protoplasts showed the presence of three distinct thermoresponsive Ca2+ channels in wild-type cells. Deletion of CNGCb led to a total absence of one and increased the open probability of the remaining two thermoresponsive Ca2+ channels. Thus, CNGC2 and CNGCb are expected to form heteromeric Ca2+ channels with other related CNGCs. These channels in the plasma membrane respond to increments in the ambient temperature by triggering an optimal HSR, leading to the onset of plant acquired thermotolerance. PMID:22904147

  9. Convergent evolution of shoots in land plants: lack of auxin polar transport in moss shoots.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomomichi; Sakaguchi, Hisako; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Wagstaff, Steven J; Ito, Motomi; Deguchi, Hironori; Sato, Toshiyuki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2008-01-01

    The shoot is a repeated structure made up of stems and leaves and is the basic body plan in land plants. Vascular plants form a shoot in the diploid generation, whereas nonvascular plants such as mosses form a shoot in the haploid generation. It is not clear whether all land plants use similar molecular mechanisms in shoot development or how the genetic networks for shoot development evolved. The control of auxin distribution, especially by polar auxin transport, is essential for shoot development in flowering plants. We did not detect polar auxin transport in the gametophytic shoots of several mosses, but did detect it in the sporophytes of mosses without shoot structure. Treatment with auxin transport inhibitors resulted in abnormal embryo development, as in flowering plants, but did not cause any morphological changes in the haploid shoots. We fused the soybean auxin-inducible promoter GH3 with a GUS reporter gene and used it to indirectly detect auxin distribution in the moss Physcomitrella patens. An auxin transport inhibitor NPA did not cause any changes in the putative distribution of auxin in the haploid shoot. These results indicate that polar auxin transport is not involved in haploid shoot development in mosses and that shoots in vascular plants and mosses are most likely regulated differently during development.

  10. Calmodulin-binding proteins in bryophytes: identification of abscisic acid-, cold-, and osmotic stress-induced genes encoding novel membrane-bound transporter-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Daisuke; Minami, Anzu

    2004-04-30

    Plant responses to environmental stresses are mediated in part by signaling processes involving cytosolic Ca2+ and a Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. Screening with radiolabeled calmodulin of a cDNA library of the moss Physcomitrella patens resulted in identification of genes encoding novel membrane transporter-like proteins, MCamb1 and MCamb2. These proteins each had a central hydrophobic domain with two putative membrane spans and N- and C-terminal hydrophilic domains, and showed sequence similarity to mammalian inward rectifier potassium channels. Calmodulin binds to MCamb1 and MCamb2 via interaction with basic amphiphilic amino acids in the C-terminal domain. Levels of MCamb1 and MCamb2 transcripts increased dramatically following treatment with low temperature, hyperosmotic solutes, and the stress hormone abscisic acid, all of which were previously shown to increase cellular tolerance to freezing stress. These results suggest that calmodulin participates in cellular signaling events leading to enhancement of stress resistance through regulation of novel transporter-like proteins.

  11. Highly Active and Specific Tyrosine Ammonia-Lyases from Diverse Origins Enable Enhanced Production of Aromatic Compounds in Bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Li, Mingji; Gaspar, Paula; Siedler, Solvej; Förster, Jochen; Maury, Jérôme; Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2015-07-01

    Phenylalanine and tyrosine ammonia-lyases form cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, which are precursors of a wide range of aromatic compounds of biotechnological interest. Lack of highly active and specific tyrosine ammonia-lyases has previously been a limitation in metabolic engineering approaches. We therefore identified 22 sequences in silico using synteny information and aiming for sequence divergence. We performed a comparative in vivo study, expressing the genes intracellularly in bacteria and yeast. When produced heterologously, some enzymes resulted in significantly higher production of p-coumaric acid in several different industrially important production organisms. Three novel enzymes were found to have activity exclusively for phenylalanine, including an enzyme from the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Brevibacillus laterosporus, a bacterial-type enzyme from the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, and a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from the moss Physcomitrella patens (producing 230 μM cinnamic acid per unit of optical density at 600 nm [OD600]) in the medium using Escherichia coli as the heterologous host). Novel tyrosine ammonia-lyases having higher reported substrate specificity than previously characterized enzymes were also identified. Enzymes from Herpetosiphon aurantiacus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae resulted in high production of p-coumaric acid in Escherichia coli (producing 440 μM p-coumaric acid OD600 unit(-1) in the medium) and in Lactococcus lactis. The enzymes were also efficient in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where p-coumaric acid accumulation was improved 5-fold over that in strains expressing previously characterized tyrosine ammonia-lyases.

  12. Origin of strigolactones in the green lineage.

    PubMed

    Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Xie, Xiaonan; Timme, Ruth E; Puech-Pages, Virginie; Dunand, Christophe; Lecompte, Emilie; Delwiche, Charles F; Yoneyama, Koichi; Bécard, Guillaume; Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the appearance of strigolactones in the green lineage and to determine the primitive function of these molecules. We measured the strigolactone content of several isolated liverworts, mosses, charophyte and chlorophyte green algae using a sensitive biological assay and LC-MS/MS analyses. In parallel, sequence comparison of strigolactone-related genes and phylogenetic analyses were performed using available genomic data and newly sequenced expressed sequence tags. The primitive function of strigolactones was determined by exogenous application of the synthetic strigolactone analog, GR24, and by mutant phenotyping. Liverworts, the most basal Embryophytes and Charales, one of the closest green algal relatives to Embryophytes, produce strigolactones, whereas several other species of green algae do not. We showed that GR24 stimulates rhizoid elongation of Charales, liverworts and mosses, and rescues the phenotype of the strigolactone-deficient Ppccd8 mutant of Physcomitrella patens. These findings demonstrate that the first function of strigolactones was not to promote arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Rather, they suggest that the strigolactones appeared earlier in the streptophyte lineage to control rhizoid elongation. They may have been conserved in basal Embryophytes for this role and then recruited for the stimulation of colonization by glomeromycotan fungi.

  13. HpDTC1, a Stress-Inducible Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase Involved in Momilactone Biosynthesis, Functions in Chemical Defence in the Moss Hypnum plumaeforme

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazunori; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Sho; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Kimura, Honoka; Fujiwara, Kaoru; Natsume, Masahiro; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Hatano, Yuki; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Momilactones, which are diterpenoid phytoalexins with antimicrobial and allelopathic functions, have been found only in rice and the moss Hypnum plumaeforme. Although these two evolutionarily distinct plant species are thought to produce momilactones as a chemical defence, the momilactone biosynthetic pathway in H. plumaeforme has been unclear. Here, we identified a gene encoding syn-pimara-7,15-diene synthase (HpDTC1) responsible for the first step of momilactone biosynthesis in the moss. HpDTC1 is a bifunctional diterpene cyclase that catalyses a two-step cyclization reaction of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to syn-pimara-7,15-diene. HpDTC1 transcription was up-regulated in response to abiotic and biotic stress treatments. HpDTC1 promoter-GUS analysis in transgenic Physcomitrella patens showed similar transcriptional responses as H. plumaeforme to the stresses, suggesting that a common response system to stress exists in mosses. Jasmonic acid (JA), a potent signalling molecule for inducing plant defences, could not activate HpDTC1 expression. In contrast, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, an oxylipin precursor of JA in vascular plants, enhanced HpDTC1 expression and momilactone accumulation, implying that as-yet-unknown oxylipins could regulate momilactone biosynthesis in H. plumaeforme. These results demonstrate the existence of an evolutionarily conserved chemical defence system utilizing momilactones and suggest the molecular basis of the regulation for inductive production of momilactones in H. plumaeforme. PMID:27137939

  14. MADS about MOSS

    PubMed Central

    Singer, SD

    2009-01-01

    Classic MIKC-type MADS-box genes (MIKCc) play diverse and crucial roles in angiosperm development, the most studied and best understood of which is the specification of floral organ identities. To shed light on how the flower evolved, phylogenetic and functional analyses of genes involved in its ontogeny, such as the MIKCc genes, must be undertaken in as broad a selection as possible of plants with disparate ancestries. Since little is known about the functions of these genes in non-seed plants, we investigated the developmental roles of a subset of the MIKCc genes present in the moss, Physcomitrella patens, which is positioned informatively near the base of the land plant evolutionary tree. We observed that transgenic lines possessing an antisense copy of a MIKCc gene characteristically displayed knocked-down expression of the corresponding native MIKCc gene as well as multiple diverse phenotypic alterations to the haploid gametophytic and diploid sporophytic generations of the life cycle.1 In this addendum, we re-examine our findings in the light of recent pertinent literature and provide additional data concerning the effects of simultaneously knocking out multiple MIKCc genes in this moss. PMID:19649183

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from moss, lycophyte and vascular plant lineages reveals that GRAS genes arose and underwent substantial diversification in the ancestral lineage common to bryophytes and vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Eric M

    2011-06-01

    GRAS genes are a large family of streptophyte specific transcription factors that function in a diverse set of physiological and developmental processes. GRAS proteins of the HAIRY MERISTEM (HAM) sub-family are required for maintenance of shoot and root indeterminacy. The transcriptional targets of HAM proteins and the signaling inputs regulating HAM activity are completely unknown. Understanding the relationship of HAM proteins to other members of the GRAS family may inform hypotheses relating to cellular level HAM functions. I here report a phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins employing the complete set of known and probable GRAS proteins from the sequenced genomes of the flowering plants Arabidopsis and Rice, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. HAM proteins are most closely related to DELLA proteins, key components of gibberellin perception. However, GRAS proteins diversified into a minimum of twelve discreet monophyletic lineages, including the HAM and DELLA subfamilies, prior to divergence of the moss and flowering plant lineages. Substantial diversification of GRAS proteins at so early a point in land plant evolution suggests that relative relatedness sequence homology among GRAS proteins sub-families may not substantially reflect shared protein function. 

  16. Identification, expression, and taxonomic distribution of alternative oxidases in non-angiosperm plants.

    PubMed

    Neimanis, Karina; Staples, James F; Hüner, Norman P A; McDonald, Allison E

    2013-09-10

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a terminal ubiquinol oxidase present in the respiratory chain of all angiosperms investigated to date, but AOX distribution in other members of the Viridiplantae is less clear. We assessed the taxonomic distribution of AOX using bioinformatics. Multiple sequence alignments compared AOX proteins and examined amino acid residues involved in AOX catalytic function and post-translational regulation. Novel AOX sequences were found in both Chlorophytes and Streptophytes and we conclude that AOX is widespread in the Viridiplantae. AOX multigene families are common in non-angiosperm plants and the appearance of AOX1 and AOX2 subtypes pre-dates the divergence of the Coniferophyta and Magnoliophyta. Residues involved in AOX catalytic function are highly conserved between Chlorophytes and Streptophytes, while AOX post-translational regulation likely differs in these two lineages. We demonstrate experimentally that an AOX gene is present in the moss Physcomitrella patens and that the gene is transcribed. Our findings suggest that AOX will likely exert an influence on plant respiration and carbon metabolism in non-angiosperms such as green algae, bryophytes, liverworts, lycopods, ferns, gnetophytes, and gymnosperms and that further research in these systems is required.

  17. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-06

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment.

  18. Anomalous motor mediated cargo transport in microtubule networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandal, Steven; Macveigh-Fierro, Daniel; Shen, Zhiyuan; Lemoi, Kyle; Vidali, Luis; Ross, Jennifer; Tuzel, Erkan

    Cargo transport is an important biological mechanism by which cells locomote, self-organize, and actively transport organelles. This transport is mediated by the cytoskeletal network and molecular motors; however, it is not known how network self-organization and dynamics affect these transport processes. In order to develop a mechanistic understanding of cargo transport, we use a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that incorporates the dynamics of these networks, as well as experimentally determined motor properties. We will test these models with two experimental systems: (1) in vitro microtubule networks with kinesin-1 motors, and quantum dot cargos on recreated microtubule networks, and (2) an excellent model organism, the moss Physcomitrella patens, in which chloroplasts are transported via the microtubule network by means of kinesin-like proteins. Phenomenological network characterizations are made, both in vivo and in vitro, and cargo motility is characterized using Mean Squared Displacement (MSD) measurements. Our simulations shed light on the role of network density and motor properties on the observed transport behavior, and improve our understanding of cargo transport in cells.

  19. Tomato Cutin Deficient 1 (CD1) and putative orthologs comprise an ancient family of cutin synthase-like (CUS) proteins that are conserved among land plants.

    PubMed

    Yeats, Trevor H; Huang, Wenlin; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Viart, Hélène M-F; Clausen, Mads H; Stark, Ruth E; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-03-01

    The aerial epidermis of all land plants is covered with a hydrophobic cuticle that provides essential protection from desiccation, and so its evolution is believed to have been prerequisite for terrestrial colonization. A major structural component of apparently all plant cuticles is cutin, a polyester of hydroxy fatty acids; however, despite its ubiquity, the details of cutin polymeric structure and the mechanisms of its formation and remodeling are not well understood. We recently reported that cutin polymerization in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit occurs via transesterification of hydroxyacylglycerol precursors, catalyzed by the GDSL-motif lipase/hydrolase family protein (GDSL) Cutin Deficient 1 (CD1). Here, we present additional biochemical characterization of CD1 and putative orthologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens, which represent a distinct clade of cutin synthases within the large GDSL superfamily. We demonstrate that members of this ancient and conserved family of cutin synthase-like (CUS) proteins act as polyester synthases with negligible hydrolytic activity. Moreover, solution-state NMR analysis indicates that CD1 catalyzes the formation of primarily linear cutin oligomeric products in vitro. These results reveal a conserved mechanism of cutin polyester synthesis in land plants, and suggest that elaborations of the linear polymer, such as branching or cross-linking, may require additional, as yet unknown, factors.

  20. A subfamily of putative cytokinin receptors is revealed by an analysis of the evolution of the two-component signaling system of plants.

    PubMed

    Gruhn, Nijuscha; Halawa, Mhyeddeen; Snel, Berend; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The two-component signaling system--the major signaling pathway of bacteria--is found among higher eukaryotes only in plants, where it regulates diverse processes, such as the signaling of the phytohormone cytokinin. Cytokinin is perceived by a hybrid histidine (His) kinase receptor, and the signal is transduced by a multistep phosphorelay system of His phosphotransfer proteins and different classes of response regulators (RRs). To shed light on the origin and evolution of the two-component signaling system members in plants, we conducted a comprehensive domain-based phylogenetic study across the relevant kingdoms, including Charophyceae algae, the group of green algae giving rise to land plants. Surprisingly, we identified a subfamily of cytokinin receptors with members only from the early diverging land plants Marchantia polymorpha and Physcomitrella patens and then experimentally characterized two members of this subfamily. His phosphotransfer proteins of Charophyceae seemed to be more closely related to land plants than to other groups of green algae. Farther down the signaling pathway, the type-B RRs were found across all plant clades, but many members lack either the canonical Asp residue or the DNA binding domain. In contrast, the type-A RRs seemed to be limited to land plants. Finally, the analysis provided hints that one additional group of RRs, the type-C RRs, might be degenerated receptors and thus, of a different evolutionary origin than bona fide RRs.

  1. A unique RPW8-encoding class of genes that originated in early land plants and evolved through domain fission, fusion, and duplication

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yan; Cheng, Zong-Ming (Max)

    2016-01-01

    Duplication, lateral gene transfer, domain fusion/fission and de novo domain creation play a key role in formation of initial common ancestral protein. Abundant protein diversities are produced by domain rearrangements, including fusions, fissions, duplications, and terminal domain losses. In this report, we explored the origin of the RPW8 domain and examined the domain rearrangements that have driven the evolution of RPW8-encoding genes in land plants. The RPW8 domain first emerged in the early land plant, Physcomitrella patens, and it likely originated de novo from a non-coding sequence or domain divergence after duplication. It was then incorporated into the NBS-LRR protein to create a main sub-class of RPW8-encoding genes, the RPW8-NBS-encoding genes. They evolved by a series of genetic events of domain fissions, fusions, and duplications. Many species-specific duplication events and tandemly duplicated clusters clearly demonstrated that species-specific and tandem duplications played important roles in expansion of RPW8-encoding genes, especially in gymnosperms and species of the Rosaceae. RPW8 domains with greater Ka/Ks values than those of the NBS domains indicated that they evolved faster than the NBS domains in RPW8-NBSs. PMID:27678195

  2. Conserved Roles of CrRLK1L Receptor-Like Kinases in Cell Expansion and Reproduction from Algae to Angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Trigo, Sergio; Gray, Julie E.; Smith, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are regulators of plant development through allowing cells to sense their extracellular environment. They facilitate detection of local endogenous signals, in addition to external biotic and abiotic stimuli. The Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L) protein kinase subfamily, which contains FERONIA, plays a central role in regulating fertilization and in cell expansion mechanisms such as cell elongation and tip growth, as well as having indirect links to plant–pathogen interactions. Several components of CrRLK1L signaling pathways have been identified, including an extracellular ligand, coreceptors, and downstream signaling elements. The presence and abundance of the CrRLK1L proteins in the plant kingdom suggest an origin within the Streptophyta lineage, with a notable increase in prevalence in the seeded land plants. Given the function of the sole CrRLK1L protein in a charophycean alga, the possibility of a conserved role in detection and/or regulation of cell wall integrity throughout the Strephtophytes is discussed. Orthologs of signaling pathway components are also present in extant representatives of non-vascular land plants and early vascular land plants including the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, the moss Physcomitrella patens and the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Deciphering the roles in development of the CrRLK1L protein kinases in early diverging land plants will provide insights into their ancestral function, furthering our understanding of this diversified subfamily of receptors in higher plants. PMID:27621737

  3. 77 FR 11560 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... inhibition of bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ, an enzyme necessary for the replication of bacteria. FtsZ is responsible for Z-ring assembly in bacteria, which leads to bacterial cell division. Highly conserved among all bacteria, FtsZ is a very attractive antimicrobial target. The chrysophaetin...

  4. Molecular evolution of the substrate specificity of ent-kaurene synthases to adapt to gibberellin biosynthesis in land plants.

    PubMed

    Shimane, Manami; Ueno, Yohei; Morisaki, Keiko; Oogami, Shingo; Natsume, Masahiro; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    ent-Kaurene is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of the plant hormone gibberellin. In ent-kaurene biosynthesis in flowering plants, two diterpene cyclases (DTCs), ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CDP) synthase (ent-CPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS), catalyse the cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-CDP and ent-CDP to ent-kaurene, respectively. In contrast, the moss Physcomitrella patens has a bifunctional ent-CPS/KS (PpCPS/KS) that catalyses both cyclization reactions. To gain more insight into the functional diversity of ent-kaurene biosynthetic enzymes in land plants, we focused on DTCs in the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. The present paper describes the characterization of two S. moellendorffii DTCs (SmKS and SmDTC3) in vitro. SmDTC3 converted ent-CDP into ent-16α-hydroxykaurane and also used other CDP stereoisomers as substrate. Remarkably, SmKS, which produces ent-kaurene from ent-CDP, showed similar substrate selectivity: both SmKS and SmDTC3 synthesized sandaracopimaradiene from normal CDP. Therefore, the diversity of substrate recognition among KSs from other plants was investigated. PpCPS/KS could use normal CDP and syn-CDP as well as ent-CDP as substrate. In contrast, lettuce KS showed high specificity for ent-CDP, and rice KS recognized only ent-CDP. Our studies imply that ancient KS having low substrate specificity has evolved to be specific for ent-CDP to the biosynthesis of gibberellin.

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Wood, Andrew J.; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD+- or NADP+-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as ‘aldehyde scavengers’ by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried outgenome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species—including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  6. Molecular phylogenetic study and expression analysis of ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family in Oryza sativa in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Saha, Jayita; Sengupta, Atreyee; Gupta, Kamala; Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter is a large gene superfamily that utilizes the energy released from ATP hydrolysis for transporting myriad of substrates across the biological membranes. Although many investigations have been done on the structural and functional analysis of the ABC transporters in Oryza sativa, much less is known about molecular phylogenetic and global expression pattern of the complete ABC family in rice. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis constructing neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees based on various statistical methods of different ABC protein subfamily of five plant lineages including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Selaginella moellendorffii (lycophyte), Arabidopsis thaliana (dicot) and O. sativa (monocot) to explore the origin and evolutionary patterns of these ABC genes. We have identified several conserved motifs in nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of ABC proteins among all plant lineages during evolution. Amongst the different ABC protein subfamilies, 'ABCE' has not yet been identified in lower plant genomes (algae, moss and lycophytes). The result indicated that gene duplication and diversification process acted upon these genes as a major operative force creating new groups and subgroups and functional divergence during evolution. We have demonstrated that rice ABCI subfamily consists of only half size transporters that represented highly dynamic members showing maximum sequence variations among the other rice ABC subfamilies. The evolutionary and the expression analysis contribute to a deep insight into the evolution and diversity of rice ABC proteins and their roles in response to salt stress that facilitate our further understanding on rice ABC transporters.

  7. Pectin Metabolism and Assembly in the Cell Wall of the Charophyte Green Alga Penium margaritaceum1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Sørensen, Iben; Popper, Zoë A.; Ochs, Julie; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Pielach, Anna; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Ruisi-Besares, Pia; Willats, William G.T.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2014-01-01

    The pectin polymer homogalacturonan (HG) is a major component of land plant cell walls and is especially abundant in the middle lamella. Current models suggest that HG is deposited into the wall as a highly methylesterified polymer, demethylesterified by pectin methylesterase enzymes and cross-linked by calcium ions to form a gel. However, this idea is based largely on indirect evidence and in vitro studies. We took advantage of the wall architecture of the unicellular alga Penium margaritaceum, which forms an elaborate calcium cross-linked HG-rich lattice on its cell surface, to test this model and other aspects of pectin dynamics. Studies of live cells and microscopic imaging of wall domains confirmed that the degree of methylesterification and sufficient levels of calcium are critical for lattice formation in vivo. Pectinase treatments of live cells and immunological studies suggested the presence of another class of pectin polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and indicated its colocalization and structural association with HG. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of the walls of P. margaritaceum, Physcomitrella patens, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) further suggested the conservation of pectin organization and interpolymer associations in the walls of green plants. The individual constituent HG polymers also have a similar size and branched structure to those of embryophytes. The HG-rich lattice of P. margaritaceum, a member of the charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants, was shown to be important for cell adhesion. Therefore, the calcium-HG gel at the cell surface may represent an early evolutionary innovation that paved the way for an adhesive middle lamella in multicellular land plants. PMID:24652345

  8. Expression and evolution of functionally distinct haemoglobin genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Watts, R A; Trevaskis, B; Llewelyn, D J; Burnell, J; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    2001-11-01

    Haemoglobin genes have been found in a number of plant species, but the number of genes known has been too small to allow effective evolutionary inferences. We present nine new non-symbiotic haemoglobin sequences from a range of plants, including class 1 haemoglobins from cotton, Citrus and tomato, class 2 haemoglobins from cotton, tomato, sugar beet and canola and two haemoglobins from the non-vascular plants, Marchantia polymorpha (a liverwort) and Physcomitrella patens (a moss). Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of all currently known non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes and a selection of symbiotic haemoglobins have confirmed the existence of two distinct classes of haemoglobin genes in the dicots. It is likely that all dicots have both class 1 and class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes whereas in monocots we have detected only class 1 genes. The symbiotic haemoglobins from legumes and Casuarina are related to the class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobins, whilst the symbiotic haemoglobin from Parasponia groups with the class 1 non-symbiotic genes. Probably, there have been two independent recruitments of symbiotic haemoglobins. Although the functions of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins remain unknown, their patterns of expression within plants suggest different functions. We examined the expression in transgenic plants of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins from Arabidopsis using promoter fusions to a GUS reporter gene. The Arabidopsis GLB1 and GLB2 genes are likely to be functionally distinct. The class 2 haemoglobin gene (GLB2) is expressed in the roots, leaves and inflorescence and can be induced in young plants by cytokinin treatment in contrast to the class 1 gene (GLB1) which is active in germinating seedlings and can be induced by hypoxia and increased sucrose supply, but not by cytokinin treatment.

  9. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  10. Conserved Organisation of 45S rDNA Sites and rDNA Gene Copy Number among Major Clades of Early Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Kovařík, Aleš; Garilleti, Ricardo; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rDNA) are universal key constituents of eukaryotic genomes, and the nuclear genome harbours hundreds to several thousand copies of each species. Knowledge about the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number provides information for comparative studies of organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. With the exception of seed plants, the range of 45S rDNA locus (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA) and gene copy number variation within key evolutionary plant groups is largely unknown. This is especially true for the three earliest land plant lineages Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses), and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). In this work, we report the extent of rDNA variation in early land plants, assessing the number of 45S rDNA loci and gene copy number in 106 species and 25 species, respectively, of mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Unexpectedly, the results show a narrow range of ribosomal locus variation (one or two 45S rDNA loci) and gene copies not present in vascular plant lineages, where a wide spectrum is recorded. Mutation analysis of whole genomic reads showed higher (3-fold) intragenomic heterogeneity of Marchantia polymorpha (Marchantiophyta) rDNA compared to Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tomentosifomis) suggesting the presence of rDNA pseudogenes in its genome. No association between phylogenetic position, taxonomic adscription and the number of rDNA loci and gene copy number was found. Our results suggest a likely evolutionary rDNA stasis during land colonisation and diversification across 480 myr of bryophyte evolution. We hypothesise that strong selection forces may be acting against ribosomal gene locus amplification. Despite showing a predominant haploid phase and infrequent meiosis, overall rDNA homogeneity is not severely compromised in bryophytes. PMID:27622766

  11. Rice plants expressing the moss sodium pumping ATPase PpENA1 maintain greater biomass production under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Andrew; Ford, Kristina; Kretschmer, Jodie; Tester, Mark

    2011-10-01

    High cytosolic concentrations of Na+ inhibit plant growth and development. To maintain low cytosolic concentrations of Na+ , higher plants use membrane-bound transporters that drive the efflux of Na+ or partition Na+ ions from the cytosol, either to the extracellular compartment or into the vacuole. Bryophytes also use an energy-dependent Na+ pumping ATPase, not found in higher plants, to efflux Na+ . To investigate whether this transporter can increase the salt tolerance of crop plants, Oryza sativa has been transformed with the Physcomitrella patens Na+ pumping ATPase (PpENA1). When grown in solutions containing 50 mm NaCl, plants constitutively expressing the PpENA1 gene are more salt tolerant and produce greater biomass than controls. Transgenics and controls accumulate similar amounts of Na+ in leaf and root tissues under stress, which indicates that the observed tolerance is not because of Na+ exclusion. Moreover, inductively coupled plasma analysis reveals that the concentration of other ions in the transformants and the controls is similar. The transgenic lines are developmentally normal and fertile, and the transgene expression levels remain stable in subsequent generations. GFP reporter fusions, which do not alter the ability of PpENA1 to complement a salt-sensitive yeast mutant, indicate that when it is expressed in plant tissues, the PpENA1 protein is located in the plasma membrane. PpENA1 peptides are found in plasma membrane fractions supporting the plasma membrane targeting. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of PpENA1 as a potential tool for engineering salinity tolerance in important crop species.

  12. Functional Characterization of UDP-apiose Synthases from Bryophytes and Green Algae Provides Insight into the Appearance of Apiose-containing Glycans during Plant Evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, James; Yang, Yiwen; Levy, Shahar; Adelusi, Oluwatoyin Oluwayemi; Hahn, Michael G; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2016-10-07

    Apiose is a branched monosaccharide that is present in the cell wall pectic polysaccharides rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and in numerous plant secondary metabolites. These apiose-containing glycans are synthesized using UDP-apiose as the donor. UDP-apiose (UDP-Api) together with UDP-xylose is formed from UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcA) by UDP-Api synthase (UAS). It was hypothesized that the ability to form Api distinguishes vascular plants from the avascular plants and green algae. UAS from several dicotyledonous plants has been characterized; however, it is not known if avascular plants or green algae produce this enzyme. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of UAS homologs from avascular plants (mosses, liverwort, and hornwort), from streptophyte green algae, and from a monocot (duckweed). The recombinant UAS homologs all form UDP-Api from UDP-glucuronic acid albeit in different amounts. Apiose was detected in aqueous methanolic extracts of these plants. Apiose was detected in duckweed cell walls but not in the walls of the avascular plants and algae. Overexpressing duckweed UAS in the moss Physcomitrella patens led to an increase in the amounts of aqueous methanol-acetonitrile-soluble apiose but did not result in discernible amounts of cell wall-associated apiose. Thus, bryophytes and algae likely lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize apiose-containing cell wall glycans. Nevertheless, these plants may have the ability to form apiosylated secondary metabolites. Our data are the first to provide evidence that the ability to form apiose existed prior to the appearance of rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and provide new insights into the evolution of apiose-containing glycans.

  13. Evolution of GOLDEN2-LIKE gene function in C(3) and C (4) plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Fouracre, Jim; Kelly, Steven; Karki, Shanta; Gowik, Udo; Aubry, Sylvain; Shaw, Michael K; Westhoff, Peter; Slamet-Loedin, Inez H; Quick, W Paul; Hibberd, Julian M; Langdale, Jane A

    2013-02-01

    A pair of GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors is required for normal chloroplast development in land plant species that encompass the range from bryophytes to angiosperms. In the C(4) plant maize, compartmentalized function of the two GLK genes in bundle sheath and mesophyll cells regulates dimorphic chloroplast differentiation, whereas in the C(3) plants Physcomitrella patens and Arabidopsis thaliana the genes act redundantly in all photosynthetic cells. To assess whether the cell-specific function of GLK genes is unique to maize, we analyzed gene expression patterns in the C(4) monocot Sorghum bicolor and C(4) eudicot Cleome gynandra. Compartmentalized expression was observed in S. bicolor, consistent with the development of dimorphic chloroplasts in this species, but not in C. gynandra where bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts are morphologically similar. The generation of single and double mutants demonstrated that GLK genes function redundantly in rice, as in other C(3) plants, despite the fact that GLK gene duplication in monocots preceded the speciation of rice, maize and sorghum. Together with phylogenetic analyses of GLK gene sequences, these data have allowed speculation on the evolutionary trajectory of GLK function. Based on current evidence, most species that retain single GLK genes belong to orders that contain only C(3) species. We therefore propose that the ancestral state is a single GLK gene, and hypothesize that GLK gene duplication enabled sub-functionalization, which in turn enabled cell-specific function in C(4) plants with dimorphic chloroplasts. In this scenario, GLK gene duplication preconditioned the evolution of C(4) physiology that is associated with chloroplast dimorphism.

  14. Characterization of a novel plant PP2C-like protein Ser/Thr phosphatase as a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Daisuke

    2003-09-26

    Protein phosphatases regulated by calmodulin (CaM) mediate the action of intracellular Ca2+ and modulate functions of various target proteins by dephosphorylation. In plants, however, the role of Ca2+ in the regulation of protein dephosphorylation is not well understood due to a lack of information on characteristics of CaM-regulated protein phosphatases. Screening of a cDNA library of the moss Physcomitrella patens by using 35S-labeled calmodulin as a ligand resulted in identification of a gene, PCaMPP, that encodes a protein serine/threonine phosphatase with 373 amino acids. PCaMPP had a catalytic domain with sequence similarity to type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) with six conserved metal-associating amino acid residues and also had an extra C-terminal domain. Recombinant GST fusion proteins of PCaMPP exhibited Mn2+-dependent phosphatase activity, and the activity was inhibited by pyrophosphate and 1 mm Ca2+ but not by okadaic acid, orthovanadate, or beta-glycerophosphate. Furthermore, the PCaMPP activity was increased 1.7-fold by addition of CaM at nanomolar concentrations. CaM binding assays using deletion proteins and a synthetic peptide revealed that the CaM-binding region resides within the basic amphiphilic amino acid region 324-346 in the C-terminal domain. The CaM-binding region had sequence similarity to amino acids in one of three alpha-helices in the C-terminal domain of human PP2Calpha, suggesting a novel role of the C-terminal domains for the phosphatase activity. These results provide the first evidence showing possible regulation of PP2C-related phosphatases by Ca2+/CaM in plants. Genes similar to PCaMPP were found in genomes of various higher plant species, suggesting that PCaMPP-type protein phosphatases are conserved in land plants.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changpin; Chen, Yanbo; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-11-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants, and play key roles in regulatory networks controlling development, metabolism, and stress responses. A total of 125 MYB genes (JcMYB) have been identified in the physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) genome, including 120 2R-type MYB, 4 3R-MYB, and 1 4R-MYB genes. Based on exon-intron arrangement of MYBs from both lower (Physcomitrella patens) and higher (physic nut, Arabidopsis, and rice) plants, we can classify plant MYB genes into ten groups (MI-X), except for MIX genes which are nonexistent in higher plants. We also observed that MVIII genes may be one of the most ancient MYB types which consist of both R2R3- and 3R-MYB genes. Most MYB genes (76.8% in physic nut) belong to the MI group which can be divided into 34 subgroups. The JcMYB genes were nonrandomly distributed on its 11 linkage groups (LGs). The expansion of MYB genes across several subgroups was observed and resulted from genome triplication of ancient dicotyledons and from both ancient and recent tandem duplication events in the physic nut genome. The expression patterns of several MYB duplicates in the physic nut showed differences in four tissues (root, stem, leaf, and seed), and 34 MYB genes responded to at least one abiotic stressor (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation, and nitrogen starvation) in leaves and/or roots based on the data analysis of digital gene expression tags. Overexpression of the JcMYB001 gene in Arabidopsis increased its sensitivity to drought and salinity stresses.

  16. A bifunctional delta-fatty acyl acetylenase/desaturase from the moss Ceratodon purpureus. A new member of the cytochrome b5 superfamily.

    PubMed

    Sperling, P; Lee, M; Girke, T; Zähringer, U; Stymne, S; Heinz, E

    2000-06-01

    Many plant genes have been cloned that encode regioselective desaturases catalyzing the formation of cis-unsaturated fatty acids. However, very few genes have been cloned that encode enzymes catalyzing the formation of the functional groups found in unusual fatty acids (e.g. hydroxy, epoxy or acetylenic fatty acids). Here, we describe the characterization of an acetylenase from the moss Ceratodon purpureus with a regioselectivity differing from the previously described Delta12-acetylenase. The gene encoding this protein, together with a Delta6-desaturase, was cloned by a PCR-based approach with primers derived from conserved regions in Delta5-, Delta6-fatty-acid desaturases and Delta8-sphingolipid desaturases. The proteins that are encoded by the two cloned cDNAs are likely to consist of a N-terminal extension of unknown function, a cytochrome b5-domain, and a C-terminal domain that is similar to acyl lipid desaturases with characteristic histidine boxes. The proteins were highly homologous in sequence to the Delta6-desaturase from the moss Physcomitrella patens. When these two cDNAs were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both transgenic yeast cultures desaturated Delta9-unsaturated C16- and C18-fatty acids by inserting an additional Delta6cis-double bond. One of these transgenic yeast clones was also able to introduce a Delta6-triple bond into gamma-linolenic and stearidonic acid. This resulted in the formation of 9,12,15-(Z,Z,Z)-octadecatrien-6-ynoic acid, the main fatty acid found in C. pupureus. These results demonstrate that the Delta6-acetylenase from C. pupureus is a bifunctional enzyme, which can introduce a Delta6cis-double bond into 9,12,(15)-C18-polyenoic acids as well as converting a Delta6cis-double bond to a Delta6-triple bond.

  17. Small-molecule agonists and antagonists of F-box protein-substrate interactions in auxin perception and signaling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Tan, Xu; Zheng, Ning; Hatate, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yoshio; Kepinski, Stefan; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2008-04-08

    The regulation of gene expression by the hormone auxin is a crucial mechanism in plant development. We have shown that the Arabidopsis F-box protein TIR1 is a receptor for auxin, and our recent structural work has revealed the molecular mechanism of auxin perception. TIR1 is the substrate receptor of the ubiquitin-ligase complex SCF(TIR1). Auxin binding enhances the interaction between TIR1 and its substrates, the Aux/IAA repressors, thereby promoting the ubiquitination and degradation of Aux/IAAs, altering the expression of hundreds of genes. TIR1 is the prototype of a new class of hormone receptor and the first example of an SCF ubiquitin-ligase modulated by a small molecule. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of auxin agonists and antagonists. We show these molecules are specific to TIR1-mediated events in Arabidopsis, and their mode of action in binding to TIR1 is confirmed by x-ray crystallographic analysis. Further, we demonstrate the utility of these probes for the analysis of TIR1-mediated auxin signaling in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Our work not only provides a useful tool for plant chemical biology but also demonstrates an example of a specific small-molecule inhibitor of F-box protein-substrate recruitment. Substrate recognition and subsequent ubiquitination by SCF-type ubiquitin ligases are central to many cellular processes in eukaryotes, and ubiquitin-ligase function is affected in several human diseases. Our work supports the idea that it may be possible to design small-molecule agents to modulate ubiquitin-ligase function therapeutically.

  18. Chloroplast FBPase and SBPase are thioredoxin-linked enzymes with similar architecture but different evolutionary histories

    PubMed Central

    Gütle, Desirée D.; Roret, Thomas; Müller, Stefanie J.; Couturier, Jérémy; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Hecker, Arnaud; Dhalleine, Tiphaine; Buchanan, Bob B.; Reski, Ralf; Einsle, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The Calvin–Benson cycle of carbon dioxide fixation in chloroplasts is controlled by light-dependent redox reactions that target specific enzymes. Of the regulatory members of the cycle, our knowledge of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) is particularly scanty, despite growing evidence for its importance and link to plant productivity. To help fill this gap, we have purified, crystallized, and characterized the recombinant form of the enzyme together with the better studied fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), in both cases from the moss Physcomitrella patens (Pp). Overall, the moss enzymes resembled their counterparts from seed plants, including oligomeric organization—PpSBPase is a dimer, and PpFBPase is a tetramer. The two phosphatases showed striking structural homology to each other, differing primarily in their solvent-exposed surface areas in a manner accounting for their specificity for seven-carbon (sedoheptulose) and six-carbon (fructose) sugar bisphosphate substrates. The two enzymes had a similar redox potential for their regulatory redox-active disulfides (−310 mV for PpSBPase vs. −290 mV for PpFBPase), requirement for Mg2+ and thioredoxin (TRX) specificity (TRX f > TRX m). Previously known to differ in the position and sequence of their regulatory cysteines, the enzymes unexpectedly showed unique evolutionary histories. The FBPase gene originated in bacteria in conjunction with the endosymbiotic event giving rise to mitochondria, whereas SBPase arose from an archaeal gene resident in the eukaryotic host. These findings raise the question of how enzymes with such different evolutionary origins achieved structural similarity and adapted to control by the same light-dependent photosynthetic mechanism—namely ferredoxin, ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase, and thioredoxin. PMID:27226308

  19. Identification and characterization of MYB-bHLH-WD40 regulatory complexes controlling proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits.

    PubMed

    Schaart, Jan G; Dubos, Christian; Romero De La Fuente, Irene; van Houwelingen, Adèle M M L; de Vos, Ric C H; Jonker, Harry H; Xu, Wenjia; Routaboul, Jean-Marc; Lepiniec, Loïc; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruits contain high concentrations of flavonoids. In unripe strawberries, the flavonoids are mainly represented by proanthocyanidins (PAs), while in ripe fruits the red-coloured anthocyanins also accumulate. Most of the structural genes leading to PA biosynthesis in strawberry have been characterized, but no information is available on their transcriptional regulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the expression of the PA biosynthetic genes is specifically induced by a ternary protein complex, composed of AtTT2 (AtMYB123), AtTT8 (AtbHLH042) and AtTTG1 (WD40-repeat protein). A strategy combining yeast-two-hybrid screening and agglomerative hierarchical clustering of transcriptomic and metabolomic data was undertaken to identify strawberry PA regulators. Among the candidate genes isolated, four were similar to AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1 (FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1, respectively) and two encode putative negative regulators (FaMYB5 and FabHLH3∆). Interestingly, FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 were found to complement the tt2-1, tt8-3 and ttg1-1 transparent testa mutants, respectively. In addition, they interacted in yeast and activated the Arabidopsis BANYULS (anthocyanidin reductase) gene promoter when coexpressed in Physcomitrella patens protoplasts. Taken together, these results demonstrated that FaMYB9/FaMYB11, FabHLH3 and FaTTG1 are the respective functional homologues of AtTT2, AtTT8 and AtTTG1, providing new tools for modifying PA content and strawberry fruit quality.

  20. PCoM-DB Update: A Protein Co-Migration Database for Photosynthetic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Saeka; Takahashi, Kaori; Watanabe, Mai; Uchida, Hiroko; Murakami, Akio; Fujita, Tomomichi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-12-22

    The identification of protein complexes is important for the understanding of protein structure and function and the regulation of cellular processes. We used blue-native PAGE and tandem mass spectrometry to identify protein complexes systematically, and built a web database, the protein co-migration database (PCoM-DB, http://pcomdb.lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp/proteins/top), to provide prediction tools for protein complexes. PCoM-DB provides migration profiles for any given protein of interest, and allows users to compare them with migration profiles of other proteins, showing the oligomeric states of proteins and thus identifying potential interaction partners. The initial version of PCoM-DB (launched in January 2013) included protein complex data for Synechocystis whole cells and Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membranes. Here we report PCoM-DB version 2.0, which includes new data sets and analytical tools. Additional data are included from whole cells of the pelagic marine picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus, the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. The Arabidopsis protein data now include data for intact mitochondria, intact chloroplasts, chloroplast stroma and chloroplast envelopes. The new tools comprise a multiple-protein search form and a heat map viewer for protein migration profiles. Users can compare migration profiles of a protein of interest among different organelles or compare migration profiles among different proteins within the same sample. For Arabidopsis proteins, users can compare migration profiles of a protein of interest with putative homologous proteins from non-Arabidopsis organisms. The updated PCoM-DB will help researchers find novel protein complexes and estimate their evolutionary changes in the green lineage.

  1. Regulation of Sulfate Assimilation in Arabidopsis and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    KOPRIVA, STANISLAV

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Sulfate assimilation is a pathway used by prokaryotes, fungi and photosynthetic organisms to convert inorganic sulfate to sulfide, which is further incorporated into carbon skeletons of amino acids to form cysteine or homocysteine. The pathway is highly regulated in a demand-driven manner; however, this regulation is not necessarily identical in various plant species. Therefore, our knowledge of the regulation of sulfate assimilation is reviewed here in detail with emphasis on different plant species. • Scope Although demand-driven control plays an essential role in regulation of sulfate assimilation in all plants, the molecular mechanisms of the regulation and the effects of various treatments on the individual enzymes and metabolites are often different. This review summarizes (1) the molecular regulation of sulfate assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana, especially recent data derived from platform technologies and functional genomics, (2) the co-ordination of sulfate, nitrate and carbon assimilations in Lemna minor, (3) the role of sulfate assimilation and glutathione in plant–Rhizobia symbiosis, (4) the cell-specific distribution of sulfate reduction and glutathione synthesis in C4 plants, (5) the regulation of glutathione biosynthesis in poplar, (6) the knock-out of the adenosine 5′phosphosulfate reductase gene in Physcomitrella patens and identification of 3′-phosphoadenosyl 5′-phosphosulfate reductase in plants, and (7) the sulfur sensing mechanism in green algae. • Conclusions As the molecular mechanisms of regulation of the sulfate assimilation pathway are not known, the role of Arabidopsis as a model plant will be further strengthened. However, this review demonstrates that investigations of other plant species will still be necessary to address specific questions of regulation of sulfur nutrition. PMID:16464881

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of K+ Transporters in Bryophytes, Lycophytes, and Flowering Plants Indicates a Specialization of Vascular Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Porras, Judith Lucia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Benito, Begoña; Haro, Rosario; Sklodowski, Kamil; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alonso; Dreyer, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    As heritage from early evolution, potassium (K+) is absolutely necessary for all living cells. It plays significant roles as stabilizer in metabolism and is important for enzyme activation, stabilization of protein synthesis, and neutralization of negative charges on cellular molecules as proteins and nucleic acids. Land plants even enlarged this spectrum of K+ utilization after having gone ashore, despite the fact that K+ is far less available in their new oligotrophic habitats than in sea water. Inevitably, plant cells had to improve and to develop unique transport systems for K+ accumulation and distribution. In the past two decades a manifold of K+ transporters from flowering plants has been identified at the molecular level. The recently published genome of the fern ally Selaginella moellendorffii now helps in providing a better understanding on the molecular changes involved in the colonization of land and the development of the vasculature and the seeds. In this article we present an inventory of K+ transporters of this lycophyte and pigeonhole them together with their relatives from the moss Physcomitrella patens, the monocotyledon Oryza sativa, and two dicotyledonous species, the herbaceous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the tree Populus trichocarpa. Interestingly, the transition of green plants from an aqueous to a dry environment coincides with a dramatic reduction in the diversity of voltage-gated potassium channels followed by a diversification on the basis of one surviving K+ channel class. The first appearance of K+ release (Kout) channels in S. moellendorffii that were shown in Arabidopsis to be involved in xylem loading and guard cell closure coincides with the specialization of vascular plants and may indicate an important adaptive step. PMID:22876252

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of k(+) transporters in bryophytes, lycophytes, and flowering plants indicates a specialization of vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Porras, Judith Lucia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Benito, Begoña; Haro, Rosario; Sklodowski, Kamil; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alonso; Dreyer, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    As heritage from early evolution, potassium (K(+)) is absolutely necessary for all living cells. It plays significant roles as stabilizer in metabolism and is important for enzyme activation, stabilization of protein synthesis, and neutralization of negative charges on cellular molecules as proteins and nucleic acids. Land plants even enlarged this spectrum of K(+) utilization after having gone ashore, despite the fact that K(+) is far less available in their new oligotrophic habitats than in sea water. Inevitably, plant cells had to improve and to develop unique transport systems for K(+) accumulation and distribution. In the past two decades a manifold of K(+) transporters from flowering plants has been identified at the molecular level. The recently published genome of the fern ally Selaginella moellendorffii now helps in providing a better understanding on the molecular changes involved in the colonization of land and the development of the vasculature and the seeds. In this article we present an inventory of K(+) transporters of this lycophyte and pigeonhole them together with their relatives from the moss Physcomitrella patens, the monocotyledon Oryza sativa, and two dicotyledonous species, the herbaceous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the tree Populus trichocarpa. Interestingly, the transition of green plants from an aqueous to a dry environment coincides with a dramatic reduction in the diversity of voltage-gated potassium channels followed by a diversification on the basis of one surviving K(+) channel class. The first appearance of K(+) release (K(out)) channels in S. moellendorffii that were shown in Arabidopsis to be involved in xylem loading and guard cell closure coincides with the specialization of vascular plants and may indicate an important adaptive step.

  4. Bioinformatics Prediction and Evolution Analysis of Arabinogalactan Proteins in the Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuling; Yan, Chenchao; Li, Huimin; Wu, Wentao; Liu, Yaxue; Wang, Yuqian; Chen, Qin; Ma, Haoli

    2017-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a family of extracellular glycoproteins implicated in plant growth and development. With a rapid growth in the number of genomes sequenced in many plant species, the family members of AGPs can now be predicted to facilitate functional investigation. Building upon previous advances in identifying Arabidopsis AGPs, an integrated strategy of systematical AGP screening for “classical” and “chimeric” family members is proposed in this study. A Python script named Finding-AGP is compiled to find AGP-like sequences and filter AGP candidates under the given thresholds. The primary screening of classical AGPs, Lys-rich classical AGPs, AGP-extensin hybrids, and non-classical AGPs was performed using the existence of signal peptides as a necessary requirement, and BLAST searches were conducted mainly for fasciclin-like, phytocyanin-like and xylogen-like AGPs. Then glycomodule index and partial PAST (Pro, Ala, Ser, and Thr) percentage are adopted to identify AGP candidates. The integrated strategy successfully discovered AGP gene families in 47 plant species and the main results are summarized as follows: (i) AGPs are abundant in angiosperms and many “ancient” AGPs with Ser-Pro repeats are found in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; (ii) Classical AGPs, AG-peptides, and Lys-rich classical AGPs first emerged in Physcomitrella patens, Selaginella moellendorffii, and Picea abies, respectively; (iii) Nine subfamilies of chimeric AGPs are introduced as newly identified chimeric subfamilies similar to fasciclin-like, phytocyanin-like, and xylogen-like AGPs; (iv) The length and amino acid composition of Lys-rich domains are largely variable, indicating an insertion/deletion model during evolution. Our findings provide not only a powerful means to identify AGP gene families but also probable explanations of AGPs in maintaining the plant cell wall and transducing extracellular signals into the cytoplasm. PMID:28184232

  5. Rational design of an auxin antagonist of the SCF(TIR1) auxin receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Neve, Joshua; Hirose, Masakazu; Kuboki, Atsuhito; Shimada, Yukihisa; Kepinski, Stefan; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-03-16

    The plant hormone auxin is a master regulator of plant growth and development. By regulating rates of cell division and elongation and triggering specific patterning events, indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) regulates almost every aspect of plant development. The perception of auxin involves the formation of a ternary complex consisting of an F-box protein of the TIR1/AFB family of auxin receptors, the auxin molecule, and a member the Aux/IAA family of co-repressor proteins. In this study, we identified a potent auxin antagonist, α-(phenylethyl-2-oxo)-IAA, as a lead compound for TIR1/AFB receptors by in silico virtual screening. This molecule was used as the basis for the development of a more potent TIR1 antagonist, auxinole (α-[2,4-dimethylphenylethyl-2-oxo]-IAA), using a structure-based drug design approach. Auxinole binds TIR1 to block the formation of the TIR1-IAA-Aux/IAA complex and so inhibits auxin-responsive gene expression. Molecular docking analysis indicates that the phenyl ring in auxinole would strongly interact with Phe82 of TIR1, a residue that is crucial for Aux/IAA recognition. Consistent with this predicted mode of action, auxinole competitively inhibits various auxin responses in planta. Additionally, auxinole blocks auxin responses of the moss Physcomitrella patens, suggesting activity over a broad range of species. Our works not only substantiates the utility of chemical tools for plant biology but also demonstrates a new class of small molecule inhibitor of protein-protein interactions common to mechanisms of perception of other plant hormones, such as jasmonate, gibberellin, and abscisic acid.

  6. A phylogenetic approach to study the origin and evolution of the CRINKLY4 family

    PubMed Central

    Nikonorova, Natalia; Vu, Lam D.; Czyzewicz, Nathan; Gevaert, Kris; De Smet, Ive

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell communication plays a crucial role in plant growth and development and relies to a large extent on peptide ligand–receptor kinase signaling mechanisms. The CRINKLY4 (CR4) family of receptor-like kinases is involved in a wide range of developmental processes in plants, including mediating columella stem cell identity and differentiation in the Arabidopsis thaliana root tip. Members of the CR4 family contain a signal peptide, an extracellular part, a single-pass transmembrane helix and an intracellular cytoplasmic protein kinase domain. The main distinguishing features of the family are the presence of seven “crinkly” repeats and a TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR RECEPTOR (TNFR)-like domain in the extracellular part. Here, we investigated the evolutionary origin of the CR4 family and explored to what extent members of this family are conserved throughout the green lineage. We identified members of the CR4 family in various dicots and monocots, and also in the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. In addition, we attempted to gain insight in the evolutionary origin of different CR4-specific domains, and we could detect “crinkly” repeat containing proteins already in single celled algae. Finally, we related the presence of likely functional CR4 orthologs to its best described signaling module comprising CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-RELATED 40 (CLE40), WUSCHEL RELATED HOMEOBOX 5 (WOX5), CLAVATA 1 (CLV1), and ARABIDOPSIS CR4 (ACR4), and established that this module likely is already present in bryophytes and lycophytes. PMID:26557128

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Wood, Andrew J; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried out genome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species-including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (