Science.gov

Sample records for physical electrochemistry high

  1. Physical electrochemistry of nanostructured devices.

    PubMed

    Bisquert, Juan

    2008-01-07

    This Perspective reviews recent developments in experimental techniques and conceptual methods applied to the electrochemical properties of metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and organic conductors, such as those used in dye-sensitized solar cells, high-energy batteries, sensors, and electrochromic devices. The aim is to provide a broad view of the interpretation of electrochemical and optoelectrical measurements for semiconductor nanostructures (sintered colloidal particles, nanorods, arrays of quantum dots, etc.) deposited or grown on a conducting substrate. The Fermi level displacement by potentiostatic control causes a broad change of physical properties such as the hopping conductivity, that can be investigated over a very large variation of electron density. In contrast to traditional electrochemistry, we emphasize that in nanostructured devices we must deal with systems that depart heavily from the ideal, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, due to broad distributions of states (energy disorder) and interactions of charge carriers, therefore the electrochemical analysis must be aided by thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. We discuss in detail the most characteristic densities of states, the chemical capacitance, and the transport properties, specially the chemical diffusion coefficient, mobility, and generalized Einstein relation.

  2. (The latest developments of the physical aspects of electrochemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.H.

    1990-09-24

    The author was one of 26 invited lecturers to discuss the latest developments of the physical aspects of electrochemistry. He interacted extensively with other lecturers and many participants from developing countries. He also visited with the Director of the Italian Synchrotron Radiation Source now under construction in Trieste, Italy.

  3. A Conceptual Change Teaching Strategy To Facilitate High School Students' Understanding of Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Chacon, Eleazar

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study that used a teaching strategy based on two teaching experiments which could facilitate students' conceptual understanding of electrochemistry. Involves two sections (n=29 and n=28) of 10th grade high school students in Venezuela. Concludes that the teaching experiments facilitated student understanding of electrochemistry.…

  4. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Electrochemistry of sigma-Bonded Cobalt Corroles in High Oxidation States.

    PubMed

    Will, Stefan; Lex, Johann; Vogel, Emanuel; Adamian, Victor A.; Van Caemelbecke, Eric; Kadish, Karl M.

    1996-09-11

    The synthesis, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and structural characterization of two high-valent phenyl sigma-bonded cobalt corroles containing a central cobalt ion in formal +IV and +V oxidation states is presented. The characterized compounds are represented as phenyl sigma-bonded cobalt corroles, (OEC)Co(C(6)H(5)) and [(OEC)Co(C(6)H(5))]ClO(4), where OEC is the trianion of 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethylcorrole. The electronic distribution in both molecules is discussed in terms of their NMR and EPR spectroscopic data, magnetic susceptibility, and electrochemistry.

  6. Conceptual difficulties experienced by senior high school students of electrochemistry: Electric circuits and oxidation-reduction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, Pamela J.; Treagust, David F.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate students' understanding of electrochemistry following a course of instruction. A list of conceptual and propositional knowledge statements was formulated to identify the knowledge base necessary for students to understand electric circuits and oxidation-reduction equations. The conceptual and propositional knowledge statements provided the framework for the development of a semistructured interview protocol which was administered to 32 students in their final year of high school chemistry. The interview questions about electric circuits revealed that several students in the sample were confused about the nature of electric current both in metallic conductors and in electrolytes. Students studying both physics and chemistry were more confused about current flow in metallic conductors than students who were only studying chemistry. In the section of the interview which focused on oxidation and reduction, many students experienced problems in identifying oxidation-reduction equations. Several misconceptions relating to the inappropriate use of definitions of oxidation and reduction were identified. The data illustrate how students attempted to make sense of the concepts of electrochemistry with the knowledge they had already developed or constructed. The implications of the research are that teachers, curriculum developers, and textbook writers, if they are to minimize potential misconceptions, need to be cognizant of the relationship between physics and chemistry teaching, of the need to test for erroneous preconceptions about current before teaching about electrochemical (galvanic) and electrolytic cells, and of the difficulties experienced by students when using more than one model to explain scientific phenomena.

  7. Electrochemistry-based approaches to low cost, high sensitivity, automated, multiplexed protein immunoassays for cancer diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Chandra K; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Otieno, Brunah A; Tang, Chi; Malla, Spundana; Krause, Colleen E; Rusling, James F

    2016-01-21

    Early detection and reliable diagnostics are keys to effectively design cancer therapies with better prognoses. The simultaneous detection of panels of biomarker proteins holds great promise as a general tool for reliable cancer diagnostics. A major challenge in designing such a panel is to decide upon a coherent group of biomarkers which have higher specificity for a given type of cancer. The second big challenge is to develop test devices to measure these biomarkers quantitatively with high sensitivity and specificity, such that there are no interferences from the complex serum or tissue matrices. Lastly, integrating all these tests into a technology that does not require exclusive training to operate, and can be used at point-of-care (POC) is another potential bottleneck in futuristic cancer diagnostics. In this article, we review electrochemistry-based tools and technologies developed and/or used in our laboratories to construct low-cost microfluidic protein arrays for the highly sensitive detection of a panel of cancer-specific biomarkers with high specificity which at the same time has the potential to be translated into POC applications.

  8. Electrochemistry-based Approaches to Low Cost, High Sensitivity, Automated, Multiplexed Protein Immunoassays for Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Chandra K.; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Otieno, Brunah A.; Tang, Chi; Malla, Spundana; Krause, Colleen E.; Rusling, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and reliable diagnostics are keys to effectively design cancer therapies with better prognoses. Simultaneous detection of panels of biomarker proteins holds great promise as a general tool for reliable cancer diagnostics. A major challenge in designing such a panel is to decide upon a coherent group of biomarkers which have higher specificity for a given type of cancer. The second big challenge is to develop test devices to measure these biomarkers quantitatively with high sensitivity and specificity, such that there are no interferences from the complex serum or tissue matrices. Lastly, integrating all these tests into a technology that doesn’t require exclusive training to operate, and can be used at point-of-care (POC) is another potential bottleneck in futuristic cancer diagnostics. In this article, we review electrochemistry-based tools and technologies developed and/or used in our laboratories to construct low-cost microfluidic protein arrays for highly sensitive detection of the panel of cancer-specific biomarkers with high specificity and at the same time have the potential to be translated into a POC. PMID:26525998

  9. Conceptual Difficulties Experienced by Senior High School Students of Electrochemistry: Electrochemical (Galvanic) and Electrolytic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnett, Pamela J.; Treagust, David F.

    1992-01-01

    This research used semistructured interviews to investigate students' (n=32) understanding of electrochemistry following a 7-9 week course of instruction. Three misconceptions were identified and incorporated with five previously reported into an alternative framework about electric current involving drifting electrons. Also noted was the tendency…

  10. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IN ELECTROCHEMISTRY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS), (*ELECTROCHEMISTRY, OXIDATION, REDUCTION, SULFIDES, PHOSPHINE OXIDES, CATALYSTS , FLUORINE COMPOUNDS, BENZENE, POLAROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS, ADSORPTION, ELECTROLYSIS, ELECTRODES.

  11. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Jack A.; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide–acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  12. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Branch, Jack A; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-12-28

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide-acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs.

  13. Elucidation of the surface characteristics and electrochemistry of high-performance LiNiO2

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Jing; Lin, Feng; Nordlund, Dennis; ...

    2016-02-25

    Phase pure LiNiO2 was prepared using a solid-state method and the optimal synthesis conditions led to a remarkably high capacity of 200 mA h g$-$1 with excellent retention. The combination of bulk and surface characterization elucidated an essential role of the excess Li in phase formation during synthesis and the subsequent electrochemical performance.

  14. High Performance Nano-Crystalline Oxide Fuel Cell Materials. Defects, Structures, Interfaces, Transport, and Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Scott; Poeppelmeier, Ken; Mason, Tom; Marks, Lawrence; Voorhees, Peter

    2016-09-07

    This project addresses fundamental materials challenges in solid oxide electrochemical cells, devices that have a broad range of important energy applications. Although nano-scale mixed ionically and electronically conducting (MIEC) materials provide an important opportunity to improve performance and reduce device operating temperature, durability issues threaten to limit their utility and have remained largely unexplored. Our work has focused on both (1) understanding the fundamental processes related to oxygen transport and surface-vapor reactions in nano-scale MIEC materials, and (2) determining and understanding the key factors that control their long-term stability. Furthermore, materials stability has been explored under the “extreme” conditions encountered in many solid oxide cell applications, i.e, very high or very low effective oxygen pressures, and high current density.

  15. Hydrodynamic electrochemistry: design for a high-speed rotating disk electrode.

    PubMed

    Banks, Craig E; Simm, Andrew O; Bowler, Roger; Dawes, Keith; Compton, Richard G

    2005-03-15

    We report a novel gas-driven high-speed rotating disk electrode (HSRDE). The HSRDE when immersed in an aqueous solution rotates at approximately 650 Hz, generating laminar flow resulting in a diffusion layer, under steady-state conditions, of thickness approximately 2 microm. The use of high-pressure gas to drive the rotator offers significant improvement in electrical noise as compared to conventional mechanically driven devices. The electroanalytical utility of the HSRDE was exemplified by the anodic stripping voltammetry of arsenic(III) at a gold working electrode. The charge under the arsenic stripping peak was found to increase by more than 1 order of magnitude under the enhanced mass transport regime at the HSRDE in comparison to that seen under quiescent conditions.

  16. Performance degradation of high-power lithium-ion cells-Electrochemistry of harvested electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Knuth, J. L.; Dees, D. W.; Bloom, I.; Christophersen, J. P.

    The performance of 18650-type high-power lithium-ion cells is being evaluated as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOEs) Advanced Technology Development (ATD) program. In this article, we present accelerated aging data acquired on 18650-cells containing LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2- or LiNi 0.8Co 0.1Al 0.1O 2-based positive electrodes, MAG-10 graphite-based negative electrodes, and 1.2-M LiPF 6 in EC:EMC (3:7 by wt.) electrolyte. Capacity and impedance data acquired on electrodes harvested from these cells highlight the contributions of the positive and negative electrodes to the degradation of cell performance. We also describe test methodologies used to examine the electrochemical characteristics of the harvested electrodes. Identifying and optimizing cell components responsible for performance degradation should enable the development of new lithium-ion cell chemistries that will meet the 15-year cell calendar life goal established by DOEs FreedomCar initiative.

  17. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  18. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  19. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  20. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  1. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  2. Improving Advanced High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spital, Robin David

    2003-04-01

    A National Research Council study committee recently commissioned a "Physics Panel" to evaluate and make recommendations for improving advanced physics education in American high schools [1]. The Physics Panel recommends the creation of a nationally standardized Newtonian Mechanics Unit that would form the foundation of all advanced physics programs. In a one-year program, the Panel recommends that advanced physics students study at most one other major area of physics, so that sufficient time is available to develop the deep conceptual understanding that is the primary goal of advanced study. The Panel emphasizes that final assessments must be improved to focus on depth of understanding, rather than technical problem-solving skill. The Physics Panel strongly endorses the inclusion of meaningful real-world experiences in advanced physics programs, but believes that traditional "cook-book" laboratory exercises are not worth the enormous amount of time and effort spent on them. The Physics Panel believes that the talent and preparation of teachers are the most important ingredients in effective physics instruction; it therefore calls for a concerted effort by all parts of the physics community to remedy the desperate shortage of highly qualified teachers. [1] Jerry P. Gollub and Robin Spital, "Advanced Physics in the High Schools", Physics Today, May 2002.

  3. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with water-insoluble porphyrin in ionic liquid: direct electrochemistry and highly sensitive amperometric biosensing for trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenwen; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2009-01-01

    A functional composite of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with hematin, a water-insoluble porphyrin, was first prepared in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF(6)]) ionic liquid. The novel composite in ionic liquid was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and showed a pair of direct redox peaks of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple. The composite-[BMIM][PF(6)]-modified glassy carbon electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in neutral media due to the synergic effect among SWNTs, [BMIM][PF(6)], and porphyrin, which led to a highly sensitive and stable amperometric biosensor for TCA with a linear range from 9.0x10(-7) to 1.4x10(-4) M. The detection limit was 3.8x10(-7) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The TCA biosensor had good analytical performance, such as rapid response, good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy, and could be successfully used for the detection of residual TCA in polluted water. The functional composite in ionic liquid provides a facile way to not only obtain the direct electrochemistry of water-insoluble porphyrin, but also construct novel biosensors for monitoring analytes in real environmental samples.

  4. Students' understandings of electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Grady-Morris, Kathryn

    Electrochemistry is considered by students to be a difficult topic in chemistry. This research was a mixed methods study guided by the research question: At the end of a unit of study, what are students' understandings of electrochemistry? The framework of analysis used for the qualitative and quantitative data collected in this study was comprised of three categories: types of knowledge used in problem solving, levels of representation of knowledge in chemistry (macroscopic, symbolic, and particulate), and alternative conceptions. Although individually each of the three categories has been reported in previous studies, the contribution of this study is the inter-relationships among them. Semi-structured, task-based interviews were conducted while students were setting up and operating electrochemical cells in the laboratory, and a two-tiered, multiple-choice diagnostic instrument was designed to identify alternative conceptions that students held at the end of the unit. For familiar problems, those involving routine voltaic cells, students used a working-forwards problem-solving strategy, two or three levels of representation of knowledge during explanations, scored higher on both procedural and conceptual knowledge questions in the diagnostic instrument, and held fewer alternative conceptions related to the operation of these cells. For less familiar problems, those involving non-routine voltaic cells and electrolytic cells, students approached problem-solving with procedural knowledge, used only one level of representation of knowledge when explaining the operation of these cells, scored higher on procedural knowledge than conceptual knowledge questions in the diagnostic instrument, and held a greater number of alternative conceptions. Decision routines that involved memorized formulas and procedures were used to solve both quantitative and qualitative problems and the main source of alternative conceptions in this study was the overgeneralization of theory

  5. Dynamic Electrochemistry: Methodology and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dennis C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature dealing with novel developments or important trends in electrochemistry. Areas examined include mass transfer, electrode kinetics, surface effects, chemically modified electrodes, coulostatic/galvanostatic methods, bioelectrochemistry, spectroelectrochemistry, and electrode instrumentation. Books, textbooks, and literature…

  6. (High energy physics)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    An intense analysis effort on the data we obtained in a seven month run on E704 last year has produced a flood of new results on polarization effects in particle production at 200 GeV/c. We are fortunate to be able to report in detail on those results. Our other Fermilab experiment, E683 (photoproduction of jets) has been delayed an unbelievable amount of time by Fermilab schedule slippages. It was scheduled and ready for beam two years ago As this report is being written, we have been running for two months and are expecting four months of production data taking. In this report we show some of our preliminary results. In addition we are near the end of a six month run on our CERN experiment, NA47 (SMC) which will measure the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron. It is with a sense of relief, mixed with pride, that we report that all the equipment which we constructed for that experiment is currently working as designed. The random coincidence of accelerator schedules has left us slightly dazed, but all experiments are getting done and analyzed in a timely fashion. As members of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration, we have been preparing for the only currently approved experiment at the SSC. Here we report on our scintillating fiber tracker design and simulation activities. In addition we report the results of our investigation of the detector response to heavy Z particles. Since our last report, we have joined the D0 collaboration with the primary aim of contributing to the D0 upgrade over the next few years. It is also important for us to gain experience in collider physics during the period leading up to the SDC turn-on.

  7. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1993-02-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physics-chemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid minedrainage. A novel approach to the study of pyrite aqueous electrochemistry is proposed, based on the use of both synthetic and natural ( i.e. coal-derived) pyrite specimens, the utilization of.pyrite both in the form of micro (i.e. colloidal and subcolloidal) and macro (i.e. rotating ring disk) electrodes, and the application of in-situ direct electroanalytical and spectroelectrochemical characterization techniques. The kinetic study of the reaction between sulfide and ferrous ions in solution suggested that the black species formed initially is FeHS[sup +] intermediate. To farther confirm this mechanism, the experiments aimed at establishing the stoichiometry for the intermediate were carried out thermodynamically with a stopped-flow spectrophotometric technique. The results showed that the mole ratio of H[sup [minus

  8. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  9. High School Physics Teaching Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-04-01

    We divided our high school physics teaching experience into three groups: first year teaching physics, second or third year teaching physics, and four or more years of experience teaching physics. We did this because everything is new for teachers teaching a course for the first time. The second and third time through the course, teachers learn from past experiences and hone their approaches. By the time a teacher is in the fourth year of teaching a course, he or she is more comfortable with the material and better able to understand the ways in which different approaches work with different topics.

  10. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z[degrees] resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s] for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  11. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z{degrees} resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}{gamma}. We also began a major upgrade of the L3 luminosity monitor by replacing PWC chamber by a Si strip system in front of the BGO calorimeters. Finally we have continued our SSC R&D work on BaF{sub 2} by joining the GEM collaboration.

  12. Chelating ionic liquids for reversible zinc electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2013-05-21

    Advanced, high energy-density, metal-air rechargeable batteries, such as zinc-air, are of intense international interest due to their important role in energy storage applications such as electric and hybrid vehicles, and to their ability to deal with the intermittency of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Ionic liquids offer a number of ideal thermal and physical properties as potential electrolytes in such large-scale energy storage applications. We describe here the synthesis and characterisation of a family of novel "chelating" ILs designed to chelate and solubilize the zinc ions to create electrolytes for this type of battery. These are based on quaternary alkoxy alkyl ammonium cations of varying oligo-ether side chains and anions such as p-toluene sulfonate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and dicyanoamides. This work shows that increasing the ether chain length in the cation from two to four oxygens can increase the ionic conductivity and reduce the melting point from 67 °C to 15 °C for the tosylate system. Changing the anion also plays a significant role in the nature of the zinc deposition electrochemistry. We show that zinc can be reversibly deposited from [N(222(20201))][NTf2] and [N(222(202020201))][NTf2] beginning at -1.4 V and -1.7 V vs. SHE, respectively, but not in the case of tosylate based ILs. This indicates that the [NTf2] is a weaker coordinating anion with the zinc cation, compared to the tosylate anion, allowing the coordination of the ether chain to dominate the behavior of the deposition and stripping of zinc ions.

  13. NASA Glenn Research Center Electrochemistry Branch Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Hoberecht, Mark; Reid, Concha

    2010-01-01

    This presentation covers an overview of NASA Glenn's history and heritage in the development of electrochemical systems for aerospace applications. Current programs related to batteries and fuel cells are addressed. Specific areas of focus are Li-ion batteries and Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel cells systems and their development for future Exploration missions. The presentation covers details of current component development efforts for high energy and ultra high energy Li-ion batteries and non-flow-through fuel cell stack and balance of plant development. Electrochemistry Branch capabilities and facilities are also addressed.

  14. Fundamentals and applications of electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    The Voltaic pile, invented here on Lake Como 200 years ago, was a crucial step in the development of electrical engineering. For the first time a controlled and reliable source of electric current was available. The science of electrochemistry developed rapidly and is now a key contributor, not just to energy technology but also, for example, to metallurgy and industrial processes. The basic concepts of electrochemistry are presented, with the practical examples of its application in fuel cells, and with the perspective of the history of the subject.

  15. Mexican High Energy Physics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olivo, J. C.; Napsuciale, M.; Pérez-Angón, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican High Energy Physics Network is one of CONACYT's thematic research networks, created with the aim of increasing the communication and cooperation of the scientific and technology communities of Mexico in strategic areas. In this report we review the evolution, challenges, achievements and opportunities faced by the network.

  16. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  17. Electrochemistry at carbon nanotubes: perspective and issues.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Unwin, Patrick R; Macpherson, Julie V

    2009-12-07

    Electrochemistry at carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a large and growing field, but one in which there is still uncertainty about the fundamental activity of CNTs as electrode materials. On the one hand, there are many reports which focus on the favourable electrochemical properties of CNT electrodes, such as enhanced detection sensitivity, electrocatalytic effects and reduced fouling. On the other hand, other studies suggest that CNTs may be no more electroactive than graphitic powder. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the catalytic nanoparticles from which CNTs are formed may dominate the electrochemical characteristics in some instances. A considerable body of the literature presumes that the CNT sidewall is inert and that edge-plane-graphite-like open ends and defect sites are responsible for the electron transfer activity observed. In contrast, studies of well characterised single-walled nanotube (SWNT) electrodes, either as individual tubes or as two-dimensional networks, suggest sidewall activity. This review highlights how the various discrepancies in CNT electrochemistry may have arisen, by taking a historical view of the field and identifying crucial issues that still need to be solved. When assessing the behaviour of CNT electrodes, it is vitally important that careful consideration is given to the type of CNT used (SWNT or multi-walled), the quality of the material (presence of impurities), the effect of chemical processing steps in the fabrication of electrodes and the experimental arrangements adopted. Understanding these key features is an essential requirement to develop a fundamental understanding of CNT electrochemistry, to allow a wide range of electroanalytical applications, and to move the field forward rationally. As part of this process, high resolution electrochemical and electrical imaging techniques are expected to play a significant role in the future, as well as theoretical developments which examine the fundamentals of electron transfer

  18. Forensic electrochemistry: the electroanalytical sensing of synthetic cathinone-derivatives and their accompanying adulterants in "legal high" products.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jamie P; Metters, Jonathan P; Irving, Craig; Sutcliffe, Oliver B; Banks, Craig E

    2014-01-21

    The production and abuse of new psychoactive substances, known as "legal highs" which mimic traditional drugs of abuse is becoming a global epidemic. Traditional analytical methodologies exist which can provide confirmatory analysis but there is a requirement for an on-the-spot analytical screening tool that could be used to determine whether a substance, or sample matrix contains such legal, or formally "legal highs". In this paper the electrochemical sensing of (±)-methcathinone and related compounds at a range of commercially available electrode substrates is explored. We demonstrate for the first time that this class of "legal highs" are electrochemically active providing a novel sensing protocol based upon their electrochemical oxidation. Screen-printed graphite sensing platforms are favoured due to their proven ability to be mass-produced providing large numbers of reliable and reproducible electrode sensing platforms that preclude the requirement of surface pre-treatment such as mechanical polishing as is the case in the use of solid/re-usable electrode substrates. Additionally they hold potential to be used on-site potentially being the basis of an on-site legal high screening device. Consequently the electroanalytical sensing of (±)-methcathinone (3a), (±)-4′-methylmethcathinone [3b, 4-MMC, (±)-mephedrone] and (±)-4′-methyl-N-ethylcathinone (3c, 4-MEC) is explored using screen-printed sensing platforms with the effect of pH explored upon the analytical response with their analytical efficiency evaluated towards the target legal highs. Interesting at pH values below 6 the voltammetric response quantitatively changes from that of an electrochemically irreversible response to that of a quasi-reversible signature which can be used analytically. It is demonstrated for the first time that the electroanalytical sensing of (±)-methcathinone (3a), (±)-mephedrone (3b) and 4-MEC (3c) are possible with accessible linear ranges found to correspond to 16

  19. Elucidation of the surface characteristics and electrochemistry of high-performance LiNiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing; Lin, Feng; Nordlund, Dennis; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Wang, Feng; Bai, Jianming; Doeff, Marca M.; Tong, Wei

    2016-02-25

    Phase pure LiNiO2 was prepared using a solid-state method and the optimal synthesis conditions led to a remarkably high capacity of 200 mA h g$-$1 with excellent retention. The combination of bulk and surface characterization elucidated an essential role of the excess Li in phase formation during synthesis and the subsequent electrochemical performance.

  20. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  1. Experimental High Energy Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Hohlmann, Marcus

    2016-01-13

    This final report summarizes activities of the Florida Tech High Energy Physics group supported by DOE under grant #DE-SC0008024 during the period June 2012 – March 2015. We focused on one of the main HEP research thrusts at the Energy Frontier by participating in the CMS experiment. We were exploiting the tremendous physics opportunities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and prepared for physics at its planned extension, the High-Luminosity LHC. The effort comprised a physics component with analysis of data from the first LHC run and contributions to the CMS Phase-2 upgrades in the muon endcap system (EMU) for the High-Luminosity LHC. The emphasis of our hardware work was the development of large-area Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) for the CMS forward muon upgrade. We built a production and testing site for such detectors at Florida Tech to complement future chamber production at CERN. The first full-scale CMS GE1/1 chamber prototype ever built outside of CERN was constructed at Florida Tech in summer 2013. We conducted two beam tests with GEM prototype chambers at CERN in 2012 and at FNAL in 2013 and reported the results at conferences and in publications. Principal Investigator Hohlmann served as chair of the collaboration board of the CMS GEM collaboration and as co-coordinator of the GEM detector working group. He edited and authored sections of the detector chapter of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for the GEM muon upgrade, which was approved by the LHCC and the CERN Research Board in 2015. During the course of the TDR approval process, the GEM project was also established as an official subsystem of the muon system by the CMS muon institution board. On the physics side, graduate student Kalakhety performed a Z' search in the dimuon channel with the 2011 and 2012 CMS datasets that utilized 20.6 fb⁻¹ of p-p collisions at √s = 8 TeV. For the dimuon channel alone, the 95% CL lower limits obtained on the mass of a Z' resonance are 2770 GeV for a Z

  2. High School Physics and the Affordable Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Norman L.

    1978-01-01

    Explains how the computer was used in a high school physics course; Project Physics program and individualized study PSSC physics program. Evaluates the capabilities and limitations of a $600 microcomputer system. (GA)

  3. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan C.

    2013-09-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they had begun the post-secondary career at a TYC. Nine percent of the physics undergraduate seniors in 2007 had started their college education at a TYC, and these students differ significantly from those who did not start at a TYC. The two graphs at right depict the high school physics experience for these two groups of students. More than one-fourth of those who started at a TYC did not take physics in high school, and only 18% took AP physics. The 6% of those who did not start at a TYC and did not take physics is consistent with the 5% of high school seniors who attend a school where physics is not offered. Their apparent difference of interest in physics in high school is also evident from their knowledge about AP physics offerings: 25% of those who started at a TYC did not know if AP physics was offered at their high school versus only 5% of those who did not start at a TYC. Since their high school physics experiences were so different, it is likely that something happened in their physics courses at the TYC that captured these students' interest in physics.

  4. European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics, organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society, is a major international conference that reviews biennially since 1971 the state of our knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisbon, and Aachen. Jointly organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, the Vienna University of Technology, and the Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the 23rd edition of this conference took place in Vienna, Austria. Among the topics covered were Accelerators, Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Detector R&D and Data Handling, Education and Outreach, Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries, Heavy Ion Physics, Higgs and New Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Perturbative Field Theory and String Theory, QCD and Hadronic Physics, as well as Top and Electroweak Physics.

  5. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they…

  6. Factors that Prevent Learning in Electrochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen; Marohn, Annette; Harrison, Allan G.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemistry plays an important role in curricula, textbooks, and in everyday life. The purpose of the present study was to identify and understand secondary-school students' problems in learning electrochemistry at an introductory chemistry level. The investigation covered four areas: (a) electrolytes, (b) transport of electric charges in…

  7. Modern aspects of electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Bockris, J.M.; Conway, B.E.; White, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: perspectives in electrochemical physics; modern state of double layer study of solid metals; photoelectrolysis and photoelectrochemical catalysis; electron transfer reactions on oxide-covered metal electrodes; and interfacial electrostatics and electrodynamics in disperse systems.

  8. Modern aspects of electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.E.; Bockris, J.O'M.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This book focuses on topics at the forefront of electrochemical research. Splitting water by electrolysis; splitting water by visible light; the recent development of lithium batteries; theoretical approaches to intercalation; and fundamental concepts of electrode kinetics, particularly as applied to semiconductors are discussed. It is recommended for electrochemists, physical chemists, corrosion scientists, and those working in the fields of analytical chemistry, surface and colloid science, materials science, electrical engineering, and chemical engineering.

  9. Physical Activity Levels in Portuguese High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmeleira, Jose Francisco Filipe; Aldeias, Nuno Micael Carrasqueira; da Graca, Pedro Miguel dos Santos Medeira

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the physical activity (PA) levels of high school Portuguese students during physical education (PE) and investigate the association of PA levels with students' goal orientation and intrinsic motivation. Forty-six students from three high schools participated. Heart rate telemetry and pedometry were used…

  10. Electrochemistry and Spectroelectrochemistry of Luminescent Europium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, Amanda M.; Wang, Zheming; Clark, Sue B.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2016-05-04

    Fast, cost effective, and robust means of detecting and quantifying lanthanides are needed for supporting more efficient tracking within the nuclear, medicinal, and industrial fields. Spectroelectrochemistry (SEC) is a powerful technique combining electrochemistry and spectroscopy that can meet those needs. The primary limitation of SEC as a detection method for lanthanides is their low molar absorptivity in absorbance based measurements and low emission intensities in fluorescence based measurements; both lead to high limits of detection. These limitations can be circumvented by complexing the lanthanides with sensitizing ligands that enhance fluorescence, thereby dropping the limits of detection. Complexation may also stabilize the metal ions in solution and improve the electrochemical reversibility, or Nernstian behavior, of the redox couples. To demonstrate this concept, studies were completed using europium in complexes with four different sensitizing ligands. Initial work indicates Eu in the four complexes studied does display the necessary characteristics for SEC analysis, which was successfully and reproducibly applied to all Eu complexes.

  11. Lithium-sulfur batteries: electrochemistry, materials, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ya-Xia; Xin, Sen; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-12-09

    With the increasing demand for efficient and economic energy storage, Li-S batteries have become attractive candidates for the next-generation high-energy rechargeable Li batteries because of their high theoretical energy density and cost effectiveness. Starting from a brief history of Li-S batteries, this Review introduces the electrochemistry of Li-S batteries, and discusses issues resulting from the electrochemistry, such as the electroactivity and the polysulfide dissolution. To address these critical issues, recent advances in Li-S batteries are summarized, including the S cathode, Li anode, electrolyte, and new designs of Li-S batteries with a metallic Li-free anode. Constructing S molecules confined in the conductive microporous carbon materials to improve the cyclability of Li-S batteries serves as a prospective strategy for the industry in the future.

  12. Development of an Electrochemistry Teaching Sequence using a Phenomenographic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Velazquez, Sorangel

    Electrochemistry is the area of chemistry that studies electron transfer reactions across an interface. Chemistry education researchers have acknowledged that difficulties in electrochemistry instruction arise due to the level of abstraction of the topic, lack of adequate explanations and representations found in textbooks, and a quantitative emphasis in the application of concepts. Studies have identified conceptions (also referred to as misconceptions, alternative conceptions, etc.) about the electrochemical process that transcends academic and preparation levels (e.g., students and instructors) as well as cultural and educational settings. Furthermore, conceptual understanding of the electrochemical process requires comprehension of concepts usually studied in physics such as electric current, resistance and potential and often neglected in introductory chemistry courses. The lack of understanding of physical concepts leads to students. conceptions with regards to the relation between the concepts of redox reactions and electric circuits. The need for instructional materials to promote conceptual understanding of the electrochemical process motivated the development of the electrochemistry teaching sequence presented in this dissertation. Teaching sequences are educational tools that aim to bridge the gap between student conceptions and the scientific acceptable conceptions that instructors expect students to learn. This teaching sequence explicitly addresses known conceptions in electrochemistry and departs from traditional instruction in electrochemistry to reinforce students. previous knowledge in thermodynamics providing the foundation for the explicit relation of redox reactions and electric circuits during electrochemistry instruction. The scientific foundations of the electrochemical process are explained based on the Gibbs free energy (G) involved rather than on the standard redox potential values (E° ox/red) of redox half-reactions. Representations of

  13. High School Physics Offerings by Socioeconomic Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    This fall we have been examining physics classes in U.S. high schools by the principal's assessment of the socioeconomic profile of each school. This month we turn our focus to the distribution of high school physics enrollment across the different types of physics offered. Not only do fewer students take physics at "worse off" schools (see the October issue), but the types of physics courses students take also differs by socioeconomic profile. About 10% of the students taking physics at "worse off" schools take AP and second-year physics; almost 20% of the students at "better off" schools take these courses. At "worse off" schools, a higher proportion of students are enrolled in conceptual courses, including Physics First and regular physics taught using a conceptual textbook. The data we have presented over the last four months suggests that differences in physics taking in high school by blacks and Hispanics are driven, in part, by underlying socioeconomic factors. Other factors, such as the availability of additional seats in physics classes and the ability of teachers to attract students to physics, also impact physics taking. It is unlikely that the racial and ethnic differences in physics taking in high school will decrease unless the underlying factors are addressed.

  14. Coupling Electrochemistry with Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Liu, Pengyuan; Held, Michael A; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2016-04-18

    A new coupling of electrochemistry with mass spectrometry (MS) using probe electrospray ionization (PESI) is presented. Due to the high salt tolerance of PESI, the detection of electrochemical reaction products in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) is realized for the first time. Furthermore, PESI-MS allows the analysis of electrochemical reaction products on different or multiple electrode surfaces. In addition, peptides and proteins fractionated through isoelectric focusing (IEF) in the presence of an external electric field can also be directly analyzed by using PESI-MS, suggesting a new and rapid characterization means for the IEF technique. This study reveals the versatility of EC/PESI-MS, which could have an impact in electrochemistry and bioanalysis fields.

  15. The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 2013 Europhysics conference on High Energy Physics is a biennial conference organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society since 1971. The conference in this series usually attracts 600-700 participants and is one of the worlds largest conferences in this field. The latest conferences in this series were held in Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisabon and Aachen. The conference has parallel, plenary and poster sessions as well as an industrial exhibition. The conference is jointly organised by the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm University, Chalmers University of Technology, Lund University, Uppsala University, Nordita and the Oskar Klein Centre. Topics covered are: Standard Model and Beyond Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Neutrino Physics Flavour Physics CP Violation and Tests of Fundamental Symmetries QCD and Hadronic Physics Heavy Ions Astroparticle Physics High Energy Astrophysics Cosmology Non-perturbative Field Theory String Theory Detectors and Data Handling Accelerator R&D Future Facilities. Special ECFA session 20 July: Particle Physics after the European strategy update

  16. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies.

  17. High school students' perceptions of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checkley, Doug

    There are far fewer high school students enrolled in physics than in chemistry or biology courses within the province of Alberta (Alberta Education, 2007). Students are also completing the highest level math course in larger numbers than those taking physics. It appears that a fear of physics exists within students in our province; this fear seems to be related to a level of difficulty the students associate with physics. Many students either opt to not take physics or enter the course with the expectation of failure. In this study I explored the impact of physics' reputation upon a group of students who chose not to take physics. In addition, I attempted to determine whether the perception of the difficulty of high school physics is accurate. This was done by investigating the perceptions of several students who took physics. I surveyed students from one high school in a small urban school district using group interviews. The students were in grades 10 to 12 and divided into groups of Science 10, Physics 20 and Physics 30 students. The students were interviewed to gain a deeper understanding of what perceptions they have about physics and why they may have them, hoping to identify factors that affect their academic decision to take or not take physics classes. For the students interviewed, I found that the biggest influence on their decisions to take or not take physics was related to their future aspirations. The students were also heavily influenced by their perceptions of physics. The students who took physics claimed that physics was not as difficult as they had believed it to be and they reported that it was interesting, enjoyable and relevant. Those students who had chosen to not take physics perceived it would be difficult, irrelevant and boring. Therefore, a major difference of perception exists between the students who took physics and those that did not.

  18. Ubiquitous trisulfur radical anion: fundamentals and applications in materials science, electrochemistry, analytical chemistry and geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Tristram; Elder, Philip J W

    2013-07-21

    The trisulfur radical anion [S3]˙(-) is well-known from inorganic chemistry textbooks as the blue chromophore in ultramarine blues in which this highly reactive species is trapped in a zeolitic framework. Recent findings have revealed that [S3]˙(-) has a multi-faceted role in a variety of media, including alkali metal-sulfur batteries, aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures, and ionic liquids; it has also been used to detect trace amounts of water in organic solvents. This tutorial review illustrates how various physical techniques are used to identify a reactive species in solution and shows how elucidation of electronic structures can be used to explain spectroscopic and structural properties. Examples of the function of [S3]˙(-) in materials science, electrochemistry, analytical chemistry and geochemistry are used to illustrate the widespread influence of this fundamentally important triatomic sulfur species.

  19. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2016-07-12

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal’s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  20. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard`s High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops.

  1. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard's High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops.

  2. Using Plasma Physics to Enhance the High School Physics Curriculu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J.; Buck, M.; Gekelman, W.; Buck, R.; Spahn, C.; Walker, C.; Layton, W.

    2001-10-01

    Faculty and student members of the Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group (LAPTAG) have constructed a plasma machine on the ULCA. Dr. Gekelman, the faculty advisor, provides information and materials on plasma physics via the Web and lectures to high school faculty and students. Faculty members then transfer the information to students at their respective schools and schedule time for experiments on the machine. A lab manual and curricular materials suitable for high school students is being developed using a lab based, discovery approach. The manual is available as a pdf document on the LAPTAG website (http://coke.physics.ucla.edu/laptag/plasma_exp.dir/laptag_plasma.htm). Introducing plasma physics into the high school curriculum provides a 20th century application of classical physics concepts that support and motivate student interest in physics. Students from LAPTAG schools use state-of-the-art computers, software, and equipment to perform developed labs and to design experiments of their own. Collaboration exists between students and faculty from different schools and the university. Learning physics concepts takes place in the context of a "science community" that realistically demonstrates the scientific process to students.

  3. Phun Physics 4 Phemales: Physics Camp for High School Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chuhee; Gu, Jiyeong; Henriquez, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The department of Physics and Astronomy with the department of Science Education at California State University, Long Beach hosted summer program of ``Phun Physics 4 Phemales (PP4P)'' during summer 2012 and summer 2013 with the support from APS public outreach program. PP4P summer camp was hosted along with a two-week summer science camp, Young Scientists Camp, which has been institutionalized for the last 14 years since 1999. More than 2,500 3rd -8th grade students and 250 teachers have participated in the program. PP4P program provided the tools and support that female high school students need to pursue careers in physics and/or science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) field. This girls-only camp created connections among the girls and built confidence. In addition PP4P program introduced students to key principles in physics by a hands-on lab environment and demonstrated the real-world social impact of physics. In summer 2012, high school girls worked on physics experimental project on electronics and in summer 2013 they worked on the mechanics. I would share our experience in this program and the impact on the female high school students. This work was supported by 2012 Public Outreach and Informing the Public Grants from American Physical Society.

  4. Pulsars and high density physics.

    PubMed

    Hewish, A

    1975-06-13

    In outlining the physics of neutron stars, and my good fortune in stumbling upon them, I hope that I have given some idea of the interest and rewards of extending physics beyond the confines of laboratories. These are good times in which to be an astrophysicist. I am also deeply aware of my debt to all my colleagues in the Cavendish Laboratory. Firstly to Sir Martin Ryle for his unique flair in creating so congenial and stimulating a team in which to work. Secondly to Jocelyn Bell for the care, diligence, and persistence that led to our discovery so early in the scintillation program, and finally to my friends who contributed so generously in many aspects of the work.

  5. Who's Teaching What in High School Physics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    During the 2012-13 school year, approximately 27,000 teachers taught at least one physics course in a U.S. high school. About one-third of those teachers have earned a degree in physics or physics education; the vast majority of the others have earned degrees in a variety of other science fields. About 53,000 physics classes were taught, ranging…

  6. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.

    1992-05-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physicochemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. A novel approach to the study of pyrite aqueous electrochemistry is proposed, based on the use of both synthetic and natural (i.e. coal-derived) pyrite specimens, the utilization of pyrite both in the form of micro (i.e. colloidal and subcolloidal) and macro (i.e. rotating ring disk)-electrodes, and the application of in-situ direct electroanalytical and spectroelectrochemical characterization techniques. Central to this research is the recognition that pyrite is a semiconductor material. (Photo)electrochemical experiments will be conducted to unravel the mechanisms of anodic and cathodic processes such as those associated with pyrite decomposition and the reduction of oxidants such as molecular oxygen and the ferric ion.

  7. High Pressure Particulate Physics Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-26

    models, which are physically based. This new thrust at AFRL/RW is addressing a recommendation made by the Scientific Advisory Board in 2007. 15...I have recommended Photo of 60 mm smooth bore powder gun . 4 Figure 4 Rendering of fully assembled catch tank...obtained by copper wire. In the future x-ray cinematography , line VISAR and time indexed spectroscopy are planned. SECTION III SUMMARY We are

  8. PARTICIPATION IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    White, Christopher

    2012-12-20

    This grant funded experimental and theoretical activities in elementary particles physics at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). The experiments in which IIT faculty collaborated included the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, the MINOS experiment, the Double Chooz experiment, and FNAL E871 - HyperCP experiment. Funds were used to support summer salary for faculty, salary for postdocs, and general support for graduate and undergraduate students. Funds were also used for travel expenses related to these projects and general supplies.

  9. Solvents' Critical Role in Nonaqueous Lithium-Oxygen Battery Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, B D; Bethune, D S; Shelby, R M; Girishkumar, G; Luntz, A C

    2011-05-19

    Among the many important challenges facing the development of Li-air batteries, understanding the electrolyte's role in producing the appropriate reversible electrochemistry (i.e., 2Li(+) + O2 + 2e(-) ↔ Li2O2) is critical. Quantitative differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS), coupled with isotopic labeling of oxygen gas, was used to study Li-O2 electrochemistry in various solvents, including carbonates (typical Li ion battery solvents) and dimethoxyethane (DME). In conjunction with the gas-phase DEMS analysis, electrodeposits formed during discharge on Li-O2 cell cathodes were characterized using ex situ analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Carbonate-based solvents were found to irreversibly decompose upon cell discharge. DME-based cells, however, produced mainly lithium peroxide on discharge. Upon cell charge, the lithium peroxide both decomposed to evolve oxygen and oxidized DME at high potentials. Our results lead to two conclusions; (1) coulometry has to be coupled with quantitative gas consumption and evolution data to properly characterize the rechargeability of Li-air batteries, and (2) chemical and electrochemical electrolyte stability in the presence of lithium peroxide and its intermediates is essential to produce a truly reversible Li-O2 electrochemistry.

  10. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  11. High energy physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world`s highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t{bar t} decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-{mu}-{tau} universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices.

  12. GEANT4: Applications in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Tariq; Zafar, Abrar Ahmed; Hussain, Talib; Rashid, Haris

    2007-02-14

    GEANT4 is a detector simulation toolkit aimed at studying, mainly experimental high energy physics. In this paper we will give an overview of this software with special reference to its applications in high energy physics experiments. A brief of process methods is given. Object-oriented nature of the simulation toolkit is highlighted.

  13. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  14. Korean Physical Society's Physics Camp for High School Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Youngah; Yoon, Jin-Hee

    2005-10-01

    The Women's Committee of the Korean Physical Society organized physics camps during the summers of 2002, 2003, and 2004 for high school girls. The camps give the girls an opportunity to meet and interact with working physicists and enhance smart-girl networking. About 40 students in 10 teams visited excellent laboratories in universities and research institutes located in diverse areas of the country. The girls explored the work going on in each laboratory for a few days and participated in some basic experiments when possible. Afterward they gathered at the on-site camp for oral and poster presentations about what they learned and what they did in the laboratories they visited. Their presentations were evaluated and prizes awarded for outstanding teams. These camps were successful in terms of attracting many enthusiastic girl students and enhancing their interest in physics. The camps also showed the Korean physics community the importance of this kind of activity. To attract many girl students from various regions of the country, the Korean Physical Society co-organized the physics camp with the WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) Center, which has a network system for girl students interested in science and mathematics. The 2004 KPS-ASML-WISE Physics camp was supported by the ASML Foundation in the Netherlands.

  15. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: CERN Link Breathes Life Into Russian Physics.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    2000-10-13

    Without fanfare, 600 Russian scientists here at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory, are playing key roles in building the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a machine that will explore fundamental questions such as why particles have mass, as well as search for exotic new particles whose existence would confirm supersymmetry, a popular theory that aims to unify the four forces of nature. In fact, even though Russia is not one of CERN's 20 member states, most top high-energy physicists in Russia are working on the LHC. Some say their work could prove the salvation of high-energy physics back home.

  16. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  17. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherfoord, John P.; Johns, Kenneth A.; Shupe, Michael A.; Cheu, Elliott C.; Varnes, Erich W.; Dienes, Keith; Su, Shufang; Toussaint, William Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  18. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE PAGES

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  19. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  20. AAPT/NSTA High School Physics Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses development of the American Association of Physics Teachers and National Science Teachers Association (AAPT/NSTA) high school physics examination. Includes sample examination questions and distribution of topics: mechanics (30 percent), waves/optics/sound (20 percent), heat/kinetic theory (10 percent), electricity/magnetism (25 percent),…

  1. Guidelines for High School Physics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Physics Teachers (NJ1), 2002

    2002-01-01

    The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) developed this document as a resource for high school administrators, parents, and teachers who are interested in developing guidelines for physics curriculum and instruction in their school(s). These guidelines reflect the goals of the AAPT, with an emphasis on instructional strategies and…

  2. The Army's High Priority Physical Fitness Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drews, Fred R.

    1984-01-01

    This article explores the importance of physical fitness in the United States Army. The development of expanded fitness assessment and programs is related to health and the prevention of coronary heart disease. Improved physical training programs, improved nutrition, and fundamental research are necessary for maintaining a highly fit and healthy…

  3. Trends in experimental high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

  4. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1992-01-01

    Pyrite synthesis is of interest in many diverse fields, such as geology, fuel processing technology, chemistry, metallurgy, materials science, and so on. Based on fundamental studies of this process, the formation mechanisms of this important sulfide on the earth can be better understood. The studies can also help us to better understand the surface chemistry and electrochemistry of pyrite, thereby assisting in the development of more efficient processes for removal of the sulfide from coal. The work performed during this quarter focuses on the study of the reaction between aqueous sulfide ions and dissolved Fe(II) salts by using a stopped-flow spectrophotometric technique. At a wavelength of 500 mn, no absorption was observed with either aqueous sulfide or dissolved Fe(II) salt alone. However, when the two solutions were mixed, a strong absorbance appeared at the same wavelength. The absorbance-time curve showed that a black material formed at the first few seconds of the reaction, then this material decayed and changed gradually to a lighter dark material within the following several minutes. These processes were pH-dependent. It was more likely to form the black intermediate at the pH range from 7 to 8. This indicates that the reaction between Fe[sup 2+] and HS[sup [minus

  5. Connecting High School Physics Experiences, Outcome Expectations, Physics Identity, and Physics Career Choice: A Gender Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Zahra; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how students' physics identities are shaped by their experiences in high school physics classes and by their career outcome expectations. The theoretical framework focuses on physics identity and includes the dimensions of student performance, competence, recognition by others, and interest. Drawing data from the Persistence…

  6. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  7. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  8. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  9. Graphene-based nanomaterials and their electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials are in the forefront of chemical research. This tutorial review provides an introduction to their electrochemistry, its fundamentals and applications. Selected examples of applications in energy storage and sensing are presented. The synthetic methods for preparing graphenes as well as their materials chemistry are thoroughly discussed, as they have a profound influence on the electronic and electrochemical behavior of graphene-related nanomaterials. Inherent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of graphene nanomaterials is discussed thoroughly. Important application in sensing and energy storage areas are highlighted.

  10. The Mathematics of High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanderakis, Nikos

    2016-10-01

    In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, mathematicians and physical philosophers managed to study, via mathematics, various physical systems of the sublunar world through idealized and simplified models of these systems, constructed with the help of geometry. By analyzing these models, they were able to formulate new concepts, laws and theories of physics and then through models again, to apply these concepts and theories to new physical phenomena and check the results by means of experiment. Students' difficulties with the mathematics of high school physics are well known. Science education research attributes them to inadequately deep understanding of mathematics and mainly to inadequate understanding of the meaning of symbolic mathematical expressions. There seem to be, however, more causes of these difficulties. One of them, not independent from the previous ones, is the complex meaning of the algebraic concepts used in school physics (e.g. variables, parameters, functions), as well as the complexities added by physics itself (e.g. that equations' symbols represent magnitudes with empirical meaning and units instead of pure numbers). Another source of difficulties is that the theories and laws of physics are often applied, via mathematics, to simplified, and idealized physical models of the world and not to the world itself. This concerns not only the applications of basic theories but also all authentic end-of-the-chapter problems. Hence, students have to understand and participate in a complex interplay between physics concepts and theories, physical and mathematical models, and the real world, often without being aware that they are working with models and not directly with the real world.

  11. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  12. [High Energy Physics: Research in high energy physics]. Annual report, FY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1982-12-31

    This report discusses high energy physics research on: Quantum chromodynamics; neutrinos; multiparticle spectrometers; inclusive scattering; Mark III detector; and cascade decays of phi resonances. (LSP)

  13. Examples from Astronomy for High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A formal course in physics is increasingly becoming a standard requirement in the high school curriculum. With that dissemination comes the challenge of reaching and motivating a population that is more diverse in their academic abilities and intrinsic motivation. The abstract nature of pure physics is often made more accessible when motivated by examples from everyday life, and providing copious mathematical as well as conceptual examples has become standard practice in high school physics textbooks. Astronomy is a naturally captivating subject and astronomical examples are often successful in capturing the curiosity of high school students as well as the general population. This project seeks to diversify the range of pedagogical materials available to the high school physics instructor by compiling and publishing specific examples where an astronomical concept can be used to motivate the physics curriculum. This collection of examples will consist of both short problems suitable for daily homework assignments as well as longer project style activities. Collaborations are encouraged and inquiries should be directed to sdieterich at carnegiescience dot edu.This work is funded by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship Program through NSF grant AST-1400680.

  14. Electrochemistry in the General Chemistry Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James Q.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines several ideas on introductory electrochemistry material suitable for college-level general chemistry. These include discussions of conductivity in solids and electrolytes, electrical quantities/properties, electrode potentials, and membrane potentials. Indicates that whatever strategy is used to present this material, the presentation…

  15. [High blood pressure and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Sosner, P; Gremeaux, V; Bosquet, L; Herpin, D

    2014-06-01

    High blood pressure is a frequent pathology with many cardiovascular complications. As highlighted in guidelines, the therapeutic management of hypertension relies on non-pharmacological measures, which are diet and regular physical activity, but both patients and physicians are reluctant to physical activity prescription. To acquire the conviction that physical activity is beneficial, necessary and possible, we can take into account some fundamental and clinical studies, as well as the feedback of our clinical practice. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension contributes to increase this risk. Conversely, regular practice of physical activity decreases very significantly the risk by up to 60%. The acute blood pressure changes during exercise and post-exercise hypotension differs according to the dynamic component (endurance or aerobic and/or strength exercises), but the repetition of the sessions leads to the chronic hypotensive benefit of physical activity. Moreover, physical activity prescription must take into account the assessment of global cardiovascular risk, the control of the hypertension, and the opportunities and desires of the patient in order to promote good adherence and beneficial lifestyle change.

  16. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  17. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  18. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A

    SciTech Connect

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A.; Hanson, G.; Martin, H.; Marshall, T.; Mir, R.; Mouthuy, T.; Ogren, H.; Rust, D.; Teige, S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics under the following experiments: Meson spectroscopy at BNL; dimuon production at FNAL; the DO collider experiment at FNAL; the Mark II experiment at SLC and PEP; the OPAL experiment at CERN; and the superconducting supercollider.

  19. Status of (US) High Energy Physics Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1987-02-01

    The current status of Networking to and between computers used by the High Energy Physics community is discussed. Particular attention is given to developments over the last year and to future prospects. Comparison between the current status and that of two years ago indicates that considerable strides have been made but that much remains to be done to achieve an acceptable level of functionality.

  20. High energy physics, past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    2017-03-01

    At the beginning of last century we witnessed the emergence of new physics, quantum theory and gravitational theory, which gave us correct understanding of the world of atoms and deep insight into the structure of universe we live in. Towards the end of the century, string theory emerged as the most promising candidate to unify these two theories. In this talk, I would like to assert that the understanding of the origin of physical constants, ℏ (Planck constant) for quantum theory, and G (Newton’s gravitational constant) for gravitational theory within the framework of string theory is the key to understanding string theory. Then, I will shift to experimental high energy physics and discuss the necessity of world-wide collaboration in the area of superconducting technology which is essential in constructing the 100 TeV hadron collider.

  1. Electrochemistry of Q-Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randviir, Edward P.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Gómez-Mingot, Maria; Kampouris, Dimitrios K.; Iniesta, Jesús; Banks, Craig E.

    2012-09-01

    A newly synthesised type of graphene, Q-Graphene, has been physically and electrochemically characterised with Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). Interpretation of SEM, TEM and XPS data reveal the material to consist of hollow carbon nanospheres of multi-layer graphene (viz. graphite), which exhibit a total oxygen content of ca. 36.0% (atomic weight via XPS). In addition to the carbon structures present, spherical magnesium oxide particles of <=50 nm in diameter are abundantly present in the sample (ca. 16.2%). Interestingly, although the TEM/SEM images show macroporous carbon structures, Raman spectroscopy shows peaks typically characteristic of graphene, which suggests the material is highly heterogeneous and consists of many types of carbon allotropes. Q-Graphene is electrochemically characterised using both inner-sphere and outer-sphere electrochemical redox probes, namely potassium ferrocyanide(ii), hexaammine-ruthenium(iii) chloride and hexachloroiridate(iii), in addition to the biologically relevant and electroactive analytes, norepinephrine, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and l-ascorbic acid. The electrochemical response of Q-Graphene is benchmarked against edge plane- and basal plane-pyrolytic graphite (EPPG and BPPG respectively), pristine graphene and graphite alternatives. Q-Graphene is found to exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, likely due to its high proportion of folded edges and surface defects, exhibiting a response similar to that of EPPG - which exhibits fast electron transfer rates due to the high proportion of edge plane sites it possesses. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the specific oxygen content plays a pivotal role in dictating the observed electrochemical response, which is analyte dependant. Consequently there is potential for this new member of the graphene family to be beneficially utilised in various electrochemical

  2. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Hector

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1) Λ0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon θ-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of

  3. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  4. Facile synthesis of cuprous oxide nanoparticles by plasma electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Liu, Jiandi; Yue, Guanghui

    2015-09-01

    Cuprous oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by plasma electrochemistry. In the plasma electrochemistry system, plasma was contacted with the solution as one electrode and a Cu plate immersed in the solutions as the counter electrode. NaCl solution was used as the basic electrolyte and glucose was added as a reaction mediator and/or a reducing agent. The plasma created many reducing and oxidizing species which can react with the Cu ions released from the Cu plate in the solution. Cu2O nanoparticles with an average diameter of about 30 nm were formed under the competition of reducing and oxidizing reactions. The results show that the concentration of added glucose strongly affects the properties of the products. Corresponding to high, medium and low concentrations of glucose, the products were, respectively, nanoparticles of amorphous Cu2O, polycrystalline Cu2O, and a mixture of polycrystalline Cu2O and Cu2Cl(OH)3. This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No: 11405144) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant No: 20720150022).

  5. Electrochemistry of Silicon: Instrumentation, Science, Materials and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Volker

    2002-04-01

    Silicon has been and will most probably continue to be the dominant material in semiconductor technology. Although the defect-free silicon single crystal is one of the best understood systems in materails science, its electrochemistry to many people is still a kind of "alchemy". This view is partly due to the interdisciplinary aspects of the topic: Physics meets chemistry at the silicon-electrolyte interface. This book gives a comprehensive overview of this important aspect of silicon technology as well as examples of applications ranging from photonic crystals to biochips. It will serve materials scientists as well as engineers involved in silicon technology as a quick reference with its more than 150 technical tables and diagrams and ca. 1000 references cited for easy access of the original literature.

  6. High-precision arithmetic in mathematical physics

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2015-05-12

    For many scientific calculations, particularly those involving empirical data, IEEE 32-bit floating-point arithmetic produces results of sufficient accuracy, while for other applications IEEE 64-bit floating-point is more appropriate. But for some very demanding applications, even higher levels of precision are often required. Furthermore, this article discusses the challenge of high-precision computation, in the context of mathematical physics, and highlights what facilities are required to support future computation, in light of emerging developments in computer architecture.

  7. High precision modeling for fundamental physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rievers, Benny; Nesemann, Leo; Costea, Adrian; Andres, Michael; Stephan, Ernst P.; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    With growing experimental accuracies and high precision requirements for fundamental physics space missions the needs for accurate numerical modeling techniques are increasing. Motivated by the challenge of length stability in cavities and optical resonators we propose the develop-ment of a high precision modeling tool for the simulation of thermomechanical effects up to a numerical precision of 10-20 . Exemplary calculations for simplified test cases demonstrate the general feasibility of high precision calculations and point out the high complexity of the task. A tool for high precision analysis of complex geometries will have to use new data types, advanced FE solver routines and implement new methods for the evaluation of numerical precision.

  8. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Dart, Eli; Bauerdick, Lothar; Bell, Greg; Ciuffo, Leandro; Dasu, Sridhara; Dattoria, Vince; De, Kaushik; Ernst, Michael; Finkelson, Dale; Gottleib, Steven; Gutsche, Oliver; Habib, Salman; Hoeche, Stefan; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Ibarra, Julio; Johnston, William; Kisner, Theodore; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Luitz, Steffen; Mackenzie, Paul; Maguire, Chales; Metzger, Joe; Monga, Inder; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nielsen, Jason; Price, Larry; Porter, Jeff; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Roser, Rob; Schram, Malachi; Tull, Craig; Watson, Chip; Zurawski, Jason

    2014-03-02

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements needed by instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In August 2013, ESnet and the DOE SC Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Nuclear Physics (NP) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the HEP and NP program offices. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1. The Large Hadron Collider?s ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) and CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments are adopting remote input/output (I/O) as a core component of their data analysis infrastructure. This will significantly increase their demands on the network from both a reliability perspective and a performance perspective. 2. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments (particularly ATLAS and CMS) are working to integrate network awareness into the workflow systems that manage the large number of daily analysis jobs (1 million analysis jobs per day for ATLAS), which are an integral part of the experiments. Collaboration with networking organizations such as ESnet, and the consumption of performance data (e.g., from perfSONAR [PERformance Service Oriented Network monitoring Architecture]) are critical to the success of these efforts. 3. The international aspects of HEP and NP collaborations continue to expand. This includes the LHC experiments, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiments, the Belle II Collaboration, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and others. The international nature of these collaborations makes them heavily

  9. Bipolar electrochemistry: from materials science to motion and beyond.

    PubMed

    Loget, Gabriel; Zigah, Dodzi; Bouffier, Laurent; Sojic, Neso; Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-11-19

    Bipolar electrochemistry, a phenomenon which generates an asymmetric reactivity on the surface of conductive objects in a wireless manner, is an important concept for many purposes, from analysis to materials science as well as for the generation of motion. Chemists have known the basic concept for a long time, but it has recently attracted additional attention, especially in the context of micro- and nanoscience. In this Account, we introduce the fundamentals of bipolar electrochemistry and illustrate its recent applications, with a particular focus on the fields of materials science and dynamic systems. Janus particles, named after the Roman god depicted with two faces, are currently in the heart of many original investigations. These objects exhibit different physicochemical properties on two opposite sides. This makes them a unique class of materials, showing interesting features. They have received increasing attention from the materials science community, since they can be used for a large variety of applications, ranging from sensing to photosplitting of water. So far the great majority of methods developed for the generation of Janus particles breaks the symmetry by using interfaces or surfaces. The consequence is often a low time-space yield, which limits their large scale production. In this context, chemists have successfully used bipolar electrodeposition to break the symmetry. This provides a single-step technique for the bulk production of Janus particles with a high control over the deposit structure and morphology, as well as a significantly improved yield. In this context, researchers have used the bipolar electrodeposition of molecular layers, metals, semiconductors, and insulators at one or both reactive poles of bipolar electrodes to generate a wide range of Janus particles with different size, composition and shape. In using bipolar electrochemistry as a driving force for generating motion, its intrinsic asymmetric reactivity is again the

  10. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S; Strauss, M J; Snow, J; Rizatdinova, F; Abbott, B; Babu, K; Gutierrez, P; Kao, C; Khanov, A; Milton, K A; Neaman, H; H Severini, P Skubic

    2012-02-29

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma's impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the

  11. High school students' physical education conceptual knowledge.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Suzan F

    2004-09-01

    The value of conceptual physical education knowledge has long been acknowledged (American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 1969; Kneer, 1981; NASPE, 1995) yet has not been formally measured or assessed. Seven multiple choice tests with established validity and reliability (Ayers, 2001b) were used to assess the concepts identified in Mohnsen's text (1998). Tests were administered to 3,263 high school students at the schools of 17 NASPE Teachers of the Year in 16 states. On all tests, girls outscored boys, and Caucasians outscored all other racial groups. Examinees' average performance on each test was: motor development (65%), exercise physiology (62%), social psychology (60%), biomechanics (57%), aesthetic experiences (56%), motor learning (53%), and historical perspectives (49%). Analyses of each area determined concepts students knew and did not know.

  12. High energy flare physics group summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  13. Preparation, structure study and electrochemistry of layered H2V3O8 materials: High capacity lithium-ion battery cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sudeep; Bhowmik, Arghya; Pan, Jaysree; Bharadwaj, Mridula Dixit; Mitra, Sagar

    2016-10-01

    The present study explores H2V3O8 as high capacity cathode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIB's). Despite having high discharge capacity, H2V3O8 material suffers from poor electrochemical stability for prolonged cycle life. Ultra-long H2V3O8 nanobelts with ordered crystallographic patterns are synthesized via a hydrothermal process to mitigate this problem. The growth of the crystal is facile along [001] direction, and the most common surface is (001) as suggested by Wulff construction study. Electrochemical performance of H2V3O8 cathode is tested against Li/Li+ at various current rates. At 50 mA g-1current rate, it delivers a discharge capacity of 308 mAh g-1, whereas, at 3000 mA g-1, an initial discharge capacity of 144 mAh g-1 is observed and stabilized at 100 mAh g-1 till 500 cycles. Further, the density functional theory (DFT) based simulations study of both the pristine and lithiated phase of H2V3O8 cathode materials is undertaken. DFT study reveals the presence of hydrogen as hydroxyl unit in the framework of the host. In correlation, the magnetic property of vanadium atoms is examined in detail with through partial density of states (PDOS) calculation during three stage lithiation processes and evaluating various potential steps involved in lithium insertion.

  14. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  15. Modified fractal iron oxide magnetic nanostructure: A novel and high performance platform for redox protein immobilization, direct electrochemistry and bioelectrocatalysis application.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Hasan; Ranjbari, Elias; Amiri-Aref, Mohaddeseh; Hajian, Ali; Ardakani, Yalda Hosseinzadeh; Amidi, Salimeh

    2016-11-15

    A novel biosensing platform based on fractal-pattern of iron oxides magnetic nanostructures (FIOMNs) and mixed hemi/ad-micelle of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was designed for the magnetic immobilization of hemoglobin (Hb) at a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). The FIOMNs was successfully synthesized through hydrothermal approach and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In order to provide guidelines for the mixed hemi/ad-micelle formation, zeta-potential isotherms were investigated. The construction steps of the biosensor were evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Direct electron transfer of Hb incorporated into the biocomposite film was realized with a pair of quasi-reversible redox peak at the formal potential of -0.355V vs. Ag/AgCl attributing to heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple. The results suggested that synergistic functions regarding to the hyper-branched and multidirectional structure of FIOMNs and the dual interaction ability of mixed hemi/ad-micelle array of SDS molecules not only induce an effective electron transfer between the Hb and the underlying electrode (high heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of 2.08s(-1)) but also provide powerful and special microenvironment for the adsorption of the redox proteins. Furthermore, the biosensor displayed an excellent performance to the electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 with a detection limit of 0.48µM and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) value of 44.2µM. The fabricated biosensor represented the features of sensitivity, disposable design, low sample volume, rapid and simple preparation step, and acceptable anti-interferences, which offer great perspectives for the screen-determination of H2O2 in real samples.

  16. Morphology engineering of ZnO nanostructures for high performance supercapacitors: Enhanced electrochemistry of ZnO nanocones compared to ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoli; Yoo, Joung; Lee, Min; Bae, Joonho

    2017-04-06

    In this work, the morphology of ZnO nanostructures is engineered to demonstrate enhanced supercapacitor characteristics of ZnO nanocones (NCs) compared to ZnO nanowires (NWs). ZnO NCs are obtained by chemically etching ZnO NWs. Electrochemical characteristics of ZnO NCs and NWs are extensively investigated to demonstrate morphology dependent capacitive performance of one dimensional ZnO nanostructures. Cyclic voltammetry measurements on these two kind of electrodes in three electrode cell confirms that ZnO NCs exhibit high specific capacitance of 378.5 F g-1 at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1, which is almost twice that of ZnO NWs (191.5 F g-1). The charge-discharge and EIS measurements also clearly results in enhanced capacitive performance of NCs as evidenced by higher specific capacitances and lower internal resistance. Asymmetric spuercapacitors are fabricated using activated carbon (AC) as negative electrode and ZnO NWs and NCs as positive electrodes. The ZnO NC//AC can deliver a maximum specific capacitance of 126 F g-1 at a current density of 1.33 A g-1 with an energy density of 25.2 W h kg-1 at the power density of 896.44 W kg-1. In contrast, ZnO NW//AC displays 63% of capacitance obtained from ZnO NC//AC supercapacitor. The enhanced performances of NCs are attributed to higher surface area of ZnO nanostructures after the morphology is altered from NWs to NCs.

  17. High Voltage in Noble Liquids for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, B.; Bernard, E.; Faham, C. H.; Ito, T. M.; Lundberg, B.; Messina, M.; Monrabal, F.; Pereverzev, S. P.; Resnati, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Soderberg, M.; Strauss, T.; Tomas, A.; Va'vra, J.; Wang, H.

    2014-08-22

    A workshop was held at Fermilab November 8-9, 2013 to discuss the challenges of using high voltage in noble liquids. The participants spanned the fields of neutrino, dark matter, and electric dipole moment physics. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions. This document summarizes the experiences and lessons learned from experiments in these fields at developing high voltage systems in noble liquids.

  18. Seismic Research and High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, J.

    2004-12-01

    Through a series of summer workshops, seismologists at Indiana University have trained secondary physics and earth science teachers in fundamentals of seismology and basic concepts in seismic research. Teachers and students then gain hands on experience in science research through operation of a research quality seismic station sited at the local schools. Physics and earth science students have operated the Northview High School Seismic Station since 1998. Data from the Northview seismometer are stored locally and also transmitted over the Internet to a database at Indiana University. Students have access to local data as well as seismic databases accessible through the Internet to use for research projects. In this presentation, I will describe how these projects have been incorporated into the physics and earth science programs at Northview High School. I will discuss how our teachers and students have benefited from the opportunity to take part in hands-on collaborative scientific research under the guidance of university faculty. In particular, I will describe our participation in a regional seismic network through seismic data acquisition, data analysis using seismological software, and students' experiences in a university-based student research symposium. I reflect on the some of the successes, such as increased student and community interest, resulting from our work with the seismic station. I comment on some of the barriers, such as time constraints and unintended interference from school personnel, to high-school teachers' and students' involvement in scientific research programs. I conclude with a discussion of a successful student seismology project, an examination of blasts from local surface coal mines, that was a finalist in the 2003 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair

  19. GEM Applications Outside High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Serge Duarte

    2013-04-01

    From its invention in 1997, the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has been applied in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Over time however, other applications have also exploited the favorable properties of GEMs. The use of GEMs in these applications will be explained in principle and practice. This paper reviews applications in research, beam instrumentation and homeland security. The detectors described measure neutral radiations such as photons, x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons, as well as all kinds of charged radiation. This paper provides an overview of the still expanding range of possibilities of this versatile detector concept.

  20. Development of an Electrochemistry Teaching Sequence Using a Phenomenographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Velazquez, Sorangel

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemistry is the area of chemistry that studies electron transfer reactions across an interface. Chemistry education researchers have acknowledged that difficulties in electrochemistry instruction arise due to the level of abstraction of the topic, lack of adequate explanations and representations found in textbooks, and a quantitative…

  1. A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-10-13

    This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

  2. Electrochemistry-mass spectrometry in drug metabolism and protein research.

    PubMed

    Permentier, Hjalmar P; Bruins, Andries P; Bischoff, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The combination of electrochemistry coupled on-line to mass spectrometry (EC-MS) forms a powerful analytical technique with unique applications in the fields of drug metabolism and proteomics. In this review the latest developments are surveyed from both instrumental and application perspectives. The limitations and solutions for coupling an electrochemical system to a mass spectrometer are discussed. The electrochemical mimicking of drug metabolism, specifically by Cytochrome P450, is high-lighted as an application with high biomedical relevance. The EC-MS analysis of proteins also has promising new applications for both proteomics research and biomarker discovery. EC-MS has furthermore advantages for improved analyte detection with mass spectrometry, both for small molecules and large biomolecules. Finally, potential future directions of development of the technique are briefly discussed.

  3. The Importance of High School Physics Teachers for Female Students' Physics Identity and Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazari, Zahra; Brewe, Eric; Goertzen, Renee Michelle; Hodapp, Theodore

    2017-02-01

    Given the historic and continued underrepresentation of women in physics, it is important to understand the role that high school physics might play in attracting female students to physics careers. Drawing on data from over 900 female undergraduates in physics, we examine when these women became interested in physics careers and different sources of recognition (important for physics identity development) that may have affected their choices at certain time points. The results provide optimism since many of these female students, even those not previously intending science careers, began to intend physics careers in high school and recognition from high school physics teachers had a significant effect on predicting these intentions.

  4. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, Patrick L.

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances

  5. Electroanalytical Evaluation of Nanoparticles by Nano-impact Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Anahita

    Applications of engineered nanoparticles in electronics, catalysis, solid oxide fuel cells, medicine and sensing continue to increase. Traditionally, nanoparticle systems are characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. These methods are cumbersome and expensive, which limit their routine use for screening purposes. Electrochemistry is a powerful, yet underutilized tool, for the detection and classification of nanoparticles. The first part of this dissertation investigates a recently developed electrochemical method -- nanoparticle collision electrochemistry -- for detection and characterization of nanoparticles. Three independent projects have been described to evaluate the use of this technique for characterizing nanoparticle based systems including: conjugation with biomolecules, interaction with environmental contaminants and fundamental investigation of conformational changes of nanoparticle capping ligands. The thesis reports the first use of nano-impact electrochemistry to quantitatively investigate bioconjugation and biomolecular recognition at conductive nanoparticles. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the potential of this method as a single step, reagentless and label-free technique for the ultra-sensitive detection of biomolecular targets. A fundamental study of biorecognition is important for the development of therapeutics and molecular diagnosis probes in the biomedical, biosensing and biotechnology fields. The second project describes the use of this method as a screening tool of particle reactivity. We study the interaction and adsorption of a toxic environmental metalloid (Arsenic) with metal oxide nanoparticles to extract mechanistic, speciation and loading information. We discuss the potential of this approach to complement or replace costly characterization techniques and enable routine study of nanoparticles and their reactivity. In the third project, we use the nano-impact method to study the pH-dependent conformational changes

  6. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kai, K.

    1986-01-01

    A project for space observations of solar flares for the coming solar maximum phase is briefly described. The main objective is to make a comprehensive study of high energy phenomena of flares through simultaneous imagings in both hard and soft X-rays. The project will be performed with collaboration from US scientists. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) WG of ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences) has extensively discussed future aspects of space observations of high energy phenomena of solar flares based on successful results of the Hinotori mission, and proposed a comprehensive research program for the next solar maximum, called the HESP (SOLAR-A) project. The objective of the HESP project is to make a comprehensive study of both high energy phenomena of flares and quiet structures including pre-flare states, which have been left uncovered by SMM and Hinotori. For such a study simultaneous imagings with better resolutions in space and time in a wide range of energy will be extremely important.

  7. Single Pt nanowire electrode: preparation, electrochemistry, and electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Wu, Qingqing; Jiao, Shoufeng; Xu, Chaodi; Wang, Lun

    2013-04-16

    A single Pt nanowire electrode (SPNE) was fabricated through HF etching process from Pt disk nanoelectrode and an underpotential deposition (UPD) redox replacement technique. The electrochemical experiments showed that SPNE had steady-state electrochemical responses at redox species solution and the mass transfer rates were affected by the lengths and radii of SPNEs. The prepared SPNEs were utilized to examine the oxygen-reduction reaction in a KOH solution to explore the feasibility of electrocatalytic activity of single Pt nanowire and the results showed that the electrocatalytic activity of SPNE was dependent on the surface position of single Pt nanowire: the tip end position is more active than the sidewall position. Meanwhile, the electrocatalytic activity of SPNE was related to the radius of nanowire. These observations are not only important to understand the structure-function relationship in single nanowire level but have significant implications for the synthesis and selection of novel catalysts with high efficiency used in electrochemistry, energy, bioanalysis, etc.

  8. Oxygen electrochemistry as a cornerstone for sustainable energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Katsounaros, Ioannis; Cherevko, Serhiy; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar R; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2014-01-03

    Electrochemistry will play a vital role in creating sustainable energy solutions in the future, particularly for the conversion and storage of electrical into chemical energy in electrolysis cells, and the reverse conversion and utilization of the stored energy in galvanic cells. The common challenge in both processes is the development of-preferably abundant-nanostructured materials that can catalyze the electrochemical reactions of interest with a high rate over a sufficiently long period of time. An overall understanding of the related processes and mechanisms occurring under the operation conditions is a necessity for the rational design of materials that meet these requirements. A promising strategy to develop such an understanding is the investigation of the impact of material properties on reaction activity/selectivity and on catalyst stability under the conditions of operation, as well as the application of complementary in situ techniques for the investigation of catalyst structure and composition.

  9. Facile synthesis of cuprous oxide nanoparticles by plasma electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiandi; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; Xiong, Qing; Yue, Guanghui; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size; Huo Liu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    We report on a simple plasma electrochemistry method for synthesizing cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles in the presence of glucose. In this system, Ar plasma in contact with a NaCl solution was used as one electrode, and a Cu plate was immersed in the solution as the counter electrode. The plasma-solution interaction produced many reducing and oxidizing species which can react with the Cu ions released from the Cu electrode. Cu2O nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 22 +/- 6 nm, were formed under the competition of reducing and oxidizing reactions in the solution. The results show that the glucose added in the electrolyte strongly influences the properties of the products. Corresponding to high, medium, and low concentrations of glucose, the products were nanoparticles from amorphous Cu2O, polycrystalline Cu2O, and a mixture of polycrystalline Cu2O and Cu2Cl(OH)3, respectively.

  10. Electrochemistry of xanthine oxidase and its interaction with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Xu, Yi; Chen, Ting; Suzuki, Iwao; Li, Genxi

    2006-02-01

    With the help of nanocrystalline TiO2, the direct electrochemistry of xanthine oxidase (XOD) was achieved and two pairs of redox waves were observed. The interaction between XOD and nitric oxide (NO) was also investigated. The experimental results reveal that NO can be reduced at a XOD-nano TiO2 film modified electrode. When the NO concentration was low, the reduced product, HNO, would inactivate the protein. However, when the NO concentration was high, HNO would continue to react with NO to form N2O2- and N3O3-, which would not inhibit XOD, and thus the amount of active protein did not decrease any further.

  11. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-12-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS) which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in writing before solving a problem. The CPS approach was implemented by high school physics teachers at three schools for major theorems and conservation laws in mechanics and CPS-taught classes were compared to control classes taught using traditional problem solving methods. Information about the teachers' implementation of the approach was gathered from classroom observations and interviews, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated from a series of written assessments. Results indicated that teachers found CPS easy to integrate into their curricula, students engaged in classroom discussions and produced problem solutions of a higher quality than before, and students scored higher on conceptual and problem solving measures.

  12. Electrochemistry of Main-Group Phthalocyanines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-30

    to follow a linear relationship with the function r/(ze) (radius/charge). This reltionshlp may be used to facilitate the design of photocatalysts with...ze) and a function of central metal ion has been published. We have recently completed a study of the electrochemistry of main- us n i. Figure I for...SiV 54 0.074 -540 CIA 111 67.5 0.044 915 -655 1570Experimental Secfio* CiGat el 76 0.040 865 -735 1600Clintl! 94 0.032 830 -715 1545The r.-:m grUp

  13. Statistical Physics of High Dimensional Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advani, Madhu; Ganguli, Surya

    To model modern large-scale datasets, we need efficient algorithms to infer a set of P unknown model parameters from N noisy measurements. What are fundamental limits on the accuracy of parameter inference, given limited measurements, signal-to-noise ratios, prior information, and computational tractability requirements? How can we combine prior information with measurements to achieve these limits? Classical statistics gives incisive answers to these questions as the measurement density α =N/P --> ∞ . However, modern high-dimensional inference problems, in fields ranging from bio-informatics to economics, occur at finite α. We formulate and analyze high-dimensional inference analytically by applying the replica and cavity methods of statistical physics where data serves as quenched disorder and inferred parameters play the role of thermal degrees of freedom. Our analysis reveals that widely cherished Bayesian inference algorithms such as maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori are suboptimal in the modern setting, and yields new tractable, optimal algorithms to replace them as well as novel bounds on the achievable accuracy of a large class of high-dimensional inference algorithms. Thanks to Stanford Graduate Fellowship and Mind Brain Computation IGERT grant for support.

  14. Identifying High School Physical Education Physical Activity Patterns after High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David; Pleban, Francis T.; Wilkinson, Carol; Prusak, Keven A.

    2015-01-01

    National standards for physical education (PE) encompass five principles for the purpose of defining what high school students should recognize and be able to perform as a result of a quality PE program. The expectation is that youth will develop an active, healthy lifestyle into adulthood from activities and skills taught in PE. Researchers from…

  15. Networking for High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Harvey B.

    2007-07-01

    This report gives an overview of the status and outlook for the world's research networks and major international links used by the high energy physics and other scientific communities, network technology advances on which our community depends and in which we have an increasingly important role, and the problem of the Digital Divide, which is a primary focus of ICFA's Standing Committee on Inter-regional Connectivity (SCIC). Wide area networks of sufficient, and rapidly increasing end-to-end capability are vital for every phase of high energy physicists' work. Our bandwidth usage, and the typical capacity of the major national backbones and intercontinental links used by our field have progressed by a factor of more than 1000 over the past decade, and the outlook is for a similar increase over the next decade. This striking exponential growth trend, outstripping the growth rates in other areas of information technology, has continued in the past year, with many of the major national, continental and transoceanic networks supporting research and education progressing from a 10 Gigabits/sec (Gbps) backbone to multiple 10 Gbps links in their core. This is complemented by the use of point-to-point "light paths" to support the most demanding applications, including high energy physics, in a growing list of cases. As we approach the era of LHC physics, the growing need to access and transport Terabyte-scale and later 10 to 100 Terabyte datasets among more than 100 "Tier1" and "Tier2" centers at universities and laboratories spread throughout the world has brought the key role of networks, and the ongoing need for their development, sharply into focus. Bandwidth itself on an increasing scale is not enough. Realizing the scientific wealth of the LHC and our other major scientific programs depends crucially on our ability to use the bandwidth efficiently and reliably, with reliable high rates of data throughput, and effectively, where many parallel large-scale data

  16. Proceedings of the conference on electrochemistry of carbon allotropes: Graphite, fullerenes and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, K.; Scherson, D.

    1998-02-01

    This conference provided an opportunity for electrochemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers to meet and exchange information on different carbon allotropes. The presentations and discussion among the participants provided a forum to develop recommendations on research and development which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes. The following topics which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes were addressed: Graphitized and disordered carbons, as Li-ion intercalation anodes for high-energy-density, high-power-density Li-based secondary batteries; Carbons as substrate materials for catalysis and electrocatalysis; Boron-doped diamond film electrodes; and Electrochemical characterization and electrosynthesis of fullerenes and fullerene-type materials. Abstracts of the presentations are presented.

  17. Fuzzy systems in high-energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Marcello; Masulli, Francesco; Penna, Massimo

    1996-06-01

    Decision making is one of the major subjects of interest in physics. This is due to the intrinsic finite accuracy of measurement that leads to the possible results to span a region for each quantity. In this way, to recognize a particle type among the others by a measure of a feature vector, a decision must be made. The decision making process becomes a crucial point whenever a low statistical significance occurs as in space cosmic ray experiments where searching in rare events requires us to reject as many background events as possible (high purity), keeping as many signal events as possible (high efficiency). In the last few years, interesting theoretical results on some feedforward connectionist systems (FFCSs) have been obtained. In particular, it has been shown that multilayer perceptrons (MLPs), radial basis function networks (RBFs), and some fuzzy logic systems (FLSs) are nonlinear universal function approximators. This property permits us to build a system showing intelligent behavior , such as function estimation, time series forecasting, and pattern classification, and able to learn their skill from a set of numerical data. From the classification point of view, it has been demonstrated that non-parametric classifiers based FFCSs holding the universal function approximation property, can approximate the Bayes optimal discriminant function and then minimize the classification error. In this paper has been studied the FBF when applied to a high energy physics problem. The FBF is a powerful neuro-fuzzy system (or adaptive fuzzy logic system) holding the universal function approximation property and the capability of learning from examples. The FBF is based on product-inference rule (P), the Gaussian membership function (G), a singleton fuzzifier (S), and a center average defuzzifier (CA). The FBF can be regarded as a feedforward connectionist system with just one hidden layer whose units correspond to the fuzzy MIMO rules. The FBF can be identified both by

  18. The merger of electrochemistry and molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Molecular Electronics has the potential to greatly enhance existing silicon-based microelectronics to realize new functions, higher device density, lower power consumption, and lower cost. Although the investigation of electron transport through single molecules and molecular monolayers in "molecular junctions" is a recent development, many of the relevant concepts and phenomena are derived from electrochemistry, as practiced for the past several decades. The past 10+ years have seen an explosion of research activity directed toward how the structure of molecules affects electron transport in molecular junctions, with the ultimate objective of "rational design" of molecular components with new electronic functions, such as chemical sensing, interactions with light, and low-cost, low-power consumer electronics. In order to achieve these scientifically and commercially important objectives, the factors controlling charge transport in molecules "connected" to conducting contacts must be understood, and methods for massively parallel manufacturing of molecular circuits must be developed. This Personal Account describes the development of reproducible and robust molecular electronic devices, starting with modified electrodes used in electrochemistry and progressing to manufacturable molecular junctions. Although the field faced some early difficulties in reliability and characterization, the pieces are now in place for rapid advances in understanding charge transport at the molecular level. Inherent in the field of Molecular Electronics are many electrochemical concepts, including tunneling, redox exchange, activated electron transfer, and electron coupling between molecules and conducting contacts.

  19. (The physics of highly charged ions)

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, R.A.

    1990-10-12

    The Fifth International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions drew more than 200 participants, providing an excellent overview of this growing field. Important technical developments and experimental results in electron-ion collisions were reported. The merging of fast ion beams from accelerators or storage rings with advanced high-intensity electron-beam targets has yielded data of unprecedented quality on radiative and dielectronic recombination, providing stringent tests of theory. Long-awaited technical innovations in electron-impact excitation measurements were also reported. The level of activity in multicharged ion-surface interactions has increased. More sophisticated experimental studies of the neutralization process have shown the inadequacy of previously accepted mechanisms, and theoretical activity in this area is just being initiated. The IAEA meetings addressed atomic and molecular data needs for fusion research, with ITER providing a key focus. Such data are especially critical to modeling and diagnostics of the edge plasma. The ALADDIN data base system has been universally accepted and has streamlined the exchange of numerical data among data centers and the fusion community. The IAEA continues to play a pivotal role in the identification of data needs, and in the coordination of data compilation and research activities for fusion applications.

  20. High energy physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1982-01-01

    The high energy plans at BNL are centered around the AGS and ISABELLE, or a variant thereof. At present the AGS is maintaining a strong and varied program. This last year a total of 4 x 10/sup 19/ protons were delivered on target in a period of approximately 20 weeks. Physics interest is very strong, half of the submitted proposals are rejected (thereby maintaining high quality experiments) and the program is full over the next two years. The future colliding beam facility will utilize the AGS as an injector and will be a dedicated facility. It will have six intersection regions, run > 10/sup 7/ sec/year, and explore a new domain of energy and luminosity. Common to all the considered alternatives is a large aperture proton ring. These possible choices involve pp, ep, and heavy ion variants. The long term philosophy is to run the AGS as much as possible, continuously to upgrade it in performance and reliability, and then to phase it down as the new collider begins operation. (WHK)

  1. Perspectives on future high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1996-12-31

    The author states two general ways in which one must proceed in an attempt to forecast the future of high energy physics. The first is to utilize the state of knowledge in the field and thereby provide theoretical and experimental guidance on future directions. The second approach is technical, namely, how well can one do in going to higher energies with present techniques or new accelerator principles. He concludes that the future strategy is straightforward. The present accelerator facilities must be upgraded and run to produce exciting and forefront research. At the same time, the theoretical tools should be sharpened both extrapolating from lower energies (100 GeV) to high (multi TeV) and vice versa. The US should be involved in the LHC, both in the accelerator and experimental areas. There should be an extensive R and D program on accelerators for a multi-TeV capability, emphasizing e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. Finally, the international cooperative activities should be strengthened and maintained.

  2. A Study on Linking High-School Physics and Perfect Teaching Reformation of College Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolai; Li, Qun; Gao, Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    For the students who have just entered colleges, learning university physics would be a challenge. This paper discusses how to make students who have just finished senior high school physics won't feel difficult in learning university physics and how to guide and cultivate the students' interest in the study of physics so to stimulate the…

  3. Influence of High School Physical Education on University Student's Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Jessica; Jenkins, Jayne; Wallhead, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the Lifelong Physical Activity (LLPA) framework to examine the influence of high school physical education (PE) on university students' level of physical activity (PA). Participants included 365 undergraduate students from the Rocky Mountain West of the USA enrolled in a university physical activity course.…

  4. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  5. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; Le Diberder, Francois; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; Bellis, Matt; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; Lucchesi, Donatella; Denisov, Dmitri; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Li, Qizhong; Varnes, Erich; Jonckheere, Alan; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  6. High School Students' Physical Education Conceptual Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Suzan F.

    2004-01-01

    The value of conceptual physical education knowledge has long been acknowledged (American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 1969; Kneer, 1981; NASPE, 1995) yet has not been formally measured or assessed. Seven multiple choice tests with established validity and reliability (Ayers, 2001b) were used to assess the concepts…

  7. Graphene electrochemistry: fabricating amperometric biosensors.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Dale A C; Banks, Craig E

    2011-05-21

    The electrochemical sensing of hydrogen peroxide is of substantial interest to the operation of oxidase-based amperometric biosensors. We explore the fabrication of a novel and highly sensitive electro-analytical biosensor using well characterised commercially available graphene and compare and contrast responses using Nafion -graphene and -graphite modified electrodes. Interestingly we observe that graphite exhibits a superior electrochemical response due to its enhanced percentage of edge plane sites when compared to graphene. However, when Nafion, routinely used in amperometric biosensors, is introduced onto graphene and graphite modified electrodes, re-orientation occurs in both cases which is beneficial in the former and detrimental in the latter; insights into this contrasting behaviour are consequently presented providing acuity into sensor design and development where graphene is utilised in biosensors.

  8. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    López, Angel M.

    2015-10-27

    For the period of sixteen years covered by this report (June 1, 1997 - July 31, 2013) the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Puerto Rico’s Mayaguez Campus (UPRM) carried out an extensive research program that included major experiments at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), the Cornell Electron-positron Collider and CERN. In particular, these were E831 (FOCUS) at Fermilab, CLEOc at Cornell and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The group’s history is one of successful execution and growth. Beginning with one faculty researcher in 1985, it eventually included four faculty researchers, one post-doctoral research associate, two undergraduates and as many as six graduate students at one time working on one of the experiments that discovered the Higgs boson. Some of this expansion was due to the group’s leveraging of funds from the Department of Energy’s core grant to attract funds from National Science Foundation programs not targeted to high energy physics. Besides the group’s research productivity, its other major contribution was the training of a large number of MS students who later went on to successful technical careers in industry as well as academia including many who obtained PhD degrees at US universities. In an attempt to document this history, this final report gives a general description of the Group’s work prior to June 1, 2010, the starting date for the last grant renewal period. Much more detail can, of course, be found in the annual reports submitted up to that date. The work during the last grant period is discussed in detail in a separate section. To summarize the group’s scientific accomplishments, one can point to the results of the experiments. Both FOCUS and CLEOc were designed to carry out precise measurements of processes involving the heavy quarks, charm and bottom. Heavy quarks are particularly interesting because, due to their mass, theoretical calculations

  9. Analytical Electrochemistry: Theory and Instrumentation of Dynamic Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dennis C.

    1980-01-01

    Emphasizes trends in the development of six topics concerning analytical electrochemistry, including books and reviews (34 references cited), mass transfer (59), charge transfer (25), surface effects (33), homogeneous reactions (21), and instrumentation (31). (CS)

  10. Analytical Electrochemistry: Methodology and Applications of Dynamic Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, William R.; Kissinger, Peter T.

    1980-01-01

    Reports developments involving the experimental aspects of finite and current analytical electrochemistry including electrode materials (97 cited references), hydrodynamic techniques (56), spectroelectrochemistry (62), stripping voltammetry (70), voltammetric techniques (27), polarographic techniques (59), and miscellany (12). (CS)

  11. 75 FR 17701 - High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... Elementary Particle Physics Program Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General Interest in High Energy... Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel...

  12. What Is a Highly Qualified Adapted Physical Education Teacher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Rebecca; Lavay, Barry; Rizzo, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This article presents information related to the new position statement on the definition of a "highly qualified adapted physical education teacher" published by the Adapted Physical Activity Council (a council of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance). It discusses the legal references for "highly qualified"…

  13. What Constitutes a Highly Qualified Physical Education Teacher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) that is it critical to have highly qualified physical education teachers delivering a standards-based curriculum that will assist children in adopting and maintaining healthy lifestyles. NASPE acknowledges that highly qualified physical education teachers will…

  14. Background and Professional Qualifications of High-School Physics Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuschatz, Michael; McFarling, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Describes a study of the professional qualifications of high school physics teachers conducted by the American Institute of Physics (AIP). Concludes that high school physics teachers are better trained than they are given credit for, and that instances of utterly unqualified instructors are rare. (WRM)

  15. 78 FR 50405 - High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent... hereby given that the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel will be renewed for a two-year period beginning...-range planning and priorities in the national high-energy physics program. Additionally, the renewal...

  16. Breaking Out: Codependency of High School Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Mary; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a study of 11 high school physical educators, their teaching, and their programs, drawing conclusions about their work based on the findings of similar research. The article includes implications for high school physical education, staff development, and physical education teacher education. (SM)

  17. Perspectives on High-Energy-Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2008-11-01

    Much of 21st century plasma physics will involve work to produce, understand, control, and exploit very non-traditional plasmas. High-energy density (HED) plasmas are often examples, variously involving strong Coulomb interactions and few particles per Debeye sphere, dominant radiation effects, strongly relativistic effects, or strongly quantum-mechanical behavior. Indeed, these and other modern plasma systems often fall outside the early standard theoretical definitions of ``plasma''. This presentation will focus on two types of HED plasmas that exhibit non-traditional behavior. Our first example will be the plasmas produced by extremely strong shock waves. Shock waves are present across the entire realm of plasma densities, often in space or astrophysical contexts. HED shock waves (at pressures > 1 Mbar) enable studies in many areas, from equations of state to hydrodynamics to radiation hydrodynamics. We will specifically consider strongly radiative shocks, in which the radiative energy fluxes are comparable to the mechanical energy fluxes that drive the shocks. Modern HED facilities can produce such shocks, which are also present in dense, energetic, astrophysical systems such as supernovae. These shocks are also excellent targets for advanced simulations due to their range of spatial scales and complex radiation transport. Our second example will be relativistic plasmas. In general, these vary from plasmas containing relativistic particle beams, produced for some decades in the laboratory, to the relativistic thermal plasmas present for example in pulsar winds. Laboratory HED relativistic plasmas to date have been those produced by laser beams of irradiance ˜ 10^18 to 10^22 W/cm^2 or by accelerator-produced HED electron beams. These have applications ranging from generation of intense x-rays to production of proton beams for radiation therapy to acceleration of electrons. Here we will focus on electron acceleration, a spectacular recent success and a rare

  18. University of Virginia experimental and theoretical high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1991-01-10

    This report discusses research being done in high energy physics at the University of Virginia in the following areas: charmonium; B mesons decay; B physics at the SCC; and symmetry and field theory. (LSP)

  19. Graphene and its electrochemistry - an update.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Latiff, Naziah Mohamad; Loo, Adeline Huiling; Wong, Colin Hong An; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2016-05-07

    The electrochemistry of graphene and its derivatives has been extensively researched in recent years. In the aspect of graphene preparation methods, the efficiencies of the top-down electrochemical exfoliation of graphite, the electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide and the electrochemical delamination of CVD grown graphene, are currently on par with conventional procedures. Electrochemical analysis of graphene oxide has revealed an unexpected inherent redox activity with, in some cases, an astonishing chemical reversibility. Furthermore, graphene modified with p-block elements has shown impressive electrocatalytic performances in processes which have been historically dominated by metal-based catalysts. Further progress has also been achieved in the practical usage of graphene in sensing and biosensing applications. This review is an update of our previous article in Chem. Soc. Rev. 2010, 39, 4146-4157, with special focus on the developments over the past two years.

  20. Molybdenum, molybdenum oxides, and their electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Saji, Viswanathan S; Lee, Chi-Woo

    2012-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of molybdenum and its oxides, both in bulk and thin film dimensions, are critical because of their widespread applications in steels, electrocatalysts, electrochromic materials, batteries, sensors, and solar cells. An important area of current interest is electrodeposited CIGS-based solar cells where a molybdenum/glass electrode forms the back contact. Surprisingly, the basic electrochemistry of molybdenum and its oxides has not been reviewed with due attention. In this Review, we assess the scattered information. The potential and pH dependent active, passive, and transpassive behaviors of molybdenum in aqueous media are explained. The major surface oxide species observed, reversible redox transitions of the surface oxides, pseudocapacitance and catalytic reduction are discussed along with carefully conducted experimental results on a typical molybdenum glass back contact employed in CIGS-based solar cells. The applications of molybdenum oxides and the electrodeposition of molybdenum are briefly reviewed.

  1. Organic Electrochemistry in Aluminum Chloride Melts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-15

    CLASS. (.5 Uit• “P.’U (21F,n~!ye~ t . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _I .~~. cY~ t 7~ .3~ ~‘l+g 7~ \\ ii.. kt~~I1ICAY* ONYCO ~ $GRA D*$G IU OIITRIIUTIOM STATEMENT (.1...DOCUMENTATION PAGE 8aFO CO~~~~~~~ NC~ PORM i. REPORT NUNSER 3. GOVT ACCIIZION NO 3. RtC,PIENt ’i C A T A ~ O~~ NUN.LR TIY ~.E (~~~~3~.AtIaS.) I YVPE OF...REPORT I PERIOD COVERED Final- 1 October 1972- • t ~~ ‘~~~~ _ ( Organic Electrochemistry in Al uminum .-~~ 30 May 1976 ~ L ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I •. •i~ ,o

  2. Electrochemistry-based Battery Modeling for Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chetan Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are used in a wide variety of applications. In recent years, they have become popular as a source of power for electric vehicles such as cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, and commericial passenger aircraft. In such application domains, it becomes crucial to both monitor battery health and performance and to predict end of discharge (EOD) and end of useful life (EOL) events. To implement such technologies, it is crucial to understand how batteries work and to capture that knowledge in the form of models that can be used by monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis algorithms. In this work, we develop electrochemistry-based models of lithium-ion batteries that capture the significant electrochemical processes, are computationally efficient, capture the effects of aging, and are of suitable accuracy for reliable EOD prediction in a variety of usage profiles. This paper reports on the progress of such a model, with results demonstrating the model validity and accurate EOD predictions.

  3. Development of an Attitude Scale towards High School Physics Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavas, Pervin Ünlü; Çagan, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a Likert type attitude scale for high school students with regard to high school physics lessons. The research was carried out with high school students who were studying in Ankara. First, the opinions of 105 high school students about physics lessons were obtained and then 55 scale items were determined from…

  4. Ninth Grade Physics: A Necessity for High School Science Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilt, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The traditional order in which science courses are taught in U.S. high schools is biology, chemistry, physics. The physics course usually is regarded as very difficult because it requires both high-level mathematical skills and high-level thinking skills; it is taught in the final year of high school to provide time for students to develop the…

  5. Physics in US High Schools: Truths and Untruths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan

    2012-03-01

    Georg Christoph Lichtenberg once noted that ``[t]he most dangerous untruths are truths moderately distorted.'' In this talk, I will look at truths -- and attempt to dispel untruths -- regarding physics in US high schools. Using data from our quadrennial Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers, I'll address questions such as: *Does every student in the US have access to physics in high school? *Does every student take physics in high school? *Does taking physics in high school impact future career paths? *How well do students in different states do with respect to high school physics and preparation for STEM careers? *Do high school physics teachers have physics training? *How well are females and minorities represented in high school physics? *Did every student earning a bachelor's degree in physics from a US institution take physics in high school? I will also consider the impact of high school physics on future academic pursuits in STEM fields using the Science and Engineering Readiness Index (SERI) developed by Paul Cottle and me. SERI provides a way to examine progress in K-12 physical science education on a state-by-state basis. By the way, Lichtenberg was the first person to hold a professorship dedicated to experimental physics in Germany and was one of the first scientists to introduce experiments with apparatus in his lectures. Today he is remembered for his investigations in electricity, for discovering branching discharge patterns on dielectrics now called Lichtenberg figures. As every physicist does, he wanted to get at the truth and avoid distortions. This talk does just that.

  6. Conceptual Problem Solving in High School Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an…

  7. Engineering High Assurance Distributed Cyber Physical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    interact with the physical world have demonstrated the consequences of not adequately verifying the correctness of the software (such as Therac - 25 ...report02-3.pdf [4] Schmidt, D.C. "Guest Editor’s Introduction: Model-Driven Engineering," IEEE Computer 39 (2), pp. 25 -31, February, 2006. [5

  8. 76 FR 53119 - High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of renewal. SUMMARY: Pursuant... Energy Physics Advisory Panel will be renewed for a two-year period, beginning on August 12, 2011. The... priorities in the national High Energy Physics program. Additionally, the renewal of the HEPAP has...

  9. High energy physics division semiannual report of research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. )

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  10. The Physics Front: Resources for High School Physics & Physical Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezrailson, Cathy M.

    2006-12-01

    The overarching goal of the Physics Front, (part of ComPADRE -Physics and Astronomy digital library) is to provide enhanced accessibility to quality physics teaching resources for all pre-college teachers of physics and the physical sciences with special materials for new and “cross-over” teachers. Some highlights/features of the site are: • A collection of physics-related topics with units of instruction including content, tutorials, labs and reference materials. • Descriptions of some PTRA manuals with example activities. • A “Welcome to the Profession” statement from the New Physics Teacher Manual. • Classroom techniques and best practices. • Simulations and images to enhance instruction for students. • Special features and help for the new physics teacher • Discussion Forums • Filing cabinet for sharing and organizing teaching materials Advantages of using The Physics Front: • Peer -reviewed materials • Connections with other physics teachers nation/worldwide • Content and pedagogy support • Venue for sharing, accessing and archiving exemplary teacher-designed materials • Opportunity to contribute to a dynamic and growing online physics teacher community

  11. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development.

  12. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  13. Research in experimental High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J.

    1996-12-01

    UF Task B has been funded continuously by the DoE since 1986. Formerly it included work on the D0 experiment at Fermilab which is no longer a part of the UF program. With the addition of Prof. Guenakh Mitselmakher, Dr. Jacobo Konigsberg and one more Assistant Professor to the faculty, the group now has a new Task to incorporate their work at Fermilab and Cern. They intend Task B to continue to cover the major research of Paul Avery and John Yelton, which is presently directed towards the CLEO detector with some effort going to B physics at Fermilab.

  14. Number theory meets high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Feynman amplitudes in perturbative quantum field theory are being expressed in terms of an algebra of functions, extending the familiar logarithms, and associated numbers— periods. The study of these functions (including hyperlogarithms) and numbers (like the multiple zeta values), that dates back to Leibniz and Euler, has attracted anew the interest of algebraic geometers and number theorists during the last decades. The two originally independent developments are recently coming together in an unlikely collaboration between particle physics and what were regarded as the most abstruse branches of mathematics.

  15. Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago

    SciTech Connect

    Martinec, Emil J.

    2013-06-27

    This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

  16. Profiles of Change: Lessons for Improving High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This feature has told stories of high school physical educators who have refused to accept the status quo of high school physical education programs. They have identified problems, initiated innovations in their own classes, implemented changes beyond their classes, and moved toward institutionalizing improvements throughout their programs and…

  17. Physics of Nuclear Collisions at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    2012-05-01

    A wide range of problems has been investigated in the research program during the period of this grant. Although the major effort has been in the subject of heavy-ion collisions, we have also studied problems in biological and other physical systems. The method of analysis used in reducing complex data in multiparticle production to simple descriptions can also be applied to the study of complex systems of very different nature. Phase transition is an important phenomenon in many areas of physics, and for heavy-ion collisions we study the fluctuations of multiplicities at the critical point. Human brain activities as revealed in EEG also involve fluctuations in time series, and we have found that our experience enables us to find the appropriate quantification of the fluctuations in ways that can differentiate stroke and normal subjects. The main topic that characterizes the research at Oregon in heavy-ion collisions is the recombination model for the treatment of the hadronization process. We have avoided the hydrodynamical model partly because there is already a large community engaged in it, but more significantly we have found the assumption of rapid thermalization unconvincing. Recent results in studying LHC physics lead us to provide more evidence that shower partons are very important even at low p_T, but are ignored by hydro. It is not easy to work in an environment where the conventional wisdom regards our approach as being incorrect because it does not adhere to the standard paradigm. But that is just what a vibrant research community needs: unconventional approach may find evidences that can challenge the orthodoxy. An example is the usual belief that elliptic flow in fluid dynamics gives rise to azimuthal anisotropy. We claim that it is only sufficient but not necessary. With more data from LHC and more independent thinkers working on the subject what is sufficient as a theory may turn out to be incorrect in reality. Another area of investigation that

  18. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  19. High Energy Physics at Tufts University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-15

    This report discusses the following topics: Neutrino Interactions in the 15-foot Bubble Chamber; Pion and Kaon Production of Charm and Charm-Strange States; Study of Heavy Flavors at the Tagged Particle Spectrometer; Neutrino Oscillations at the Fermilab Main Injector; Soudan II Nucleon Decay Project; Physics at the Antiproton-Proton Collider at {radical}{bar s} = 1.8 TeV; Designing the Solenoidal Detector for the Supercollider; Neutrino Telescope Proposal; Polarization in Inclusive Hyperon Production and QCD Subprocesses; Production and Decay Characteristics of Top Quarks; Scattering in Extended Skyrmion Models and Spin Dependence; Search for Top Quark Production at the Tevatron; Polarization Correlations in Hadronic Production of Top Quarks; and Computation and Networking.

  20. Princeton University High Energy Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, Daniel R.

    2015-06-30

    This is the Final Report on research conducted by the Princeton Elementary Particles group over the approximately three-year period from May 1, 2012 to April 30, 2015. The goal of our research is to investigate the fundamental constituents of matter, their fields, and their interactions; to understand the properties of space and time; and to study the profound relationships between cosmology and particle physics. During the funding period covered by this report, the group has been organized into a subgroup concentrating on the theory of particles, strings, and cosmology; and four subgroups performing major experiments at laboratories around the world: CERN, Daya Bay, Gran Sasso as well as detector R\\&D on the Princeton campus. Highlights in of this research include the discovery of the Higgs Boson at CERN and the measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ by the Daya Bay experiment. In both cases, Princeton researchers supported by this grant played key roles.

  1. Black holes and high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grib, A. A.; Pavlov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Three mechanisms of getting high energies in particle collisions in the ergosphere of the rotating black holes are considered. The consequences of these mechanisms for observation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles on the Earth as result of conversion of superheavy dark matter particles into ordinary particles are discussed.

  2. Moving High School Students toward Physical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Lynn Couturier

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses teaching for skill and knowledge competency in high school based on the National Standards and grade-level outcomes. The outcomes guide teachers away from a curriculum that emphasizes competition through team sports, which appeals to just the highly-skilled and competitive students, toward one that is inclusive of all skill…

  3. The Mesoscopic Electrochemistry of Molecular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Paulo R.; Benites, Tiago A.; Davis, Jason J.

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of an electron dynamic (time-dependent) perspective and a voltage driving force acting to redistribute electrons between metallic and addressable molecular states, we define here the associated electron admittance and conductance. We specifically present a mesoscopic approach to resolving the electron transfer rate associated with the electrochemistry of a redox active film tethered to metallic leads and immersed in electrolyte. The methodology is centred on aligning the lifetime of the process of electron exchange with associated resistance and capacitance quantities. Notably, however, these are no longer those empirically known as charge transfer resistance and pseudo-capacitance, but are those derived instead from a consideration of the quantum states contained in molecular films and their accessibility through a scattering region existing between them and the metallic probe. The averaged lifetime (τr) associated with the redox site occupancy is specifically dependent on scattering associated with the quantum channels linking them to the underlying metallic continuum and associated with both a quantum resistance (Rq) and an electrochemical (redox) capacitance (Cr). These are related to electron transfer rate through k = 1/τr = (RqCr)−1. The proposed mesoscopic approach is consistent with Marcus’s (electron transfer rate) theory and experimental measurements obtained by capacitance spectroscopy. PMID:26757677

  4. DNA Electrochemistry with Tethered Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Pheeney, Catrina G.

    2012-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB′), covalently attached to DNA through a flexible C12 alkyl linker, provides a sensitive redox reporter in DNA electrochemistry measurements. Tethered, intercalated MB′ is reduced through DNA-mediated charge transport; the incorporation of a single base mismatch at position 3, 10, or 14 of a 17-mer causes an attenuation of the signal to 62 ± 3% of the well-matched DNA, irrespective of position in the duplex. The redox signal intensity for MB′–DNA is found to be least 3-fold larger than that of Nile blue (NB)–DNA, indicating that MB′ is even more strongly coupled to the π-stack. The signal attenuation due to an intervening mismatch does, however, depend on DNA film density and the backfilling agent used to passivate the surface. These results highlight two mechanisms for reduction of MB′ on the DNA-modified electrode: reduction mediated by the DNA base pair stack and direct surface reduction of MB′ at the electrode. These two mechanisms are distinguished by their rates of electron transfer that differ by 20-fold. The extent of direct reduction at the surface can be controlled by assembly and buffer conditions. PMID:22512327

  5. Electrochemistry combined on-line with electrospray mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Berkel, G.J.V.

    1995-10-15

    In this paper a variety of methods to couple electrochemistry on-line with electrospray mass spectrometry (EC/ES-MS) are presented, and the fundamental and analytical utility of this hybrid technique is illustrated. The major problems encountered in coupling EC and ES-MS are discussed, and means to overcome them are presented. Three types of electrochemical flow cells, viz., a thin-layer electrode flow-by cell, a tubular electrode flow-through cell, and a porous electrode flow-through cell, are discussed in regard to their suitability for this coupling. Methods for coupling each of these electrochemical cells on-line with ES-MS, either floated at or decoupled from the ES high voltage and controlled by a constant current supply, a constant potential supply, or a potentiostat are presented. Three applications are used to illustrate the utility and versatility of the EC/ES-MS combination: (1) the ionization of neutral analytes (i.e., perylene) for detection by ES-MS, (2) the study of the products of electrode reactions (i.e., nickel(II) octaethylporphyrin oxidation products), including relatively short-lived products (i.e., {Beta}-carotene oxidation products), and (3) the enhanced determination of metals (i.e., elemental silver) achieved by coupling anodic stripping voltammetry on-line with ES-MS. 52 refs., 6 figs.

  6. High-Precision Computation and Mathematical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2008-11-03

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required. Such calculations are facilitated by high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. This paper presents a survey of recent applications of these techniques and provides some analysis of their numerical requirements. These applications include supernova simulations, climate modeling, planetary orbit calculations, Coulomb n-body atomic systems, scattering amplitudes of quarks, gluons and bosons, nonlinear oscillator theory, Ising theory, quantum field theory and experimental mathematics. We conclude that high-precision arithmetic facilities are now an indispensable component of a modern large-scale scientific computing environment.

  7. Shaping and exploring the micro- and nanoworld using bipolar electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Loget, Gabriel; Kuhn, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    Bipolar electrochemistry is a technique with a rather young history in the field of analytical chemistry. Being based on the polarization of a conducting object which is exposed to an external electric field, it allowed recently the development of new methods for controlled surface modification at the micro- and nanoscale and very original analytical applications. Using bipolar electrodes, analyte separation and detection becomes possible based on miniaturized systems. Moreover, the modified objects that can be created with bipolar electrochemistry could find applications as key components for detection systems. In this contribution, the principles of bipolar electrochemistry will be reviewed, as well as recent developments that focus on the modification of objects at the nano- and microscale and their potential application in miniaturized analytical systems.

  8. Exploiting plug-and-play electrochemistry for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixia; Teng, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Electrochemistry has emerged as a powerful analytical technique for chemical analysis of living cells, biologically active molecules and metabolites. Electrochemical biosensor, microfluidics and mass spectrometry are the most frequently used methods for electrochemical detection and monitory, which comprise a collection of extremely useful measurement tools for various fields of biology and medicine. Most recently, electrochemistry has been shown to be coupled with nanotechnology and genetic engineering to generate new enabling technologies, providing rapid, selective, and sensitive detection and diagnosis platforms. The primary focus of this review is to highlight the utility of electrochemical strategies and their conjunction with other approaches for drug metabolism and discovery. Current challenges and possible future developments and applications of electrochemistry in drug studies are also discussed.

  9. Workshop on the frontiers of theoretical and experimental electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesfeld, S.; Redondo, A.; Lemons, R.

    1986-01-01

    The Workshop on the Frontiers of Theoretical and Experimental Electrochemistry was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, February 25-26, 1985, to identify those problems and techniques that are at the forefront of electrochemistry research and to generate a summary that will be a guide to the most fruitful areas of electrochemistry research and a foundation for long-term support of such work in this country. Among the conclusions, major advances in understanding electrochemical systems are expected from the application of the new tools for in situ characterization of the solid/electrolyte interface. Parallel thrusts are needed in the areas of theory, experiments on well-defined surfaces, and exploratory research on new interfacial phenomena and new electrode materials. Several specific areas for new research are described in this report.

  10. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  11. Physics of High Temperature, Dense Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    34Investigation of the High-Energy Acceleration Mode in the Coaxial Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S28, (1964). I. 9. Dattner, A. and Eninger J...34Studies of a Coaxial Plasma Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S41, (1964). II. 10. Wilcox, J. M., Pugh, E., Dattner, A. and Eninger , J., "Experimental Study of

  12. Bringing Technology into college and High School Physics Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2007-04-01

    We want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to college and high school physics classrooms. We focus in particular on our outreach initiative in supporting a number of school districts with ways to improve high school physics education. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. IMPACTSEED aims at helping high school teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama course of study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of programs: a two-week long summer institute, a series of five technology workshops, and onsite year-round support. Through our hands-on approach, we have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms. A number of technology projects were assigned to the teachers so as to show their students how physics connects to the technological devices around us. IMPACTSEED aims at providing our students with a physics education that enjoys continuity and consistency from high school to college.

  13. Nanoscale Electrochemistry of sp(2) Carbon Materials: From Graphite and Graphene to Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Patrick R; Güell, Aleix G; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-09-20

    Carbon materials have a long history of use as electrodes in electrochemistry, from (bio)electroanalysis to applications in energy technologies, such as batteries and fuel cells. With the advent of new forms of nanocarbon, particularly, carbon nanotubes and graphene, carbon electrode materials have taken on even greater significance for electrochemical studies, both in their own right and as components and supports in an array of functional composites. With the increasing prominence of carbon nanomaterials in electrochemistry comes a need to critically evaluate the experimental framework from which a microscopic understanding of electrochemical processes is best developed. This Account advocates the use of emerging electrochemical imaging techniques and confined electrochemical cell formats that have considerable potential to reveal major new perspectives on the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon materials, with unprecedented detail and spatial resolution. These techniques allow particular features on a surface to be targeted and models of structure-activity to be developed and tested on a wide range of length scales and time scales. When high resolution electrochemical imaging data are combined with information from other microscopy and spectroscopy techniques applied to the same area of an electrode surface, in a correlative-electrochemical microscopy approach, highly resolved and unambiguous pictures of electrode activity are revealed that provide new views of the electrochemical properties of carbon materials. With a focus on major sp(2) carbon materials, graphite, graphene, and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), this Account summarizes recent advances that have changed understanding of interfacial electrochemistry at carbon electrodes including: (i) Unequivocal evidence for the high activity of the basal surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is at least as active as noble metal electrodes (e.g., platinum) for outer

  14. A comparative study of middle school and high school students' views about physics and learning physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of student epistemological beliefs about physics and learning physics focused on college and post-college students in Western countries. However, little is known about early-grade students in Asian countries. This paper reports Chinese middle and high school students' views about the nature of physics and learning physics, measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes Survey about Science (CLASS). Two variables—school level and gender—are examined for a series of comparative analyses. Results show that although middle school students received fewer years of education in physics, they demonstrated more expert-like conceptions about this subject matter than high school students. Also, male students in general exhibited more expert-like views than their female counterparts. While such a gender difference remained constant across both middle and high schools, for the most part it was a small-size difference.

  15. Precision Timing Calorimeter for High Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; ...

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present studies on the performance and characterization of the time resolution of LYSO-based calorimeters. Results for an LYSO sampling calorimeter and an LYSO-tungsten Shashlik calorimeter are presented. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for the LYSO sampling calorimeter. Timing calorimetry is described as a tool for mitigating the effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider.

  16. Scientific Argumentation in Public Physics Lectures: Bringing Contemporary Physics into High-School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an approach to integrating public e-lectures on contemporary physics into a traditional high-school syllabus. This approach was used in a long-distance professional development course for in-service physics teachers. Each lecture was related to a specific obligatory syllabus chapter, and was accompanied by learner-centred…

  17. "Why Do I Slog through the Physics?" Understanding High School Students' Difficulties in Learning Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekici, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a valid and reliable instrument to assess why physics courses are perceived as one of the most difficult courses among high school students and to investigate the reasons why students have difficulty in learning physics through this scale. This study includes the development and validation studies of the…

  18. Electrochemistry, biosensors and microfluidics: a convergence of fields.

    PubMed

    Rackus, Darius G; Shamsi, Mohtashim H; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-08-07

    Electrochemistry, biosensors and microfluidics are popular research topics that have attracted widespread attention from chemists, biologists, physicists, and engineers. Here, we introduce the basic concepts and recent histories of electrochemistry, biosensors, and microfluidics, and describe how they are combining to form new application-areas, including so-called "point-of-care" systems in which measurements traditionally performed in a laboratory are moved into the field. We propose that this review can serve both as a useful starting-point for researchers who are new to these topics, as well as being a compendium of the current state-of-the art for experts in these evolving areas.

  19. High-Order Methods for Computational Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    the finite element space Vh such that Vj= 1,...,N: Rh( p )(xj,t) - p (Xýj,t) = 0, £ = 0,..., k, (2.34) where the points xj,t are the Gauss- Radau ...element refinement (h- p refinement). In computational fluid dynamics, high-order discretization methods are infrequently used in the com- putation of...work with Shu). The articles of Dr. Henderson and Professor Schwab consider the mathematical formulation and implementa- tion of the h- p finite element

  20. Computing support for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J.

    1996-12-01

    This computing proposal (Task S) is submitted separately but in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and Theory tasks. The authors have built a very strong computing base at Florida over the past 8 years. In fact, computing has been one of the main contributions to their experimental collaborations, involving not just computing capacity for running Monte Carlos and data reduction, but participation in many computing initiatives, industrial partnerships, computing committees and collaborations. These facts justify the submission of a separate computing proposal.

  1. Physics of very high energy hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1986-09-01

    A review is given of the physics accessible at a very high energy hadron-hadron collider. Emphasis is placed on the reliability of the predicted rates, and upon the energy and luminosity required to explore new physics options. 38 refs., 19 figs.

  2. High performance computing for beam physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.

    1994-09-01

    Several countries are now involved in efforts aimed at utilizing accelerator-driven technologies to solve problems of national and international importance. These technologies have both economic and environmental implications. The technologies include waste transmutation, plutonium conversion, neutron production for materials science and biological science research, neutron production for fusion materials testing, fission energy production systems, and tritium production. All of these projects require a high-intensity linear accelerator that operates with extremely low beam loss. This presents a formidable computational challenge: One must design and optimize over a kilometer of complex accelerating structures while taking into account beam loss to an accuracy of 10 parts per billion per meter. Such modeling is essential if one is to have confidence that the accelerator will meet its beam loss requirement, which ultimately affects system reliability, safety and cost. At Los Alamos, the authors are developing a capability to model ultra-low loss accelerators using the CM-5 at the Advanced Computing Laboratory. They are developing PIC, Vlasov/Poisson, and Langevin/Fokker-Planck codes for this purpose. With slight modification, they have also applied their codes to modeling mesoscopic systems and astrophysical systems. In this paper, they will first describe HPC activities in the accelerator community. Then they will discuss the tools they have developed to model classical and quantum evolution equations. Lastly they will describe how these tools have been used to study beam halo in high current, mismatched charged particle beams.

  3. An experimental high energy physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, J. A.; Loeffler, F. J.; McIlwain, R. L.; Miller, D. H.; Palfrey, T. R.; Shibata, E. I.

    1989-05-01

    The CLEO detector accumulated, (approximately 480,000 B-mesons) the world's largest sample of B decays, before being shutdown in May 1988 for the installation of CLEO II. This data sample came from 335 pb(-1) accumulated at the upsilon (4S). The Cornell Electron Storage Ring set new luminosity records, reaching 3.5 pb(-1) in a single day. These data are being intensively analyzed and 21 papers were given at the Baltimore APS meeting. Among the highlights are: confirmation of B(sup 0)(bar B)(sup 0) mixing; discovery of the charm-strange baryon xi (sub c)(sup 0); limits on b yields u decay; and non-observation of B yields p(bar p)pi(pi), which was reported by the ARGUS collaboration. The construction of CLEO II is proceeding on schedule. The new 1.5 T superconducting magnet has passed all tests and all of the detector elements have been installed. This includes a 7800 CsI crystals electromagnetic shower calorimeter. The data from the Gamma Ray Astrophysics experiment show a significant signal for high energy gamma ray emission from Cygnus X-3 and also confirm the previously reported anomalous period from Her X-1. Meanwhile, the old 6 mirror telescope has been refitted with 26 high resolution mirrors and improved fast electronics. GRANDE, the next generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique, has been formally proposed to HEPAP. The detector will search for neutrino emission in the Southern Hemisphere and gamma radiation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  4. High School Physics Courses & Enrollments: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    This report examines enrollments in high school physics during the 2012-13 school year. Based on data from the most recent survey (which includes both public and private high schools in the U.S.), it is estimated that 39% of the class of 2013 took high school physics before graduating. During the 2012-13 school year, 1.38 million students were…

  5. Indiana University high energy physics, Task A

    SciTech Connect

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A.; Hanson, G.; Martin, H.; Marshall, T.; Mir, R.; Mouthy, T.; Ogren, H.; Rust, D.; Teige, S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.

    1992-01-01

    During this reporting period the group has been carrying out programs in several areas. These are presented in this paper is follows: The group was a collaborator in the Mark II experiment at the SLC and completed analysis on the experiment. Three students completed their theses this reporting period; the group is the prime mover in (E672), a high mass dimuon experiment which now in its final data collection period. Our group is also a collaborator in the DO collider experiment which is now preparing for the first data run in 1992; the group is a collaborator in the OPAL experiment at LEP which is now taking data. The group also is working on the development of a major offline facility shift and on a silicon vertex chamber for 1993; the group is the prime mover in the construction of a major new experiment (E852) in precision meson spectroscopy. A test run is presently underway and data taking will begin in 1993; and the group is a prime mover in the tracking design of the SDC experiment. The SDC has completed the Technical Design report. Construction will begin in 1993.

  6. Status of neural network hardware in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denby, Bruce

    2001-08-01

    This paper examines the current status of hardware implementations of neural networks in high energy physics experiments, as reflected in the applications presented at ACAT 2000, Fermilab, October, 2000.

  7. Final Report. Research in Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeffrey P.; Golterman, Maarten F.L.

    2015-04-30

    Grant-supported research in theoretical high-energy physics, conducted in the period 1992-2015 is briefly described, and a full listing of published articles result from those research activities is supplied.

  8. Improving High School Physics Through An Outreach Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2006-04-01

    We want to discuss our outreach initiative at Jacksonville State University designed to help improve the teaching of physics at a number of high schools in Northeast Alabama. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. IMPACTSEED is designed to achieve a double aim: (a) to make physics and chemistry understandable and fun to learn within a hands-on, inquiry-based setting; (b) to overcome the fear-factor for physics and chemistry among students. Through a two-week long summer institute, a series of weekend workshops designed to help bring technology into physics classrooms, onsite support, and a hotline, we have been providing year-round support to the physics/chemistry teachers in this area. IMPACTSEED aims at providing our students with a physics/chemistry education that enjoys a great deal of continuity and consistency from high school to college.

  9. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  10. High School Physics Courses & Enrollments: Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S., both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. They received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  11. Who Teaches High School Physics? Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S., both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. They received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  12. Understanding Electrochemistry Concepts Using the Predict-Observe-Explain Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamustafaoglu, Sevilay; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The current study deals with freshman students who study at the Department of Science at the Faculty of Education. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of teaching electrochemistry concepts using Predict-Observe-Explain (POE) strategy. The study was quasi-experimental design using 20 students each in the experimental group (EG) and…

  13. Using a Teaching Model To Correct Known Misconceptions in Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddle, Penelope Ann; White, Margaret Dawn; Rogers, Fiona

    2000-01-01

    Describes a concrete teaching model designed to eliminate students' misconceptions about current flow in electrochemistry. The model uses a semi-permeable membrane rather than a salt bridge to complete the circuit and demonstrate the maintenance of cell neutrality. Concludes that use of the model led to improvement in students' understanding at…

  14. The 16th James L. Waters Annual Symposium: Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Adrian C.

    2007-04-01

    The 16th Annual James L. Waters Symposium focused on electrochemistry, with emphasis on methods involving the flow of current. The speakers in this year's symposium are uniquely qualified to review the history of electroanalytical chemistry starting with Heyrovsky's initial studies and culminating with the present state of the art. Each has contributed significantly to the scientific, technical, and commercial development of the field.

  15. Common Student Misconceptions in Electrochemistry: Galvanic, Electrolytic, and Concentration Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates student (N=16) misconceptions concerning electrochemistry related to galvanic, electrolytic, and concentration cells. Findings indicate that most students demonstrating misconceptions were still able to calculate cell potentials correctly. Discusses common misconceptions and possible sources of these. Contains 33 references.…

  16. LCEC: The Combination of Liquid Chromatography and Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Peter T.

    1983-01-01

    Use of combined liquid chromatography and finite-current electrochemistry (LCEC) procedures are discussed. Also discusses the relationship between electroactivity and molecular structure, selectivity in LCEC, and LCEC applications. Because of its selectivity and low detection limits, the procedures are most often applied in biomedical and…

  17. Alleviating the Common Confusion Caused by Polarity in Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, P. J.; Gileadi, E.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is some of the confusion encountered in electrochemistry due to misunderstandings of sign conventions and simple mathematical errors. Clarified are issues involving emf series, IUPAC sign conventions, calculation of cell potentials, reference electrodes, the polarity of electrodes in electrochemical devices, and overpotential. (CW)

  18. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Cousins, Robert D.

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  19. High-Productivity Computing in Computational Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel-Zur, Guy

    2011-03-01

    We describe the development of a new course in Computational Physics at the Ben-Gurion University. This elective course for 3rd year undergraduates and MSc. students is being taught during one semester. Computational Physics is by now well accepted as the Third Pillar of Science. This paper's claim is that modern Computational Physics education should deal also with High-Productivity Computing. The traditional approach of teaching Computational Physics emphasizes ``Correctness'' and then ``Accuracy'' and we add also ``Performance.'' Along with topics in Mathematical Methods and case studies in Physics the course deals a significant amount of time with ``Mini-Courses'' in topics such as: High-Throughput Computing - Condor, Parallel Programming - MPI and OpenMP, How to build a Beowulf, Visualization and Grid and Cloud Computing. The course does not intend to teach neither new physics nor new mathematics but it is focused on an integrated approach for solving problems starting from the physics problem, the corresponding mathematical solution, the numerical scheme, writing an efficient computer code and finally analysis and visualization.

  20. Integration of electrochemistry in micro-total analysis systems for biochemical assays: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Song; Chen, Hui; Kong, Jilie

    2009-11-15

    Micro-total analysis systems (microTAS) integrate different analytical operations like sample preparation, separation and detection into a single microfabricated device. With the outstanding advantages of low cost, satisfactory analytical efficiency and flexibility in design, highly integrated and miniaturized devices from the concept of microTAS have gained widespread applications, especially in biochemical assays. Electrochemistry is shown to be quite compatible with microanalytical systems for biochemical assays, because of its attractive merits such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, reduced power consumption, and sample/reagent economy. This review presents recent developments in the integration of electrochemistry in microdevices for biochemical assays. Ingenious microelectrode design and fabrication methods, and versatility of electrochemical techniques are involved. Practical applications of such integrated microsystem in biochemical assays are focused on in situ analysis, point-of-care testing and portable devices. Electrochemical techniques are apparently suited to microsystems, since easy microfabrication of electrochemical elements and a high degree of integration with multi-analytical functions can be achieved at low cost. Such integrated microsystems will play an increasingly important role for analysis of small volume biochemical samples. Work is in progress toward new microdevice design and applications.

  1. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: Bulgarians Sue CERN for Leniency.

    PubMed

    Koenig, R

    2000-10-13

    In cash-strapped Bulgaria, scientists are wondering whether a ticket for a front-row seat in high-energy physics is worth the price: Membership dues in CERN, the European particle physics lab, nearly equal the country's entire budget for competitive research grants. Faced with that grim statistic and a plea for leniency from Bulgaria's government, CERN's governing council is considering slashing the country's membership dues for the next 2 years.

  2. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  3. Gender Differences in High School Students' Interests in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Medine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the interests of high school students in Physics and variable of how the influential factors on their interests depending on gender. The research sample included 154 (F:78 M:76) high school students. A structured interview form was used as the data collection tool in the study. The research data were…

  4. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. [UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, Charles D.; Cline, David B.; Byers, N.; Ferrara, S.; Peccei, R.; Hauser, Jay; Muller, Thomas; Atac, Muzaffer; Slater, William; Cousins, Robert; Arisaka, Katsushi

    1992-01-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R D.

  5. The use of nuclear physics and high energy physics detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina

    2013-06-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late '70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this paper we will try to present how Nuclear Physics/High Energy Physics and Medical Imaging have both benefited by the cross-fertilization of research activities between the two fields and how much they will take advantage in the future.

  6. High Energy Physics at Tufts University Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Gary R.; Oliver, William P.; Napier, Austin; Gallagher, Hugh R.

    2012-07-18

    In this Final Report, we the researchers of the high energy physics group at Tufts University summarize our works and achievements in three frontier areas of elementary particle physics: (i) Neutrino physics at the Intensity Frontier, (ii) Collider physics at the Energy Frontier, and (iii) Theory investigations of spin structure and quark-gluon dynamics of nucleons using quantum chromodynamics. With our Neutrino research we completed, or else brought to a useful state, the following: Data-taking, physics simulations, physics analysis, physics reporting, explorations of matter effects, and detector component fabrication. We conducted our work as participants in the MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE neutrino oscillation experiments and in the MINERvA neutrino scattering experiment. With our Collider research we completed or else brought to a useful state: Data-taking, development of muon system geometry and tracking codes, software validation and maintenance, physics simulations, physics analysis, searches for new particles, and study of top-quark and B-quark systems. We conducted these activities as participants in the ATLAS proton-proton collider experiment at CERN and in the CDF proton-antiproton collider experiment at Fermilab. In our Theory research we developed QCD-based models, applications of spin phenomenology to fundamental systems, fitting of models to data, presenting and reporting of new concepts and formalisms. The overarching objectives of our research work have always been: 1) to test and clarify the predictions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and 2) to discover new phenomena which may point the way to a more unified theoretical framework.

  7. Physics Teachers' Behavioral, Control and Normative Beliefs about Teaching Physics According to the National High School Physics Curriculum in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yildirim, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    In Turkey, a new Turkish High School Physics Curriculum (THSPC) was put into practice, starting initially with the Grade 9 in the 2008-2009 education-year. When compared with the previous ones, this curriculum emphasized the importance of students' active involvement in learning, use of real-life contexts and development of new skills. Even though…

  8. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; De Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics programs at the University of Colorado are reported. Areas of concentration include the following: study of the properties of the Z[sup 0] with the SLD detector; fixed-target K-decay experiments; the R D program for the muon system: the SDC detector; high-energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; electron--positron physics with the CLEO II detector at CESR; lattice QCD; and spin models and dynamically triangulated random surfaces. 24 figs., 2 tabs., 117 refs.

  9. Problem solving workshop for physics teachers at Venezuelan High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, Maria Maite

    1997-03-01

    The Venezuelan Physics Olympiad is aimed at high school students. The syllabus at the high school level includes mechanics, electricity and magnetism, vibrations and waves, optics, fluid statics, and energy and its transformations. The Venezuelan Physics Olympiad consists of three tests. The preliminary test has 20 problems. They are multiple choice questions with a choice of five options. The theory test has 8 or 10 open-ended problems and the experimental final test is a problem whose solution it is made at the laboratory. The results of the five Venezuelan Physics Olympiads, 1991-1995, were analyzed. It was found that students solve physics problems the same way they solve mathematics exercises (1, 2). They emphasized the mathematical processes too much and paid little attention to description and analysis of the physical situation involved. Also, we observed that students did not develop experimental skills at school and their experience with laboratory work is very poor. According to these results, we designed two workshops for in-service physics teachers. One workshop focuses on solving pencil-and-paper-type problems, and the other one provides knowledge and skills about experimental work. Both workshops are designed with a cognitive approach (3-7).

  10. High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Liss, Tony M.; Thaler, Jon J.

    2013-07-26

    This is the final report for DOE award DE-FG02-91ER40677 (“High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois”), covering the award period November 1, 2009 through April 30, 2013. During this period, our research involved particle physics at Fermilab and CERN, particle physics related cosmology at Fermilab and SLAC, and theoretical particle physics. Here is a list of the activities described in the final report: * The CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron * Search For Lepton Flavor Violation in the Mu2e Experiment At Fermilab * The ATLAS Collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider * the Study of Dark Matter and Dark Energy: DES and LSST * Lattice QCD * String Theory and Field Theory * Collider Phenomenology

  11. Conceptual design and experiments of electrochemistry-flushing technology for the remediation of historically Cr(Ⅵ)-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Sun, Delin; Hu, Siyang; Hu, Jing; Yuan, Xingzhong

    2016-02-01

    A conceptual design and experiments, electrochemistry-flushing (E-flushing), using electrochemistry to enhance flushing efficiency for the remediation of Cr(Ⅵ)-contaminated soil is presented. The rector contained three compartments vertically superposed. The upper was airtight cathode compartment containing an iron-cathode. The middle was soil layer. The bottom was anode compartment containing an iron-anode and connected to a container by circulation pumps. H2 and OH(-) ions were produced at cathode. H2 increased the gas pressure in cathode compartment and drove flushing solution into soil layer forming flushing process. OH(-) ions entered into soil layer by eletromigration and hydraulic flow to enhance the desorption of Cr(Ⅵ). High potential gradient was applied to accelerate the electromigration of desorbed Cr(Ⅵ) ions and produced joule heat to increase soil temperature to enhance Cr(Ⅵ) desorption. In anode compartment, Fe(2+) ions produced at iron-anode reduced the desorbed Cr(Ⅵ) into Cr(3+) ions, which reacted with OH(-) ions forming Cr(OH)3. Experimental results show that Cr(Ⅵ) removal efficiency of E-flushing experiments was more than double of flushing experiments and reached the maximum of removal efficiency determined by desorption kinetics. All electrochemistry processes were positively used in E-flushing technology.

  12. Laboratory for Nuclear Science. High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard

    2014-07-30

    High energy and nuclear physics research at MIT is conducted within the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS). Almost half of the faculty in the MIT Physics Department carry out research in LNS at the theoretical and experimental frontiers of subatomic physics. Since 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded the high energy physics research program through grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 (other grants and cooperative agreements provided decades of support prior to 2004). The Director of LNS serves as PI. The grant supports the research of four groups within LNS as “tasks” within the umbrella grant. Brief descriptions of each group are given here. A more detailed report from each task follows in later sections. Although grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 has ended, DOE continues to fund LNS high energy physics research through five separate grants (a research grant for each of the four groups, as well as a grant for AMS Operations). We are pleased to continue this longstanding partnership.

  13. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  14. Particle Physics in High School: A Diagnose Study.

    PubMed

    Tuzón, Paula; Solbes, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The science learning process improves when the contents are connected to students' lives. Particle physics has had a great impact in our society in the last years and has changed the theoretical picture about matter fundamental dynamics. Thus, we think that academic contents about matter components and interactions should be updated. With this study we aim to characterize the level of knowledge of high school students about this topic. We built a test with questions about classical atomic models, particle physics, recent discoveries, social implications and students opinions about it. Contrary to our first suspicion, students' answers show a high variability. They have new physics ideas and show a great interest towards modern concepts. We suggest including an updated view of this topic as part of the curriculum.

  15. Particle Physics in High School: A Diagnose Study

    PubMed Central

    Solbes, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The science learning process improves when the contents are connected to students’ lives. Particle physics has had a great impact in our society in the last years and has changed the theoretical picture about matter fundamental dynamics. Thus, we think that academic contents about matter components and interactions should be updated. With this study we aim to characterize the level of knowledge of high school students about this topic. We built a test with questions about classical atomic models, particle physics, recent discoveries, social implications and students opinions about it. Contrary to our first suspicion, students’ answers show a high variability. They have new physics ideas and show a great interest towards modern concepts. We suggest including an updated view of this topic as part of the curriculum. PMID:27253377

  16. Harvard University High Energy Physics. [Annual report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The mainly experimental research program in high energy physics at Harvard is summarized in a descriptive fashion according to the following outline: Proton{endash}antiproton colliding beam program at Fermilab -- CDF (forward/backward electromagnetic calorimeters -- FEM, central muon extension -- CMX, gas calorimetry and electronics development, front-end electronics upgrades, software development, physics analysis, timetable), electron -- positron collisions in the upsilon region -- CLEO (the hardware projects including CLEO II barrel TOF system and silicon drift detector R&D, physics analysis), search for {nu}{sub {mu}} to {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations with the NOMAD experiment at CERN, the solenoidal detector collaboration at the SSC, muon scattering at FNAL -- E665, the L3 experiment, and phenomenological analysis of high-energy {bar p}p cross sections. 149 refs.

  17. Direct electrochemistry of GOD on nitrogen-doped porous carbon and its biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Liu, Hongyu; Chen, Shouhui; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped porous carbon (N-DPC) was prepared via a simple and effective method and was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the N-DPC with two type reticular porosities in an average diameter of 10-100 nm has a large specific surface area, which is favorable to immobilize the redox proteins for constructing biosensors. Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD) on the N-DPC-modified electrode was investigated. UV-vis spectroscopy showed that GOD retained its catalytic activity in the N-DPC film. Electrochemical results indicated that the modified electrode exhibited effective direct electron transfer. It demonstrated that such N-DPC could provide a good matrix for direct electrochemistry of enzymes. A novel biosensor was developed by entrapping GOD in the N-DPC-modified electrode for glucose detection and showed a stable, rapid, and reproducible electrocatalytic response, a high sensitivity, a wide linear range and a low detection limit. Moreover, the biosensor can be applied in practical analysis and exhibit good reproducibility and long-term stability.

  18. Scanning thermo-ionic microscopy for probing local electrochemistry at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghinejad, Ahmadreza; Nasr Esfahani, Ehsan; Wang, Peiqi; Xie, Shuhong; Geary, Timothy C.; Adler, Stuart B.; Li, Jiangyu

    2016-05-01

    Conventional electrochemical characterization techniques based on voltage and current measurements only probe faradaic and capacitive rates in aggregate. In this work we develop a scanning thermo-ionic microscopy (STIM) to probe local electrochemistry at the nanoscale, based on imaging of Vegard strain induced by thermal oscillation. It is demonstrated from both theoretical analysis and experimental validation that the second harmonic response of thermally induced cantilever vibration, associated with thermal expansion, is present in all solids, whereas the fourth harmonic response, caused by local transport of mobile species, is only present in ionic materials. The origin of STIM response is further confirmed by its reduced amplitude with respect to increased contact force, due to the coupling of stress to concentration of ionic species and/or electronic defects. The technique has been applied to probe Sm-doped Ceria and LiFePO4, both of which exhibit higher concentrations of mobile species near grain boundaries. The STIM gives us a powerful method to study local electrochemistry with high sensitivity and spatial resolution for a wide range of ionic systems, as well as ability to map local thermomechanical response.

  19. Electrochemistry coupled to (LC-)MS for the simulation of oxidative biotransformation reactions of PAHs.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Tina; Seidel, Albrecht; Karst, Uwe

    2017-02-27

    Electrochemistry coupled to liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry was used for simulating the biological and environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as for studying the PAH degradation behavior during electrochemical remediation. Pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene were selected as model compounds and oxidized within an electrochemical thin-layer cell equipped with boron-doped diamond electrode. At potentials of 1.2 and 1.6 V vs. Pd/H2, quinones were found to be the major oxidation products for both investigated PAHs. These quinones belong to a large group of PAH derivatives referred to as oxygenated PAHs, which have gained increasing attention in recent years due to their high abundance in the environment and their significant toxicity. Separation of oxidation products allowed the identification of two pyrene quinone and three benzo[a]pyrene quinone isomers, all of which are known to be formed via photooxidation and during mammalian metabolism. The good correlation between electrochemically generated PAH quinones and those formed in natural processes was also confirmed by UV irradiation experiments and microsomal incubations. At potentials higher than 2.0 V, further degradation of the initial oxidation products was observed which highlights the capability of electrochemistry to be used as remediation technique.

  20. Environmental Learning Experiences: Bio-Physical, Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junglas, Mary R.; And Others

    This environmental education curriculum guide was developed for teacher use at the junior high school level. Although the guide deals with the bio-physical aspects of the environment, it is designed to encourage an integration of the disciplines into an inter-disciplinary approach. The volume consists of a set of ideas, activities, and opinions…

  1. Environmental Learning Experiences: Bio-Physical, Senior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junglas, Mary R.; And Others

    This environmental education curriculum guide was developed for teacher use at the senior high school level. Although the guide deals with the bio-physical aspects of the environment, it is designed to encourage an integration of the disciplines into an inter-disciplinary approach. The volume consists of a set of ideas, activities, and opinions…

  2. Strenuous physical exercise inhibits granulocyte activation induced by high altitude.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, Alexander; Demetz, Florian; Martignoni, André; Smith, Leslie; Setzer, Florian; Bauer, Andreas; Hölzl, Joseph; Peter, Klaus; Christ, Frank; Thiel, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    To test the hypothesis of whether strenuous physical exercise inhibits neutrophils that can get activated by hypobaric hypoxia, we analyzed the effects of both high altitude and strenuous exercise alone and in combination on potentially cytotoxic functions of granulocytes in healthy volunteers (n = 12 men; average age 27.6 yr; range 24-38 yr). To this end, a field study was prospectively performed with an open-labeled within-subject design comprising three protocols. Protocol I (high altitude) involved a helicopter ascent, overnight stay at 3,196 m, and descent on the following day. Protocol II (physical exercise) involved hiking below an altitude of 2,100 m with repetitive ascents amounting to a total ascent to that of protocol III. Protocol III (combination of physical exercise and high altitude) involved climbing from 1,416 to 3,196 m, stay overnight, and descent on the following day. In protocol I, number of granulocytes did not change, but potentially cytotoxic functions of cells (CD18 expression and superoxide production) were early and significantly upregulated. In protocol II, subjects developed granulocytosis, but functions of cells were inhibited. In protocol III, granulocytosis occurred at higher values than those observed under protocol II. Potentially cytotoxic functions of cells, however, were strongly inhibited again. In conclusion, high altitude alone, even moderate in extent, can activate potentially cytotoxic functions of circulating granulocytes. Strenuous physical exercise strongly inhibits this activation, which may give protection from an otherwise inflammatory injury.

  3. Physical Activity in High School during "Free-Time" Periods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Sousa, Michael; Sá, Carla; Ribeiro, José; Mota, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine youth physical activity (PA) in free-time periods during high school days and their contribution to total PA. Differences in terms of sex, age, body mass index and school level were assessed in a sample of Portuguese adolescents. Participants totalled 213 (135 girls), aged 14.6 ± 1.7, from two different…

  4. "Slow Science": Building Scientific Concepts in Physics in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigozzi, Lucia; Tarchi, Christian; Falsini, Paola; Fiorentini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a progressive-learning approach to physics, based on knowledge-building pedagogy, was compared to a content-centered approach in which explanations, experiments, and discussions are centered on the transmission of knowledge. Forty-six students attending the first year of high school participated in this study over a whole school…

  5. Teaching RLC Parallel Circuits in High-School Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Alpár

    2015-01-01

    This paper will try to give an alternative treatment of the subject "parallel RLC circuits" and "resonance in parallel RLC circuits" from the Physics curricula for the XIth grade from Romanian high-schools, with an emphasis on practical type circuits and their possible applications, and intends to be an aid for both Physics…

  6. Weighting mean timers for high energy physics electronics

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wu

    1998-11-01

    A new family of electronics circuits, weighting mean timer, is presented in this technical memo. Weighting mean timers can be used in high energy physics experiment electronics to implement the \\concurrence" condition in hardware trigger stage. Several possible architectures of weighting mean timers have been discussed.

  7. Teaching High School Physics with a Story-Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagenais, Andre

    2010-01-01

    High school physics curricula are designed to meet a number of goals, all of which compete for classroom and homework time. The process-oriented goals include the development of skills in problem solving, measurement, analyzing data, and research, particularly in this world of internet based, unfiltered information. Content goals, on the other…

  8. Stellar Evolution and Cosmology in High School Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Claudine

    1979-01-01

    Described is a three-week unit on stellar evolution and cosmology taught as part of a one-year introductory high school physics course for seniors. Prerequisite topics necessary for a student's understanding of the material and topics covered during the unit are presented. (BT)

  9. High-energy Physics with Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.

    1958-03-07

    Recent experience with liquid hydrogen bubble chambers of 25 and 40 cm dia. in high-energy physics experiments is discussed. Experiments described are: interactions of K{sup -} mesons with protons, interactions of antiprotons with protons, catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions by muons, and production and decay of hyperons from negative pions. (W.D.M.)

  10. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  11. Effectiveness of "Tutorials for Introductory Physics" in Argentinean High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benegas J.; Flores, J. Sirur

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study reports the results of a replication of "Tutorials in Introductory Physics" in high schools of a Latin-American country. The main objective of this study was to examine the suitability of "Tutorials" for local science education reform. Conceptual learning of simple resistive electric circuits was…

  12. The Distinguishing Characteristics of High Schools with High and Low Enrollments in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Koevering, Thomas E.

    This paper presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study designed to determine if high schools with either high or low enrollments in physics exhibit any distinguishing characteristics that are measurable. The study involved 48 schools, 51 physics teachers, and 3767 students in the State of Michigan. Questionnaires were administered…

  13. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-06-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials.

  14. Developing adaptive QM/MM computer simulations for electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dohm, Sebastian; Spohr, Eckhard; Korth, Martin

    2017-01-05

    We report the development of adaptive QM/MM computer simulations for electrochemistry, providing public access to all sources via the free and open source software development model. We present a modular workflow-based MD simulation code as a platform for algorithms for partitioning space into different regions, which can be treated at different levels of theory on a per-timestep basis. Currently implemented algorithms focus on targeting molecules and their solvation layers relevant to electrochemistry. Instead of using built-in forcefields and quantum mechanical methods, the code features a universal interface, which allows for extension to a range of external forcefield programs and programs for quantum mechanical calculations, thus enabling the user to readily implement interfaces to those programs. The purpose of this article is to describe our codes and illustrate its usage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials. PMID:27283872

  16. Modular safety interlock system for high energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, J.; Golceff, B.V.

    1980-10-01

    A frequent problem in electronics systems for high energy physics experiments is to provide protection for personnel and equipment. Interlock systems are typically designed as an afterthought and as a result, the working environment around complex experiments with many independent high voltages or hazardous gas subsystems, and many different kinds of people involved, can be particularly dangerous. A set of modular hardware has been designed which makes possible a standardized, intergrated, hierarchical system's approach and which can be easily tailored to custom requirements.

  17. Monolithic electronics for nuclear and high-energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G.R.

    1994-12-31

    Electronic instrumentation for large fixed-target and collider experiments is rapidly moving to the use of highly integrated electronics wherever it is cost effective. This trend is aided by the development of circuit building blocks useful for nuclear and high-energy physics instrumentation and has accelerated recently with the development of monolithic silicon chips with multiple functions on one substrate. Examples of recent developments are given, together with remarks on the rationale for use of monolithic electronics and economic considerations.

  18. Numerical relativity and high energy physics: Recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luis C. B.; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    We review recent progress in the application of numerical relativity techniques to astrophysics and high-energy physics. We focus on recent developments regarding the spin evolution in black hole binaries, high-energy black hole collisions, compact object solutions in scalar-tensor gravity, superradiant instabilities, hairy black hole solutions in Einstein’s gravity coupled to fundamental fields, and the possibility to gain insight into these phenomena using analog gravity models.

  19. Synthesis, Electrochemistry, and Photophysics of Aza-BODIPY Porphyrin Dyes.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Simon; Bucher, Léo; Desbois, Nicolas; Bucher, Christophe; Andraud, Chantal; Gros, Claude P

    2016-03-24

    The synthesis of dyad and triad aza-BODIPY-porphyrin systems in two steps starting from an aryl-substituted aza-BODIPY chromophore is described. The properties of the resulting aza-BODIPY-porphyrin conjugates have been extensively investigated by means of electrochemistry, spectroelectrochemistry, and absorption/emission spectroscopy. Fluorescence measurements have revealed a dramatic loss of luminescence intensity, mainly due to competitive energy transfer and photoinduced electron transfer involving charge separation followed by recombination.

  20. Prospective Physics Teachers' Views on Their Knowledge about the New Concepts in Turkish High School Physics Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yildirim, Ufuk

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to a) investigate prospective physics teachers' views on their knowledge about new physics concepts introduced in Turkish High School Physics Curricula; b) investigate the sources of their acquired knowledge about these new physics concepts; and c) explore if there were differences in views on knowledge about these…

  1. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  2. 2010 ELECTROCHEMISTRY GRC, JANUARY 9-15, 2010, VENTURA, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Creager

    2010-12-31

    Electrochemical science plays a crucial role in many important technologies and is intimately involved in many natural phenomena. Several new Gordon Research Conferences have appeared recently that are dedicated to electrochemical technologies, however electrochemistry as a discipline continues to thrive and provide the underpinnings of these technologies. The 2010 Electrochemistry GRC will focus on a wide range of fundamental electrochemical phenomena and materials and on their application in areas involving energy storage, information storage, chemical analysis, and motion actuation. The meeting will include sessions dedicated to the following specific topics: electrochemical energy storage (e.g. batteries; at least two sessions); electrochemical motion actuation (e.g. electrokinesis); electrocatalysis; electrochemistry in digital information storage; and bioelectrochemistry (including bioanalysis). An Open Session devoted to highlighting the activities of {approx}10 young investigators and non-North American visitors via brief 10-minute talks, and two open poster sessions highlighting the contributions of approximately 60 conference participants including graduate students, will be held. Altogether the conference is expected to include approximately 90 presentations. As has been the case in the recent past, the meeting will bring together participants from academia, national labs, and the private sector, including senior and junior-level scientists, postdoctoral scientists, and graduate students for informal interactions and exchange of ideas. An affiliated Gordon-Kenan Research Seminar (GRS) will also be held with the conference. Special efforts will be made to invite participation from members of underrepresented groups.

  3. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  4. Massive affordable computing using ARM processors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-05-01

    High Performance Computing is relevant in many applications around the world, particularly high energy physics. Experiments such as ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb generate huge amounts of data which need to be stored and analyzed at server farms located on site at CERN and around the world. Apart from the initial cost of setting up an effective server farm the cost of power consumption and cooling are significant. The proposed solution to reduce costs without losing performance is to make use of ARM® processors found in nearly all smartphones and tablet computers. Their low power consumption, low cost and respectable processing speed makes them an interesting choice for future large scale parallel data processing centers. Benchmarks on the CortexTM-A series of ARM® processors including the HPL and PMBW suites will be presented as well as preliminary results from the PROOF benchmark in the context of high energy physics will be analyzed.

  5. Parameterized neural networks for high-energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Pierre; Cranmer, Kyle; Faucett, Taylor; Sadowski, Peter; Whiteson, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    We investigate a new structure for machine learning classifiers built with neural networks and applied to problems in high-energy physics by expanding the inputs to include not only measured features but also physics parameters. The physics parameters represent a smoothly varying learning task, and the resulting parameterized classifier can smoothly interpolate between them and replace sets of classifiers trained at individual values. This simplifies the training process and gives improved performance at intermediate values, even for complex problems requiring deep learning. Applications include tools parameterized in terms of theoretical model parameters, such as the mass of a particle, which allow for a single network to provide improved discrimination across a range of masses. This concept is simple to implement and allows for optimized interpolatable results.

  6. Methods for Probing New Physics at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Peter B.

    This dissertation covers two broad topics. The title, " Methods for Probing New Physics at High Energies," hopefully encompasses both of them. The first topic is located in part I of this work and is about integral dispersion relations. This is a technique to probe for new physics at energy scales near to the machine energy of a collider. For example, a hadron collider taking data at a given energy is typically only sensitive to new physics occurring at energy scales about a factor of five to ten beneath the actual machine energy due to parton distribution functions. This technique is sensitive to physics happening directly beneath the machine energy in addition to the even more interesting case: directly above. Precisely where this technique is sensitive is one of the main topics of this area of research. The other topic is located in part II and is about cosmic ray anisotropy at the highest energies. The unanswered questions about cosmic rays at the highest energies are numerous and interconnected in complicated ways. What may be the first piece of the puzzle to fall into place is determining their sources. This work looks to determine if and when the use of spherical harmonics becomes sensitive enough to determine these sources. The completed papers for this work can be found online. For part I on integral dispersion relations see reference published in Physical Review D. For part II on cosmic ray anisotropy, there are conference proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The analysis of the location of an experiment on anisotropy reconstruction is, and the comparison of different experiments' abilities to reconstruct anisotropies is published in The Astrophysical Journal and the Journal of High Energy Astrophysics respectively. While this dissertation is focused on three papers completed with Tom Weiler at Vanderbilt University, other papers were completed at the same time. The first was with Nicusor Arsene, Lauretiu Caramete, and

  7. Reaching the Critical Mass: The Twenty Year Surge in High School Physics. Findings from the 2005 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. AIP Report. Number R-442

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuschatz, Michael; McFarling, Mark; White, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This report traces the growth of high school physics in American school over the past twenty years. Highlights of the report include: (1) Enrollments in high school physics continue to grow; (2) Increase in number and proportion of physics teachers; (3) Number of students taking honors, advance placement or second-year physics course has nearly…

  8. A Comparison of the Fitness, Obesity, and Physical Activity Levels of High School Physical Education Students across Race and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kathryn L.; Wojcik, Janet R.; DeWaele, Christi S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the physical fitness, obesity, and physical activity (PA) levels of high school students in physical education classes when comparing racial and gender groups. Purpose: To compare the fitness, obesity, and PA levels of female and male students of different racial groups in 6 high schools in the southeastern…

  9. Evaluation of Monte Carlo tools for high energy atmospheric physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, Casper; Sarria, David; Broberg Skeltved, Alexander; Luque, Alejandro; Diniz, Gabriel; Østgaard, Nikolai; Ebert, Ute

    2016-11-01

    The emerging field of high energy atmospheric physics (HEAP) includes terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, electron-positron beams and gamma-ray glows from thunderstorms. Similar emissions of high energy particles occur in pulsed high voltage discharges. Understanding these phenomena requires appropriate models for the interaction of electrons, positrons and photons of up to 40 MeV energy with atmospheric air. In this paper, we benchmark the performance of the Monte Carlo codes Geant4, EGS5 and FLUKA developed in other fields of physics and of the custom-made codes GRRR and MC-PEPTITA against each other within the parameter regime relevant for high energy atmospheric physics. We focus on basic tests, namely on the evolution of monoenergetic and directed beams of electrons, positrons and photons with kinetic energies between 100 keV and 40 MeV through homogeneous air in the absence of electric and magnetic fields, using a low energy cutoff of 50 keV. We discuss important differences between the results of the different codes and provide plausible explanations. We also test the computational performance of the codes. The Supplement contains all results, providing a first benchmark for present and future custom-made codes that are more flexible in including electrodynamic interactions.

  10. Scintillation counters in modern high-energy physics experiments (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzheev, Yu. N.

    2015-07-01

    Scintillation counters (SCs) based on organic plastic scintillators (OPSs) are widely used in modern high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. A comprehensive review is given to technologies for production of OPS strips and tiles (extrusion, injection molding, etc.), optical and physical characteristics of OPSs, and methods of light collection based on the use of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers coupled to multipixel vacuum and silicon PMs. Examples are given of the use of SCs in modern experiments involved in the search for quarks and new particles, including the Higgs boson (D0, CDF, ATLAS, CMS), new states of matter (ALICE), CP violation (LHCb, KLOE), neutrino oscillations (MINOS, OPERA), and cosmic particles in a wide mass and energy interval (AMS-02). Scintillation counters hold great promise for future HEP experiments (at the ILC, NICA, FAIR) due to properties of a high segmentation, WLS fiber light collection, and multipixel silicon PMT readout.

  11. Insights into Physics of Fluid Turbulence Using High Resolution Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-Y.

    2001-06-01

    Turbulence is of universal importance in fluid flows. Its correct description thereby impacts such diverse fields as atmospheric pollutant dispersion, weather, commercial chemical processes, aircraft design, ship design, and ocean dynamics. The challenge of understanding turbulence, ``the last unsolved problem in classical statistical mechanics'' (according to Feynman), has been with us over 100 years. The difficulties in the physical understanding and modeling of fluid turbulence arise from the fundamental dynamical properties: strong nonlinearity; the simultaneous presence and interaction of a huge number of degrees of freedom, comprising a wide range of spatial scales; marked departure from statistical equilibrium. With emerging multi-teraflop computers, direct numerical simulation of fluid turbulence at high Reynolds numbers is becoming possible. In this talk, I will give an overview about the latest development of understanding fundamental physics of fluid turbulence, including two-D and three-D Navier-Stokes turbulence and passive scalar advection diffusion system, using high resolution numerical simulation.

  12. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  13. 35th International Conference of High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The French particle physics community is particularly proud to have been selected to host the 35th ICHEP conference in 2010 in Paris. This conference is the focal point of all our field since more than fifty years and is the reference event where all important results in particle physics cosmology and astroparticles are presented and discussed. This alone suffices to make this event very important. But in 2010, a coincidence of exceptional events will make this conference even more attractive! What is then so special about ICHEP 2010 conference? It will be the first ICHEP conference where physics results obtained at the LHC will be presented! New results about the elusive Higgs boson, or signals of physics beyond the standard model might therefore be announced at this conference! Major discoveries in other domains such as gravitational waves, neutrino telescopes, neutrino oscillations, dark matter or in the flavour sector are also possible, just to name a few. In addition , 2010 will be an important date to shape up the future of our field. Several major projects will present the status of their Conceptual or Engineering Design Reports during the conference. The International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort team will present the report corresponding to the end of their Technical Design Phase 1. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will also report on its Conceptual Design Report. Other major projects such as Super B factories will also be presented. These reports together with LHC physics results will form the basis for key political decisions needed to be taken in the years to come. In summary, there can be no doubt that Paris is the place to be in summer 2010 for anyone interested in High Energy Physics and we will make every effort to make your stay as interesting and enjoyable as possible.

  14. HEPDOOP: High-Energy Physics Analysis using Hadoop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhimji, W.; Bristow, T.; Washbrook, A.

    2014-06-01

    We perform a LHC data analysis workflow using tools and data formats that are commonly used in the "Big Data" community outside High Energy Physics (HEP). These include Apache Avro for serialisation to binary files, Pig and Hadoop for mass data processing and Python Scikit-Learn for multi-variate analysis. Comparison is made with the same analysis performed with current HEP tools in ROOT.

  15. Studies in chemical physics through high-pressure luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Energy transfer in chelates of Eu/sup 3 +/ with ligands (dibenzylmethane) was studied as a function of pressure. Rate of thermal dissipation of electronic excitation was correlated with viscosity and dielectric constant for indoles in a series of solvents, and with pressure for porphyrins. Effects of medium (dielectric constant, viscosity) on complexes were studied. Studies on 3-hydroxyflavone are also summarized. These studies show the power of high pressure luminescence as a tool in chemical physics. 11 figures. (DLC)

  16. High energy physics - The large and the small

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Alberto

    2012-09-24

    In this Sixth International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, I was invited to give this talk to the students and researchers of Field Theory mainly about LHC - The Large Hadron Collider and results. I will try to summarize the main daily life of the high energy physics and give an idea about the experiments and the expectations for the near future. I will comment the present results and the prospects to LHC/CMS.

  17. Advanced Electrochemistry of Individual Metal Clusters Electrodeposited Atom by Atom to Nanometer by Nanometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeon; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2016-11-15

    Metal clusters are very important as building blocks for nanoparticles (NPs) for electrocatalysis and electroanalysis in both fundamental and applied electrochemistry. Attention has been given to understanding of traditional nucleation and growth of metal clusters and to their catalytic activities for various electrochemical applications in energy harvesting as well as analytical sensing. Importantly, understanding the properties of these clusters, primarily the relationship between catalysis and morphology, is required to optimize catalytic function. This has been difficult due to the heterogeneities in the size, shape, and surface properties. Thus, methods that address these issues are necessary to begin understanding the reactivity of individual catalytic centers as opposed to ensemble measurements, where the effect of size and morphology on the catalysis is averaged out in the measurement. This Account introduces our advanced electrochemical approaches to focus on each isolated metal cluster, where we electrochemically fabricated clusters or NPs atom by atom to nanometer by nanometer and explored their electrochemistry for their kinetic and catalytic behavior. Such approaches expand the dimensions of analysis, to include the electrochemistry of (1) a discrete atomic cluster, (2) solely a single NP, or (3) individual NPs in the ensemble sample. Specifically, we studied the electrocatalysis of atomic metal clusters as a nascent electrocatalyst via direct electrodeposition on carbon ultramicroelectrode (C UME) in a femtomolar metal ion precursor. In addition, we developed tunneling ultramicroelectrodes (TUMEs) to study electron transfer (ET) kinetics of a redox probe at a single metal NP electrodeposited on this TUME. Owing to the small dimension of a NP as an active area of a TUME, extremely high mass transfer conditions yielded a remarkably high standard ET rate constant, k(0), of 36 cm/s for outer-sphere ET reaction. Most recently, we advanced nanoscale

  18. Theoretical Problems in High Resolution Solar Physics, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, G. (Editor); Spicer, D. S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Science Working Group for the High Resolution Solar Observatory (HRSO) laid plans beginning in 1984 for a series of workshops designed to stimulate a broadbased input from the scientific community to the HRSO mission. These workshops have the dual objectives of encouraging an early start on the difficult theoretical problems in radiative transfer, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics that will be posed by the HRSO data, and maintaining current discussions of results in high resolution solar studies. This workshop was the second in the series. The workshop format presented invited review papers during the formal sessions and contributed poster papers for discussions during open periods. Both are presented.

  19. In-situ Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of adsorption in graphene electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    van den Beld, Wesley T. E.; Odijk, Mathieu; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Bol, Ageeth A.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C. T.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemistry on graphene is of particular interest due to graphene’s high surface area, high electrical conductivity and low interfacial capacitance. Because the graphene Fermi level can be probed by its strong Raman signal, information on the graphene doping can be obtained which in turn can provide information on adsorbed atoms or molecules. For this paper, the adsorption analysis was successfully performed using three electroactive substances with different electrode interaction mechanisms: hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex), ferrocenemethanol (FcMeOH) and potassium ferricyanide/potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6). The adsorption state was probed by analysing the G-peak position in the measured in-situ Raman spectrum during electrochemical experiments. We conclude that electrochemical Raman spectroscopy on graphene is a valuable tool to obtain in-situ information on adsorbed species on graphene, isolated from the rest of the electrochemical behaviour. PMID:28338094

  20. In-situ Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of adsorption in graphene electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Beld, Wesley T. E.; Odijk, Mathieu; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Bol, Ageeth A.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C. T.

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemistry on graphene is of particular interest due to graphene’s high surface area, high electrical conductivity and low interfacial capacitance. Because the graphene Fermi level can be probed by its strong Raman signal, information on the graphene doping can be obtained which in turn can provide information on adsorbed atoms or molecules. For this paper, the adsorption analysis was successfully performed using three electroactive substances with different electrode interaction mechanisms: hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex), ferrocenemethanol (FcMeOH) and potassium ferricyanide/potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(CN)6). The adsorption state was probed by analysing the G-peak position in the measured in-situ Raman spectrum during electrochemical experiments. We conclude that electrochemical Raman spectroscopy on graphene is a valuable tool to obtain in-situ information on adsorbed species on graphene, isolated from the rest of the electrochemical behaviour.

  1. PREFACE: High Energy Particle Physics Workshop (HEPPW2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Alan S.; Mellado, B.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation for this workshop began with the discovery of the Higgs boson three years ago, and the realisation that many problems remain in particle physics, such as why there is more matter than anti-matter, better determining the still poorly measured parameters of the strong force, explaining possible sources for dark matter, naturalness etc. While the newly discovered Higgs boson seems to be compatible with the Standard Model, current experimental accuracy is far from providing a definitive statement with regards to the nature of this new particle. There is a lot of room for physics beyond the Standard Model to emerge in the exploration of the Higgs boson. Recent measurements in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the LHC have shed light on the complex dynamics that govern high-density quark-gluon interactions. An array of results from the ALICE collaboration have been highlighted in a recent issue of CERN courier. The physics program of high-energy heavy ion collisions promises to further unveil the intricacies of high-density quark-gluon plasma physics. The great topicality of high energy physics research has also seen a rapid increase in the number of researchers in South Africa pursuing such studies, both experimentally through the ATLAS and ALICE colliders at CERN, and theoretically. Young researchers and graduate students largely populate these research groups, with little experience in presenting their work, and few support structures (to their knowledge) to share experiences with. Whilst many schools and workshops have sought to educate these students on the theories and tools they will need to pursue their research, few have provided them with a platform to present their work. As such, this workshop discussed the various projects being pursued by graduate students and young researchers in South Africa, enabling them to develop networks for future collaboration and discussion. The workshop took place at the iThemba Laboratories - North facility, in

  2. Software tools and frameworks in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, R.

    2011-01-01

    In many fields of science and industry the computing environment has grown at an exponential speed in the past 30 years. From ad hoc solutions for each problem, the field has evolved gradually to use or reuse systems developed across the years for the same environment or coming from other fields with the same requirements. Several frameworks have emerged to solve common problems. In High Energy Physics (HEP) and Nuclear Physics, we have witnessed the emergence of common tools, packages and libraries that have become gradually the corner stone of the computing in these fields. The emergence of these systems has been complex because the computing field is evolving rapidly, the problems to be solved more and more complex and the size of the experiments now involving several thousand physicists from all over the world. This paper describes the emergence of these frameworks and their evolution from libraries including independent subroutines to task-oriented packages and to general experiments frameworks.

  3. Collapsing Bubble in Metal for High Energy Density Physics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, S F; Barnard, J J; Leung, P T; Yu, S S

    2011-04-13

    This paper presents a new idea to produce matter in the high energy density physics (HEDP) regime in the laboratory using an intense ion beam. A gas bubble created inside a solid metal may collapse by driving it with an intense ion beam. The melted metal will compress the gas bubble and supply extra energy to it. Simulations show that the spherical implosion ratio can be about 5 and at the stagnation point, the maximum density, temperature and pressure inside the gas bubble can go up to nearly 2 times solid density, 10 eV and a few megabar (Mbar) respectively. The proposed experiment is the first to permit access into the Mbar regime with existing or near-term ion facilities, and opens up possibilities for new physics gained through careful comparisons of simulations with measurements of quantities like stagnation radius, peak temperature and peak pressure at the metal wall.

  4. Bringing Earth Magnetism Research into the High School Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Bluth, G.; Engel, E.; Kurpier, K.; Foucher, M. S.; Anderson, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present our work in progress from an NSF CAREER project that aims to integrate paleomagnetic research and secondary school physics education. The research project is aimed at quantifying the strength and geometry of the Precambrian geomagnetic field. Investigation of the geomagnetic field behavior is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of field generation, and the development of the Earth's atmosphere and biosphere, and can serve as a focus for connecting high-level Earth science research with a standard physics curriculum. High school science teachers have participated in each summer field and research component of the project, gaining field and laboratory research experience, sets of rock and mineral samples, and classroom-tested laboratory magnetism activities for secondary school physics and earth science courses. We report on three field seasons of teacher field experiences and two years of classroom testing of paleomagnetic research materials merged into physics instruction on magnetism. Students were surveyed before and after dedicated instruction for both perceptions and attitude towards earth science in general, then more specifically on earth history and earth magnetism. Students were also surveyed before and after instruction on major earth system and magnetic concepts and processes, particularly as they relate to paleomagnetic research. Most students surveyed had a strongly positive viewpoint towards the study of Earth history and the importance of studying Earth Sciences in general, but were significantly less drawn towards more specific topics such as mineralogy and magnetism. Students demonstrated understanding of Earth model and the basics of magnetism, as well as the general timing of life, atmospheric development, and magnetic field development. However, detailed knowledge such as the magnetic dynamo, how the magnetic field has changed over time, and connections between earth magnetism and the development of an atmosphere remained largely

  5. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the {mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  6. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Goshaw, Al; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water- lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  7. Optimizing liner implosions for high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Cylindrical metal shells imploded by magnetic fields - liners - are used as kinetic energy drivers for high energy density physics experiments in hydrodynamics and dynamic material property measurements. There are at least three ways in which liners have been, or are expected to be, used to produce high energy density, i.e., high pressure, in target materials. A common approach uses the liner as a convergent flyer plate, which impacts a material target cylinder after having been shocklessly accelerated across an intervening gap. The resultant shock and piston hydrodynamic flow in the target are used in exploration of a wide variety of phenomena and material properties. Another common method is to slowly compress a liner containing a material sample in a such fashion that little heating occurs. This technique is most useful for investigated physical properties at low temperature and extreme density. Finally, one can use a hybrid approach to shock heat with an impacting liner followed by slower adiabatic, if not isentropic, compression to explore material properties in extrema. The magnetic fields for driving these liners may be produced by either high explosive pulsed power generators or by capacitor banks. Here we will consider only capacitor banks.

  8. HEPAP White Paper on planning for U.S. high-energy physics [High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-01

    High-energy physicists seek to understand what the universe is made of, how it works, and where it has come from. They investigate the most basic particles and the forces between them. Experiments and theoretical insights over the past several decades have made it possible to see the deep connection between apparently unrelated phenomena, and to piece together more of the story of how a rich and complex cosmos could evolve from just a few kinds of elementary particles. The 1998 Subpanel of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) laid out a strategy for U.S. high-energy physics for the next decade. That strategy balanced exciting near-term opportunities with preparations for the most important discovery possibilities in the longer-term. Difficult choices were made to end several highly productive programs and to reduce others. This year HEPAP was charged to take the plan given in the Subpanel's report, understand it in the context of worldwide progress, and update it. In response to that charge, this White Paper provides an assessment of where we stand, states the next steps to take in the intermediate term, and serves as input for a longer range planning process involving a new HEPAP subpanel and high-energy physics community evaluation in 2001. Since the 1998 Subpanel, there have been important developments and a number of the Subpanel's recommendations have been implemented. Notably, construction of the B-factory at SLAC, the Main Injector at Fermilab, and the upgrade of CESR at Cornell have all been finished on schedule and on budget. We have gained great confidence in the performance of these accelerators and the associated detectors. The B-factory at SLAC is already operating above design luminosity and plans are in place to reach three times the design in the next few years. In addition, there have been major physics developments that lead us to believe that these completed projects are guaranteed to produce frontier physics results and have an

  9. Graphene electrochemistry: fundamental concepts through to prominent applications.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Dale A C; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2012-11-07

    The use of graphene, a one atom thick individual planar carbon layer, has exploded in a plethora of scientific disciplines since it was reported to possess a range of unique and exclusive properties. Despite graphene being explored theoretically since the 1940s and known to exist since the 1960s, the recent burst of interest from a large proportion of scientists globally can be correlated with work by Geim and Novoselov in 2004/5, who reported the so-called "scotch tape method" for the production of graphene in addition to identifying its unique electronic properties which has escalated into graphene being reported to be superior in a superfluity of areas. Consequently, many are involved in the pursuit of producing new methodologies to fabricate pristine graphene on an industrial scale in order to meet the current world-wide appetite for graphene. One area which receives considerable interest is the field of electrochemistry, where graphene has been reported to be beneficial in various applications ranging from sensing through to energy storage and generation and carbon based molecular electronics. Electrochemistry is an interfacial technique which is dominated by processes that occur at the solid-liquid interface and thus with the correct understanding can be beneficially utilised to characterise the surface under investigation. In this tutorial review we overview fundamental concepts of Graphene Electrochemistry, making electrochemical characterisation accessible to those who are working on new methodologies to fabricate graphene, bridging the gap between materials scientists and electrochemists and also assisting those exploring graphene in electrochemical areas, or that wish to start to. An overview of the recent understanding of graphene modified electrodes is also provided, highlighting prominent applications reported in the current literature.

  10. The importance of high-precision hadronic calorimetry to physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptman, John

    2016-11-01

    The reconstruction and high-precision measurement of the four-vectors of W and Z decays to quarks, which constitute nearly 70% of their decay branching fractions, are critical to a high efficiency and high quality experiment. Furthermore, it is crucial that the energy resolution, and consequently the resolution on the invariant mass of the two fragmenting quarks, is comparable to the energy-momentum resolution on the other particles of the standard model, in particular, electrons, photons, and muons, at energies around 100 GeV. I show that this “unification of resolutions” on all particles of the standard model is now in sight, and will lead to excellent physics at an electron-positron collider.

  11. Large-Volume High-Pressure Mineral Physics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Prewitt, Charles T.; Weidner, Donald J.

    American high-pressure research with large sample volumes developed rapidly in the 1950s during the race to produce synthetic diamonds. At that time the piston cylinder, girdle (or belt), and tetrahedral anvil devices were invented. However, this development essentially stopped in the late 1950s, and while the diamond anvil cell has been used extensively in the United States with spectacular success for high-pressure experiments in small sample volumes, most of the significant technological advances in large-volume devices have taken place in Japan. Over the past 25 years, these technical advances have enabled a fourfold increase in pressure, with many important investigations of the chemical and physical properties of materials synthesized at high temperatures and pressures that cannot be duplicated with any apparatus currently available in the United States.

  12. Experimental spectroscopy for the high-school Physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinra, Rajeev; Karpetis, Adonios

    2008-11-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of including spectroscopic experiments in high-school physics curricula. Two experimental optics ``modules'' were constructed for this purpose: (a) a simple CCD detector, in combination with appropriate filters, was used for the measurement of solar spectra and the determination of the sun's surface temperature; (b) the same detector was used, in combination with a transmissive diffraction grating and some miniature optics, to form a spectrophotometer that can be used for the determination of spectra with high resolution. Both modules were designed and constructed with portability and low cost in mind, and their objective is to introduce experimental spectroscopy to high school students in an intriguing, educational and phase-appropriate manner without sacrificing scientific rigor. A large variety of experiments may be designed around the basic devices that were built during this work, and a number of possible examples will be presented, from research on plant phototropism to human color cognition.

  13. On-line electrochemistry/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the simulation of pesticide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Wiebke; Dötzer, Reinhard; Gütter, Gerald; Van Leeuwen, Suze M; Karst, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    On-line electrochemistry/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (EC/LC/MS) was employed to mimic the oxidative metabolism of the fungicide boscalid. High-resolution mass spectrometry and MS/MS experiments were used to identify its electrochemical oxidation products. Furthermore, the introduction of a second electrochemical cell with reductive conditions provided important additional information on the oxidation products. With this equipment, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, formation of a covalent ammonia adduct, and dimerization were detected after initial one-electron oxidation of boscalid to a radical cation. On-line reaction with glutathione yielded different isomeric covalent glutathione adducts. The results of the electrochemical oxidation are in good accordance with previously reported in vivo experiments, showing that EC/LC/MS is a useful tool for studying biotransformation reactions of various groups of xenobiotics.

  14. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

  15. High school student physics research experience yields positive results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a small scale research project while in high school gives them the hands on experience and ultimately prepares them more for the college experience. SUNY Plattsburgh’s Physics department started a five-week summer program for high school students in 2012. This program has proved not only beneficial for students while in the program, but also as they continue on in their development as scientists/engineers. Independent research, such as that offered by SUNY Plattsburgh’s five-week summer program, offers students a feel and taste of the culture of doing research, and life as a scientist. It is a short-term, risk free way to investigate whether a career in research or a particular scientific field is a good fit.

  16. An introduction to the physics of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A.; Syphers, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of a course given by the authors at various universities and particle accelerator schools. It starts from the basic physics principles governing particle motion inside an accelerator, and leads to a full description of the complicated phenomena and analytical tools encountered in the design and operation of a working accelerator. The book covers acceleration and longitudinal beam dynamics, transverse motion and nonlinear perturbations, intensity dependent effects, emittance preservation methods and synchrotron radiation. These subjects encompass the core concerns of a high energy synchrotron. The authors apparently do not assume the reader has much previous knowledge about accelerator physics. Hence, they take great care to introduce the physical phenomena encountered and the concepts used to describe them. The mathematical formulae and derivations are deliberately kept at a level suitable for beginners. After mastering this course, any interested reader will not find it difficult to follow subjects of more current interests. Useful homework problems are provided at the end of each chapter. Many of the problems are based on actual activities associated with the design and operation of existing accelerators.

  17. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  18. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  19. 76 FR 8358 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Particle Physics Program Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General Interest in High Energy Physics... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  20. 77 FR 4027 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Energy High Energy Physics Program Discussion of National Science Foundation Elementary Particle Physics... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  1. 75 FR 57463 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Energy High Energy Physics Program. Discussion of National Science Foundation Elementary Particle Physics... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  2. The Survey and Analysis of Excellent Senior High School Physics Teachers' Professional Growth Actuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Haibin; Liu, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    Excellent senior high school physics teachers are the backbone power in the new course reform of physics in China. The excellent senior high school physics teachers' professional growth actuality in Shandong is surveyed in this article by the self-made "Questionnaire of Excellent Senior High School Physics Teachers' Professional Growth",…

  3. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry; Carroll, Sean; Ooguri, Hirosi; Gukov, Sergei; Preskill, John; Hitlin, David G.; Porter, Frank C.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Newman, Harvey B.; Spiropulu, Maria; Golwala, Sunil; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26

    Caltech High Energy Physics (HEP) has a broad program in both experimental and theoretical physics. We are known for our creativity and leadership. The future is uncertain and we strive to be involved in all the major areas of experimental and theoretical HEP physics so no matter where the important discoveries occur we are well positioned to play an important role. An outstanding group of postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, staff scientists, and technical and administrative personnel support our efforts in experimental and theoretical physics. The PI’s on this grant are involved in the following program of experimental and theoretical activities: I) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Our CMS group, led by Harvey Newman and Maria Spiropulu, has played a key role in the discovery and interpretation of the Higgs boson and in searches for new physics. They have important hardware responsibilities in both ECAL and HCAL and are also involved in the upgrades needed for the High Luminosity LHC. Newman's group also develops and operates Grid-based computing, networking, and collaborative systems for CMS and the US HEP community. The charged lepton (Mu2e) and quark BaBar flavor physics group is led by David Hitlin and Frank Porter. On Mu2e they have been instrumental in the design of the calorimeter. Construction responsibilities include one third of the crystals and associated readout as well as the calibration system. They also will have responsibility for a major part of the online system software. Although data taking ceased in 2008 the Caltech BaBar group is active on several new forefront analyses. The neutrino group is led by Ryan Patterson. They are central to NOvA's core oscillation physics program, to calibration, and to detector readiness being responsible for the production and installation of 12,000 APD arrays. They have key roles in neutrino appearance and disappearance analysis in MINOS and MINOS+. Sunil Golwala leads the dark matter direct detection effort. Areas

  4. PROBING THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF ATOMIC GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2015-02-10

    A new method is used to measure the physical conditions of the gas in damped Lyα systems (DLAs). Using high-resolution absorption spectra of a sample of 80 DLAs, we are able to measure the ratio of the upper and lower fine-structure levels of the ground state of C{sup +} and Si{sup +}. These ratios are determined solely by the physical conditions of the gas. We explore the allowed physical parameter space using a Monte Carlo Markov chain method to constrain simultaneously the temperature, neutral hydrogen density, and electron density of each DLA. The results indicate that at least 5% of all DLAs have the bulk of their gas in a dense, cold phase with typical densities of ∼100 cm{sup –3} and temperatures below 500 K. We further find that the typical pressure of DLAs in our sample is log (P/k{sub B} ) = 3.4 (K cm{sup –3}), which is comparable to the pressure of the local interstellar medium (ISM), and that the components containing the bulk of the neutral gas can be quite small with absorption sizes as small as a few parsecs. We show that the majority of the systems are consistent with having densities significantly higher than expected for a purely canonical warm neutral medium, indicating that significant quantities of dense gas (i.e., n {sub H} > 0.1 cm{sup –3}) are required to match observations. Finally, we identify eight systems with positive detections of Si II*. These systems have pressures (P/k{sub B} ) in excess of 20,000 K cm{sup –3}, which suggest that these systems tag a highly turbulent ISM in young, star-forming galaxies.

  5. High Energy Physics Program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The high energy physics program has continued its experimental activities over. In CDF, the Texas A M group has led an effort to design an upgrade for the silicon vertex detector, and is currently working with the rest of the collaboration on the next major data taking run. In MACRO, work was done on the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. This work is nearing completion, and the system is expected to be up and running on the detector by summer 1993. Work was done within the SDC group to develop gas microstrip chambers for use in precision tracking at the SSC, and in the GEM group, toward the development of a suitable forward calorimeter design. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued the study of a very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has also continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  6. Analyzing high energy physics data using database computing: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baden, Andrew; Day, Chris; Grossman, Robert; Lifka, Dave; Lusk, Ewing; May, Edward; Price, Larry

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept system is described for analyzing high energy physics (HEP) data using data base computing. The system is designed to scale up to the size required for HEP experiments at the Superconducting SuperCollider (SSC) lab. These experiments will require collecting and analyzing approximately 10 to 100 million 'events' per year during proton colliding beam collisions. Each 'event' consists of a set of vectors with a total length of approx. one megabyte. This represents an increase of approx. 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in the amount of data accumulated by present HEP experiments. The system is called the HEPDBC System (High Energy Physics Database Computing System). At present, the Mark 0 HEPDBC System is completed, and can produce analysis of HEP experimental data approx. an order of magnitude faster than current production software on data sets of approx. 1 GB. The Mark 1 HEPDBC System is currently undergoing testing and is designed to analyze data sets 10 to 100 times larger.

  7. High-Energy-Density Physics, with Applications to Astrophysics*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce A.

    2002-04-01

    High-energy-density (HED) physics broadly refers to the study of collections of matter under extreme conditions of pressure, temperature, and density. The experimental facilities used for these studies are high power lasers, magnetic pinch generators, and charged particle beams. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet a broad user community has nucleated, and new regimes of experimental science are emerging. [1, 2] Examples drawn from astrophysics include work relevant to supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. A selection of science highlights in this field from the past decade will be reviewed, and a look ahead to the coming decade will be given. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. 1. B.A. Remington, D. Arnett, R.P. Drake, and H. Takabe, Science 284, 1488 (1999); Phys. Plasmas 7, 1641 (2000). 2. Hideaki Takabe, Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. 143, 202 (2001).

  8. High energy physics program at Texas A M University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Texas A M high energy physics program has achieved significant mile-stones in each of its research initiatives. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO; the development of two new detector technologies, liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry and knife-edge chambers; and two SSC detector proposals, SDC and TEXAS/EMPACT. We have developed prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry in TEXAS/EMPACT. A new element in this program is the inclusion of a theoretical high energy physics research program being carried out by D. Nanopoulos and C. Pope. D. Nanopoulos has succeeded in building a string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. The impact of this work on string phenomenology certainly has far reaching consequences. C. Pope is currently working on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two- dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity, and W-string theory. The following report presents details of the accomplishments of the Texas A M program over the past year and the proposed plan of research for the coming year.

  9. Singlet model interference effects with high scale UV physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, S.; Lewis, I. M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model (SM) is the addition of a scalar gauge singlet, S . If S is not forbidden by a symmetry from mixing with the Standard Model Higgs boson, the mixing will generate non-SM rates for Higgs production and decays. In general, there could also be unknown high energy physics that generates additional effective low energy interactions. We show that interference effects between the scalar resonance of the singlet model and the effective field theory (EFT) operators can have significant effects in the Higgs sector. We examine a non-Z2 symmetric scalar singlet model and demonstrate that a fit to the 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings and to limits on high mass resonances, S , exhibit an interesting structure and possible large cancellations of effects between the resonance contribution and the new EFT interactions, that invalidate conclusions based on the renormalizable singlet model alone.

  10. Singlet model interference effects with high scale UV physics

    DOE PAGES

    Dawson, S.; Lewis, I. M.

    2017-01-06

    One of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model (SM) is the addition of a scalar gauge singlet, S . If S is not forbidden by a symmetry from mixing with the Standard Model Higgs boson, the mixing will generate non-SM rates for Higgs production and decays. Generally, there could also be unknown high energy physics that generates additional effective low energy interactions. We show that interference effects between the scalar resonance of the singlet model and the effective field theory (EFT) operators can have significant effects in the Higgs sector. Here, we examine a non- Z 2 symmetric scalarmore » singlet model and demonstrate that a fit to the 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings and to limits on high mass resonances, S , exhibit an interesting structure and possible large cancellations of effects between the resonance contribution and the new EFT interactions, that invalidate conclusions based on the renormalizable singlet model alone.« less

  11. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, James; Graziani, Frank; Marinak, Marty; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  12. High-Efficiency Solar Cell Concepts: Physics, Materials, and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Francoeur, S.; Seong, M. J.; Fluegel, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wanlass, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past three decades, significant progress has been made in the area of high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, with the effort primarily directed at current-matched solar cells in tandem. The key materials issues here have been obtaining semiconductors with the required bandgaps for sequential absorption of light in the solar spectrum and that are lattice matched to readily available substrates. The GaInP/GaAs/Ge cell is a striking example of success achieved in this area. Recently, several new approaches for high-efficiency solar cell design have emerged, that involve novel methods for tailoring alloy bandgaps, as well as alternate technologies for hetero-epitaxy of III-V's on Si. The advantages and difficulties expected to be encountered with each approach will be discussed, addressing both the materials issues and device physics whilst contrasting them with other fourth-generation solar cell concepts.

  13. Effectiveness of Tutorials for Introductory Physics in Argentinean high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benegas, J.; Flores, J. Sirur

    2014-06-01

    This longitudinal study reports the results of a replication of Tutorials in Introductory Physics in high schools of a Latin-American country. The main objective of this study was to examine the suitability of Tutorials for local science education reform. Conceptual learning of simple resistive electric circuits was determined by the application of the single-response multiple-choice test "Determining and Interpreting Resistive Electric Circuits Concepts Test" (DIRECT) to high school classes taught with Tutorials and traditional instruction. The study included state and privately run schools of different socioeconomic profiles, without formal laboratory space and equipment, in classes of mixed-gender and female-only students, taught by novice and experienced instructors. Results systematically show that student learning is significantly higher in the Tutorials classes compared with traditional teaching for all of the studied conditions. The results also show that long-term learning (one year after instruction) in the Tutorials classes is highly satisfactory, very similar to the performance of the samples of college students used to develop the test DIRECT. On the contrary, students following traditional instruction returned one year after instruction to the poor performance (<20%) shown before instruction, a result compatible with the very low level of conceptual knowledge of basic physics recently determined by a systematic study of first-year students attending seven universities in Spain and four Latin-American countries. Some replication and adaptation problems and difficulties of this experience are noted, as well as recommendations for successful use of Tutorials in high schools of similar educational systems.

  14. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Preparation of High School Physics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge--PCK). The program has been in place…

  15. In-Depth Characterization of Protein Disulfide Bonds by Online Liquid Chromatography-Electrochemistry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzar, Linda; Nicolardi, Simone; Rutten, Julie W.; Oberstein, Saskia A. J. Lesnik; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are an important class of protein post-translational modifications, yet this structurally crucial modification type is commonly overlooked in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches. Recently, the benefits of online electrochemistry-assisted reduction of protein S-S bonds prior to MS analysis were exemplified by successful characterization of disulfide bonds in peptides and small proteins. In the current study, we have combined liquid chromatography (LC) with electrochemistry (EC) and mass analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS in an online LC-EC-MS platform to characterize protein disulfide bonds in a bottom-up proteomics workflow. A key advantage of a LC-based strategy is the use of the retention time in identifying both intra- and interpeptide disulfide bonds. This is demonstrated by performing two sequential analyses of a certain protein digest, once without and once with electrochemical reduction. In this way, the "parent" disulfide-linked peptide detected in the first run has a retention time-based correlation with the EC-reduced peptides detected in the second run, thus simplifying disulfide bond mapping. Using this platform, both inter- and intra-disulfide-linked peptides were characterized in two different proteins, ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B. In order to prevent disulfide reshuffling during the digestion process, proteins were digested at a relatively low pH, using (a combination of) the high specificity proteases trypsin and Glu-C. With this approach, disulfide bonds in ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B were comprehensively identified and localized, showing that online LC-EC-MS is a useful tool for the characterization of protein disulfide bonds.

  16. Construction and direct electrochemistry of orientation controlled laccase electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Jiwei; Huang, Xirong; Wang, Tianhong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A recombinant laccase with Cys-6×His tag at the N or C terminus was generated. • Orientation controlled laccase electrodes were constructed via self assembly. • The electrochemical behavior of laccase electrodes was orientation dependent. • The C terminus tagged laccase was better for bioelectrocatalytic reduction of O{sub 2}. - Abstract: A laccase has multiple redox centres. Chemisorption of laccases on a gold electrode through a polypeptide tag introduced at the protein surface provides an isotropic orientation of laccases on the Au surface, which allows the orientation dependent study of the direct electrochemistry of laccase. In this paper, using genetic engineering technology, two forms of recombinant laccase which has Cys-6×His tag at the N or C terminus were generated. Via the Au-S linkage, the recombinant laccase was assembled orientationally on gold electrode. A direct electron transfer and a bioelectrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction were observed on the two orientation controlled laccase electrodes, but their electrochemical behaviors were found to be quite different. The orientation of laccase on the gold electrode affects both the electron transfer pathway and the electron transfer efficiency of O{sub 2} reduction. The present study is helpful not only to the in-depth understanding of the direct electrochemistry of laccase, but also to the development of laccase-based biofuel cells.

  17. High School Students' Approaches to Learning Physics with Relationship to Epistemic Views on Physics and Conceptions of Learning Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Guo-Li; Lee, Min-Hsien; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Knowing how students learn physics is a central goal of physics education. The major purpose of this study is to examine the strength of the predictive power of students' epistemic views and conceptions of learning in terms of their approaches to learning in physics. Sample, design and method: A total of 279 Taiwanese high…

  18. Phenoxazine Based Units- Synthesis, Photophysics and Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowska-Oleksy, Anna; Cabaj, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    A few new phenoxazine-based conjugated monomers were synthesized, characterized, and successfully used as semiconducting materials. The phenoxazine-based oligomers have low ionization potentials or high-lying HOMO levels (~4.7 eV), which were estimated from cyclic voltammetry. Conjugated oligomers offer good film—forming, mechanical and optical properties connected with their wide application. These results demonstrate that phenoxazine-based conjugated mers are a promising type of semiconducting and luminescent structures able to be used as thin films in organic electronics. PMID:20625802

  19. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Minority Physics Taking in U.S. High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Teacher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In the September issue, we saw that a lower proportion of Hispanics and blacks take physics in U.S. high schools than do whites and Asians. Last month, we examined physics offerings and students by socioeconomic profile of the high school as reported by the principal. We saw that there were more physics classes and more physics students at…

  20. High-energy hadron physics at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Kumano, S.

    2008-10-13

    The J-PARC facility is near completion and experiments will start in 2009 on nuclear and particle physics projects. In this article, the J-PARC facility is introduced, and possible projects are discussed in high-energy hadron physics by using the primary proton beam of 30-50 GeV. There are proposed experiments on charm-production and Drell-Yan processes as well as single spin asymmetries for investigating quark and gluon structure of the nucleon and nuclei. Parton-energy loss could be studied in the Drell-Yan processes. There is also a proposal on hadron-mass modifications in a nuclear medium by using the proton beam. In addition, possible topics include transition from hadron to quark degrees of freedom by elastic pp scattering, color transparency by (p,2p), short-range correlation in nuclear force by (p,2pN), tensor structure functions for spin-one hadrons, fragmentation functions, and generalized partem distributions in the ERBL region although proposals are not written on these projects. If proton-beam polarization is attained, it is possible to investigate details of nucleon spin structure. In the last part of this article, our own studies are explained on partem distribution functions in connection with the J-PARC projects.

  1. Electrochemistry of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans reactions with pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B.

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of mineral-pyrite with T. ferrooxidans were studied by using a cyclic voltametry technique. The interactions with bacteria were examined during the entire growth stage of bacterial (fermentation). The pyrite surface invariably drastically changed its properties at the second day of fermentation. Beyond two days of fermentation, the cyclic voltamograms were insensitive to convective diffusion produced by stirring. The product layer was examined by SEM, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. The SEM study revealed that bacteria populated the pyrite surface at an extremely high density levels. The high density of bacteria, and the solid reaction products formed on the pyrite surface created conditions for pore diffusion which explained why the CVs became insensitive to convective diffusion in solution (stirring). The X-ray diffraction study confirmed jarosite as a product layer. A mechanism of T. ferrooxidans cells serving as nucleation sites for jarosite formation is proposed. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. High school students' scientific epistemological beliefs, self-efficacy in learning physics and attitudes toward physics: a structural equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapucu, Serkan; Bahçivan, Eralp

    2015-05-01

    Background: There are some theoretical evidences that explain the relationships between core beliefs (i.e., epistemological beliefs) and peripheral beliefs (self-efficacy in learning) in the literature. The close relationships of such type of beliefs with attitudes are also discussed by some researchers. Constructing a model that investigates these relationships by considering theoretical and empirical evidences can empower researchers to discuss these relationships more comprehensively. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships among Turkish high school students' scientific epistemological beliefs, self-efficacy in learning physics and their attitudes toward physics. Sample: A total of 632 high school students participated in this study; however, 269 female and 229 male (a total of 498) high school students' data were used. Design and methods: Three distinct instruments that measure scientific epistemological beliefs, self-efficacy in learning physics and attitudes toward physics were combined into a unique questionnaire form and it was distributed to high school students. To explore the relationships among these variables, structural equation modeling was used. Results: The results showed that scientific epistemological belief dimensions uncovered by the nature of knowing (source and justification) significantly and positively related to both self-efficacy in learning physics and attitudes toward other important physics dimensions. Additionally, self-efficacy in learning physics significantly and positively predicted attitudes toward multiple physics dimensions (importance, comprehension and requirement). However, epistemological belief dimensions related to the nature of knowledge (certainty and development) did not have significant impact on self-efficacy in learning physics or attitudes toward physics. Conclusions: This study concludes that there are positive and significant relationships among Turkish high school students' scientific

  3. Detectors and signal processing for high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles of the particle detection and signal processing for high-energy physics experiments are presented. It is shown that the optimum performance of a properly designed detector system is not limited by incidental imperfections, but solely by more fundamental limitations imposed by the quantum nature and statistical behavior of matter. The noise sources connected with the detection and signal processing are studied. The concepts of optimal filtering and optimal detector/amplifying device matching are introduced. Signal processing for a liquid argon calorimeter is analyzed in some detail. The position detection in gas counters is studied. Resolution in drift chambers for the drift coordinate measurement as well as the second coordinate measurement is discussed.

  4. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The Texas A M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  5. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (also known as the Calor Conference series, started in October 1990 at Fermilab) address all aspects of calorimetric particle detection and measurement, with an emphasis on high energy physics experiments. The XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (Calor 2010) was held at the campus of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, from May 10-14, 2010. This conference brought together more than 110 participants from 20 countries, including senior scientists and young physicists. During the five days of the conference, 98 presentations were given in seven plenary sessions. The attendees had in-depth discussions on the latest developments and innovations in calorimetry, including the exciting new LHC results. From the presentations, 83 papers were published in this proceedings. The success of the conference was due to the participants' enthusiasm and the excellent talks given by the speakers, and to the conveners for organizing the individual sessions. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for giving us the opportunity to host this Conference in Beijing. Finally we would like to thank all the people involved in the organization of the Conference, who have provided valuable local support. Yifang WangChair of Local Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee M DanilovITEP Moscow M DiemozINFN Roma I A EreditatoBern F L FabbriINFN Frascati T KobayashiICEPP Tokyo M LivanPavia University & INFN P LubranoINFN Perugia S MagillANL Argonne A MaioLIPP Lisbon H OberlackMPI Munich A ParaFermilab R WigmansTTU Lubbock R YoshidaANL Argonne R ZhuCaltech Local Organizing Committee Y WangIHEP (Chair) Y GaoTshinghua University T HuIHEP (Scientific secretary) C LiUSTC W LiIHEP J LuIHEP P WangIHEP T XuIHEP L ZhouIHEP Session Conveners 1) Materials and detectors - Junguang Lu (IHEP), Francesca Nessi (CERN) 2) Algorithm and simulation - Nural Akchurin

  6. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, M.S.

    2008-05-03

    Historically, progress in high-energy physics has largely been determined by development of more capable particle accelerators. This trend continues today with the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the worldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider. Looking ahead, there are two scientific areas ripe for further exploration--the energy frontier and the precision frontier. To explore the energy frontier, two approaches toward multi-TeV beams are being studied, an electron-positron linear collider based on a novel two-beam powering system (CLIC), and a Muon Collider. Work on the precision frontier involves accelerators with very high intensity, including a Super-BFactory and a muon-based Neutrino Factory. Without question, one of the most promising approaches is the development of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very high scientific potential, and would substantially advance the state-of-the-art in accelerator design. The challenges of the new generation of accelerators, and how these can be accommodated in the accelerator design, are described. To reap their scientific benefits, all of these frontier accelerators will require sophisticated instrumentation to characterize the beam and control it with unprecedented precision.

  7. The Physical Conditions of Atomic Gas at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeleman, Marcel

    In this thesis we provide insight into the chemical composition, physical conditions and cosmic distribution of atomic gas at high redshift. We study this gas in absorption against bright background quasars in absorption systems known as Damped Ly-alpha Systems (DLAs). These systems contain the bulk of the atomic gas at high redshift and are the likely progenitors of modern-day galaxies. In Chapter 2, we find that the atomic gas in DLAs obeys a mass-metallicity relationship that is similar to the mass-metallicity relationship seen in star-forming galaxies. The evolution of this relationship is linear with redshift, allowing for a planar equation to accurately describe this evolution, which provides a more stringent constraint on simulations modeling DLAs. Furthermore, the concomitant evolution of the mass-metallicity relationship of atomic gas and star-forming galaxies suggests an intimate link between the two. We next use a novel way to measure the physical conditions of the gas by using fine-structure line ratios of singly ionized carbon and silicon. By measuring the density of the upper and lower level states, we are able to determine the temperature, hydrogen density and electron density of the gas. We find that the conditions present in this high redshift gas are consistent with the conditions we see in the local interstellar medium (ISM). A few absorbers have higher than expected pressure, which suggests that they probe the ISM of star-forming galaxies. Finally in Chapter 4, we measure the cosmic neutral hydrogen density at redshifts below 1.6. Below this redshift, the Ly-alpha line of hydrogen is absorbed by the atmosphere, making detection difficult. Using the archive of the Hubble Space Telescope, we compile a comprehensive list of quasars for a search of DLAs at redshift below 1.6. We find that the incidence rate of DLAs and the cosmic neutral hydrogen density is smaller than previously measured, but consistent with the values both locally and at

  8. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1983-12-31

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC, FERMILAB, and DESY.

  9. High-throughput physically based approach for mammalian cell encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiashing; Wu, Po-Chen; Huang, Chi-Hui; Yang, Chung-Yao; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-01

    Herein, we wish to tear down the traditional boundaries between physics and life sciences by demonstrating a physically based, flow-focusing method to encapsulate mammalian cells into alginate-based microspheres in a very short period of time. We paid particular attention to the physical properties of the alginate solution as it was critical to create a physiologically relevant environment within the alginate microspheres. The cells we cultured when re-culturing them on Petri dishes could still be maintained for at least 4 days after microsphere encapsulation. We believe that this study would provide interesting insight in biophysics, polymer physics, and applied physics.

  10. Electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of nitroxyl free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, J.R.; Swarts, S.G.; Sevilla, M.D.; Malinski, T.

    1988-06-30

    This work reports electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies of the two nitroxyl radicals 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolin-1-yloxy (3-carbamoyl-PROXYL). Oxidation and reduction reactions have been observed in aqueous media over the pH range 2-12 in the potential range -0.8 to +0.8 V by differential pulse voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, and thin-layer UV-visible spectroelectrochemistry, and the reaction products have been characterized by IR, NMR, and ESR spectrometry. At pH values less than 10, characteristic electrochemical behavior is observed to be analogous for both radicals, and the products from electron transfer compare quite favorably with those found by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of nitroxyl radicals. At pH 2-9, a stable cation from a reversible oxidation and hydroxylamine following an irreversible reduction, as well as hydroxylated cation at pH higher than 9, are the same as those obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments. Spectroscopic evidence indicates that behavior following reduction at high pH differs for the two radicals. At pH 12, reduced TEMPO may undergo structural changes leading to the formation of a new radical consisting of a seven-membered ring.

  11. Equilibrium statistical-thermal models in high-energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2014-05-01

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948, an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it, the simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analyzed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze-out parameters. The higher order moments of multiplicity have been discussed. They offer deep insights about particle production and to critical fluctuations. Therefore, we use them to describe the freeze-out parameters

  12. The Effects of Choice on Autonomous Motivation, Perceived Autonomy Support, and Physical Activity Levels in High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    How, Yew Meng; Whipp, Peter R.; Dimmock, James A.; Jackson, Ben

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether the provision of choice in physical education (PE) enhanced students' autonomous motivation, perceived autonomy support, and physical activity (PA) levels, relative to a "regular PE" control group. Students from eight intact high school PE classes ("N" = 257, M[subscript "age"] = 12.91)…

  13. [High energy particle physics at Purdue, 1990--1991]. [Dept. of Physics, Purdue Univ. , West Lafayette, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1991-05-01

    Progress made in the experimental and theoretical high energy physics program is reviewed. The CLEO experiment, particle astrophysics, dynamical symmetry breaking in gauge theories, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, the TOPAZ Experiment, and elementary particle physics beyond the standard model are included.

  14. Planetary Defense and the High Temperture Physical Properties of Meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, D. R.; Sears, D. W. G.; Bryson, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Ames Meteorite Characterization Laboratory is examining the physical proprerties of a diverse selection of meteorites. Each meteorite will be processed by the full suite of observations and measurements: petrographic/microscopic studies, density, porosity, albedo, shock effects, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, emissivity, and acoustic velocity. Of these measurments, density and porosity are the most studied to date (Macke, 2010; Britt and Consolmagno, 2003). The thermal properties of meteorites are less well understood. Thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and thermal emissivity are important data for a number of applications but especially to understanding the behavior of a meteor as it passes through the atmosphere. Opeil et al. (2010) have shown that meteorites have a thermal conductivities lower than the pure minerals they are composed of by a factor of 3 to 10, with the values coming to a roughly constant number from 150 to 300 K. Calculated conductivity numbers from Yomogida and Matsui (1983) show the H chondrites have the higest conductivity in the range of 3.8 W/m*K at 200 K and then slowly decreases to 3.2 W/m*K at 400 K. Whereas they show the LL chondrites do not reach 1 W/m*K over the temperature range 100 to 400 K. While there have been several high temperature spectroscopic studies of meteorites, to date all experimental data for the physical properties of meteorites were obtained at temperatures below 400 K, since previous studies were made in attempts to understand the formation and evolution of asteroids. Our laboratory will focus on understanding the thermal properties of materials at temperatures above 300 K and, where possible, up to atmospheric entry temperatures. Work on pure minerals has shown that thermal conductivity decreases as temperatures exceed 300 K but it is unknown whether this holds true for meteorites. We will describe our laboratory and procedures, and present some preliminary data, at the meeting.

  15. Report on Research in Experimental High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rusack, Roger W.; Cushman, Priscilla; Poling, Ronald

    2016-01-06

    In the past three years the groups supported by the DOE have all made significant progress and posted major successes. The Minnesota CMS group has played leading roles in five data analyses and has had major roles in detector operations, the data management and the detector upgrades that are planned for for the LHC and those that are planned for the high-luminosity LHC. The CDMS-II experiment held the lead in WIMP sensitivity over the last decade, and is still the most sensitive detector in the world in the low WIMP mass region, with a recent 3σ hint of 8 GeV/c2 WIMP candidates in the silicon data. SuperCDMS, with three orders of magnitude better electron recoil background rejection, has been collecting data since October 2011. Since all dark matter experiments require a better understanding of neutron backgrounds to make further advances in sensitivity, Cushman has expanded the Minnesota effort on backgrounds to the national level, where she is leading a coordinated effort in neutron simulations for underground physics. The work of Mandic on 100 mm detectors both for Super-CDMS and beyond has advanced rapidly. Also at the Intensity Frontier, the BESIII experiment has had a successful year of operation largely focused on searches for and studies of new "charmonium-like" states above DD threshold. At least one new state has been observed so far, with hints of others. An intensive effort to understand their nature and gain new insight into the strong interaction continues. BESIII has also produced a large number of other results in charmonium decay and light-hadronic physics.

  16. On high explosive launching of projectiles for shock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Damian C.; Forest, Charles A.; Clark, David A.; Buttler, William T.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Rightley, Paul

    2007-06-01

    The hydrodynamic operation of the "Forest Flyer" type of explosive launching system for shock physics projectiles was investigated in detail using one and two dimensional continuum dynamics simulations. The simulations were numerically converged and insensitive to uncertainties in the material properties; they reproduced the speed of the projectile and the shape of its rear surface. The most commonly used variant, with an Al alloy case, was predicted to produce a slightly curved projectile, subjected to some shock heating and likely exhibiting some porosity from tensile damage. The curvature is caused by a shock reflected from the case; tensile damage is caused by the interaction of the Taylor wave pressure profile from the detonation wave with the free surface of the projectile. The simulations gave only an indication of tensile damage in the projectile, as damage is not understood well enough for predictions in this loading regime. The flatness can be improved by using a case of lower shock impedance, such as polymethyl methacrylate. High-impedance cases, including Al alloys but with denser materials improving the launching efficiency, can be used if designed according to the physics of oblique shock reflection, which indicates an appropriate case taper for any combination of explosive and case material. The tensile stress induced in the projectile depends on the relative thickness of the explosive, expansion gap, and projectile. The thinner the projectile with respect to the explosive, the smaller the tensile stress. Thus if the explosive is initiated with a plane wave lens, the tensile stress is lower than that for initiation with multiple detonators over a plane. The previous plane wave lens designs did, however, induce a tensile stress close to the spall strength of the projectile. The tensile stress can be reduced by changes in the component thicknesses. Experiments verifying the operation of explosively launched projectiles should attempt to measure

  17. Remote Sensing: Radio Frequency Detection for High School Physics Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, Daniel; Jeandron, Michael; Maddox, Larry; Yoshida, Sanichiro

    2011-10-01

    In an effort to give high school students experience in real world science applications, we have partnered with Loranger High School in Loranger, LA to mentor 9 senior physics students in radio frequency electromagnetic detection. The effort consists of two projects: Mapping of 60 Hz noise around the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), and the construction of a 20 MHz radio telescope for observations of the Sun and Jupiter (Radio Jove, NASA). The results of the LIGO mapping will aid in strategies to reduce the 60 Hz line noise in the LIGO noise spectrum. The Radio Jove project will introduce students to the field of radio astronomy and give them better insight into the dynamic nature of large solar system objects. Both groups will work together in the early stages as they learn the basics of electromagnetic transmission and detection. The groups will document and report their progress regularly. The students will work under the supervision of three undergraduate mentors. Our program is designed to give them theoretical and practical knowledge in radiation and electronics. The students will learn how to design and test receiver in the lab and field settings.

  18. 77 FR 64799 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Elementary Particle Physics Program Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General Interest in High Energy... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel...

  19. 78 FR 69839 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... Elementary Particle Physics Program Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General Interest in High Energy... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  20. 76 FR 41234 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Elementary Particle Physics Program. Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General Interest in High Energy... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  1. 75 FR 63450 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    .../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of...

  2. 78 FR 14087 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel: Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel: Correction AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION...) published a notice of open meeting for the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel to be held on March 11... Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy;...

  3. The Readiness of High School Students to Pursue First Year Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramnarain, U.; Molefe, P.

    2012-01-01

    A high failure rate at first year physics is often attributed to the lack of readiness of high school students to pursue such studies. This research explores this issue and reports on the perceptions of five physics lecturers at a South African university on the preparedness of high school students for first year physics. Qualitative data was…

  4. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    DOE PAGES

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2016-04-21

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales – from single atoms to macroscopic devices. Our short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. In this discussion we present the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  5. High School Physics Teacher Preparation: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    This report examines teachers' self-assessed preparedness to teach physics, their membership in professional organizations, and where they turn for help when they have questions. Almost every teacher reports feeling at least adequately prepared to teach basic physics knowledge and the application of physics to everyday experience. The smallest…

  6. Inorganic-organic hybrid polyoxometalate: Preparation, characterization and electrochemistry properties

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhangang; Zhao Yulong; Peng Jun . E-mail: jpeng@nenu.edu.cn; Tian Aixiang; Feng Yuhua; Liu Qun

    2005-05-15

    The solid hybrid material (H{sub 3/4}pbpy){sub 4}[PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}].1.25H{sub 2}O (1) (pbpy=5-phenyl-2-(4-pyridinyl)pyridine) has been prepared and characterized. A structural feature of compound 1 is that the polyoxometalate anions exhibit a one-dimensional inorganic double chain-like structure via weak interactions of O...O. The organic moiety exhibits regular packing with offset aromatic-aromatic interactions between the pbpys, leading to a compact supramolecular framework structure to accommodate the inorganic chains. Compound 1 was employed to fabricate the three-dimensional bulk-modified carbon paste electrode (1-CPE) to research on its electrochemistry properties. The results indicate that 1 retained Keggin molybdate anion electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of chlorate, hydrogen peroxide and nitrite.

  7. Proximal bacterial lysis and detection in nanoliter wells using electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Besant, Justin D; Das, Jagotamoy; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2013-09-24

    Rapid and direct genetic analysis of low numbers of bacteria using chip-based sensors is limited by the slow diffusion of mRNA molecules. Long incubation times are required in dilute solutions in order to collect a sufficient number of molecules at the sensor surface to generate a detectable signal. To overcome this barrier here we present an integrated device that leverages electrochemistry-driven lysis less than 50 μm away from electrochemical nucleic acid sensors to overcome this barrier. Released intracellular mRNA can diffuse the short distance to the sensors within minutes, enabling rapid and sensitive detection. We validate this strategy through direct lysis and detection of E. coli mRNA at concentrations as low as 0.4 CFU/μL in 2 min, a clinically relevant combination of speed and sensitivity for a sample-to-answer molecular analysis approach.

  8. Pedagogical content knowledge and preparation of high school physics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-07-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge—PCK). The program has been in place for 7 years and has a steady production rate of an average of six teachers per year who remain in the profession. The main purpose of the paper is to provide information about a possible structure, organization, and individual elements of a program that prepares physics teachers. The philosophy of the program and the coursework can be implemented either in a physics department or in a school of education. The paper provides details about the program course work and teaching experiences and suggests ways to adapt it to other local conditions.

  9. Current Status of Women in Physics in Korea—and the New Physics Camp Initiative for High School Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Song, Sanghoon; Park, Hyunjeong; Park, Jiseon; An, Jihye; Park, Joyoung; Yim, Haein; Song, Jeonghyeon; Yoon, Jin-Hee; Park, Youngah

    2009-04-01

    The Korean Physical Society (KPS) Women Committee has organized a series of the physics camps for high school girl students to give them an opportunity to work together and interact with professional physicists. Although the KPS Women Committee has successfully set the KPS's face toward women's issues, it still needs more systematic support for helping and promoting the activities of women physicists. We describe the physics camp initiative and present the current status of women in physics in Korea, comparing female ratios in undergraduate and graduate school and faculty for the last ten years (1998-2007). The employment rate for females is compared with that for males according to education level. The total number of female students in physics in Korea has increased; however, it is still a very small portion of females who stay in physics with professional positions.

  10. A Life in High-Energy Physics: Success Beyond Expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, James W.

    2014-10-01

    The author describes in some technical detail his career in experimental particle physics. It began in 1955, when he joined Brookhaven National Laboratory, and ended in 1985, when he moved to the field of cosmic-ray physics. The author discusses not only his successes but also his failures and his bad judgments. This period was the golden age of particle physics, when the experimental possibilities were abundant and one could carry out experiments with a small team of colleagues and students.

  11. Sophisticated Epistemologies of Physics versus High-Stakes Tests: How Do Elite High School Students Respond to Competing Influences about How to Learn Physics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Elby, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how elite Turkish high school physics students claim to approach learning physics when they are simultaneously (i) engaged in a curriculum that led to significant gains in their epistemological sophistication and (ii) subject to a high-stakes college entrance exam. Students reported taking surface (rote) approaches to…

  12. Success in Introductory College Physics: The Role of High School Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the extent to which a high school physics course prepares students for college physics success. In this study of 1,933 introductory college physics students, demographic and schooling factors account for a large fraction of the variation in college physics grades at 18 colleges and universities from around the nation. (Author/SAH)

  13. Physical Activity Levels of Overweight and Nonoverweight High School Students during Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study examined physical activity (PA) levels of overweight and nonoverweight African American and Caucasian students (n = 198) during game play in physical education classes. Methods: Body fat percentages (%BFs) were determined using the skinfold technique and Slaughter et al prediction equations. Girls were classified as…

  14. Promoting Lifelong Physical Activity and High Level Performance: Realising an Achievable Aim for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNamara, Aine; Collins, Dave; Bailey, Richard; Toms, Martin; Ford, Paul; Pearce, Gemma

    2011-01-01

    Background: Even though all school-aged children in most countries experience some form of curricular physical education many do not maintain a lifelong involvement in sport or physical activity. From a theoretical perspective, the development models that dominate sport are limited by their staged and linear approaches to development (e.g. Cote's…

  15. Physical Activity and Quality of Life Experienced by Highly Active Individuals with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Stancil, Michael; Hardin, Brent; Bryant, Lance

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined links between physical activity and quality of life experienced by individuals with physical disabilities recruited from a wheelchair user's basketball tournament. The participants included 12 male and 14 female adults between the ages of 18-54 (M = 31.12, SD = 10.75) who all reported one or more condition(s) that…

  16. Unveiling the High Energy Obscured Universe: Hunting Collapsed Objects Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Cocchi, M.; Natalucci, L.; Bassani, L.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Villa, G.

    2005-01-01

    A large part of energy from space is coming from collapsing stars (SN, Hypernovae) and collapsed stars (black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs). The peak of their energy release is in the hard-X and gamma-ray wavelengths where photons are insensitive to absorption and can travel from the edge the Universe or the central core of the Galaxy without loosing the primordial information of energy, time signature and polarization. The most efficient process to produce energetic photons is gravitational accretion of matter from a "normal" star onto a collapsed companion (LGxMcollxdMacc/dtx( 1Rdisc)-dMacc/dt x c2), exceeding by far the nuclear reaction capability to generate high energy quanta. Thus our natural laboratory for "in situ" investigations are collapsed objects in which matter and radiation co-exist in extreme conditions of temperature and density due to gravitationally bent geometry and magnetic fields. This is a unique opportunity to study the physics of accretion flows in stellar mass and super-massive Black Holes (SMBHs), plasmoids generated in relativistic jets in galactic microQSOs and AGNs, ionised plasma interacting at the touching point of weakly magnetized NS surface, GRB/Supernovae connection, and the mysterious origins of "dark" GRB and X-ray flash.

  17. Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task C

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, R.M.; Mufson, S.L.; Musser, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task C has been actively involved in the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso and the SSC experiment L during the current contract year. MACRO is a large US-Italian Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory being built under the Gran Sasso Mountain outside of Rome. Indiana University is in charge of organizing the United States software effort. We have built a state-of-the-art two-meter spectrophotometer for the MACRO liquid scintillator. We are in charge of ERP, the Event Reconstruction Processor online trigger processor for muons and stellar collapse. We are designing an air Cerenkov array to be placed on top of the Gran Sasso. Our other activity involves participation in the SSC experiment L. As long-standing members of L we have done proposal writing and have worked on important L planning and organization matters. We are now doing development work on the L Central Tracker straw drift tubes, including gas optimization, readout, and Monte Carlos. 12 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Photoelectroconversion by Semiconductors: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Qinbai; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment designed to give students some experience with photochemistry, electrochemistry, and basic theories about semiconductors. Uses a liquid-junction solar cell and illustrates some fundamental physical and chemical principles related to light and electricity interconversion as well as the properties of semiconductors. (JRH)

  19. Problems and Solutions for High School Physics in Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Mevlut; Oruncak, Bekir; Gunbayi, Ilhan

    2002-01-01

    Presents a study that investigates participating (n=70) teachers and (n=940) students' perceptions of physics. Reports that students have the most difficulty with magnetism but the most interest in electricity, optics, and motion. Discusses the possibilities for making physics more attractive to students. (YDS)

  20. Curricular Issues in Urban High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidlein, Robert; Vickers, Brad; Chepyator-Thomson, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Urban physical education curriculum articles are sparsely published in major educational journals (Chepyator-Thomson et al., 2008; Culp, 2005). This leaves urban physical educators the daunting task to modify and prepare curriculum based on formal class training and educational workshops and to interpret journal articles to be applied to the urban…

  1. Learning Pathways in High-School Level Quantum Atomic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedderer, Hans; Petri, Juergen

    Investigations of changes in conceptions during physics instruction are the logical and necessary steps to follow successful international research on students' preinstructional conceptions. The theoretical perspective integrates currently available frameworks of cognition, cognitive states, and cognitive processes in physics. Particular emphasis…

  2. The use of effective variables in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Matthew Todd

    In high energy physics, we often gain by systematically reducing the formal description of a physical system or the data sets that come from particle colliders. Converting the naive, original setup results in a more useful set of couplings, fields, or observables, which we call effective variables. This thesis considers several examples of them: We take a φ4 scalar field theory and renormalize it according to the equations of Wilsonian exact renormalization group. Whatever the initial setup of the theory, this results in an infinite number of operators. We demonstrate a procedure to remove all interaction terms except for the quartic. We find its coupling has the same one-loop beta-function as obtained from standard renormalization group. We also examine the relationship between little Higgs and 5d composite models with identical symmetries. By performing an "extreme" deconstruction, one can reduce any warped composite model to a little Higgs theory on a handful of sites. We find that the finiteness of the Higgs potential in 5d is due to the same collective symmetry breaking as in the little Higgs. We compare a 4d and 5d model with the same symmetry to the data. We see that the 5d model has difficulty meeting several constraints simultaneously. By contrast, the Minimal Moose with custodial symmetry is viable in a large region of its parameter space. Finally, we turn our attentions to the hadron collider environment. In the context of SUSY extended by U(1)', production of an initial Z' gauge boson gives us an additional kinematic constraint. We use this to implement a novel method to measure all of the superpartner masses involved in its decay. For certain final states with two invisible particles, one can construct kinematic observables bounded above by parent particle masses. Additionally, we study other effects of extending the MSSM by a Z '. The production cross-section of sleptons is enhanced over the MSSM, so the discovery potential for sleptons is greatly

  3. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  4. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  5. ``But you're just a physics booster!'' -- Why political advocacy for high school physics is crucial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul

    2010-10-01

    There is no shortage of research-based arguments supporting the importance of high school physics. A study from the University of South Florida demonstrates the importance of high school physics for the preparation of future STEM professionals [1]. A white paper from the National Academy of Education [2] states that the usual biology-chemistry-physics sequence in high school is ``out of order'' and points out that students in 9th grade biology classes are taught concepts that make no sense to them because they ``know little about atoms and next to nothing about the chemistry and physics that can help them make sense of these structures and their functions.'' Nevertheless, in Florida the high school physics-taking rate has been declining for several years and a large fraction of the International Baccalaureate programs do not even offer IB Physics. I will argue that physicists must collectively advocate in the political arena for the expansion and improvement of high school physics. I will also provide a few examples of collective actions by scientists that may have influenced the formulation of the new high school graduation requirements in Florida. Finally, I will argue that we must lobby our colleagues in the Colleges of Education to devote their scarce resources to recruiting and training teachers in the physical sciences. [4pt] [1] W. Tyson, R. Lee, K.M. Borman, and M.A. Hanson, {Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk} 12, 243 (2007). [0pt] [2] National Academy of Education White Paper ``Science and Mathematics Education,'' (http://www.naeducation.org/Science/and/Mathematics/Education/White/Paper.pdf).

  6. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes

  7. 77 FR 33449 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Foundation Elementary Particle Physics Program. Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General Interest in... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  8. 78 FR 12043 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... Foundation Elementary Particle Physics Program. ] Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General Interest in... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  9. 75 FR 6651 - Office of Science; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Science Foundation Elementary Particle Physics Program. Reports on and Discussions of Topics of General... Office of Science; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel...

  10. 76 FR 19986 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    .... Discussion of National Science Foundation Elementary Particle Physics Program. Reports on and Discussion of... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics...

  11. High School Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Students with Mild to Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebolt, Kevin M.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze high school physical education teachers' beliefs about teaching students with disabilities in inclusive physical education. The participants (3 men, 2 women) were certified physical education teachers at four suburban high schools. The research method was descriptive-qualitative using a case study approach…

  12. Langston University - High Energy Physics (LU-HEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Dr., Joel

    2012-08-13

    This final report is presented by Langston University (LU) for the project entitled "Langston University High Energy Physics" (LUHEP) under the direction of principal investigator (PI) and project director Professor Joel Snow. The project encompassed high energy physics research performed at hadron colliders. The PI is a collaborator on the DZero experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL, USA and the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and was during the entire project period from April 1, 1999 until May 14, 2012. Both experiments seek to understand the fundamental constituents of the physical universe and the forces that govern their interactions. In 1999 as member of the Online Systems group for Run 2 the PI developed a cross-platform Python-based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) application for monitoring and control of EPICS based devices for control room use. This served as a model for other developers to enhance and build on for further monitoring and control tasks written in Python. Subsequently the PI created and developed a cross-platform C++ GUI utilizing a networked client-server paradigm and based on ROOT, the object oriented analysis framework from CERN. The GUI served as a user interface to the Examine tasks running in the D\\O\\ control room which monitored the status and integrity of data taking for Run 2. The PI developed the histogram server/control interface to the GUI client for the EXAMINE processes. The histogram server was built from the ROOT framework and was integrated into the D\\O\\ framework used for online monitoring programs and offline analysis. The PI developed the first implementation of displaying histograms dynamically generated by ROOT in a Web Browser. The PI's work resulted in several talks and papers at international conferences and workshops. The PI established computing software infrastructure at LU and U. Oklahoma (OU) to do analysis of DZero production data and produce simulation data

  13. Average Exceptional Lie Group Hierarchy and High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    El Naschie, M. S.

    2008-05-29

    Starting from an invariant total dimension for an exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy, we drive all the essential characteristic and coupling constants of the fundamental interactions of physics. It is shown in a most simplistic fashion that all physical fields are various transfinite scaling transformation and topological deformation of each other. An extended standard model on the other hand turned out to be a compact sub group H of a version of E7 exceptional Lie group E7(-5) with dim H = 69. Thus particle physics, electromagnetism as well as gravity and the bulk are all representable via modular spaces akin to the famous compactified version of F. Klein's modular curve.

  14. Active Physics Problem Based Learning for High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenkraft, Arthur

    2006-12-01

    Active Physics bridges research and practice. This NSF supported curriculum project uses a 7E instructional model and a problem based learning approach. Students learn physics on a need to know basis as they construct solutions to challenges such as developing a sport that can be played on the moon, creating an appliance package for developing countries, designing a light and sound show, or building a museum exhibit. In addition to meeting the content requirements of an introductory physics course, there is also an emphasis on engineering design principles and on essential questions. The excitement and frustration of trying to bridge research and practice will be discussed.

  15. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary

  16. Mechanisms underlying obesity resistance associated with high spontaneous physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Jennifer A.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity resistance due to elevated orexin signaling is accompanied by high levels of spontaneous physical activity (SPA). The behavioral and neural mechanisms underlying this observation have not been fully worked out. We determined the contribution of hypothalamic orexin receptors (OXR) to SPA stimulated by orexin A (OXA), whether OXA-stimulated SPA was secondary to arousal and whether voluntary wheel running led to compensations in 24-h SPA. We further tested whether orexin action on dopamine one receptors (DA1R) in the substantia nigra (SN) plays an important role in generation of SPA. To test this, SPA response was determined in lean and obese rats with cannulae targeted towards the rostral lateral hypothalamus (rLH) or SN. Sleep/wake states were also measured in rats with rLH cannula and EEG/EMG radiotelemetry transmitters. SPA in lean rats was more sensitive to antagonism of the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) and in the early response to the orexin 2 agonist. OXA increased arousal equally in lean and obese rodents, which is discordant from the greater SPA response in lean rats. Obesity resistant rats ran more and wheel running was directly related to 24-h SPA levels. The OX1R antagonist, SB-334867-A, and the DA1R antagonist, SCH3390, in SN more effectively reduced SPA stimulated by OXA in OR rats. These data suggest OXA-stimulated SPA is not secondary to enhanced arousal, propensity for SPA parallels inclination to run and that orexin action on dopaminergic neurons in SN may participate in mediation of SPA and running wheel activity. PMID:24161277

  17. Monte Carlo programs and other utilities for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Palounek, A.P.T. ); Youssef, S. . Supercomputer Computations Research Inst.)

    1990-05-01

    The Software Standards and Documentation Group of the Workshop on Physics and Detector Simulation for SSC Experiments has compiled a list of physics generators, detector simulations, and related programs. This is not meant to be an exhaustive compilation, nor is any judgment made about program quality; it is a starting point or a more complete bibliography. Where possible we have included an author and source for the code. References for most programs are in the final section.

  18. Characterization of high school mathematics and physics language genres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Michelle L.

    Research indicates that language factors play a critical role in the learning of school mathematics and science. Symbols and language-forms have been created to represent and discuss mathematical ideas. Understanding language factors, therefore, is critical in improving the teaching and learning of school mathematics and science. The specific goal of this research was to characterize language genres found in secondary school mathematics and physics classrooms. The research presented here was conducted in two secondary school classrooms---one algebra and one physics---taught by the same teacher. The focus was on the discourse between the teacher and her students. In both mathematics and physics, the teacher attended to the meaning of mathematical concepts and processes, but the talk differed. Physics talk focused on developing meaning for the physics concepts through activities and discussion, which were accompanied by mathematical calculations and analyses. Algebra talk, on the other hand, was procedural and narrative in nature. Thus physics talk was more descriptive of individual concepts and situation, and was more explanatory and exploratory than algebra talk. All discourse inevitably reflects one's thinking and beliefs about the content of that discourse. Thus talking algebra and talking physics, as observed in this study, both represented the teacher's beliefs about teaching and learning and the nature of the school curriculum. Even for a teacher with a strong academic background in both mathematics and science, integrating across the curriculum can be hindered by the approved school curriculum and by the reality of the particular classroom context. Providing professional development and implementing one of several available integrated curricula would be needed if more integration were to be implemented. This study presents a literature-based description of the conceptual notion of language genre. It additionally presents a conceptualization of mathematics and

  19. Female Students in High School Physics: Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2011-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S., both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. The authors received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  20. Implementation of physics and everyday thinking in a high school classroom: Concepts and argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belleau, Shelly N.; Ross, Mike J.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2012-02-01

    The Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum is based on educational research and consists of carefully sequenced sets of activities intended to help students develop physics ideas through guided experimentation and questioning with extensive small group and whole class discussion. A high school physics teacher has adapted and implemented the PET curriculum in a low-income urban high school with the aim of removing barriers that typically limit access to traditional physics curriculum. Though PET was not designed for secondary physics students, this teacher has worked closely with physics education research faculty and graduate students to simultaneously modify, implement, and investigate the impact of PET on urban high school students' physics learning. Preliminary results indicate that the PET curriculum has great potential to provide students with opportunities for success in understanding physics concepts, as well as helping to develop scientific argumentation strategies.

  1. Opportunities for high-sensitivity charm physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.; Burnstein, R.A.; Lederman, L.M.; Rubin, H.A.; Brown, C.N.; Christian, D.C.; Gelfand, N.M.; Kwan, S.W.; Chen, T.Y.; He, M.; Koetke, D.D.; Napier, A.; Papavassiliou, V.; Yu, X.Q.

    1996-07-01

    The CO initiative under consideration at Fermilab makes feasible a charm experiment reconstructing >10{sup 9} charm decays, four orders - of magnitude beyond the largest extant sample. The experiment might commence data-taking as early as 1999. In addition to programmatic charm physics such as spectroscopy, lifetimes, and QCD tests, it will have significant new-physics reach in the areas of CP violation, flavor-changing neutral-current and lepton-number-violating decays, and D{sup o} {bar D} {bar {sup o}} mixing, and should observe direct CP violation in Cabibbo-suppressed D decays if it occurs at the level predicted by the Standard Model.

  2. Using the Electrochemistry of the Electrospray Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) is one of the more widely used analysis methods in science today, impacting fields as diverse as conventional chemistry to biotechnology and materials science. , Even 20 years after bursting onto the mass spectrometry scene, the underlying processes in ES ionization continue to be better understood exposing new opportunities for the technique. , , , , Such is the case for the improved understanding related to the electrochemical processes inherent to the operation of this ion source, , , which is the topic of this report. Electrospray ionization involves three main steps prior to mass analysis: the generation and charging of the ES droplets; droplet evaporation and the production of gas-phase ions; and secondary processes that modify the gas-phase ions in the atmosphere and the sub-atmospheric pressure sampling regions of the mass spectrometer. Integral to the generation and charging of the ES droplets are electrochemical reactions that occur at the conductive contact/solution interface within or near the ES emitter to maintain the quasi-continuous production of charged droplets and ultimately gas-phase ions. The basic electrochemical phenomena concerning the ES ion source were first brought to wide attention in the mass spectrometry community by Kebarle and co-workers in the early 1990's,8 but the electrochemistry of electrostatic spray devices and possible analytical consequences resulting from this phenomenon were realized and discussed in the literature at least as far back as the mid-1970's. When asked to intercede in a debate on the significance of electrochemistry in the ES ionization (ESI) process, 2002 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry John Fenn noted that to him " the idea that electrochemical reactions might be taking place in an ES ion source was too obvious to mention. That products of such reactions are of vital significance in the overall ESI process was much less obvious. Indeed, it seems fair to say that with few

  3. Electrochemistry and spectroscopy of energy conversion and polynuclear aromatic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, Maryam

    The field of materials chemistry is becoming increasingly important in many technological disciplines, including batteries, fuel cells, hydrogen storage materials, and application of poly-nuclear aromatic compounds in solar cells, color copiers, sensors, and catalysis. This multidisciplinary research work focuses on the development, understanding, and characterization of novel materials for advanced lithium batteries and a unique series of polyaromatic compounds for application in solar cells and color copiers. A general overview of materials and techniques used in this work is presented, including the electrochemistry, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and x-ray diffraction. A unique electrochemical procedure based on carbon paste microelectrode was applied to study the electrochemistry of novel poly-nuclear aromatic compounds. X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy are also used to gain further information about their molecular organization in solid-state. Conductivity of a novel electrolyte based on a multi-blend of organic carbonate solvents, has been studied over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to 70°C). An optimized electrolyte for an advanced lithium battery based on ternary solvent blend of linear and cyclic organic carbonates has been developed. The nature of ion-association and ion-solvent interactions in complex electrolytes are studied using infrared spectroscopy. We have found a strong preferred solvation of lithium ion in electrolyte containing multi-blend solvent molecules. The advanced lithium battery uses intercalation compounds with layered structure such as LiCoO2 cathode, and lithiated graphite, (LiC 6), anode. In this work, we have studied the reactivity of Li-C anode materials in contact with organic carbonate-based electrolyte, and have investigated the nature of the decomposition products formed on the electrode surface. A significant reactivity between the LiC6 and organic electrolytes is observed, and is a major safety concern. A

  4. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  5. Reduced Graphene Oxide Thin Film on Conductive Substrates by Bipolar Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Anis, Allagui; Mohammad, Ali Abdelkareem; Hussain, Alawadhi; Ahmed, S. Elwakil

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have shown an increased interest in developing manufacturing processes for graphene and its derivatives that consider the environmental impact and large scale cost-effectiveness. However, today’s most commonly used synthesis routes still suffer from their excessive use of harsh chemicals and/or the complexity and financial cost of the process. Furthermore, the subsequent transfer of the material onto a substrate makes the overall process even more intricate and time-consuming. Here we describe a single-step, single-cell preparation procedure of metal-supported reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using the principle of bipolar electrochemistry of graphite in deionized water. Under the effect of an electric field between two stainless steel feeder electrodes, grapheme layers at the anodic pole of the wireless graphite were oxidized into colloidal dispersion of GO, which migrated electrophoretically towards the anodic side of the cell, and deposited in the form of rGO (d(002) = 0.395 nm) by van der Waals forces. For substrates chemically more susceptible to the high anodic voltage, we show that the electrochemical setup can be adapted by placing the latter between the wireless graphite and the stainless steel feeder anode. This method is straightforward, inexpensive, environmentally-friendly, and could be easily scaled up for high yield and large area production of rGO thin films. PMID:26883173

  6. Dispersion of nanocrystalline Fe3O4 within composite electrodes: Insights on battery-related electrochemistry

    DOE PAGES

    David C. Bock; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Pelliccione, Christopher J.; ...

    2016-04-20

    Aggregation of nanosized materials in composite lithium-ion-battery electrodes can be a significant factor influencing electrochemical behavior. In this study, aggregation was controlled in magnetite, Fe3O4, composite electrodes via oleic acid capping and subsequent dispersion in a carbon black matrix. A heat treatment process was effective in the removal of the oleic acid capping agent while preserving a high degree of Fe3O4 dispersion. Electrochemical testing showed that Fe3O4 dispersion is initially beneficial in delivering a higher functional capacity, in agreement with continuum model simulations. However, increased capacity fade upon extended cycling was observed for the dispersed Fe3O4 composites relative to themore » aggregated Fe3O4 composites. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of electrodes post cycling indicated that the dispersed Fe3O4 electrodes are more oxidized in the discharged state, consistent with reduced reversibility compared with the aggregated sample. Higher charge-transfer resistance for the dispersed sample after cycling suggests increased surface-film formation on the dispersed, high-surface-area nanocrystalline Fe3O4 compared to the aggregated materials. Furthermore, this study provides insight into the specific effects of aggregation on electrochemistry through a multiscale view of mechanisms for magnetite composite electrodes.« less

  7. Characterization of the roles of electrochemistry, convection and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Young, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    Understanding the role of ionic current flow within a crack and near the crack tip is fundamental to modeling of environmentally assisted crack advance. Critical conceptual issues and models related to ionic current flow within cracks, and the associated ``crevice`` chemistry and metal oxidation that results, are presented and examined in the light of experimental evidence. Various advanced techniques have been developed to evaluate the roles of electrochemistry, transport, and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking, with emphasis on high temperature ``pure`` water. These include high resolution crack length measurement by dc potential drop performed simultaneously with microsampling, electrochemical microprobe mapping, microinjection of species, and micropolarization of the crack. Conceptual issues addressed include the importance of the corrosion potential vs. oxidant concentration, the absence of oxidants and associated low corrosion potential within cracks, the location and role of macrocell currents associated with potential gradients from differential aeration cells, the localized nature of the microcell currents associated with dissolution at the crack tip, the importance of pH and adsorbed species on repassivation and crack advance, and the role of convection in crack chemistry and crack advance. Correct concepts are shown to be an essential pre-cursor to quantitative modeling.

  8. The Early Universe and High-Energy Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.

    1983-01-01

    Many properties of new particle field theories can only be tested by comparing their predictions about the physical conditions immediately after the big bang with what can be reconstructed about this event from astronomical data. Facts/questions about big bang, unified field theories, and universe epochs/mass are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  9. High-Level Physical Educators: How Do You Measure Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Kris

    2004-01-01

    Soon after formal education became the norm, those in leadership talked about making improvements to the process. However, decades after, educators still use some practices that are contraindicated by research findings. As such, physical educators are required to play a more active role in educational reform. In this article, the author presents a…

  10. Yoga for PE: Engaging High School Students Physically and Mentally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The administration and community used to place little or no value on physical education and attendance, and attitudes toward our profession were stereotypical and disrespectful. Yet, at some level, there were people quietly longing for a change. This article describes how the author used her passion for yoga to win over her students and,…

  11. A Pilot Program in Adapted Physical Education: Hillsborough High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Vince

    The instructor of an adapted physical education program describes his experiences and suggests guidelines for implementing other programs. Reviewed are such aspects as program orientation, class procedures, identification of student participants, and grading procedures. Objectives, lesson plans and evaluations are presented for the following units…

  12. Experimental High Energy Physics Brandeis University Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, Craig A.; Bensinger, James; Sciolla, Gabriella; Wellenstein, Hermann

    2013-07-26

    During the past three years, the Brandeis experimental particle physics group was comprised of four faculty (Bensinger, Blocker, Sciolla, and Wellenstein), one research scientist, one post doc, and ten graduate students. The group focused on the ATLAS experiment at LHC. In 2011, the LHC delivered 5/fb of pp colliding beam data at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In 2012, the center-of-mass energy was increased to 8 TeV, and 20/fb were delivered. The Brandeis group focused on two aspects of the ATLAS experiment -- the muon detection system and physics analysis. Since data taking began at the LHC in 2009, our group actively worked on ATLAS physics analysis, with an emphasis on exploiting the new energy regime of the LHC to search for indications of physics beyond the Standard Model. The topics investigated were Z' -> ll, Higgs -> ZZ* -. 4l, lepton flavor violation, muon compositeness, left-right symmetric theories, and a search for Higgs -> ee. The Brandeis group has for many years been a leader in the endcap muon system, making important contributions to every aspect of its design and production. During the past three years, the group continued to work on commissioning the muon detector and alignment system, development of alignment software, and installation of remaining chambers.

  13. High-Speed Video Analysis in a Conceptual Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desbien, Dwain M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of probe ware and computers has become quite common in introductory physics classrooms. Video analysis is also becoming more popular and is available to a wide range of students through commercially available and/or free software. Video analysis allows for the study of motions that cannot be easily measured in the traditional lab setting…

  14. 36th International Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Australian particle physics community was honoured to host the 36th ICHEP conference in 2012 in Melbourne. This conference has long been the reference event for our international community. The announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC was a major highlight, with huge international press coverage. ICHEP2012 was described by CERN Director-General, Professor Rolf Heuer, as a landmark conference for our field. In additional to the Higgs announcement, important results from neutrino physics, from flavour physics, and from physics beyond the standard model also provided great interest. There were also updates on key accelerator developments such as the new B-factories, plans for the LHC upgrade, neutrino facilities and associated detector developments. ICHEP2012 exceeded the promise expected of the key conference for our field, and really did provide a reference point for the future. Many thanks to the contribution reviewers: Andy Bakich, Csaba Balazs, Nicole Bell, Catherine Buchanan, Will Crump, Cameron Cuthbert, Ben Farmer, Sudhir Gupta, Elliot Hutchison, Paul Jackson, Geng-Yuan Jeng, Archil Kobakhidze, Doyoun Kim, Tong Li, Antonio Limosani (Head Editor), Kristian McDonald, Nikhul Patel, Aldo Saavedra, Mark Scarcella, Geoff Taylor, Ian Watson, Graham White, Tony Williams and Bruce Yabsley.

  15. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  16. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  17. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  18. High Energy Physics division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1998--June 30, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D. S.; Berger, E. L.; Blair, R.; Bodwin, G. T.; Drake, G.; Goodman, M. C.; Guarino, V.; Klasen, M.; Lagae, J.-F.; Magill, S.; May, E. N.; Nodulman, L.; Norem, J.; Petrelli, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P. V.; Sinclair, D. K.; Spinka, H. M.; Stanek, R.; Underwood, D.; Wagner, R.; White, A. R.; Yokosawa, A.; Zachos, C.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1998 through June 30, 1998. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  19. Putting Physics First: Three Case Studies of High School Science Department and Course Sequence Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the process of shifting to a "Physics First" sequence in science course offerings in three school districts in the United States. This curricular sequence reverses the more common U.S. high school sequence of biology/chemistry/physics, and has gained substantial support in the physics education community over the…

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  1. Meeting the Challenge of Students' Understanding of Formulae in High-School Physics: A Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagno, Esther; Berger, Hana; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a diagnostic study to investigate students' understanding of two basic formulae in physics. Based on the findings of the study, we have developed a classroom activity focused on the interpretation of formulae. The activity was developed cooperatively by physics education researchers and high-school physics teachers and…

  2. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities July 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Schuur, C.; Wagner, R.

    1998-08-11

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1997--December 31, 1997. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  3. The World in Slow Motion: Using a High-Speed Camera in a Physics Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewanto, Andreas; Lim, Geok Quee; Kuang, Jianhong; Zhang, Jinfeng; Yeo, Ye

    2012-01-01

    We present a physics workshop for college students to investigate various physical phenomena using high-speed cameras. The technical specifications required, the step-by-step instructions, as well as the practical limitations of the workshop, are discussed. This workshop is also intended to be a novel way to promote physics to Generation-Y…

  4. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1 - June 30, 1996. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. List of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  5. Preparation of silver-carbon nanotubes composites with plasma electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefft, Oliver; Lohmann, Lara; Olschewski, Mark; Endres, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Plasma electrochemistry is a powerful tool to generate free nanoparticles in aqueous solutions and especially in ionic liquids (ILs). Due to their very low vapour pressure, ionic liquids can be employed under vacuum conditions as fluid substrates or solvents. Thus, ionic liquids are well suitable electrolytes for plasma electrochemical processes delivering stable and homogeneous plasmas. We have shown that free copper and germanium nanoparticles can be obtained in ILs by applying a plasma as a mechanically contact-free electrode. Here we present our results using an argon plasma for the electrochemical synthesis of silver on pure and pre-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide. For the pre-treatment of the MWCNTS we have used a dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. For the untreated MWCNTs we have found a formation of free silver nanoparticles between, on and in the vicinity of the carbon nanotubes. In case of the plasma treated MWCNTs a silver-carbon nanotubes composite is formed. Thus, the treatment of the MWCNTs obviously has a great influence on the deposit. Therefore we additionally have investigated the influence of the DBD on the chemical composition of the MWCNTs surface with X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

  6. Perspective on Electrospray Ionization and Its Relation to Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Boguslaw P.; Cole, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    The phenomenon of electrospraying of liquids is presented from the perspective of the electrochemistry involved. Basics of current and liquid flow in the capillary and spray tip are discussed, followed by specifics of charging and discharging of the sprayed liquid surface. Fundamental theories and numerical modeling relating electrospray current to solution and spray parameters are described and then compared with our own experimentally obtained data. The method of mapping potentials and currents inside the electrospray capillary by using an inserted electrically-isolated small wire probe electrode is discussed in detail with illustrations from new and published data. Based on these experimentally obtained results, a new mathematical model is derived. The introduced "nonlinear resistor electrospray capillary model" divides the electrospray capillary into small sections, adds their contributions, and then, by transition to infinitely small section thickness, produces analytical formulas that relate current and potential maps to other properties of the electrospraying liquid: primarily conductivity and current density. The presentation of the model is undertaken from an elementary standpoint, and it offers the possibility to obtain quantitative information regarding operating parameters from typical analytical systems subjected to electrospray. The model stresses simplicity and ease of use; examples applying experimental data are shown and some predictions of the model are also presented. The developed nonlinear resistor electrospray capillary model is intended to provide a new quantitative basis for improving the understanding of electrochemical transformations occurring in the electrospray emitter. A supplemental material section gives full derivation of the model and discusses other consequences.

  7. Dual reductive/oxidative electrochemistry/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: Towards peptide and protein modification, separation and identification.

    PubMed

    Büter, Lars; Frensemeier, Lisa M; Vogel, Martin; Karst, Uwe

    2017-01-06

    A new hyphenated technique based on on-line dual (oxidative and reductive) electrochemistry coupled to liquid chromatography and high resolution electrospray mass spectrometry is presented. Two liquid streams are combined, with one containing a disulfide, which is reduced to the respective thiol in an electrochemical cell based on a titanium working electrode. The other stream contains phenol, which is electrochemically activated to benzoquinone on a boron-doped diamond working electrode. Upon combination of the two streams, a Michael addition takes places, leading to the covalent coupling of thiol to quinone. In continuous flow, the reaction mixture is transferred into an injection valve and the products are separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography and detected by electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry. Proof of concept is demonstrated for low molecular mass disulfides and peptides, but further optimization will be required in future work to achieve efficient protein labelling.

  8. Investigations in Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, Frank

    2013-07-29

    We report on the work done under DOE grant DE-FG02-01ER41155. The experimental tasks have ongoing efforts at CERN (ATLAS), the Whipple observatory (VERITAS) and R&D work on dual readout calorimetry and neutrino-less double beta decay. The theoretical task emphasizes the weak interaction and in particular CP violation and neutrino physics. The detailed descriptions of the final report on each project are given under the appropriate task section of this report.

  9. Using social media in a high school physics classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    In today's classrooms students have ever increasing access to technology and social media. Rather than try and suppress the use of it in my classroom, I have embraced it and use it as a tool to foster collaboration and science writing with my physics students. There are many platforms to engage your students online, from simple and free to dynamic and costly, but the benefits of using social media for your students is worth giving it try.

  10. New physics and chemistry in high electrostatic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahka, M. L.; Kreuzer, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Fields of the order of volts per meter exist along micron-sized tips. They are of the magnitude of fields inside atoms and molecules and can affect their electronic structure. This leads to a continuous periodic table resulting in new field-induced chemistry. We will present a tutorial treatment of this new physics and chemistry explaining such surprising phenomena like covalent bonding of helium to metal surfaces, metallization of semiconductors and insulators, and more.

  11. High speed optical wireless data transmission system for particle sensors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, W.; Corsini, R.; Ciaramella, E.; Dell'Orso, R.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.

    2015-08-01

    High speed optical fiber or copper wire communication systems are frequently deployed for readout data links used in particle physics detectors. Future detector upgrades will need more bandwidth for data transfer, but routing requirements for new cables or optical fiber will be challenging due to space limitations. Optical wireless communication (OWC) can provide high bandwidth connectivity with an advantage of reduced material budget and complexity of cable installation and management. In a collaborative effort, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna and INFN Pisa are pursuing the development of a free-space optical link that could be installed in a future particle physics detector or upgrade. We describe initial studies of an OWC link using the inner tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector as a reference architecture. The results of two experiments are described: the first to verify that the laser source transmission wavelength of 1550 nm will not introduce fake signals in silicon strip sensors while the second was to study the source beam diameter and its tolerance to misalignment. For data rates of 2.5 Gb/s and 10 Gb/s over a 10 cm working distance it was observed that a tolerance limit of ±0.25 mm to ±0.8 mm can be obtained for misaligned systems with source beam diameters of 0.38 mm to 3.5 mm, respectively.

  12. Direct Electrochemistry of Hemoglobin at a Graphene Gold Nanoparticle Composite Film for Nitric Oxide Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Miao-Qing; Wu, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2013-01-01

    A simple two-step method was employed for preparing nano-sized gold nanoparticles-graphene composite to construct a GNPs-GR-SDS modified electrode. Hemoglobin (Hb) was successfully immobilized on the surface of a basal plane graphite (BPG) electrode through a simple dropping technique. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of the hemoglobin-modified electrode was investigated. The as-prepared composites showed an obvious promotion of the direct electro-transfer between hemoglobin and the electrode. A couple of well-defined and quasi-reversible Hb CV peaks can be observed in a phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0). The separation of anodic and cathodic peak potentials is 81 mV, indicating a fast electron transfer reaction. The experimental results also clarified that the immobilized Hb retained its biological activity for the catalysis toward NO. The biosensor showed high sensitivity and fast response upon the addition of NO, under the conditions of pH 7.0, potential -0.82 V. The time to reach the stable-state current was less than 3 s, and the linear response range of NO was 0.72-7.92 μM, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9991. PMID:23748173

  13. Application of graphene-copper sulfide nanocomposite modified electrode for electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fan; Zheng, Weizhe; Wang, Wencheng; Hou, Fei; Lei, Bingxin; Sun, Zhenfan; Sun, Wei

    2015-02-15

    In this paper a graphene (GR) and copper sulfide (CuS) nanocomposite was synthesized by hydrothermal method and used for the electrode modification with a N-butylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate based carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) as the substrate electrode. Hemoglobin (Hb) was immobilized on the modified electrode to get a biocompatible sensing platform. UV-vis absorption spectroscopic results confirmed that Hb retained its native secondary structure in the composite. Direct electron transfer of Hb incorporated into the nanocomposite was investigated with a pair of well-defined redox waves appeared on cyclic voltammogram, indicating the realization of direct electrochemistry of Hb on the modified electrode. The results can be ascribed to the presence of GR-CuS nanocomposite on the electrode surface that facilitates the electron transfer rate between the electroactive center of Hb and the electrode. The Hb modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid in the concentration range from 3.0 to 64.0 mmol L(-1) with the detection limit of 0.20 mmol L(-1) (3σ). The fabricated biosensor displayed the advantages such as high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability.

  14. Glucose oxidase-graphene-chitosan modified electrode for direct electrochemistry and glucose sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-11-01

    Direct electrochemistry of a glucose oxidase (GOD)/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite was studied. The immobilized enzyme retains its bioactivity, exhibits a surface confined, reversible two-proton and two-electron transfer reaction, and has good stability, activity and a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate with the rate constant (ks) of 2.83 s-1. A much higher enzyme loading (1.12 × 10-9 mol/cm2) is obtained as compared to the bare glass carbon surface. This GOD/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite film can be used for sensitive detection of glucose. The biosensor exhibits a wider linearity range from 0.08 mM to 12 mM glucose with a detection limit of 0.02 mM and much higher sensitivity (37.93 μA mM-1 cm-2) as compared with other nanostructured supports. The excellent performance of the biosensor is attributed to large surface-to-volume ratio and high conductivity of graphene, and good biocompatibility of chitosan, which enhances the enzyme absorption and promotes direct electron transfer between redox enzymes and the surface of electrodes.

  15. Wireless Synthesis and Activation of Electrochemiluminescent Thermoresponsive Janus Objects Using Bipolar Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Phuakkong, Oranit; Sentic, Milica; Li, Haidong; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Sojic, Neso; Kuhn, Alexander; Ravaine, Valérie; Zigah, Dodzi

    2016-12-13

    In this work, bipolar electrochemistry (BPE) is used as a dual wireless tool to generate and to activate a thermoresponsive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) Janus object. For the first time, BPE allows regioselective growth of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel film on one side of a carbon fiber. It is achieved thanks to the local reduction of persulfate ions, which initiate radical polymerization of NIPAM. By controlling the electric field and the time of the bipolar electrochemical reactions, we are able to control the length and the thickness of the deposit. The resulting pNIPAM film is found to be swollen in water at room temperature and collapsed when heated above 32 °C. We further incorporated a covalently attached ruthenium complex luminophore, Ru(bpy)3(2+), in the hydrogel film. In the second time, BPE is used to activate remotely the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of the Ru(bpy)3(2+) moieties in the film. We take advantage of the film responsiveness to amplify the ECL signal. Upon collapse of the film, the ECL signal, which is sensitive to the distance between adjacent Ru(bpy)3(2+) centers, is strongly amplified. It is therefore shown that BPE is a versatile tool to generate highly sophisticated materials based on responsive polymers, which could lead to sensitive sensors.

  16. Biomolecular detection at ssDNA-conjugated nanoparticles by nano-impact electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Anahita; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2017-01-15

    We describe the use of ssDNA functionalized silver nanoparticle (AgNP) probes for quantitative investigation of biorecognition and real time detection of biomolecular targets using nano-impact electrochemistry. The method is based on measurements of the individual collision events between ssDNA aptamer-functionalized AgNPs and a carbon fiber miroelectrode (CFME). Specific binding events of target analyte induced collision frequency changes enabling ultrasensitive detection of the aptamer target in a single step. These changes are assigned to the surface coverage of the NP by the ssDNA aptamers and subsequent conformational changes of the aptamer probe which affect the electron transfer between the NP and the electrode surface. The method enables sensitive and selective detection of ochratoxin A (OTA), chosen here as a model target, with a limit of detection of 0.05nM and a relative standard deviation of 4.9%. The study provides a means of characterizing bioconjugation of AgNPs with aptamers and assessing biomolecular recognition events with high sensitivity and without the use of exogenous reagents or enzyme amplification steps. This methodology can be broadly applicable to other bioconjugated systems, biosensing and related bioanalytical applications.

  17. Forensic electrochemistry: indirect electrochemical sensing of the components of the new psychoactive substance "Synthacaine".

    PubMed

    Cumba, Loanda R; Kolliopoulos, Athanasios V; Smith, Jamie P; Thompson, Paul D; Evans, Peter R; Sutcliffe, Oliver B; do Carmo, Devaney R; Banks, Craig E

    2015-08-21

    "Synthacaine" is a New Psychoactive Substance which is, due to its inherent psychoactive properties, reported to imitate the effects of cocaine and is therefore consequently branded as "legal cocaine". The only analytical approach reported to date for the sensing of "Synthacaine" is mass spectrometry. In this paper, we explore and evaluate a range of potential analytical techniques for its quantification and potential use in the field screening "Synthacaine" using Raman spectroscopy, presumptive (colour) testing, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and electrochemistry. HPLC analysis of street samples reveals that "Synthacaine" comprises a mixture of methiopropamine (MPA) and 2-aminoindane (2-AI). Raman spectroscopy and presumptive (colour) tests, the Marquis, Mandelin, Simon's and Robadope test, are evaluated towards a potential in-the-field screening approach but are found to not be able to discriminate between the two when they are both present in the same sample, as is the case in the real street samples. We report for the first time a novel indirect electrochemical protocol for the sensing of MPA and 2-AI which is independently validated in street samples with HPLC. This novel electrochemical approach based upon one-shot disposable cost effective screen-printed graphite macroelectrodes holds potential for in-the-field screening for "Synthacaine".

  18. Physical Education and Moral Development: An Intervention Programme to Promote Moral Reasoning through Physical Education in High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouratidou, Katerina; Goutza, Stavroula; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Moral development is one of the goals of physical education (PE). However, few programmes have been implemented to investigate how moral development is promoted in PE settings. This study was designed in order to explore the effectiveness of a six-week specially designed moral development intervention in the PE domain in high school students, and…

  19. Differentiating the Underrepresented: Physics Opportunities for Bronx High School Students in a University Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Angela M.

    2010-10-01

    Urban students often have limited opportunities to study physics in high school; many schools, particularly in high poverty areas, do not have the resources and capital to provide physics courses for those who wish to enroll. The Bronx Institute at Lehman College has initiated several programs for Black and Latino youth to enroll in physics classes and progress to college-level physics while still in high school. Students with promise from the surrounding community have been recruited to participate in afterschool and summer classes, taught by university faculty. Examples of student reflections illustrate the collective impact of high expectations, access to rigorous physics study, and a communal, supportive learning environment. Initial experiences with the first two cohorts will be shared, along with curriculum plans for a comprehensive physics sequence to prepare students for admission to competitive colleges and participation in future STEM study and careers.

  20. Collider Aspects of Flavour Physics at High Q

    SciTech Connect

    del Aguila, F.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Allanach, B.C.; Alwall, J.; Andreev, Yu.; Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Bartl, A.; Beccaria, M.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Bityukov, S.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Burdman, G.; Carvalho, J.; Castro, N.; Clerbaux, B.; de Campos, F.; de Gouvea, A.; Dennis, C.; Djouadi, A.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Louvain U., CP3 /Moscow, INR /Valencia U. /Vienna U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Karlsruhe U. /Sao Paulo U. /LIP, Coimbra /Brussels U. /Sao Paulo U., Guaratingueta /Northwestern U. /Oxford U. /Orsay, LPT /Athens U. /Lisbon U.

    2008-03-07

    This chapter of the report of the 'Flavour in the era of LHC' workshop discusses flavor related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavor aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.

  1. The virtual library in action: Collaborative international control of high-energy physics pre-print

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitz, P.A.; Addis, L.; Galic, H.; Johnson, T.

    1996-02-01

    This paper will discuss how control of the grey literature in high-energy physics pre-prints developed through a collaborative effort of librarians and physicists. It will highlight the critical steps in the development process and describe one model of a rapidly evolving virtual library for high-energy physics information. In conclusion, this paper will extend this physics model to other areas of grey literature management.

  2. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gail G.

    2013-05-31

    The highlight of our last budget period, June 1, 2010, to May 31, 2013, was the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), announced on July 4, 2012, and for which François Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 8, 2013. The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964 to explain how elementary particles obtain mass and was the missing piece of the Standard Model. However, the Standard Model does not describe everything that we know. There are many unanswered questions, such as how can the Higgs boson have the mass that we have observed, are there more Higgs bosons, why is there more matter than antimatter, and what is the invisible dark matter, which constitutes about 85% of the matter in the universe. Our group played a significant role in the discovery of the Higgs boson and in subsequent analyses. We also carried out searches for new physics, in ways that could help elucidate some of the remaining questions. Our role in the CMS detector focused on the Tracker, a silicon strip outer tracker and pixel inner tracker.

  3. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C; Al-Sarawi, Said F; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-04

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information.

  4. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information.

  5. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  6. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information. PMID:26239669

  7. LIGA-based microsystem manufacturing:the electrochemistry of through-mold depostion and material properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, James J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Goods, Steven Howard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-06-01

    The report presented below is to appear in ''Electrochemistry at the Nanoscale'', Patrik Schmuki, Ed. Springer-Verlag, (ca. 2005). The history of the LIGA process, used for fabricating dimensional precise structures for microsystem applications, is briefly reviewed, as are the basic elements of the technology. The principal focus however, is on the unique aspects of the electrochemistry of LIGA through-mask metal deposition and the generation of the fine and uniform microstructures necessary to ensure proper functionality of LIGA components. We draw from both previously published work by external researchers in the field as well as from published and unpublished studies from within Sandia.

  8. A Proposal to Introduce a Topic of Contemporary Physics into High-School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Wilma M.S.; Luiz, Adir M.; de Carvalho, Carlos R.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an approach to integrate contemporary physics into high-school teaching. We present a simple way to understand mass spectroscopy using basic physics concepts, so that high-school students may have contact with recent topics of modern research. The main features of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer using secondary…

  9. Proceedings of the conference on numerical methods in high temperature physics

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Holm, D.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.

    1988-11-01

    These proceedings contain full papers presented at the Los Alamos Conference on High Temperature Physics. This conference discussed many aspects of high temperature physics including hydrodynamics, radiation and particle transport and some computational issues important for efficient calculations. The meetings was held between researchers from Los Alamos and the French Commissariat a L'Energy Atomique (CEA).

  10. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-05

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R & D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  11. Effects of Medicine Ball Training on Fitness Performance of High-School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Mediate, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of medicine ball training on the fitness performance of high-school physical education students. Sixty-nine high-school students participated in a 6-week medicine training program during the first 10 to 15 minutes of each physical education class. A group of 49 students who participated in…

  12. Dispositional Empathy in Neglectful Mothers and Mothers at High Risk for Child Physical Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia; Guibert, Maria; Asla, Nagore; Ormaechea, Amaia

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates whether mothers who are neglectful and at high risk for child physical abuse present a deficit in empathy. Participants were neglectful mothers (n = 37), mothers at high risk for child physical abuse (n = 22), and nonmaltreating mothers (n = 37). The Interpersonal Reactivity Index, a self-report measure assessing specific…

  13. Prospective High School Physics Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Practices: From Traditionalist to Constructivist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirci, Neset

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the teaching practices of prospective high school physics teachers with respect to their preference for teaching as a traditionalist or as a constructivist. To study the beliefs of prospective high school physics teachers on this subject, firstly, the Teacher Belief Survey was administered to 135…

  14. Evaluating High School Students' Conceptions of the Relationship between Mathematics and Physics: Development of a Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapucu, S.; Öçal, M. F.; Simsek, M.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to develop a questionnaire measuring high school students' conceptions of the relationship between mathematics and physics, (2) and to determine the students' conceptions of the relationship between mathematics and physics. A total of 718 high school students (343 male, 375 female) participated in this study.…

  15. Tutorial on neural network applications in high energy physics: A 1992 perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B.

    1992-04-01

    Feed forward and recurrent neural networks are introduced and related to standard data analysis tools. Tips are given on applications of neural nets to various areas of high energy physics. A review of applications within high energy physics and a summary of neural net hardware status are given.

  16. Education of Social Skills among Senior High School Age Students in Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akelaitis, Arturas V.; Malinauskas, Romualdas K.

    2016-01-01

    Research aim was to reveal peculiarities of the education of social skills among senior high school age students in physical education classes. We hypothesized that after the end of the educational experiment the senior high school age students will have more developed social skills in physical education classes. Participants in the study were 51…

  17. Physics Last: A Historical Study of the Development of the US High School Science Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Keith; Robbins, Dennis M.

    This study explores how and when physics became the last course in U.S. high school science and what impact this had on high school physics offerings and student enrollment. Four main areas of historical data were identified: (1) national and state education statistics; (2) reports from major organizations on reform and policy; (3) reports from…

  18. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-01

    This report is divided into the following areas: (1) experimental research program; (2) theoretical research program; (3) accelerator research and development; (4) divisional computing activities; (5) publications; (6) colloquia and conference talks; (7) high energy physics community activities; and (7) High Energy Physics Division research personnel. Summaries are given for individual research programs for activities (1), (2) and (3).

  19. Ongoing development of high-efficiency and high-reliability laser diodes at Spectra-Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanxuan; Chyr, Irving; Brown, Denny; Jin, Xu; Reinhardt, Frank; Towe, Terry; Nguyen, Touyen; Srinivasan, Raman; Berube, Myra; Miller, Robert; Kuppuswamy, Kiran; Hu, Yongdan; Crum, Trevor; Truchan, Tom; Harrison, James

    2007-02-01

    Ongoing optimization of epitaxial designs, MOCVD growth processes, and device engineering at Spectra-Physics has yielded significant improvement in both power conversion efficiency (PCE) and reliable power, without compromising manufacturability in a high-volume production environment. Maximum PCE of 72.2% was measured at 25 °C for 976- nm single-emitter devices with 3-mm cavity length. 928 W continuous-wave (CW) output power has been demonstrated from a high-efficiency (65% maximum PCE) single laser bar with 5-mm cavity length and 77% fill factor. Eight-element laser bars (976 nm) with 100μm-wide emitters have been operated at >148 W CW, corresponding to linear power densities at the facet >185 mW/μm. Ongoing life-testing, in combination with stepped stress tests, indicate rates of random failure and wear-out are well below those of earlier device designs. For operation near 800 nm, the design has been optimized for high-power, high-temperature applications. The highest PCE for water-cooled stacks was 54.7% at 35°C coolant temperature.

  20. Using electrochemistry - total internal refection imaging ellipsometry to monitor biochemical oxygen demand on the surface tethered polyelectrolyte modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Meng; Lv, Bei'er; Chen, YanYan; Ma, Hongwei; Jin, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Our previous work has proposed an electrochemistry - total internal reflection imaging ellipsometry (EC-TIRIE) technique to observe the dissolved oxygen (DO) reduction on Clark electrode since high interface sensitivity makes TIRIE a useful tool to study redox reactions on the electrode surface. To amplify the optical signal noise ratio (OSNR), a surface tethered weak polyelectrolyte, carboxylated poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-random- 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (abbreviated as carboxylated poly(OEGMA-r-HEMA)), has been introduced on the electrode surface. Since Clark electrode is widely used in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) detection, we use this technique to measure BOD in the sample. The dynamic range of the system is from 0 ˜ 25 mg/L. Two samples have been measured. Compared with the conventional method, the deviation of both optical and electrical signals are less than 10%.

  1. Single nanowire electrode electrochemistry of silicon anode by in situ atomic force microscopy: solid electrolyte interphase growth and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-Rui; Deng, Xin; Liu, Ran-Ran; Yan, Hui-Juan; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2014-11-26

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have attracted great attention as promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) on account of their high capacity and improved cyclability compared with bulk silicon. The interface behavior, especially the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), plays a significant role in the performance and stability of the electrodes. We report herein an in situ single nanowire atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to investigate the interface electrochemistry of silicon nanowire (SiNW) electrode. The morphology and Young's modulus of the individual SiNW anode surface during the SEI growth were quantitatively tracked. Three distinct stages of the SEI formation on the SiNW anode were observed. On the basis of the potential-dependent morphology and Young's modulus evolution of SEI, a mixture-packing structural model was proposed for the SEI film on SiNW anode.

  2. Predicting High Temperature Dislocation Physics in HCP Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Abigail; Carpenter, John S.; Martinez Saez, Enrique

    2016-05-09

    This report applies models and experiments to answer key questions about the way materials deform; specifics regarding phase field dislocations dynamics; as well as high temperature rolling experiments.

  3. UVA experimental and high energy physics. Final grant report

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1999-10-07

    The period 1992--1997 was a mixture of frustrations and of accomplishments for the UVa HEP group. The experimental HEP group began this period with the completion of a truncated run of Experiment E771 at Fermilab in 1992. This experiment was designed to measure the cross section for beauty production in 800 GeV/c pN interactions. It succeeded in this goal as well as in obtaining one of the best limits on FCNC in charm decays by setting an upper limit on D{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}. In addition, they were able to measure {Psi}, {Psi}, {chi}{sub 1},{chi}{sub 2} and upsilon production. Three UVa PhD theses have resulted from this experiment (as well as 12 other PhD's at other institutions). At the same time, the UVa experimental group was vigorously pursuing the goal of studying CP violation in B production. This took the form of a proposal to the SSC for a super fixed target facility, the SFT, which would focus on studies of B mesons. B. Cox was the spokesman of this experiment that had over thirty institutions. This proposal EOI-14 had a good reception by the SSC PAC. A R and D activity to prove the technique of crystal channeling was undertaken to prove the accelerator aspects of this proposal. This activity, known as E853 or CEX at Fermilab, resulted in proof of the crystal channeling technique as viable for the extraction of 20 TeV beam at the SSC. In addition to this activity, the UVa group investigated many other aspects of B physics at the SSC. They were among the leaders of the 1993 Snowmass meeting on B Physics at Hadronic Accelerators. The UVa HEP group worked vigorously on developing the ideas for B physics at the SSC, as evidenced by the many different studies listed in the publication list given, up to the very day the SSC was terminated by an act of Congress.

  4. Selection and Physical Properties of High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, G. W.

    2014-09-01

    Extremely Red Objects (EROs) and BzKs continue to attract considerable interest. It has been suggested that they may be the direct progenitors of present-day massive E/S0 galaxies, and can provide crucial constraints on the current galaxy formation and evolution models. Therefore, the key question is to measure the relative fraction of OGs (old galaxies) and DGs (young, and dusty starburst galaxies) in the sample of EROs. Many groups have been currently investigating the fractions of these two ERO populations using a variety of observational approaches, but the fraction of OGs and DGs from different surveys is different. In the meantime, a number of observations suggest that the epoch of z˜2 also plays an important role in galaxy formation and evolution for various reasons: the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) begins to drop at z˜2 from a flat plateau at higher redshifts; the morphological type mix of field galaxies changes remarkably at z˜2; the number density of QSOs has a peak at z˜2; and about 50% to 70% of the stellar mass assembly of galaxies took place in the redshift range 1physical properties of passive and star-forming galaxies at z˜2 in the AEGIS field, and (3) the mid-infrared spectroscopy and multi-wavelength study of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z˜2 in the AEGIS field. Chapter 1 gives a brief review on the research progresses of EROs at z˜1, BzKs at z˜2, and ULIRGs at z˜2, respectively. In Chapter 2 we present a quantitative study of the classification of EROs in the UDF and COSMOS field. Our sample includes 5264 (COSMOS, K_{Vega} ≤19.2) and 24 EROs (UDF, K_{Vega}≤22.0) with (i-K)_{AB}≥2.45. Using the fitting method of spectral energy distribution (SED), [3.6]-[8.0] color, and the nonparametric measures of galaxy morphology, we classify EROs into two classes: DGs and OGs. We find

  5. Experimental High Energy Physics Research: Direct Detection of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, Michael S.

    2014-10-02

    The grant supported research on an experimental search for evidence of dark matter interactions with normal matter. The PI carried out the research as a member of the LUX and LZ collaborations. The LUX research team collected a first data set with the LUX experiment, a large liquid xenon detector installed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first results were published in Physical Review Letters on March 4, 2014. The journal Nature named the LUX result a scientific highlight of the year for 2013. In addition, the LZ collaboration submitted the full proposal for the Lux Zeplin experiment, which has since been approved by DOE-HEP as a second-generation dark matter experiment. Witherell is the Level 2 manager for the Outer Detector System on the LUX-Zeplin experiment.

  6. Attitudes toward Physical Education of Female High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodson-Smith, Andrea; Dorwart, Catherine E.; Linder, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes of female high school students toward PE in selected North Carolina schools. The high schools were conveniently selected to include the Northeast Piedmont urban region of North Carolina. Participants consisted of 102 female students aged 14 to 18 years old who were enrolled in ninth to 12th…

  7. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1993-02-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physics-chemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid minedrainage. A novel approach to the study of pyrite aqueous electrochemistry is proposed, based on the use of both synthetic and natural ( i.e. coal-derived) pyrite specimens, the utilization of.pyrite both in the form of micro (i.e. colloidal and subcolloidal) and macro (i.e. rotating ring disk) electrodes, and the application of in-situ direct electroanalytical and spectroelectrochemical characterization techniques. The kinetic study of the reaction between sulfide and ferrous ions in solution suggested that the black species formed initially is FeHS{sup +} intermediate. To farther confirm this mechanism, the experiments aimed at establishing the stoichiometry for the intermediate were carried out thermodynamically with a stopped-flow spectrophotometric technique. The results showed that the mole ratio of H{sup {minus}}/Fe{sup 2+} is 1 to 1 for the intermediate product, which is in good agreement with the kinetic results previously obtained. Furthermore, the equilibrium constant for the reaction Fe{sup 2+} + H{sup {minus}} = FeHS{sup +} was determined as K = 10{sup 4.34}. The forward rate constant is 10{sup 3.81}(mol/l){sup {minus}1}sec{sup {minus}1} and the backward rate constant is 10{sup {minus}0.53} (mol/l){sup {minus}1} sec{sup {minus}1}.

  8. Li/Ag2VO2PO4 batteries: the roles of composite electrode constituents on electrochemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Bock, David C.; Bruck, Andrea M.; Pelliccione, Christopher J.; ...

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we utilize silver vanadium phosphorous oxide, Ag2VO2PO4, as a model system to systematically study the impact of the constituents of a composite electrode, including polymeric and conductive additives, on electrochemistry. Notably, although highly resistive, this bimetallic cathode can be discharged as a pure electroactive material in the absence of a conductive additive as it generates an in situ conductive matrix via a reduction displacement reaction resulting in the formation of silver metal nanoparticles. Also, three different electrode compositions were investigated: Ag2VO2PO4 only, Ag2VO2PO44 with binder, and Ag2VO2PO4 with binder and carbon. Constant current discharge, pulse testing andmore » impedance spectroscopy measurements were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of the electrodes as a function of depth of discharge. In situ EDXRD was used to spatially resolve the discharge progression within the cathode by following the formation of Ag0. Ex situ XRD and EXAFS modeling were used to quantify the amount of Ag0 formed. Results indicate that the metal center reduced (V5+ or Ag+) was highly dependent on composite composition (presence of PTFE, carbon), depth of discharge (Ag0 nanoparticle formation), and spatial location within the cathode. The addition of a binder was found to increase cell polarization, and the percolation network provided by the carbon in the presence of PTFE was further increased with reduction and formation of Ag0. Lastly, this study provides insight into the factors controlling the electrochemistry of resistive active materials in composite electrodes.« less

  9. Research activities on high-intensity laser and high field physics at APRI-GIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Tae Moon

    2015-05-01

    The performance of a 0.1-Hz-repetition-rate, 30-fs, 1.5-PW Ti:sapphire laser which is using for research on high field physics in APRI-GIST is presented. The charged particles (electrons and protons) are accelerated and an efficient x-ray generation is demonstrated using the PW laser. Protons are accelerated up to 80 MeV when an ultra-thin polymer target is irradiated by a circularly-polarized PW laser pulse. Electrons are accelerated to multi-GeV level with a help of injector and accelerator scheme. In the relativistic harmonic generation experiment, the harmonic order is dramatically extended, by optimizing the intensity of pre-pulse level, up to 164th that corresponds to 4.9 nm in wavelength and the experimental results can be explained by the oscillatory flying mirror model. The upgrade of the PW laser to the multi-PW level is under way.

  10. Martian dust devil electron avalanche process and associated electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Telana L.; Farrell, William M.; Delory, Gregory T.; Nithianandam, Jeyasingh

    2010-05-01

    Mars' dynamic atmosphere displays localized dust devils and larger, global dust storms. Based on terrestrial analog studies, electrostatic modeling, and laboratory work, these features will contain large electrostatic fields formed via triboelectric processes. In the low-pressure Martian atmosphere, these fields may create an electron avalanche and collisional plasma due to an increase in electron density driven by the internal electrical forces. To test the hypothesis that an electron avalanche is sustained under these conditions, a self-consistent atmospheric process model is created including electron impact ionization sources and electron losses via dust absorption, electron dissociation attachment, and electron/ion recombination. This new model is called the Dust Devil Electron Avalanche Model (DDEAM). This model solves simultaneously nine continuity equations describing the evolution of the primary gaseous chemical species involved in the electrochemistry. DDEAM monitors the evolution of the electrons and primary gas constituents, including electron/water interactions. We especially focus on electron dynamics and follow the electrons as they evolve in the E field driven collisional gas. When sources and losses are self-consistently included in the electron continuity equation, the electron density grows exponentially with increasing electric field, reaching an equilibrium that forms a sustained time-stable collisional plasma. However, the character of this plasma differs depending upon the assumed growth rate saturation process (chemical saturation versus space charge). DDEAM also shows the possibility of the loss of atmospheric methane as a function of electric field due to electron dissociative attachment of the hydrocarbon. The methane destruction rates are presented and can be included in other larger atmospheric models.

  11. First principles electrochemistry: Electrons and protons reacting as independent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llano, Jorge; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2002-12-01

    We here present a first principles approach to calculate standard Gibbs energies and the corresponding observables (standard electrode potentials in the hydrogen scale ESHE0 and pKa values) of stoichiometric reactions involving electrons and/or protons as independent species in solution, from absolute electrochemical potentials defined according to quantum and statistical mechanics. In order to pass from the conventional electrodic and thermodynamic descriptions of electrochemistry to the first principles approach based on estimating absolute electrochemical potentials, we revisit the problem of the absolute and relative electrochemical scales from the macroscopic and microscopic viewpoints. A microscopic definition of the absolute electrochemical potential is presented in order to enable an identical thermodynamic treatment of any species in a given phase, i.e., electrons, protons, atoms, molecules, atomic and molecular ions, and electronically excited species. We show that absolute standard chemical potentials in the mole fraction scale can be easily computed with wave function and density functional theories in conjunction with self-consistent reaction field models. Based on Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics and experimental solvation data, we estimate an internally compatible set of absolute standard chemical and electrochemical potentials of protons and solvated electrons in the molality and molarity scales in aqueous solution at 298 K and 1 atm, within an absolute error of ±0.5 kcal/mol. This scheme enables a consistent and simultaneous description of the Gibbs energy changes and the observables (ESHE0 and pKa 's) of electron, proton, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in aqueous solution at 298 K and 1 atm.

  12. Martian Dust Devil Electron Avalanche Process and Associated Electrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Telana L.; Farrell, William M.; Delory, Gregory T.; Nithianandam, Jeyasingh

    2010-01-01

    Mars' dynamic atmosphere displays localized dust devils and larger, global dust storms. Based on terrestrial analog studies, electrostatic modeling, and laboratory work these features will contain large electrostatic fields formed via triboelectric processes. In the low-pressure Martian atmosphere, these fields may create an electron avalanche and collisional plasma due to an increase in electron density driven by the internal electrical forces. To test the hypothesis that an electron avalanche is sustained under these conditions, a self-consistent atmospheric process model is created including electron impact ionization sources and electron losses via dust absorption, electron dissociation attachment, and electron/ion recombination. This new model is called the Dust Devil Electron Avalanche Model (DDEAM). This model solves simultaneously nine continuity equations describing the evolution of the primary gaseous chemical species involved in the electrochemistry. DDEAM monitors the evolution of the electrons and primary gas constituents, including electron/water interactions. We especially focus on electron dynamics and follow the electrons as they evolve in the E field driven collisional gas. When sources and losses are self-consistently included in the electron continuity equation, the electron density grows exponentially with increasing electric field, reaching an equilibrium that forms a sustained time-stable collisional plasma. However, the character of this plasma differs depending upon the assumed growth rate saturation process (chemical saturation versus space charge). DDEAM also shows the possibility of the loss of atmospheric methane as a function of electric field due to electron dissociative attachment of the hydrocarbon. The methane destruction rates are presented and can be included in other larger atmospheric models.

  13. Towards High Resolution Numerical Algorithms for Wave Dominated Physical Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-30

    couple these elements using Finite- Volume-like surface Riemann solvers. This hybrid, dual-layer design allows DGTD to combine advantages from both of...electromagnetic waves , J. Comput. Phys., 114 (1994), pp. 185-200. [62] F. COLLINO, High order absorbing boundary conditions for wave propagation...formulation with high order absorbing boundary conditions for time-dependent waves , Comput. Meth. Appl. Mech., 195 (2006), pp. 3666-3690. [69] M. GUDDATI

  14. High energy physics advisory panel`s composite subpanel for the assessment of the status of accelerator physics and technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    In November 1994, Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (OER), initiated a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to five OER programs -- High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy, and Health and Environmental Research. Dr. Krebs asked the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to establish a composite subpanel with representation from the five OER advisory committees and with a balance of membership drawn broadly from both the accelerator community and from those scientific disciplines associated with the OER programs. The Subpanel was also charged to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future research and development needs, management issues, and funding requirements. The Subpanel finds that accelerator science and technology is a vital and intellectually exciting field. It has provided essential capabilities for the DOE/OER research programs with an enormous impact on the nation`s scientific research, and it has significantly enhanced the nation`s biomedical and industrial capabilities. Further progress in this field promises to open new possibilities for the scientific goals of the OER programs and to further benefit the nation. Sustained support of forefront accelerator research and development by the DOE`s OER programs and the DOE`s predecessor agencies has been responsible for much of this impact on research. This report documents these contributions to the DOE energy research mission and to the nation.

  15. Report of the HEPAP (High Energy Physics Advisory Panel) Subpanel on Future Modes of Experimental Research in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Particle physics is the study of matter and its interaction on the most microscopic of scales. Since mid-century, our view of the most elementary forms of matter has shifted from the neutrons, protons, and electrons that make up atoms to the more pointlike quarks and leptons. Although open questions and challenges abound, a comprehensive picture that successfully describes these entities and their interactions on a scale down to at least 10/sup -16/ cm has been forged through the intellectual efforts of experimental and theoretical physicists alike. The strides taken have been aided by accelerators of ever increasing energy and, correspondingly, ever increasing physical size. The nature of experimental research has gradually changed over the years from individual and small group efforts to large team projects involving hundreds of physicists. Among other things, it is our purpose in this report to examine how one can continue this research, which is now often on a massive scale, in ways that best preserve the qualities of individual, intellectual input. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-Ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Bailey, Catherine N.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Daniel P.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, Jack E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall K.

    2010-01-01

    High spectral resolution, high cadence, imaging x-ray spectroscopy has the potential to revolutionize the study of the solar corona. To that end we have been developing transition-edge-sensor (TES) based x-ray micro calorimeter arrays for future solar physics missions where imaging and high energy resolution spectroscopy will enable previously impossible studies of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona. The characteristics of these x-ray microcalorimeters are significantly different from conventional micro calorimeters developed for astrophysics because they need to accommodate much higher count rates (300-1000 cps) while maintaining high energy resolution of less than 4 eV FWHM in the X-ray energy band of 0.2-10 keV. The other main difference is a smaller pixel size (less than 75 x 75 square microns) than is typical for x-ray micro calorimeters in order to provide angular resolution less than 1 arcsecond. We have achieved at energy resolution of 2.15 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 12 x 12 square micron TES sensor and 34 x 34 x 9.1 micron gold absorber, and a resolution of 2.30 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 35 x 35 micron TES and a 57 x 57 x 9.1 micron gold absorber. This performance has been achieved in pixels that are fabricated directly onto solid substrates, ie. they are not supported by silicon nitride membranes. We present the results from these detectors, the expected performance at high count-rates, and prospects for the use of this technology for future Solar missions.

  17. Towards combined electrochemistry and surface-enhanced resonance Raman of heme proteins: Improvement of diffusion electrochemistry of cytochrome c at silver electrodes chemically modified with 4-mercaptopyridine.

    PubMed

    Millo, Diego; Ranieri, Antonio; Koot, Wynanda; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2006-08-01

    To date, a successful combination of surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and electrochemistry to study heme proteins is inhibited by the problems raised by the prerequisite to use silver as electrode metal. This paper indicates an approach to overcome these problems. It describes a quick and reproducible procedure to prepare silver electrodes chemically modified with 4-mercaptopyridine suitable to perform diffusion electrochemistry of cytochrome c (cyt c). The method involves the employment of a mechanical and a chemical treatment and avoids the use of alumina slurries and any electrochemical pretreatment. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to test the electrochemical response of cyt c, and the CV signals were found identical with those obtained on gold electrodes under the same experimental conditions. Compared to previous literature, a significant improvement of the CV signal of cyt c at silver electrodes was achieved. Preliminary results show that this treatment can be also successfully employed for the preparation of SERRS-active electrodes.

  18. Theoretical-research summer: For a new generation of experts on high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Sánchez, Saúl

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the need to strengthen the comprehensive training of young Mexican physicists interested in theoretical high energy physics, the Theoretical-research summer on high energy physics program was conceived. This program, that celebrates its sixth anniversary, consists in a yearly, nationwide challenging contest in which a board of experts identify the best undergraduate contestants to support them during short research stays in high-energy- theory groups of prestigious international institutions. Out of 80 contestants, the eight awarded students have demonstrated their skills, producing highly advanced (and publicly available) reviews on particle physics, field theory, cosmology and string theory, and a published paper.

  19. Insight in layer-by-layer assembly of cysteamine and L-cysteine on the copper surface by electrochemistry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ping; Shen, Shu; Li, Chuan-Chuan; Guo, Xiao-Yu; Wen, Ying; Yang, Hai-Feng

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we examined the relationship between the anticorrosion behavior and the structure of the cysteamine/L-cysteine layer-by-layer coating on the copper surface via the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) technique with electrochemistry and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. SERS results elucidated the layer-by-layer adsorption mechanism of cysteamine/L-cysteine at the copper surface. Electrochemical investigations explored the inhibition behavior of cysteamine/L-cysteine for copper from corrosion with a high protection efficiency of 91.4%.

  20. Indiana Wesleyan University SPS Physics Outreach to Rural Middle School and High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrander, Joshua; Rose, Heath; Burchell, Robert; Ramos, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The Society of Physics Students chapter at Indiana Wesleyan University is unusual in that it has no physics major, only physics minors. Yet while just over a year old, IWU-SPS has been active in performing physics outreach to middle school and high school students, and the rural community of Grant County. Our year-old SPS chapter consists of majors from Chemistry, Nursing, Biology, Exercise Science, Computer Science, Psychology, Pastoral Studies, and Science Education, who share a common interest in physics and service to the community. IWU currently has a physics minor and is currently working to build a physics major program. Despite the intrinsic challenges, our multi-disciplinary group has been successful at using physics demonstration equipment and hands-on activities and their universal appeal to raise the interest in physics in Grant County. We report our experience, challenges, and successes with physics outreach. We describe in detail our two-pronged approach: raising the level of physics appreciation among the IWU student community and among pre-college students in a rural community of Indiana. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge the support of the Society of Physics Students through a Marsh White Outreach Award and a Blake Lilly Prize.

  1. HEPAP Subpanel on the US High Energy Physics Research Program for the 1990's

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The entire community of high energy physicists looks expectantly to the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) era. The SSC is the highest priority in the US high energy physics (HEP) program, and physics at the SSC will increasingly become its focus. In this report, the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on the US High Energy Physics Research Program for the 1990's examines how the National HEP program can go forward vigorously in the period of preparation for the SSC. The Subpanel concluded early that a viable and productive physics research program in the next decade on a range of promising fronts is essential for this field to continue to attract and educate scientists of great creativity. The Subpanel found that such a program requires both exploiting existing opportunities and undertaking some new initiatives. The recommendations are based on the constant budget scenario,'' which the Subpanel interprets as averaging the FY 1991 budget level over the next decade.

  2. Is the Physical Being Taken out of Physical Education? On the Possible Effects of High-Stakes Testing on an Embattled Profession's Curriculum Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Clancy; Garrison, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Building on recent discussions regarding how current national standards for physical education promote cognitive outcomes over physical outcomes, the authors explore how a new era in high-stakes testing is also contributing to an emphasis on the cognitive, over the physical. While high-stakes testing has been linked to reducing the amount of…

  3. Physics of Coanda jet detachment at high-pressure ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Kenneth C.; Lucius, Gerald A.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental measurements of surface pressure for an underexpanded two-dimensional supersonic Coanda flow with static conditions exterior to the jet flow was obtained for a fixed slot height to a radius ratio of 0.04. The data demonstrate that an oblique shock forms near the jet exit plane which vectors the jet flow from the curved surface at a pressure ratio of 7.6. The jet detachment occurs at a pressure ratio which is a function of the ratio of slot height to cylinder radius. An increase in the pressure ratio to 11.5 before jet detachment has been demonstrated by the translation of the upper wall providing for a converging-diverging geometry. The physics of the Coanda expansion and the jet detachment are qualitatively described using an optical schlieren system. A compressible inviscid model was derived analytically to demonstrate the variation in Mach number and surface pressure as a function of the geometric parameters with increasing pressure ratio.

  4. Innovative Noyce Program for Preparing High School Physics Teachers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Eric; Kosheleva, Olga; Wagler, Amy; Wagler, Ron

    2011-10-01

    The ``Robert Noyce Scholarships for Teaching Miners'' program at the University of Texas at El Paso currently consists of 14 mathematics majors minoring in secondary education, most of whom are preparing for the Mathematics-Physics Certification. From the time of their selection (junior year), till after they begin teaching, participants in this program will have financial support consisting of a 10,000 per year scholarship during the last two years in college. Programmatic support during these two years consists of four, half-day workshops emphasizing: 1) inquiry-based teaching, 2) mathematics & science integration, and 3) actual inquiry in the form of a senior research project. The workshops are facilitated by a team of university faculty and school district partners (EPISD and YISD). These district partners help with the workshops, but also mentor the scholars when placed at their classroom observation and student teacher sites. Once the scholars graduate and receive certification, they will experience unique induction year support: being hired in pairs or small groups and placed together in the same school. This placement with classmates combined with the mentoring of the same district personnel with whom they are familiar is hypothesized to be uniquely effective.

  5. Physical and chemical transformations of sodium cyanide at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2009-12-01

    Pressure-induced physical and chemical transformations of sodium cyanide (NaCN) have been studied up to 50 GPa in diamond-anvil cells, using micro-Raman spectroscopy and angle-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction. We observe three phase transitions in this pressure range: NaCN-IIA (orthorhombic, Immm), to NaCN-IIB (orthorhombic, Pmmn) at 4 GPa, to NaCN-III (monoclinic, Cm) at 8 GPa, and to NaCN-IV (tetragonal, P4mm) at 15 GPa, which is stable to 25 GPa. At higher pressures, NaCN-IV undergoes an irreversible chemical change, which occurs over a large pressure range between 25 and 34 GPa. The new material exhibits a broad yet strong Raman band at around 1550 cm{sup -1}, indicating the formation of C = N bonds in a similar configuration of carbon graphite. The absence of sharp diffraction lines in this material suggests an amorphous nature of CN polymer products.

  6. The Effect of High School Physics Laboratories on Performance in Introductory College Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltese, Adam V.; Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiences play a substantial role in most high school science courses, and many teachers believe the number of labs they offer is a measure of the quality of their curriculum. While some teachers believe labs are meant to confirm concepts taught during lectures, others feel labs should address students' everyday beliefs about the…

  7. Physics of ultra-high bioproductivity in algal photobioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Efrat; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Zarmi, Yair

    2012-04-01

    Cultivating algae at high densities in thin photobioreactors engenders time scales for random cell motion that approach photosynthetic rate-limiting time scales. This synchronization allows bioproductivity above that achieved with conventional strategies. We show that a diffusion model for cell motion (1) accounts for high bioproductivity at irradiance values previously deemed restricted by photoinhibition, (2) predicts the existence of optimal culture densities and their dependence on irradiance, consistent with available data, (3) accounts for the observed degree to which mixing improves bioproductivity, and (4) provides an estimate of effective cell diffusion coefficients, in accord with independent hydrodynamic estimates.

  8. An Event to Encourage High School Students to Pursue College Degrees in Physics and Math

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukiet, Bruce; Thomas, Gordon

    2003-04-01

    We discuss a Math and Physics Day for high school students and teachers, with hands-on activities and seminars involving mathematics and physics. Participants also learn about careers for those who go on to major in physics and mathematics in college. The New York State Section of the APS has provided generous support for this workshop through its Outreach grant program. Approximately a dozen high schools and 100 students attend each year. The program, which runs from 9:15 AM until 2:15 PM, includes an introduction to undergraduate degree programs in Mathematics, Statistics, Optics, Actuarial Science and Applied Physics, a group physics experiment/contest, brief talks over lunch by speakers from industry who have degrees in Math or Physics, and an afternoon seminar. Teachers earn Professional Development credit.

  9. In situ solid-state electrochemistry of mass-selected ions at well-defined electrode–electrolyte interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Johnson, Grant E.; Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Julia

    2016-11-07

    Molecular-level understanding of electrochemical processes occurring at electrode-electrolyte interfaces (EEI) is key to the rational development of high-performance and sustainable electrochemical technologies. This article reports the development and first application of solid-state in situ electrochemical probes to study redox and catalytic processes occurring at well-defined EEI generated using soft-landing of mass- and charge-selected cluster ions (SL). In situ electrochemical probes with excellent mass transfer properties are fabricated using carefully-designed nanoporous ionic liquid membranes. SL enables deposition of pure active species that are not obtainable with other techniques onto electrode surfaces with precise control over charge state, composition, and kinetic energy. SL is, therefore, a unique tool for studying fundamental processes occurring at EEI. For the first time using an aprotic electrochemical probe, the effect of charge state (PMo12O403-/2-) and the contribution of building blocks of Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) clusters to redox processes are characterized by populating EEI with novel POM anions generated by electrospray ionization and gas phase dissociation. Additionally, a proton conducting electrochemical probe has been developed to characterize the reactive electrochemistry (oxygen reduction activity) of bare Pt clusters (Pt40 ~1 nm diameter), thus demonstrating the capability of the probe for studying reactions in controlled gaseous environments. The newly developed in situ electrochemical probes combined with ion SL provide a versatile method to characterize the EEI in solid-state redox systems and reactive electrochemistry at precisely-defined conditions. This capability will advance molecular-level understanding of processes occurring at EEI that are critical to many energy-related technologies.

  10. Experimenting in a constructivist high school physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    Although laboratory activities have long been recognized for their potential to facilitate the learning of science concepts and skills, this potential has yet to be realized. To remediate this problem, researchers have called for constructivist learning environments in which students can pursue open inquiry and frame their own research problems. The present study was designed to describe and understand students' experimenting and problem solving in such an environment. An interpretive research methodology was adopted for the construction of meaning from the data. The data sources included videotapes, their transcripts, student laboratory reports and reflections, interviews with the students, and the teacher's course outline and reflective notes. Forty-six students from three sections of an introductory physics course taught at a private school for boys participated in the study. This article shows the students' remarkable ability and willingness to generate research questions and to design and develop apparatus for data collection. In their effort to frame research questions, students often used narrative explanations to explore and think about the phenomena to be studied. In some cases, blind alleys, students framed research questions and planned experiments that did not lead to the expected results. We observed a remarkable flexibility to deal with problems that arose during the implementation of their plans in the context of the inquiry. These problems, as well as their solutions and the necessary decision-making processes, were characterized by their situated nature. Finally, students pursued meaningful learning during the interpretation of data and graphs to arrive at reasonable answers of their research questions. We concluded that students should be provided with problem-rich learning environments in which they learn to investigate phenomena of their own interest and in which they can develop complex problem-solving skills.

  11. High School Physics Teacher Outreach Programs at California State University Long Beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chuhee; Pickett, Galen; Henriques, Laura

    2013-03-01

    One of the goals of the CSULB PhysTEC project has been to establish a physics teaching community that partners CSULB faculty, high school teachers, pre-service teachers, and physics students. In two years, we have created a solid sustainable Physics Teacher Network with local high school teachers. We will discuss the successful outreach programs for high school physics teachers at CSULB and the detailed logistics. Teacher-In-Residence (TIR), high school physics teachers working with the CSULB PhysTEC team, has provided invaluable input for designing and implementing outreach events. The department organizes biannual open house for local high school teachers and their students. The open house event is attended by pre-service teachers, physics undergraduate and graduate students, and faculty. We also host the monthly demo-sharing day that physics teachers bring and share topical demos, which has about 30 - 50 attendees each month. The CSULB PhysTEC project also distributes a monthly newsletter for local physics teachers with upcoming events and information about teaching, and this newsletter is organized and written by TIR. This work is supported by the PhysTEC grant.

  12. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J. . Physics Dept.); Kivelson, S.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the universality'' of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter.

  13. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the ``universality`` of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter.

  14. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  15. CALET on the ISS: a high energy astroparticle physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone; CALET Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    CALET is a space mission of the Japanese Aerospace Agency (JAXA) in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and NASA. The CALET instrument (CALorimetric Electron Telescope) is planned for a long exposure on the JEM-EF, an external platform of the Japanese Experiment Module KIBO, aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The main science objectives include high precision measurements of the inclusive electron (+positron) spectrum below 1 TeV and the exploration of the energy region above 1 TeV, where the shape of the high end of the spectrum might reveal the presence of nearby sources of acceleration. With an excellent energy resolution and low background contamination CALET will search for possible spectral signatures of dark matter with both electrons and gamma rays. It will also measure the high energy spectra and relative abundance of cosmic nuclei from proton to iron and detect trans-iron elements up to Z ~ 40. With a large exposure and high energy resolution, CALET will be able to verify and complement the observations of CREAM, PAMELA and AMS-02 on a possible deviation from a pure power-law of proton and He spectra in the region of a few hundred GeV and to extend the study to the multi-TeV region. CALET will also contribute to clarify the present experimental picture on the energy dependence of the boron/carbon ratio, below and above 1 TeV/n, thereby providing valuable information on cosmic-ray propagation in the galaxy. Gamma-ray transients will be studied with a dedicated Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM).

  16. High pressure electrides: a predictive chemical and physical theory.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Sheng; Hoffmann, Roald

    2014-04-15

    Electrides, in which electrons occupy interstitial regions in the crystal and behave as anions, appear as new phases for many elements (and compounds) under high pressure. We propose a unified theory of high pressure electrides (HPEs) by treating electrons in the interstitial sites as filling the quantized orbitals of the interstitial space enclosed by the surrounding atom cores, generating what we call an interstitial quasi-atom, ISQ. With increasing pressure, the energies of the valence orbitals of atoms increase more significantly than the ISQ levels, due to repulsion, exclusion by the atom cores, effectively giving the valence electrons less room in which to move. At a high enough pressure, which depends on the element and its orbitals, the frontier atomic electron may become higher in energy than the ISQ, resulting in electron transfer to the interstitial space and the formation of an HPE. By using a He lattice model to compress (with minimal orbital interaction at moderate pressures between the surrounding He and the contained atoms or molecules) atoms and an interstitial space, we are able to semiquantitatively explain and predict the propensity of various elements to form HPEs. The slopes in energy of various orbitals with pressure (s > p > d) are essential for identifying trends across the entire Periodic Table. We predict that the elements forming HPEs under 500 GPa will be Li, Na (both already known to do so), Al, and, near the high end of this pressure range, Mg, Si, Tl, In, and Pb. Ferromagnetic electrides for the heavier alkali metals, suggested by Pickard and Needs, potentially compete with transformation to d-group metals.

  17. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  18. High-Precision Computation: Mathematical Physics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, D. H.; Barrio, R.; Borwein, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit oating-point arithmetic is suficiently accurate for most scientic applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientic computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required. Such calculations are facilitated by high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion e ort. This pa- per presents a survey of recent applications of these techniques and provides someanalysis of their numerical requirements. These applications include supernova simulations, climate modeling, planetary orbit calculations, Coulomb n-body atomic systems, studies of the one structure constant, scattering amplitudes of quarks, glu- ons and bosons, nonlinear oscillator theory, experimental mathematics, evaluation of orthogonal polynomials, numerical integration of ODEs, computation of periodic orbits, studies of the splitting of separatrices, detection of strange nonchaotic at- tractors, Ising theory, quantum held theory, and discrete dynamical systems. We conclude that high-precision arithmetic facilities are now an indispensable compo- nent of a modern large-scale scientic computing environment.

  19. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1991-10-01

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Some Physical and Engineering Aspects of High Current EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A; Prelec, K.

    1999-05-21

    Some applications of an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) require intensities of highly charged ions significantly greater than those which have been achieved in present EBIS sources. For example, the ion source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) must be capable of generating 3 x 10{sup 9} ions of Au{sup 35+} or 2 x 10{sup 9} ions of U{sup 45+} per pulse. In this case, if the fraction of ions of interest is 20% of the total ion space charge, the total extracted charge is {approximately} 5 x 10{sup 11}. It is also desirable to extract these ions in a 10 {micro}s pulse to allow single turn injection into the first synchrotrons. Requirements for an EBIS which could meet the needs of the LHC at CERN are similar ({approximately} 1.5 x 10{sup 9} ions of Pb{sup 54+} in 5.5 {micro}s). This charge yield is about an order of magnitude greater than that achieved in existing EBIS sources, and is what is meant here by high current. This also implies, then, an EBIS with a high electron beam current.

  1. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite. Final technical report, September 1990--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1996-01-01

    This project is concerned with the physiochemical processes occuring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. The use of synthetic particles of pyrite as model electrodes to investigate the semiconductor electrochemistry of pyrite is employed.

  2. A Historical Analysis of the Daniell Cell and Electrochemistry Teaching in French and Tunisian Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulabiar, Ahlem; Bouraoui, Kamel; Chastrette, Maurice; Abderrabba, Manef

    2004-01-01

    The condition in which the Daniell Cell was historically constructed is examined and the evolution of its presentation in French and Tunisian chemistry textbooks is analyzed. Based on the studies, several innovations to facilitate the teaching of the cell, and more generally, the teaching of electrochemistry and of ionic conduction are proposed.

  3. Effects of Jigsaw and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Concepts and Subjects in Electrochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doymus, Kemal; Karacop, Ataman; Simsek, Umit

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and animation versus traditional teaching methods on students' understanding of electrochemistry in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in three different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2007-2008 academic year. The…

  4. The Effects of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) on the Academic Achievement of Students Studying "Electrochemistry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günter, Tugçe; Alpat, Sibel Kilinç

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) on students' academic achievements in studying "Electrochemistry" within a course on Analytical Chemistry. The research was of a pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design and it was conducted with second year students in the Chemistry Teaching Program at…

  5. RF physics of ICWC discharge at high cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Lyssoivan, A.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Vervier, M.; Van Schoor, M.; Bobkov, V.; Rohde, V.; Schneider, P.; Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Philipps, V.; Sergienko, G.; Moiseenko, V.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Collaboration: TEXTOR Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    Recent experiments on Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) performed in tokamaks TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade with standard ICRF antennas operated at fixed frequencies but variable toroidal magnetic field demonstrated rather contrasting parameters of ICWC discharge in scenarios with on-axis fundamental ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) for protons,ω=ω{sub H+}, and with its high cyclotron harmonics (HCH), ω=10ω{sub cH+}⋅ HCH scenario: very high antenna coupling to low density RF plasmas (P{sub pl}≈0.9P{sub RF-G}) and low energy Maxwellian distribution of CX hydrogen atoms with temperature T{sub H}≈350 eV. Fundamental ICR: lower antenna-plasma coupling efficiency (by factor of about 1.5 times) and generation of high energy non-Maxwellian CX hydrogen atoms (with local energy E{sub ⊥H} ≥1.0 keV). In the present paper, we analyze the obtained experimental results numerically using (i) newly developed 0-D transport code describing the process of plasma production with electron and ion collisional ionization in helium-hydrogen gas mixture and (ii) earlier developed 1-D Dispersion Relation Solver accounting for finite temperature effects and collision absorption mechanisms for all plasma species in addition to conventionally examined Landau/TTPM damping for electrons and cyclotron absorption for ions. The numerical study of plasma production in helium with minor hydrogen content in low and high toroidal magnetic fields is presented. The investigation of the excitation, conversion and absorption of plasma waves as function of B{sub T}-field suggests that only fast waves (FW) may give a crucial impact on antenna coupling and characteristics of the ICWC discharge using standard poloidally polarized ICRF antennas designed to couple RF power mainly to FW. The collisional (non-resonant) absorption by electrons and ions and IC absorption by resonant ions of minor concentration in low T{sub e} plasmas is studied at fundamental ICR and its high harmonics.

  6. Evaluation of Tris-Bipyridine Chromium Complexes for Flow Battery Applications: Impact of Bipyridine Ligand Structure on Solubility and Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Pablo J; Yang, Xingyi; Suttil, James A; Brooner, Rachel E M; Thompson, Levi T; Sanford, Melanie S

    2015-11-02

    This report describes the design, synthesis, solubility, and electrochemistry of a series of tris-bipyridine chromium complexes that exhibit up to six reversible redox couples as well as solubilities approaching 1 M in acetonitrile. We have systematically modified both the ligand structure and the oxidation state of these complexes to gain insights into the factors that impact solubility and electrochemistry. The results provide a set of structure-solubility-electrochemistry relationships to guide the future development of electrolytes for nonaqueous flow batteries. In addition, we have identified a promising candidate from the series of chromium complexes for further electrochemical and battery assessment.

  7. 1992 HEPAP subpanel on the US Program of High Energy Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    High energy physics seeks an understanding of the fundamental structure of matter and the laws that govern all physical phenomena. The US high energy physics community has many scientific opportunities before it. Discovering the top quark, exploring the origin of particle-antiparticle asymmetry, and elucidating the Higgs mechanism, the source of mass, are some of the most notable. We were charged with laying out programs for US high energy physics through this decade that would accord with three specific budgetary guidelines for the period FY 1994--FY 1997. This report details the scientific, technical, and resource issues involved, recommends a program for each guideline, and discusses the implications of each program. In all our plans we consider construction of the SSC to have the highest priority in the US particle physics program and to be absolutely essential for continued progress in our field into the 21st century.

  8. High Energy Density Physics technical quarterly, October--December 1994. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The High Energy Density Physics Technical Quarterly (formerly the AGEX 2 Technical Quarterly) publishes short technical contributions on above ground experiments that use pulsed power and laser drivers. The Quarterly is intended to provide rapid exposure of timely technical ideas and results as well as a means for documenting High Energy Density Physics progress and scientific quality for the High Energy Density Physics community. Two articles are included in this volume. They are ``Simulation and Analysis of PEGII-25`` and ``Resistor Developments for Atlas Marx Modules``.

  9. Physical Data on Certain Alloys for High Temperature Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-04-01

    exhibited outstanding strength properties: i. High alloyed materials designated 6_@43 224M, 1M, 16-25-6, N153 , N154, N155, N156 and Age Hardenable Inconel...Alloys (Cont’d.) H626 H627 628 ( _419) H629 (Fr419) N153 -Annealed N155-Eot Worked N155- "Cold" Worked N154-Annealed N154-Hot Worked N154-"Cold" Worked...FORGEABIX_ITY MACHINABILITY Forged and rolled without difficulty. Metal turned and threaded without difficultY. *Alloys N153 - Annealed, NiS3 - Hot

  10. Physics and Materials Science of High Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-26

    Renaissance of Superconductivity 11:00 -11:30 Break 11:30 - 12:00 Discussion Period 12:00 - 12:30 K . Bordoloi: Open Orbit and Magnetic Breakdown Effect 12:30...19:30 S. K . Patapis: Thermodynamic Fluctuations and Critical Behaviour of Ceramic High Tc Superconductors Out of-Electrical Resistivitaia...26 August 1989 11 I Session IV K . Borodoli, Chairman I 16:00 - 17:00 Coffee, Tea 17:00 - 18:30 D. Rainer: BCS Theory and Beyond 18:30 - 19:00

  11. Budget projections 1990, 1991, and 1992 for research in high energy nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, M. Franklin, S. Geer, R. J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, F. M. Pipkin, R. F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, M. E. Law, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, R.F.Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg is the Director of the High Energy Physics Laboratory and administers the DOE high energy physics contract. Professor Schwitters is currently on leave of absence as Director of the Superconducting Super Collider project. In the fall of 1990 Professor G. Feldman, who is currently at SLAC, will join the Harvard faculty and become a principal investigator. Harvard is planning to make one or two additional senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics over the next two years. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. Harvard`s educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education. These budget projections cover all of the Harvard based high energy physics experimental activities. The {open_quotes}umbrella{close_quotes} nature of this contract greatly simplifies support of essential central technical and computer services and helps the group to take advantage of new physics opportunities and to respond to unexpected needs. The funding for the operation of the HEPL facility is shared equally by the experimental groups.

  12. Perceptions of Heart Rate Monitor Use in High School Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Julie A.; King, Kristi McClary; Bian, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating technology into the physical education curriculum is becoming a popular strategy in which teachers can assess, motivate, and provide feedback to students regarding their physical activity participation during class. The purpose of this exploratory study was to gain a greater understanding of high school students' perceptions of using…

  13. Health-Related Fitness Knowledge and Physical Activity of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Angela; Hannon, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if health-related fitness (HRF) knowledge is related to self-reported physical activity (PA) of high school students. Students (N=165) enrolled in physical education from two schools in the Southwestern U.S participated. A 100-point HRF knowledge test was assembled, focusing on the HRF concepts of…

  14. Alternative High School Students' Physical Activity: Role of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Denyelle Baete; Kubik, Martha Y.; Davey, Cynthia; Sirard, John; Fulkerson, Jayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine physical activity self-efficacy as a mediator of the association between perceived barriers to PA and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among alternative high school (AHS) students. Methods: Students (N = 145) from 6 AHS completed self-report questionnaires. Results: Mediation analyses revealed partial mediation…

  15. Variation by Gender in Abu Dhabi High School Students' Interests in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badri, Masood; Mazroui, Karima Al; Al Rashedi, Asma; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Abu Dhabi high school students' interest in physics in different contexts was investigated with a survey conducted in connection with the international project, The Relevance of Science Education (ROSE). The sample consisted of 2248 students in public and private schools. Means of most items that belong to the school physics context for both girls…

  16. Asilomar conference on managing complexity in high energy physics: A summary and renaming of the conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1987-02-01

    The complex aspects of high energy physics work are briefly described, and approaches to managing them are discussed. Management of software and data are covered. For managing complexity in experimental physics, the choice of building or buying processor systems is addressed and the issues of compatibility and standardization are discussed. (LEW)

  17. Multiple Teaching Approaches, Teaching Sequence and Concept Retention in High School Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David

    2013-01-01

    Students in 4 Canadian high school physics classes completed instructional sequences in two key physics topics related to motion--Straight Line Motion and Newton's First Law. Different sequences of laboratory investigation, teacher explanation (lecture) and the use of computer-based scientific visualizations (animations and simulations) were…

  18. The Relationship between Attitude toward Physical Education and Leisure-Time Exercise in High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Min-hau; Phillips, D. Allen

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between U.S. and Taiwanese high school students' attitudes toward physical education and leisure time exercise, noting the influence of nationality and gender. Student surveys indicated significant relationships between attitudes toward physical education and leisure time exercise, regardless of nationality or gender.…

  19. Simplifications and Idealizations in High School Physics in Mechanics: A Study of Slovenian Curriculum and Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forjan, Matej; Sliško, Josip

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of an analysis of three Slovenian textbooks for high school physics, from the point of view of simplifications and idealizations in the field of mechanics. In modeling of physical systems, making simplifications and idealizations is important, since one ignores minor effects and focuses on the most important…

  20. Emotion Recognition in Fathers and Mothers at High-Risk for Child Physical Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asla, Nagore; de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to determine whether parents at high risk for physical child abuse, in comparison with parents at low risk, show deficits in emotion recognition, as well as to examine the moderator effect of gender and stress on the relationship between risk for physical child abuse and emotion recognition. Methods: Based…