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Sample records for physical function disease

  1. Benefits of Physical Exercise on Executive Functions in Older People with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Katia; de Quadros, Antonio Carlos, Jr.; Santos, Ruth Ferreira; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of physical exercise on cognitive functioning have been reported in the literature, but the potential benefits to slow the eventual decline in executive functioning (EF) caused by neurodegeneration from Parkinson's Disease (PD) have rarely been studied. Thus the objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a multimodal…

  2. The relationship between physical, functional capacity and quality of life (QoL) among elderly people with a chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Asuman; Simşek, Tülay Tarsuslu; Yümin, Eylem Tütün; Sertel, Meral; Yümin, Murat

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between physical and functional capacity and quality of life (QoL) among elderly people who have a chronic disease. The study included 100 elderly individuals aged 65 years and older, who have a chronic disease. The study examined the marital and educational status, social security status, kind of chronic disease, number of chronic diseases and whether participants use assistive devices for walking. The Nottingham health profile (NHP) was used to evaluate QoL related to health; the physical mobility scale (PMS) was used to evaluate mobility in daily life and the functional independent measure (FIM) was used to evaluate functional independence in daily activities. In both female and male individuals, a statistically significant difference was found between the number of chronic diseases, kind of chronic disease, educational status, marital status, total FIM, PMS and NHP values (p<0.05). In males, there was a correlation between number of chronic illnesses and total NHP, FIM (p<0.05), but in females, there were no correlation between number of chronic illnesses and total NHP, FIM (p>0.05). There were no correlations between kind of chronic disease and PMS, NHP, FIM (p>0.05) in either of genders. It was found that there are differences among elderly female and male individuals with a chronic disease in terms of the number of chronic diseases, types of chronic disease, mobility level, functional status and QoL; and mobility level is related to functional capacity and QoL in females. It is thought that the rehabilitation programs to improve physical and functional capacity in elderly people and applications that increase participation in activities and reduce pain may improve QoL. PMID:21215469

  3. Aerobic training during hemodialysis improves body composition, muscle function, physical performance, and quality of life in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min; Jo, Jong Il

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We assessed the influences of individualized aerobic training on body composition, knee joint muscle function, physical performance, and quality of life in chronic kidney disease patients. [Subjects] Ten chronic kidney disease patients undergoing dialysis. [Methods] Overall physical function and quality of life before and after 12 weeks of aerobic training were evaluated by body composition, the six-minute walk test, cardiopulmonary exercise tests, and Short Form 36-item questionnaire. [Results] The six-minute walk test distance increased significantly after 12 weeks aerobic training. Resting metabolic rate, lactate threshold, maximum oxygen uptake, and quality of life tended to increase after training. Post-training weight, muscle mass, body fat mass, fat percentage, body mass index, and peak torque of right and left knee extension and flexion did not change significantly. [Conclusion] Intra-dialytic training can a safe approach to maintain or improve physical performance and quality of life of chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis without adverse events or negative cardiovascular responses. Aerobic training may prevent a decline in body composition and knee joint muscle function due to inactivity in chronic kidney disease patients. Clinically, aerobic training may initially be adapted to maintain overall physical function or improve quality of life in chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:26157237

  4. Physical Activity is Associated with Better Neurocognitive and Everyday Functioning Among Older Adults with HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pariya L.; Marquine, Maria J.; Dufour, Catherine; Henry, Brook L.; Montoya, Jessica; Gouaux, Ben; Moore, Raeanne C.; Letendre., Scott L.; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor; Jeste, Dilip V.; Moore, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the association between physical activity (PA), neurocognitive impairment (NCI), and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) among older HIV+ persons. One hundred older HIV+ adults completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), a neurocognitive battery, and IADL scale. Higher levels of moderate PA were associated with lower odds of NCI (p=0.01), even when covariates were modeled. The association between moderate PA and NCI was driven by executive function (p=0.04). Higher levels of moderate PA were also associated with lower odds of IADL Dependence (p = 0.03), although this fell to a trend (p = 0.08) when including covariates. Follow-up analysis showed those with both NCI and IADL Dependence had lower moderate PA than those with neither (p=0.03). While these cross-sectional findings suggest PA is associated with better neurocognitive and everyday functioning in older HIV+ adults, longitudinal studies utilizing objective PA methods are needed to evaluate directionality and mechanisms. PMID:25731660

  5. Effects of Home Exercise on Physical Function and Activity in Home Care Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Hideyuki; Tsushima, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of guidance in home exercise on physical function and the amount of activity in home care patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). [Subjects and Methods] A 2-month home exercise intervention consisting of self-administered exercise by patients (self-exercise) and home visit exercise therapy guided by a physical therapist (home visit exercise) was conducted in 10 home care patients with PD to compare changes in physical function, activities of daily living, and postural status between before and after the intervention. [Results] A decreased number of chief complaints and alleviation of fear of falling were observed after the intervention. In terms of physical function, a significant increase in flexibility and muscle strength were observed, although no significant changes were found in activities of daily living, gait, and balance. Although there was no significant change in the total amount of daily physical activity, the analysis of daily posture changes revealed a significant reduction in the percentage of time spent lying down and a significant increase in the percentage of time spent sitting after the intervention. [Conclusion] Guidance in home exercise in home care patients with PD can be effective in making self-exercise a habit, improving range of motion and muscle strength, and reducing the time spent in a supine position. PMID:25435681

  6. Two Year Exercise Program Improves Physical Function in Parkinson’s Disease: the PRET-PD Study

    PubMed Central

    Prodoehl, Janey; Rafferty, Miriam; David, Fabian J.; Poon, Cynthia; Vaillancourt, David E.; Comella, Cynthia L.; Leurgans, Sue; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Corcos, Daniel M.; Robichaud, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The progressive resistance exercise (PRE) in Parkinson’s disease trial (PRET-PD) showed that PRE improved the motor signs of PD compared to a modified Fitness Counts (mFC) program. It is unclear how long-term exercise affects physical function in these individuals. Objective To examine the effects of long-term PRE and mFC on physical function outcome measures in individuals with PD. Methods A preplanned secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 38 patients with idiopathic PD who completed the PRET-PD trial. Participants were randomized into PRE or mFC groups and exercised 2 days/week up to 24 months. Blinded assessors obtained functional outcomes on and off medication at baseline, 6 and 24 months with the Modified Physical Performance Test (mPPT), five times sit to stand test (STS), Functional Reach Test (FRT), Timed Up and Go (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), 6 minute walk test (6MWT), and 50ft walking speed (walk speed). Results The groups did not differ on any physical function measure at 6 or 24 months (p’s > 0.1). Across time, all physical function measures improved from baseline to 24 months when tested on medication (p’s < .0001), except for 6MWT(p = .068). Off medication results were similar except that the 6MWT was now significant. Conclusions 24 months of supervised and structured exercise (either PRE or mFC) is effective at improving functional performance outcomes in individuals with moderate PD. Clinicians should strive to include structured and supervised exercise in the long-term plan of care for individuals with PD. PMID:24961994

  7. Depressive Symptoms, Chronic Diseases, and Physical Disabilities as Predictors of Cognitive Functioning Trajectories in Older Americans

    PubMed Central

    Chodosh, Joshua; Miller-Martinez, Dana; Aneshensel, Carol S.; Wight, Richard G.; Karlamangla, Arun S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The concurrent influence of depressive symptoms, medical conditions, and disabilities in activities of daily living (ADL) upon the rates of decline in older Americans’ cognitive function is unknown. Design This study examined a national sample of 6,476 adults born before 1924 to determine differences in cognitive function trajectories by prevalence and incidence of depressive symptoms, chronic diseases, and ADL disabilities. Cognitive performance was tested 5 times between 1993 and 2002 with a multifaceted inventory that we examined as a global measure (range: 0–35, standard deviation (SD) 6.00) and with word recall (range: 0–20, SD 3.84) analyzed separately. Results Baseline prevalence of depressive symptoms, stroke, and ADL limitations were each independently and strongly associated with lower baseline cognition scores, but did not predict future cognitive decline. Each incident depressive symptom was independently associated with 0.06 point reduction (95% confidence interval (CI):0.02–0.10) in recall score, incident stroke with 0.59 point reduction in total score (95% CI:0.20–0.98), each new basic ADL limitation with 0.07 point (95% CI:0.01–0.14) reduction in recall score and 0.16 point reduction in total score (95% CI:0.07–0.25), and each incident instrumental ADL limitation with 0.20 point reduction in recall score (95% CI:0.10–0.30) and 0.52 point reduction in total score (95% CI:0.37–0.67). Conclusion Prevalent and incident depressive symptoms, stroke, and ADL disabilities contribute independently to reductions in cognitive functioning in older Americans, but do not appear to influence rates of future cognitive decline. Therefore, prevention, early identification, and aggressive treatment of these conditions may ameliorate the burdens of cognitive impairment. PMID:21087219

  8. Novel, high-intensity exercise prescription improves muscle mass, mitochondrial function, and physical capacity in individuals with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Neil A.; Ford, Matthew P.; Standaert, David G.; Watts, Ray L.; Bickel, C. Scott; Moellering, Douglas R.; Tuggle, S. Craig; Williams, Jeri Y.; Lieb, Laura; Windham, Samuel T.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted, in persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), a thorough assessment of neuromotor function and performance in conjunction with phenotypic analyses of skeletal muscle tissue, and further tested the adaptability of PD muscle to high-intensity exercise training. Fifteen participants with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2–3) completed 16 wk of high-intensity exercise training designed to simultaneously challenge strength, power, endurance, balance, and mobility function. Skeletal muscle adaptations (P < 0.05) to exercise training in PD included myofiber hypertrophy (type I: +14%, type II: +36%), shift to less fatigable myofiber type profile, and increased mitochondrial complex activity in both subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar fractions (I: +45–56%, IV: +39–54%). These adaptations were accompanied by a host of functional and clinical improvements (P < 0.05): total body strength (+30–56%); leg power (+42%); single leg balance (+34%); sit-to-stand motor unit activation requirement (−30%); 6-min walk (+43 m), Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Scale (PDQ-39, −7.8pts); Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total (−5.7 pts) and motor (−2.7 pts); and fatigue severity (−17%). Additionally, PD subjects in the pretraining state were compared with a group of matched, non-PD controls (CON; did not exercise). A combined assessment of muscle tissue phenotype and neuromuscular function revealed a higher distribution and larger cross-sectional area of type I myofibers and greater type II myofiber size heterogeneity in PD vs. CON (P < 0.05). In conclusion, persons with moderately advanced PD adapt to high-intensity exercise training with favorable changes in skeletal muscle at the cellular and subcellular levels that are associated with improvements in motor function, physical capacity, and fatigue perception. PMID:24408997

  9. [Physical therapy for parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hubert, M

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex neurologic and progressive incapacitating disease. Parkinson's disease severely threatens the quality of live and the number of patients worldwide is expected to rise considerably in the coming decade due to aging of the population. Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients are faced with progressively increasing impairments (e.g. in speech, mental and movement related functions), and restrictions in participation (e.g. domestic life and social activities). Physical therapy is often prescribed next to medical treatment but there is a lack of uniform treatment. A systematic literature search for guidelines, systematic reviews, trials, and expert opinions lead to a better understanding. The key question: Is physiotherapy able to optimally treat the Parkinson's disease symptoms? In which way, how and on which scientific bases can the physiotherapist participate to improve autonomy and to help them living independently and avoid, as long as possible, institutionalization? This article has integrated clinical research findings to provide clinicians with an overview to physical therapist management of disorders in people with Parkinson's disease. An Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Guideline providing practice recommendations was developed by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). Evidence from research was supplemented with clinical expertise and patients values. Randomized clinical trials reflect specific core areas of physical therapy, that is, transfer, posture, balance, reaching and grasping, gait and physical condition. Another aspect is that of educating patients (as well as their partners and family) about the disease process and the benefits of exercise therapy. Alternative therapies can be helpful like Tai Chi, virtual games, dancing, yoga, ball games for example. PMID:22034770

  10. Ecological Immunology through the Lens of Exercise Immunology: New Perspective on the Links between Physical Activity and Immune Function and Disease Susceptibility in Wild Animals.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Jacintha G B; Matson, Kevin D

    2016-08-01

    Locomotion and other physical activities by free-living animals may influence immune function and disease susceptibility. This influence may be a consequence of energetic trade-offs or other mechanisms that are often, but not always, inseparably linked to an animal's life history (e.g., flight and migration). Ecological immunology has mainly focused on these life-history trade-offs, overlooking the possible effects of physical activity per se on immune function and disease susceptibility. In this review, we explore the field of exercise immunology, which examines the impact of exercise on immune function and disease susceptibility in humans, with the aim of presenting new perspectives that might be transferable to ecological immunology. First, we explore key concepts in exercise immunology that could be extended to animals. Next, we investigate the concept "exercise" in animals, and propose the use of "physical activity" instead. We briefly discuss methods used in animals to quantify physical activity in terms of energy expenditure and summarize several examples of animals engaging in physical activity. Then, we highlight potential consequences of physical activity on immune function and disease susceptibility in animals, together with an overview of animal studies that examine these links. Finally, we explore and discuss the potential for incorporating perspectives from exercise immunology into ecological immunology. Such integration could help advance our understanding of human and animal health and contribute new ideas to budding "One Health" initiatives.

  11. Physical anhedonia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Isella, V; Iurlaro, S; Piolti, R; Ferrarese, C; Frattola, L; Appollonio, I; Melzi, P; Grimaldi, M

    2003-09-01

    Anhedonia is the inability to experience physical or social pleasure. Its physical component is hypothesised to be due to dysfunction of a dopaminergic frontotemporal-subcortical circuit and has never been investigated as a possible affective complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to formally assess prevalence and correlates of physical anhedonia in PD patients compared with normal controls. Twenty five people with PD and 25 matched controls were administered a psychometric battery exploring mainly executive functions and mood. Hedonic tone was assessed using Chapman's Physical Anhedonia Scale. PD patients also underwent MRI linear measurement of frontal structures. Anhedonia levels were significantly higher in PD patients with respect to controls, although not extremely elevated; prevalence rate was 40% for parkinsonians, while no anhedonics were found among controls. Clinical, neuropsychological, and quantitative neuroradiological features did not show any significant correlation with physical anhedonia. Physical anhedonia appears to be a relatively frequent, although mild, affective disturbance of PD, independent from neurological, frontal, and depressive aspects.

  12. The relationship between habitual physical activity status and executive function in individuals with Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal, cross-lagged panel analysis.

    PubMed

    Farina, Nicolas; Tabet, Naji; Rusted, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether habitual physical activity status specifically influences executive function change in Alzheimer's disease (AD) over 1 year. In this longitudinal cohort study, 45 participants with AD were recruited and provided follow-up data approximately 1 year later. Executive function measures (map search task, digit symbol substitution task, controlled oral word association task, verbal fluency task) and habitual physical activity measures (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and handgrip strength) were taken at baseline and follow-up. Individual composites were subsequently created. Additional demographic, lifestyle, and neuropsychiatric measures were also taken. In a structural equation model (χ(2)(26) = 9.84, p = .998, comparative fit index = 1.00, root mean square error of approximation = .00), a significant association was found between habitual physical activity and executive function change (β = .27, p = .04). In a cross-lagged panel analysis, a significant path was found between the PASE score and executive change (β = .22, p = .01). As higher habitual physical activity levels were associated with reduced executive function change, the promotion of low-intensity habitual physical activities in individuals with a diagnosis of AD may be warranted. Further research is needed, however, to explore the impact of habitual physical activity on the trajectory of change across cognitive domains, and how this relates to the progression of the underlying pathology associated with this disease.

  13. Urban-Rural Differences in the Effect of a Medicare Health Promotion and Disease Self-Management Program on Physical Function and Health Care Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Wamsley, Brenda; Liebel, Diane; Dixon, Denise; Eggert, Gerald; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent health promotion and disease self-management intervention on physical function and health care expenditures among Medicare beneficiaries. To determine if these outcomes vary by urban or rural residence. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from a 22-month randomized controlled trial of a health…

  14. Is There an Association of Physical Activity with Brain Volume, Behavior, and Day-to-day Functioning? A Cross Sectional Design in Prodromal and Early Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, McKenzie; Downing, Nancy; Lourens, Spencer; Mills, James; Kim, Ji-in; Long, Jeffrey; Paulsen, Jane; PREDICT-HD Investigators and Coordinators of the Huntington Study Group

    2016-01-01

    Background: Huntington disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease leading to progressive motor, cognitive, and behavioral decline. Subtle changes in these domains are detectable up to 15 years before a definitive motor diagnosis is made. This period, called prodromal HD, provides an opportunity to examine lifestyle behaviors that may impact disease progression. Theoretical Framework: Physical activity relates to decreased rates of brain atrophy and improved cognitive and day-to-day functioning in Alzheimer disease and healthy aging populations. Previous research has yielded mixed results regarding the impact of physical activity on disease progression in HD and paid little attention to the prodromal phase. Methods: We conducted analyses of associations among current physical activity level, current and retrospective rate of change for hippocampus and striatum volume, and cognitive, motor, and day-to-day functioning variables. Participants were 48 gene-expanded cases with prodromal and early-diagnosed HD and 27 nongene-expanded control participants. Participants wore Fitbit Ultra activity monitors for three days and completed the self-reported International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Hippocampal and striatal white matter volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Cognitive tests included the Stroop Color and Word Test, and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). Motor function was assessed using the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale total motor score (TMS). Day-to-day functioning was measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) version 2.0. Results: Higher Fitbit activity scores were significantly related to better scores on the SDMT and WHODAS in case participants but not in controls. Fitbit activity scores tracked better with TMS scores in the group as a whole, though the association did not reach statistical significance in the case participants. Higher Fitbit activity scores

  15. Aerobic capacity correlates to self-assessed physical function but not to overall disease activity or organ damage in women with systemic lupus erythematosus with low-to-moderate disease activity and organ damage.

    PubMed

    Boström, C; Dupré, B; Tengvar, P; Jansson, E; Opava, C H; Lundberg, I E

    2008-02-01

    The present aim is to investigate the relationships between aerobic capacity and disease activity, organ damage, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and physical activity in 34 women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with low-to-moderate disease activity and organ damage. Mean age was 51 (SD 10) years, disease duration 17 (SD 11) years. Aerobic capacity (maximal oxygen uptake/VO2 max) was measured with a bicycle ergometer exercise test. Overall disease activity was assessed with Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) and the modified Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Disease Activity Index (modified SLE-DAI), overall organ damage with the Systemic Lupus International Collaboration Clinics/American College of Rheumatology-Damage Index, [SLICC/(ACR)-DI], HRQL with the 36-item Short-form health-survey (SF-36) and physical activity with a self-assessed question. The women who were low-to-moderately physically active had 89-92% (P < or = 0.001) of VO2 max predicted for sedentary women. Maximal oxygen uptake (L/min, mL/min/kg) correlated to SF-36 physical function (rs = 0.49, rs = 0.72) (P < or = 0.01), but not (rs < or = 0.25) to other HRQL scales, overall disease activity or organ damage or physical activity. The correlation between aerobic capacity and physical function and the absence of correlation between aerobic capacity and physical activity, suggest a possible disease-related factor behind the low aerobic capacity. However, with no correlation between aerobic capacity and overall disease activity and organ damage, low physical activity may contribute to the low aerobic capacity in our sample.

  16. Defining arthritis and measuring functional status in elders: methodological issues in the study of disease and physical disability.

    PubMed

    Guccione, A A; Felson, D T; Anderson, J J

    1990-08-01

    This study explores the degree to which the association of knee osteoarthritis with physical disability changes with different definitions of osteoarthritis in 1,416 Framingham Study elders. When all categories of radiographic osteoarthritis were aggregated into a single "arthritis" variable and dependence upon human assistance in one or more functional activities combined into a single variable, elders with osteoarthritis had only moderately increased odds for dependence after controlling for age or sex (OR = 1.25). A definition of osteoarthritis based only upon symptoms produced larger odds for dependency (OR = 1.85). Elders with mild osteoarthritis and infrequent knee pain had no significantly elevated risk for dependence in any of the seven functional activities. Elders with infrequently symptomatic, moderate to marked radiographic osteoarthritis were at increased risk for dependence in stair climbing, walking a mile, housekeeping, and carrying bundles. Elder with radiographic osteoarthritis accompanied by frequent pain had an increased odds of dependence in stair climbing, walking a mile, and housekeeping. Using a generic definition of "arthritis" and aggregating functional activities may underestimate the impact of osteoarthritis on physical disability in the elderly and obscure the task-specific nature of that relationship. PMID:2368855

  17. Defining arthritis and measuring functional status in elders: methodological issues in the study of disease and physical disability.

    PubMed Central

    Guccione, A A; Felson, D T; Anderson, J J

    1990-01-01

    This study explores the degree to which the association of knee osteoarthritis with physical disability changes with different definitions of osteoarthritis in 1,416 Framingham Study elders. When all categories of radiographic osteoarthritis were aggregated into a single "arthritis" variable and dependence upon human assistance in one or more functional activities combined into a single variable, elders with osteoarthritis had only moderately increased odds for dependence after controlling for age or sex (OR = 1.25). A definition of osteoarthritis based only upon symptoms produced larger odds for dependency (OR = 1.85). Elders with mild osteoarthritis and infrequent knee pain had no significantly elevated risk for dependence in any of the seven functional activities. Elders with infrequently symptomatic, moderate to marked radiographic osteoarthritis were at increased risk for dependence in stair climbing, walking a mile, housekeeping, and carrying bundles. Elder with radiographic osteoarthritis accompanied by frequent pain had an increased odds of dependence in stair climbing, walking a mile, and housekeeping. Using a generic definition of "arthritis" and aggregating functional activities may underestimate the impact of osteoarthritis on physical disability in the elderly and obscure the task-specific nature of that relationship. PMID:2368855

  18. Effects of dietary protein levels on the disease resistance, immune function and physical barrier function in the gill of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) after challenged with Flavobacterium columnare.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-10-01

    The effects of dietary protein levels on the disease resistance, gill immune function and physical barrier function of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) were investigated in this study. A total of 540 grass carp (264.11 ± 0.76 g) were fed six diets containing graded levels of protein (143.1, 176.7, 217.2, 257.5, 292.2 and 322.8 g digestible protein kg(-1) diet) for 8 weeks. After the growth trial, fish were challenged with Flavobacterium columnare for 3 days. The results indicated that optimal levels of dietary protein had the following effects: (1) the production of antibacterial components increased, and anti-inflammatory cytokines, inhibitor of κBα, target of rapamycin and ribosomal protein S6 kinases 1 mRNA levels were up-regulated, whereas mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P65, NF-κB P52, IκB kinase (IKK) α, IKKβ, IKKγ, eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BP) 1 and 4E-BP2 were down-regulated in the gills of grass carp (P < 0.05), indicating that fish gill immune function was enhanced at an optimal level of dietary protein; (2) the activities and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione content increased, the contents of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl (PC) decreased, and NF-E2-related factor 2, B-cell lymphoma protein-2, inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, myeloid cell leukemia-1 and tight junction complexes mRNA levels were up-regulated, whereas Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1a, Keap1b, cysteinyl aspartic acid-protease 3, 8, 9, fatty acid synthetase ligand, apoptotic protease activating factor-1, Bcl-2 associated X protein, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, myosin light chain kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mRNA levels were down-regulated in the gills of grass carp (P < 0.05), indicating that the fish gill physical barrier function improved at an optimal level of dietary protein. Finally, based on the gill rot morbidity, ACP activity and PC

  19. Effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption on disease activity and physical functioning in ankylosing spondylitis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengli; Li, Yan; Xu, Xiangjin; Feng, Xiugao; Yang, Dawei; Lin, Guiying

    2015-01-01

    The effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption on the disease activity and physical functioning in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is currently understated. Present study aims to investigate the relationship between them. A total of 425 patients with AS were recruited in the study and their smoking and drinking habit were investigated with a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Metrology Index (BASMI) were evaluated. Parameters including fingertip-to-floor distance, overall assessment of health, nocturnal pain, total back pain and morning stiffness were analyzed as well. Blood erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined. For 118 (27.8%) AS patients with smoking habit, the scorings of BASDAI, BASFI, BASMI and other physical parameters (including fingertip-to-floor, overall assessment of health, nocturnal pain and total back pain) were higher than those in patients without smoking. 101 (23.8%) AS patients with alcohol consumption demonstrated significantly higher scores in BASMI (P < 0.05). In hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption variables contributed to the variance in BASDAI scores, adding an additional 1.6% to the overall R-square, resulting in a final R-square of 5.1%. Smoking has a negative effect on disease activity of patients with AS and the patients' physical functioning. Alcohol consumption would aggravate the overall physical functioning of AS patient. The results indicated the potential benefit of quitting smoking and drinking for AS patients. PMID:26550348

  20. Physical Therapy For Rheumatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Physical therapy remains an important tool in rheumatic disease treatment even though great strides have been made with chemotherapy. Much physical therapy is misused, however, and physicians should ensure that the exercises ordered for a patient do not contribute to joint deformity. Underwater exercise, heat therapy, traction, massage and splinting as well as a warm and sympathetic staff are all good aids in rehabilitating the rheumatic patient, but careful supervision is needed for maximum benefit. PMID:20468607

  1. The Glittre-ADL test reflects functional performance measured by physical activities of daily living in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Karloh, Manuela; Araujo, Cintia L. P.; Gulart, Aline A.; Reis, Cardine M.; Steidle, Leila J. M.; Mayer, Anamaria F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The Glittre-ADL test (TGlittre) is a valid and reliable test for the evaluation of functional capacity and involves multiple physical activities of daily living (PADL), which are known to be troublesome to patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, it is still unknown if this test is also able to reflect the functional performance of patients with COPD. Objective To investigate whether the TGlittre reflects the functional performance of COPD patients and whether the necessary time to complete the TGlittre and the PADL varies according to disease severity. Method Thirty-eight patients with COPD (age 65, SD=7 years; forced expiratory volume in the first second 41.3, SD=15.2% predicted) underwent anthropometric and lung function assessments and were submitted to the TGlittre and PADL measurement. Results TGlittre performance correlated significantly (p<0.05) with PADL variables, such as time sitting (r=0.50), walking (r=-0.46), number of steps taken (r=–0.53), walking movement intensity (r=–0.66), walking energy expenditure (r=-0.50), and total energy expenditure (r=–0.33). TGlittre performance was not significantly different in patients among the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD) spirometric stages, but walking and sitting time were significantly lower and greater, respectively, in severe and very severe patients compared to those with moderate disease (p<0.05). Conclusion The performance on the TGlittre correlates with walking and sitting time and other real life PADL measurements. The severity of the disease is associated with the differences in the level of physical activity in daily life more than in functional capacity. PMID:27437713

  2. Association of cigarette smoking with Chinese ankylosing spondylitis patients in Taiwan: a poor disease outcome in systemic inflammation, functional ability, and physical mobility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsiung; Chen, Hung-An; Lu, Chin-Li; Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Liu, Chin-Hsiu; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the association between smoking and the disease activity, functional ability, physical mobility, and systemic inflammation in Chinese ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Seventy five male Chinese AS patients in Taiwan were enrolled in the cross-sectional study. These patients fulfilled the 1984 modified New York criteria. Patients completed the questionnaires, containing the demographic data, disease activity, functional ability (BASFI), and patient's global assessment. Meanwhile, physical examinations were performed to determine the patient's physical mobility. Acute-phase reactants, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein levels were also measured in the AS patients. Smoking habits with smoking duration and smoking intensity (pack-years of smoking) were recorded. Among these physical mobility parameters, modified Schober's index (p < 0.001), cervical rotation (p = 0.034), later lumbar flexion (p = 0.002), chest expansion (p = 0.016), and occiput-to-wall distances (p = 0.003) were significantly impaired in smoking AS patients (n = 35) as compared to non-smoking (n = 40). Systemic inflammation parameter, ESR was significantly higher in smoking AS patients than non-smoking (p = 0.03). The odds ratio of advanced modified Schober's index, lateral lumbar flexion, fingertip-to-floor distance, chest expansion, and occiput-to-wall were significantly elevated in smoking AS patients as compared to non-smoking. Moreover, the smoking intensity correlated significantly with BASFI (r = 0.481, p = 0.005), cervical rotation (r = -0.401, p = 0.031), fingertip-to-floor distance (r = 0.485, p = 0.004), and occiput-to-wall distance (r = 0.473, p = 0.005) in the 35 smoking AS patients. The cigarette smokers in the Chinese AS patients have increased systemic inflammation and poor physical mobility. In addition, the higher smoking intensity in the AS smokers is associated with poor disease outcome, including functional ability and physical mobility

  3. The NB-LRR proteins RGA4 and RGA5 interact functionally and physically to confer disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Césari, Stella; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Bernoux, Maud; Chalvon, Véronique; Kawano, Yoji; Shimamoto, Ko; Dodds, Peter; Terauchi, Ryohei; Kroj, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins of the class of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain proteins (NB-LRRs) are immune sensors which recognize pathogen-derived molecules termed avirulence (AVR) proteins. We show that RGA4 and RGA5, two NB-LRRs from rice, interact functionally and physically to mediate resistance to the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and accomplish different functions in AVR recognition. RGA4 triggers an AVR-independent cell death that is repressed in the presence of RGA5 in both rice protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana. Upon recognition of the pathogen effector AVR-Pia by direct binding to RGA5, repression is relieved and cell death occurs. RGA4 and RGA5 form homo- and hetero-complexes and interact through their coiled-coil domains. Localization studies in rice protoplast suggest that RGA4 and RGA5 localize to the cytosol. Upon recognition of AVR-Pia, neither RGA4 nor RGA5 is re-localized to the nucleus. These results establish a model for the interaction of hetero-pairs of NB-LRRs in plants: RGA4 mediates cell death activation, while RGA5 acts as a repressor of RGA4 and as an AVR receptor. PMID:25024433

  4. Physical unclonable functions: A primer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Todd; Hamlet, Jason

    2014-11-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) make use of the measurable intrinsic randomness of physical systems to establish signatures for those systems. Thus, PUFs provide a means to generate unique keys that don't need to be stored in nonvolatile memory, and they offer exciting opportunities for new authentication and supply chain security technologies.

  5. Patient education, disease activity and physical function: can we be more targeted? A cross sectional study among people with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In order to target educational needs of patients more effectively, an Austrian-German educational needs assessment tool (OENAT) was developed, the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and hand osteoarthritis (HOA) were described and the relationships between educational needs, gender, disease activity and function were explored. Methods The English ENAT was adapted into Austrian-German using Beaton's cross-cultural adaptation process. Internal construct validity was assessed by Rasch analysis. Educational needs across diagnostic groups and subgroups of patients were summarized descriptively and their relationship with disease activity and physical functioning explored. Results The sample comprised 130 RA, 125 PsA and 48 HOA patients. Their mean ages ± SD were 56 ± 14, 51 ± 11 and 64 ± 7 years for RA, PsA and HOA; disease duration was 11 ± 9, 11 ± 11 and 14 ± 9 years, respectively. More than 70% in each patient group expressed interest in receiving education about their disease. The educational needs differed significantly between women and men in all 3 groups. In RA and PsA, female patients expressed significantly higher educational needs than men in 'movements’ and 'feelings’ domains (p=0.04 and p=0.03 for RA and p<0.01 and p=0.01 for PsA). Female patients in the HOA group had significantly higher scores on all domains except for the 'movements’. Older patients with PsA scored significantly higher than their younger counterparts in the 'pain’ domain (p=0.05). RA patients with disease duration >5 years), expressed higher educational needs in 'movements’ (p<0.01). Educational background had effects in the PsA group only, patients with basic education had greater scores than those with higher education on 'movements’ and 'arthritis process’ (p=0.01). In the RA group, DAS28 correlated significantly with 'movements’ (r=0.24, p=0.01), 'feelings’ (r=0.22, p

  6. Physical health functioning among United Methodist clergy.

    PubMed

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; LeGrand, Sara

    2012-09-01

    United Methodist clergy have been found to have higher than average self-reported rates of obesity, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, and high blood pressure. However, health diagnoses differ from physical health functioning, which indicates how much health problems interfere with activities of daily living. Ninety-five percent (n = 1726) of all actively serving United Methodist clergy in North Carolina completed the SF-12, a measure of physical health functioning that has US norms based on self-administered survey data. Sixty-two percent (n = 1074) of our sample completed the SF-12 by self-administered formats. We used mean difference tests among self-administered clergy surveys to compare the clergy SF-12 Physical Composite Scores to US-normed scores. Clergy reported significantly better physical health composite scores than their gender- and age-matched peers, despite above average disease burden in the same sample. Although health interventions tailored to clergy that address chronic disease are urgently needed, it may be difficult to elicit participation given pastors' optimistic view of their physical health functioning.

  7. The reliability and validity of gait speed with different walking pace and distances against general health, physical function, and chronic disease in aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-jae; Park, Ilhyoek; Lee, Hyo joo; Lee, On

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait speed is an important objective values associated with several health-related outcomes including functional mobility in aging people. However, walking test methodologies and descriptions are not standardized considering specific aims of research. This study examine the reliability and validity of gait speed measured at various distances and paces in elderly Koreans. [Methods] Fifty-four female participants ≥70 years of age were recruited from a local retirement community. Gait speed was assessed at 4, 6 and 10 meters, and at usual- and fast-pace walking mode. The short physical performance battery (SPPB) that estimates senior fitness includes three tests of lower-body function. Data concerning for the chronic conditions and self-perceived health of the participants was collected using questionnaires. Concurrent validity of gait speed using the aforementioned test protocols was determined by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficients. [Results] Significant positive correlations were evident between skeletal muscle mass and maximal pace walking regardless of distance (r=.301~.308; p<.05), but not with body fat. All gait tests significantly positively correlated with self-rated health (normal pace r=.328~.346, p<.05; maximal pace r=.427~.472, p<.001) and depression (normal pace r=.279~.430, p<.05; maximal pace r=.413~.456, p<.001). [Conclusion] Walking test at the normal pace appears suitable for estimating physical function and deterioration due to chronic disease. Walking test at a maximum pace might be useful for estimating subjective general health and skeletal muscle mass. PMID:27757387

  8. Objectively assessed physical activity and lower limb function and prospective associations with mortality and newly diagnosed disease in UK older adults: an OPAL four-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Kenneth R.; Ku, Po-Wen; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Davis, Mark G.; Simmonds, Bethany A. J.; Thompson, Janice L.; Stathi, Afroditi; Gray, Selena F.; Sharp, Deborah J.; Coulson, Joanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: objective measures of physical activity and function with a diverse cohort of UK adults in their 70s and 80s were used to investigate relative risk of all-cause mortality and diagnoses of new diseases over a 4-year period. Participants: two hundred and forty older adults were randomly recruited from 12 general practices in urban and suburban areas of a city in the United Kingdom. Follow-up included 213 of the baseline sample. Methods: socio-demographic variables, height and weight, and self-reported diagnosed diseases were recorded at baseline. Seven-day accelerometry was used to assess total physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous activity and sedentary time. A log recorded trips from home. Lower limb function was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery. Medical records were accessed on average 50 months post baseline, when new diseases and deaths were recorded. Analyses: ANOVAs were used to assess socio-demographic, physical activity and lower limb function group differences in diseases at baseline and new diseases during follow-up. Regression models were constructed to assess the prospective associations between physical activity and function with mortality and new disease. Results: for every 1,000 steps walked per day, the risk of mortality was 36% lower (hazard ratios 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44–0.91, P = 0.013). Low levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (incident rate ratio (IRR) 1.67, 95% CI 1.04–2.68, P = 0.030) and low frequency of trips from home (IRR 1.41, 95% CI 0.98–2.05, P = 0.045) were associated with diagnoses of more new diseases. Conclusion: physical activity should be supported for adults in their 70s and 80s, as it is associated with reduced risk of mortality and new disease development. PMID:25377744

  9. Lung function and airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    Two studies report genome-wide association studies for lung function, using cross-sectional spirometric measurements in healthy individuals. They identify six genetic loci newly associated to natural variation in lung function, which may have implications for the related airway diseases of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:20037613

  10. Cognitive Representations of Physical Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, George D.

    Recent research in lay conceptions of physical illness has indicated that lay people understand physical illness through the use of illness schemas. These schemas are thought to include at least five components: identity, cause, time line, consequences, and cure. This research examined two of these components, cause and consequences, through the…

  11. [Diagnosis of functional bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kruis, W

    2007-02-28

    Functional bowel disorders cause frequent doctor visits. The term comprises various disease entities. Most frequent are the irritable bowel syndrome, functional constipation and functional diarrhea. An exact history plays an outstanding role for the diagnosis of all these entities. History either confirms a positive diagnosis or initiates some complementary investigations. Redundant and dangerous technical procedures should be avoided in the diagnostic work up.

  12. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  13. Physical Activity Fundamental to Preventing Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Regular physical activity, fitness, and exercise are critically important for all people's health and wellbeing. It can reduce morbidity and mortality from many chronic diseases. Despite its well-known benefits, most U.S. adults, and many children, are not active enough to achieve these health benefits. Physical inactivity and related health…

  14. Functional imaging in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jane S

    2009-04-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic brain disease characterized by loss of capacity in movement control, cognition, and emotional regulation over a period of about 30 years. Since it is well established that clinical impairments and brain atrophy can be detected decades prior to receiving a clinical diagnosis, functional neuroimaging efforts have gained momentum in HD research. In most brain disorders, there is accumulating evidence that the clinical manifestations of disease do not simply depend on the extent of tissue loss, but represent a complex balance among neuronal dysfunction, tissue repair, and circuitry reorganization. Based upon this premise, functional neuroimaging modalities may be more sensitive to the earliest changes in HD than are structural imaging approaches. For this review, PET and fMRI studies conducted in HD samples were summarized. Strengths and limitations of the utilization of functional imaging in HD are discussed and recommendations are offered to facilitate future research endeavors.

  15. Role of physical exercise in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, WEI-WEI; ZHANG, XIA; HUANG, WEN-JUAN

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of physical exercise on the brain and general wellness are well recognised, but not particularly well known to the general public. Understanding the importance of integrating active behavior for overall health is crucial at any age and particularly for the elderly who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease mainly affecting individuals aged >65 years. AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by extracellular senile plaques of amyloid-β, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of the protein tau, brain atrophy and dementia. The beneficial effects of physical exercise have been observed on the maintenance of brain size and efficiency for the prevention of AD risks, such as obesity, hypertension and stroke. These effects are extended to individuals with, or at risk of dementia and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Accordingly, although extensive studies are required to fully understand the mechanisms by which physical exercise procures beneficial effects, data suggest the relevance of integrating physical exercise in the prevention and/or cure of AD, disease whose incidence is predicted to increase in the future. Such an increase, may pose medical, social and economical challenges for populations and the health care system worldwide. In the present review we assess the positive aspects of physical exercise with regard to prevention and cure of AD. PMID:27073621

  16. Physical function and quality of life in patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease: A summary of preclinical and clinical studies and a call for exercise intervention trials in patients

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Simpson, Richard J.; Ramírez, Manuel; Lucia, Alejandro; Berger, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant, to reconstitute hematopoietic and immune status of patients undergoing myeloablative therapy for hematologic disorders, has been of great benefit in minimizing or eradicating disease and extending survival. Patients who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) are subject to many comorbidities among which the most significant, affecting quality of life (QoL) and survival, are acute (aGVHD) and chronic Graft Versus Host Disease (cGVHD), resulting from donor lymphocytes reacting to and damaging host tissues. Physical activity and exercise have clearly been shown, in both children and adults, to enhance fitness, improve symptomatology and QoL, reduce disease progression and extend survival for many diseases including malignancies. In some cases, vigorous exercise has been shown to be equal to or more effective than pharmacologic therapy. This review addresses how cGVHD affects patients’ physical function and physical domain of QoL, and the potential benefits of exercise interventions along with recommendations for relevant research and evaluation targeted at incorporating this strategy as soon as possible after allo-HSCT and ideally, as soon as possible upon diagnosis of the condition leading to allo-HSCT. PMID:26367233

  17. [Institutionalized elderly: functional capacity and physical fitness].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Lúcia Hisako Takase; Silva, Aline Huber da; Mazo, Giovana Zarpsellon; Benedetti, Tânia R Bertoldo; dos Santos, Silvia Maria Azevedo; Marques, Sueli; Rodrigues, Rosalina A Partezani; Portella, Marilene Rodrigues; Scortegagna, Helenice de Moura; Santos, Silvana Sidney C; Pelzer, Marlene Teda; Souza, Andrea dos Santos; Meira, Edmeia Campos; Sena, Edite Lago da Silva; Creutzberg, Marion; Resende, Thais de Lima; Rezende, Tais de Lima

    2010-09-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between physical fitness and functional capacity in 78 residents of long-stay institutions for low-income elderly located in five regions of Brazil. The majority of the sample consisted of women, and mean age was 77.4 years (SD = 7.9). Physical fitness was assessed with the AAHPERD test, adjusted for institutionalized elderly. The Katz scale was used for functional capacity. The five components of physical fitness rated fair for flexibility, coordination, agility, and aerobic endurance and good for strength. The mean general physical fitness (GPF) index was fair. According to the findings, the greater the degree of dependency in institutionalized elderly, the lesser their strength and GPF level; meanwhile, better coordination and agility are associated with greater independence for performing activities of daily living. The results can contribute to appropriate physical exercise programs for maintenance and/or recovery of functionality.

  18. Physical Androgyny and Cognitive Functioning in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Anne C.

    1976-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of physical manifestations of sex hormone influence to cognitive functioning in a longitudinal sample of 106 adolescent males and 99 females (ages 13, 16, and 18 years). Analyses of the 35 males and 40 females who had all cognitive and physical data at all three ages are reported here. (Author/SB)

  19. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-03-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients.

  20. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:2926415

  1. Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Rinaldi, Natalia M; Santos, Paulo Cezar R; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Vitório, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Arroyo, Cláudia; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa B

    2012-01-01

    The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n=35); and bilateral group (n=19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity. PMID:21963176

  2. [Pulmonary obstructive chronic disease and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Gonçalves, Ana Paula; Tavares, Alcina

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease that can be prevented and treated, with a pulmonary component and with significant systemic effects that contribute to the severity of clinical manifestations. COPD causes a number of changes, including those which lead to exercise tolerance limitation and to a progressive deterioration of life quality of the patients. Respiratory rehabilitation (RR) represents a key part of the treatment. The benefits of RR are independent of sex, age and disease severity. At the end of the program, the patient should have acquired a life style as independent and healthy as possible. With this article the authors intend to review the benefits of physical exercise in rehabilitation of patients with COPD and the different types of training used in the respiratory rehabilitation program established for each patient. PMID:20700562

  3. Kidney function decline and physical function in women

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Julie; Curhan, Gary C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Cross-sectional analyses of kidney function and physical function have identified profound quality of life impairments in people with advanced kidney dysfunction. No data are currently available, however, on how kidney function decline may be associated with physical function. Methods. We undertook a study of kidney function decline and physical function in 2544 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were estimated using the four-variable MDRD equation from plasma creatinine measured in blood collected in 1989 and 2000. Physical function was assessed by the Physical Function Sub-Scale (PFS) score of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) in a questionnaire administered in the year 2000. PFS scores have been shown to correlate well with direct measures of physical function. Results. In the year 2000, the median age was 67 years, median body mass index (BMI) was 25.6 kg/m2, 48.5% had hypertension and 5.8% had diabetes. There were 427 women (16.8%) who experienced an ≥25% decline in eGFR between 1989 and 2000. Median PFS in 2000 for those with an eGFR decline of ≥25% was 80 compared to a PFS score of 85 for those without (P < 0.001). In fully adjusted models, the presence of an eGFR decline of ≥25% was independently associated with a 3.5-point lower PFS score (95% CI −5.4 to −1.5). Also, an eGFR decline of ≥25% was independently associated with an increased odds ratio of being in the lowest quartile of PFS score (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.04–1.81). Conclusions. We conclude that an eGFR decline of ≥25% over 11 years is independently associated with lower physical function in women. PMID:18398018

  4. [THE PROGRAM OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND HYPERTENSIVE DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Makarova, I N; Starikov, S M; Bolotov, D D

    2016-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the importance of individual criteria for the choice of dosed physical load for the patients with cardiological problems during hospitalization. The analysis of the functional state and hemodynamic parameters included 68 patients with various cardiovascular diseases before and after performance of the special program of physical rehabilitation. The results suggest high efficiency of the proposed treatment and good prospects for further studies in this field. PMID:27172720

  5. Funny and Functional Physics: PEC Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen Stuart, Martien

    When the tendency of polyelectrolyte complexes to phase separate is judiciously combined with appropriate concepts from the realms of polymer physics and supramolecular chemistry, a wealth of novel self-assembled nanoparticles with original properties can be prepared. This presentation discusses how a high degree of complexity and functionality arises spontaneously, in the form of equilibrium structures, and how these structures can be understood from physical principles. Some promising applications are mentioned as well.

  6. Validation of questionnaires on physical function.

    PubMed

    Fortin, F; Kérouac, S

    1977-01-01

    Data-gathering instruments were used in a randomized controlled trial, designed to assess a structured preoperative educational program for elective surgical patients. The key dependent variable was the physical functional capacity of patients following surgery. Questionnaires were developed to measure physical functioning in the immediate postoperative period, after discharge from hospital, and 10 days and 33 days after surgery. Statistical techniques used to measure interobserver agreement and bias were worker's chi square, Cicchett's statistic, the contingency coefficient, Kendall's Taub, and Kendall's coefficient of concordance W. The standardized questionnaires permitted classification of patients's postoperative physical functions with results that agreed highly with the classification done by experienced clinicians who cared for the same patients.

  7. Impact of a program of Tai Chi plus behaviorally based dietary weight loss on physical functioning and coronary heart disease risk factors: a community-based study in obese older women.

    PubMed

    Xu, Furong; Letendre, Jonathan; Bekke, Jillian; Beebe, Nowen; Mahler, Leslie; Lofgren, Ingrid E; Delmonico, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a quasi-experimental design in a community-based study translating the results of our recent findings on the combined effects of Tai Chi and weight loss on physical function and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. A 16-week intervention was conducted to assess the impact of Tai Chi plus a behavioral weight loss program (TCWL, n = 29) on obese (body mass index [BMI] = 35.4 ± 0.8 kg/m²) older (68.2 ± 1.5 yr.) women compared to a control group (CON, n = 9, BMI = 38.0 ± 1.5 kg/m², 65.6 ± 2.7 yr.), which was asked to maintain their normal lifestyle. The TCWL group lost weight (1.6 ± 2.9 kg, P = 0.006) while the CON group did not (1.2 ± 1.9 kg, P = 0.106). Physical functioning as measured by the short physical performance battery improved in TCWL when compared to the CON group (β = 1.94, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.12, 2.76, P < 0.001). TCWL also improved in sit-and-reach flexibility (β = -2.27, 95% CI: -4.09, -0.46, P = 0.016), body fat mass (BMI, β = -0.65, 95% CI: -1.03, -0.26, P = 0.002), waist circumference (β = -1.78, 95% CI: -2.83, -0.72, P = 0.002), systolic blood pressure (β = -16.41, 95% CI: -21.35, -11.48, P < 0.001), and diastolic blood pressure (β = -9.52, 95% CI: -12.65, -6.39, P < 0.001). Thus, TCWL intervention may represent an effective strategy to improve physical function and ameliorate CHD risk in the older adult population. PMID:25803604

  8. Impact of a program of Tai Chi plus behaviorally based dietary weight loss on physical functioning and coronary heart disease risk factors: a community-based study in obese older women.

    PubMed

    Xu, Furong; Letendre, Jonathan; Bekke, Jillian; Beebe, Nowen; Mahler, Leslie; Lofgren, Ingrid E; Delmonico, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a quasi-experimental design in a community-based study translating the results of our recent findings on the combined effects of Tai Chi and weight loss on physical function and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. A 16-week intervention was conducted to assess the impact of Tai Chi plus a behavioral weight loss program (TCWL, n = 29) on obese (body mass index [BMI] = 35.4 ± 0.8 kg/m²) older (68.2 ± 1.5 yr.) women compared to a control group (CON, n = 9, BMI = 38.0 ± 1.5 kg/m², 65.6 ± 2.7 yr.), which was asked to maintain their normal lifestyle. The TCWL group lost weight (1.6 ± 2.9 kg, P = 0.006) while the CON group did not (1.2 ± 1.9 kg, P = 0.106). Physical functioning as measured by the short physical performance battery improved in TCWL when compared to the CON group (β = 1.94, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.12, 2.76, P < 0.001). TCWL also improved in sit-and-reach flexibility (β = -2.27, 95% CI: -4.09, -0.46, P = 0.016), body fat mass (BMI, β = -0.65, 95% CI: -1.03, -0.26, P = 0.002), waist circumference (β = -1.78, 95% CI: -2.83, -0.72, P = 0.002), systolic blood pressure (β = -16.41, 95% CI: -21.35, -11.48, P < 0.001), and diastolic blood pressure (β = -9.52, 95% CI: -12.65, -6.39, P < 0.001). Thus, TCWL intervention may represent an effective strategy to improve physical function and ameliorate CHD risk in the older adult population.

  9. Mechanisms of physical activity limitation in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Zakynthinos, George; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i) the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii) the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii) the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea) and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients' quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  10. Prevalence of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases and their impact on health-related quality of life, physical function and mental health in Portugal: results from EpiReumaPt– a national health survey

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Jaime C; Rodrigues, Ana M; Gouveia, Nélia; Eusébio, Mónica; Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro M; da Costa, Leonor Pereira; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Silva, Inês; Laires, Pedro; Sepriano, Alexandre; Araújo, Filipe; Gonçalves, Sónia; Coelho, Pedro S; Tavares, Viviana; Cerol, Jorge; Mendes, Jorge M; Carmona, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the national prevalence of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) in the adult Portuguese population and to determine their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), physical function, anxiety and depression. Methods EpiReumaPt is a national health survey with a three-stage approach. First, 10 661 adult participants were randomly selected. Trained interviewers undertook structured face-to-face questionnaires that included screening for RMDs and assessments of health-related quality of life, physical function, anxiety and depression. Second, positive screenings for ≥1 RMD plus 20% negative screenings were invited to be evaluated by a rheumatologist. Finally, three rheumatologists revised all the information and confirmed the diagnoses according to validated criteria. Estimates were computed as weighted proportions, taking the sampling design into account. Results The disease-specific prevalence rates (and 95% CIs) of RMDs in the adult Portuguese population were: low back pain, 26.4% (23.3% to 29.5%); periarticular disease, 15.8% (13.5% to 18.0%); knee osteoarthritis (OA), 12.4% (11.0% to 13.8%); osteoporosis, 10.2% (9.0% to 11.3%); hand OA, 8.7% (7.5% to 9.9%); hip OA, 2.9% (2.3% to 3.6%); fibromyalgia, 1.7% (1.1% to 2.1%); spondyloarthritis, 1.6% (1.2% to 2.1%); gout, 1.3% (1.0% to 1.6%); rheumatoid arthritis, 0.7% (0.5% to 0.9%); systemic lupus erythaematosus, 0.1% (0.1% to 0.2%) and polymyalgia rheumatica, 0.1% (0.0% to 0.2%). After multivariable adjustment, participants with RMDs had significantly lower EQ5D scores (β=−0.09; p<0.001) and higher HAQ scores (β=0.13; p<0.001) than participants without RMDs. RMDs were also significantly associated with the presence of anxiety symptoms (OR=3.5; p=0.006). Conclusions RMDs are highly prevalent in Portugal and are associated not only with significant physical function and mental health impairment but also with poor HRQoL, leading to more health resource consumption. The Epi

  11. Visual Function in Geriatric Eye Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faye, Eleanor E.

    1971-01-01

    Visual functioning, treatment, and helpful low vision aids are discussed in relation to four major eye diseases of the elderly: cataract, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. (KW)

  12. [Physical activity in basic and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Kałka, Dariusz; Pilecki, Witold; Adamus, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    , which leads to adaptive changes increasing the efficiency of its functioning and, in intermediate way, modifying and reducing the influence of other risk factors of cardiac vascular disease, mainly obesity dyslipidemy and hypertension. The subsequent scientific observations had an influence on the alterations of scientific associations recommendations concerning the preferred kind, intensity and effective dose of health-oriented physical activity. The current recommendations on preventive usefulness of physical activity, implemented by Polish Cardiological Association, have been based on a document containing the guidelines of European Cardiologic Association coming from 2003. All described evidences present in unambiguous way the undeniable benefits of active lifestyle. Its promoting as well as supporting in this area vast number of population, especially in case of disturbing epidemiological data, is becoming a duty of not only health service workers but also state administration employees responsible for planning public health expenditure. PMID:19711738

  13. Physical modification of food starch functionalities.

    PubMed

    BeMiller, James N; Huber, Kerry C

    2015-01-01

    Because, in general, native starches do not have properties that make them ideally suited for applications in food products, most starch is modified by dervatization to improve its functionality before use in processed food formulations, and because food processors would prefer not to have to use the modified food starch label designation required when chemically modified starches are used, there is considerable interest in providing starches with desired functionalities that have not been chemically modified. One investigated approach is property modification via physical treatments, that is, modifications of starches imparted by physical treatments that do not result in any chemical modification of the starch. Physical treatments are divided into thermal and nonthermal treatments. Thermal treatments include those that produce pregelatinized and granular cold-water-swelling starches, heat-moisture treatments, annealing, microwave heating, so-called osmotic pressure treatment, and heating of dry starch. Nonthermal treatments include ultrahigh-pressure treatments, instantaneous controlled pressure drop, use of high-pressure homogenizers, dynamic pulsed pressure, pulsed electric field, and freezing and thawing.

  14. Physical Education Performance Outcomes and Cognitive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    This article intends to inform physical education teachers about the current research describing the relationship between physical education performance outcomes as identified by the national physical education standards (i.e., regular participation in physical activity, physical fitness, motor competence; National Association of Physical…

  15. [Function and disease in manganese].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    Manganese is a metal that has been known named a Greek word "Magnesia" meaning magnesia nigra from Roman Empire. Manganese provide the wide range of metablic function and the multiple abnomalities from its deficiency or toxicity. In 1931, the essentiality of manganese was demonstrated with the authoritative poor growth and declined reproduction in its deficiency. Manganese deficiency has been recognized in a number of species and its signs are impaired growth, impaired reproduction, ataxia, skeletal abnormalities and disorders in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Manganese toxicity is also acknowledged as health hazard for animals and humans. Here manganese nutrition, metabolism and metabolic function are summarized. PMID:27455810

  16. Neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Westervelt, Holly James; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Lyme disease is currently the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The disease is multisystemic, and chronic disease, in particular, may be associated with neuropsychological deficits. However, to date, only a few empirical studies exist, which examine the neuropsychological sequelae associated with chronic Lyme disease. A review of the literature shows that the deficits observed in adults with chronic Lyme disease are generally consistent with the deficits that can be seen in processes with primarily frontal systems involvement. These observations are generally consistent with neuroradiologic findings. The clinical presentation in chronic Lyme disease and the nature of the neuropsychological deficits are discussed, as are several central issues in understanding neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease, such as the impact of chronic illness, response to treatment, and the relationship between neuropsychological performance and depression, fatigue, and neurological indicators of disease.

  17. Protective Effects of Physical Exercise in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Yves; de Souto Barreto, Philipe

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are devastating, frequent, and still incurable neurodegenerative diseases that manifest as cognitive and motor disorders. Epidemiological data support an inverse relationship between the amount of physical activity (PA) undertaken and the risk of developing these two diseases. Beyond this preventive role, exercise may also slow down their progression. Several mechanisms have been suggested for explaining the benefits of PA in the prevention of AD. Aerobic physical exercise (PE) activates the release of neurotrophic factors and promotes angiogenesis, thereby facilitating neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, which in turn improve memory and cognitive functions. Research has shown that the neuroprotective mechanisms induced by PE are linked to an increased production of superoxide dismutase, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor, and a reduction in the production of free radicals in brain areas such as the hippocampus, which is particularly involved in memory. Other mechanisms have also been reported in the prevention of PD. Exercise limits the alteration in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and contributes to optimal functioning of the basal ganglia involved in motor commands and control by adaptive mechanisms involving dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission. AD and PD are expansive throughout our ageing society, and so even a small impact of nonpharmacological interventions, such as PA and exercise, may have a major impact on public health. PMID:26174783

  18. Statistical physics approaches to Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shouyong

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of late life dementia. In the brain of an AD patient, neurons are lost and spatial neuronal organizations (microcolumns) are disrupted. An adequate quantitative analysis of microcolumns requires that we automate the neuron recognition stage in the analysis of microscopic images of human brain tissue. We propose a recognition method based on statistical physics. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulations of an inhomogeneous Potts model are applied for image segmentation. Unlike most traditional methods, this method improves the recognition of overlapped neurons, and thus improves the overall recognition percentage. Although the exact causes of AD are unknown, as experimental advances have revealed the molecular origin of AD, they have continued to support the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which states that early stages of aggregation of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides lead to neurodegeneration and death. X-ray diffraction studies reveal the common cross-beta structural features of the final stable aggregates-amyloid fibrils. Solid-state NMR studies also reveal structural features for some well-ordered fibrils. But currently there is no feasible experimental technique that can reveal the exact structure or the precise dynamics of assembly and thus help us understand the aggregation mechanism. Computer simulation offers a way to understand the aggregation mechanism on the molecular level. Because traditional all-atom continuous molecular dynamics simulations are not fast enough to investigate the whole aggregation process, we apply coarse-grained models and discrete molecular dynamics methods to increase the simulation speed. First we use a coarse-grained two-bead (two beads per amino acid) model. Simulations show that peptides can aggregate into multilayer beta-sheet structures, which agree with X-ray diffraction experiments. To better represent the secondary structure transition happening during aggregation, we refine the

  19. Inadequate cardiovascular disease prevention in women with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Theresa

    2006-01-01

    Health promotion and screening tests are important in persons with disability to avert secondary conditions that can lead to suboptimal functioning or premature death. Conversely, the existence of a primary disability can increase a person's susceptibility to secondary conditions. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of death in the United States, and its prevalence has been underinvestigated in persons with disability. This descriptive study used survey research to compare the risk of CVD in samples of 100 physically disabled women with 50 nondisabled women in the community. Participants, recruited from health fairs, completed questionnaires that explored the participants' knowledge of CVD risk factors, possession of specific CVD risk factors, and experience with CVD preventive screening procedures. Data revealed that compared with women without disability, women with disability were less knowledgeable about CVD risk factors and experienced marked deficiencies in CVD preventive screening. Body weight measurement, baseline electrocardiograms, family history, and smoking queries were performed less often in women with disabilities than in women without disabilities of similar age. Physical inactivity and postmenopausal status were specific CVD risk factors found to be more prevalent in the sample of women with disability. These findings suggest that risk of CVD is underrecognized and underassessed in women with a physical disability.

  20. Lambert W function for applications in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veberič, Darko

    2012-12-01

    The Lambert W(x) function and its possible applications in physics are presented. The actual numerical implementation in C++ consists of Halley's and Fritsch's iterations with initial approximations based on branch-point expansion, asymptotic series, rational fits, and continued-logarithm recursion. Program summaryProgram title: LambertW Catalogue identifier: AENC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1335 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 25 283 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (with suitable wrappers it can be called from C, Fortran etc.), the supplied command-line utility is suitable for other scripting languages like sh, csh, awk, perl etc. Computer: All systems with a C++ compiler. Operating system: All Unix flavors, Windows. It might work with others. RAM: Small memory footprint, less than 1 MB Classification: 1.1, 4.7, 11.3, 11.9. Nature of problem: Find fast and accurate numerical implementation for the Lambert W function. Solution method: Halley's and Fritsch's iterations with initial approximations based on branch-point expansion, asymptotic series, rational fits, and continued logarithm recursion. Additional comments: Distribution file contains the command-line utility lambert-w. Doxygen comments, included in the source files. Makefile. Running time: The tests provided take only a few seconds to run.

  1. People Use Psychological Cues to Detect Physical Disease From Faces.

    PubMed

    Tskhay, Konstantin O; Wilson, John Paul; Rule, Nicholas O

    2016-10-01

    Previous theoretical work has suggested that people can accurately perceive disease from others' appearances and behaviors. However, much of that research has examined diseases with relatively obvious symptoms (e.g., scars, obesity, blemishes, sneezing). Here, we examined whether people similarly detect diseases that do not exhibit such visible physical cues (i.e., sexually transmitted diseases). We found that people could indeed identify individuals infected with sexually transmitted diseases significantly better than chance from photos of their faces. Perceptions of the targets' affective expression and socioeconomic status mediated participants' accuracy. Finally, increasing participants' contamination fears improved their sensitivity to disease cues. These data therefore suggest that people may use subtle and indirect psychological markers to detect some physical diseases from appearance.

  2. People Use Psychological Cues to Detect Physical Disease From Faces.

    PubMed

    Tskhay, Konstantin O; Wilson, John Paul; Rule, Nicholas O

    2016-10-01

    Previous theoretical work has suggested that people can accurately perceive disease from others' appearances and behaviors. However, much of that research has examined diseases with relatively obvious symptoms (e.g., scars, obesity, blemishes, sneezing). Here, we examined whether people similarly detect diseases that do not exhibit such visible physical cues (i.e., sexually transmitted diseases). We found that people could indeed identify individuals infected with sexually transmitted diseases significantly better than chance from photos of their faces. Perceptions of the targets' affective expression and socioeconomic status mediated participants' accuracy. Finally, increasing participants' contamination fears improved their sensitivity to disease cues. These data therefore suggest that people may use subtle and indirect psychological markers to detect some physical diseases from appearance. PMID:27431444

  3. The Case for Increased Physical Activity in Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    2016-06-01

    Regular physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer, but there is little information on the merits of such activity in the prevention and management of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (CIBD). The present systematic review thus documents current levels of habitual physical activity and aerobic and muscular function in CIBD, and examines the safety, practicality and efficacy of exercise programmes in countering the disease process, correcting functional deficits and enhancing quality of life. A systematic search of the Ovid/Medline database from January 1996 to May 2015 linked the terms physical activity/motor activity/physical fitness/physical training/physical education/training/exercise/exercise therapy with Crohn's disease/colitis/ulcerative colitis/inflammatory bowel disease, supplementing this information by a scanning of reference lists and personal files.12 of 16 published studies show a low level of habitual physical activity in CIBD, with sub-normal values for aerobic power, lean tissue mass and muscular strength. 3 of 4 studies suggest physical activity may reduce the risk of developing IBD, and 11 interventions all note that exercise programmes are well tolerated with some decreases of disease activity, and functional gains leading to an increased health-related quality of life. Moreover, programme compliance rates compare favourably with those seen in the treatment of other chronic conditions. More information on mechanisms is needed, but regular moderate aerobic and/or resistance exercise improves the health status of patients with CIBD both by modulating immune function and by improving physical function. A regular exercise programme should thus become an important component in the management of CIBD. PMID:27116344

  4. Functional neuroanatomy of intuitive physical inference.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jason; Mikhael, John G; Tenenbaum, Joshua B; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2016-08-23

    To engage with the world-to understand the scene in front of us, plan actions, and predict what will happen next-we must have an intuitive grasp of the world's physical structure and dynamics. How do the objects in front of us rest on and support each other, how much force would be required to move them, and how will they behave when they fall, roll, or collide? Despite the centrality of physical inferences in daily life, little is known about the brain mechanisms recruited to interpret the physical structure of a scene and predict how physical events will unfold. Here, in a series of fMRI experiments, we identified a set of cortical regions that are selectively engaged when people watch and predict the unfolding of physical events-a "physics engine" in the brain. These brain regions are selective to physical inferences relative to nonphysical but otherwise highly similar scenes and tasks. However, these regions are not exclusively engaged in physical inferences per se or, indeed, even in scene understanding; they overlap with the domain-general "multiple demand" system, especially the parts of that system involved in action planning and tool use, pointing to a close relationship between the cognitive and neural mechanisms involved in parsing the physical content of a scene and preparing an appropriate action. PMID:27503892

  5. Mitochondria, endothelial cell function, and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are perhaps the most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems in eukaryotic cells. The role of mitochondria goes beyond their capacity to create molecular fuel and includes the generation of reactive oxygen species, the regulation of calcium, and the activation of cell death. In endothelial cells, mitochondria have a profound impact on cellular function under both healthy and diseased conditions. In this review, we summarize the basic functions of mitochondria in endothelial cells and discuss the roles of mitochondria in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular dysfunction, pulmonary artery hypertension, and hypertension. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and vascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants and calorie restriction. PMID:24834056

  6. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  7. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  8. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  9. PREFACE: Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    , about 15 years after the original reports, it is clear that amyloids are special structures that occur in nature under several different guises, some good, some evil [3]. The number of diseases associated with misfolding and fibrillogenesis has steadily increased. Examples of fairly common pathologies associated with fibre formation include Alzheimer's disease (currently one of the major threats for human health in our increasingly aging world), Parkinson's disease and several rare, but not less severe, pathologies. On the other hand, it is also clear that amyloid formation is a convenient mechanism for storing peptides and/or proteins in a compact and resistant way. The number of organisms/tissues in which amyloid deposits are found is thus increasing. It is also not too far-fetched to expect that the mechanical properties of amyloids could be used in biotechnology to design new materials. Because of the importance of this topic in so many scientific fields, we have dedicated this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter to the topic of protein aggregation and disease. In the following pages we have collected two reviews and five articles that explore new and interesting developments in the field. References [1] Olby R 1994 The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (New York: Dover) [2] Dobson C M 2004 Principles of protein folding, misfolding and aggregation Semin. Cell Dev. Biol. 15 3-16 [3] Hammer N D, Wang X, McGuffie B A, Chapman M R 2008 Amyloids: friend or foe? J. Alzheimers Dis. 13 407-19 Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases contents Protein aggregation and misfolding: good or evil?Annalisa Pastore and Pierandrea Temussi Alzheimer's disease: biological aspects, therapeutic perspectives and diagnostic toolsM Di Carlo, D Giacomazza and P L San Biagio Entrapment of Aβ1-40 peptide in unstructured aggregatesC Corsale, R Carrotta, M R Mangione, S Vilasi, A Provenzano, G Cavallaro, D Bulone and P L San Biagio Elemental micro

  10. Physics Buildings Today. A Supplement to Modern Physics Buildings: Design and Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Physics, New York, NY.

    This supplement to "Modern Physics Buildings: Design and Function" is intended as an aid to physics department faculties, administrators, and architects responsible for designing new science buildings. It provides descriptions of 26 new physics buildings and science buildings with physics facilities. Presented are (1) floor plans, (2) photographs,…

  11. Physics of Cell Adhesion Failure and Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    Emergent phenomena in living systems, including your ability to read these lines, do not obviously follow as a consequence of the fundamental laws of physics. Understanding the physics of living systems clearly falls outside the conventional boundaries of scientific disciplines and requires a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach. Here I will discuss how theoretical and computational techniques from statistical physics can be used to make progress in explaining the physical mechanisms that underlie complex biological phenomena, including major diseases. In the specific cases of macular degeneration and cancer that we have studied recently, we find that the breakdown of the mechanical stability in the local tissue structure caused by weakening of the cell-cell adhesion plays a key role in the initiation and progression of the disease. This finding can help in the development of new therapies that would prevent or halt the initiation and progression of these diseases.

  12. PREFACE: Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    , about 15 years after the original reports, it is clear that amyloids are special structures that occur in nature under several different guises, some good, some evil [3]. The number of diseases associated with misfolding and fibrillogenesis has steadily increased. Examples of fairly common pathologies associated with fibre formation include Alzheimer's disease (currently one of the major threats for human health in our increasingly aging world), Parkinson's disease and several rare, but not less severe, pathologies. On the other hand, it is also clear that amyloid formation is a convenient mechanism for storing peptides and/or proteins in a compact and resistant way. The number of organisms/tissues in which amyloid deposits are found is thus increasing. It is also not too far-fetched to expect that the mechanical properties of amyloids could be used in biotechnology to design new materials. Because of the importance of this topic in so many scientific fields, we have dedicated this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter to the topic of protein aggregation and disease. In the following pages we have collected two reviews and five articles that explore new and interesting developments in the field. References [1] Olby R 1994 The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (New York: Dover) [2] Dobson C M 2004 Principles of protein folding, misfolding and aggregation Semin. Cell Dev. Biol. 15 3-16 [3] Hammer N D, Wang X, McGuffie B A, Chapman M R 2008 Amyloids: friend or foe? J. Alzheimers Dis. 13 407-19 Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases contents Protein aggregation and misfolding: good or evil?Annalisa Pastore and Pierandrea Temussi Alzheimer's disease: biological aspects, therapeutic perspectives and diagnostic toolsM Di Carlo, D Giacomazza and P L San Biagio Entrapment of Aβ1-40 peptide in unstructured aggregatesC Corsale, R Carrotta, M R Mangione, S Vilasi, A Provenzano, G Cavallaro, D Bulone and P L San Biagio Elemental micro

  13. Feelings of well being in elderly people: relationship to physical activity and physical function.

    PubMed

    Garatachea, Nuria; Molinero, Olga; Martínez-García, Raquel; Jiménez-Jiménez, Rodrigo; González-Gallego, Javier; Márquez, Sara

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate in a sample of Spanish elderly whether measures of physical activity and physical function are related to feelings of well being, and whether level of dependence is a moderator in the relation of well being, physical activity and physical function. The sample was a cohort of 151 elderly people (89 women and 62 men, aged 60-98 years) from the North of Spain. Participants completed surveys including demographic characteristics, and measures of physical activity (Yale Physical Activity Survey, YPAS), instrumental activities of daily living (Barthel Index, BI) and well being (Psychological Well Being Scale, from Spanish: Escala de Bienestar Psicológico=EBP). Components of the physical function were measured by the Senior Fitness Test (SFT). Upper and lower body strength, dynamic balance, aerobic endurance, self-reported weekly energy expenditure and physical activity total time were significantly correlated with both Material and Subjective well being. All components of physical function were significantly impaired in dependent subjects when compared to independent individuals of the same sex and physical activity category. Significant differences were also observed in Subjective well being among less active dependent or independent individuals. In conclusion, physical function and physical activity are related to feelings of well being, and results emphasize the positive functional and psychological effects of physical activity in dependent subjects.

  14. Functional brain changes in presymptomatic Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Reading, Sarah A J; Dziorny, Adam C; Peroutka, Laura A; Schreiber, Mathew; Gourley, Lisa M; Yallapragada, Venu; Rosenblatt, Adam; Margolis, Russell L; Pekar, James J; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Aylward, Elizabeth; Brandt, Jason; Bassett, Susan S; Ross, Christopher A

    2004-06-01

    Evidence suggests early structural brain changes in individuals with the Huntington's disease (HD) genetic mutation who are presymptomatic for the movement symptoms of the illness. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of functional brain changes in this same population using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects and matched controls underwent an functional magnetic resonance imaging "interference" protocol, a task known to be mediated in part by corticostriatal circuitry. In the setting of normal cognitive performance, presymptomatic HD subjects had significantly and specifically less activation in the left anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24, 32) compared with matched controls.

  15. Hypnosis and upper digestive function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Palsson, Olafur S; Whitehead, William E

    2008-01-01

    Hypnosis is a therapeutic technique that primarily involves attentive receptive concentration. Even though a small number of health professionals are trained in hypnosis and lingering myths and misconceptions associated with this method have hampered its widespread use to treat medical conditions, hypnotherapy has gained relevance as an effective treatment for irritable bowel syndrome not responsive to standard care. More recently, a few studies have addressed the potential influence of hypnosis on upper digestive function and disease. This paper reviews the efficacy of hypnosis in the modulation of upper digestive motor and secretory function. The present evidence of the effectiveness of hypnotherapy as a treatment for functional and organic diseases of the upper bowel is also summarized, coupled with a discussion of potential mechanisms of its therapeutic action. PMID:19009639

  16. [Life style diseases and functional foods].

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo

    2016-03-01

    In Japan the onset of lifestyle-related diseases has increased, the people interests in "food and health", and the movement of the food industry is actively to respond to it. Healthy life expectancy is essential for mitigation of social medical expenses and improvement of the personal QOL in the super-aged society. Daily diet becomes the nucleus of healthy life expectancy. Historically, the concept of "functional food" system was born in the mid-1980s in ahead of our country in the world. Administration as a response to it to allow on that review, "food for specified health uses" was born. Furthermore, foods with a prevention function of lifestyle-related diseases, such as "Foods with Function Claims" system have been developing from 2015. In this paper, we want to further describe these circumstances, the current situation and the outlook.

  17. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  18. Trajectory of change in pain, depression, and physical functioning after physical activity adoption in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Bigatti, Silvia M; Ang, Dennis C

    2015-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with widespread pain, depression, and declines in physical functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine the trajectory of these symptoms over time related to physical activity adoption and maintenance via motivational interviewing versus education, to increase physical activity. There were no treatment group differences; we divided the sample (n = 184) based on changes in physical activity. Repeated measures analyses demonstrated differential patterns in depression, pain, and physical functioning at 24 and 36 weeks. Findings suggest increased physical activity may serve as a multiple-target intervention that provides moderate to large, long-lasting benefits for individuals with fibromyalgia.

  19. Some physical applications of generalized Lambert functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mező, István; Keady, Grant

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we show two applications for a generalization of the Lambert W function. Explicit calculations are given for the inverse Langevin function that plays an important role in the study of paramagnetic materials, and for the dispersion equations for water waves. After these examples we provide some additional knowledge on the generalized Lambert function as well as a review of former studies made towards this direction by other authors.

  20. Consequences of physical inactivity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Jorine E; Boezen, H Marike; de Greef, Mathieu H G; Bossenbroek, Linda; ten Hacken, Nick H T

    2010-12-01

    The many health benefits of regular physical activity underline the importance of this topic, especially in this period of time when the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle in the population is increasing. Physical activity levels are especially low in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Regular physical activity and an active lifestyle has shown to be positively associated with outcomes such as exercise capacity and health-related quality of life, and therefore could be beneficial for the individual COPD patient. An adequate level of physical activity needs to be integrated into daily life, and stimulation of physical activity when absent is important. This article aims to discuss in more detail the possible role of regular physical activity for a number of well-known outcome parameters in COPD. PMID:21128749

  1. Dopamine function in Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, W L

    2000-06-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a disorder of purine metabolism resulting from mutations in the gene for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase on the X chromosome. It is characterized by hyperuricemia and all of its consequences, as in gout; but in addition, patients have impressive disease of the central nervous system. This includes spasticity, involuntary movements, and retardation of motor development. The behavioral phenotype is best remembered by self-injurious biting behavior with attendant destruction of tissue. The connection between aberrant metabolism of purines and these neurologic and behavioral features of the disease is not clear. Increasing evidence points to imbalance of neurotransmitters. There is increased excretion of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the urine. There are decreased quantities and activities of a number of dopaminergic functions. Positron emission tomography scanning has indicated deficiency in the dopamine transporter.

  2. Functional foods and physical activities in health promotion of aging people.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carlos K B

    2007-12-20

    Foods contain many bioactive compounds that can improve humans' health, helping to decrease the risk of cataract, macular degeneration, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, osteoporosis, and cancer. Regular practice of exercise and physical activity could also help to drive away aging-associated diseases (obesity, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia, and stroke). Exercise recommendations to promote both women's and men's health and disease conditions that hinder exercise practice are described. Health promotion practices should focus on both dietary intake of functional foods and regular practice of exercise within the framework of a healthy lifestyle.

  3. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Tallner, Alexander; Waschbisch, Anne; Hentschke, Christian; Pfeifer, Klaus; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-07-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  4. PTSD is negatively associated with physical performance and physical function in older overweight military veterans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Katherine S.; Beckham, Jean C.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Sloane, Richard; Pieper, Carl F.; Morey, Miriam C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on function and physical performance in older overweight military Veterans with comorbid conditions. This is a secondary data analysis of older Veterans (mean age = 62.9 yr) participating in a physical activity counseling trial. Study participants with PTSD (n = 67) and without PTSD (n = 235) were identified. Self-reported physical function (36-item Short Form Health Survey) and directly measured physical performance (mobility, aerobic endurance, strength) were assessed. Multivariate analyses of variance controlling for demographic factors and psychiatric disorders demonstrated significant physical impairment among those with PTSD. PTSD was negatively associated with self-reported physical function, functioning in daily activities, and general health (p < 0.01). Those with PTSD also performed significantly worse on tests of lower-limb function (p < 0.05). Despite being significantly younger, Veterans with PTSD had comparable scores on gait speed, aerobic endurance, grip strength, and bodily pain compared with Veterans without PTSD. This study provides preliminary data for the negative association between PTSD and physical function in older military Veterans. These data highlight the importance of ongoing monitoring of physical performance among returning Veterans with PTSD and intervening in older overweight Veterans with PTSD, whose physical performance scores are indicative of accelerated risk of premature functional aging. PMID:24933726

  5. PTSD is negatively associated with physical performance and physical function in older overweight military Veterans.

    PubMed

    Hall, Katherine S; Beckham, Jean C; Bosworth, Hayden B; Sloane, Richard; Pieper, Carl F; Morey, Miriam C

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on function and physical performance in older overweight military Veterans with comorbid conditions. This is a secondary data analysis of older Veterans (mean age = 62.9 yr) participating in a physical activity counseling trial. Study participants with PTSD (n = 67) and without PTSD (n = 235) were identified. Self-reported physical function (36-item Short Form Health Survey) and directly measured physical performance (mobility, aerobic endurance, strength) were assessed. Multivariate analyses of variance controlling for demographic factors and psychiatric disorders demonstrated significant physical impairment among those with PTSD. PTSD was negatively associated with self-reported physical function, functioning in daily activities, and general health (p < 0.01). Those with PTSD also performed significantly worse on tests of lower-limb function (p < 0.05). Despite being significantly younger, Veterans with PTSD had comparable scores on gait speed, aerobic endurance, grip strength, and bodily pain compared with Veterans without PTSD. This study provides preliminary data for the negative association between PTSD and physical function in older military Veterans. These data highlight the importance of ongoing monitoring of physical performance among returning Veterans with PTSD and intervening in older overweight Veterans with PTSD, whose physical performance scores are indicative of accelerated risk of premature functional aging.

  6. Short-term Physical Inactivity Impairs Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Emily V.; Yen, Priscilla; Chong, Karen C.; Alley, Hugh F.; Stock, Eveline O.; Quinn, Alex; Hellmann, Jason; Conte, Michael S.; Owens, Christopher D.; Spite, Matthew; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sedentarism, also termed physical inactivity, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms thought to be involved include insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased inflammation. It is unknown whether changes in vascular and endothelial function also contribute to this excess risk. We hypothesized that short-term exposure to inactivity would lead to endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and increased vascular inflammation. Methods Five healthy subjects (4 males and 1 female) underwent 5 days of bed rest (BR) to simulate inactivity. Measurements of vascular function [flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) to evaluate endothelial function; applanation tonometry to assess arterial resistance], inflammation and metabolism were made before BR, daily during BR and after 2 recovery days. Subjects maintained an isocaloric diet throughout. Results Bed rest led to significant decreases in brachial artery and femoral artery FMD [Brachial: 11 ± 3% pre-BR vs. 9 ± 2% end-BR, P=0.04; Femoral: 4 ± 1% vs. 2 ± 1%, P=0.04]. The central augmentation index increased with BR [−4 ± 9% vs. 5 ± 11%, P=0.03]. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increased [58 ± 7 mmHg vs. 62 ± 7 mmHg, P=0.02], while neither systolic blood pressure nor heart rate changed. 15-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite, increased but the other inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers were unchanged. Conclusions Our findings show that acute exposure to sedentarism results in decreased endothelial function, arterial stiffening, increased DBP, and an increase in 15-HETE. We speculate that inactivity promotes a vascular “deconditioning” state characterized by impaired endothelial function, leading to arterial stiffness and increased arterial tone. Although physiologically significant, the underlying mechanisms and clinical relevance of these findings need to be further explored. PMID:24630521

  7. Effect of physical exhaustion on cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Féry, Y A; Ferry, A; Vom Hofe, A; Rieu, M

    1997-02-01

    Experiments utilizing reaction time to measure the effects of fatigue on cognition must discern sensitivity of peripheral and central processing to strenuous exercise. The additive factors method enables one to stipulate that if fatigue interacts with subjects' reaction time in a decision task, central processing is affected by fatigue. While pedaling at different intensities, 13 physically-fit men had to perform a series of short-term memory tests. The tests were executed during a constant workload session and a progressive workload session in which subjects pedaled until exhaustion. Subjects provided ratings on Borg's 1970 scale to measure the psychological effects of the physical effort such as perceived exertion. Allocation of processing resources was also measured to determine attentional constraints exerted by the dual-task situation. Analysis showed that decision reaction time was affected only during the exhausting bout of the progressive workload session and for the more difficult decision task. We discuss our results in the context of arousal and the allocation of processing resources.

  8. Physical growth, sexual maturation, body image and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, M. L.; Allen, F. H.; Cepeda, N. J.; Yang, Y. M.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study assessed delays in physical growth and sexual maturation, self-esteem and body image in youth with homozygous sickle hemoglobin disease (HgbSS). METHOD: A consecutive sample of 30 subjects age 8 through 19 with homozygous sickle cell disease (hemoglobin SS) and a similar number of control subjects matched for age, race, gender and socioeconomic status and free of chronic illness were examined for height, weight and Tanner staging of sexual development. Subjects also completed the Body Cathexis Scale and Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale. Assessments were with paired samples t-tests. RESULTS: The subjects with sickle cell disease had significantly lower weights and were shorter than matched control subjects. Sexual development (physical) was also delayed in the sickle cell subjects. The study failed to find significant differences for either body image or self-esteem. CONCLUSIONS: The latency age and adolescent subjects with sickle cell disease had significant delays in physical (height, weight, secondary sexual characteristics) maturation. The study failed to find significant differences in either self-esteem or body image between the two groups. Theoretical constructs from the literature were presented which questioned the belief that these expected delays in physical growth and sexual maturation have an adverse effect upon self-esteem and body image. PMID:10800281

  9. Heart disease and physical activity: looking beyond patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Chris M

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) adherence is a problem that has plagued cardiovascular disease patients for years. Because of this, researchers have advocated for the identification of key theoretical correlates that can be used to guide PA intervention development. The present review will identify key PA correlates for these patients and provide subsequent recommendations to look beyond patient-level correlates.

  10. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudia P.; de Lima Sanches, Priscila; de Abreu-Silva, Erlon Oliveira; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD. PMID:26770987

  11. Physical Activity as a Function of Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Đukanović, Nina; Mašić, Zoran; Kostovski, Žarko; Širić, Vesna; Blažević, Stipe

    2015-07-01

    Physical activity means any form of body movement that is associated with certain metabolic demands. At the same time, physical activity is one of the most important steps in the maintenance, protection and improvement of health. There is strong evidence to suggest that higher levels of physical activity are associated with numerous preventive effects and therapeutic effects in the treatment of many diseases. Although they account for a larger portion of the population, physical inactivity is more often registered in women, which can be attributed to a variety of reasons--ranging from anatomical and physiological to the socio-psychological. The present paper discusses some of the most important benefits associated with physical activity in women, to encourage their greater participation in various forms of physical activity.

  12. Physical fitness and activity as separate heart disease risk factors: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Public health policies for physical activity presume that the greatest health benefits are achieved by increasing physical activity among the least active. This presumption is based largely on studies of cardiorespiratory fitness. To assess whether studies of cardiorespiratory fitness are germane to physical activity guidelines, we compared the dose-response relationships between cardiovascular disease endpoints with leisure-time physical activity and fitness from published studies. Data Sources Twenty-three sex-specific cohorts of physical activity or fitness (representing 1,325,004 person-years of follow-up), cited in Tables 4-1 and 4-2 of the Surgeon General's Report. Data Synthesis Relative risks were plotted as a function of the cumulative percentages of the samples when ranked from least fit or active, to most fit or active. To combine study results, a weighted average of the relative risks over the 16 physical activity or seven fitness cohorts was computed at every 5th percentile between the 5% and 100%. The analyses show that the risks of coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease decrease linearly in association with increasing percentiles of physical activity. In contrast, there is a precipitous drop in risk occurring before the 25th percentile of the fitness distribution. As a consequence of this drop, there is a significant difference in the risk reduction associated with being more physically active or physically fit (P ≤ 0.04). Conclusions Being unfit warrants consideration as a risk factor, distinctly from inactivity, and worthy of screening and intervention. Formulating physical activity recommendations on the basis of fitness studies may inappropriately demote the status of physical fitness as a risk factor while exaggerating the public health benefits of moderate amounts of physical activity. PMID:11323544

  13. Physical activity of workers with and without chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Loef, Bette; de Hollander, Ellen L.; Boot, Cécile R.L.; Proper, Karin I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To contribute to the development of measures that increase physical activity (PA) levels in workers with and without chronic diseases, insight into workers' PA level is needed. Therefore, this study examined the association between the number of chronic diseases and PA in a Dutch working population. Methods Data of 131,032 workers from the Dutch Public Health Monitor 2012 were used in this cross-sectional study conducted in 2015 in the Netherlands. PA was operationalized as adherence (yes/no) to three PA guidelines. One of these was the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guideline (≥ 3 days/week, ≥ 20 min/day of vigorous-intensity activities). Also, the amount of moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA in min/week for those who were physically active for > 0 min/week was calculated. Associations between chronic diseases (0, 1, ≥ 2 chronic diseases) and PA were examined using logistic regression and Generalized Estimating Equations stratified for age (19–54 years/55–64 years). Results Workers aged 19–54 years with one (OR = 0.90 (99% CI = 0.84–0.95)) and multiple chronic diseases (OR = 0.76 (99% CI = 0.69–0.83)) had lower odds of adhering to the ACSM-guideline than workers without chronic diseases. Similar patterns were found for older workers. Younger workers with one (B = 24.44 (99% CI = 8.59–40.30)) and multiple chronic diseases (B = 49.11 (99% CI = 26.61–71.61)) had a higher amount of moderate PA than workers without chronic diseases. Conclusion Workers with chronic diseases adhered less often to the ACSM-guideline, but among workers aged 19–54 years who were physically active for > 0 min/week, those with chronic diseases spent more time in moderate-intensity PA than those without chronic diseases. PMID:26844183

  14. Correlation between physical function, cognitive function, and health-related quality of life in elderly persons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, DeokJu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the quality of life of elderly people related to physical function, cognitive function, and health, and devised methods to enhance their health-related quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted from November 2014 to January 2015 in 140 people over 65 registered at welfare centers. Those with a functional psychological disorder or difficulty communicating were excluded. Data were collected for physical function, cognitive function, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using an assessment tool and questionnaire for healthy elderly people over 65. Physical function was measured using muscle strength muscle endurance, reaction time, and balance. [Results] Correlations were observed between cognitive function and endurance, reaction time, and balance. Physical HRQOL showed correlations with all domains of physical function; mental HRQOL showed correlations with all items of physical function except muscle strength. Among factors that influence HRQOL, all items except educational background were significant variables. Educational background had no influence on HRQOL. [Conclusion] Interventions will correct factors with a negative influence on HRQOL, utilizing regular checks on physical, cognitive, and other functions of elderly people, with early detection and intervention to enhance HRQOL. Cognitive intervention related to physical and other functions will be applied. PMID:27390430

  15. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  16. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  17. Physical properties of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sklaviadis, T.K.; Manuelidis, L.; Manuelidis, E.E.

    1989-03-01

    In this report, the authors present the first physical characterization of the Creutzfeld-Jakob disease agent. Preparations with high yields of infectivity (assayed infectious units) were obtained by a novel, gentle procedure in which initially sedimenting Gp34 (prion protein) was disaggregated by a variety of criteria with no subsequent loss of infectivity. Studies with this preparation indicate that most of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent has both a viruslike size and density. In velocity sedimentation and isopycnic sucrose gradients, infectivity comigrated with nucleic acid-protein complexes of appreciable size.

  18. Gastrointestinal motility and functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Zai, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Osamu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Digestive tract motility patterns are closely related to the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID), and these patterns differ markedly between the interdigestive period and the postprandial period. The characteristic motility pattern in the interdigestive period is so-called interdigestive migrating contraction (IMC). IMCs have a housekeeping role in the intestinal tract, and could also be related to FGID. IMCs arising from the stomach are called gastrointestinal IMCs (GI-IMC), while IMCs arising from the duodenum without associated gastric contractions are called intestinal IMCs (I-IMC). It is thought that I-IMCs are abnormal in FGID. Transport of food residue to the duodenum via gastric emptying is one of the most important postprandial functions of the stomach. In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), abnormal gastric emptying is a possible mechanism of gastric dysfunction. Accordingly, delayed gastric emptying has attracted attention, with prokinetic agents and herbal medicines often being administered in Japan to accelerate gastric emptying in patients who have anorexia associated with dyspepsia. Recently, we found that addition of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) to a high-calorie liquid diet rich in casein promoted gastric emptying in healthy men. Therefore, another potential method of improving delayed gastric emptying could be activation of chemosensors that stimulate the autonomic nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a role for MSG in the management of delayed gastric emptying in patients with FD.

  19. Pituitary function and morphology in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luigi; Tortora, Fabio; Modica, Roberta; Ramundo, Valeria; Riccio, Eleonora; Daniele, Aurora; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Colao, Annamaria; Pisani, Antonio; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2015-11-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are known to affect patients with Fabry disease (FD). Pituitary gland theoretically represents an ideal target for FD because of high vascularization and low proliferation rate. We explored pituitary morphology and function in a cohort of FD patients through a prospectic, monocentric study at an Academic Tertiary Center. The study population included 28 FD patients and 42 sex and age-matched normal subjects. The protocol included a contrast enhancement pituitary MRI, the assessment of pituitary hormones, anti-pituitary, and anti-hypothalamus antibodies. At pituitary MRI, an empty sella was found in 11 (39%) FD patients, and in 2 (5%) controls (p < 0.001). Pituitary volume was significantly smaller in FD than in controls (p < 0.001). Determinants of pituitary volume were age and alpha-galactosidase enzyme activity. Both parameters resulted independently correlated at multivariate analysis. Pituitary function was substantially preserved in FD patients. Empty sella is a common finding in patients with FD. The major prevalence in the elderly supports the hypothesis of a progressive pituitary shrinkage overtime. Pituitary function seems not to be impaired in FD. An endocrine workup with pituitary hormone assessment should be periodically performed in FD patients, who are already at risk of cardiovascular complications.

  20. Physical activity in prefrail older adults: confidence and satisfaction related to physical function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the hypothesis that physical activity will have favorable effects on measures of self-efficacy for a 400-m walk and satisfaction with physical functioning in older adults 701 years of age who have deficits in mobility. We randomized a total of 412 adults aged 70–89 years at elevated risk...

  1. Influence of fatigue on construction workers’ physical and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M.; Murphy, L. A.; Fang, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite scientific evidence linking workers’ fatigue to occupational safety (due to impaired physical or cognitive function), little is known about this relationship in construction workers. Aims To assess the association between construction workers’ reported fatigue and their perceived difficulties with physical and cognitive functions. Methods Using data from a convenience sample of US construction workers participating in the 2010–11 National Health Interview Survey two multivariate weighted logistic regression models were built to predict difficulty with physical and with cognitive functions associated with workers’ reported fatigue, while controlling for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption status, sleep hygiene, psychological distress and arthritis status. Results Of 606 construction workers surveyed, 49% reported being ‘tired some days’ in the past 3 months and 10% reported ‘tired most days or every day’. Compared with those feeling ‘never tired’, workers who felt ‘tired some days’ were significantly more likely to report difficulty with physical function (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–3.51) and cognitive function (AOR = 2.27; 95% CI 1.06–4.88) after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusions Our results suggest an association between reported fatigue and experiencing difficulties with physical and cognitive functions in construction workers. PMID:25701835

  2. Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Jeffrey B; Bury, David C; Richardson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. One-third of these deaths may be preventable through healthy lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity. The Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, whereas the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Substituting dietary saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes, although exogenous supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids does not improve cardiovascular outcomes. There is an association between increased sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, but reducing dietary sodium has not consistently shown a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Physical activity recommendations for adults are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination. Increases in physical activity by any level are associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Introducing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice per week in previously inactive adults is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Inactive adults without known CVD can gradually increase activity to a moderate-intensity level without consulting a physician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet and physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Evidence of benefit for counseling patients at average risk is less established.

  3. Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Jeffrey B; Bury, David C; Richardson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. One-third of these deaths may be preventable through healthy lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity. The Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, whereas the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Substituting dietary saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes, although exogenous supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids does not improve cardiovascular outcomes. There is an association between increased sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, but reducing dietary sodium has not consistently shown a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Physical activity recommendations for adults are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination. Increases in physical activity by any level are associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Introducing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice per week in previously inactive adults is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Inactive adults without known CVD can gradually increase activity to a moderate-intensity level without consulting a physician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet and physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Evidence of benefit for counseling patients at average risk is less established. PMID:27281836

  4. Physical agents and occupational disease compensation: noise, vibration, radiation, and other physical agents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiho; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-06-01

    The context of specific criteria for the recognition of occupational diseases (ODs) due to physical agents in the Enforcement Decree of the Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance Act (ED-IACIA) and the Labor Standard Act (LSA) does not describe definite disease along with the agents but listed symptoms or obscure clinical conditions. Moreover, the needs for an amendment of these Acts have recently attracted renewed interest. To establish agreed criteria for compensable ODs due to physical agents, we reviewed the criteria for recognizing ODs on the basis of International Labor Organization (ILO) documents and European Union (EU) guideline. After providing a brief review of the history of OD outbreaks due to physical exposure in South Korea and the responses to them, we describe the basis for the recent amendments to the IACI Act and LSA and assess their appropriateness. On the basis of these findings, this study could be helpful for determining and compensating process of ODs. However, further work is required to ascertain the scientific relationship between diseases caused by physical agents and the exposure criteria. PMID:25006328

  5. Using special functions to model the propagation of airborne diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    Some special functions of the mathematical physics are using to obtain a mathematical model of the propagation of airborne diseases. In particular we study the propagation of tuberculosis in closed rooms and we model the propagation using the error function and the Bessel function. In the model, infected individual emit pathogens to the environment and this infect others individuals who absorb it. The evolution in time of the concentration of pathogens in the environment is computed in terms of error functions. The evolution in time of the number of susceptible individuals is expressed by a differential equation that contains the error function and it is solved numerically for different parametric simulations. The evolution in time of the number of infected individuals is plotted for each numerical simulation. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of the pathogen around the source of infection is represented by the Bessel function K0. The spatial and temporal distribution of the number of infected individuals is computed and plotted for some numerical simulations. All computations were made using software Computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is expected that the analytical results that we obtained allow the design of treatment rooms and ventilation systems that reduce the risk of spread of tuberculosis.

  6. Novel Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease and Their Associations Between Obesity, Physical Activity And Physical Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Duncan S.; Thomas, Non E.; Baker, Julien S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing around the globe and is the leading cause of death around the world. Though once thought of as an adult problem, it is now recognised that the early manifestations of disease may occur during childhood. Numerous risk factors have been linked to CVD with much of the research focusing on understanding the prevalence and relationship of traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, psychosocial stress, poor diet, physical inactivity and alcohol consumption to the early etiology of disease. While this line of investigation has greatly enhanced our understanding of the relationship between these risk factors and disease, they do not fully explain all cardiovascular events. To enhance our understanding and help with the management of CVD, investigations that involve the measurement of traditional as well as novel risk factors may be necessary. Public health strategies that aim to reduce the prevalence of obesity and overweight encourage youth to increase their physical activity levels as a means of protecting against poor cardiometabolic profiles. Interventions that increase physical activity levels and improve cardiorespiratory fitness cause a reduction in certain CVD risk factors but the lack of agreement between findings makes it impossible to give precise recommendations that will ensure CVD risk reduction. Yet it is important that research continues in order to establish the most appropriate means of improving the health and well-being of those at most risk of future CVD. PMID:25170447

  7. Early Life Stress and Physical and Psychosocial Functioning in Late Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Alastalo, Hanna; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B.; Räikkönen, Katri; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J. P.; Heinonen, Kati; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe stress experienced in early life may have long-term effects on adult physiological and psychological health and well-being. We studied physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood in subjects separated temporarily from their parents in childhood during World War II. Methods The 1803 participants belong to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, born 1934–44. Of them, 267 (14.8%) had been evacuated abroad in childhood during WWII and the remaining subjects served as controls. Physical and psychosocial functioning was assessed with the Short Form 36 scale (SF-36) between 2001 and 2004. A test for trends was based on linear regression. All analyses were adjusted for age at clinical examination, social class in childhood and adulthood, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, body mass index, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Results Physical functioning in late adulthood was lower among the separated men compared to non-separated men (b = −0.40, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: −0.71 to −0.08). Those men separated in school age (>7 years) and who were separated for a duration over 2 years had the highest risk for lower physical functioning (b = −0.89, 95% CI: −1.58 to −0.20) and (b = −0.65, 95% CI: −1.25 to −0.05), respectively). Men separated for a duration over 2 years also had lower psychosocial functioning (b = −0.70, 95% CI: −1.35 to −0.06). These differences in physical and psychosocial functioning were not observed among women. Conclusion Early life stress may increase the risk for impaired physical functioning in late adulthood among men. Timing and duration of the separation influenced the physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood. PMID:23861956

  8. The Importance of Physical Fitness versus Physical Activity for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships among physical fitness, physical activity, and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in male police officers. Data from screenings and physical fitness assessments indicated physical activity must be sufficient to influence fitness before obtaining statistically significant risk-reducing…

  9. Reduced physical activity and risk of chronic disease: the biology behind the consequences.

    PubMed

    Booth, Frank W; Laye, Matthew J; Lees, Simon J; Rector, R Scott; Thyfault, John P

    2008-03-01

    This review focuses on three preserved, ancient, biological mechanisms (physical activity, insulin sensitivity, and fat storage). Genes in humans and rodents were selected in an environment of high physical activity that favored an optimization of aerobic metabolic pathways to conserve energy for a potential, future food deficiency. Today machines and other technologies have replaced much of the physical activity that selected optimal gene expression for energy metabolism. Distressingly, the negative by-product of a lack of ancient physical activity levels in our modern civilization is an increased risk of chronic disease. We have been employing a rodent wheel-lock model to approximate the reduction in physical activity in humans from the level under which genes were selected to a lower level observed in modern daily functioning. Thus far, two major changes have been identified when rats undertaking daily, natural voluntary running on wheels experience an abrupt cessation of the running (wheel lock model). First, insulin sensitivity in the epitrochlearis muscle of rats falls to sedentary values after 2 days of the cessation of running, confirming the decline to sedentary values in whole-body insulin sensitivity when physically active humans stop high levels of daily exercise. Second, visceral fat increases within 1 week after rats cease daily running, confirming the plasticity of human visceral fat. This review focuses on the supporting data for the aforementioned two outcomes. Our primary goal is to better understand how a physically inactive lifestyle initiates maladaptations that cause chronic disease.

  10. Gender differences in cardiovascular diseases risk for physical education teachers.

    PubMed

    Misigoj-Duraković, Marjeta; Duraković, Zijad; Ruzić, Lana; Findak, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the level of habitual physical activity in Croatian physical education (PE) teachers, as well as the existence of some other risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The sample consisted of 191 PE teachers aged 24 to 59 years (122 men, mean age 42.6+/-8.76 and 69 women, mean age 40.3+/-8.84;p=0.09). In order to assess the level of habitual physical activity, the teachers were asked to fill in Baecke's questionnaire. The questionnaire comprises 16 items testing physical loads at work, during sport activity and during leisure time. The questionnaire also contains 8 items, each of them representing a certain cardiovascular risk factor. In comparison to average adult employed population, PE teachers have a significantly higher level of sport and leisure time activity, which could have a favorable impact on the incidence of particular risk factors, such as overweight/obesity, systolic hypertension and blood cholesterol level. This is more obvious in females PE teachers who pay more attention to the principles of healthy life style: optimal body weight regulation, low fat diet and higher amount of leisure time physical activity (significantly higher than in male teachers). Female PE teachers who have maintained their active life style decrease the risk of CVD, particularly after the age of 55. Although it is necessary to keep in mind all the limitations of a questionnaire study, this preliminary report leads to the conclusion that male PE teachers, although physically active at job, have still kept sedentary habits, often have maintained heavy smoking habits, are slightly overweight, thus minimizing the positive effects of their demanding workplace. Consequently, average male PE teachers' risk for CVD development corresponds to the risk of general male population.

  11. Physical exercise and quantitative lower limb collateral function

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Michael; Stoller, David; Seiler, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that global physical activity and physical performance parameters are directly related to invasively obtained left superficial femoral artery (SFA) collateral flow index (CFI). Background So far, the association between different measures of physical exercise activity and quantitative lower limb collateral function has not been investigated. Methods The primary study end point was pressure-derived CFI as obtained during a 3 min left SFA balloon occlusion. CFI is the ratio of simultaneously recorded mean SFA distal occlusive pressure divided by mean aortic pressure, both subtracted by central venous pressure. As independent variables, the items of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) and physical exercise performance (maximal workload in watts) as achieved during a bicycle or treadmill exercise test were determined. The secondary study end point was transcutaneous left calf partial oxygen pressure (PO2 in mm Hg) divided by transcutaneous PO2 at a non-ischaemic reference site as obtained simultaneously to CFI measurement. Results Of the 110 study patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography, 79 belonged to the group without and 31 with engagement in regular intensive leisure time physical activity according to GPAQ. Left SFA CFI tended to be lower in the group without than with intensive leisure time physical activity: 0.514 ±0.141 vs 0.560 ±0.184 (p =0.0566). Transcutaneous PO2 index was associated with simultaneous left SFA CFI: CFI =018 +0.57 PO2 index; p<0.0001. Maximal physical workload was directly associated with left SFA CFI: CFI =0.40 +0.0009 maximal workload; p =0.0044. Conclusions Quantitative left SFA collateral function is directly reflected by maximal physical workload as achieved during an exercise test. Trial registration number NCTO02063347. PMID:26977310

  12. Simple Physics in Diseases and Embryonic Development of the Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirinifard, Abbas

    2011-03-01

    While molecular-level regulation within cells during embryonic development is highly complex, the physical mechanisms which translate this intracellular information into multicellular physical structure at the tissue level are often surprisingly simple. I will discuss an example where regulation of cell-cell contact energies is primarily responsible for robust and evolvable regular patterns, the organization of the ommatidia and supporting cells into the regular tiling characteristic of the Drosophila eye and another example where adhesion failures in the human retina result in choroidal neovascularization leading to blindness. In both cases, simulations based on materials-science techniques can help us understand the patterning mechanisms and the reasons for their robustness and failures. Such simulations are easy to extend to other developmental phenomena and to development-related diseases like cancer. EPA grant ``The Texas-Indiana Virtual STAR Center'' and NIH grants R01 GM76692 and R01 GM077138.

  13. Adjoint Function: Physical Basis of Variational & Perturbation Theory in Transport

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Importance: The Adjoint Function: The Physical Basis of Variational and Perturbation Theory in Transport and Diffusion Problems, North-Holland Publishing Company - Amsterdam, 582 pages, 1966 Introduction: Continuous Systems and the Variational Principle 1. The Fundamental Variational Principle 2. The Importance Function 3. Adjoint Equations 4. Variational Methods 5. Perturbation and Iterative Methods 6. Non-Linear Theory

  14. Physical Functioning and Mortality among Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: Insights from TRIAD

    PubMed Central

    Ylitalo, Kelly R.; McEwen, Laura N.; Karter, Andrew; Lee, Pearl; Herman, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for mortality. Subjective health status, including self-reported physical functioning, may also be a marker for mortality. This study examined the association between self-reported physical functioning and mortality in people with diabetes, and determined if this association differed by race/ethnicity. We studied 7,894 type 2 diabetic patients who participated in Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective study of diabetes care in managed care. At baseline in 2000, participants completed a questionnaire and had a medical record review. Physical functioning was assessed with the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). The National Death Index was searched annually for deaths over 10 years of follow-up (2000-2009). At baseline, mean age was 61.7 years, 50% were non-Hispanic white, 22% were black, and 16% of participants reported “good physical functioning” (better than norms for U.S. adults). Over 10 years, 28% of participants died (2,111/7,894); 39% (856/2,111) due to cardiovascular disease. Relative to those reporting good functioning, those reporting poor physical functioning had a 37% higher all-cause death rate, after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, body mass index, smoking, and comorbidities (Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.37; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.15, 1.63). Similarly, those reporting poor physical functioning had a 42% higher adjusted cardiovascular death rate compared to those reporting good functioning (HR= 1.42; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.90). Although blacks were less likely than whites to report good functioning (p<0.01), the association between functioning and mortality was consistent across race/ethnicity. In this managed care population with diabetes, self-reported physical functioning was a robust predictor of mortality, in addition to traditional biological risk factors, for all race/ethnic groups. Physical functioning assessments are easy to perform and may be useful benchmarks for

  15. Physical capacity and functional abilities improve in young adults with intellectual disabilities after functional training.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Ryan B; Tillman, Mark D; Stopka, Christine B; Dipnarine, Krishna; Delisle, Anthony; Sayedul Huq, Mona

    2012-06-01

    Individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) have higher rates of obesity, lower rates of physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscular endurance than do typically developed individuals (TDI) and are twice as likely to develop chronic disease, living half as long as TDIs do. The purpose of this study was to examine the improvements in physical capacity and functional ability in Special Olympic Athletes (SOAs) aged 19-22 years after participating in a functional training (FT) program and compare these scores with those of the SOAs in a resistance weight training (WT) program. Twenty SOAs (13 men, 7 women with mild to moderate ID) participated in a 1-hour FT program, twice a week, for 10 weeks, compared with 22 same-aged SOAs (14 men, 8 women) participating in a 1-hour WT program (2× week for 8 weeks). Prefitness and postfitness tests consisting of heart rate (HR) for the 3-minute step test, static plank, body weight squats, static bar hang, and knee push-ups were conducted. Two-tailed, paired sample t-tests (p < 0.05) were used to evaluate the differences in the FT group. Change scores were used to compare FTG with the WT group. The HR decreased by 31.8 b·min⁻¹ pre-post in the FTG (p < 0.001). Static plank duration improved by 22.4 seconds in the FTG (p = 0.016); static plank change scores improved (p = 0.037) for the FTG (26.5 ± 32.1 seconds compared with that for the WT group (4.6 ± 22 seconds). Height and weight values were unchanged in both the groups. The results of this study demonstrate the value of FT programs for this population, because weight equipment is not always available in many settings.

  16. Physical Performance and Frailty in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Cappola, Anne R.; Shults, Justine; Townsend, Raymond R.; Gadegbeku, Crystal; Anderson, Cheryl; Baker, Joshua F.; Carlow, Dean; Sulik, Michael J.; Lo, Joan C.; Go, Alan S.; Ky, Bonnie; Mariani, Laura; Feldman, Harold I.; Leonard, Mary B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor physical performance and frailty are associated with elevated risks of death and disability. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also strongly associated with these outcomes. The risks of poor physical performance and frailty among CKD patients, however, are not well established. Methods We measured the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, a summary test of gait speed, chair-raises and balance; range 0–12) and the five elements of frailty among 1111 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort participants. Adjusting for demographics and multiple comorbidities, we fit a linear regression model for the outcome of SPPB score and an ordinal logistic regression model for frailty status. Results Median (interquartile range [IQR]) age was 65 (57–71) years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for non-dialysis patients was 49 (36–62) ml/min/1.73m2, and median SPPB score was 9 (7–10). Seven percent of participants were frail and 43% were pre-frail. Compared with the SPPB score for eGFR >60 ml/min/1.73m2, the SPPB was 0.51 points lower for eGFR 30 – 59; 0.61 points lower for eGFR 15 – 29; and 1.75 points lower for eGFR <15; (p<0.01 for all comparisons). eGFR 30 – 59 (OR 1.45; p=0.024), eGFR 15 – 29 (OR 2.02; p=0.002) and eGFR <15 (OR 4.83, p<0.001) were associated with worse frailty status compared with eGFR >60 ml/min/1.73m2. Conclusions CKD severity was associated with poor physical performance and frailty in a graded fashion. Future trials should determine if outcomes for CKD patients with frailty and poor physical performance are improved by targeted interventions. PMID:24107579

  17. Phillips' Lambda function: Data summary and physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irisov, V.; Plant, W.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of Phillips' Lambda function describing the average length of breakers on the ocean per unit area at speed cb are summarized. An expression is developed that fits these data within reasonable bounds. A physical model for the Lambda function is derived based on the assumption that breaking occurs when the surface steepness exceeds a threshold value. The energy contained in the breaking region is related to the fifth power of the breaker speed, as Phillips showed, and from this the probability of finding a breaker with a speed cb may be determined from a simulation of the long-wave surface based on a linear superposition of Fourier components. This probability is directly related to the Lambda function so that a form for this function can be determined. The Lambda function so determined agrees in both shape and intensity with the fit to the measured Lambda functions.

  18. A systematic review of physical illness, functional disability, and suicidal behaviour among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Fässberg, Madeleine Mellqvist; Cheung, Gary; Canetto, Silvia Sara; Erlangsen, Annette; Lapierre, Sylvie; Lindner, Reinhard; Draper, Brian; Gallo, Joseph J.; Wong, Christine; Wu, Jing; Duberstein, Paul; Wærn, Margda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct a systematic review of studies that examined associations between physical illness/functional disability and suicidal behaviour (including ideation, nonfatal and fatal suicidal behaviour) among individuals aged 65 and older. Method: Articles published through November 2014 were identified through electronic searches using the ERIC, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Scopus databases. Search terms used were suicid* or death wishes or deliberate self-harm. Studies about suicidal behaviour in individuals aged 65 and older with physical illness/functional disabilities were included in the review. Results: Sixty-five articles (across 61 independent samples) met inclusion criteria. Results from 59 quantitative studies conducted in four continents suggest that suicidal behaviour is associated with functional disability and numerous specific conditions including malignant diseases, neurological disorders, pain, COPD, liver disease, male genital disorders, and arthritis/arthrosis. Six qualitative studies from three continents contextualized these findings, providing insights into the subjective experiences of suicidal individuals. Implications for interventions and future research are discussed. Conclusion: Functional disability, as well as a number of specific physical illnesses, was shown to be associated with suicidal behaviour in older adults. We need to learn more about what at-risk, physically ill patients want, and need, to inform prevention efforts for older adults. PMID:26381843

  19. Skin microvascular endothelial function as a biomarker in cardiovascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Marcin; Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Skin microvascular endothelial function is impaired in many cardiovascular diseases, and could be therefore considered as a representative vascular bed. However, today, available evidence allows considering skin microvascular endothelial function neither as a diagnostic biomarker nor as a prognostic biomarker in cardiovascular diseases. Large follow-up studies using standardized methods should now be conducted to assess the potential predictive value of skin microvascular function in cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  1. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally. PMID:16825516

  2. Muscle metabolic function and free-living physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Sirikul, Bovorn; Newcomer, Bradley R

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that muscle metabolic function measured during exercise is related to exercise performance and subsequent 1-yr weight gain. Because it is well established that physical activity is important in weight maintenance, we examined muscle function relationships with free-living energy expenditure and physical activity. Subjects were 71 premenopausal black and white women. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during 90-s isometric plantar flexion contractions (45% maximum). Free-living energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was calculated as 0.9 x TEE - sleeping energy expenditure from room calorimetry, and free-living physical activity (ARTE) was calculated by dividing AEE by energy cost of standard physical activities. At the end of exercise, anaerobic glycolytic rate (ANGLY) and muscle concentration of phosphomonoesters (PME) were negatively related to TEE, AEE, and ARTE (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that both PME (partial r = -0.29, <0.02) and ANGLY (partial r = -0.24, P < 0.04) were independently related to ARTE. PME, primarily glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, was significantly related to ratings of perceived exertion (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.05) during a maximal treadmill test. PME was not related to ARTE after inclusion of RPE in the multiple regression model, suggesting that PME may be obtaining its relationship with ARTE through an increased perception of effort during physical activity. In conclusion, physically inactive individuals tend to be more dependent on anaerobic glycolysis during exercise while relying on a glycolytic pathway that may not be functioning optimally.

  3. Home environmental problems and physical function in Taiwanese older adults.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Chang, Wen-Chiung; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Environmental hazards play an important role in the disablement process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between home environmental problems and personal physical function. Data were based on a two-stage nationwide survey and evaluation on the needs of long-term care in Taiwan. A total of 10,596 individuals aged 65 and over were included in this study. These participants were identified with physical or cognitive problems at the screening interview and further evaluated at the second interview on health condition, functional status, needs of long-term care, and home environmental problems. Six items of environmental hazards were assessed at the participants' homes with direct observation. The prevalence rates of home environmental problems were similar among older adults with different levels of physical function. No grab bars (79.6-85.1%) and no protections against slip (81.9-92.8%) in the bathroom were two commonly present hazards in older adults' homes. Older adults with a higher income (Odds ratio=OR=0.75), without income information (OR=0.78) or living with other persons (OR=0.74) were less likely to experience environmental problems at home. Results from this study revealed that home environment condition was associated with factors other than personal disabling conditions for the elderly. Modifying home environment, especially the bathroom, should be attached with great importance for physically disabled older adults. PMID:19124167

  4. Chemical and Physical Sensors in the Regulation of Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the status of the volume and composition of the body fluid compartment, the kidney monitors a wide variety of chemical and physical parameters. It has recently become clear that the kidney’s sensory capacity extends well beyond its ability to sense ion concentrations in the forming urine. The kidney also keeps track of organic metabolites derived from a surprising variety of sources and uses a complex interplay of physical and chemical sensing mechanisms to measure the rate of fluid flow in the nephron. Recent research has provided new insights into the nature of these sensory mechanisms and their relevance to renal function. PMID:25280495

  5. Recent approaches in physical modification of protein functionality.

    PubMed

    Mirmoghtadaie, Leila; Shojaee Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh

    2016-05-15

    Today, there is a growing demand for novel technologies, such as high hydrostatic pressure, irradiation, ultrasound, filtration, supercritical carbon dioxide, plasma technology, and electrical methods, which are not based on chemicals or heat treatment for modifying ingredient functionality and extending product shelf life. Proteins are essential components in many food processes, and provide various functions in food quality and stability. They can create interfacial films that stabilize emulsions and foams as well as interact to make networks that play key roles in gel and edible film production. These properties of protein are referred to as 'protein functionality', because they can be modified by different processing. The common protein modification (chemical, enzymatic and physical) methods have strong effects on the structure and functionality of food proteins. Furthermore, novel technologies can modify protein structure and functional properties that will be reviewed in this study.

  6. Recent approaches in physical modification of protein functionality.

    PubMed

    Mirmoghtadaie, Leila; Shojaee Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh

    2016-05-15

    Today, there is a growing demand for novel technologies, such as high hydrostatic pressure, irradiation, ultrasound, filtration, supercritical carbon dioxide, plasma technology, and electrical methods, which are not based on chemicals or heat treatment for modifying ingredient functionality and extending product shelf life. Proteins are essential components in many food processes, and provide various functions in food quality and stability. They can create interfacial films that stabilize emulsions and foams as well as interact to make networks that play key roles in gel and edible film production. These properties of protein are referred to as 'protein functionality', because they can be modified by different processing. The common protein modification (chemical, enzymatic and physical) methods have strong effects on the structure and functionality of food proteins. Furthermore, novel technologies can modify protein structure and functional properties that will be reviewed in this study. PMID:26776016

  7. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Gawade, Prasad L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research. PMID:25692094

  8. Physical Performance and Physical Activity in Older Adults: Associated but Separate Domains of Physical Function in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    van Lummel, Rob C.; Walgaard, Stefan; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Elders, Petra J. M.; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Beek, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical function is a crucial factor in the prevention and treatment of health conditions in older adults and is usually measured objectively with physical performance tests and/or physical activity monitoring. Objective To examine whether 1) physical performance (PP) and physical activity (PA) constitute separate domains of physical function; 2) differentiation of PA classes is more informative than overall PA. Design Cross-sectional study to explore the relationships within and among PP and PA measures. Methods In 49 older participants (83±7 years; M±SD), performance-based tests were conducted and PA was measured for one week. Activity monitor data were reduced in terms of duration, periods, and mean duration of periods of lying, sitting, standing and locomotion. The relation between and within PP scores and PA outcomes were analysed using rank order correlation and factor analysis. Results Factor structure after varimax rotation revealed two orthogonal factors explaining 78% of the variance in the data: one comprising all PA variables and one comprising all PP variables. PP scores correlated moderately with PA in daily life. Differentiation of activity types and quantification of their duration, intensity and frequency of occurrence provided stronger associations with PP, as compared to a single measure of acceleration expressing overall PA. Limitations For independent validation, the conclusions about the validity of the presented conceptual framework and its clinical implications need to be confirmed in other studies. Conclusions PP and PA represent associated but separate domains of physical function, suggesting that an improvement of PP does not automatically imply an increase of PA, i.e. a change to a more active lifestyle. Differentiation of activity classes in the analysis of PA provides more insights into PA and its association with PP than using a single overall measure of acceleration. PMID:26630268

  9. The relation of childhood physical activity and aerobic fitness to brain function and cognition: a review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naiman A; Hillman, Charles H

    2014-05-01

    Physical inactivity has been shown to increase the risk for several chronic diseases across the lifespan. However, the impact of physical activity and aerobic fitness on childhood cognitive and brain health has only recently gained attention. The purposes of this article are to: 1) highlight the recent emphasis for increasing physical activity and aerobic fitness in children's lives for cognitive and brain health; 2) present aspects of brain development and cognitive function that are susceptible to physical activity intervention; 3) review neuroimaging studies examining the cross-sectional and experimental relationships between aerobic fitness and executive control function; and 4) make recommendations for future research. Given that the human brain is not fully developed until the third decade of life, preadolescence is characterized by changes in brain structure and function underlying aspects of cognition including executive control and relational memory. Achieving adequate physical activity and maintaining aerobic fitness in childhood may be a critical guideline to follow for physical as well as cognitive and brain health.

  10. Physical activity ameliorates cardiovascular health in elderly subjects: the functional role of the β adrenergic system

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Ciccarelli, Michele; Trimarco, Bruno; Iaccarino, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a complex process characterized by a gradual decline in organ functional reserves, which eventually reduces the ability to maintain homeostasis. An exquisite feature of elderly subjects, which constitute a growing proportion of the world population, is the high prevalence of cardiovascular disorders, which negatively affect both the quality of life and the life expectancy. It is widely acknowledged that physical activity represents one of the foremost interventions capable in reducing the health burden of cardiovascular disease. Interestingly, the benefits of moderate-intensity physical activity have been established both in young and elderly subjects. Herein we provide a systematic and updated appraisal of the literature exploring the pathophysiological mechanisms evoked by physical activity in the elderly, focusing on the functional role of the β adrenergic system. PMID:23964243

  11. Physical invariant strain energy function for passive myocardium.

    PubMed

    Shariff, M H B M

    2013-04-01

    Principal axis formulations are regularly used in isotropic elasticity, but they are not often used in dealing with anisotropic problems. In this paper, based on a principal axis technique, we develop a physical invariant orthotropic constitutive equation for incompressible solids, where it contains only a one variable (general) function. The corresponding strain energy function depends on six invariants that have immediate physical interpretation. These invariants are useful in facilitating an experiment to obtain a specific constitutive equation for a particular type of materials. The explicit appearance of the classical ground-state constants in the constitutive equation simplifies the calculation for their admissible values. A specific constitutive model is proposed for passive myocardium, and the model fits reasonably well with existing simple shear and biaxial experimental data. It is also able to predict a set of data from a simple shear experiment.

  12. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  13. Tip110: Physical properties, primary structure, and biological functions.

    PubMed

    Whitmill, Amanda; Timani, Khalid Amine; Liu, Ying; He, Johnny J

    2016-03-15

    HIV-1 Tat-interacting protein of 110kDa (Tip110), also referred to as squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells 3 (Sart3), p110 or p110(nrb), was initially identified as a cDNA clone (KIAA0156) without annotated functions. Over the past twenty years, several functions have been attributed to this protein. The proposed biological functions include roles for Tip110 in pre-mRNA splicing, gene transcription, stem cell biology, and development. Dysregulation of Tip110 is also a contributing factor in the development of cancer and other human diseases. It is clear that our understanding of this protein is rapidly evolving. In this review, we aimed to provide a summary of all the existing literature on this gene/protein and its proposed biological functions. PMID:26896687

  14. Physical, occupational, speech and swallowing therapies and physical exercise in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ransmayr, G

    2011-05-01

    Former studies on the effects of physical exercise, physical and occupational therapy (PT, OT) and speech and swallowing therapy (ST, SwT) in Parkinson's disease (PD) have demonstrated little or uncertain effects. New pathophysiological concepts have been developed. Recent controlled high-level studies demonstrate improvement of mobility and balance after training of muscular strength and endurance, trunk control, and amplitude and rhythmicity of movements (treadmill). Attentional and cognitive strategies were found to enforce body awareness and improve movement sequences. Dance, sensory (auditory, visual, tactile) and cognitive cueing are effective for problems of gait and balance. Whether PT and OT reduce the risk of falls remains uncertain. ST including Lee Silverman Voice Treatment has been shown to relieve speech problems. SwT and OT are frequently applied, however, further studies are necessary. Therapeutic interventions need to be evaluated with regard to consistency, intensity, frequency, duration, side effects, home versus institution based and standardized versus individualized training, quality standards, practicability in real life, and cost-effectiveness. Parkinson patients should resume or continue physical exercise as long as possible. There is hope that regular sport may modify PD risk and progression. PMID:21461962

  15. [Effect of physical exercise on endothelial function, indicators of inflammation and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł; Madry, Edyta; Pupek-Musialik, Danuta; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2014-02-01

    Endothelium plays an important role in regulation of the activity of inflammation and oxidative stress. Numerous studies have shown that physical training affects endothelial function. It is proven that regular physical activity reduces the seventy of inflammation and the risk of cardiovascular events. Changes observed in effect of physical activity include increase in production of nitric oxide (NO), a decrease of plaque volume, a decrease in vascular wall viscosity and an increase in diastolic coronary perfusion. It has been shown that exercise reduces cardiovascular risk in subjects with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease and hypertension, as well as in healthy people. In above populations the benefits result from improved endothelial function. It has been proven that regular physical activity improves enzymatic antioxidant systems and the immune response. It is a result of the stimulating effect of muscle tissue micro-injuries and recruitment of various cell types of the inflammatory response and their migration deeper into the tissues. The biggest changes in the immune response are observed in prolonged aerobic exercise. Physical activity has a significant impact on endothelial function, intensity of inflammatory processes and exponents of oxidative stress. There is a need for further researches, in particular in order to determine the optimal model of training.

  16. Trick or treat? Showing patients with functional (psychogenic) motor symptoms their physical signs.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Edwards, Mark

    2012-07-17

    Functional (psychogenic) motor symptoms are diagnosed on the basis of positive signs of inconsistency or incongruity with known neurologic disease. These signs, such as Hoover sign or tremor entrainment, are often regarded by neurologists as 'tricks of the trade,' to 'catch the patient out, ' and certainly not to be shared with them. In this reflective article, the authors suggest that showing the patient with functional motor symptoms their physical signs, if done in the right way, is actually one of the most useful things a neurologist can do for these patients in persuading them of the accuracy of their diagnosis and the potential reversibility of their symptoms.

  17. Assessing Physical Functioning in Otolaryngology: Feasibility of the Short Physical Performance Battery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David S.; Blake, Caitlin R.; Genther, Dane J.; Li, Lingsheng; Lin, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Objective measures of physical functioning and mobility are considered to be the strongest indicators of overall health and mortality risk in older adults. These measures are not routinely used in otolaryngology research. We investigated the feasibility of using a validated physical performance battery to assess the functioning of older adults seen in a tertiary care otolaryngology clinic. Materials and Methods The Short Physical Performance Battery was performed on 22 individuals aged 50 years or older enrolled in the Studying Multiple Outcomes after Aural Rehabilitative Treatment (SMART) study at Johns Hopkins Results We successfully administered the SPPB to 22 participants, and this testing resulted in minimal participant and provider burden with respect to time, training, and space requirements. The mean time to complete 5 chair stands was 13.0 ± 3.8 seconds. The mean times for the side-by-side, semi-tandem, and tandem stands were 10.0 ± 0.0, 9.5 ± 2.1, and 8.8 ± 3.2 seconds, respectively. Mean walking speed was 1.1 ± 0.3 meters per second, and composite SPPB scores ranged from 6 to 12 (mean = 10.45, S.D. = 1.6). Conclusions Our results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a standardized physical performance battery to assess physical functioning in a cohort of older adults seen in a tertiary otolaryngology clinic. We provide detailed instructions, references, and analytic methods for implementing the SPPB in future otolaryngology studies involving older adults. PMID:25179123

  18. Texercise Effectiveness: Impacts on Physical Functioning and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Ory, Marcia G; Smith, Matthew Lee; Jiang, Luohua; Howell, Doris; Chen, Shuai; Pulczinski, Jairus C; Stevens, Alan B

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of Texercise Select, a 12-week lifestyle program to improve physical functioning (as measured by gait speed) and quality of life. Baseline and 12-week follow-up assessments were collected from 220 enrollees who were older (mean = 75 years), predominantly female (85%), White (82%), and experiencing multiple comorbidities (mean = 2.4). Linear mixed-models were fitted for continuous outcome variables and GEE models with logit link function for binary outcome variables. At baseline, over 52% of participants had Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) test times of 12 s or more, which indicates below-normal performance. On average, participants showed significant reductions in TUG test scores at the postintervention (11% reduction, p < .001). Participants also showed significant improvements in general health status (p = .002), unhealthy physical days (p = .032), combined unhealthy physical and mental days (p = .006), and days limited from usual activity (p = .045). Findings suggest that performance indicators can be objectively collected and integrated into evaluation designs of community-based, activity-rich lifestyle programs.

  19. Prognostic value of physical function tests: hand grip strength and six-minute walking test in elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ponce, Esther; Hernández-Betancor, Iván; González-Reimers, Emilio; Hernández-Luis, Rubén; Martínez-Riera, Antonio; Santolaria, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    To discern if physical function test are better mortality predictors than muscle mass in elderly hospitalized patients, we analyzed the prognostic value of muscle mass malnutrition and compared it with physical muscle function tests, including the six-minute walking test (6 MWT) and hand grip strength. We included the ankle brachial index (ABI) to assess arterial disease, related to muscle atrophy due to hypoperfusion. We also analyzed the relationship of ABI with malnutrition, physical function tests and survival. We studied 310 hospitalized patients older than 60 years. To assess nutritional status, we determined BMI, triceps skinfold and mid-arm muscle area; we performed a subjective nutritional assessment; and evaluated the degree of inflammatory stress. We assessed physical function by hand grip strength and 6 MWT. We evaluated arterial disease by ABI. Forty-one patients died during hospitalization; 269 were discharged and followed for a mean 808 days, reaching a mortality of 49%. Muscle malnutrition was frequent and was related to mortality, but the best predictors were physical function tests: inability to perform the 6 MWT and low handgrip strength. Function tests were closely related to each other and correlated with nutritional data. Reduced ABI was related to impaired nutritional status, physical function tests and mortality.

  20. Chronology of Onset of Mental Disorders and Physical Diseases in Mental-Physical Comorbidity - A National Representative Survey of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tegethoff, Marion; Stalujanis, Esther; Belardi, Angelo; Meinlschmidt, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective was to estimate temporal associations between mental disorders and physical diseases in adolescents with mental-physical comorbidities. Methods This article bases upon weighted data (N = 6483) from the National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement (participant age: 13–18 years), a nationally representative United States cohort. Onset of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition lifetime mental disorders was assessed with the fully structured World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview, complemented by parent report. Onset of lifetime medical conditions and doctor-diagnosed diseases was assessed by self-report. Results The most substantial temporal associations with onset of mental disorders preceding onset of physical diseases included those between affective disorders and arthritis (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.36, 95%-confidence interval (CI) = 1.95 to 5.77) and diseases of the digestive system (HR = 3.39, CI = 2.30 to 5.00), between anxiety disorders and skin diseases (HR = 1.53, CI = 1.21 to 1.94), and between substance use disorders and seasonal allergies (HR = 0.33, CI = 0.17 to 0.63). The most substantial temporal associations with physical diseases preceding mental disorders included those between heart diseases and anxiety disorders (HR = 1.89, CI = 1.41 to 2.52), epilepsy and eating disorders (HR = 6.27, CI = 1.58 to 24.96), and heart diseases and any mental disorder (HR = 1.39, CI = 1.11 to 1.74). Conclusions Findings suggest that mental disorders are antecedent risk factors of certain physical diseases in early life, but also vice versa. Our results expand the relevance of mental disorders beyond mental to physical health care, and vice versa, supporting the concept of a more integrated mental-physical health care approach, and open new starting points for early disease prevention and better treatments, with relevance for various medical disciplines. PMID:27768751

  1. The Effects of Aquatic Exercises on Physical Fitness and Muscle Function in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dziubek, Wioletta; Bulińska, Katarzyna; Rogowski, Łukasz; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Kusztal, Mariusz; Grochola, Monika; Markowska, Dominika; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian; Woźniewski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a 3-month physical training program, conducted in an aquatic environment with end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD), on the physical fitness and functional parameters of the knee joint muscles. Patients and Methods. The study included 20 ESDR patients with mean age 64.2 ± 13.1 y. treated with hemodialysis in Dialysis Center of the University Hospital in Wroclaw. Before and 3 months after the physical training in water, a test was performed to evaluate the physical fitness of each patient; additionally, a measurement was taken of force-velocity parameters. The 3-month training program took place on nonhemodialysis days, in the recreational pool of the University of Physical Education in Wroclaw. Results. After aquatic training cycle, an improvement was observed in all parameters measured using the Fullerton test. The value of peak torque and its relation to body mass increased in the movement of flexors and extensors of left and right lower extremities in all tested velocities. Conclusions. In assessing the physical fitness of studied women, the biggest improvement was achieved in tests assessing the strength of upper and lower extremities as well as lower body flexibility. Higher values of force-velocity parameters are conducive to women achieving better physical fitness test results. PMID:26161421

  2. Area-efficient physically unclonable function circuit architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrieri, Thomas; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2015-04-28

    Generating a physically a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit value includes comparing each of first identification components in a first bank to each of second identification components in a second bank. A given first identification component in the first bank is not compared to another first identification component in the first bank and a given second identification component in the second bank is not compared to another second identification component in the second bank. A digital bit value is generated for each comparison made while comparing each of the first identification components to each of the second identification components. A PUF circuit value is generated from the digital bit values from each comparison made.

  3. [Biological functions of tin and disease].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yasuaki; Tomiyama, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    Tin generates a wide variety of biological functions due to its chemical character. In this article, the modes of the biological functions of tin(especially organotin compounds) are reviewed, with special emphasis on the connection with the immune system, brain nervous system and endocrine system, on the basis of our data. To sum up this article, the biological functions of organotin compounds appear to be due to the following several processes: (1) their incorporation into the cells in vesicle form through fusion or in a similar manner to their incorporation in cationic form; (2) transport to and accumulation in the regions of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not to or in the plasma membrane or nucleus because of their hydrophobicity; (3) inhibition of intracellular phospholipid transport between organelles due to impairment of the structures and functions of the Golgi apparatus and ER; (4) inhibition of the membrane-mediated signal transduction system leading to DNA synthesis via phospholipid turnover and Ca2+ mobilization, as in cell proliferation systems; (5) disturbance of the trace element balance and the localization of certain elements; (6) disorders of membrane-mediated Ca2+ homeostasis via various channel functions including Zn modulation on the plasma and organelle membranes, and protein phosphorylation, as in the signal transduction systems of memory and olfaction; (7) necrosis or apoptosis in vivo or toxic cell death in vitro. PMID:27455812

  4. Use of pedometers to increase physical activity among children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Akber, Aalia; Portale, Anthony A.; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are inactive relative to their peers. Methods Forty-four children and adolescents aged 7-20 years with CKD, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis or a kidney transplant participated in a12-week pedometer-based intervention to increase physical activity. Patients recorded daily step counts and reported them weekly. Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) and six-minute walk (6MW) were administered at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results Age was 15.1±3.4 years; 27% had CKD, 16% were receiving dialysis, and 57% had received a kidney transplant. Mean daily step count did not change significantly (+48, 95% CI −48 to +145 steps/day per week). Transplant recipients and patients with CKD increased their activity by 100 steps/day (95% CI −14 to 208) and 73 steps/day (95% CI −115 to 262) each week, respectively, and patients on dialysis decreased by 133 steps/day (95% CI −325 to 58; p-value for interaction 0.03) in multivariable analysis. Change in physical activity was associated with change in 6MW distance (r=0.74, p<0.001) and change in physical functioning (r=0.53, p=0.001). Conclusions Youths with CKD did not significantly increase their activity over 12 weeks of a pedometer-based intervention. However, changes in physical activity were associated with changes in physical functioning and performance. PMID:24648129

  5. The Physical Content of Eigenvalues from Density Functional Theory (DFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayoko, D.; Franklin, L.; Ekuma, C.; Malozovsky, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) of Hohenberg and Kohn rests on the energy functional Ev[n] assuming its minimum for the correct density n(r), with the admissible functions restricted by the condition N[n] = ∫ n(r) dr = N , where N is the number of particles in the system under study. We show that, for such a system, there is an infinite number of basis sets (of localized orbitals) for which N is fixed while the density is not necessarily the correct one. Consequently, the eigenvalues obtained with self consistent DFT calculations using a single basis set do not necessarily have any particular physical content. The physical content is ensured only by the search and utilization of the optimal basis set that yields the minima of the occupied energies and physically meaningful values of low laying unoccupied energies. Further, by virtue of the Rayleigh theorem, there exist many basis sets larger than the optimal one [and that contain it] for which some unoccupied energies are lowered on account of a mathematical artifact. We illustrate these points in the cases of ZnO, TiO2, and SrTiO3. The calculated band gaps and other properties of these materials are in excellent agreement with experiment. Work funded by in part by the National Science Foundation, through LASiGMA [NSF AwardEPS-1003897, No. NSF (2010-15)-RII-SUBR, and No. HRD-1002541], LONI [Award No. 2-10915], and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE).

  6. Non-exercise physical activity attenuates motor symptoms in Parkinson disease independent from nigrostriatal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Jon; Müller, Martijn L.T.M; Kotagal, Vikas; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J.H.; Frey, Kirk A; Albin, Roger L.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between time spent in non-exercise and exercise physical activity and severity of motor functions in Parkinson disease (PD). Background Increasing motor impairments of PD incline many patients to a sedentary lifestyle. We investigated the relationship between duration of both non-exercise and exercise physical activity over a 4-week period using the Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire and severity of clinical motor symptoms in PD. We accounted for the magnitude of nigrostriatal degeneration. Methods Cross-sectional study. PD subjects, n=48 (40M); 69.4±7.4 (56–84) years old; 8.4±4.2 (2.5–20) years motor disease duration, mean UPDRS motor score 27.5 ± 10.3 (7–53) and mean MMSE score 28.4 ± 1.9 (22–30) underwent [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) PET imaging to assess nigrostriatal denervation and completed the CHAMPS questionnaire and clinical assessment. Results Bivariate correlations showed an inverse relationship between motor UPDRS severity scores and duration of non-exercise physical activity (R= −0.37, P=0.0099) but not with duration of exercise physical activity (R= −0.05, P= 0.76) over 4 weeks. Multiple regression analysis using UPDRS motor score as outcome variable demonstrated a significant regressor effect for duration of non-exercise physical activity (F=6.15, P=0.017) while accounting for effects of nigrostriatal degeneration (F=4.93, P=0.032), levodopa-equivalent dose (LED; F=1.07, P=0.31), age (F=4.37, P=0.043) and duration of disease (F=1.46, P=0.23; total model (F=5.76, P=0.0004). Conclusions Non-exercise physical activity is a correlate of motor symptom severity in PD independent of the magnitude of nigrostriatal degeneration. Non-exercise physical activity may have positive effects on functional performance in PD. PMID:26330028

  7. Disease avoidance as a functional basis for stigmatization

    PubMed Central

    Oaten, Megan; Stevenson, Richard J.; Case, Trevor I.

    2011-01-01

    Stigmatization is characterized by chronic social and physical avoidance of a person(s) by other people. Infectious disease may produce an apparently similar form of isolation—disease avoidance—but on symptom remission this often abates. We propose that many forms of stigmatization reflect the activation of this disease-avoidance system, which is prone to respond to visible signs and labels that connote disease, irrespective of their accuracy. A model of this system is presented, which includes an emotional component, whereby visible disease cues directly activate disgust and contamination, motivating avoidance, and a cognitive component, whereby disease labels bring to mind disease cues, indirectly activating disgust and contamination. The unique predictions of this model are then examined, notably that people who are stigmatized evoke disgust and are contaminating. That animals too show avoidance of diseased conspecifics, and that disease-related stigma targets are avoided in most cultures, also supports this evolutionary account. The more general implications of this approach are then examined, notably how it can be used to good (e.g. improving hygiene) or bad (e.g. racial vilification) ends, by yoking particular labels with cues that connote disease and disgust. This broadening of the model allows for stigmatization of groups with little apparent connection to disease. PMID:22042920

  8. Role of Gut Barrier Function in the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Wang, Bangmao

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common forms of chronic liver disease, and its incidence is increasing year by year. Many efforts have been made to investigate the pathogenesis of this disease. Since 1998 when Marshall proposed the conception of “gut-liver axis,” more and more researchers have paid close attention to the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The four aspects of gut barrier function, including physical, chemical, biological, and immunological barriers, are interrelated closely and related to NAFLD. In this paper, we present a summary of research findings on the relationship between gut barrier dysfunction and the development of NAFLD, aiming at illustrating the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25945084

  9. Fluids of the ocular surface: concepts, functions and physics.

    PubMed

    Cher, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    General adoption of the ocular surface (OS) concept has advanced the therapy of the external eye. Fresh physical findings have prompted new concepts; examples taken from each section of the text are: (i) ever-present lipid sealant bridges the palpebral fissure capping the three-dimensional 'OS' sac. The muco-aqueous pool (MAP) is thus enclosed, secluded from atmosphere, evaporation mitigated. Hence, the OS is conceptually, a compartment. The term 'dacruon' (otherwise 'tear film') has been coined for the combined fluids of the OS, viz. lipid film and MAP. (ii) Investigative techniques of physics yield data on (say) surface tension and viscosity, and on functions such as anchorage of dacruon base to the varied mucosae of the OS, lubrication, renovation of intermarginal fluid layers as the eye opens after each blink, and refinement of optics and vision by the fluids attached to the cornea. (iii) Physical events in the opening eye produce the unique 'black line' phenomenon in which capillary force induces subsurface flows into thirsty menisci, bringing about parameniscal dark grooves, pupil-ward of each meniscus. Attenuation of fluorescein in the shallowed fluid gaps behind each groove makes the dye appear unilluminated ('black lines') relative to adjacent full-thickness MAP fluid glowing under cobalt-blue illumination. Isolated from cornea by grooves and gaps, the meniscal fluid cannot pass freely over the cornea. It therefore streams through the menisci to nasolacrimal outflow.

  10. CARNITINE HOMEOSTASIS, MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitines are involved in mitochondrial transport of fatty acids and are of critical importance for maintaining normal mitochondrial function. This review summarizes recent experimental and clinical studies showing that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to a disruption of carnitine homeostasis may play a role in decreased NO signaling and the development of endothelial dysfunction. Future challenges include development of agents that can positively modulate L-carnitine homeostasis which may have high therapeutic potential. PMID:20648231

  11. [Function of zinc in liver disease].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Zinc deficiency is highly prevalent in cirrhotic patients, and contributes to several clinical symptoms such as hepatic encephalopathy and liver fibrosis. Ammonia is detoxified in liver to urea through urea cycle, and is also detoxified in extrahepatic tissue to glutamine through glutamine synthetase. The reduced ability of ammonia detoxification in liver cirrhosis is ascribed to zinc deficiency, because a member of urea cycle, ornithine transcarbamylase is a zinc enzyme. In this condition, glutamine synthesis is enhanced, which enables the body, at least temporarily, to suppress the increase of ammonia. However, the glutamine is metabolized predominantly in enterocyte to ammomia and glutamate, indicating that a vicious cycle in glutamine synthesis and glutamine breakdown occurs in liver cirrhosis. Attention should be given to the clinical significance of zinc in liver diseases. PMID:27455801

  12. Executive Functions in Premanifest Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    You, S. Christine; Geschwind, Michael D.; Sha, Sharon J.; Apple, Alexandra; Satris, Gabriella; Wood, Kristie A.; Johnson, Erica T.; Gooblar, Jonathan; Feuerstein, Jeanne S.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Kang, Gail A.; Miller, Bruce L.; Hess, Christopher P.; Kramer, Joel H.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated the viability of psychometrically robust executive function measures as markers for premanifest Huntington’s disease (HD). Methods Fifteen premanifest HD subjects and 42 controls were compared on the NIH EXAMINER executive function battery. This battery yields an overall Executive Composite score, plus Working Memory, Cognitive Control, and Fluency Scores that are measured on psychometrically matched scales. The scores were correlated with two disease markers, disease burden and striatal volumes, in the premanifest HD subjects. Results The premanifest HD subjects scored significantly lower on the Working Memory Score. The Executive Composite positively correlated with striatal volumes, and Working Memory Score negatively correlated with disease burden. The Cognitive Control and Fluency Scores did not differ between the groups or correlate significantly with the disease markers. Conclusions The NIH EXAMINER Executive Composite and Working Memory Score are sensitive markers of cognitive dysfunction, striatal volume, and disease burden in premanifest HD. PMID:24375511

  13. The impact of pain control on physical and psychiatric functions of cancer patients: a nation-wide survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Jen-Shi; Wu, Hung-Bo; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Huang, Ming-Lih; Wang, Cyuan-Jheng; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Hwang, Wen-Li; Lu, Yin-Che; Chan, Chung-Huang; Hsieh, Ruey Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of pain in cancer patients at different disease statuses, the impact of pain on physical and psychiatric functions of patients and the satisfaction of pain control of patients at outpatient clinic department in Taiwan. Methods Short form of the Brief Pain Inventory was used as the outcome questionnaire. Unselected patients of different cancers and different disease statuses at outpatient clinic department were included. The impacts of their current pain control on physical function, psychiatric function and the satisfaction of doctors were evaluated. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate whether the interference scale performed identically in the different analgesic ladders. The dependent variables were satisfaction toward physician and treatment. Results A total of 14 sites enrolled 2075 patients in the study. One thousand and fifty-one patients reported pain within the last 1 week. In patients whose diseases deteriorated, >60% of them need analgesics for pain control. Pain influenced physical and psychiatric functions of patients, especially in the deteriorated status. More than 80% of patients were satisfied about current pain control, satisfaction rate related to disease status, pain intensities and treatments for pain. Conclusion Our study found that different cancers at different statuses had pain at variable severity. Pain can influence physical and psychological functions significantly. More than 75% of subjects reported satisfaction over physician and pain management in outpatient clinic department patients with cancer pain in Taiwan. PMID:26292698

  14. Novel approaches to assessing renal function in cirrhotic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Portal, Andrew J; Austin, Mark; Heneghan, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in patients with end-stage liver disease. Etiological factors include conditions as diverse as acute tubular necrosis, immunoglobulin A nephropathy and hepatorenal syndrome. Current standard tests of renal function, such as measurement of serum urea and creatinine levels, are inaccurate as the synthesis of these markers is affected by the native liver pathology. This article reviews novel markers of renal function and their potential use in patients with liver disease.

  15. Bingo vs. physical intervention in stimulating short-term cognition in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sobel, B P

    2001-01-01

    Past research has shown that pharmacological measures can enhance cognitive and functional capacities for patients with Alzheimer's disease, but may result in unacceptable side effects. Investigations using nonpharmacological treatments are limited. This study evaluates the therapeutic effect of the game of Bingo as cognitive stimulation, versus daily physical activity, on short-term memory, concentration, word retrieval, and word recognition. Informed consent was obtained from the designated representatives of 50 subjects from six community adult day care centers on Long Island. The results show that cognitive stimulation enhanced performance on the Boston Naming Test and a Word List Recognition Task; physical intervention, however, did not reach statistical significance. Thus, a simple cognitive activity such as Bingo can be of great value to the daily management of Alzheimer's patients.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease, liver diseases and endothelial function: is there a linkage?

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo; Ricci, Gabriella; Carbonara, Santa; Gesualdo, Michele; Devito, Fiorella; Zito, Annapaola; Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease able to deeply worsen the outcome of patients because of its serious clinical consequences. The complex inflammatory background underlining such a disease makes atherosclerosis linked to several systemic inflammatory conditions able to impair endothelial function and morphology. Inflammatory bowel diseases are a group of gastrointestinal diseases including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, that is, syndromes characterized by changes in mucosal immunity and gastrointestinal physiology, which could negatively influence the vascular endothelial function and structure. Hepatitis (i.e. inflammatory diseases of the liver mainly due to viral infections) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease could be aligned to inflammatory bowel disease in such an induction of atherosclerosis disease.Many studies tried to point out the relationship between bowel and liver inflammatory diseases and early vascular changes, considered the first step for atherosclerosis development.The aim of such a narrative review is to explain the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease, hepatitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and their role in increasing cardiovascular risk profile due to early impairment in vascular function and morphology.

  17. Effects of psychological well-being, physical status, and social support on oxygen-dependent COPD patients' level of functioning.

    PubMed

    Lee, R N; Graydon, J E; Ross, E

    1991-10-01

    Thirty oxygen-dependent patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) participated in a descriptive correlational study in which investigators examined the relationship between oxygen-dependent COPD patients' psychological well-being, physical status, social support, and level of functioning. Lazarus and Folkman's (1984) theory of psychological stress and coping was used to guide the study. Using multiple regression analysis, physical symptoms had the most predictive power in relation to the level of functioning, accounting for 44.3% of the variance. Among the symptoms, dyspnea had the greatest influence on functioning.

  18. Physical activity associated with increased resting-state functional connectivity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Patterson, Beth; Janssen, Alisha; Abduljalil, Amir; Boster, Aaron

    2011-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, resulting in physical, cognitive and affective disturbances, with notable declines in the ability to learn and retain new information. In this study, we examined if higher levels of physical activity in MS individuals were associated with an increased resting-state connectivity of the hippocampus and cortex, resulting in better performance on a task of episodic memory. Forty-five individuals with a clinically definite diagnosis of MS were recruited for the study. Consistent with previous reports, hippocampus was functionally connected to the posteromedial cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, and the medial frontal cortex. Higher levels of physical activity in MS patients were associated with an increased coherence between the hippocampus and the posteromedial cortex (PMC). The increased connectivity between these two regions, in turn, was predictive of better relational memory, such that MS patients who showed an increased coherence between the left (not right) hippocampus and the PMC also showed better relational memory. Results of the study are interpreted in light of the challenge of disentangling effects of physical activity from effects of disease severity and its neuropathological correlates.

  19. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity according to triaxial accelerometers; physical function and mobility according to the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, stair climb time, and a lift-and-lower task; aerobic capacity according to maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2) max); and leg press and chest pr...

  20. Physical Activity and Hemodynamic Reactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Light, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an elevated cardiovascular risk. This study was designed to understand better the presence and strength of the relationship between physical activity and BP and to explore determinants of hemodynamic reactivity. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Twenty-four patients with CKD (mean age 69.5 yr; 3.1 antihypertensive drugs; estimated GFR 47 ml/min per 1.73 m2, albumin/creatinine ratio 403 mg/g) were studied on three occasions during a 6-wk period with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and simultaneous activity monitoring with wrist actigraphy. Results: Nondippers were found have a greater level of sleep activity compared with dippers, although the awake activity level was similar (7.06 versus 6.73) between groups (P = 0.042 for interaction). In 3587 BP activity pairs, hemodynamic reactivity was variable between individuals (systolic BP reactivity 1.06 [SD 10.50]; diastolic BP reactivity 0.89 [SD 7.80] heart rate reactivity 1.18 [SD 11.00]); those who were more sedentary had a greater increment in systolic BP compared with those who were less sedentary. Antihypertensive drugs blunted hemodynamic reactivity. Hemodynamic reactivity was greatest between 12 a.m. and 8 a.m., making this a vulnerable period for cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Greater hemodynamic reactivity in sedentary people with CKD offers a possible and thus far unrecognized mechanism of cardiovascular damage. Besides reducing BP, antihypertensive drugs reduce hemodynamic reactivity, which offers another plausible mechanism of cardiovascular protection with their use. PMID:18922983

  1. Neighbourhood green space, physical function and participation in physical activities among elderly men: the Caerphilly Prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The built environment in which older people live plays an important role in promoting or inhibiting physical activity. Most work on this complex relationship between physical activity and the environment has excluded people with reduced physical function or ignored the difference between groups with different levels of physical function. This study aims to explore the role of neighbourhood green space in determining levels of participation in physical activity among elderly men with different levels of lower extremity physical function. Method Using data collected from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS) and green space data collected from high resolution Landmap true colour aerial photography, we first investigated the effect of the quantity of neighbourhood green space and the variation in neighbourhood vegetation on participation in physical activity for 1,010 men aged 66 and over in Caerphilly county borough, Wales, UK. Second, we explored whether neighbourhood green space affects groups with different levels of lower extremity physical function in different ways. Results Increasing percentage of green space within a 400 meters radius buffer around the home was significantly associated with more participation in physical activity after adjusting for lower extremity physical function, psychological distress, general health, car ownership, age group, marital status, social class, education level and other environmental factors (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.05, 1.41). A statistically significant interaction between the variation in neighbourhood vegetation and lower extremity physical function was observed (OR = 1.92, 95% CI 1.12, 3.28). Conclusion Elderly men living in neighbourhoods with more green space have higher levels of participation in regular physical activity. The association between variation in neighbourhood vegetation and regular physical activity varied according to lower extremity physical function. Subjects reporting poor lower extremity

  2. Women With Peripheral Arterial Disease Experience Faster Functional Decline Than Men With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Tao, Huimin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that women with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) would have greater mobility loss and faster functional decline than men with PAD. Background Whether rates of mobility loss or functional decline differ between men and women with PAD is currently unknown. Methods Three hundred eighty men and women with PAD completed the 6-min walk, were assessed for mobility disability, and underwent measures of 4-m walking velocity at baseline and annually for up to 4 years. Computed tomography-assessed calf muscle characteristics were measured biannually. Outcomes included becoming unable to walk for 6 min continuously among participants who walked continuously for 6 min at baseline. Mobility loss was defined as becoming unable to walk for a quarter mile or to walk up and down 1 flight of stairs without assistance among those without baseline mobility disability. Results were adjusted for age, race, body mass index, physical activity, the ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other confounders. Results At 4 years of follow-up, women were more likely to become unable to walk for 6 min continuously (hazard ratio: 2.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 4.06, p = 0.004), more likely to develop mobility disability (hazard ratio: 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 3.03, p = 0.030), and had faster declines in walking velocity (p = 0.022) and the distance achieved in the 6-min walk (p = 0.041) compared with men. Sex differences in functional decline were attenuated after additional adjustment for baseline sex differences in calf muscle area. Conclusions Women with PAD have faster functional decline and greater mobility loss than men with PAD. These sex differences may be attributable to smaller baseline calf muscle area among women with PAD. PMID:21292130

  3. Sarcopenia and physical function in overweight patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Prado, Carla M M; Lieffers, Jessica R; Bowthorpe, Lindsay; Baracos, Vickie E; Mourtzakis, Marina; McCargar, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    Advanced cancer is associated with numerous metabolic abnormalities that may lead to significant body composition changes, particularly muscle loss or sarcopenia. Sarcopenia in cancer has been associated with poor clinical outcomes, including poor physical function. Accurate tools to assess body composition are expensive and not readily available in clinical settings. Unfortunately, little is known about the efficacy of affordable and portable techniques to assess functional status in patients with cancer. We investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia and its association with different portable and low-cost functional status measurement tools (i.e., handgrip strength testing, a two-minute walking test, and a self-report questionnaire) in overweight/obese patients (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m²) with advanced cancer. Twenty-eight patients (68% men) aged 64.5 ± 9.5 years with advanced lung or colorectal cancer were included. Sarcopenia was assessed by measuring appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM) adjusted by height (ASM index), using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Approximately 36% of patients had sarcopenia. Average handgrip strength was greater in men without sarcopenia than in men with it (p=0.035). In men, ASM index was positively correlated with average (r=0.535, p=0.018) and peak handgrip strength (r=0.457, p=0.049). No differences were observed among female patients. Handgrip strength was associated with sarcopenia in male patients with advanced cancer, and therefore it may be used as a portable and simple nutritional screening tool.

  4. New insights into sexual functioning and fertility in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika

    2004-04-01

    Sexuality is an often neglected area of quality of life in patients with rheumatic disease. Manifestations and symptoms of disease can impair sexual functioning, but this can be much improved by adequate intervention and counseling. Fertility is in general not reduced in rheumatic diseases, however, the time taken to achieve a pregnancy is often increased. An increased rate of pregnancy loss is observed in systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome contributing to a reduced family size. Autoantibodies are present in most of the rheumatic diseases and can interfere with fertilization, implantation, embryonic development and placental function. Active disease disturbs the hypothalamic-pituitary-axis, giving rise to periods of gonadal dysfunction. Toxic effects of immunosuppressive drugs can induce transient or permanent gonadal failure in women and men.

  5. Executive functions in clinical and preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allain, P; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Verny, C

    2013-10-01

    Executive functions is an umbrella term describing a wide range of higher order processes that allow the flexible modification of thought and behaviour in response to changing cognitive or environmental contexts. Impairment of executive functions is common in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These deficits negatively affect everyday activities and hamper the ability to cope with other cognitive or behavioural disorders. In this paper, we propose a synthesis of the knowledge on executive impairments in clinical and preclinical Alzheimer's disease, mostly leaning on the current studies made in this domain. We made some propositions for neuropsychological assessment of executive functions in preclinical and clinical phases of Alzheimer's disease. We hope that this overview will provide a useful insight into an area that is still insufficiently explored in the field of the neuropsychology of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary findings from the MDRD study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. In the general population, physical activity is associated with reduced mortality. We examined physical activity status in CKD patients and its relation to all-cause mortality. The Modified...

  7. Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions As A Function Of Physical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Shonda; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Derseweh, J. A.; Richmond, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). In turn, models of outflows have shown particular sensitivity to the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED), depending on the UV luminosity to transfer momentum to the gas, the X-ray luminosity to regulate how efficiently that transfer can be, etc. To investigate how SED changes with physical properties, we follow up on Richards et al. (2006), who constructed SEDs with varying luminosity. Here, we construct SEDs as a function of redshift, and physical property (black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, Eddington ratio) for volume limited samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with photometry supplemented from 2MASS, WISE, GALEX, ROSAT, and Chandra. To estimate black hole masses, we adopt the scaling relations from Greene & Ho (2005) based on the H-alpha emission line FWHM. This requires redshifts less than 0.4. To construct volume-limited subsamples, we begin by adopting g=19.8 as a nominal limiting magnitude over which we are guaranteed to detect z<0.4 quasars. At redshift 0.4, we are complete down to Mg=-21.8, which yields 3300 objects from Data Release 7. At z=0.1, we are complete down to Mg=-18.5. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  8. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information.

  9. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information. PMID:26239669

  10. Physical Unclonable Function with Multiplexing Units and its Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Masaya; Asai, Toshiya; Shiozaki, Mitsuru; Fujino, Takeshi

    Recently, semiconductor counterfeiting has become an increasingly serious problem. Therefore, techniques to prevent the counterfeit by using random characteristic patterns that are difficult to control artificially have attracted attention. The physical unclonable function (PUF) is one of the techniques. It is a method to derive ID information peculiar to a device by detecting random physical features that cannot be controlled during the device's manufacture. Because information such as the ID information is difficult to replicate, PUF is used as a technique to prevent counterfeiting. Several studies have been reported on PUF. Arbiter PUF, which utilizes the difference in signal propagation delay between selectors, is the typical method of composing PUF using delay characteristics. This paper proposed a new PUF which is based on the arbiter PUF. The proposed PUF introduces new multiplexing selector units. It attempts to generate an effective response using the orders of three signal arrivals. Experiments using FPGAs verify the validity of the proposed PUF. Although Uniqueness is deteriorated, Correctness, Steadiness, Randomness and Resistance against the machine learning attacks are improved in comparison with conventional one.

  11. Role of astrocytes in brain function and disease.

    PubMed

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Lee, Eunsook; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes assume multiple roles in maintaining an optimally suited milieu for neuronal function. Select astrocytic functions include the maintenance of redox potential, the production of trophic factors, the regulation of neurotransmitter and ion concentrations, and the removal of toxins and debris from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Impairments in these and other functions, as well as physiological reactions of astrocytes to injury, can trigger or exacerbate neuronal dysfunction. This review addresses select metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes and emphasizes the role of astrocytes in mediating and amplifying the progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), hyperammonemia (HA), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and ischemia.

  12. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Eden; Park, Jin Gyu; Paravastu, Anant; Branco Lopes, Elsa; Brooks, James S.; Englander, Ongi; Siegrist, Theo; Kaner, Papatya; Alamo, Rufina G.

    2011-10-01

    This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of β-sheet (crystalline) and amorphous (helical) structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 °C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size), on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates) and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain). The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating) motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and β-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of β-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof-of-concept applications of

  13. Effects of Pomegranate Extract Supplementation on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Physical Function in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Tzu; Fitschen, Peter J; Kistler, Brandon M; Jeong, Jin Hee; Chung, Hae Ryong; Aviram, Michael; Phillips, Shane A; Fernhall, Bo; Wilund, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of oral supplementation with pomegranate extract on cardiovascular risk, physical function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Thirty-three HD subjects were randomized to the pomegranate (POM) or placebo (CON) group. Patients in POM ingested a 1000 mg capsule of a purified pomegranate polyphenol extract 7 days/week for 6 months. Individuals in CON ingested a noncaloric placebo capsule using the same protocol. Measurements were conducted at baseline and repeated 6 months following the start of the intervention. Brachial blood pressure (BP) was obtained using an automatic digital BP monitor. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using ultrasound and arterial tonometry. Blood samples were collected for the measurements of circulating markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity. Muscle strength and physical function were assessed by isokinetic dynamometry, a validated shuttle walk test, and a battery of tests to assess functional fitness. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were reduced by 24 ± 13.7 and 10 ± 5.3 mmHg, respectively, in POM (P < .05). However, the BP differences in POM were no longer significant after controlling for baseline BP. The paraoxonase-1 activity increased by 26.6% (P < .05) in POM, compared to no significant change in CON. However, pomegranate supplementation had no effect on other markers of cardiovascular disease risk, inflammation and oxidative stress, or measures of physical function and muscle strength. While pomegranate extract supplementation may reduce BP and increase the antioxidant activity in HD patients, it does not improve other markers of cardiovascular risk, physical function, or muscle strength.

  14. Rehabilitation and multiple sclerosis: hot topics in the preservation of physical functioning.

    PubMed

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2011-12-01

    In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation becomes of major importance in the preservation of physical, psychological and social functioning. Approximately 80% of patients have multiple sclerosis for more than 35 years and most will develop disability at some point of their lives, emphasising the importance of rehabilitation in order to maintain quality of life. An important aspect of multiple sclerosis rehabilitation is the preservation of physical functioning. Hot topics in the rehabilitation of physical function include (1) exercise therapy, (2) robot-assisted training and (3) pharmacological interventions. Exercise therapy has for many years been a controversial issue in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation and the advice generally given to patients was not to participate in physical exercise, since it was thought to lead to a worsening of symptoms or fatigue. However, a paradigm shift is taking place and it is now increasingly acknowledged that exercise therapy is both safe and beneficial. Robot-assisted training is also attracting attention in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation. Several sophisticated commercial robots exist, but so far the number of scientific studies that have evaluated these is limited, although some promising results have been reported. Finally, recent studies have shown that certain pharmacological interventions have the potential to improve functional capacity substantially, with the potassium channel blocker fampridine being one of the most promising. This drug has been shown to improve walking ability in some patients with multiple sclerosis, associated with a reduction of patients' self-reported ambulatory disability. Rehabilitation strategies involving these different approaches, or combinations of them, may be of great use in improving everyday functioning and quality of life in patients with MS.

  15. Gene-Disease Network Analysis Reveals Functional Modules in Mendelian, Complex and Environmental Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A.; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. Principal Findings We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. Conclusions For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and environmental factors

  16. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  17. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  18. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Richard B.

    2013-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm3 spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology.

  19. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm3 spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology. PMID:24006360

  20. Functionally diverse reef-fish communities ameliorate coral disease

    PubMed Central

    Raymundo, Laurie J.; Halford, Andrew R.; Maypa, Aileen P.; Kerr, Alexander M.

    2009-01-01

    Coral reefs, the most diverse of marine ecosystems, currently experience unprecedented levels of degradation. Diseases are now recognized as a major cause of mortality in reef-forming corals and are complicit in phase shifts of reef ecosystems to algal-dominated states worldwide. Even so, factors contributing to disease occurrence, spread, and impact remain poorly understood. Ecosystem resilience has been linked to the conservation of functional diversity, whereas overfishing reduces functional diversity through cascading, top-down effects. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that reefs with trophically diverse reef fish communities have less coral disease than overfished reefs. We surveyed reefs across the central Philippines, including well-managed marine protected areas (MPAs), and found that disease prevalence was significantly negatively correlated with fish taxonomic diversity. Further, MPAs had significantly higher fish diversity and less disease than unprotected areas. We subsequently investigated potential links between coral disease and the trophic components of fish diversity, finding that only the density of coral-feeding chaetodontid butterflyfishes, seldom targeted by fishers, was positively associated with disease prevalence. These previously uncharacterized results are supported by a second large-scale dataset from the Great Barrier Reef. We hypothesize that members of the charismatic reef-fish family Chaetodontidae are major vectors of coral disease by virtue of their trophic specialization on hard corals and their ecological release in overfished areas, particularly outside MPAs. PMID:19805081

  1. Functionally diverse reef-fish communities ameliorate coral disease.

    PubMed

    Raymundo, Laurie J; Halford, Andrew R; Maypa, Aileen P; Kerr, Alexander M

    2009-10-01

    Coral reefs, the most diverse of marine ecosystems, currently experience unprecedented levels of degradation. Diseases are now recognized as a major cause of mortality in reef-forming corals and are complicit in phase shifts of reef ecosystems to algal-dominated states worldwide. Even so, factors contributing to disease occurrence, spread, and impact remain poorly understood. Ecosystem resilience has been linked to the conservation of functional diversity, whereas overfishing reduces functional diversity through cascading, top-down effects. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that reefs with trophically diverse reef fish communities have less coral disease than overfished reefs. We surveyed reefs across the central Philippines, including well-managed marine protected areas (MPAs), and found that disease prevalence was significantly negatively correlated with fish taxonomic diversity. Further, MPAs had significantly higher fish diversity and less disease than unprotected areas. We subsequently investigated potential links between coral disease and the trophic components of fish diversity, finding that only the density of coral-feeding chaetodontid butterflyfishes, seldom targeted by fishers, was positively associated with disease prevalence. These previously uncharacterized results are supported by a second large-scale dataset from the Great Barrier Reef. We hypothesize that members of the charismatic reef-fish family Chaetodontidae are major vectors of coral disease by virtue of their trophic specialization on hard corals and their ecological release in overfished areas, particularly outside MPAs.

  2. Ligand Similarity Complements Sequence, Physical Interaction, and Co-Expression for Gene Function Prediction.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Matthew J; Ballouz, Sara; Shoichet, Brian K; Gillis, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of protein-ligand annotation databases has enabled large-scale networking of proteins by ligand similarity. These ligand-based protein networks, which implicitly predict the ability of neighboring proteins to bind related ligands, may complement biologically-oriented gene networks, which are used to predict functional or disease relevance. To quantify the degree to which such ligand-based protein associations might complement functional genomic associations, including sequence similarity, physical protein-protein interactions, co-expression, and disease gene annotations, we calculated a network based on the Similarity Ensemble Approach (SEA: sea.docking.org), where protein neighbors reflect the similarity of their ligands. We also measured the similarity with functional genomic networks over a common set of 1,131 genes, and found that the networks had only small overlaps, which were significant only due to the large scale of the data. Consistent with the view that the networks contain different information, combining them substantially improved Molecular Function prediction within GO (from AUROC~0.63-0.75 for the individual data modalities to AUROC~0.8 in the aggregate). We investigated the boost in guilt-by-association gene function prediction when the networks are combined and describe underlying properties that can be further exploited. PMID:27467773

  3. Ligand Similarity Complements Sequence, Physical Interaction, and Co-Expression for Gene Function Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Shoichet, Brian K.; Gillis, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of protein-ligand annotation databases has enabled large-scale networking of proteins by ligand similarity. These ligand-based protein networks, which implicitly predict the ability of neighboring proteins to bind related ligands, may complement biologically-oriented gene networks, which are used to predict functional or disease relevance. To quantify the degree to which such ligand-based protein associations might complement functional genomic associations, including sequence similarity, physical protein-protein interactions, co-expression, and disease gene annotations, we calculated a network based on the Similarity Ensemble Approach (SEA: sea.docking.org), where protein neighbors reflect the similarity of their ligands. We also measured the similarity with functional genomic networks over a common set of 1,131 genes, and found that the networks had only small overlaps, which were significant only due to the large scale of the data. Consistent with the view that the networks contain different information, combining them substantially improved Molecular Function prediction within GO (from AUROC~0.63–0.75 for the individual data modalities to AUROC~0.8 in the aggregate). We investigated the boost in guilt-by-association gene function prediction when the networks are combined and describe underlying properties that can be further exploited. PMID:27467773

  4. Multi-taxa trait and functional responses to physical disturbance.

    PubMed

    Pedley, Scott M; Dolman, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Examining assemblage trait responses to environmental stressors extends our understanding beyond patterns of taxonomic diversity and composition, with results potentially transferable among bioregions. But the degree to which trait responses may be generalized across taxonomic groups remains incompletely understood. We compared trait responses among carabids, spiders and plants to an experimentally manipulated gradient of physical disturbance, replicated in open habitats within a forested landscape. Recolonization of recently disturbed habitats is expected to favour species with traits that promote greater dispersal ability, independent of taxa. We specifically predicted that physical disturbance would increase the representation of carabids with smaller body size, wings or wing dimorphism, spiders able to disperse aerially, and plants with therophyte life-history and wind-dispersed seed. We sampled 197 arthropod species (14,738 individuals) and 164 species of plant. The strength of association between each trait and the disturbance intensity was quantified by correlating matrices of species by traits, species abundance by sites and sites by environment, with significance assessed by comparison with a null model. Responses of biological traits varied among taxa but could be consistently interpreted in terms of dispersal ability. Trait shifts for carabid and plant assemblages were as predicted and correspond to those observed in other disturbance regimes. Assemblages after disturbance comprised smaller and winged carabids, and smaller plants with wind-dispersed seed, consistent with selection for species with better dispersal ability. In contrast, aerial dispersal did not appear important in spider recolonization, instead terrestrial dispersal ability was suggested by the increased abundance of larger-bodied and cursorial species. However, larger spider body size was also associated with an active-hunting strategy, also favoured in the post-disturbance environment

  5. Quantification of lumbar function. Part 6: The use of psychological measures in guiding physical functional restoration.

    PubMed

    Gatchel, R J; Mayer, T G; Capra, P; Diamond, P; Barnett, J

    1986-01-01

    The present article reviews the use of psychologic measures in guiding a functional restoration treatment program with chronic low-back pain patients. The results of the first 134 consecutive patients completing this program are reviewed. These results demonstrate that various psychologic measures paralleled improvement in physical function. Of particular interest is the finding that various Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) scales that were initially clinically elevated showed a significant decrease to nonelevated levels after treatment. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed, along with the important observation that one should avoid assuming that a single psychologic test can reliably be used as the sole predictor variable in clinical cases. PMID:2939568

  6. Physical mapping of a functional cluster of epidermal differentiation genes on chromosome 1q21

    SciTech Connect

    Volz, A.; Ziegler, A.; Mischke, D. ); Korge, B.P.; Compton, J.G.; Steinert, P.M. )

    1993-10-01

    Genes of three protein families, which are in part specifically expressed in the course of terminal differentiation of human epidermis, have previously been mapped to chromosome 1q21. Here, the authors show that these genes are physically linked within 2.05 Mb of DNA. The order is calpactin I light chain, trichohyalin, profilaggrin, involucrin/small proline-rich protein, loricrin, and calcyclin. The colocalization in the 1q21 region together with their functional interdependence during epidermal differentiation raises the question whether these genes share regulatory elements which control their transcriptional activities. As several of them are potential candidate genes for dyskeratotic skin diseases, this physical map should be of great value for genetic linkage analyses. 55 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Copper and the Prion Protein: Methods, Structures, Function, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrPC to PrPSc. Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrPC in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrPC, with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrPC function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease. PMID:17076634

  8. Copper and the prion protein: methods, structures, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Millhauser, Glenn L

    2007-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrP(C) in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrP(C), with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrP(C) function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease. PMID:17076634

  9. Pulmonary functional magnetic resonance imaging for paediatric lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Miranda; Coxson, Harvey O; Parraga, Grace

    2013-09-01

    A better understanding of the anatomic structure and physiological function of the lung is fundamental to understanding the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease and how to design and deliver better treatments and measure response to intervention. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the hyperpolarised noble gases helium-3 ((3)He) and xenon-129 ((129)Xe) provides both structural and functional pulmonary measurements, and because it does not require the use of x-rays or other ionising radiation, offers the potential for intensive serial and longitudinal studies in paediatric patients. These facts are particularly important in the evaluation of chronic lung diseases such as asthma and cystic fibrosis- both of which can be considered paediatric respiratory diseases with unmet therapy needs. This review discusses MRI-based imaging methods with a focus on hyperpolarised gas MRI. We also discuss the strengths and limitations as well as the future work required for clinical translation towards paediatric respiratory disease. PMID:23522599

  10. Copper and the Prion Protein: Methods, Structures, Function, and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2007-05-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrPC to PrPSc. Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrPC in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrPC, with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrPC function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease.

  11. Effect of Disease Pathologies on Transporter Expression and Function.

    PubMed

    Atilano-Roque, Amandla; Roda, Gavriel; Fogueri, Uma; Kiser, Jennifer J; Joy, Melanie S

    2016-07-01

    Transporters are important determinants of drug absorption, distribution, and excretion. The clinical relevance of drug transporters in drug disposition and toxicology depends on their localization in liver, kidney, and brain. There has been growing evidence regarding the importance of disease status on alterations in metabolizing enzymes and transporter proteins. This review focuses on uptake and efflux transporter proteins in liver, kidney, and brain and discusses mechanisms of altered transporter expression and function secondary to disease. PMID:27385176

  12. Personality disorders and physical health: A longitudinal examination of physical functioning, healthcare utilization, and health-related behaviors in middle-aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Abigail D.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) have significant, long-term effects in many areas, including physical health outcomes such as increased risk for chronic disease and mortality. Although research has documented this detrimental impact in relation to long-term physical health, no one has explored the more immediate influence of disordered personality on aspects of physical functioning, such as pain level, or health-related behaviors, such as medication use. The present study examined the unique effects of PD features on physical functioning, medical resource utilization, and prescription medication use to determine potential risk associated with PDs. We studied an epidemiologically-based sample (N=608) of Saint Louis residents (ages 55–64) over two time points (6 months apart). We found that disordered personality was significantly predictive of worse physical functioning, role limitations, fatigue, and pain at both time points, even when current health problems, the presence of depression, and health behaviors (i.e., smoking, drinking, exercise) were controlled. PD features were also predictive of increased healthcare utilization and medication use at follow-up. These results suggest that the presence of disordered personality may be an important risk factor for worse functioning, regardless of actual health status. PMID:22867504

  13. Application of Functional Genomics for Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Aswathy N.; Epperson, William B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common economically important disease affecting cattle. For developing accurate diagnostics that can predict disease susceptibility/resistance and stratification, it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRD. To study the complex interactions among the bovine host and the multitude of viral and bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental factors associated with BRD etiology, genome-scale high-throughput functional genomics methods such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics are helpful. In this review, we summarize the progress made in our understanding of BRD using functional genomics approaches. We also discuss some of the available bioinformatics resources for analyzing high-throughput data, in the context of biological pathways and molecular interactions. Although resources for studying host response to infection are avail-able, the corresponding information is lacking for majority of BRD pathogens, impeding progress in identifying diagnostic signatures for BRD using functional genomics approaches. PMID:26526746

  14. The role of physical therapy in patients with metastatic disease to bone.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, M E; Shea, B D

    1993-01-01

    The American Cancer Society estimates that in 1991 over seven million Americans were alive despite a diagnosis of cancer.1 As the medical community becomes more successful in prolonging the lives of cancer patients, a significant number will experience the resultant disability of cancer and its treatment. Those with advanced disease may find the quality of their lives to be profoundly compromised. The role of rehabilitation with the latter population is to maximize the patients' functional capabilities and to conserve their limited energy reserves. Clearly, quality of life is an overriding issue fix this population.The development of bony metastases is devastating for the cancer patient and presents a considerable challenge for the physical therapist. Approximately 50% of patients with breast, lung, or prostate cancer will develop bony metastases. Less common, though equally problematic, are bone metastases in patients with carcinoma of the kidney, pancreas, bladder, thyroid, and cervix.Patients with advanced disease present a complex clinical picture. It is imperative that the physical therapist consult and confer regularly with the oncologist, physiatrist, and/or orthopedist to remain abreast of the patient's changing clinical picture. Information vital to safe and effective rehabilitation includes the presence, location, and extent of bony metastases, involvement of bone marrow potentiating refractory pancytopenia, infection, and hypercalcemia secondary to prolonged immobility.In patients with metastatic disease to bone, it is not sufficient to rely solely on plain X-ray findings. Plain radiographs will not detect bone lesions unless a sufficient amount of matrix is destroyed (30-50% of bone matrix must be involved to be visualized). Bone scan results should be assessed prior to establishing a rehabilitation program for most cancer patients. Patients with advanced disease frequently present with pain, neurologic deficits, impending or pathologic fractures, and

  15. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  16. [Association between function of selenium and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    An excessive oxidative stress is considered to be responsible for the development and progression of heart disease. Deficiency of trace elements with antioxidative activities is present in patients with heart disease. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase(GPx), one of the central players of the heart's antioxidant system, and it's deficiency is implicated in certain types of heart disease. Our study suggests that myocardial oxidative stress in chronic heart failure may be augmented at least in part by concomitant GPx deficiency, and that the administration of Se could rescue the exhaustion of this selenoprotein, resulting in improved left ventricular function. PMID:27455811

  17. Circulating Markers of Liver Function and Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Targher, Giovanni; Byrne, Christopher D

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of serum concentrations of various liver enzymes and other nonenzymatic proteins and metabolites of heme metabolism (eg, bilirubin) is often undertaken in clinical practice. Measurement of these liver function tests is simple, quick, and relatively inexpensive. However, interpreting the liver function test results in patients without evidence of liver disease is often challenging. Concentrations of some of liver enzymes, such as γ-glutamyltransferase or alkaline phosphatase, and concentrations of liver-derived metabolites, such as bilirubin, may be influenced by metabolic processes beyond the liver, sometimes making interpretation of the test results difficult. This scenario frequently occurs both in individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease and in patients with known cardiovascular disease, often resulting in the clinicians ignoring the test results. In this brief review, we discuss the evidence for associations between key serum liver function tests and cardiovascular disease risk and where associations are robust; we provide an interpretation for possible mechanistic links between the liver function test and cardiovascular disease.

  18. Rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory disease other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: exercise and physical activity interventions in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Burtin, Chris; Hebestreit, Helge

    2015-01-01

    A relevant proportion of children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) have a marked decrease in exercise tolerance, which can be partly related to impaired muscle function and decreased physical activity levels in daily life, in addition to lung disease. Preliminary findings suggest that patients with non-CF bronchiectasis face the same problems. These patients might be excellent candidates for exercise and physical activity interventions. This review elaborates on the rationale for exercise training and activity behaviour changes and summarizes the existing evidence for these rehabilitation strategies in patients with bronchiectasis, both CF and non-CF bronchiectasis. Furthermore, practical considerations and safety aspects are discussed. PMID:25676797

  19. The Link Between Physical Activity and Cognitive Dysfunction in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Cristy; Baktir, Mehmet Akif; Das, Devsmita; Lin, Bill; Salehi, Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a primary cause of cognitive dysfunction in the elderly population worldwide. Despite the allocation of enormous amounts of funding and resources to studying this brain disorder, there are no effective pharmacological treatments for reducing the severity of pathology and restoring cognitive function in affected people. Recent reports on the failure of multiple clinical trials for AD have highlighted the need to diversify further the search for new therapeutic strategies for cognitive dysfunction. Thus, studies detailing the neuroprotective effects of physical activity (PA) on the brain in AD were reviewed, and mechanisms by which PA might mitigate AD-related cognitive decline were explored. A MEDLINE database search was used to generate a list of studies conducted between January 2007 and September 2014 (n=394). These studies, along with key references, were screened to identify those that assessed the effects of PA on AD-related biomarkers and cognitive function. The search was not limited on the basis of intensity, frequency, duration, or mode of activity. However, studies in which PA was combined with another intervention (eg, diet, pharmacotherapeutics, ovariectomy, cognitive training, behavioral therapy), and studies not written in English were excluded. Thirty-eight animal and human studies met entry criteria. Most of the studies suggested that PA attenuates neuropathology and positively affects cognitive function in AD. Although the literature lacked sufficient evidence to support precise PA guidelines, convergent evidence does suggest that the incorporation of regular PA into daily routines mitigates AD-related symptoms, especially when deployed earlier in the disease process. Here the protocols used to alter the progression of AD-related neuropathology and cognitive decline are highlighted, and the implications for physical therapist practice are discussed. PMID:25573757

  20. Study on Assessment of Renal Function in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nupur; Paria, Baishakhi; Sarkar, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Renal dysfunction is common in chronic liver disease. The cause of this renal dysfunction is either multi-organ involvement in acute conditions or secondary to advanced liver disease. Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the renal function in chronic liver diseases and find out the association of alteration of renal function with gradation of liver disease. (assessed by child-pugh criteria) and to find out the association of alteration of renal function among the cases of chronic liver disease of different aetiology. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken in Department of General Medicine, Calcutta National Medical College & Hospital, Kolkata during March 2012 to July 2013 with 50 admitted patients of chronic liver disease after considering the exclusion criteria. The patients were interviewed with a pre-designed and pre-tested schedule, examined clinically, followed by some laboratory investigations relevant to diagnose the aetiology of chronic liver disease, and to assess the severity of liver and renal dysfunction. Data was analysed by standard statistical method. Results: Eighty six percent of the patients were male and the mean age of study population was 43.58 y, 68% patients suffered from alcoholic liver disease, followed by 14% patients had chronic Hepatitis-B, 10% patients developed acute kidney injury, 20% had hepato renal syndrome and 14% had IgA deposition. The distribution of serum urea and creatinine across the categories of Child Pugh classification tested by Mann-Whitney test and the distribution was statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study has found significant association between severity of liver dysfunction and certain parameters of renal dysfunction. PMID:25954647

  1. Demographic, physical, and radiographic factors associated with functional flatfoot deformity.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Kitterman, Ryan T; LaFontaine, Javier; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    In 1 of our previous studies, the occurrence of self-reported flatfoot was associated with self-reported increased age, male gender, Asian and African American races, veteran status, poor health, increased body mass index, callus, bunion, hammertoe, and arthritis. However, we had to rely on survey data to identify these risk factors, and the accuracy of the survey results was unknown. Therefore, we decided to identify the risk factors associated with flatfeet using objectively and more accurately measured data. A total of 94 patients were enrolled in the present study. The demographic data and physical and radiographic examination results were recorded by the investigators in the clinic. The data were then analyzed to identify the factors unique to flatfoot, measured and defined using a plantar pressure measurement system during natural gait. We learned that a painful tibialis posterior tendon was associated with flatfoot. The calcaneal inclination angle was also decreased in the flatfoot group. The talar declination, intermetatarsal, hallux abductus, and calcaneal cuboid angles, and static calcaneal stance eversion were elevated in the flatfoot group compared with the non-flatfoot group. Systematic evaluation of these associated factors will help in the understanding of the functional status of the flatfoot deformity.

  2. Hyper-connectivity of functional networks for brain disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jie, Biao; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Shen, Dinggang; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2016-08-01

    Exploring structural and functional interactions among various brain regions enables better understanding of pathological underpinnings of neurological disorders. Brain connectivity network, as a simplified representation of those structural and functional interactions, has been widely used for diagnosis and classification of neurodegenerative diseases, especially for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its early stage - mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the conventional functional connectivity network is usually constructed based on the pairwise correlation among different brain regions and thus ignores their higher-order relationships. Such loss of high-order information could be important for disease diagnosis, since neurologically a brain region predominantly interacts with more than one other brain regions. Accordingly, in this paper, we propose a novel framework for estimating the hyper-connectivity network of brain functions and then use this hyper-network for brain disease diagnosis. Here, the functional connectivity hyper-network denotes a network where each of its edges representing the interactions among multiple brain regions (i.e., an edge can connect with more than two brain regions), which can be naturally represented by a hyper-graph. Specifically, we first construct connectivity hyper-networks from the resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) time series by using sparse representation. Then, we extract three sets of brain-region specific features from the connectivity hyper-networks, and further exploit a manifold regularized multi-task feature selection method to jointly select the most discriminative features. Finally, we use multi-kernel support vector machine (SVM) for classification. The experimental results on both MCI dataset and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) dataset demonstrate that, compared with the conventional connectivity network-based methods, the proposed method can not only improve the classification performance, but also help

  3. Nonlinear analysis of human physical activity patterns in health and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv-Ionescu, A.; Buchser, E.; Rutschmann, B.; Aminian, K.

    2008-02-01

    The reliable and objective assessment of chronic disease state has been and still is a very significant challenge in clinical medicine. An essential feature of human behavior related to the health status, the functional capacity, and the quality of life is the physical activity during daily life. A common way to assess physical activity is to measure the quantity of body movement. Since human activity is controlled by various factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body, quantitative parameters only provide a partial assessment and do not allow for a clear distinction between normal and abnormal activity. In this paper, we propose a methodology for the analysis of human activity pattern based on the definition of different physical activity time series with the appropriate analysis methods. The temporal pattern of postures, movements, and transitions between postures was quantified using fractal analysis and symbolic dynamics statistics. The derived nonlinear metrics were able to discriminate patterns of daily activity generated from healthy and chronic pain states.

  4. Long-term effects of home rehabilitation on physical performance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wijkstra, P J; van der Mark, T W; Kraan, J; van Altena, R; Koëter, G H; Postma, D S

    1996-04-01

    A pilot study was set up to assess the long-term effects of once weekly versus once monthly follow-up of pulmonary rehabilitation after a comprehensive home rehabilitation program on physical performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during an 18-mo period. Thirty-six patients with a mean FEV1 of 1.3 +/- 0.4 L (43% pred) were included in the study. Groups A and B (n = 23) visited the physical therapist twice weekly for 3 mo. Thereafter, 11 patients (Group A) had a follow-up of pulmonary rehabilitation once a week, and 12 patients (Group B) had a follow-up once a month. Thirteen patients received no rehabilitation at all (Group C). Long-term home rehabilitation does not appear to improve exercise tolerance; however, on the other hand, there is a deterioration in vital capacity (p < 0.01), walking distance (p < 0.01), and maximal work load (p < 0.05), as shown in the control group. A small improvement in exertional dyspnea (p < 0.01) after 18 mo and inspiratory muscle function (p < 0.05) after 12 mo was shown only in Group A. Because of the insufficient number of patients enrolled in this pilot study, no clear benefit on physical performance of long-term home rehabilitation with either weekly or monthly supervision could be demonstrated.

  5. Deciphering the function and regulation of microRNAs in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lifeng; Zhang, Wei; Tan, Eng King; Zeng, Li

    2014-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single stranded, noncoding RNA molecules that are encoded by eukaryotic nuclear DNA. miRNAs function through imperfect base-pairing with complementary sequences of target mRNA molecules, which is typically via the cleavage of target mRNA with transcriptional repression or translational degradation. An increasing number of studies identified dysregulation of miRNAs in neurodegenerative disease and suggest that alterations in the miRNA regulatory pathway could contribute to the disease pathogenesis. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological implications of dysregulated miRNA expression and regulation of the key genes that are involved in neurodegenerative diseases remain largely unknown. Here, we review the evidence for the functional role of dysregulated miRNAs involved in disease pathogenesis, as well as how miRNAs govern neuronal functions either upstream or downstream of target genes that are disease pathogenic factors. Furthermore, we review the cellular feedback regulation between miRNAs and target genes in neurodegenerative diseases, with a focus on Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  6. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  7. Physical Activity Play: The Nature and Function of a Neglected Aspect of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrini, A. D.; Smith, Peter K.

    1998-01-01

    Considers the nature and developmental functions of physical activity play. Distinguishes three kinds of physical activity play with consecutive age peaks: rhythmic stereotypies, exercise play, and rough-and-tumble play. Considers gender differences and function in terms of immediate and deferred consequences in physical, cognitive, and social…

  8. Restoration of synaptic function in sight for degenerative retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Timm; Wissinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic disorganization is a prominent feature of many neurological diseases of the CNS, including Parkinson’s disease, intellectual development disorders, and autism. Although synaptic plasticity is critical for learning and memory, it is unclear whether this innate property helps restore synaptic function in disease once the primary cause of disease is abrogated. An answer to this question may come from a recent investigation in X-linked retinoschisis, a currently untreatable retinopathy. In this issue of the JCI, Ou, Vijayasarathy, and colleagues showed progressive disorganization of key functional elements of the synapse between photoreceptors and ON-bipolar cells in a retinoschisin-deficient mouse model. Moreover, they demonstrated that adeno-associated virus–mediated (AAV-mediated) delivery of the retinoschisin gene restores structure and function to the photoreceptor to ON–bipolar cell synapse in mouse models, even in adults at advanced stages of the disease. The results of this study hold promise that AAV-based supplemental gene therapy will benefit patients with X-linked retinoschisis in a forthcoming clinical trial. PMID:26098210

  9. Altered Cardiomyocyte Function and Trypanosoma cruzi Persistence in Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Santos-Miranda, Artur; Sales-Junior, Policarpo Ademar; Monti-Rocha, Renata; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2016-05-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the triatominae Trypanosoma cruzi, is one of the leading causes of heart malfunctioning in Latin America. The cardiac phenotype is observed in 20-30% of infected people 10-40 years after their primary infection. The cardiac complications during Chagas disease range from cardiac arrhythmias to heart failure, with important involvement of the right ventricle. Interestingly, no studies have evaluated the electrical properties of right ventricle myocytes during Chagas disease and correlated them to parasite persistence. Taking advantage of a murine model of Chagas disease, we studied the histological and electrical properties of right ventricle in acute (30 days postinfection [dpi]) and chronic phases (90 dpi) of infected mice with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi and their correlation to parasite persistence. We observed an increase in collagen deposition and inflammatory infiltrate at both 30 and 90 dpi. Furthermore, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we detected parasites at 90 dpi in right and left ventricles. In addition, we observed action potential prolongation and reduced transient outward K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) current at 30 and 90 dpi. Taking together, our results demonstrate that T. cruzi infection leads to important modifications in electrical properties associated with inflammatory infiltrate and parasite persistence in mice right ventricle, suggesting a causal role between inflammation, parasite persistence, and altered cardiomyocyte function in Chagas disease. Thus, arrhythmias observed in Chagas disease may be partially related to altered electrical function in right ventricle.

  10. Synergistic Effects of Six Chronic Disease Pairs on Decreased Physical Activity: The SMILE Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dörenkamp, Sarah; Mesters, Ilse; Vos, Rein; Schepers, Jan; van den Akker, Marjan; Teijink, Joep; de Bie, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how two chronic diseases interact with each other in modifying the risk of physical inactivity. The aim of the present study is to identify chronic disease pairs that are associated with compliance or noncompliance with the Dutch PA guideline recommendation and to study whether specific chronic disease pairs indicate an extra effect on top of the effects of the diseases individually. Cross-sectional data from 3,386 participants of cohort study SMILE were used and logistic regression analysis was performed to study the joint effect of the two diseases of each chronic disease pair for compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. For six chronic disease pairs, patients suffering from both diseases belonging to these disease pairs in question show a higher probability of noncompliance to the Dutch PA guideline, compared to what one would expect based on the effects of each of the two diseases alone. These six chronic disease pairs were chronic respiratory disease and severe back problems; migraine and inflammatory joint disease; chronic respiratory disease and severe kidney disease; chronic respiratory disease and inflammatory joint disease; inflammatory joint disease and rheumatoid arthritis; and rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the knees, hips, and hands. PMID:27274994

  11. The associations of physical activity and television watching with change in kidney function in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Marquis; Newman, Anne B.; Madero, Magdalena; Patel, Kushang V.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Cooper, Jennifer; Johansen, Kirsten L.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Fried, Linda F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physical activity (PA) may play a role in preserving kidney health. The purpose of this study was to determine if PA and sedentary behavior are associated with incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and change in kidney function in older adults. METHODS The Health, Aging and Body Composition study is a prospective cohort of 3,075 well-functioning older adults. PA and television watching was measured by self-report and serum cystatin C was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). CKD was defined as an eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2. Rapid kidney function decline was defined as an annual loss in eGFR of >3ml/min/1.73m2. Discrete survival analysis was used to determine if baseline PA and television watching were related to 10-year cumulative incidence of CKD and rapid decline in kidney function. RESULTS Individuals who reported watching television >3 hours/day had a higher risk of incident CKD (HR 1.34; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.65) and experiencing a rapid decline in kidney function (HR 1.26; 95% CI 1.05, 1.52) compared to individuals who watched television < 2 hours/day. PA was not related to either outcome. CONCLUSIONS High levels of television watching are associated with declining kidney function; the mechanisms that underlie this association need further study. PMID:24762526

  12. Long-Term Effects of Physically Active Academic Lessons on Physical Fitness and Executive Functions in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Greeff, J. W.; Hartman, E.; Mullender-Wijnsma, M. J.; Bosker, R. J.; Doolaard, S.; Visscher, C.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating physical activity into the curriculum has potential health and cognitive benefits in primary school children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of physically active academic lessons on cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness and executive functions. In the current randomized controlled trial, 499 second and third…

  13. Impaired cortico-striatal functional connectivity in prodromal Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Unschuld, Paul G; Joel, Suresh E; Liu, Xinyang; Shanahan, Megan; Margolis, Russell L; Biglan, Kevin M; Bassett, Susan S; Schretlen, David J; Redgrave, Graham W; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Ross, Christopher A

    2012-04-18

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG triplet-repeat expansion-mutation in the Huntingtin gene. Subjects at risk for HD can be identified by genetic testing in the prodromal phase. Structural changes of basal-ganglia nuclei such as the caudate nucleus are well-replicated findings observable early in prodromal-HD subjects and may be preceded by distinct functional alterations of cortico-striatal circuits. This study aims to assess functional integrity of the motor system as a cortico-striatal circuit with particular clinical relevance in HD. Ten subjects in the prodromal phase of HD and ten matched controls were administered blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at rest (3T). Functional connectivity was measured as synchrony of BOLD activity between the caudate nucleus and thirteen cortical brain regions (seeds). Basal-ganglia volumes were assessed as established markers of disease progression in prodromal-HD. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for a relationship between structural changes and group differences in functional connectivity. Prodromal-HD subjects showed reduced BOLD synchrony between two seeds in the premotor cortex (BA6) and the caudate nucleus. While similar effect sizes could be observed for reduced basal-ganglia volumes and differences in functional connectivity, coefficients of determination indicate a moderate relationship between functional connectivity and striatal atrophy. Our data show reduced cortico-striatal functional connectivity at rest in prodromal-HD and suggest a relation to early structural brain changes. Additional longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the temporal relationship between functional alterations and earliest structural brain changes in prodromal-HD.

  14. Prefrontal cortical blood flow and cognitive function in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, D R; Berman, K F; Iadarola, M; Driesen, N; Zec, R F

    1988-01-01

    To examine the relationship between cortical physiology and dementia in Huntington's disease, rCBF during three different behavioural conditions, one of which emphasised prefrontal cognition, was determined by xenon-133 inhalation in 14 patients with Huntington's disease and in matched controls. Cortical rCBF was not reduced in Huntington's disease patients even while they manifested overt prefrontal-type cognitive deficits. Caudate atrophy on CT and rCBF were significantly correlated, but only during the prefrontal behaviour where the correlation was positive. These results suggest a qualification of the subcortical dementia concept as applied to Huntington's disease and implicate an interaction between pathology that is subcortical and cognitive function that is cortical. Images PMID:2965218

  15. Normal huntingtin function: an alternative approach to Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Elena; Zuccato, Chiara; Tartari, Marzia

    2005-12-01

    Several neurological diseases are characterized by the altered activity of one or a few ubiquitously expressed cell proteins, but it is not known how these normal proteins turn into harmful executors of selective neuronal cell death. We selected huntingtin in Huntington's disease to explore this question because the dominant inheritance pattern of the disease seems to exclude the possibility that the wild-type protein has a role in the natural history of this condition. However, even in this extreme case, there is considerable evidence that normal huntingtin is important for neuronal function and that the activity of some of its downstream effectors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, is reduced in Huntington's disease. PMID:16288298

  16. Alterations of pulmonary function in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao-Qing; Ji, Yan-Bo; Wang, Shan-Xin; Zhang, Cai-Qing; Lu, De-Gan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and their relationship with disease activity in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). METHODS: Sixty-four IBD patients (31 Crohn's disease [CD] and 33 ulcerative colitis [UC]) and thirty healthy individuals (controls) were studied with regard to the following parameters of PFTs: Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), their ratio, mid-forced expiratory flow of 25–75% (FEF 25–75), residual volume, total lung capacity, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO). The disease activity was calculated using the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for CD and Mayo Clinic Score for UC. Correlation analysis was performed between disease activity and sputum cytology and PFTs. RESULTS: Nineteen of the 31 CD patients (61.29%) and 17 of the 33 UC patients (51.52%) but none of the controls showed at least one abnormal PFTs (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, both CD and UC patients exhibited a significant reduction in FEV1 (P < 0.05), FVC (P < 0.05), FEF 25–75 (P < 0.05), and DLCO (P < 0.05). The majority with decreased measurements of PFTs were in the active phase of diseases (P < 0.05). IBD activity scores correlated negatively with some parameters of PFTs and positively with lymphocytosis and eosinophilia of sputum (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary function disorders are significantly common in IBD patients. The impairment in active disease is significantly greater than in remission. PMID:27803750

  17. Daily energy expenditure and physical activity measured in Parkinson's disease patients with and without weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss, which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated resting energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REF) and physical activit...

  18. Effects of exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity covers not just sports but also simple everyday movements such as housework, walking and playing. Regular exercise has a great importance in maintaining good health, indeed inactivity is a risk factor for different chronic diseases. Physical exercise can play a crucial role in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, optimizing both physical and mental health, enhancing energy, decreasing fatigue and improving sleep. An exercise program for patients with rheumatic diseases aims to preserve or restore a range of motion of the affected joints, to increase muscle strength and endurance, and to improve mood and decrease health risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle. In this editorial I describe the benefits of the exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases that seem to have a short and long-term effectiveness. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords based on the present editorial. PMID:26601057

  19. Daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss (WL) which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity (P...

  20. Effects of exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2015-11-18

    Physical activity covers not just sports but also simple everyday movements such as housework, walking and playing. Regular exercise has a great importance in maintaining good health, indeed inactivity is a risk factor for different chronic diseases. Physical exercise can play a crucial role in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, optimizing both physical and mental health, enhancing energy, decreasing fatigue and improving sleep. An exercise program for patients with rheumatic diseases aims to preserve or restore a range of motion of the affected joints, to increase muscle strength and endurance, and to improve mood and decrease health risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle. In this editorial I describe the benefits of the exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases that seem to have a short and long-term effectiveness. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords based on the present editorial. PMID:26601057

  1. Physical Exercise with Multicomponent Cognitive Intervention for Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease: A 6-Month Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ji; Han, Chang-Wan; Min, Kyoung-Youn; Cho, Chae-Yoon; Lee, Chae-Won; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Mori, Etsuro; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to investigate the effect of 6-month physical exercise with a multicomponent cognitive program (MCP) on the cognitive function of older adults with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods We included 33 participants with AD in a 6-month randomized controlled trial. The intervention group participated in physical exercise and received a MCP. The control group received only the MCP. Before and after the intervention, cognitive outcomes were assessed using the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog), Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Clock Drawing Test. Physical performance was evaluated by exercise time, the number of pedal rotation, total load, grip strength, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Results In all cognitive measures, there were no significant improvements between the two groups after 6 months in the baseline value-adjusted primary analysis. However, the ADAS-cog score was significantly lower between the two groups in secondary analysis adjusted for baseline value, age, sex, and education years. All physical outcomes were significantly higher in the intervention group except for total load compared with baseline measurements. Conclusion This study indicates that it is possible to improve cognitive function in older adults with moderate to severe AD through 6-month physical exercise with a multicomponent cognitive intervention. PMID:27403134

  2. Physical and functional properties of arrowroot starch extrudates.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, A N; Sheriff, J T; Sajeev, M S

    2009-03-01

    Arrowroot starch, a commercially underexploited tuber starch but having potential digestive and medicinal properties, has been subjected to extrusion cooking using a single screw food extruder. Different levels of feed moisture (12%, 14%, and 16%) and extrusion temperatures (140, 150, 160, 170, 180, and 190 degrees C) were used for extrusion. The physical properties--bulk density, true density, porosity, and expansion ratio; functional properties such as water absorption index, water solubility index, oil absorption index, pasting, rheological, and textural properties; and in vitro enzyme digestibility of the extrudates were determined. The expansion ratio of the extrudates ranged from 3.22 to 6.09. The water absorption index (6.52 to 8.85 g gel/g dry sample), water solubility index (15.92% to 41.31%), and oil absorption index (0.50 to 1.70 g/g) were higher for the extrudates in comparison to native starch (1.81 g gel/g dry sample, 1.16% and 0.60 g/g, respectively). The rheological properties, storage modulus, and loss modulus of the gelatinized powdered extrudates were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and these behaved like solutions rather than a paste or a gel. Hardness and toughness were more for the samples extruded at higher feed moisture and lower extrusion temperature, whereas snap force and energy were higher at lower feed moisture and temperature. There was a significant decrease in the percentage digestibility of arrowroot starch (30.07% after 30 min of incubation with the enzyme) after extrusion (25.27% to 30.56%). Extrusion cooking of arrowroot starch resulted in products with very good expansion, color, and lower digestibility, which can be exploited for its potential use as a snack food. PMID:19323747

  3. Physical and functional properties of arrowroot starch extrudates.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, A N; Sheriff, J T; Sajeev, M S

    2009-03-01

    Arrowroot starch, a commercially underexploited tuber starch but having potential digestive and medicinal properties, has been subjected to extrusion cooking using a single screw food extruder. Different levels of feed moisture (12%, 14%, and 16%) and extrusion temperatures (140, 150, 160, 170, 180, and 190 degrees C) were used for extrusion. The physical properties--bulk density, true density, porosity, and expansion ratio; functional properties such as water absorption index, water solubility index, oil absorption index, pasting, rheological, and textural properties; and in vitro enzyme digestibility of the extrudates were determined. The expansion ratio of the extrudates ranged from 3.22 to 6.09. The water absorption index (6.52 to 8.85 g gel/g dry sample), water solubility index (15.92% to 41.31%), and oil absorption index (0.50 to 1.70 g/g) were higher for the extrudates in comparison to native starch (1.81 g gel/g dry sample, 1.16% and 0.60 g/g, respectively). The rheological properties, storage modulus, and loss modulus of the gelatinized powdered extrudates were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and these behaved like solutions rather than a paste or a gel. Hardness and toughness were more for the samples extruded at higher feed moisture and lower extrusion temperature, whereas snap force and energy were higher at lower feed moisture and temperature. There was a significant decrease in the percentage digestibility of arrowroot starch (30.07% after 30 min of incubation with the enzyme) after extrusion (25.27% to 30.56%). Extrusion cooking of arrowroot starch resulted in products with very good expansion, color, and lower digestibility, which can be exploited for its potential use as a snack food.

  4. Concept of functional imaging of memory decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Drzezga, Alexander

    2008-04-01

    Functional imaging methods such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) have contributed inestimably to the understanding of physiological cognitive processes in the brain in the recent decades. These techniques for the first time allowed the in vivo assessment of different features of brain function in the living human subject. It was therefore obvious to apply these methods to evaluate pathomechanisms of cognitive dysfunction in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well. One of the most dominant symptoms of AD is the impairment of memory. In this context, the term "memory" represents a simplification and summarizes a set of complex cognitive functions associated with encoding and retrieval of different types of information. A number of imaging studies assessed the functional changes of neuronal activity in the brain at rest and also during performance of cognitive work, with regard to specific characteristics of memory decline in AD. In the current article, basic principles of common functional imaging procedures will be explained and it will be discussed how they can be reasonably applied for the assessment of memory decline in AD. Furthermore, it will be illustrated how these imaging procedures have been employed to improve early and specific diagnosis of the disease, to understand specific pathomechanisms of memory dysfunction and associated compensatory mechanisms, and to draw reverse conclusions on physiological function of memory.

  5. Prefrontal executive function associated coupling relates to Huntington's disease stage.

    PubMed

    Unschuld, Paul G; Liu, Xinyang; Shanahan, Megan; Margolis, Russell L; Bassett, Susan S; Brandt, Jason; Schretlen, David J; Redgrave, Graham W; Hua, Jun; Hock, Christoph; Reading, Sarah A; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Ross, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG)-repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Early changes that may precede clinical manifestation of movement disorder include executive dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify functional network correlates of impaired higher cognitive functioning in relation to HD stage. Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional-magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and structural-MRI were performed in 53 subjects with the HD-mutation (41 prodromals, 12 early affected) and 52 controls. Disease stage was estimated for each subject with HD-mutation based on age, length of the CAG-repeat expansion mutation and also putaminal atrophy. The Tower of London test was administered with three levels of complexity during fMRI as a challenge of executive function. Functional brain networks of interest were identified based on cortical gray matter voxel-clusters with significantly enhanced task-related functional coupling to the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) area. While prodromal HD-subjects showed similar performance levels as controls, multivariate analysis of task-related functional coupling to the MPFC identified reduced connectivity in prodromal and early manifest HD-subjects for a cluster including mainly parts of the left premotor area. Secondary testing indicated a significant moderator effect for task complexity on group differences and on the degree of correlation to measures of HD stage. Our data suggest that impaired premotor-MPFC coupling reflects HD stage related dysfunction of cognitive systems involved in executive function and may be present in prodromal HD-subjects that are still cognitively normal. Additional longitudinal studies may reveal temporal relationships between impaired task-related premotor-MPFC coupling and other brain changes in HD.

  6. Therapist Competency as a Function of Physical Attractiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Carmen

    Research has suggested that physical attractiveness contributes to subjects' perception of female competency. This finding has generated interest in investigating the effect of physical attractiveness on subjects' perceptions of competency in male and female therapists. Undergraduates (N=192) viewed a 15-minute videotaped session reflecting either…

  7. Analysis of physical fitness and coronary heart disease risk of Dallas area police officers.

    PubMed

    Pollock, M L; Gettman, L R; Meyer, B U

    1978-06-01

    Two hundred thirteen male police officers between 21 and 52 years of age volunteered to participate in a physical evaluation and conditioning program. Information concerning the physical fitness status and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) of police officers were shown. Younger police officers (less than 30 years of age) were average in physical fitness levels and CHD risk compared to the population of the same age. Middle-aged police officers were shown to be lower in physical fitness levels and higher in CHD risk compared to their cohorts. The results from this investigation support the need for physical fitness and preventive medicine programs for police officers.

  8. Prebiotics as functional food ingredients preventing diet-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Florowska, A; Krygier, K; Florowski, T; Dłużewska, E

    2016-05-18

    This paper reviews the potential of prebiotic-containing foods in the prevention or postponement of certain diet-related diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases with hypercholesterolemia, osteoporosis, diabetes, gastrointestinal infections and gut inflammation. Also the data on prebiotics as food ingredients and their impact on food product quality are presented. Prebiotics are short chain carbohydrates that are resistant to the digestion process in the upper part of the digestive system, are not absorbed in any segment of the gastrointestinal system, and finally are selectively fermented by specific genera of colonic bacteria. The mechanisms of the beneficial impacts of prebiotics on human health are very difficult to specify directly, because their health-promoting functions are related to fermentation by intestinal microflora. The impact of prebiotics on diet-related diseases in many ways also depends on the products of their fermentation. Prebiotics as functional food ingredients also have an impact on the quality of food products, due to their textural and gelling properties. Prebiotics as food additives can be very valuable in the creation of functional food aimed at preventing or postponing many diet-related diseases. They additionally have beneficial technological properties which improve the quality of food products.

  9. Functional roles of alternative splicing factors in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Cieply, Benjamin; Carstens, Russ P

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism used to generate greater transcriptomic and proteomic diversity from a finite genome. Nearly all human gene transcripts are alternatively spliced and can produce protein isoforms with divergent and even antagonistic properties that impact cell functions. Many AS events are tightly regulated in a cell-type or tissue-specific manner, and at different developmental stages. AS is regulated by RNA-binding proteins, including cell- or tissue-specific splicing factors. In the past few years, technological advances have defined genome-wide programs of AS regulated by increasing numbers of splicing factors. These splicing regulatory networks (SRNs) consist of transcripts that encode proteins that function in coordinated and related processes that impact the development and phenotypes of different cell types. As such, it is increasingly recognized that disruption of normal programs of splicing regulated by different splicing factors can lead to human diseases. We will summarize examples of diseases in which altered expression or function of splicing regulatory proteins has been implicated in human disease pathophysiology. As the role of AS continues to be unveiled in human disease and disease risk, it is hoped that further investigations into the functions of numerous splicing factors and their regulated targets will enable the development of novel therapies that are directed at specific AS events as well as the biological pathways they impact. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:311–326. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1276 For further resources related to this article, please visit the http://wires.wiley.com/remdoi.cgi?doi=10.1002/wrna.1276WIREs website. Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. PMID:25630614

  10. Factors Contributing to Satisfaction with Changes in Physical Function after Orthopedic Surgery for Musculoskeletal Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Nitta, Osamu; Matsuo, Atsushi; Takaki, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background The recognition of required treatments for cerebral palsy (CP) patients, including orthopedic surgery, differs according to region. This study was performed to identify factors associated with satisfactory changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. Methods 358 patients were selected for the questionnaire survey. The following information was collected: gender, primary disease, age of initial surgery, total procedural count, operated sites, satisfaction of postoperative rehabilitation frequency, ideal amount of postoperative rehabilitation sessions per week, frequency of voluntary home training per week, satisfaction of the timing of surgery and the current satisfaction with the changes in physical function after the orthopedic surgery. We classified the patients into the satisfied and dissatisfied group according to satisfactory changes in physical function after the surgery. We performed unpaired t-tests and chi-square tests to determine the variables that differed significantly between the groups. Variables with a p value of <0.2 were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The logistic model was revised and summed up to two potential predictors of postsurgical satisfaction with physical function: satisfaction with the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation sessions and the orthopedic surgery of the hip (distinction hit ratio, 75.4%). Conclusions This study demonstrated that the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation and history of hip surgery seemed to be related to the satisfaction with the changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27135609

  11. Validity of a Questionnaire to Assess the Physical Activity Level in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Granger, Richard; Bousquet, Marc; Gremeaux, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare, in coronary artery disease patients, physical activity (PA) assessed with the Dijon Physical Activity Questionnaire (DPAQ) and the true PA objectively measured using an accelerometer. Seventy patients wore an accelerometer (MyWellness Key actimeter) throughout 1 week after a cardiac rehabilitation program that…

  12. Abnormal fronto-striatal functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinping; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Jiaojian; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao; Zhang, Yuanchao

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the relatively selective depletion of dopamine in the striatum, which consequently leads to dysfunctions in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuitries. It has been shown that the most common cognitive deficits in PD patients are related to the fronto-striatal circuits. In PD, most previous functional connectivity studies have been performed using seed-based methods to identify the brain regions that are abnormally connected to one or more seeds, but these cannot be used to quantify the interactions between one region and all other regions in a particular network. Functional connectivity degree, which is a measurement that can be used to quantify the functional or structural connectivity of a complex brain network, was adopted in this study to assess the interactions of the fronto-striatal network. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients had significantly decreased total functional connectivity degree for the left putamen and the right globus pallidum in fronto-striatal networks. Additionally, negative correlations between the fronto-pallial functional connectivity degree (i.e., the right globus pallidum with the left middle frontal gyrus, and with the right triangular part of inferior frontal gyrus) and disease duration were observed in PD patients. The results of this study demonstrate that fronto-striatal functional connectivity is abnormal in patients with PD and indicate that these deficits might be the result of motor and cognitive dysfunctions in PD patients. PMID:26724369

  13. Association between Body Mass Index and Physical Function among Endometrial Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to quantify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and physical function among endometrial cancer survivors. Understanding this relationship would help healthcare providers target efforts to refer obese endometrial cancer survivors to weight loss and exercise interventions. Methods We conducted a survey of 213 endometrial cancer survivors who received cancer care at an academic l health system between 2006 and 2010. Physical function subscale was quantified using physical functional component score from the SF-12 questionnaire. We compared physical function of endometrial cancer survivors to population-based age-standardized normative values. Results Among the 213 patients, 16% were normal weight (BMI ≤25 kg/m2), and 52% were obese (≥30 kg/m2). Higher BMI categories were associated with lower physical function (Ptrend = 0.003), as a continuous variable each 5kg/m2 higher BMI, physical function score was lower by 0.15 points (β = -0.15; P = 0.045). Compared to population-based age-standardized normative values, patients <75yrs reported lower physical function, whereas patients ≥75yrs reported better physical function. BMI was the only covariate associated with differences in physical function between survivors and age-standardized normative values (P = 0.039). Conclusions Among endometrial cancer survivors, higher BMI is associated with lower physical function. Younger endometrial cancer survivors report lower physical function compared to age-standardized normative values. Healthcare providers should be aware that younger, obese endometrial cancer survivors may particularly benefit from interventions such as exercise and weight loss to increase or preserve physical function. PMID:27529546

  14. Burden of physical inactivity and hospitalization costs due to chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bielemann, Renata Moraes; da Silva, Bruna Gonçalves Cordeiro; Coll, Carolina de Vargas Nunes; Xavier, Mariana Otero; da Silva, Shana Ginar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the physical inactivity-related inpatient costs of chronic non-communicable diseases. METHODS This study used data from 2013, from Brazilian Unified Health System, regarding inpatient numbers and costs due to malignant colon and breast neoplasms, cerebrovascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases, hypertension, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In order to calculate the share physical inactivity represents in that, the physical inactivity-related risks, which apply to each disease, were considered, and physical inactivity prevalence during leisure activities was obtained from Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey). The analysis was stratified by genders and residing country regions of subjects who were 40 years or older. The physical inactivity-related hospitalization cost regarding each cause was multiplied by the respective share it regarded to. RESULTS In 2013, 974,641 patients were admitted due to seven different causes in Brazil, which represented a high cost. South region was found to have the highest patient admission rate in most studied causes. The highest prevalences for physical inactivity were observed in North and Northeast regions. The highest inactivity-related share in men was found for osteoporosis in all regions (≈ 35.0%), whereas diabetes was found to have a higher share regarding inactivity in women (33.0% to 37.0% variation in the regions). Ischemic heart diseases accounted for the highest total costs that could be linked to physical inactivity in all regions and for both genders, being followed by cerebrovascular diseases. Approximately 15.0% of inpatient costs from Brazilian Unified Health System were connected to physical inactivity. CONCLUSIONS Physical inactivity significantly impacts the number of patient admissions due to the evaluated causes and through their resulting costs, with different genders and country regions representing different shares. PMID:26487291

  15. Exercise interventions and peripheral arterial function: implications for cardio-metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shane A; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Brown, Michael D; Haus, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for the development of obesity and other cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a key event in the development of CVD and is associated with a sedentary lifestyle in otherwise healthy adults. In addition, vascular endothelial dysfunction may be exacerbated in sedentary individuals who are obese and insulin resistant, since excess body fat is associated with elevated levels of pro-atherogenic inflammatory adipokines and cytokines that reduce the nitric oxide (NO) and other upstream paracrine signaling substances which reduces vascular health. Since blood flow-related shear stress is a major stimulus to NO release from the endothelium, disturbed flow or low shear stress is the likely mechanism by which vascular endothelial function is altered with inactivity. Evidence shows that regular physical exercise has beneficial effects on CVD and the risk factors that promote peripheral arterial function and health. Both aerobic and resistance exercise training are generally believed to improve endothelial function and are commonly recommended for CV health, including the management of obesity, hypertension, and insulin resistance. However, many factors including age, disease status, and race appear to influence these outcomes. Although evidence supporting the health benefits of exercise is compelling, the optimum prescription (volume and intensity) and the exact mechanism underlying the effects of exercise training on arterial function and cardiometabolic risk has yet to be identified. The focus of this review will be on the evidence supporting exercise interventions for peripheral arterial function. PMID:25529367

  16. Exercise interventions and peripheral arterial function: implications for cardio-metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shane A; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Brown, Michael D; Haus, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for the development of obesity and other cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a key event in the development of CVD and is associated with a sedentary lifestyle in otherwise healthy adults. In addition, vascular endothelial dysfunction may be exacerbated in sedentary individuals who are obese and insulin resistant, since excess body fat is associated with elevated levels of pro-atherogenic inflammatory adipokines and cytokines that reduce the nitric oxide (NO) and other upstream paracrine signaling substances which reduces vascular health. Since blood flow-related shear stress is a major stimulus to NO release from the endothelium, disturbed flow or low shear stress is the likely mechanism by which vascular endothelial function is altered with inactivity. Evidence shows that regular physical exercise has beneficial effects on CVD and the risk factors that promote peripheral arterial function and health. Both aerobic and resistance exercise training are generally believed to improve endothelial function and are commonly recommended for CV health, including the management of obesity, hypertension, and insulin resistance. However, many factors including age, disease status, and race appear to influence these outcomes. Although evidence supporting the health benefits of exercise is compelling, the optimum prescription (volume and intensity) and the exact mechanism underlying the effects of exercise training on arterial function and cardiometabolic risk has yet to be identified. The focus of this review will be on the evidence supporting exercise interventions for peripheral arterial function.

  17. Somatic symptom disorders without known physical causes: one disease with many names?

    PubMed

    Tavel, Morton E

    2015-10-01

    Patients complaining of pain or fatigue in the absence of known physical diseases constitute a high percentage of those seeking general medical care. Depending upon the type of physician/specialist consulted, those individuals may receive disease labels that range from an implied psychological origin such as somatoform or psychosomatic disease, or to a presumed physical disease such as fibromyalgia. Although all these conditions are regularly associated with fatigue, we have provided a new label suggesting another disease category, "systemic exertion intolerance disease," which replaces the previous "chronic fatigue syndrome." All these conditions have common, overlapping features that usually consist of both fatigue and pain, and, in the absence of definitive objective confirmation, might be best classified under one heading such as somatic symptom disorder. Management of these disorders is challenging, but suggestions for proper identification and treatment are presented.

  18. Somatic symptom disorders without known physical causes: one disease with many names?

    PubMed

    Tavel, Morton E

    2015-10-01

    Patients complaining of pain or fatigue in the absence of known physical diseases constitute a high percentage of those seeking general medical care. Depending upon the type of physician/specialist consulted, those individuals may receive disease labels that range from an implied psychological origin such as somatoform or psychosomatic disease, or to a presumed physical disease such as fibromyalgia. Although all these conditions are regularly associated with fatigue, we have provided a new label suggesting another disease category, "systemic exertion intolerance disease," which replaces the previous "chronic fatigue syndrome." All these conditions have common, overlapping features that usually consist of both fatigue and pain, and, in the absence of definitive objective confirmation, might be best classified under one heading such as somatic symptom disorder. Management of these disorders is challenging, but suggestions for proper identification and treatment are presented. PMID:26031885

  19. Suicidal ideation and its determinants in Korean adults: The role of physical activity and functional limitations.

    PubMed

    Park, S M

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of suicide as a major public health problem has suggested the need to identify risk factors that have implications for preventive intervention. In the suicidal process, suicidal ideation is a key stage in the pathway leading to eventual suicide. This study investigated the influence of physical activity and functional limitations on suicidal ideation among young and middle-aged adults in a high suicidal society. Data for the current study were obtained from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2009 (KNHANES), a cross-sectional study conducted by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The survey conducted face-to-face interviews with young adults (n = 2326) and middle-aged adults (n = 3396). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, the relationship of physical activity and functional limitations with suicidal ideation in young and middle-aged adults was assessed. A notable outcome was that the absence of a regular walking was correlated with increased suicidal ideation in middle-aged women. The other major finding was that young women and middle-aged adults with functional limitations had a high rate of suicidal thoughts. Multiple intervention approaches, including informational, social and behavioural approaches, are needed to promote regular walking in middle-aged women. For instance, mass media campaigns, community walking groups and individually adapted health behaviour modification may provide opportunities for positive intervention. Additionally, another important public health implication from these findings is the need for a suicide-intervention support system that includes screening for suicide risk in healthcare settings, especially among young women with physical limitations. PMID:25434531

  20. The corneal epithelial basement membrane: structure, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, André A M; Singh, Vivek; Santhiago, Marcony R; Wilson, Steven E

    2013-09-01

    The corneal epithelial basement membrane (BM) is positioned between basal epithelial cells and the stroma. This highly specialized extracellular matrix functions not only to anchor epithelial cells to the stroma and provide scaffolding during embryonic development but also during migration, differentiation, and maintenance of the differentiated epithelial phenotype. Basement membranes are composed of a diverse assemblage of extracellular molecules, some of which are likely specific to the tissue where they function; but in general they are composed of four primary components--collagens, laminins, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, and nidogens--in addition to other components such as thrombospondin-1, matrilin-2, and matrilin-4 and even fibronectin in some BM. Many studies have focused on characterizing BM due to their potential roles in normal tissue function and disease, and these structures have been well characterized in many tissues. Comparatively few studies, however, have focused on the function of the epithelial BM in corneal physiology. Since the normal corneal stroma is avascular and has relatively low keratocyte density, it is expected that the corneal BM would be different from the BM in other tissues. One function that appears critical in homeostasis and wound healing is the barrier function to penetration of cytokines from the epithelium to stroma (such as transforming growth factor β-1), and possibly from stroma to epithelium (such as keratinocyte growth factor). The corneal epithelial BM is also involved in many inherited and acquired corneal diseases. This review examines this structure in detail and discusses the importance of corneal epithelial BM in homeostasis, wound healing, and disease.

  1. Genomic Physics. Multiple Laser Beam Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The synapses affected by Alzheimer's disease can be rejuvenated by the multiple ultrashort wavelength laser beams.[2] The guiding lasers scan the whole area to detect the amyloid plaques based on the laser scattering technique. The scanning lasers pinpoint the areas with plaques and eliminate them. Laser interaction is highly efficient, because of the focusing capabilities and possibility for the identification of the damaging proteins by matching the protein oscillation eigen-frequency with laser frequency.[3] Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, La Jolla, California, USA.

  2. Variations in patient-reported physical health between cardiac and musculoskeletal diseases: systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Prior, James A; Jordan, Kelvin P; Kadam, Umesh T

    2015-01-01

    .9) compared to the hypertension category. For osteoarthritis -4.2 (-5.3 to -3.0) and rheumatoid arthritis -3.9 (-9.5 to 1.6) compared to the lower back pain category. Our findings provide the benchmark norms for the differences in physical health within and between disease spectra. Improved characterisation of the relative impact of individual conditions on physical health will facilitate public health assessments of chronic diseases as well as assessments of interventions using functional patient-reported outcomes.

  3. High-density lipoprotein functionality in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, Constantine E; Christodoulidis, Georgios; Cheng, Jeh-wei; Vittorio, Timothy J; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    The role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in cardiovascular atheroprotection is well established. Epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL levels and the risk for coronary artery disease, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein levels. However, more recent data provide evidence that high HDL levels are not always protective and that under certain conditions may even confer an increased risk. Thus, a new concept has arisen, which stresses the importance of HDL functionality, rather than HDL concentration per se, in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. HDL functionality is genetically defined but can also be modified by several environmental and lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking or certain pharmacologic interventions. Furthermore, HDL is consisted of a heterogeneous group of particles with major differences in their structural, biological and functional properties. Recently, the cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages was proven to be an excellent metric of HDL functionality, because it was shown to have a strong inverse relationship with the risk of angiographically documented coronary artery disease, independent of the HDL and apolipoprotein A-1 levels, although it may not actually predict the prospective risk for cardiovascular events. Thus, improving the quality of HDL may represent a better therapeutic target than simply raising the HDL level, and assessment of HDL function may prove informative in refining our understanding of HDL-mediated atheroprotection.

  4. Androgen actions on endothelium functions and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing-Jing; Wen, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lin, Jian; Hong, Yuan; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The roles of androgens on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology are controversial as both beneficial and detrimental effects have been reported. Although the reasons for this discrepancy are unclear, multiple factors such as genetic and epigenetic variation, sex-specificity, hormone interactions, drug preparation and route of administration may contribute. Recently, growing evidence suggests that androgens exhibit beneficial effects on cardiovascular function though the mechanism remains to be elucidated. Endothelial cells (ECs) which line the interior surface of blood vessels are distributed throughout the circulatory system, and play a crucial role in cardiovascular function. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are considered an indispensable element for the reconstitution and maintenance of an intact endothelial layer. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as an initiating step in development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of endothelial functions by androgens through either genomic or nongenomic signal pathways is one possible mechanism by which androgens act on the cardiovascular system. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms by which androgens affect EC and EPC functions will allow us to determine whether androgens possess beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. This in turn may be critical in the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases. This article seeks to review recent progress in androgen regulation of endothelial function, the sex-specificity of androgen actions, and its clinical applications in the cardiovascular system. PMID:27168746

  5. Decreased coherence and functional connectivity of electroencephalograph in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Wei, Xile; Yang, Chen; Deng, Bin

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the abnormalities of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) by analyzing 16-scalp electrodes EEG signals and make a comparison with the normal controls. Coherence is introduced to measure the pair-wise normalized linear synchrony and functional correlations between two EEG signals in different frequency domains, and graph analysis is further used to investigate the influence of AD on the functional connectivity of human brain. Data analysis results show that, compared with the control group, the pair-wise coherence of AD group is significantly decreased, especially for the theta and alpha frequency bands in the frontal and parieto-occipital regions. Furthermore, functional connectivity among different brain regions is reconstructed based on EEG, which exhibit obvious small-world properties. Graph analysis demonstrates that the local functional connections between regions for AD decrease. In addition, it is found that small-world properties of AD networks are largely weakened, by calculating its average path lengths, clustering coefficients, global efficiency, local efficiency, and small-worldness. The obtained results show that both pair-wise coherence and functional network can be taken as effective measures to distinguish AD patients from the normal, which may benefit our understanding of the disease.

  6. Androgen actions on endothelium functions and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing-Jing; Wen, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lin, Jian; Hong, Yuan; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-02-01

    The roles of androgens on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology are controversial as both beneficial and detrimental effects have been reported. Although the reasons for this discrepancy are unclear, multiple factors such as genetic and epigenetic variation, sex-specificity, hormone interactions, drug preparation and route of administration may contribute. Recently, growing evidence suggests that androgens exhibit beneficial effects on cardiovascular function though the mechanism remains to be elucidated. Endothelial cells (ECs) which line the interior surface of blood vessels are distributed throughout the circulatory system, and play a crucial role in cardiovascular function. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are considered an indispensable element for the reconstitution and maintenance of an intact endothelial layer. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as an initiating step in development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of endothelial functions by androgens through either genomic or nongenomic signal pathways is one possible mechanism by which androgens act on the cardiovascular system. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms by which androgens affect EC and EPC functions will allow us to determine whether androgens possess beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. This in turn may be critical in the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases. This article seeks to review recent progress in androgen regulation of endothelial function, the sex-specificity of androgen actions, and its clinical applications in the cardiovascular system.

  7. Structural and functional hepatocyte polarity and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gissen, Paul; Arias, Irwin M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocytes form a crucially important cell layer that separates sinusoidal blood from the canalicular bile. They have a uniquely organized polarity with a basal membrane facing liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, while one or more apical poles can contribute to several bile canaliculi jointly with the directly opposing hepatocytes. Establishment and maintenance of hepatocyte polarity is essential for many functions of hepatocytes and requires carefully orchestrated cooperation between cell adhesion molecules, cell junctions, cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix and intracellular trafficking machinery. The process of hepatocyte polarization requires energy and, if abnormal, may result in severe liver disease. A number of inherited disorders affecting tight junction and intracellular trafficking proteins have been described and demonstrate clinical and pathophysiological features overlapping those of the genetic cholestatic liver diseases caused by defects in canalicular ABC transporters. Thus both structural and functional components contribute to the final hepatocyte polarity phenotype. Many acquired liver diseases target factors that determine hepatocyte polarity, such as junctional proteins. Hepatocyte depolarization frequently occurs but is rarely recognized because hematoxylin-eosin staining does not identify the bile canaliculus. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not well understood. Here we aim to provide an update on the key factors determining hepatocyte polarity and how it is affected in inherited and acquired diseases.

  8. Prediction of functional regulatory SNPs in monogenic and complex disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yiqiang; Clark, Wyatt T.; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N.; Radivojac, Predrag; Mooney, Sean D.

    2013-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are yielding ever-higher volumes of human genome sequence data. Given this large amount of data, it has become both a possibility and a priority to determine how disease-causing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detected within gene regulatory regions (rSNPs) exert their effects on gene expression. Recently, several studies have explored whether disease-causing polymorphisms have attributes that can distinguish them from those that are neutral, attaining moderate success at discriminating between functional and putatively neutral regulatory SNPs. Here, we have extended this work by assessing the utility of both SNP-based features (those associated only with the polymorphism site and the surrounding DNA) and Gene-based features (those derived from the associated gene in whose regulatory region the SNP lies) in the identification of functional regulatory polymorphisms involved in either monogenic or complex disease. Gene-based features were found to be capable of both augmenting and enhancing the utility of SNP-based features in the prediction of known regulatory mutations. Adopting this approach, we achieved an AUC of 0.903 for predicting regulatory SNPs. Finally, our tool predicted 225 new regulatory SNPs with a high degree of confidence, with 105 of the 225 falling into linkage disequilibrium blocks of reported disease-associated GWAS SNPs. PMID:21796725

  9. Structural and functional hepatocyte polarity and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gissen, Paul; Arias, Irwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes form a crucially important cell layer that separates sinusoidal blood from the canalicular bile. They have a uniquely organized polarity with a basal membrane facing liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, while one or more apical poles can contribute to several bile canaliculi jointly with the directly opposing hepatocytes. Establishment and maintenance of hepatocyte polarity is essential for many functions of hepatocytes and requires carefully orchestrated cooperation between cell adhesion molecules, cell junctions, cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix and intracellular trafficking machinery. The process of hepatocyte polarization requires energy and, if abnormal, may result in severe liver disease. A number of inherited disorders affecting tight junction and intracellular trafficking proteins have been described and demonstrate clinical and pathophysiological features overlapping those of the genetic cholestatic liver diseases caused by defects in canalicular ABC transporters. Thus both structural and functional components contribute to the final hepatocyte polarity phenotype. Many acquired liver diseases target factors that determine hepatocyte polarity, such as junctional proteins. Hepatocyte depolarization frequently occurs but is rarely recognized because hematoxylin-eosin staining does not identify the bile canaliculus. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not well understood. Here we aim to provide an update on the key factors determining hepatocyte polarity and how it is affected in inherited and acquired diseases. PMID:26116792

  10. Physical exercise-induced protection on ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Li, Mei; Dong, Fang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise is any bodily activity to enhance or maintain physical fitness and overall health and wellness. A series of associated studies have demonstrated that physical exercise could alleviate the infarct volume, increase the collateral circulation, promote endothelial progenitor cells, improve cerebral blood flow after cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. In this review, we summed up the protective effects of physical exercise on cerebral blood flow (CBF), vascular endothelium, vascular vasodilation, endothelial progenitor cells and collateral circulation. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases may encourage more patients with cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction and people with high risk factors to accept exercise interventions for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:26884896

  11. [Life-long regular physical exercise is crucial in coronary disease].

    PubMed

    Ståhle, Agneta

    2004-09-23

    Coronary heart disease, i.e. angina pectoris or myocardial infarction, is one of our most common diseases. Age, gender and heredity, as well as smoking, hypertension, physical inactivity, diabetes, overweight and stress are risk factors for the disease. Regular physical activity and exercise training positively influences several of these risk factors at the same time. The prescription for physical activity and training is life long and should include fitness as well as strength and endurance training. It is of great importance that the first period of rehabilitation, after an acute event, is carried out under supervision, preferably by a specialised physiotherapist. When the condition is stabilised, in most of the cases after 2-3 months, the training may be continued outside the hospital. Suitable activities are daily walks, jogging, cycling, swimming, aerobics, dance, ballgames etc depending on interest and physical condition. PMID:15493636

  12. A computer adaptive testing approach for assessing physical functioning in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Haley, Stephen M; Ni, Pengsheng; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A; Skrinar, Alison M; Corzo, Deyanira

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate: (1) the accuracy and (2) the reduction in amount of time and effort in assessing physical functioning (self-care and mobility domains) of children and adolescents using computer-adaptive testing (CAT). A CAT algorithm selects questions directly tailored to the child's ability level, based on previous responses. Using a CAT algorithm, a simulation study was used to determine the number of items necessary to approximate the score of a full-length assessment. We built simulated CAT (5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-item versions) for self-care and mobility domains and tested their accuracy in a normative sample (n=373; 190 males, 183 females; mean age 6y 11mo [SD 4y 2m], range 4mo to 14y 11mo) and a sample of children and adolescents with Pompe disease (n=26; 21 males, 5 females; mean age 6y 1mo [SD 3y 10mo], range 5mo to 14y 10mo). Results indicated that comparable score estimates (based on computer simulations) to the full-length tests can be achieved in a 20-item CAT version for all age ranges and for normative and clinical samples. No more than 13 to 16% of the items in the full-length tests were needed for any one administration. These results support further consideration of using CAT programs for accurate and efficient clinical assessments of physical functioning.

  13. Functional assessment staging (FAST) in Korean patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Na, Hae-Ri; Kim, Sang-Yun; Chang, Young-Hee; Park, Moon-Ho; Cho, Sung-Tae; Han, Il-Woo; Kim, Tae-You; Hwang, Sul-A

    2010-01-01

    Functional Assessment Staging (FAST) was devised to meet the need for a more brief patient-derived rating scale for evaluating changes in functional performance and activities of daily living skills in all the stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). FAST was administered to 464 patients with probable AD according to the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA) criteria. The patients were also evaluated using the Korean version of the Mini-Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE), the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), the Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (B-ADL), and the Seoul-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (S-IADL). For patients with moderate to severe dementia, the Korean versions of the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB-Ko) and Baylor profound mental status examination (BPMSE-Ko) were also administered. There were significant correlations between the FAST and the K-MMSE scores (r= - 0.71, p< 0.001), between the FAST and the SIB-Ko scores (r= - 0.54, p< 0.001) and between the FAST and the BPMSE-Ko scores (r=- 0.46, p< 0.001). The FAST was also correlated with the CDR, the CDR-SB, the B-ADL, and the S-IADL (p< 0.001). Ultimately, FAST is a reliable and valid assessment technique for evaluating functional deterioration in AD patients throughout the disease course. Moreover, the findings of the present study suggest that the FAST elucidates a characteristic pattern of progressive, ordinal, and functional decline in AD in Korean AD patients with dementia. PMID:20847407

  14. Assessment of thyroid and gonadal function in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, Sandeep; Garg, M. K.; Puri, Pankaj; Brar, Karninder S.; Pandit, Aditi; Srivastava, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Liver is involved with the synthesis of carrier proteins and metabolism of various hormones and liver diseases may, therefore, be associated with various endocrine disturbances. This study was conducted to assess thyroid and gonadal function in subjects with acute hepatitis (AH), chronic liver disease (CLD), and those who had undergone liver transplantation (LT). Materials and Methods: Patients with AH, CLD with Child-Pugh stage A (CLD-1) and Child-Pugh stage B or C (CLD-2), and LT seen at our tertiary level hospital were assessed clinically, biochemically, and for thyroid and gonadal functions besides 25 healthy controls. Results: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism were present in 14 (16%) and 24 (28%) patients with liver diseases respectively. Among thyroid dysfunction, the commonest was sick euthyroid syndrome six (7%), followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in three patients (3.5%), subclinical hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis in two patients each (2.3%) and overt hypothyroidism in one patient. Among patients with LT and AH groups, the only abnormality was significantly lower total T3 compared with healthy controls. The CLD2 group had significantly lower levels of all thyroid hormones compared with controls and CLD1 group. Hypogonadism was commonest in patients with CLD-2 (14; 50%) followed by LT (3; 33%), CLD-1 (4; 20%), and AH (3; 14%). Hypogonadism was predicted by older age, lower levels of serum albumin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides and higher levels of plasma glucose, serum bilirubin, aspartate transaminases, and international normalized ratio. Gonadal functions showed recovery following LT. Conclusions: Thyroid dysfunction and hypogonadism form an important part of the spectrum of acute and CLD, and patients with LT. Deterioration of synthetic functions of liver disease predicts presence of hypogonadism. PMID:25593833

  15. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  16. Promoting a Functional Physical Self-Concept in Physical Education: Evaluation of a 10-Week Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Mirko; Valkanover, Stefan; Roebers, Claudia; Conzelmann, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Most physical education intervention studies on the positive effect of sports on self-concept development have attempted to "increase" schoolchildren's self-concept without taking the "veridicality" of the self-concept into account. The present study investigated whether a 10-week intervention in physical education would…

  17. Influence of Temple Headache Frequency on Physical Functioning and Emotional Functioning in Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorder Pain

    PubMed Central

    List, Thomas; John, Mike T.; Ohrbach, Richard; Schiffman, Eric L.; Truelove, Edmond L.; Anderson, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the relationship of headache frequency with patient-reported physical functioning and emotional functioning in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) subjects with concurrent temple headache. Methods The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) Validation Project identified, as a subset of 614 TMD cases and 91 controls (n = 705), 309 subjects with concurrent TMD pain diagnoses (RDC/TMD) and temple headache. The temple headaches were subdivided into infrequent, frequent, and chronic headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition (ICHD–II). Study variables included self-report measures of physical functioning (Jaw Function Limitation Scale [JFLS], Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS], Short Form–12 [SF–12]) and emotional functioning (depression and anxiety as measured by the Symptom Checklist–90R/SCL–90R). Differences among the three headache subgroups were characterized by increasing headache frequency. The relationship between ordered headache frequency and physical as well as emotional functioning was analyzed using linear regression and trend tests for proportions. Results Physical functioning, as assessed with the JFLS (P < .001), SF-12 (P < .001), and GCPS (P < .001), was significantly associated with increased headache frequency. Emotional functioning, reflected in depression and anxiety, was also associated with increased frequency of headache (both P < .001). Conclusion Headache frequency was substantially correlated with reduced physical functioning and emotional functioning in subjects with TMD and concurrent temple headaches. A secondary finding was that headache was precipitated by jaw activities more often in subjects with more frequent temple headaches. PMID:22558607

  18. Can physical exercise in old age improve memory and hippocampal function?

    PubMed

    Duzel, Emrah; van Praag, Henriette; Sendtner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Physical exercise can convey a protective effect against cognitive decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. While the long-term health-promoting and protective effects of exercise are encouraging, it's potential to induce neuronal and vascular plasticity in the ageing brain is still poorly understood. It remains unclear whether exercise slows the trajectory of normal ageing by modifying vascular and metabolic risk factors and/or consistently boosts brain function by inducing structural and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus and related medial temporal lobe circuitry-brain areas that are important for learning and memory. Hence, it remains to be established to what extent exercise interventions in old age can improve brain plasticity above and beyond preservation of function. Existing data suggest that exercise trials aiming for improvement and preservation may require different outcome measures and that the balance between the two may depend on exercise intensity and duration, the presence of preclinical Alzheimer's disease pathology, vascular and metabolic risk factors and genetic variability. PMID:26912638

  19. Can physical exercise in old age improve memory and hippocampal function?

    PubMed

    Duzel, Emrah; van Praag, Henriette; Sendtner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Physical exercise can convey a protective effect against cognitive decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. While the long-term health-promoting and protective effects of exercise are encouraging, it's potential to induce neuronal and vascular plasticity in the ageing brain is still poorly understood. It remains unclear whether exercise slows the trajectory of normal ageing by modifying vascular and metabolic risk factors and/or consistently boosts brain function by inducing structural and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus and related medial temporal lobe circuitry-brain areas that are important for learning and memory. Hence, it remains to be established to what extent exercise interventions in old age can improve brain plasticity above and beyond preservation of function. Existing data suggest that exercise trials aiming for improvement and preservation may require different outcome measures and that the balance between the two may depend on exercise intensity and duration, the presence of preclinical Alzheimer's disease pathology, vascular and metabolic risk factors and genetic variability.

  20. Can physical exercise in old age improve memory and hippocampal function?

    PubMed Central

    van Praag, Henriette; Sendtner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can convey a protective effect against cognitive decline in ageing and Alzheimer’s disease. While the long-term health-promoting and protective effects of exercise are encouraging, it’s potential to induce neuronal and vascular plasticity in the ageing brain is still poorly understood. It remains unclear whether exercise slows the trajectory of normal ageing by modifying vascular and metabolic risk factors and/or consistently boosts brain function by inducing structural and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus and related medial temporal lobe circuitry—brain areas that are important for learning and memory. Hence, it remains to be established to what extent exercise interventions in old age can improve brain plasticity above and beyond preservation of function. Existing data suggest that exercise trials aiming for improvement and preservation may require different outcome measures and that the balance between the two may depend on exercise intensity and duration, the presence of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease pathology, vascular and metabolic risk factors and genetic variability. PMID:26912638

  1. Novel insights into Tim-4 function in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin-Yu; Xu, Wang-Dong; Pan, Hai-Feng; Leng, Rui-Xue; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2015-06-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-4 (Tim-4) was first recognized as a costimulatory molecule regulating T-cell activation. Dysregulation of Tim-4 has been found in some autoimmune conditions, particularly in the immune cells. Recently, Tim-4 was found to be critical for regulating T cells, with the ability of inhibiting naïve CD4(+) T cells and Th17 cells, increasing Th2 cell development. Tim-4 can also enhance T cell expansion via linker for activation of T cells, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) signaling pathways. Moreover, the Tim-4 signaling pathway may affect multiple molecular processes in autoimmune diseases. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that Tim-4 influences chronic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, an association between Tim-4 polymorphisms and susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases have been identified, such as RA. Taken together, recent works have indicated that Tim-4 may represent a novel target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this article, we will discuss the Tim-4 function and the therapeutic potential of modulating the Tim-4 in autoimmune diseases.

  2. Physical activity and the prevention of cardiovascular disease: from evolution to epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Archer, Edward; Blair, Steven N

    2011-01-01

    For most of human history, the environmental demands of survival necessitated prodigious amounts of physical exertion. The avoidance of predators, hunting, gathering, and the literal "chopping wood and carrying water" of daily existence provided a wholesome dose of physical activity that obviated the need for deliberate exercise. Nevertheless, 21st century humans are now immersed within an environment explicitly designed to eliminate physical labor. Over the past century and especially the past 50 years, an accrual of epidemiological evidence has established that the unintended consequence of humankind's predilection for labor-saving contrivances is an epidemic of hypokinetically induced cardiovascular disease, morbidity, and mortality. This review surveys data from observational studies supporting the premise that physical activity, exercise training, and improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness are essential elements in the prevention and treatment of the cardiovascular diseases induced by an environment in which survival no longer obligates physical exertion.

  3. The Association between a Single Bout of Moderate Physical Activity and Executive Function in Young Adults with Down Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, C.-C.; Ringenbach, S. D. R.; Crews, D.; Kulinna, P. H.; Amazeen, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating the impact of a single exercise intervention on executive function in young adults with Down syndrome (DS). Methods: Considering the relations among executive function, physical and mental health and early onset of Alzheimer's disease in this population, we tested three components of executive…

  4. Impact of Trichiasis Surgery on Physical Functioning in Ethiopian Patients: STAR Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolle, Meraf A.; Cassard, Sandra D.; Gower, Emily W.; Munoz, Beatriz E.; Wang, Jiangxia; Alemayehu, Wondu; West, Sheila K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the physical functioning of Ethiopian trichiasis surgery patients before and six months after surgery. Design Nested Cohort Study Methods This study was nested within the Surgery for Trichiasis, Antibiotics to Prevent Recurrence (STAR) clinical trial conducted in Ethiopia. Demographic information, ocular examinations, and physical functioning assessments were collected before and 6 months after surgery. A single score for patients’ physical functioning was constructed using Rasch analysis. A multivariate linear regression model was used to determine if change in physical functioning was associated with change in visual acuity. Results Of the 438 participants, 411 (93.8%) had both baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Physical functioning scores at baseline ranged from −6.32 (great difficulty) to +6.01 (no difficulty). The percent of participants reporting no difficulty in physical functioning increased by 32.6%; the proportion of participants in the mild/no visual impairment category increased by 8.6%. A multivariate linear regression model showed that for every line of vision gained, physical functioning improves significantly (0.09 units; 95% CI: 0.02–0.16). Conclusions Surgery to correct trichiasis appears to improve patients’ physical functioning as measured at 6 months. More effort in promoting trichiasis surgery is essential, not only to prevent corneal blindness, but also to enable improved functioning in daily life. PMID:21333268

  5. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy for a period of 1 year. [Results] The correlation between physical therapy frequency and Gross Motor Function Measure scores for crawling and kneeling, standing, walking, running and jumping, and rolling, and the Gross Motor Function Measure total score was significant. The differences in gross motor function according to physical therapy frequency were significant for crawling, kneeling, standing, and Gross Motor Function Measure total score. The differences in gross motor function according to frequency of physical therapy were significant for standing in Gross Motor Function Classification System Level V. [Conclusion] Intensive physical therapy was more effective for improving gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In particular, crawling and kneeling, and standing ability showed greater increases with intensive physical therapy. PMID:27390440

  6. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy for a period of 1 year. [Results] The correlation between physical therapy frequency and Gross Motor Function Measure scores for crawling and kneeling, standing, walking, running and jumping, and rolling, and the Gross Motor Function Measure total score was significant. The differences in gross motor function according to physical therapy frequency were significant for crawling, kneeling, standing, and Gross Motor Function Measure total score. The differences in gross motor function according to frequency of physical therapy were significant for standing in Gross Motor Function Classification System Level V. [Conclusion] Intensive physical therapy was more effective for improving gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In particular, crawling and kneeling, and standing ability showed greater increases with intensive physical therapy. PMID:27390440

  7. 21 CFR 890.5880 - Multi-function physical therapy table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multi-function physical therapy table. 890.5880 Section 890.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5880...

  8. 21 CFR 890.5880 - Multi-function physical therapy table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Multi-function physical therapy table. 890.5880 Section 890.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5880...

  9. 21 CFR 890.5880 - Multi-function physical therapy table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Multi-function physical therapy table. 890.5880 Section 890.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5880...

  10. 21 CFR 890.5880 - Multi-function physical therapy table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Multi-function physical therapy table. 890.5880 Section 890.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5880...

  11. 21 CFR 890.5880 - Multi-function physical therapy table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Multi-function physical therapy table. 890.5880 Section 890.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5880...

  12. Ryanodine receptors: physiological function and deregulation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Dolores; Checler, Frédéric; Chami, Mounia

    2014-06-05

    Perturbed Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis emerges as a central player in Alzheimer disease (AD). Accordingly, different studies have reported alterations of the expression and the function of Ryanodine Receptors (RyR) in human AD-affected brains, in cells expressing familial AD-linked mutations on the β amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) and presenilins (the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the βAPP, thereby generating amyloid β (Aβ) peptides), as well as in the brain of various transgenic AD mice models. Data converge to suggest that RyR expression and function alteration are associated to AD pathogenesis through the control of: i) βAPP processing and Aβ peptide production, ii) neuronal death; iii) synaptic function; and iv) memory and learning abilities. In this review, we document the network of evidences suggesting that RyR could play a complex dual "compensatory/protective versus pathogenic" role contributing to the setting of histopathological lesions and synaptic deficits that are associated with the disease stages. We also discuss the possible mechanisms underlying RyR expression and function alterations in AD. Finally, we review recent publications showing that drug-targeting blockade of RyR and genetic manipulation of RyR reduces Aβ production, stabilizes synaptic transmission, and prevents learning and memory deficits in various AD mouse models. Chemically-designed RyR "modulators" could therefore be envisioned as new therapeutic compounds able to delay or block the progression of AD.

  13. Arterial structure and function in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoli, Luca; Rastelli, Stefania; Inserra, Gaetano; Castellino, Pietro

    2015-10-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of a combination of environmental, genetic and immunologic factors that trigger an uncontrolled immune response within the intestine, which results in inflammation among genetically predisposed individuals. Several studies have reported that the prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors is lower among subjects with IBD than in the general population, including obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and hypertension. Therefore, given the risk profile of IBD subjects, the expected cardiovascular morbidity and mortality should be lower in these patients than in the general population. However, this is not the case because the standardized mortality ratio is not reduced and the risk of coronary heart disease is increased in patients with IBD. It is reasonable to hypothesize that other factors not considered in the classical stratification of cardiovascular risk may be involved in these subjects. Therefore, IBD may be a useful model with which to evaluate the effects of chronic low-grade inflammation in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Arterial stiffness is both a marker of subclinical target organ damage and a cardiovascular risk factor. In diseases characterized by chronic systemic inflammation, there is evidence that the inflammation affects arterial properties and induces both endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. It has been reported that decreasing inflammation via anti tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy decreases arterial stiffness and restores endothelial function in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. Consistent with these results, several recent studies have been conducted to determine whether arterial properties are altered among patients with IBD. In this review, we discuss the evidence pertaining to arterial structure and function and present the available data regarding arterial stiffness and endothelial function in patients with IBD.

  14. Impressions of Counselors as a Function of Counselor Physical Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jean A.

    1978-01-01

    Research assessed the effects of counselor physical attractiveness and inter-actions between attractiveness and counselor subject sex. It is suggested that sex of counselor and client may play a more important role independently and in conjunction with attractiveness than does attractiveness alone in influencing impressions and expectations.…

  15. Social-adaptive and psychological functioning of patients affected by Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Laney, Dawn Alyssia; Gruskin, Daniel J; Fernhoff, Paul M; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Hipp, Heather; Mehta, Ami J

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. In addition to the debilitating physical symptoms of FD, there are also under-recognized and poorly characterized psychiatric features. As a first step toward characterizing psychiatric features of FD, we administered the Achenbach adult self report questionnaire to 30 FD patients and the Achenbach adult behavior checklist questionnaire to 28 partners/parents/friends of FD patients. Data from at least one of the questionnaires were available on 33 subjects. Analysis focused on social-adaptive functioning in various aspects of daily life and on criteria related to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV (DSM-IV). Adaptive functioning scale values, which primarily measure social and relationship functioning and occupational success, showed that eight FD patients (six female and two male) had mean adaptive functioning deficits as compared to population norms. Greater rates of depression (P < 0.01), anxiety (P = 0.05), depression and anxiety (P = 0.03), antisocial personality (P < 0.001), attention-deficit/hyperactivity (AD/H; P < 0.01), hyperactivity-impulsivity (P < 0.01), and aggressive behavior (P = 0.03) were associated with poorer adaptive functioning. Decreased social-adaptive functioning in this study was not statistically significantly associated to disease severity, pain, or level of vitality. This study shows for the first time that FD patients, particularly women, are affected by decreased social-adaptive functioning. Comprehensive treatment plans for FD should consider assessments and interventions to evaluate and improve social, occupational, and psychological functioning. Attention to the behavioral aspects of FD could lead to improved treatment outcome and improved quality of life. Individuals affected by Fabry disease exhibited social-adaptive functioning deficits that were significantly correlated with anxiety

  16. Development of the Huntington Disease Work Function Scale

    PubMed Central

    Brossman, Bradley; Williams, Janet K.; Downing, Nancy; Mills, James A.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A work function measure specific for persons with prodromal Huntington disease (HD) was created to assist with workplace accommodations Methods A self-report HD Work Function measure (HDWF) was developed from focus group and expert validation. Results Pilot studies with 238 people with prodromal HD, and 185 companions; and 89 people without prodromal HD, and 70 companions indicate HDWF has acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.77), acceptable inter-rater reliability (r = 0.58), and acceptable convergent validity with selected items from EWPS (r = −0.56), SAS (r = −0.29), and ECog (r = −0.70). The HDWF can distinguish between people with prodromal HD and people with a HD family history who do not have prodromal HD (p < 0.0001). Conclusions The HDWF is a brief self assessment that may be used to monitor work function. PMID:22995807

  17. Impact of a senior fitness program on measures of physical and emotional health and functioning.

    PubMed

    Hamar, Brent; Coberley, Carter R; Pope, James E; Rula, Elizabeth Y

    2013-12-01

    The SilverSneakers fitness program is a health plan benefit for Medicare beneficiaries that provides older adults with fitness center membership, customized group exercise classes, and a supportive social environment that promotes socialization among participants. This study evaluated the impact of the SilverSneakers program on physical and emotional health and activities of daily living (ADLs). A quasi-experimental retrospective analysis compared annual survey responses from SilverSneakers members (treatment N=5586) to a matched national random sample of Medicare Advantage organization beneficiaries (comparison N=22,344) in Cohort 10 of the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey. Matching was performed based on 6 demographic and 6 disease status variables. Survey responses from 2007 and 2009 were evaluated using categorical and logistic regression analysis. The treatment group showed significantly better physical and emotional health and lower impairment in both 2007 and 2009, less impairment for 4 of 6 ADLs in 2007, and all 6 in 2009, and a higher average number of days of good health within the prior month for both years. Three-year longitudinal analyses indicated a significantly more favorable survey response trend for the treatment group for nearly all measures of health and ADLs. Members who exercised less frequently had poorer health and functioning. Overall, participation in the SilverSneakers program was associated with more favorable overall physical and social/emotional health status and fewer activity impairments, suggesting that the provision of senior-oriented group fitness programs may be a valuable approach to improve quality of life and reduce the burden associated with declining health and functioning as older adults age.

  18. Impact of a Senior Fitness Program on Measures of Physical and Emotional Health and Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Hamar, Brent; Coberley, Carter R.; Pope, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The SilverSneakers fitness program is a health plan benefit for Medicare beneficiaries that provides older adults with fitness center membership, customized group exercise classes, and a supportive social environment that promotes socialization among participants. This study evaluated the impact of the SilverSneakers program on physical and emotional health and activities of daily living (ADLs). A quasi-experimental retrospective analysis compared annual survey responses from SilverSneakers members (treatment N=5586) to a matched national random sample of Medicare Advantage organization beneficiaries (comparison N=22,344) in Cohort 10 of the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey. Matching was performed based on 6 demographic and 6 disease status variables. Survey responses from 2007 and 2009 were evaluated using categorical and logistic regression analysis. The treatment group showed significantly better physical and emotional health and lower impairment in both 2007 and 2009, less impairment for 4 of 6 ADLs in 2007, and all 6 in 2009, and a higher average number of days of good health within the prior month for both years. Three-year longitudinal analyses indicated a significantly more favorable survey response trend for the treatment group for nearly all measures of health and ADLs. Members who exercised less frequently had poorer health and functioning. Overall, participation in the SilverSneakers program was associated with more favorable overall physical and social/emotional health status and fewer activity impairments, suggesting that the provision of senior-oriented group fitness programs may be a valuable approach to improve quality of life and reduce the burden associated with declining health and functioning as older adults age. (Population Health Management 2013;16:364–372) PMID:23560492

  19. Intra-Individual Variability of Physical Activity in Older Adults With and Without Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Watts, Amber; Walters, Ryan W; Hoffman, Lesa; Templin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity shows promise for protection against cognitive decline in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better understand barriers to adoption of physical activity in this population, a clear understanding of daily and weekly activity patterns is needed. Most accelerometry studies report average physical activity over an entire wear period without considering the potential importance of the variability of physical activity. This study evaluated individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity and determined whether these differences could be predicted by AD status, day of wear, age, gender, education, and cardiorespiratory capacity. Physical activity was measured via accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X+) over one week in 86 older adults with and without AD (n = 33 and n = 53, respectively). Mixed-effects location-scale models were estimated to evaluate and predict individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity. Results indicated that compared to controls, participants with AD averaged 21% less activity, but averaged non-significantly greater intra-individual variability. Women and men averaged similar amounts of physical activity, but women were significantly less variable. The amount of physical activity differed significantly across days of wear. Increased cardiorespiratory capacity was associated with greater average amounts of physical activity. Investigation of individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity provided insight into differences by AD status, days of monitor wear, gender, and cardiovascular capacity. All individuals regardless of AD status were equally consistent in their physical activity, which may have been due to a highly sedentary sample and/or the early disease stage of those participants with AD. These results highlight the value of considering individual differences in both the amount and

  20. Intra-Individual Variability of Physical Activity in Older Adults With and Without Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Watts, Amber; Walters, Ryan W; Hoffman, Lesa; Templin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity shows promise for protection against cognitive decline in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better understand barriers to adoption of physical activity in this population, a clear understanding of daily and weekly activity patterns is needed. Most accelerometry studies report average physical activity over an entire wear period without considering the potential importance of the variability of physical activity. This study evaluated individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity and determined whether these differences could be predicted by AD status, day of wear, age, gender, education, and cardiorespiratory capacity. Physical activity was measured via accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X+) over one week in 86 older adults with and without AD (n = 33 and n = 53, respectively). Mixed-effects location-scale models were estimated to evaluate and predict individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity. Results indicated that compared to controls, participants with AD averaged 21% less activity, but averaged non-significantly greater intra-individual variability. Women and men averaged similar amounts of physical activity, but women were significantly less variable. The amount of physical activity differed significantly across days of wear. Increased cardiorespiratory capacity was associated with greater average amounts of physical activity. Investigation of individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity provided insight into differences by AD status, days of monitor wear, gender, and cardiovascular capacity. All individuals regardless of AD status were equally consistent in their physical activity, which may have been due to a highly sedentary sample and/or the early disease stage of those participants with AD. These results highlight the value of considering individual differences in both the amount and

  1. Physical activity and body functionality: implications for obesity prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Angelo; Therrien, Fanny

    2006-02-01

    Physical activity promotes metabolic adaptations that improve body functionality and contribute to the prevention of some diseases. With respect to energy and fat balance, physical activity facilitates the equilibrium between energy intake and expenditure as well as between fat intake and fat oxidation. When combined with a healthy diet that favors satiety with a reduced energy intake, exercise can induce a substantial mass loss in obese individuals. However, even the impact of an exemplary lifestyle does not seem to have the potential to decrease body mass in obese individuals down to the mass range of lean people. Up to now, we have not been able to induce mass changes exceeding 12%-15% initial body mass in obese male subjects under tolerable exercise and dietary habits, and this moderate success was accompanied by modifications in appetite and energy expenditure susceptible to compromise subsequent mass stability. As described in this paper, many environmental factors can influence energy balance and the ability to lose body fat in response to a healthy diet and (or) physical activity program. Particular attention is given to preliminary data obtained in our laboratory that suggest that knowledge-based work does not favor the same potential mass reducing effects as physical work. In fact, the acute effects of knowledge-based work suggest that this work modality may be rather susceptible to promote a more pronounced positive energy balance compared with what we may expect from a sedentary relaxing activity. This is problematic for obesity prevention in the future since knowledge-based work now represents the main working modality in a context of modernity.

  2. The Relationship between Physical Activity and Thermal Protective Clothing on Functional Balance in Firefighters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Pui W.; Suyama, Joe; Cham, Rakie; Hostler, David

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between baseline physical training and the use of firefighting thermal protective clothing (TPC) with breathing apparatus on functional balance. Twenty-three male firefighters performed a functional balance test under four gear/clothing conditions. Participants were divided into groups by physical training status,…

  3. Posttraumatic Distress and Physical Functioning: A Longitudinal Study of Injured Survivors of Community Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.; Jaycox, Lisa H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the cross-lagged relationships between posttraumatic distress symptoms and physical functioning, using a sample of 413 persons who were hospitalized for injuries resulting from community violence. Posttraumatic distress was assessed at 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months postinjury, and posttraumatic physical functioning was…

  4. Smell and taste function in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jessica E; Laing, David G; Wilkes, Fiona J; Kainer, Gad

    2010-08-01

    Loss of appetite and poor growth are common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and changes in smell and/or taste function may be responsible, but the hypothesis has not been proven. This aims of this prospective age- and gender-controlled study were to determine whether: (1) changes in smell and taste function occur in children with CKD; (2) smell or taste dysfunction are associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); (3) there is an association between smell or taste loss and body mass index (BMI). The study cohort consisted of 72 children of whom 20 were CKD stage 3-5 patients, 12 were CKD stage 2 patients, 20 were clinical controls (CC) and 20 were healthy children (HC). The CKD patients and clinical controls were recruited from Sydney Children's Hospital and The Children's Hospital, Westmead, and healthy controls were recruited from a local school. Scores for each group from taste and smell chemosensory function tests were compared, and their relationship with renal function and BMI investigated. The CKD stage 3-5 group had a significantly lower taste identification score (85.6%, P < 0.001) than the CC (94.8%) and HC (94.8%) groups, with almost one third of the children in the CKD stage 3-5 group exhibiting taste loss. Decreased taste function was associated with decreased eGFR (r = 0.43, P < 0.01), but no association between BMI and taste function was found (r = 0.001, P > 0.9). Odour identification scores were not different; however, there was a positive relationship with BMI (r = 0.427, P = 0.006). We conclude that a loss of taste can occur in children with CKD and that when it occurs, it worsens as eGFR declines and is found early in kidney disease.

  5. Raising the Priority of Lifestyle-Related Noncommunicable Diseases in Physical Therapy Curricula.

    PubMed

    Dean, Elizabeth; Greig, Alison; Murphy, Sue; Roots, Robin; Nembhard, Nadine; Rankin, Anne; Bainbridge, Lesley; Anthony, Joseph; Hoens, Alison M; Garland, S Jayne

    2016-07-01

    Given their enormous socioeconomic burdens, lifestyle-related noncommunicable diseases (heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity) have become priorities for the World Health Organization and health service delivery systems. Health care systems have been criticized for relative inattention to the gap between knowledge and practice, as it relates to preventing and managing noncommunicable diseases. Physical therapy is a profession that can contribute effectively to patients'/clients' lifestyle behavior changes at the upstream end of prevention and management. Efforts by entry-to-practice physical therapist education programs to align curricula with epidemiological trends toward best health care practices are varied. One explanation may be the lack of a frame of reference for reducing the knowledge translation gap. The purpose of this article is to provide a current perspective on epidemiological indicators and societal priorities to inform physical therapy curriculum content. Such content needs to include health examination/evaluation tools and health behavior change interventions that are consistent with contemporary values, directions, and practices of physical therapy. These considerations provide a frame of reference for curriculum change. Based on 5 years of experience and dialogue among curriculum stakeholders, an example of how epidemiologically informed and evidence-based best health care practices may be systematically integrated into physical therapy curricula to maximize patient/client health and conventional physical therapy outcomes is provided. This novel approach can serve as an example to other entry-to-practice physical therapist education programs of how to align their curricula with societal health priorities, specifically, noncommunicable diseases. The intentions are to stimulate dialogue about effectively integrating health-based competencies into entry-level education and advancing

  6. Raising the Priority of Lifestyle-Related Noncommunicable Diseases in Physical Therapy Curricula.

    PubMed

    Dean, Elizabeth; Greig, Alison; Murphy, Sue; Roots, Robin; Nembhard, Nadine; Rankin, Anne; Bainbridge, Lesley; Anthony, Joseph; Hoens, Alison M; Garland, S Jayne

    2016-07-01

    Given their enormous socioeconomic burdens, lifestyle-related noncommunicable diseases (heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity) have become priorities for the World Health Organization and health service delivery systems. Health care systems have been criticized for relative inattention to the gap between knowledge and practice, as it relates to preventing and managing noncommunicable diseases. Physical therapy is a profession that can contribute effectively to patients'/clients' lifestyle behavior changes at the upstream end of prevention and management. Efforts by entry-to-practice physical therapist education programs to align curricula with epidemiological trends toward best health care practices are varied. One explanation may be the lack of a frame of reference for reducing the knowledge translation gap. The purpose of this article is to provide a current perspective on epidemiological indicators and societal priorities to inform physical therapy curriculum content. Such content needs to include health examination/evaluation tools and health behavior change interventions that are consistent with contemporary values, directions, and practices of physical therapy. These considerations provide a frame of reference for curriculum change. Based on 5 years of experience and dialogue among curriculum stakeholders, an example of how epidemiologically informed and evidence-based best health care practices may be systematically integrated into physical therapy curricula to maximize patient/client health and conventional physical therapy outcomes is provided. This novel approach can serve as an example to other entry-to-practice physical therapist education programs of how to align their curricula with societal health priorities, specifically, noncommunicable diseases. The intentions are to stimulate dialogue about effectively integrating health-based competencies into entry-level education and advancing

  7. Executive Function and Postural Instability in People with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Cole, Michael H.; Mengersen, Kerrie; Silburn, Peter A.; Qiu, Feng; Graepel, Cara; Kerr, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    The specific aspects of cognition contributing to balance and gait have not been clarified in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty PD participants and twenty age- and gender-matched healthy controls were assessed on cognition and clinical mobility tests. General cognition was assessed with the Mini Mental State Exam and Addenbrooke's Cognitive Exam. Executive function was evaluated using the Trail Making Tests (TMT-A and TMT-B) and a computerized cognitive battery which included a series of choice reaction time (CRT) tests. Clinical gait and balance measures included the Tinetti, Timed Up & Go, Berg Balance, and Functional Reach tests. PD participants performed significantly worse than the controls on the tests of cognitive and executive function, balance, and gait. PD participants took longer on Trail Making Tests, CRT-Location, and CRT-Colour (inhibition response). Furthermore, executive function, particularly longer times on CRT-Distracter and greater errors on the TMT-B, was associated with worse balance and gait performance in the PD group. Measures of general cognition were not associated with balance and gait measures in either group. For PD participants, attention and executive function were impaired. Components of executive function, particularly those involving inhibition response and distracters, were associated with poorer balance and gait performance in PD. PMID:25136474

  8. Community-based strength training improves physical function in older women and arthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise is recognized as a mainstay treatment of arthritis, yet more than 40% of adults with arthritis report no leisure time physical activity participation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to identify and promote evidence-based physical activity programs to improve physi...

  9. EEG functional connectivity, axon delays and white matter disease

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Paul L.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Fields, R. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Both structural and functional brain connectivities are closely linked to white matter disease. We discuss several such links of potential interest to neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and non-clinical neuroscientists. Methods Treatment of brains as genuine complex systems suggests major emphasis on the multi-scale nature of brain connectivity and dynamic behavior. Cross-scale interactions of local, regional, and global networks are apparently responsible for much of EEG's oscillatory behaviors. Finite axon propagation speed, often assumed to be infinite in local network models, is central to our conceptual framework. Results Myelin controls axon speed, and the synchrony of impulse traffic between distant cortical regions appears to be critical for optimal mental performance and learning. Results Several experiments suggest that axon conduction speed is plastic, thereby altering the regional and global white matter connections that facilitate binding of remote local networks. Conclusions Combined EEG and high resolution EEG can provide distinct multi-scale estimates of functional connectivity in both healthy and diseased brains with measures like frequency and phase spectra, covariance, and coherence. Significance White matter disease may profoundly disrupt normal EEG coherence patterns, but currently these kinds of studies are rare in scientific labs and essentially missing from clinical environments. PMID:24815984

  10. WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease: measures of functioning in neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Nancy R; Kim, Ji-In; Williams, Janet K; Long, Jeffrey D; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials to improve day-to-day function in Huntington disease (HD) require accurate outcome measures. The DSM-5 recommends the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) 2.0 for use in neuropsychiatric disorders. The DSM-5 also states proxy measures may be useful when cognitive function may be impaired. We tested WHODAS participant and companion ratings for differences in baseline and longitudinal function in three prodromal HD groups and a control group. Participants with prodromal HD were stratified by disease progression (low, medium, and high disease burden) based on their cytosine–adenine–guanine (CAG)-age product (CAP) score. Participant (N=726) and companion (N=630) WHODAS scores were examined for group differences, and for participant versus companion differences using linear mixed effects regression and Akaike's information criterion to test model fit. We also compared WHODAS with the Total Functional Capacity (TFC) scale. At baseline, functioning on the WHODAS was rated worse by participants in the high group and companions compared with controls. For longitudinal changes, companions reported functional decline over time in the medium and high groups. In simultaneous analysis, participant and companion longitudinal trajectories showed divergence in the high group, suggesting reduced validity of self-report. The WHODAS showed greater longitudinal difference than the TFC in the medium group relative to controls, whereas the TFC showed greater longitudinal difference than WHODAS in the high group. Results suggest the WHODAS can identify baseline and longitudinal differences in prodromal HD and may be useful in HD clinical trials. Companions may provide more accurate data as the disease progresses. PMID:24327189

  11. WHODAS 2.0 in prodromal Huntington disease: measures of functioning in neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Downing, Nancy R; Kim, Ji-In; Williams, Janet K; Long, Jeffrey D; Mills, James A; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials to improve day-to-day function in Huntington disease (HD) require accurate outcome measures. The DSM-5 recommends the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) 2.0 for use in neuropsychiatric disorders. The DSM-5 also states proxy measures may be useful when cognitive function may be impaired. We tested WHODAS participant and companion ratings for differences in baseline and longitudinal function in three prodromal HD groups and a control group. Participants with prodromal HD were stratified by disease progression (low, medium, and high disease burden) based on their cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG)-age product (CAP) score. Participant (N=726) and companion (N=630) WHODAS scores were examined for group differences, and for participant versus companion differences using linear mixed effects regression and Akaike's information criterion to test model fit. We also compared WHODAS with the Total Functional Capacity (TFC) scale. At baseline, functioning on the WHODAS was rated worse by participants in the high group and companions compared with controls. For longitudinal changes, companions reported functional decline over time in the medium and high groups. In simultaneous analysis, participant and companion longitudinal trajectories showed divergence in the high group, suggesting reduced validity of self-report. The WHODAS showed greater longitudinal difference than the TFC in the medium group relative to controls, whereas the TFC showed greater longitudinal difference than WHODAS in the high group. Results suggest the WHODAS can identify baseline and longitudinal differences in prodromal HD and may be useful in HD clinical trials. Companions may provide more accurate data as the disease progresses.

  12. Autonomic and cognitive functions in Parkinson's disease (PD).

    PubMed

    Oh, Eung Seok; Lee, Ji Hee; Seo, Jin Gi; Sohn, Eun Hee; Lee, Ae Young

    2011-01-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the relationship between the stages of PD and autonomic dysfunction, and to find an association between the autonomic dysfunction and cognitive impairment in PD. Sixty-three patients who met the criteria of the United Kingdom PD Society Brain Bank were enrolled prospectively. Clinical stages were using the Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging and unified PD rating scale motor scores. Cognitive functions were evaluated using the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and the modified MMSE (3MS) test. The scale for outcome in PD-autonomic (SCOPA-AUT) was used to evaluate autonomic symptoms. Severities of autonomic dysfunction were classified using the composite autonomic scoring scale (CASS). Fifty-four of the 63 patients (86%) had shown abnormalities on CASS. H&Y stages correlated with SCOPA-AUT (p<0.05) and 3MS and MMSE scores (p<0.05). H&Y stages were positively related with autonomic dysfunction, heart rate ratios during deep breathing and the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) scores. Autonomic dysfunction may be present from disease onset, whereas the rate of cognitive decline increases with disease progression. We recommend that both qualitative and quantitative autonomic evaluation from the early stage of disease and regular cognitive screening with disease progression might be useful to facilitate optimal management in PD.

  13. Midcingulate cortex: Structure, connections, homologies, functions and diseases.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Brent A

    2016-07-01

    Midcingulate cortex (MCC) has risen in prominence as human imaging identifies unique structural and functional activity therein and this is the first review of its structure, connections, functions and disease vulnerabilities. The MCC has two divisions (anterior, aMCC and posterior, pMCC) that represent functional units and the cytoarchitecture, connections and neurocytology of each is shown with immunohistochemistry and receptor binding. The MCC is not a division of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the "dorsal ACC" designation is a misnomer as it incorrectly implies that MCC is a division of ACC. Interpretation of findings among species and developing models of human diseases requires detailed comparative studies which is shown here for five species with flat maps and immunohistochemistry (human, monkey, rabbit, rat, mouse). The largest neurons in human cingulate cortex are in layer Vb of area 24 d in pMCC which project to the spinal cord. This area is part of the caudal cingulate premotor area which is involved in multisensory orientation of the head and body in space and neuron responses are tuned for the force and direction of movement. In contrast, the rostral cingulate premotor area in aMCC is involved in action-reinforcement associations and selection based on the amount of reward or aversive properties of a potential movement. The aMCC is activated by nociceptive information from the midline, mediodorsal and intralaminar thalamic nuclei which evoke fear and mediates nocifensive behaviors. This subregion also has high dopaminergic afferents and high dopamine-1 receptor binding and is engaged in reward processes. Opposing pain/avoidance and reward/approach functions are selected by assessment of potential outcomes and error detection according to feedback-mediated, decision making. Parietal afferents differentially terminate in MCC and provide for multisensory control in an eye- and head-centric manner. Finally, MCC vulnerability in human disease confirms

  14. Regulation and function of AMPK in physiology and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang-Min

    2016-01-01

    5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that was originally identified as the key player in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. Intensive research over the last decade has identified diverse molecular mechanisms and physiological conditions that regulate the AMPK activity. AMPK regulates diverse metabolic and physiological processes and is dysregulated in major chronic diseases, such as obesity, inflammation, diabetes and cancer. On the basis of its critical roles in physiology and pathology, AMPK is emerging as one of the most promising targets for both the prevention and treatment of these diseases. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular and physiological regulation of AMPK and its metabolic and physiological functions. In addition, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the versatile roles of AMPK in diabetes and cancer. PMID:27416781

  15. mRNP granules. Assembly, function, and connections with disease.

    PubMed

    Buchan, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granules are dynamic, self-assembling structures that harbor non-translating mRNAs bound by various proteins that regulate mRNA translation, localization, and turnover. Their importance in gene expression regulation is far reaching, ranging from precise spatial-temporal control of mRNAs that drive developmental programs in oocytes and embryos, to similarly exquisite control of mRNAs in neurons that underpin synaptic plasticity, and thus, memory formation. Analysis of mRNP granules in their various contexts has revealed common themes of assembly, disassembly, and modes of mRNA regulation, yet new studies continue to reveal unexpected and important findings, such as links between aberrant mRNP granule assembly and neurodegenerative disease. Continued study of these enigmatic structures thus promises fascinating new insights into cellular function, and may also suggest novel therapeutic strategies in various disease states.

  16. Disease Combinations Associated with Physical Activity Identified: The SMILE Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dörenkamp, Sarah; Mesters, Ilse; Schepers, Jan; Vos, Rein; van den Akker, Marjan; Teijink, Joep; de Bie, Rob

    2016-01-01

    In the search of predictors of inadequate physical activity, an investigation was conducted into the association between multimorbidity and physical activity (PA). So far the sum of diseases used as a measure of multimorbidity reveals an inverse association. How specific combinations of chronic diseases are associated with PA remains unclear. The objective of this study is to identify clusters of multimorbidity that are associated with PA. Cross-sectional data of 3,386 patients from the 2003 wave of the Dutch cohort study SMILE were used. Ward's agglomerative hierarchical clustering was executed to establish multimorbidity clusters. Chi-square statistics were used to assess the association between clusters of chronic diseases and PA, measured in compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. The highest rate of PA guideline compliance was found in patients the majority of whom suffer from liver disease, back problems, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory joint disease (62.4%). The lowest rate of PA guideline compliance was reported in patients with heart disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus (55.8%). Within the group of people with multimorbidity, those suffering from heart disease, respiratory disease, and/or diabetes mellitus may constitute a priority population as PA has proven to be effective in the prevention and cure of all three disorders. PMID:26881231

  17. Cognitive function in patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing stereotaxic thalamotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Lund-Johansen, M; Hugdahl, K; Wester, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether thalamotomy leads to cognitive disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS--A total of 53 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing stereotaxic ventrolateral thalamotomy for tremor and rigidity were tested for cognitive functions before and after surgery. The cognitive functions investigated involved visuospatial perception and memory. verbal memory, attention shift, and executive functions including set maintenance and shift. A neuropsychological test battery was used that contained the Wisconsin card sorting test, Street completion test, Stroop test, a dichotic memory listening test, and a facial recognition test. RESULTS--Clinically, a good or moderately good effect on parkinsonian symptoms was obtained in 50 patients. The neuropsychological investigations showed that the patients were impaired compared with healthy age matched control subjects on most tests, showing slight improvement postoperatively on verbal memory and visuospatial perception. No major differences were found between tests before and after operation, and there were no significant differences between patients undergoing surgery in the right or in the left thalamus. CONCLUSION--The study indicates that ventrolateral thalamotomy does not reduce the cognitive capacity in this group of patients. PMID:8778265

  18. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Kantomaa, Marko T; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-29

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people's cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents' academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = -0.023, 95% confidence interval = -0.031, -0.015) and obesity (B = -0.025, 95% confidence interval = -0.039, -0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement.

  19. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement

    PubMed Central

    Kantomaa, Marko T.; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-01

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people’s cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents’ academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = –0.023, 95% confidence interval = –0.031, –0.015) and obesity (B = –0.025, 95% confidence interval = –0.039, –0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement. PMID:23277558

  20. Therapeutically relevant structural and functional mechanisms triggered by physical and cognitive exercise

    PubMed Central

    Suo, C; Singh, M F; Gates, N; Wen, W; Sachdev, P; Brodaty, H; Saigal, N; Wilson, G C; Meiklejohn, J; Singh, N; Baune, B T; Baker, M; Foroughi, N; Wang, Y; Mavros, Y; Lampit, A; Leung, I; Valenzuela, M J

    2016-01-01

    Physical and cognitive exercise may prevent or delay dementia in later life but the neural mechanisms underlying these therapeutic benefits are largely unknown. We examined structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain changes after 6 months of progressive resistance training (PRT), computerized cognitive training (CCT) or combined intervention. A total of 100 older individuals (68 females, average age=70.1, s.d.±6.7, 55–87 years) with dementia prodrome mild cognitive impairment were recruited in the SMART (Study of Mental Activity and Resistance Training) Trial. Participants were randomly assigned into four intervention groups: PRT+CCT, PRT+SHAM CCT, CCT+SHAM PRT and double SHAM. Multimodal MRI was conducted at baseline and at 6 months of follow-up (immediately after training) to measure structural and spontaneous functional changes in the brain, with a focus on the hippocampus and posterior cingulate regions. Participants' cognitive changes were also assessed before and after training. We found that PRT but not CCT significantly improved global cognition (F(90)=4.1, P<0.05) as well as expanded gray matter in the posterior cingulate (Pcorrected <0.05), and these changes were related to each other (r=0.25, P=0.03). PRT also reversed progression of white matter hyperintensities, a biomarker of cerebrovascular disease, in several brain areas. In contrast, CCT but not PRT attenuated decline in overall memory performance (F(90)=5.7, P<0.02), mediated by enhanced functional connectivity between the hippocampus and superior frontal cortex. Our findings indicate that physical and cognitive training depend on discrete neuronal mechanisms for their therapeutic efficacy, information that may help develop targeted lifestyle-based preventative strategies. PMID:27001615

  1. The predictive value of self assessed general, physical, and mental health on functional decline and mortality in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the extent to which older people's self assessments of general health, physical health, and mental health predict functional decline and mortality.
DESIGN—The study uses population-based secondary data from the US Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSOA).
PARTICIPANTS—A total of 7527 persons aged 70 years or above living in the community.
METHODS—Eight different measures on self reported general, physical, and mental health were used. Change in functional status was measured using a composite index of ADLs and IADLs over a period of six years. Duration of survival was calculated over a period of seven years. Adjusting for age and gender, multiple logistic regression was used in analysing functional decline, and Cox proportional hazard model, for mortality. Then all of the self assessed health measures were incorporated into the final model—controlling for baseline sociodemographic characteristics, functional status, disease/conditions, and use of health and social services—to assess the independent contribution of each measure in predicting future health outcomes.
MAIN RESULTS—Overall, older people's self assessed general, physical, and mental health were predictive of functional decline and mortality. In multivariate analyses, older people who assessed their global health, self care ability, and physical activity less favourably were more likely to experience poor health outcomes. Gender disparity, however, was observed with poor global health affecting functional decline in men only. Self care ability was predictive of functioning in women only, whereas it was predictive of mortality in men only.
CONCLUSIONS—Self assessed global health, as well as, specific dimensions of health act as significant, independent predictors of functioning and mortality in a community dwelling older people.


Keywords: age; self assessed health; functional status; mortality PMID:10715745

  2. Interfacial Strength and Physical Properties of Functionalized Graphene - Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Heimann, Paula; Scheiman, Daniel; Adamson, Douglas H.; Aksay, Iihan A.; Prud'homme, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    The toughness and coefficient of thermal expansion of a series of functionalized graphene sheet - epoxy nanocomposites are investigated. Functionalized graphene sheets are produced by splitting graphite oxide into single graphene sheets through a rapid thermal expansion process. These graphene sheets contain approx. 10% oxygen due to the presence of hydroxide, epoxide, and carboxyl functional groups which assist in chemical bond formation with the epoxy matrix. Intrinsic surface functionality is used to graft alkyl amine chains on the graphene sheets, and the addition of excess hardener insures covalent bonding between the epoxide matrix and graphene sheets. Considerable improvement in the epoxy dimensional stability is obtained. An increase in nanocomposite toughness is observed in some cases.

  3. Physical exercise and osteoporosis: effects of different types of exercises on bone and physical function of postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Linda Denise Fernandes; Oliveira, Mônica Longo de; Lirani-Galvão, Ana Paula; Marin-Mio, Rosângela Villa; Santos, Rodrigo Nolasco dos; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise

    2014-07-01

    Physical exercise is an important stimulus for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. However, it is not clear yet which modality would be better to stimulate bone metabolism and enhance physical function of postmenopausal women. This review paper aims to summarize and update present knowledge on the effects of different kinds of aquatic and ground physical exercises on bone metabolism and physical function of postmenopausal women. Moderate to intense exercises, performed in a high speed during short intervals of time, in water or on the ground, can be part of a program to prevent and treat postmenopausal osteoporosis. Mechanical vibration has proven to be beneficial for bone microarchitecture, improving bone density and bone strength, as well as increasing physical function. Although impact exercises are recognized as beneficial for the stimulation of bone tissue, other variables such as muscle strength, type of muscle contraction, duration and intensity of exercises are also determinants to induce changes in bone metabolism of postmenopausal women. Not only osteoanabolic exercises should be recommended; activities aimed to develop muscle strength and body balance and improve the proprioception should be encouraged to prevent falls and fractures.

  4. SUMO-regulated mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guerra de Souza, Ana Cristina; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Cimarosti, Helena

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cardinal motor signs such as rigidity, bradykinesia or rest tremor that arise from a significant death of dopaminergic neurons. Non-dopaminergic degeneration also occurs and it seems to induce the deficits in olfactory, emotional, and memory functions that precede the classical motor symptoms in PD. Despite the majority of PD cases being sporadic, several genes have previously been associated with the hereditary forms of the disease. The proteins encoded by some of these genes, including α-synuclein, DJ-1, and parkin, are modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), a post-translational modification that regulates a variety of cellular processes. Among the several pathogenic mechanisms proposed for PD is mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent studies suggest that SUMOylation can interfere with mitochondrial dynamics, which is essential for neuronal function, and may play a pivotal role in PD pathogenesis. Here, we present an overview of recent studies on mitochondrial disturbance in PD and the potential SUMO-modified proteins and pathways involved in this process. SUMOylation, a post-translational modification, interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, and may play a pivotal role in Parkinson's disease (PD). SUMOylation maintains α-synuclein (α-syn) in a soluble form and activates DJ-1, decreasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. SUMOylation may reduce the amount of parkin available for mitochondrial recruitment and decreases mitochondrial biogenesis through suppression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator 1 α (PGC-1α). Mitochondrial fission can be regulated by dynamin-related protein 1 SUMO-1- or SUMO-2/3-ylation. A fine balance for the SUMOylation/deSUMOylation of these proteins is required to ensure adequate mitochondrial function in PD. PMID:26932327

  5. Urinary uromodulin, kidney function and cardiovascular disease in elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Pranav S.; Biggs, Mary L.; Katz, Ronit; Ix, Joachim H.; Bennett, Michael R.; Devarajan, Prasad; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Jensen, Majken K.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Chaves, Paulo H. M.; Sarnak, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary uromodulin (uUMOD) is the most common secreted tubular protein in healthy adults. However, the relationship between uUMOD and clinical outcomes is still unclear. Here we measured uUMOD in 192 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study with over a 30% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 9 years, 54 with incident end stage renal disease (ESRD), and in a random sub-cohort of 958 participants. The association of uUMOD with eGFR decline was evaluated using logistic regression and with incident ESRD, cardiovascular disease, heart failure and mortality using Cox proportional regression. Mean age was 78 years and median uUMOD was 25.8 μg/mL. In a case-control study evaluating eGFR decline (192 cases and 231 controls), each standard deviation higher uUMOD was associated with a 23% lower odds of eGFR decline (odds ratio 0.77, (95% CI 0.62, 0.96)) and a 10% lower risk of mortality (hazard ratio 0.90, (95% CI 0.83, 0.98)) after adjusting for demographics, eGFR, albumin/creatinine ratio and other risk factors. There was no risk association of uUMOD with ESRD, cardiovascular disease or heart failure after multivariable adjustment. Thus, low uUMOD levels may identify persons at risk of progressive kidney disease and mortality above and beyond established markers of kidney disease, namely eGFR and the albumin/creatinine ratio. Future studies need to confirm these results and evaluate whether uUMOD is a marker of tubular health and/or whether it plays a causal role in preserving kidney function. PMID:26154925

  6. CLC channel function and dysfunction in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Stölting, Gabriel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    CLC channels and transporters are expressed in most tissues and fulfill diverse functions. There are four human CLC channels, ClC-1, ClC-2, ClC-Ka, and ClC-Kb, and five CLC transporters, ClC-3 through −7. Some of the CLC channels additionally associate with accessory subunits. Whereas barttin is mandatory for the functional expression of ClC-K, GlialCam is a facultative subunit of ClC-2 which modifies gating and thus increases the functional variability within the CLC family. Isoform-specific ion conduction and gating properties optimize distinct CLC channels for their cellular tasks. ClC-1 preferentially conducts at negative voltages, and the resulting inward rectification provides a large resting chloride conductance without interference with the muscle action potential. Exclusive opening at voltages negative to the chloride reversal potential allows for ClC-2 to regulate intracellular chloride concentrations. ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb are equally suited for inward and outward currents to support transcellular chloride fluxes. Every human CLC channel gene has been linked to a genetic disease, and studying these mutations has provided much information about the physiological roles and the molecular basis of CLC channel function. Mutations in the gene encoding ClC-1 cause myotonia congenita, a disease characterized by sarcolemmal hyperexcitability and muscle stiffness. Loss-of-function of ClC-Kb/barttin channels impairs NaCl resorption in the limb of Henle and causes hyponatriaemia, hypovolemia and hypotension in patients suffering from Bartter syndrome. Mutations in CLCN2 were found in patients with CNS disorders but the functional role of this isoform is still not understood. Recent links between ClC-1 and epilepsy and ClC-Ka and heart failure suggested novel cellular functions of these proteins. This review aims to survey the knowledge about physiological and pathophysiological functions of human CLC channels in the light of recent discoveries from biophysical

  7. The Association between Childhood Physical Abuse and Heart Disease in Adulthood: Findings from a Representative Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Brennenstuhl, Sarah; Frank, John

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Although, the relationship between childhood physical abuse and adult heart disease has been documented, very few studies have controlled for many of the known risk factors for heart disease. The objective of the current study, therefore, was to investigate the association between childhood physical abuse and adult heart disease while…

  8. Functional Evaluation of Coronary Disease by CT Angiography.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Rodríguez-Granillo, Gastón A; Spitzer, Ernest; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Loewe, Christian; Nieman, Koen; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, several technical developments in the field of cardiac computed tomography (CT) have made possible the extraction of functional information from an anatomy-based examination. Several different lines have been explored and will be reviewed in the present paper, namely: 1) myocardial perfusion imaging; 2) transluminal attenuation gradients and corrected coronary opacification indexes; 3) fractional flow reserve computed from CT; and 4) extrapolation from atherosclerotic plaque characteristics. In view of these developments, cardiac CT has the potential to become in the near future a truly 2-in-1 noninvasive evaluation for coronary artery disease. PMID:26563862

  9. Neural Functions of Matrix Metalloproteinases: Plasticity, Neurogenesis, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Hiromi; Dairyo, Yusuke; Yasunaga, Kei-ichiro; Emoto, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    The brain changes in response to experience and altered environment. To do that, the nervous system often remodels the structures of neuronal circuits. This structural plasticity of the neuronal circuits appears to be controlled not only by intrinsic factors, but also by extrinsic mechanisms including modification of the extracellular matrix. Recent studies employing a range of animal models implicate that matrix metalloproteinases regulate multiple aspects of the neuronal development and remodeling in the brain. This paper aims to summarize recent advances of our knowledge on the neuronal functions of matrix metalloproteinases and discuss how they might relate in neuronal disease. PMID:22567285

  10. The Effects of Physical Exercise with Music on Cognitive Function of Elderly People: Mihama-Kiho Project

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Masayuki; Ogawa, Jun-ichi; Tokita, Tomoko; Nakaguchi, Noriko; Nakao, Koji; Kida, Hirotaka; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical exercise has positive effects on cognitive function in elderly people. It is unknown, however, if combinations of non-pharmaceutical interventions can produce more benefits than single ones. This study aimed to identify if physical exercise combined with music improves cognitive function in normal elderly people more than exercise alone. Methods We enrolled 119 subjects (age 65–84 years old). Forty subjects performed physical exercise (once a week for an hour with professional trainers) with musical accompaniment (ExM group), developed by YAMAHA Music Foundation; 40 subjects performed the same exercise without music (Ex group); 39 subjects were the control group (Cont group). Before and after the year-long intervention, each patient was assessed by neuropsychological batteries. MRIs were performed before and after intervention; the Voxel-based Specific Regional analysis system for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD) was used to assess medial temporal lobe atrophy. Results Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was significant only in visuospatial function. The multiple comparison (ExM vs. Ex, ExM vs. Cont, Ex vs. Cont) was significant between the ExM and Cont group. Intra-group analyses before and after intervention revealed significant improvement in visuospatial function in the ExM group, and significant improvements in other batteries in all three groups. The VSRAD score significantly worsened in the ExM and Ex groups. Conclusions Physical exercise combined with music produced more positive effects on cognitive function in elderly people than exercise alone. We attributed this improvement to the multifaceted nature of combining physical exercise with music, which can act simultaneously as both cognitive and physical training. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) UMIN000012148 PMID:24769624

  11. Modelling skin disease: lessons from the worlds of mathematics, physics and computer science.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    Theoretical biology is a field that attempts to understand the complex phenomena of life in terms of mathematical and physical principles. Likewise, theoretical medicine employs mathematical arguments and models as a methodology in approaching the complexities of human disease. Naturally, these concepts can be applied to dermatology. There are many possible methods available in the theoretical investigation of skin disease. A number of examples are presented briefly. These include the mathematical modelling of pattern formation in congenital naevi and erythema gyratum repens, an information-theoretic approach to the analysis of genetic networks in autoimmunity, and computer simulations of early melanoma growth. To conclude, an analogy is drawn between the behaviour of well-known physical processes, such as earthquakes, and the spatio-temporal evolution of skin disease. Creating models in skin disease can lead to predictions that can be investigated experimentally or by observation and offer the prospect of unexpected or important insights into pathogenesis.

  12. Assessment of anthropological, physical and functional indices in sportsmen (basketball players) against the background of high physical loading.

    PubMed

    Chakhunashvili, G; Jobava, N; Guchashvili, M; Chakhunashvili, K; Gogilashvili, T; Shvangiradze, M; Pagava, K

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the investigation was the estimation of functional condition of anthropometrical, physical and cardiovascular system of sportsmen-basketball players against the background of high physical loading. 100 basketball players at the age from 12 till 18 years underlay the study. Randomized and open controllable research was carried out during 6 months. The following characteristics have been studied: how many days the sportsman is training in a week, how many hours the sportsman is training per day, his mood after training, over fatigue and overtension, frequency of heartbeat, time of breath holding, the general condition, the height in sitting and standing position; circumference of lumbus, chest, arm and limbs, the pulse, pulse, systolic and diastolic arterial pressure before and after physical loading. According to these factors the following sport indices are calculated: Index of Rufe (physical work capacity), the coefficient of endurance (Kvas formula), Shtange test (breath holding at sighing), Genchi test (breath holding at exhalation), average arterial pressure, systolic and cardiac output of blood circulation (the formula of Lilienstrad and Tsander), the coefficient of blood circulation effectiveness, Ketle index (the ratio of height and weight), Minuvre index (the ratio of body and feet length), Pinie index (power of body-build). Statistically authentic increase of breath and pulse in frequency was observed in sportsmen-basketball players after physical loading. The study of amplitude parameters of cardiac cycle among sportsmen-basketball players before and after physical loading has revealed the ability of rather low adaptation of cardiovascular system to physical loading.

  13. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: Neuromuscular Function Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bassotti, Gabrio; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bernardini, Nunzia; Dore, Maria P

    2016-10-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a frequent finding in daily clinical practice. However, its pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. This condition is likely the result of several concomitant factors occurring together to cause anatomic and functional abnormalities, leading as a result to the outpouching of the colonic mucosa. A pivotal role seems to be played by an abnormal colonic neuromuscular function, as shown repeatedly in these patients, and by an altered visceral perception. There is recent evidence that these abnormalities might be related to the derangement of the enteric innervation, to an abnormal distribution of mucosal neuropeptides, and to low-grade mucosal inflammation. The latter might be responsible for the development of visceral hypersensitivity, often causing abdominal pain in a subset of these patients. PMID:27622368

  14. Scavenger Receptor Structure and Function in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Zani, Izma; Stephen, Sam L.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Russell, David; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) are a ‘superfamily’ of membrane-bound receptors that were initially thought to bind and internalize modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL), though it is currently known to bind to a variety of ligands including endogenous proteins and pathogens. New family of SRs and their properties have been identified in recent years, and have now been classified into 10 eukaryote families, defined as Classes A-J. These receptors are classified according to their sequences, although in each class they are further classified based in the variations of the sequence. Their ability to bind a range of ligands is reflected on the biological functions such as clearance of modified lipoproteins and pathogens. SR members regulate pathophysiological states including atherosclerosis, pathogen infections, immune surveillance, and cancer. Here, we review our current understanding of SR structure and function implicated in health and disease. PMID:26010753

  15. Thyroid function after mantle irradiation in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E. Jr.; Adler, R.A.; Clark, P.; Brinck-Johnsen, T.; Tulloh, M.E.; Colten, T.

    1981-01-02

    The thyroid function of 64 patients with Hodgkin's disease who received mantle irradiation during the period 1966 to 1976 was studied. More than two-thirds (44 to 64) had some thyroid dysfunction. Twenty had mild dysfunction manifested by an abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Twenty had what could be termed compensated hypothyroidism while four were overtly hypothyroid. The severity of dysfunction was not related to age, sex, or chemotherapy. We found, however, that decreased thyroid function was inversely proportional to the length of time between a diagnostic lymphangiogram and the radiation therapy. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the iodine load of the lymphangiogram renders the thyroid gland more radiosensitive. Thyroxine suppression of the thyroid gland during the period from the lymphangiogram through the termination of radiation therapy is suggested as a means of avoiding thyroid injury.

  16. Exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving physical therapy: a cohort-nested randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical exercise training aims at reducing disease-specific impairments and improving quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD exacerbations in particular negatively impact COPD progression. Physical therapy intervention seems indicated to influence exacerbations and their consequences. However, information on the effect of physical therapy on exacerbation occurrence is scarce. This study aims to investigate the potential of a protocol-directed physical therapy programme as a means to prevent or postpone exacerbations, to shorten the duration or to decrease the severity of exacerbations in patients with COPD who have recently experienced an exacerbation. Besides, this study focuses on the effect of protocol-directed physical therapy on health status and quality of life and on cost-effectiveness and cost-utility in patients with COPD who have recently experienced an exacerbation. Methods/Design A prospective cohort of 300 COPD patients in all GOLD stages will be constructed. Patients will receive usual multidisciplinary COPD care including guideline-directed physical therapy. Patients in this cohort who have GOLD stage 2 to 4 (post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < 0.7 and FEV1 < 80% of predicted), who receive reimbursement by health insurance companies for physical therapy (post-bronchodilator Tiffeneau-index < 0.6) and who experience a COPD exacerbation will be asked within 56 days to participate in a cohort-nested prospective randomised controlled trial (RCT). In this RCT, the intervention group will receive a strict physical therapy programme for patients with COPD. This protocol-directed physical therapy (pdPT) will be compared to a control group that will receive sham-treatment, meaning no or very low-intensity exercise training (ST). An economic evaluation will be embedded in the RCT. Anthropometric measurements, comorbidities, smoking, functional exercise capacity, peripheral muscle strength

  17. Neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive functioning in prodromal Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Deborah L; Liu, Dawei; Smith, Megan M; Mills, James A; Long, Jeffrey D; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Paulsen, Jane S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The brain mechanisms of cognitive impairment in prodromal Huntington disease (prHD) are not well understood. Although striatal atrophy correlates with some cognitive abilities, few studies of prHD have investigated whether cortical gray matter morphometry correlates in a regionally specific manner with functioning in different cognitive domains. This knowledge would inform the selection of cognitive measures for clinical trials that would be most sensitive to the target of a treatment intervention. Method In this study, random forest analysis was used to identify neuroanatomical correlates of functioning in five cognitive domains including attention and information processing speed, working memory, verbal learning and memory, negative emotion recognition, and temporal processing. Participants included 325 prHD individuals with varying levels of disease progression and 119 gene-negative controls with a family history of HD. In intermediate analyses, we identified brain regions that showed significant differences between the prHD and the control groups in cortical thickness and striatal volume. Brain morphometry in these regions was then correlated with cognitive functioning in each of the domains in the prHD group using random forest methods. We hypothesized that different regional patterns of brain morphometry would be associated with performances in distinct cognitive domains. Results The results showed that performances in different cognitive domains that are vulnerable to decline in prHD were correlated with regionally specific patterns of cortical and striatal morphometry. Putamen and/or caudate volumes were top-ranked correlates of performance across all cognitive domains, as was cortical thickness in regions related to the processing demands of each domain. Conclusions The results underscore the importance of identifying structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) markers of functioning in different cognitive domains, as their relative

  18. Ryanodine receptors: physiological function and deregulation in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Perturbed Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis emerges as a central player in Alzheimer disease (AD). Accordingly, different studies have reported alterations of the expression and the function of Ryanodine Receptors (RyR) in human AD-affected brains, in cells expressing familial AD-linked mutations on the β amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) and presenilins (the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the βAPP, thereby generating amyloid β (Aβ) peptides), as well as in the brain of various transgenic AD mice models. Data converge to suggest that RyR expression and function alteration are associated to AD pathogenesis through the control of: i) βAPP processing and Aβ peptide production, ii) neuronal death; iii) synaptic function; and iv) memory and learning abilities. In this review, we document the network of evidences suggesting that RyR could play a complex dual “compensatory/protective versus pathogenic” role contributing to the setting of histopathological lesions and synaptic deficits that are associated with the disease stages. We also discuss the possible mechanisms underlying RyR expression and function alterations in AD. Finally, we review recent publications showing that drug-targeting blockade of RyR and genetic manipulation of RyR reduces Aβ production, stabilizes synaptic transmission, and prevents learning and memory deficits in various AD mouse models. Chemically-designed RyR “modulators” could therefore be envisioned as new therapeutic compounds able to delay or block the progression of AD. PMID:24902695

  19. STRIPAK complexes: structure, biological function, and involvement in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Juyeon; Pallas, David C

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian striatin family consists of three proteins, striatin, S/G2 nuclear autoantigen, and zinedin. Striatin family members have no intrinsic catalytic activity, but rather function as scaffolding proteins. Remarkably, they organize multiple diverse, large signaling complexes that participate in a variety of cellular processes. Moreover, they appear to be regulatory/targeting subunits for the major eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, striatin family members associate with germinal center kinase III kinases as well as other novel components, earning these assemblies the name striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complexes. Recently, there has been a great increase in functional and mechanistic studies aimed at identifying and understanding the roles of STRIPAK and STRIPAK-like complexes in cellular processes of multiple organisms. These studies have identified novel STRIPAK and STRIPAK-like complexes and have explored their roles in specific signaling pathways. Together, the results of these studies have sparked increased interest in striatin family complexes because they have revealed roles in signaling, cell cycle control, apoptosis, vesicular trafficking, Golgi assembly, cell polarity, cell migration, neural and vascular development, and cardiac function. Moreover, STRIPAK complexes have been connected to clinical conditions, including cardiac disease, diabetes, autism, and cerebral cavernous malformation. In this review, we discuss the expression, localization, and protein domain structure of striatin family members. Then we consider the diverse complexes these proteins and their homologs form in various organisms, emphasizing what is known regarding function and regulation. Finally, we explore possible roles of striatin family complexes in disease, especially cerebral cavernous malformation.

  20. STRIPAK Complexes: structure, biological function, and involvement in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Juyeon; Pallas, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian striatin family consists of three proteins, striatin, S/G2 nuclear autoantigen, and zinedin. Striatin family members have no intrinsic catalytic activity, but rather function as scaffolding proteins. Remarkably, they organize multiple diverse, large signaling complexes that participate in a variety of cellular processes. Moreover, they appear to be regulatory/targeting subunits for the major eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, striatin family members associate with germinal center kinase III kinases as well as other novel components, earning these assemblies the name striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complexes. Recently, there has been a great increase in functional and mechanistic studies aimed at identifying and understanding the roles of STRIPAK–like complexes in cellular processes of multiple organisms. These studies have identified novel STRIPAK or STRIPAK-like complexes and have explored their roles in specific signaling pathways. Together, the results of these studies have sparked increased interest in striatin family complexes because they have revealed roles in signaling, cell cycle control, apoptosis, vesicular trafficking, Golgi assembly, cell polarity, cell migration, neural and vascular development, and cardiac function. Moreover, STRIPAK complexes have been connected to clinical conditions, including cardiac disease, diabetes, autism, and cerebral cavernous malformation. In this review, we discuss the expression, localization, and protein domain structure of striatin family members. Then we consider the diverse complexes these proteins and their homologs form in various organisms, emphasizing what is known regarding function and regulation. Finally, we will explore possible roles of striatin family complexes in disease, especially cerebral cavernous malformation. PMID:24333164

  1. Physical Activity and Exercise for Secondary Prevention among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Darden, Douglas; Richardson, Caroline; Jackson, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Most adults do not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, including patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, healthcare providers often do not understand the benefits of physical activity in CVD patients, rather over emphasizing the potential risks related to activity. Recent studies suggest reductions in cardiovascular events including mortality with concomitant improvements in quality of life for many vascular conditions. However gaps in our current knowledge base remain. Recent research on physical activity including use of novel internet based interventions are developing areas of interest have moved to reduce such knowledge gaps.

  2. Physical Activity and Exercise for Secondary Prevention among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Darden, Douglas; Richardson, Caroline; Jackson, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Most adults do not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, including patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, healthcare providers often do not understand the benefits of physical activity in CVD patients, rather over emphasizing the potential risks related to activity. Recent studies suggest reductions in cardiovascular events including mortality with concomitant improvements in quality of life for many vascular conditions. However gaps in our current knowledge base remain. Recent research on physical activity including use of novel internet based interventions are developing areas of interest have moved to reduce such knowledge gaps. PMID:24396552

  3. Physical Activity and Exercise for Secondary Prevention among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Darden, Douglas; Richardson, Caroline; Jackson, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Most adults do not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, including patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, healthcare providers often do not understand the benefits of physical activity in CVD patients, rather over emphasizing the potential risks related to activity. Recent studies suggest reductions in cardiovascular events including mortality with concomitant improvements in quality of life for many vascular conditions. However gaps in our current knowledge base remain. Recent research on physical activity including use of novel internet based interventions are developing areas of interest have moved to reduce such knowledge gaps. PMID:24396552

  4. Age-related Differential Item Functioning for the Patient-Reported Outcomes Information System (PROMIS®) Physical Functioning Items

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Sylvia H; Spritzer, Karen L; Morales, Leo S; Hays, Ron D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the equivalence of the PROMIS® wave 1 physical functioning item bank, by age (50 years or older versus 18-49). Materials and methods A total of 114 physical functioning items with 5 response choices were administered to English- (n=1504) and Spanish-language (n=640) adults. Item frequencies, means and standard deviations, item-scale correlations, and internal consistency reliability were estimated. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) by age was evaluated. Results Thirty of the 114 items were fagged for DIF based on an R-squared of 0.02 or above criterion. The expected total score was higher for those respondents who were 18-49 than those who were 50 or older. Conclusions Those who were 50 years or older versus 18-49 years old with the same level of physical functioning responded differently to 30 of the 114 items in the PROMIS® physical functioning item bank. This study yields essential information about the equivalence of the physical functioning items in older versus younger individuals. PMID:24052925

  5. A yeast functional screen predicts new candidate ALS disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Couthouis, Julien; Hart, Michael P.; Shorter, James; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Erion, Renske; Oristano, Rachel; Liu, Annie X.; Ramos, Daniel; Jethava, Niti; Hosangadi, Divya; Epstein, James; Chiang, Ashley; Diaz, Zamia; Nakaya, Tadashi; Ibrahim, Fadia; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Solski, Jennifer A.; Williams, Kelly L.; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Ingre, Caroline; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Clay-Falcone, Dana; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Greene, Robert; Kalb, Robert G.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ludolph, Albert; Robberecht, Wim; Andersen, Peter M.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.; King, Oliver D.; Bonini, Nancy M.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Rademakers, Rosa; Mourelatos, Zissimos; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating and universally fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in two related RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, that harbor prion-like domains, cause some forms of ALS. There are at least 213 human proteins harboring RNA recognition motifs, including FUS and TDP-43, raising the possibility that additional RNA-binding proteins might contribute to ALS pathogenesis. We performed a systematic survey of these proteins to find additional candidates similar to TDP-43 and FUS, followed by bioinformatics to predict prion-like domains in a subset of them. We sequenced one of these genes, TAF15, in patients with ALS and identified missense variants, which were absent in a large number of healthy controls. These disease-associated variants of TAF15 caused formation of cytoplasmic foci when expressed in primary cultures of spinal cord neurons. Very similar to TDP-43 and FUS, TAF15 aggregated in vitro and conferred neurodegeneration in Drosophila, with the ALS-linked variants having a more severe effect than wild type. Immunohistochemistry of postmortem spinal cord tissue revealed mislocalization of TAF15 in motor neurons of patients with ALS. We propose that aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins might contribute very broadly to ALS pathogenesis and the genes identified in our yeast functional screen, coupled with prion-like domain prediction analysis, now provide a powerful resource to facilitate ALS disease gene discovery. PMID:22065782

  6. Impairments of neural circuit function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Busche, Marc Aurel; Konnerth, Arthur

    2016-08-01

    An essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain, many years to decades before the onset of overt cognitive symptoms. We suggest that during this very extended early phase of the disease, soluble Aβ oligomers and amyloid plaques alter the function of local neuronal circuits and large-scale networks by disrupting the balance of synaptic excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) in the brain. The analysis of mouse models of AD revealed that an Aβ-induced change of the E/I balance caused hyperactivity in cortical and hippocampal neurons, a breakdown of slow-wave oscillations, as well as network hypersynchrony. Remarkably, hyperactivity of hippocampal neurons precedes amyloid plaque formation, suggesting that hyperactivity is one of the earliest dysfunctions in the pathophysiological cascade initiated by abnormal Aβ accumulation. Therapeutics that correct the E/I balance in early AD may prevent neuronal dysfunction, widespread cell loss and cognitive impairments associated with later stages of the disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377723

  7. Exercise for the diabetic brain: how physical training may help prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease in T2DM patients.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Sebastian; Brixius, Klara; Brinkmann, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review, which is based on recent studies, presents a molecular framework that links the two diseases and explains how physical training could help counteract neurodegeneration in T2DM patients. Inflammatory, oxidative, and metabolic changes in T2DM patients cause cerebrovascular complications and can lead to blood-brain-barrier (BBB) breakdown. Peripherally increased pro-inflammatory molecules can then pass the BBB more easily and activate stress-activated pathways, thereby promoting key pathological features of dementia/AD such as brain insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and accumulation of neurotoxic beta-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers, leading to synaptic loss, neuronal dysfunction, and cell death. Ceramides can also pass the BBB, induce pro-inflammatory reactions, and disturb brain insulin signaling. In a vicious circle, oxidative stress and the pro-inflammatory environment intensify, leading to further cognitive decline. Low testosterone levels might be a common risk factor in T2DM and AD. Regular physical exercise reinforces antioxidative capacity, reduces oxidative stress, and has anti-inflammatory effects. It improves endothelial function and might increase brain capillarization. Physical training can further counteract dyslipidemia and reduce increased ceramide levels. It might also improve Aβ clearance by up-regulating Aβ transporters and, in some cases, increase basal testosterone levels. In addition, regular physical activity can induce neurogenesis. Physical training should therefore be emphasized as a part of prevention programs developed for diabetic patients to minimize the risk of the onset of neurodegenerative diseases among this specific patient group. PMID:27160819

  8. Calreticulin: non-endoplasmic reticulum functions in physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Leslie I.; Eggleton, Paul; Sweetwyne, Mariya T.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Greives, Matthew R.; Naylor, Sara-Megumi; Michalak, Marek; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2010-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), when localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), has important functions in directing proper conformation of proteins and glycoproteins, as well as in homeostatic control of cytosolic and ER calcium levels. There is also steadily accumulating evidence for diverse roles for CRT localized outside the ER, including data suggesting important roles for CRT localized to the outer cell surface of a variety of cell types, in the cytosol, and in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, the addition of exogenous CRT rescues numerous CRT-driven functions, such as adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, and immunoregulatory functions of CRT-null cells. Recent studies show that topically applied CRT has diverse and profound biological effects that enhance cutaneous wound healing in animal models. This evidence for extracellular bioactivities of CRT has provided new insights into this classically ER-resident protein, despite a lack of knowledge of how CRT exits from the ER to the cell surface or how it is released into the extracellular milieu. Nonetheless, it has become clear that CRT is a multicompartmental protein that regulates a wide array of cellular responses important in physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing, the immune response, fibrosis, and cancer.—Gold, L. I., Eggleton, P., Sweetwyne, M. T., Van Duyn, L. B., Greives, M. R., Naylor, S.-M., Michalak, M., Murphy-Ullrich, J. E. Calreticulin: non-endoplamic reticulum functions in physiology and disease. PMID:19940256

  9. Source memory and frontal functioning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Drag, Lauren L; Bieliauskas, Linas A; Kaszniak, Alfred W; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Glisky, Elizabeth L

    2009-05-01

    The most extensively described pathological abnormality in Parkinson's disease (PD) is loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the ventral tegmental area, with degeneration of their striatal terminals. Because of the intimate connections between the striatum and the frontal lobes, individuals with PD often demonstrate impairments on those tasks relying on the prefrontal cortex (e.g., tests of executive functioning). Source memory, or memory for context, is believed to rely on the prefrontal cortex and has been previously associated with executive functioning performance, although it has received little attention in the PD literature. Executive functioning and source memory were measured in a group of nondemented PD patients and healthy control participants. Within the PD group, an anti-Parkinson's medication withdrawal manipulation was used to examine whether source memory was affected by phasic changes in dopamine levels. Compared to healthy control participants, PD patients were impaired in source memory (both on- and off-medication) and on a composite measure of executive functioning. Within the PD group, medication administration improved motor performance but did not have a significant effect on source memory.

  10. [Sensory functions and Alzheimer's disease: a multi-disciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Berard, Alain; Boucart, Muriel; Bouccara, Didier; Brand, Gérard; Charras, Kevin; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Gzil, Fabrice; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Madjlessi, Arach; Malaquin-Pavan, Évelyne; Penicaud, Luc; Platel, Hervé; Pozzo, Thierry; Reintjens, Christophe; Salmon, Éric; Vergnon, Laurent; Robert, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Relations between sensory functions and Alzheimer's disease are still under-explored. To understand them better, the Fondation Médéric Alzheimer has brought together a multi-disciplinary expert group. Aristote's five senses must be enhanced by today's knowledge of proprioception, motor cognition and pain perception. When cognition breaks down, the person with dementia perceives the world around her with her sensory experience, yet is unable to integrate all this information to understand the context. The treatment of multiple sensory inputs by the brain is closely linked to cognitive processes. Sensory deficits reduce considerably the autonomy of people with dementia in their daily life and their relations with others, increase their social isolation and the risk of accidents. Professionals involved with neurodegenerative diseases remain poorly aware of sensory deficits, which can bias the results of cognitive tests. However, there are simple tools to detect these deficits, notably for vision, hearing and balance disorders, which can be corrected. Many interventions for cognitive rehabilitation or quality of life improvement are based on sensory functions. The environment of people with dementia must be adapted to become understandable, comfortable, safe and eventually therapeutic. PMID:26395297

  11. Relationship of lipoprotein(a) levels to physical activity and family history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, S; Elosua, R; Covas, M I; Pavesi, M; Vila, J; Marrugat, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association of physical activity with serum lipoprotein(a) [La(a)] levels in individuals according to whether they had a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Lp(a) levels in 332 healthy Spanish men aged 20 to 60 years were measured. Physical activity and family history of CHD were assessed. RESULTS: For men with a family history of CHD, the odds ratio for Lp(a) levels above the median value was 0.13 (95% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.50) in very active men (energy expended in physical activity > 300 kcal/day) compared with active men (energy expended in physical activity < 300 kcal/day). CONCLUSIONS: Regular daily physical activity in individuals with a family history of CHD could be useful for controlling Lp(a) levels. PMID:10076490

  12. Associative reinstatement memory measures hippocampal function in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Melanie; Giannoylis, Irene; De Belder, Maya; Saint-Cyr, Jean A; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2016-09-01

    In Parkinson's Disease (PD), hippocampal atrophy is associated with rapid cognitive decline. Hippocampal function is typically assessed using memory tests but current clinical tools (e.g., free recall) also rely on executive functions or use material that is not optimally engaging hippocampal memory networks. Because of the ubiquity of executive dysfunction in PD, our ability to detect true memory deficits is suboptimal. Our previous behavioural and neuroimaging work in other populations suggests that an experimental memory task - Associative Reinstatement Memory (ARM) - may prove useful in investigating hippocampal function in PD. In this study, we investigated whether ARM is compromised in PD and we assessed its convergent and divergent validity by comparing it to standardized measures of memory and of attention and executive functioning in PD, respectively. Using fMRI, we also investigated whether performance in PD relates to degree of hippocampal engagement. Fifteen participants with PD and 13 age-matched healthy controls completed neuropsychological testing as well as an ARM fMRI recognition paradigm in which they were instructed to identify word pairs comprised of two studied words (intact or rearranged pairs) and those containing at least one new word (new or half new pairs). ARM is measured by the differences in hit rates between intact and rearranged pairs. Behaviourally, ARM was poorer in PD relative to controls and was correlated with verbal memory measures, but not with attention or executive functioning in the PD group. Hippocampal activation associated with ARM was reduced in PD relative to controls and covaried with ARM scores in both groups. To conclude, ARM is a sensitive measure of hippocampal memory function that is unaffected by attention or executive dysfunction in PD. Our study highlights the benefit of integrating cognitive neuroscience frameworks and novel experimental tasks to improve the practice of clinical neuropsychology in PD. PMID

  13. Physical exercise as a preventive or disease-modifying treatment of dementia and brain aging.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, J Eric; Geda, Yonas E; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C

    2011-09-01

    A rapidly growing literature strongly suggests that exercise, specifically aerobic exercise, may attenuate cognitive impairment and reduce dementia risk. We used PubMed (keywords exercise and cognition) and manuscript bibliographies to examine the published evidence of a cognitive neuroprotective effect of exercise. Meta-analyses of prospective studies documented a significantly reduced risk of dementia associated with midlife exercise; similarly, midlife exercise significantly reduced later risks of mild cognitive impairment in several studies. Among patients with dementia or mild cognitive impairment, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) documented better cognitive scores after 6 to 12 months of exercise compared with sedentary controls. Meta-analyses of RCTs of aerobic exercise in healthy adults were also associated with significantly improved cognitive scores. One year of aerobic exercise in a large RCT of seniors was associated with significantly larger hippocampal volumes and better spatial memory; other RCTs in seniors documented attenuation of age-related gray matter volume loss with aerobic exercise. Cross-sectional studies similarly reported significantly larger hippocampal or gray matter volumes among physically fit seniors compared with unfit seniors. Brain cognitive networks studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging display improved connectivity after 6 to 12 months of exercise. Animal studies indicate that exercise facilitates neuroplasticity via a variety of biomechanisms, with improved learning outcomes. Induction of brain neurotrophic factors by exercise has been confirmed in multiple animal studies, with indirect evidence for this process in humans. Besides a brain neuroprotective effect, physical exercise may also attenuate cognitive decline via mitigation of cerebrovascular risk, including the contribution of small vessel disease to dementia. Exercise should not be overlooked as an important therapeutic strategy.

  14. Survival effects of physical activity on mortality among persons with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; VanWagner, Lisa B

    2016-06-01

    Physical activity is protective of premature mortality and those with liver disease are at an increased risk of early mortality. It is thus plausible to suggest that physical activity may have survival benefits among those with liver disease, but this has yet to be investigated. In a national sample, we examine the prospective association of objectively-measured physical activity on all-cause mortality among those with liver disease. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (with follow-up through 2011) were evaluated (analyzed in 2015). Physical activity was assessed via accelerometry over 7 days. Liver disease was assessed via self-report of physician diagnosis. Covariates included age, gender, race-ethnicity, serum cotinine, income-to-poverty ratio, C-reactive protein, cholesterol medication use, blood pressure medication use, alcohol behavior, self-reported liver disease status, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and comorbid illness. The sample included 162 adults who self-reported a physician-diagnosis of liver disease. The unweighted median follow-up period was 80.0 months (IQR = 68-91; SD = 18.0). In the sample, 12,815 person-months occurred with a mortality incidence rate of 1.09 deaths per 1000 person-months. After adjustments, for every 10 min/day increase in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), participants had an 89% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HRadjusted = 0.11; 95% CI: 0.02-0.47; P = 0.004). There was no evidence of moderation by alcohol behavior, ALT, GGT or Hepatitis C virus status. These findings demonstrate that modest increases in MVPA may have survival benefits among those with a self-reported liver condition. PMID:26844199

  15. Physical, metabolic and developmental functions of the seed coat

    PubMed Central

    Radchuk, Volodymyr; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2014-01-01

    The conventional understanding of the role of the seed coat is that it provides a protective layer for the developing zygote. Recent data show that the picture is more nuanced. The seed coat certainly represents a first line of defense against adverse external factors, but it also acts as channel for transmitting environmental cues to the interior of the seed. The latter function primes the seed to adjust its metabolism in response to changes in its external environment. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a comprehensive view of the structure and functionality of the seed coat, and to expose its hidden interaction with both the endosperm and embryo. Any breeding and/or biotechnology intervention seeking to increase seed size or modify seed features will have to consider the implications on this tripartite interaction. PMID:25346737

  16. Characteristics of the Cochlear Symptoms and Functions in Meniere's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Bo; Wang, Rui; Jia, Ruo; Gu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meniere's disease is a unique, progressive disease of the inner ear. The complex manifestation presents diagnostic challenges. The cochlear symptoms often present before vertigo and tend to be ignored. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of cochlear symptoms and functions associated with Meniere's disease to investigate the regularity of the development of this disorder. Methods: One-hundred fifteen patients who were diagnosed with definite unilateral Meniere's disease at the Hearing and Vestibular Clinic of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of Beijing Tongren Hospital from August 2013 to November 2015 were recruited in this retrospective study. Initial symptoms, duration from initial symptoms to the diagnosis, hearing thresholds, audiogram patterns, and caloric test results were collected and analyzed for each patient. Data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0 statistical software by Spearman's correlation, Kruskal–Wallis H test, Chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test. Results: The average hearing threshold of these patients was 45.24 ± 18.40 dB HL. A majority of the patients (55.65%) were in Stage 3. The initial presentation of the disorder in 58 cases (50.43%) comprised only cochlear symptoms without vertigo. A weak, positive correlation was found between the degree of hearing loss and duration of the disease from initial symptoms to the diagnosis (rs = 0.288, P = 0.002). Upward-sloping, inverted “V,” downward-sloping, and flat pattern were the main audiometric patterns observed with a distinctive distribution between stages (P < 0.001). Based on the configurations of audiograms, the audiometric patterns had a weak correlation to the duration (rs = 0.269, P = 0.004), and there was a tendency of duration to rising from upward-sloping, inverted V, downward-sloping to flat pattern. (H = 10.024, P = 0.018). Frequencies of tinnitus in 56 patients (64.4%) were at the lowest points of the audiograms, i.e., the frequencies of the poorest

  17. Density functional theory across chemistry, physics and biology.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, Tanja; Bühl, Michael; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2014-03-13

    The past decades have seen density functional theory (DFT) evolve from a rising star in computational quantum chemistry to one of its major players. This Theme Issue, which comes half a century after the publication of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorems that laid the foundations of modern DFT, reviews progress and challenges in present-day DFT research. Rather than trying to be comprehensive, this Theme Issue attempts to give a flavour of selected aspects of DFT.

  18. Physical activity interventions and children's mental function: An introduction and overview

    PubMed Central

    Tomporowski, Phillip D.; Lambourne, Kate; Okumura, Michelle S.

    2011-01-01

    Background This review provides a historical overview of physical activity interventions designed by American educators and an evaluation of research that has assessed the effects of exercise on children's mental function. Method Historical descriptions of the emergence of American physical education doctrine throughout the 20th century were evaluated. Prior reviews of studies that assessed the effects of single acute bouts of exercise and the effects of chronic exercise training on children's mental function were examined and the results of recent studies were summarized. Results Physical activity interventions designed for American children have reflected two competing views: activities should promote physical fitness and activities should promote social, emotional, and intellectual development. Research results indicate that exercise fosters the emergence of children's mental function; particularly executive functioning. The route by which physical activity impacts mental functioning is complex and is likely moderated by several variables, including physical fitness level, health status, and numerous psycho-social factors. Conclusion Physical activity interventions for children should be designed to meet multiple objectives; e.g., optimize physical fitness, promote health-related behaviors that offset obesity, and facilitate mental development. PMID:21420981

  19. Executive Functions in Learning Processes: Do They Benefit from Physical Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barenberg, Jonathan; Berse, Timo; Dutke, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    As executive functions play an essential role in learning processes, approaches capable of enhancing executive functioning are of particular interest to educational psychology. Recently, the hypothesis has been advanced that executive functioning may benefit from changes in neurobiological processes induced by physical activity. The present…

  20. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease: changes in lung function.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Brent W; Shariat, Cyrus; Collard, Harold R; Koth, Laura L; Wolters, Paul J; Golden, Jeffrey A; Panos, Ralph J; King, Talmadge E

    2010-04-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a distinct clinical entity that may be accompanied by interstitial lung disease (ILD). The natural history of UCTD-ILD is unknown. We hypothesized that patients with UCTD-ILD would be more likely to have improvement in lung function than those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) during longitudinal follow-up. We identified subjects enrolled in the UCSF ILD cohort study with a diagnosis of IPF or UCTD. The primary outcome compared the presence or absence of a > or = 5% increase in percent predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) in IPF and UCTD. Regression models were used to account for potential confounding variables. Ninety subjects were identified; 59 subjects (30 IPF, 29 UCTD) had longitudinal pulmonary function data for inclusion in the analysis. After accounting for baseline pulmonary function tests, treatment, and duration between studies, UCTD was associated with substantial improvement in FVC (odds ratio = 8.23, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-53.2; p = 0.03) during follow-up (median, 8 months) compared with IPF. Patients with UCTD-ILD are more likely to have improved pulmonary function during follow-up than those with IPF. These findings demonstrate the clinical importance of identifying UCTD in patients presenting with an "idiopathic" interstitial pneumonia.

  1. Promotion Considerations for Exercise and Physical Activity in Mentally Impaired, Diseased, and Disabled Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frizzell, Linda Bane

    This paper reports evidence indicating that adapted exercise has a preventive effect on the incidence and progression of chronic diseases which are often related to the aging process. Exercise is known to preserve many physiological responses in the healthy elderly, yet those with physical impairments are often discouraged from exercising because…

  2. Effectiveness of discharge-planning on physical quality of life of patients with ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Mazloum, Seyyed Reza; Heidari-Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Bidgoli-Gholkhatmi, Maryam; Agayei, Nayereh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: One of the goals of health care team is to improve the quality of life of patients during and after hospitalization period. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effect of performing discharge planning on ischemic heart disease patient's physical quality of life. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed on 74 ischemic heart disease patients which randomly allocated to discharge-planning group (n = 37) and usual care group (n = 37). The discharge-planning included the patients’ educational needs, self-care instructions for patients, and caregivers. This program was performed through supporting patients during hospitalization and after discharge. The physical aspect of quality of life was assessed by standard questionnaire Short Form 36 and the data were analyzed through Mann–Whitney, independent t-test, variance analysis, Friedman and Wilcoxon. Results: There was no significant difference between intervention and control groups in physical aspects of the quality of life before intervention (P = 0.423) while two groups were significantly different after intervention (P = 0.000) and quality of life of patients in the case group improved significantly. Conclusion: Applying the discharge-planning program as an effective, efficient, cost-effective, and noninvasive intervention on physical aspects of the quality of ischemic heart disease patients’ lives is useful and helpful. Hence, it is recommended to use this program to promote and improve the quality of ischemic heart disease patients’ lives. PMID:27127744

  3. Physical Activity and Sport Participation in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease: Perceptions of Children and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Kirsh, Joel A.; Kilburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the…

  4. Default mode, executive function, and language functional connectivity networks are compromised in mild Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Marina; Fukuda, Aya; Massabki, Lilian H P; Lopes, Tatila M; Franco, Alexandre R; Damasceno, Benito P; Cendes, Fernando; Balthazar, Marcio L F

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by mental and cognitive problems, particularly with memory, language, visuospatial skills (VS), and executive functions (EF). Advances in the neuroimaging of AD have highlighted dysfunctions in functional connectivity networks (FCNs), especially in the memory related default mode network (DMN). However, little is known about the integrity and clinical significance of FNCs that process other cognitive functions than memory. We evaluated 22 patients with mild AD and 26 healthy controls through a resting state functional MRI scan. We aimed to identify different FCNs: the DMN, language, EF, and VS. Seed-based functional connectivity was calculated by placing a seed in the DMN (posterior cingulate cortex), language (Broca's and Wernicke's areas), EF (right and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), and VS networks (right and left associative visual cortex). We also performed regression analyses between individual connectivity maps for the different FCNs and the scores on cognitive tests. We found areas with significant decreases in functional connectivity in patients with mild AD in the DMN and Wernicke's area compared with controls. Increased connectivity in patients was observed in the EF network. Regarding multiple linear regression analyses, a significant correlation was only observed between the connectivity of the DMN and episodic memory (delayed recall) scores. In conclusion, functional connectivity alterations in mild AD are not restricted to the DMN. Other FCNs related to language and EF may be altered. However, we only found significant correlations between cognition and functional connectivity in the DMN and episodic memory performance.

  5. Conceptual foundation for measures of physical function and behavioral health function for Social Security work disability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M; Eisen, Susan V; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    Physical and mental impairments represent the 2 largest health condition categories for which workers receive Social Security disability benefits. Comprehensive assessment of physical and mental impairments should include aspects beyond medical conditions such as a person's underlying capabilities as well as activity demands relevant to the context of work. The objective of this article is to describe the initial conceptual stages of developing new measurement instruments of behavioral health and physical functioning relevant for Social Security work disability evaluation purposes. To outline a clear conceptualization of the constructs to be measured, 2 content models were developed using structured and informal qualitative approaches. We performed a structured literature review focusing on work disability and incorporating aspects of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a unifying taxonomy for framework development. Expert interviews provided advice and consultation to enhance face validity of the resulting content models. The content model for work-related behavioral health function identifies 5 major domains: (1) behavior control, (2) basic interactions, (3) temperament and personality, (4) adaptability, and (5) workplace behaviors. The content model describing physical functioning includes 3 domains: (1) changing and maintaining body position, (2) whole-body mobility, and (3) carrying, moving, and handling objects. These content models informed subsequent measurement properties including item development and measurement scale construction, and provided conceptual coherence guiding future empirical inquiry. The proposed measurement approaches show promise to comprehensively and systematically assess physical and behavioral health functioning relevant to work.

  6. Conceptual foundation for measures of physical function and behavioral health function for Social Security work disability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M; Eisen, Susan V; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    Physical and mental impairments represent the 2 largest health condition categories for which workers receive Social Security disability benefits. Comprehensive assessment of physical and mental impairments should include aspects beyond medical conditions such as a person's underlying capabilities as well as activity demands relevant to the context of work. The objective of this article is to describe the initial conceptual stages of developing new measurement instruments of behavioral health and physical functioning relevant for Social Security work disability evaluation purposes. To outline a clear conceptualization of the constructs to be measured, 2 content models were developed using structured and informal qualitative approaches. We performed a structured literature review focusing on work disability and incorporating aspects of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a unifying taxonomy for framework development. Expert interviews provided advice and consultation to enhance face validity of the resulting content models. The content model for work-related behavioral health function identifies 5 major domains: (1) behavior control, (2) basic interactions, (3) temperament and personality, (4) adaptability, and (5) workplace behaviors. The content model describing physical functioning includes 3 domains: (1) changing and maintaining body position, (2) whole-body mobility, and (3) carrying, moving, and handling objects. These content models informed subsequent measurement properties including item development and measurement scale construction, and provided conceptual coherence guiding future empirical inquiry. The proposed measurement approaches show promise to comprehensively and systematically assess physical and behavioral health functioning relevant to work. PMID:23548543

  7. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour: applying lessons to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Gardiner, P A; Cavalheri, V; Jenkins, S C; Healy, G N

    2015-05-01

    In health and disease, the benefits of regular participation in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity are well documented. However, individuals with chronic conditions, such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), typically do very little activity at a moderate or vigorous intensity. Much of their day is instead spent in sedentary behaviour, such as sitting or reclining, which requires very little energy expenditure. This high level of time spent in sedentary behaviour can have serious health consequences, including increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. There is emerging evidence to suggest that participation in light intensity physical activities (e.g. standing or slow walking) may have benefits for cardio-metabolic health. Given the low aerobic capacity of individuals with moderate to severe COPD, increasing light intensity activity (through reducing sedentary time) may be a feasible additional strategy to improve health in this population, alongside traditional recommendations to increase the time spent in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity. This review provides an overview of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, with a particular emphasis on these behaviours for people with COPD. It provides suggestions for the measurement of these behaviours within the clinical setting, as well as for interventions that may be effective at increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour in this population. PMID:25164319

  8. Underwater linear polarization: physical limitations to biological functions.

    PubMed

    Shashar, Nadav; Johnsen, Sönke; Lerner, Amit; Sabbah, Shai; Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Mäthger, Lydia M; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-03-12

    Polarization sensitivity is documented in a range of marine animals. The variety of tasks for which animals can use this sensitivity, and the range over which they do so, are confined by the visual systems of these animals and by the propagation of the polarization information in the aquatic environment. We examine the environmental physical constraints in an attempt to reveal the depth, range and other limitations to the use of polarization sensitivity by marine animals. In clear oceanic waters, navigation that is based on the polarization pattern of the sky appears to be limited to shallow waters, while solar-based navigation is possible down to 200-400 m. When combined with intensity difference, polarization sensitivity allows an increase in target detection range by 70-80% with an upper limit of 15 m for large-eyed animals. This distance will be significantly smaller for small animals, such as plankton, and in turbid waters. Polarization-contrast detection, which is relevant to object detection and communication, is strongly affected by water conditions and in clear waters its range limit may reach 15 m as well. We show that polarization sensitivity may also serve for target distance estimation, when examining point source bioluminescent objects in the photic mesopelagic depth range.

  9. Underwater linear polarization: physical limitations to biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Shashar, Nadav; Johnsen, Sönke; Lerner, Amit; Sabbah, Shai; Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Mäthger, Lydia M.; Hanlon, Roger T.

    2011-01-01

    Polarization sensitivity is documented in a range of marine animals. The variety of tasks for which animals can use this sensitivity, and the range over which they do so, are confined by the visual systems of these animals and by the propagation of the polarization information in the aquatic environment. We examine the environmental physical constraints in an attempt to reveal the depth, range and other limitations to the use of polarization sensitivity by marine animals. In clear oceanic waters, navigation that is based on the polarization pattern of the sky appears to be limited to shallow waters, while solar-based navigation is possible down to 200–400 m. When combined with intensity difference, polarization sensitivity allows an increase in target detection range by 70–80% with an upper limit of 15 m for large-eyed animals. This distance will be significantly smaller for small animals, such as plankton, and in turbid waters. Polarization-contrast detection, which is relevant to object detection and communication, is strongly affected by water conditions and in clear waters its range limit may reach 15 m as well. We show that polarization sensitivity may also serve for target distance estimation, when examining point source bioluminescent objects in the photic mesopelagic depth range. PMID:21282168

  10. Physical activity and memory functions: are neurotrophins and cerebral gray matter volume the missing link?

    PubMed

    Flöel, A; Ruscheweyh, R; Krüger, K; Willemer, C; Winter, B; Völker, K; Lohmann, H; Zitzmann, M; Mooren, F; Breitenstein, C; Knecht, S

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological studies reveal better cognitive function in physically active individuals. Possible mediators for this effect are neurotrophins, which are up-regulated through physical exercise and induce neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the animal model. Here we cross-sectionally assessed 75 healthy older individuals for levels of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and memory encoding, as well as neurotrophin levels and cerebral gray matter volume. We found that physical activity, but not cardiovascular fitness, was associated with better memory encoding after controlling for age, sex, education, depression, alcohol consumption, and smoking. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with higher levels of the neurotrophin granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and increased cerebral gray matter volume in prefrontal and cingulate cortex as assessed by magnetic resonance voxel-based morphometry. While mediating factors will need to be further elucidated, these findings indicate that even low-level physical activity exerts beneficial effects on memory functions in older individuals.

  11. Impact of physical activity during pregnancy and postpartum on chronic disease risk.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    Research over the past 20 years has focused on the safety of physical activity during pregnancy. Guidelines for health care providers and pregnant/postpartum women have been developed from the results of these studies. The overwhelming results of most studies have shown few negative effects on the pregnancy of a healthy gravida, but rather, be beneficial to the maternal-fetal unit. Recently, researchers have begun to consider the role of maternal physical activity in a more traditional chronic disease prevention model, for both mother and offspring. To address the key issues related to the role of physical activity during pregnancy and postpartum on chronic disease risk, the American College of Sports Medicine convened a Scientific Roundtable at Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI. Topics included preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, breastfeeding and weight loss, musculoskeletal disorders, mental health, and offspring health and development.

  12. Family burden in long-term diseases: a comparative study in schizophrenia vs. physical disorders.

    PubMed

    Magliano, Lorenza; Fiorillo, Andrea; De Rosa, Corrado; Malangone, Claudio; Maj, Mario

    2005-07-01

    This study explored burden and social networks in families of patients with schizophrenia or a long-term physical disease. It was carried out in 169 specialised units (mental health department, and units for the treatment of chronic heart, brain, diabetes, kidney, lung diseases) recruited in 30 randomly selected geographic areas of Italy. The study sample consisted of 709 key relatives of patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia and 646 key relatives of patients with physical diseases. Each relative was asked to fill in the Family Problems Questionnaire (FPQ) and the Social Network Questionnaire (SNQ). In all selected pathologies, the consequences of caregiving most frequently reported as always present in the past 2 months were constraints in social activities, negative effects on family life, and a feeling of loss. Objective burden was higher in brain diseases, and subjective burden was higher in schizophrenia and brain diseases than in the other groups. Social support and help in emergencies concerning the patient were dramatically lower among relatives of patients with schizophrenia than among those of patients with physical diseases. In the schizophrenia group, both objective and subjective burden were significantly higher among relatives who reported lower support from their social network and professionals. The results of this study highlight the need to provide the families of those with long-term diseases with supportive interventions, including: (a) the management of relatives' psychological reactions to patient's illness; (b) the provision of information on the nature, course and outcome of patient's disease; (c) training for the relatives in the management of the patient's symptoms; and (d) the reinforcement of relatives' social networks, especially in the case of schizophrenia.

  13. Using function-focused care to increase physical activity among older adults.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of physical activity for older adults, adherence to regular physical activity recommendations is poor. Less than half of adults in this country meet physical activity recommendations with reasons for lack of adherence including such things as access, motivation, pain, fear, comorbidities, among others. To overcome these challenges, function-focused care was developed. Function-focused care is a philosophy of care that focuses on evaluating the older adult's underlying capability with regard to function and physical activity and helping him or her optimize and maintain physical function and ability and continually increase time spent in physical activity. Examples of function-focused care include such things as using verbal cues during bathing, so the older individual performs the tasks rather than the caregiver bathing the individual; walking a resident or patient to the bathroom rather than using a urinal, or taking a resident to an exercise class. There are now over 20 studies supporting the benefits of function-focused care approaches across all settings and different types of patient groups (i.e, those with mild versus moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment). The approaches for implementation of function-focused care have also been well supported and have moved beyond establishing effectiveness to considering dissemination and implementation of this approach into real world clinical settings. The process of dissemination and implementation has likewise been articulated and supported, and ongoing work needs to continue in this venue across all care settings. PMID:24894140

  14. Fitness, but not physical activity, is related to functional integrity of brain networks associated with aging.

    PubMed

    Voss, Michelle W; Weng, Timothy B; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Wong, Chelsea N; Cooke, Gillian E; Clark, Rachel; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Gothe, Neha P; Olson, Erin A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-05-01

    Greater physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with reduced age-related cognitive decline and lower risk for dementia. However, significant gaps remain in the understanding of how physical activity and fitness protect the brain from adverse effects of brain aging. The primary goal of the current study was to empirically evaluate the independent relationships between physical activity and fitness with functional brain health among healthy older adults, as measured by the functional connectivity of cognitively and clinically relevant resting state networks. To build context for fitness and physical activity associations in older adults, we first demonstrate that young adults have greater within-network functional connectivity across a broad range of cortical association networks. Based on these results and previous research, we predicted that individual differences in fitness and physical activity would be most strongly associated with functional integrity of the networks most sensitive to aging. Consistent with this prediction, and extending on previous research, we showed that cardiorespiratory fitness has a positive relationship with functional connectivity of several cortical networks associated with age-related decline, and effects were strongest in the default mode network (DMN). Furthermore, our results suggest that the positive association of fitness with brain function can occur independent of habitual physical activity. Overall, our findings provide further support that cardiorespiratory fitness is an important factor in moderating the adverse effects of aging on cognitively and clinically relevant functional brain networks.

  15. Tubulin acetylation: responsible enzymes, biological functions and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules have important functions ranging from maintenance of cell morphology to subcellular transport, cellular signaling, cell migration, and formation of cell polarity. At the organismal level, microtubules are crucial for various biological processes, such as viral entry, inflammation, immunity, learning and memory in mammals. Microtubules are subject to various covalent modifications. One such modification is tubulin acetylation, which is associated with stable microtubules and conserved from protists to humans. In the past three decades, this reversible modification has been studied extensively. In mammals, its level is mainly governed by opposing actions of α-tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (ATAT1) and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). Knockout studies of the mouse enzymes have yielded new insights into biological functions of tubulin acetylation. Abnormal levels of this modification are linked to neurological disorders, cancer, heart diseases and other pathological conditions, thereby yielding important therapeutic implications. This review summarizes related studies and concludes that tubulin acetylation is important for regulating microtubule architecture and maintaining microtubule integrity. Together with detyrosination, glutamylation and other modifications, tubulin acetylation may form a unique 'language' to regulate microtubule structure and function.

  16. Habitual physical activity (HPA) as a factor in sustained executive function in Alzheimer-type dementia: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Farina, Nicolas; Tabet, Naji; Rusted, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from studies on healthy older adults and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) populations suggests that physical activity interventions have a positive effect on executive function. In this study, we consider whether HPA is positively associated with executive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Eighty-two participants with a diagnosis of mild to moderate AD completed six measures of executive function. Objective measures of physical status were taken. In addition, informants completed questionnaires on the participants' HPA and other lifestyle factors. A composite measure of executive function was the primary outcome. A multistage multiple regression was used to determine how much variance HPA accounted for. The final model comprised disease severity, cognitive reserve, cognitive activities, neuropsychiatric status and HPA status. The final model accounted for a total of 57% of the variance of executive performance, of which HPA itself accounted for 8% of the variance. HPA status is associated executive performance in an AD population even after controlling for key covariates. The findings encourage clinicians to recommend HPA and its cognitive benefits to AD patients and their carers.

  17. Physics of the multi-functionality of lanthanum ferrite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargav, K. K.; Ram, S.; Majumder, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, we have illustrated the physics of the multifunctional characteristics of nano-crystalline LaFeO3 powder prepared using auto-combustion synthesis. The synthesized powders were phase pure and crystallized into centro-symmetric Pnma space group. The temperature dependence of dielectric constant of pure LaFeO3 exhibits dielectric maxima similar to that observed in ferroelectric ceramics with non-centrosymmetric point group. The dielectric relaxation of LaFeO3 correlates well with small polaron conduction. The occurrence of polarization hysteresis in LaFeO3 (with centro-symmetric Pnma space group) is thought to be spin current induced type. The canting of the Fe3+ spins induce weak ferromagnetism in nano-crystalline LaFeO3. Room temperature saturation magnetization of pure LaFeO3 is reported to be 3.0 emu/g. Due to the presence of both ferromagnetic as well as polarization ordering, LaFeO3 behaves like a single phase multiferroic ceramics. The magneto-electric coupling in this system has been demonstrated through the magneto-dielectric measurements which yield about 0.8% dielectric tuning (at 10 kHz) with the application of 2 T magnetic field. As a typical application of the synthesized nano-crystalline LaFeO3 powder, we have studied its butane sensing characteristics. The efficient butane sensing characteristics have been correlated to their catalytic activity towards oxidation of butane. Through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses, we detect the surface adsorbed oxygen species on LaFeO3 surface. Surface adsorbed oxygen species play major role in their low temperature butane sensing. Finally, we have hypothesized that the desorbed H2O and O2 (originate from surface adsorbed hydroxyl and oxygen) initiate the catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane resulting in weakening of the electrostatics of the gas molecules.

  18. The relationship between change in self-perceptions of aging and physical functioning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sargent-Cox, Kerry A; Anstey, Kaarin J; Luszcz, Mary A

    2012-09-01

    Negative self-perceptions of aging (SPA) have been linked to poor physical health and functioning outcomes in late life, yet the direction of this relationship remain unclear. Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Aging, we investigated the directionality of the dynamic relationship between self-perceptions of aging and physical functioning in 1,212 adults 65 years and above (mean age = 76.89, SD = 6.12) over 5 waves (up to 16 years). Bivariate Dual Change Score Models (BDCSM) revealed that the best fitting model for the data was that which allowed SPA to predict change in physical functioning over time lags of 1 year. The direction of the relationship remained after controlling for age, gender, partner status, residential care, number of medical conditions, self-rated health, and psychological well-being. Findings suggest that more positive SPA may be protective of decline in physical functioning in late life. PMID:22390161

  19. Relation of Physical Activity to Memory Functioning in Older Adults: The Memory Workout Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebok, George W.; Plude, Dana J.

    2001-01-01

    The Memory Workout, a CD-ROM program designed to help older adults increase changes in physical and cognitive activity influencing memory, was tested with 24 subjects. Results revealed a significant relationship between exercise time, exercise efficacy, and cognitive function, as well as interest in improving memory and physical activity.…

  20. Physics of the multi-functionality of lanthanum ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargav, K. K.; Ram, S.; Majumder, S. B.

    2014-05-28

    In the present work, we have illustrated the physics of the multifunctional characteristics of nano-crystalline LaFeO{sub 3} powder prepared using auto-combustion synthesis. The synthesized powders were phase pure and crystallized into centro-symmetric Pnma space group. The temperature dependence of dielectric constant of pure LaFeO{sub 3} exhibits dielectric maxima similar to that observed in ferroelectric ceramics with non-centrosymmetric point group. The dielectric relaxation of LaFeO{sub 3} correlates well with small polaron conduction. The occurrence of polarization hysteresis in LaFeO{sub 3} (with centro-symmetric Pnma space group) is thought to be spin current induced type. The canting of the Fe{sup 3+} spins induce weak ferromagnetism in nano-crystalline LaFeO{sub 3}. Room temperature saturation magnetization of pure LaFeO{sub 3} is reported to be 3.0 emu/g. Due to the presence of both ferromagnetic as well as polarization ordering, LaFeO{sub 3} behaves like a single phase multiferroic ceramics. The magneto-electric coupling in this system has been demonstrated through the magneto-dielectric measurements which yield about 0.8% dielectric tuning (at 10 kHz) with the application of 2 T magnetic field. As a typical application of the synthesized nano-crystalline LaFeO{sub 3} powder, we have studied its butane sensing characteristics. The efficient butane sensing characteristics have been correlated to their catalytic activity towards oxidation of butane. Through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses, we detect the surface adsorbed oxygen species on LaFeO{sub 3} surface. Surface adsorbed oxygen species play major role in their low temperature butane sensing. Finally, we have hypothesized that the desorbed H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} (originate from surface adsorbed hydroxyl and oxygen) initiate the catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane resulting in weakening of the electrostatics of the gas molecules.

  1. Intelligent platforms for disease assessment: novel approaches in functional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Partho P

    2013-11-01

    Accelerating trends in the dynamic digital era (from 2004 onward) has resulted in the emergence of novel parametric imaging tools that allow easy and accurate extraction of quantitative information from cardiac images. This review principally attempts to heighten the awareness of newer emerging paradigms that may advance acquisition, visualization and interpretation of the large functional data sets obtained during cardiac ultrasound imaging. Incorporation of innovative cognitive software that allow advanced pattern recognition and disease forecasting will likely transform the human-machine interface and interpretation process to achieve a more efficient and effective work environment. Novel technologies for automation and big data analytics that are already active in other fields need to be rapidly adapted to the health care environment with new academic-industry collaborations to enrich and accelerate the delivery of newer decision making tools for enhancing patient care. PMID:24229773

  2. Intelligent platforms for disease assessment: novel approaches in functional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Partho P

    2013-11-01

    Accelerating trends in the dynamic digital era (from 2004 onward) has resulted in the emergence of novel parametric imaging tools that allow easy and accurate extraction of quantitative information from cardiac images. This review principally attempts to heighten the awareness of newer emerging paradigms that may advance acquisition, visualization and interpretation of the large functional data sets obtained during cardiac ultrasound imaging. Incorporation of innovative cognitive software that allow advanced pattern recognition and disease forecasting will likely transform the human-machine interface and interpretation process to achieve a more efficient and effective work environment. Novel technologies for automation and big data analytics that are already active in other fields need to be rapidly adapted to the health care environment with new academic-industry collaborations to enrich and accelerate the delivery of newer decision making tools for enhancing patient care.

  3. Morpho-chemistry and functionality of diseased biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Marta; Cicchi, Riccardo; Pavone, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Heart and cardiovascular diseases are one of the most common in the world, in particular - arthrosclerosis. The aim of the research is to distinguish pathological and healthy tissue regions in biological samples, in this case - to distinguish collagen and lipid rich regions within the arterial wall. In the work a specific combination of such methods are used: FLIM and SHG in order to evaluate the biological tissue morphology and functionality, so that this research could give a contribution for creating a new biological tissue imaging standard in the closest future. During the study the most appropriate parameter for fluorescence lifetime decay was chosen in order to evaluate lifetime decay parameters and the isotropy of the arterial wall and deposition, using statistical methods FFT and GLCM. The research gives a contribution or the future investigations for evaluating lipid properties when it can de-attach from the arterial wall and cause clotting in the blood vessel or even a stroke.

  4. Pathologic Function and Therapeutic Potential of Exosomes in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ailawadi, Shaina; Wang, Xiaohong; Gu, Haitao; Fan, Guo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a very complex conglomeration of organized interactions between various different cell types that all aid in facilitating myocardial function through contractility, sufficient perfusion, and cell-to-cell reception. In order to make sure all features of the heart work effectively, it is imperative to have a well-controlled communication system among the different types of cells. One of the most important ways the heart regulates itself is by the use of extracellular vesicles, more specifically, exosomes. Exosomes are types of nano-vesicles, naturally released from living cells. They are believed to play a critical role in intercellular communication through the means of certain mechanisms including direct cell-to-cell contact, long-range signals as well as electrical and extracellular chemical molecules. Exosomes contain many unique features like surface proteins/receptors, lipids, mRNAs, microRNAs, transcription factors and other proteins. Recent studies indicate that the exosomal contents are highly regulated by various stress and disease conditions, in turn reflective of the parent cell status. At present, exosomes are well appreciated to be involved in the process of tumor and infection disease. However, the research on cardiac exosomes is just emerging. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the pathologic effects of exosomes on cardiac remodeling under stress and disease conditions, including cardiac hypertrophy, peripartum cardiomyopathy, diabetic cardiomyopathy and sepsis-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. In addition, the cardio-protective effects of stress-preconditioned exosomes and stem cell-derived exosomes are also summarized. Finally, we discuss how to epigenetically reprogram exosome contents in host cells which makes them beneficial for the heart. PMID:25463630

  5. Exergames: neuroplastic hypothesis about cognitive improvement and biological effects on physical function of institutionalized older persons

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; Vaghetti, César Augusto Otero; Nascimento, Osvaldo José M.; Laks, Jerson; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz

    2016-01-01

    Exergames can be considered a dual task because the games are performed by a man-videogame interface, requiring cognitive and motor functions simultaneously. Although the literature has shown improvements of cognitive and physical functions due to exergames, the intrinsic mechanisms involved in these functional changes have still not been elucidated. The aims of the present study were (1) to demonstrate the known biological mechanisms of physical exercise regarding muscle adaptation and establish a relationship with exergames; and (2) to present a neurobiological hypothesis about the neuroplastic effects of exergames on the cognitive function of institutionalized older persons. These hypotheses are discussed. PMID:27073355

  6. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  7. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  8. Striatal function in normal aging: Implications for Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sawle, G.V.; Colebatch, J.G.; Shah, A.; Brooks, D.J.; Marsden, C.D.; Frackowiak, R.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Central to several current theories of the etiology of Parkinson's disease is the premise that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system degenerates with normal aging. Much of the evidence for this assertion has come from postmortem neurochemical studies. We have used L-6-({sup 18}F) fluoro-Dopa and positron emission tomography in 26 healthy volunteers (age range, 27-76 years) to examine striatal and frontal cortical tracer uptake. Data have been analyzed by using a graphical approach to calculate an influx constant (Ki) for L-6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-Dopa uptake into the caudate, putamen, and medial frontal cortex of each subject. In the population studied, there was no decline in Ki with age for any of these structures. A series of physiological measurements made on the older subjects also showed few significant changes with age. The positron emission tomographic findings demonstrate preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in normal aging. The pathological process causing Parkinson's disease may operate closer to the time of presentation than has been suggested.

  9. Functional reorganization of sensorimotor cortex in early Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kojovic, M.; Bologna, M.; Kassavetis, P.; Murase, N.; Palomar, F.J.; Berardelli, A.; Rothwell, J.C.; Edwards, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Compensatory reorganization of the nigrostriatal system is thought to delay the onset of symptoms in early Parkinson disease (PD). Here we sought evidence that compensation may be a part of a more widespread functional reorganization in sensorimotor networks, including primary motor cortex. Methods: Several neurophysiologic measures known to be abnormal in the motor cortex (M1) of patients with advanced PD were tested on the more and less affected side of 16 newly diagnosed and drug-naive patients with PD and compared with 16 age-matched healthy participants. LTP-like effects were probed using a paired associative stimulation protocol. We also measured short interval intracortical inhibition, intracortical facilitation, cortical silent period, and input/output curves. Results: The less affected side in patients with PD had preserved intracortical inhibition and a larger response to the plasticity protocol compared to healthy participants. On the more affected side, there was no response to the plasticity protocol and inhibition was reduced. There was no difference in input/output curves between sides or between patients with PD and healthy participants. Conclusions: Increased motor cortical plasticity on the less affected side is consistent with a functional reorganization of sensorimotor cortex and may represent a compensatory change that contributes to delaying onset of clinical symptoms. Alternatively, it may reflect a maladaptive plasticity that provokes symptom onset. Plasticity deteriorates as the symptoms progress, as seen on the more affected side. The rate of change in paired associative stimulation response over time could be developed into a surrogate marker of disease progression in PD. PMID:22517098

  10. Intermittent hypoxia training protects cerebrovascular function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Shi, Xiangrong; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of death and disability among older adults. Modifiable vascular risk factors for AD (VRF) include obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, and metabolic syndrome. Here, interactions between cerebrovascular function and development of AD are reviewed, as are interventions to improve cerebral blood flow and reduce VRF. Atherosclerosis and small vessel cerebral disease impair metabolic regulation of cerebral blood flow and, along with microvascular rarefaction and altered trans-capillary exchange, create conditions favoring AD development. Although currently there are no definitive therapies for treatment or prevention of AD, reduction of VRFs lowers the risk for cognitive decline. There is increasing evidence that brief repeated exposures to moderate hypoxia, i.e. intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), improve cerebral vascular function and reduce VRFs including systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and mental stress. In experimental AD, IHT nearly prevented endothelial dysfunction of both cerebral and extra-cerebral blood vessels, rarefaction of the brain vascular network, and the loss of neurons in the brain cortex. Associated with these vasoprotective effects, IHT improved memory and lessened AD pathology. IHT increases endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO), thereby increasing regional cerebral blood flow and augmenting the vaso- and neuroprotective effects of endothelial NO. On the other hand, in AD excessive production of NO in microglia, astrocytes, and cortical neurons generates neurotoxic peroxynitrite. IHT enhances storage of excessive NO in the form of S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD, and IHT reduces oxidative stress in a number of experimental pathologies. Beneficial effects of IHT in experimental neuropathologies other than AD, including dyscirculatory encephalopathy, ischemic stroke injury, audiogenic

  11. Functional anatomy of subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Koller, Jonathan M.; Black, Kathleen D.; Campbell, Meghan C.; Lugar, Heather M.; Ushe, Mwiza; Tabbal, Samer D.; Karimi, Morvarid; Hershey, Tamara; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Black, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We developed a novel method to map behavioral effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) across a 3D brain region and to assign statistical significance after stringent Type I error correction. This method was applied to behavioral changes in Parkinson disease (PD) induced by subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS to determine whether these responses depended on anatomical location of DBS. Method Fifty-one PD participants with STN DBS were evaluated off medication, with DBS off and during unilateral STN DBS with clinically optimized settings. Dependent variables included DBS-induced changes in Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) subscores, kinematic measures of bradykinesia and rigidity, working memory, response inhibition, mood, anxiety, and akathisia. Weighted t-tests at each voxel produced p images showing where DBS most significantly affected each dependent variable based on outcomes of participants with nearby DBS. Finally, a permutation test computed the probability that this p image indicated significantly different responses based on stimulation site. Results Most motor variables improved with DBS anywhere in the STN region, but several motor, cognitive and affective responses significantly depended on precise location stimulated, with peak p values in superior STN/zona incerta (quantified bradykinesia), dorsal STN (mood, anxiety), and inferior STN/substantia nigra (UPDRS tremor, working memory). Interpretation Our method identified DBS-induced behavioral changes that depended significantly on DBS site. These results do not support complete functional segregation within STN, since movement improved with DBS throughout, and mood improved with dorsal STN DBS. Rather, findings support functional convergence of motor, cognitive and limbic information in STN. PMID:24953991

  12. Mott physics and spin fluctuations: A functional viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayral, Thomas; Parcollet, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    We present a formalism for strongly correlated systems with fermions coupled to bosonic modes. We construct the three-particle irreducible functional K by successive Legendre transformations of the free energy of the system. We derive a closed set of equations for the fermionic and bosonic self-energies for a given K . We then introduce a local approximation for K , which extends the idea of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) approaches from two- to three-particle irreducibility. This approximation entails the locality of the three-leg electron-boson vertex Λ (i ω ,i Ω ) , which is self-consistently computed using a quantum impurity model with dynamical charge and spin interactions. This local vertex is used to construct frequency- and momentum-dependent electronic self-energies and polarizations. By construction, the method interpolates between the spin-fluctuation or G W approximations at weak coupling and the atomic limit at strong coupling. We apply it to the Hubbard model on two-dimensional square and triangular lattices. We complement the results of [T. Ayral and O. Parcollet, Phys. Rev. B 92, 115109 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.115109] by (i) showing that, at half-filling, as DMFT, the method describes the Fermi-liquid metallic state and the Mott insulator, separated by a first-order interaction-driven Mott transition at low temperatures, (ii) investigating the influence of frustration, and (iii) discussing the influence of the bosonic decoupling channel.

  13. Integrable dissipative exclusion process: Correlation functions and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampe, N.; Ragoucy, E.; Rittenberg, V.; Vanicat, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study a one-parameter generalization of the symmetric simple exclusion process on a one-dimensional lattice. In addition to the usual dynamics (where particles can hop with equal rates to the left or to the right with an exclusion constraint), annihilation and creation of pairs can occur. The system is driven out of equilibrium by two reservoirs at the boundaries. In this setting the model is still integrable: it is related to the open XXZ spin chain through a gauge transformation. This allows us to compute the full spectrum of the Markov matrix using Bethe equations. We also show that the stationary state can be expressed in a matrix product form permitting to compute the multipoints correlation functions as well as the mean value of the lattice and the creation-annihilation currents. Finally, the variance of the lattice current is computed for a finite-size system. In the thermodynamic limit, it matches the value obtained from the associated macroscopic fluctuation theory.

  14. Physical rehabilitation of paralysed facial muscles: functional and morphological correlates.

    PubMed

    Angelov, Doychin N

    2011-01-01

    Using a combined morphofunctional approach, we recently found that polyinnervation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the critical factor for recovery of function after transection and suture of the facial nerve. Since polyinnervation is activity-dependent and can be manipulated, we tried to design a clinically feasible therapy by electrical stimulation or by soft tissue massage. First, electrical stimulation was applied to the transected facial nerve or to paralyzed facial muscles. Both procedures did not improve vibrissal motor performance (video-based motion analysis of whisking), failed to diminish polyinnervation, and even reduced the number of innervated NMJ to one-fifth of normal values. In contrast, gentle stroking of the paralyzed vibrissal muscles by hand resulted in full recovery of whisking. Manual stimulation depended on the intact sensory supply of the denervated muscle targets and was also effective after hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, after interpositional nerve grafting, when applied to the orbicularis oculi muscle and after transection and suture of the hypoglossal nerve. From these results, we conclude that manual stimulation is a noninvasive procedure with immediate potential for clinical rehabilitation following facial nerve reconstruction.

  15. Outcomes of Anatomical versus Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J.; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. METHODS We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P = 0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P = 0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the

  16. Overlap between Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease in ABCA7 functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Nuytemans, Karen; Maldonado, Lizmarie; Ali, Aleena; John-Williams, Krista; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden; Scott, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Given their reported function in phagocytosis and clearance of protein aggregates in Alzheimer disease (AD), we hypothesized that variants in ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) might be involved in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: ABCA7 variants were identified using whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 396 unrelated patients with PD and 222 healthy controls. In addition, we used the publicly available WES data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (444 patients and 153 healthy controls) as a second, independent data set. Results: We observed a higher frequency of loss-of-function (LOF) variants and rare putative highly functional variants (Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion [CADD] >20) in clinically diagnosed patients with PD than in healthy controls in both data sets. Overall, we identified LOF variants in 11 patients and 1 healthy control (odds ratio [OR] 4.94, Fisher exact p = 0.07). Four of these variants have been previously implicated in AD risk (p.E709AfsX86, p.W1214X, p.L1403RfsX7, and rs113809142). In addition, rare variants with CADD >20 were observed in 19 patients vs 3 healthy controls (OR 2.85, Fisher exact p = 0.06). Conclusion: The presence of ABCA7 LOF variants in clinically defined PD suggests that they might be risk factors for neurodegeneration in general, especially those variants hallmarked by protein aggregation. More studies will be needed to evaluate the overall impact of this transporter in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27066581

  17. PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF WELL PERSONS—What Is “Adequate” for Detection of Unsuspected Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, John C.; Marxer, W. L.

    1962-01-01

    In the examination of 500 “well” executives, the number of unknown diseases found averaged 5.4 per person. Almost half of these executives had newly detected disease that was potentially significant to their health. Treatment was necessary in more than 47.7 per cent of them. One out of five of the total significant unknown defects found was either a peptic ulcer or gallstones; one out of five was a rectal adenoma; and one out of five was either hypertension or cardiac disease. One-third of the executives were overweight. Diabetes was found in every 20th person; and malignant disease was detected in one of every 41 people. For an examination to be “adequate” for the detection of unknown disease, the general physical examination must be complete and thorough. A proctoscopic is necessary, and certain basic laboratory screening procedures should be completed in each individual. Complete and routine x-ray studies of the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract should be done, since they are the most important single diagnostic procedure, in detecting early, major, unsuspected, and often asymptomatic diseases. Routine consultations with specialists are a valuable asset in disease detection. Repeated periodic examinations help in detection of new unknown disease that was not present or not noted in earlier examinations. PMID:13911411

  18. Impact of physical activity on inflammation: effects on cardiovascular disease risk and other inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Arrigo

    2012-01-01

    Since the 19th century, many studies have enlightened the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis, changing our perception of “vessel plaque due to oxidized lipoproteins”, similar to a “rusted pipe”, towards a disease with involvement of many cell types and cytokines with more complex mechanisms. Although “physical activity” and “physical exercise” are two terms with some differences in meaning, compared to sedentary lifestyle, active people have lower cardiovascular risk and lower inflammatory markers. Activities of skeletal muscle reveal “myokines” which have roles in both the immune system and adipose tissue metabolism. In vitro and ex-vivo studies have shown beneficial effects of exercise on inflammation markers. Meanwhile in clinical studies, some conflicting results suggested that type of activity, exercise duration, body composition, gender, race and age may modulate anti-inflammatory effects of physical exercise. Medical data on patients with inflammatory diseases have shown beneficial effects of exercise on disease activity scores, patient well-being and inflammatory markers. Although the most beneficial type of activity and the most relevant patient group for anti-inflammatory benefits are still not clear, studies in elderly and adult people generally support anti-inflammatory effects of physical activity and moderate exercise could be advised to patients with cardiovascular risk such as patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:23185187

  19. Mechanics and Function of the Pulmonary Vasculature: Implications for Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Right Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Steven; Scott, Devon; Hunter, Kendall; Tan, Wei; Shandas, Robin; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between cardiac function and the afterload against which the heart muscle must work to circulate blood throughout the pulmonary circulation is defined by a complex interaction between many coupled system parameters. These parameters range broadly and incorporate system effects originating primarily from three distinct locations: input power from the heart, hydraulic impedance from the large conduit pulmonary arteries, and hydraulic resistance from the more distal microcirculation. These organ systems are not independent, but rather, form a coupled system in which a change to any individual parameter affects all other system parameters. The result is a highly nonlinear system which requires not only detailed study of each specific component and the effect of disease on their specific function, but also requires study of the interconnected relationship between the microcirculation, the conduit arteries, and the heart in response to age and disease. Here, we investigate systems-level changes associated with pulmonary hypertensive disease progression in an effort to better understand this coupled relationship. PMID:23487595

  20. Drosophila provides rapid modeling of renal development, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2010-12-01

    The evolution of specialized excretory cells is a cornerstone of the metazoan radiation, and the basic tasks performed by Drosophila and human renal systems are similar. The development of the Drosophila renal (Malpighian) tubule is a classic example of branched tubular morphogenesis, allowing study of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transitions, stem cell-mediated regeneration, and the evolution of a glomerular kidney. Tubule function employs conserved transport proteins, such as the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and V-ATPase, aquaporins, inward rectifier K(+) channels, and organic solute transporters, regulated by cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide, and calcium. In addition to generation and selective reabsorption of primary urine, the tubule plays roles in metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics, and in innate immunity. The gene expression resource FlyAtlas.org shows that the tubule is an ideal tissue for the modeling of renal diseases, such as nephrolithiasis and Bartter syndrome, or for inborn errors of metabolism. Studies are assisted by uniquely powerful genetic and transgenic resources, the widespread availability of mutant stocks, and low-cost, rapid deployment of new transgenics to allow manipulation of renal function in an organotypic context.

  1. The human Y chromosome: function, evolution and disease.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Murci, L; Krausz, C; McElreavey, K

    2001-05-15

    The human Y chromosome is strictly paternally inherited and, in most of its length, does not recombine during male meiosis. These features make the Y a very useful genetic marker for different purposes. In the last decade, the Y has been increasingly used to investigate the evolution, migrations and range expansions of modern humans. The possibility to construct highly informative Y chromosome haplotypes has also had a significant impact in forensic studies and paternity testing. All these studies assume that the Y chromosome markers used are selectively neutral. However, recent experimental and statistical analyses suggest that both positive and negative selection are acting on the Y chromosome and, consequently, may influence Y chromosome haplotype distribution in the general population. Current data suggest that the effects of selection on patterns of Y chromosome distribution are minimal, however as interest focuses on biological functions of the Y chromosome which have a major impact on male fitness such as fertility, these assumptions may be challenged. This review briefly describes the genes and biological functions of the human Y chromosome and its use in disentangling the origin and history of human populations. An overview of the role of selection acting on the Y chromosome from the perspective of human population histories and disease is given.

  2. Cytosolic phospholipase A2: physiological function and role in disease

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme. PMID:25838312

  3. Adults Eligible for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Counseling and Participation in Aerobic Physical Activity - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Omura, John D; Carlson, Susan A; Paul, Prabasaj; Watson, Kathleen B; Loustalot, Fleetwood; Foltz, Jennifer L; Fulton, Janet E

    2015-09-25

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, and physical inactivity is a major risk factor (1). Health care professionals have a role in counseling patients about physical activity for CVD prevention. In August 2014, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that adults who are overweight or obese and have additional CVD risk factors be offered or referred to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for CVD prevention. Although the USPSTF recommendation does not specify an amount of physical activity, the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans state that for substantial health benefits adults should achieve ≥150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity or ≥75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. To assess the proportion of adults eligible for intensive behavioral counseling and not meeting the aerobic physical activity guideline, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This analysis indicated that 36.8% of adults were eligible for intensive behavioral counseling for CVD prevention. Among U.S. states and the District of Columbia (DC), the prevalence of eligible adults ranged from 29.0% to 44.6%. Nationwide, 19.9% of all adults were eligible and did not meet the aerobic physical activity guideline. These data can inform the planning and implementation of health care interventions for CVD prevention that are based on physical activity.

  4. Inflammatory, autoimmune, chronic diseases: bad diet and physical inactivity are causes or effects?

    PubMed

    Gracia, M C

    2006-01-01

    It is now well established that most chronic diseases, especially those identified as inflammatory, are statistically correlated with some typical dietary excesses and physical inactivity. But do really these habits cause the diseases, or they result from them? Current opinion favours the first option, but fails to explain why the satisfaction of eating, naturally evolved in our brains to produce health, apparently induces countless millions of people to eat unrestrictedly until becoming mortally sick, whereas trying to keep a theoretically healthy diet is most often a real torture. The inverse explanation makes much more sense: since inflammation produces much heat, calorie-rich diets are required. An inflamed digestive tract lacks digestive power and is easily irritated or damaged by solid objects, therefore requiring a refined, concentrated, low-fibre diet. And inflamed or merely sick organisms are easily exhausted by physical effort, hence physical inactivity. This study confirms that, most probably, the primary causes of inflammatory diseases are always external inflammatory agents, like infectious micro-organisms or toxic substances, of which a particularly ubiquitous example is nicotine. High-calorie/low-fibre diets and physical inactivity are direct consequences of generalised inflammation. Inversely, in most cases, physical exercise and moderation in eating, by themselves, cannot substantially suppress inflammations, but they can prevent them from being further reinforced by the neural reward system. Moreover, diets and exercise causing important suffering will usually do more harm than good, especially to children and young people, not to mention pregnant or nursing women. Only the identification and elimination of the inflammatory agents can efficiently prevent and cure inflammatory diseases, and currently nicotine, absorbed intentionally or passively, from tobacco or other sources, must be considered the chief suspect because of its inflammatory power

  5. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2014-06-17

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the "magic bullet" concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, "targeted therapy" that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges.

  6. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the “magic bullet” concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, “targeted therapy” that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges. PMID:24936916

  7. Cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity as risk predictors of future atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Jari A; Kurl, Sudhir; Salonen, Jukka T

    2002-11-01

    Physical fitness and activity status are well-documented risk predictors of cardiovascular and total mortality. The purpose of this article is to show how cardiorespiratory fitness predicts atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Measurement of maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), defined with or without ventilatory gas analysis during exercise testing, can provide a good estimate for cardiorespiratory fitness, which is an independent marker of the early disease. Low VO(2max) has been shown to be comparable with elevated systolic blood pressure, smoking, obesity, and diabetes in importance as a risk factor for mortality, as well as a predictor of coronary artery disease and the progression of atherosclerosis. Cardiorespiratory fitness represents one of the strongest predictors of mortality, emphasizing the importance of exercise testing in everyday clinical practice. In the future, well-defined, disease-specific training programs for exercise prescriptions in different risk groups are needed as a clinical tool.

  8. Physical activity, fitness and fatness: relations to mortality, morbidity and disease risk factors. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fogelholm, M

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to study the relative health risks of poor cardio-respiratory fitness (or physical inactivity) in normal-weight people vs. obesity in individuals with good cardio-respiratory fitness (or high physical activity). The core inclusion criteria were: publication year 1990 or later; adult participants; design prospective follow-up, case-control or cross-sectional; data on cardio-respiratory fitness and/or physical activity; data on BMI (body mass index), waist circumference or body composition; outcome data on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, cardiovascular disease incidence, type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular and type 2 diabetes risk factors. Thirty-six publications filled the criteria for inclusion. The data indicate that the risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality was lower in individuals with high BMI and good aerobic fitness, compared with individuals with normal BMI and poor fitness. In contrast, having high BMI even with high physical activity was a greater risk for the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the prevalence of cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors, compared with normal BMI with low physical activity. The conclusions of the present review may not be applicable to individuals with BMI > 35.

  9. Genome-wide prioritization of disease genes and identification of disease-disease associations from an integrated human functional linkage network

    PubMed Central

    Linghu, Bolan; Snitkin, Evan S; Hu, Zhenjun; Xia, Yu; DeLisi, Charles

    2009-01-01

    We integrate 16 genomic features to construct an evidence-weighted functional-linkage network comprising 21,657 human genes. The functional-linkage network is used to prioritize candidate genes for 110 diseases, and to reliably disclose hidden associations between disease pairs having dissimilar phenotypes, such as hypercholesterolemia and Alzheimer's disease. Many of these disease-disease associations are supported by epidemiology, but with no previous genetic basis. Such associations can drive novel hypotheses on molecular mechanisms of diseases and therapies. PMID:19728866

  10. Plant diversity and root traits benefit physical properties key to soil function in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Gould, Iain J; Quinton, John N; Weigelt, Alexandra; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning, including important effects on soil. Most studies that have explored plant diversity effects belowground, however, have largely focused on biological processes. As such, our understanding of how plant diversity impacts the soil physical environment remains limited, despite the fundamental role soil physical structure plays in ensuring soil function and ecosystem service provision. Here, in both a glasshouse and a long-term field study, we show that high plant diversity in grassland systems increases soil aggregate stability, a vital structural property of soil, and that root traits play a major role in determining diversity effects. We also reveal that the presence of particular plant species within mixed communities affects an even wider range of soil physical processes, including hydrology and soil strength regimes. Our results indicate that alongside well-documented effects on ecosystem functioning, plant diversity and root traits also benefit essential soil physical properties.

  11. Plant diversity and root traits benefit physical properties key to soil function in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Gould, Iain J; Quinton, John N; Weigelt, Alexandra; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning, including important effects on soil. Most studies that have explored plant diversity effects belowground, however, have largely focused on biological processes. As such, our understanding of how plant diversity impacts the soil physical environment remains limited, despite the fundamental role soil physical structure plays in ensuring soil function and ecosystem service provision. Here, in both a glasshouse and a long-term field study, we show that high plant diversity in grassland systems increases soil aggregate stability, a vital structural property of soil, and that root traits play a major role in determining diversity effects. We also reveal that the presence of particular plant species within mixed communities affects an even wider range of soil physical processes, including hydrology and soil strength regimes. Our results indicate that alongside well-documented effects on ecosystem functioning, plant diversity and root traits also benefit essential soil physical properties. PMID:27459206

  12. More than just body weight: the role of body image in psychological and physical functioning.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rebecca E; Latner, Janet D; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2013-09-01

    The current study examined BMI and body image dissatisfaction as predictors of physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQL) and psychosocial functioning in a sample of 414 undergraduate students (mean age=21.5, SD=4.9; mean BMI=23.6, SD=5.2). In men and women, higher BMI was correlated with body image dissatisfaction and physical HRQL, but not with any measures of psychosocial functioning, whereas higher body image dissatisfaction was associated with poorer physical HRQL and psychosocial functioning. Furthermore, body image dissatisfaction was observed to mediate the relationship between BMI and physical HRQL in men and women. Interestingly, in this model, higher BMI predicted increased self-esteem. These findings suggest that body image dissatisfaction may be an important target for health interventions. PMID:23726517

  13. Effects of aerobic exercise during hemodialysis on physical functional performance and depression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueh-Min; Chung, Yu-Chu; Chang, Jung-San; Yeh, Mei-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have concluded that exercise training is beneficial to patients on hemodialysis (HD). Results, however, have shown that differences in the type, intensity, and frequency of physical exercise lead to variability in its effects on physical functional performance and depression. Further research is thus warranted. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise on physical functional performance and depression during HD. Using a pretest-posttest control group design, we recruited HD patients and nonrandomly assigned them to an exercise group (n = 13) that completed a 12-week aerobic exercise program during HD or a control group (n = 11) that did no exercise during HD. The primary outcome measures were physical functional performance, as evaluated by the 6-min walk test and the sit-to-stand test, and depression, as evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory II. The secondary outcome measures were albumin and triglyceride levels and hematocrit. Results revealed significant between-group differences in physical functional performance and depression but not in albumin level, hematocrit, or triglyceride level. Findings suggest that exercise may play a critical role in physical functional performance and may decrease depression. Exercise should be encouraged and performed during HD in HD centers.

  14. [Physical exercise and yoga in prevention and treatment of addictive diseases].

    PubMed

    Nespor, K

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of addictive diseases should be complex and systematic and it should include training of social skills, decision-making skills, family intervention, etc. Similarly, effective treatment is usually long-term, systematic and complex. Physical exercise and yoga can be useful components of comprehensive prevention and treatment programmes. On the other hand, competitive professional sport rather increases the number of risk factors for substance-related problems. Practical experience with the use of yoga in substance dependent patients and pathological gambles are mentioned. One of the advantages of yoga is the integration of physical exercise and relaxation.

  15. Prioritising risk pathways of complex human diseases based on functional profiling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Huang, Teng; Xiao, Yun; Ning, Shangwei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Qianghu; Chen, Xin; Chaohan, Xu; Sun, Donglin; Li, Xia; Li, Yixue

    2013-06-01

    Analysis of the biological pathways involved in complex human diseases is an important step in elucidating the pathogenesis and mechanism of diseases. Most pathway analysis approaches identify disease-related biological pathways using overlapping genes between pathways and diseases. However, these approaches ignore the functional biological association between pathways and diseases. In this paper, we designed a novel computational framework for prioritising disease-risk pathways based on functional profiling. The disease gene set and biological pathways were translated into functional profiles in the context of GO annotations. We then implemented a semantic similarity measurement for calculating the concordance score between a functional profile of disease genes and a functional profile of pathways (FPP); the concordance score was then used to prioritise and infer disease-risk pathways. A freely accessible web toolkit, 'Functional Profiling-based Pathway Prioritisation' (FPPP), was developed (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/FPPP). During validation, our method successfully identified known disease-pathway pairs with area under the ROC curve (AUC) values of 96.73 and 95.02% in tests using both pathway randomisation and disease randomisation. A robustness analysis showed that FPPP is reliable even when using data containing noise. A case study based on a dilated cardiomyopathy data set indicated that the high-ranking pathways from FPPP are well known to be linked with this disease. Furthermore, we predicted the risk pathways of 413 diseases by using FPPP to build a disease similarity landscape that systematically reveals the global modular organisation of disease associations.

  16. A Comparative Study Evaluating the Impact of Physical Exercise on Disease Progression in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Cyna, Ewelina; Xhima, Kristiana; Aubert, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Evidence suggests that physical exercise can serve as a preventive strategy against Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast, much less is known about the impact of exercise when it is introduced after cognitive deficits are established. Using the TgCRND8 mouse model of amyloidosis, we compared the effects of exercise as an intervention strategy aimed at altering disease progression. Voluntary running for 1 month or 2 months was introduced in 3-month-old TgCRND8 mice, which exhibit amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaque pathology and cognitive deficits at this age. Specifically, we examined Aβ plaque load, spatial memory, and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. After 1 month of running, TgCRND8 mice spent more time in the novel arm of the Y-maze compared to the familiar arms, indicating improved memory. The levels of doublecortin (a marker of immature neurons) were increased in TgCRND8 mice running for 1 month, but with no significant difference in the number of new mature neurons or plaque burden. As the disease progressed, running prevented further deficits in the Y-maze performance and hippocampal neurogenesis and it reduced plaque load pathology in TgCRND8 mice running for 2 months, compared to non-running transgenics. Therefore, the impact of running on memory, neurogenesis, and amyloid pathology was of greater significance when sustained through later stages of the disease. PMID:27163797

  17. A Physical Activity Program Improves Behavior and Cognitive Functions in Children with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verret, Claudia; Guay, Marie-Claude; Berthiaume, Claude; Gardiner, Phillip; Beliveau, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to explore the effects of a moderate- to high-intensity physical activity program on fitness, cognitive functions, and ADHD-related behavior in children with ADHD. Method: Fitness level, motor skills, behaviors, and cognitive functions are assessed by standardized tests before and after a 10-week training…

  18. Older Adults in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A New Strategy for Enhancing Physical Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejeski, W. Jack; Foy, Capri Gabrielle; Brawley, Lawrence R.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Focht, Brian C.; Norris, James L., III; Smith, Marci L.

    2002-01-01

    Contrasted the effect of a group-mediated cognitive- behavioral intervention (GMCB) versus traditional cardiac rehabilitation (CRP) upon changes in objective and self-reported physical function of older adults after 3 months of exercise therapy. Both groups improved significantly. Adults with lower function at the outset of the intervention…

  19. The impact of behavioral impairment of functional ability in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Green, C R; Marin, D B; Mohs, R C; Schmeidler, J; Aryan, M; Fine, E; Davis, K L

    1999-04-01

    This study sought to determine the relationship between behavioral disturbance and functional status in a longitudinally studied sample of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). One hundred and forty-nine patients meeting NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable AD were followed for an average of 37.3 months, with follow-up assessments every 6 months. Subjects were seen at the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center clinics at the Mt Sinai Medical Center, New York, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. Measures included the Physical and Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADLS) of Lawton and Brody and the cognitive and non-cognitive subscales of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS). For each patient the assessment at which they had their most severe non-cognitive symptoms as measured by the non-cognitive part of the ADAS (ADAS-NC) was determined. ADAS-NC scores at that assessment were correlated with IADLS and PSMS scores at the same assessment and at the next assessment 6 months later. While there was some modest association of ADAS-NC scores with functional impairment using pairwise correlation coefficients, none of the correlations remained significant when the severity of cognitive impairment was controlled statistically. Findings were not significantly changed when drug status was controlled. These results suggest that behavioral disturbance, while very troubling to caregivers and patients, does not substantially worsen functional ability beyond the contribution of cognitive impairment in AD. Together with previous results indicating that non-cognitive symptoms in AD are episodic and fluctuating rather than progressive, the present data suggest that interventions for non-cognitive disturbances in AD should be viewed as ways to increase patient comfort, safety and ease of care and not as ways to improve functional autonomy. The latter can be achieved only by improving the progressive cognitive

  20. The clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis: the product of these acute-phase reactants and disease duration is associated with patient's poor physical mobility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsiung; Chen, Hung-An; Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Liu, Chin-Hsiu; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) disease severity. There were 156 Chinese AS patients included in Taiwan. Patients completed the questionnaires, containing demographic data, disease activity (BASDAI), functional status (BASFI), and patient's global assessment (BASG). Meanwhile, patient's physical mobility (BASMI) and acute-phase reactants, including ESR and CRP levels were measured. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot analysis was used to evaluate the performance of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in the AS patients. ESR mildly correlated with BASFI (r = 0.176, p = 0.028) and disease duration (r = 0.214, p = 0.008), and moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.427, p < 0.001). CRP moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.410, p < 0.001). By using ROC plot analysis, ESR, CRP, and disease duration showed the best and significant "area under the curve (AUC)", in distinguishing the AS patients with poor physical mobility (BASMI ≥ 3.6, the Median) (AUC = 0.748, 0.751 and 0.738, respectively, all p < 0.001), as compared to BASDAI, BASFI, and BASG. ESR × disease duration (AUC = 0.801, p < 0.001) and CRP × disease duration (AUC = 0.821, p < 0.001) showed higher AUC values than ESR or CRP alone in indicating poor physical mobility. For detecting poor physical mobility (BASMI ≥ 3.6) in the AS patients: ESR × disease duration (≥60.0 mm/h × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 72.8 %; CRP × disease duration (≥8.3 mg/dl × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 74.6 %. ESR, CRP, and disease duration are particularly related to AS patient's poor physical mobility. Combining the usefulness of acute-phase reactants and disease duration, the values of ESR × disease duration and CRP × disease duration demonstrate better association with poor physical mobility in AS patients.

  1. Resilience of Patients With Chronic Physical Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghanei Gheshlagh, Reza; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Ebadi, Abbas; Dalvandi, Asghar; Dalvand, Sahar; Nourozi Tabrizi, Kian

    2016-01-01

    Context Resilience can be seen as an adaption to stress, such as that caused by health problems or disease, that attenuates the negative effects of stress. The present research performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to study resilience scores among adults diagnosed with chronic physical diseases. Evidence Acquisition Electronic databases, including Persian language (scientific information database [SID], IranMedex, Magiran, IranDoc, and Medlib) and English language (Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, Pre-Quest, and Scopus), were searched. Fifteen articles were found using the keywords disease or chronic disease, resilience or resiliency, and illness, either alone or in combination, both in Persian and English languages. Data analysis was carried out through meta-analysis (random-effects model), and heterogeneity was investigated by subgroup and meta-regression analyses. The data were analyzed in STAT software (12.0). Results The mean resilience score of the chronic disease patients (n = 3369) was 74.6 (95% CI: 51.8 - 97.4). In terms of diseases, the mean resilience score of cancer patients was 79.6 (95% CI: 48.3 - 111.1), whereas it was 79.6 for cardiovascular disease patients (95% CI: 45.8 - 113.3) and 64.6 for patients with other diseases (95% CI: 6.6 - 122.7). There was no relationship between the resilience of chronic disease patients and the year of the study (P = 0.711) and the sample size in the studies (P = 0.351). Conclusions The mean resilience score of the patients was less than that of healthy individuals. As resilience can be acquired at any stage of life, irrespective of age and disease status, there is a need for training to improve resilience among patients through educational programs. PMID:27703800

  2. Functional Assessment in End-Stage Renal Disease: Enhancing Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Saby, Adam; Miller, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Why do functional assessments in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) matter? Multiple studies show that new dialysis patients undergo a substantial decline among activities of daily living. Moreover, poor functional status in ESRD patients is associated with early morality. That is why CMS has developed new criteria to assess ESRD patients in regards to their functional, psychologic, and cognitive capabilities. Functional assessments by health providers have been used in field of Rehabilitation Medicine for over 50 years; rehabilitation physicians have found them effective in establishing goals and monitoring improvement. Assessments can provide guidance by identifying the needs and types of intervention most suited for patients. Impairments can be addressed with referrals to physical therapy for gross motor issues, occupational therapy for self-care problems, psychiatry for mental disorders, and neurology for cognitive deficits. The more accurate the assessments over time, the more targeted and effective the therapies become. We believe that the new CMS goals to assess functionality will improve ESRD patient's quality of life, longevity, and long-term healthcare costs.

  3. Paricalcitol and endothelial function in chronic kidney disease trial.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Carmine; Curatola, Giuseppe; Panuccio, Vincenzo; Tripepi, Rocco; Pizzini, Patrizia; Versace, Marica; Bolignano, Davide; Cutrupi, Sebastiano; Politi, Raffaele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thadhani, Ravi; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    Altered vitamin D metabolism and low levels of the active form of this vitamin, 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D, is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but there is still no randomized controlled trial testing the effect of active forms of vitamin D on vascular function in patients with CKD. Paricalcitol and ENdothelial fuNction in chronic kidneY disease (PENNY) is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01680198) testing the effect of an active form of vitamin D, paricalcitol (2 μg/d×12 weeks) on endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatation in 88 patients with stage 3 to 4 CKD and parathormone >65 pg/mL (paricalcitol, n=44; placebo, n=44). Paricalcitol treatment reduced parathormone (-75 pg/mL; 95% confidence interval, -90 to -60), whereas parathormone showed a small rise during placebo (21 pg/mL; 95% confidence interval, 5-36). Blood pressure did not change in both study arms. Baseline flow-mediated dilation was identical in patients on paricalcitol (3.6±2.9%) and placebo (3.6±2.9%) groups. After 12 weeks of treatment, flow-mediated dilation rose in the paricalcitol but not in the placebo group, and the between-group difference in flow-mediated dilation changes (the primary end point, 1.8%; 95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.1%) was significant (P=0.016), and the mean proportional change in flow-mediated dilation was 61% higher in paricalcitol-treated patients than in placebo-treated patients. Such an effect was abolished 2 weeks after stopping the treatment. No effect of paricalcitol on endothelium-independent vasodilatation was registered. Paricalcitol improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in patients with stage 3 to 4 CKD. Findings in this study support the hypothesis that vitamin D may exert favorable effects on the cardiovascular system in patients with CKD.

  4. Chronic disease or physical disability? The role of the general practitioner.

    PubMed

    Memel, D

    1996-02-01

    There has been a lack of discussion and consensus as to what the role of the general practitioner should be in the care of patients with chronic diseases. Should general practitioners concentrate on the disease or should their remit include the resultant disability and handicap? General practitioners have tended to concentrate on the disease, but this may be inappropriate. For many disabled people, their general practitioner is their only source of health care and is the gatekeeper to other services. Greater knowledge among doctors of the functional and social aspects of disease would therefore improve the quality of care for patients, and should be assessed through clinical audit. Ways are described in which general practitioners, working together with their patients with chronic diseases and with other health professionals, can improve aspects of the care of these patients. PMID:8855019

  5. Chronic disease or physical disability? The role of the general practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    Memel, D

    1996-01-01

    There has been a lack of discussion and consensus as to what the role of the general practitioner should be in the care of patients with chronic diseases. Should general practitioners concentrate on the disease or should their remit include the resultant disability and handicap? General practitioners have tended to concentrate on the disease, but this may be inappropriate. For many disabled people, their general practitioner is their only source of health care and is the gatekeeper to other services. Greater knowledge among doctors of the functional and social aspects of disease would therefore improve the quality of care for patients, and should be assessed through clinical audit. Ways are described in which general practitioners, working together with their patients with chronic diseases and with other health professionals, can improve aspects of the care of these patients. PMID:8855019

  6. Effects of a Cognitively Demanding Aerobic Intervention During Recess on Children's Physical Fitness and Executive Functioning.

    PubMed

    van der Niet, Anneke G; Smith, Joanne; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Scherder, Erik J A; Hartman, Esther; Visscher, Chris

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a physical activity program including both aerobic exercise and cognitively engaging physical activities on children's physical fitness and executive functions. Children from 3 primary schools (aged 8-12 years) were recruited. A quasi-experimental design was used. Children in the intervention group (n = 53; 19 boys, 34 girls) participated in a 22-week physical activity program for 30 min during lunch recess, twice a week. Children in the control group (n = 52; 32 boys, 20 girls) followed their normal lunch routine. Aerobic fitness, speed and agility, and muscle strength were assessed using the Eurofit test battery. Executive functions were assessed using tasks measuring inhibition (Stroop test), working memory (Visual Memory Span test, Digit Span test), cognitive flexibility (Trailmaking test), and planning (Tower of London). Children in the intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than children in the control group on the Stroop test and Digit Span test, reflecting enhanced inhibition and verbal working memory skills, respectively. No differences were found on any of the physical fitness variables. A physical activity program including aerobic exercise and cognitively engaging physical activities can enhance aspects of executive functioning in primary school children.

  7. The PROactive instruments to measure physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Raste, Yogini; Demeyer, Heleen; Louvaris, Zafeiris; de Jong, Corina; Rabinovich, Roberto A; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Polkey, Michael I; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Tabberer, Maggie; Dobbels, Fabienne; Ivanoff, Nathalie; de Boer, Willem I; van der Molen, Thys; Kulich, Karoly; Serra, Ignasi; Basagaña, Xavier; Troosters, Thierry; Puhan, Milo A; Karlsson, Niklas; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2015-10-01

    No current patient-centred instrument captures all dimensions of physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our objective was item reduction and initial validation of two instruments to measure physical activity in COPD.Physical activity was assessed in a 6-week, randomised, two-way cross-over, multicentre study using PROactive draft questionnaires (daily and clinical visit versions) and two activity monitors. Item reduction followed an iterative process including classical and Rasch model analyses, and input from patients and clinical experts.236 COPD patients from five European centres were included. Results indicated the concept of physical activity in COPD had two domains, labelled "amount" and "difficulty". After item reduction, the daily PROactive instrument comprised nine items and the clinical visit contained 14. Both demonstrated good model fit (person separation index >0.7). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the bidimensional structure. Both instruments had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α>0.8), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥0.9) and exhibited moderate-to-high correlations (r>0.6) with related constructs and very low correlations (r<0.3) with unrelated constructs, providing evidence for construct validity.Daily and clinical visit "PROactive physical activity in COPD" instruments are hybrid tools combining a short patient-reported outcome questionnaire and two activity monitor variables which provide simple, valid and reliable measures of physical activity in COPD patients.

  8. Lower Extremity Ischemia, Calf Skeletal Muscle Characteristics, and Functional Impairment in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Hoff, Frederick; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pearce, William H.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Schneider, Joseph R.; Sharma, Leena; Tan, Jin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether lower ankle brachial index (ABI) levels are associated with lower calf skeletal muscle area and higher calf muscle percentage fat in persons with and without lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING Three Chicago-area medical centers. PARTICIPANTS Four hundred thirty-nine persons with PAD (ABI<0.90) and 265 without PAD (ABI 0.90–1.30). MEASUREMENTS Calf muscle cross-sectional area and the percentage of fat in calf muscle were measured using computed tomography at 66.7% of the distance between the distal and proximal tibia. Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer. Functional measures included the 6-minute walk, 4-meter walking speed, and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other potential confounders, lower ABI values were associated with lower calf muscle area (ABI<0.50, 5,193 mm2; ABI 0.50–0.90, 5,536 mm2; ABI 0.91–1.30, 5,941 mm2; P for trend <.001). These significant associations remained after additional adjustment for physical activity. In participants with PAD, lower calf muscle area in the leg with higher ABI was associated with significantly poorer performance in usual- and fast-paced 4-meter walking speed and on the SPPB, adjusting for ABI, physical activity, percentage fat in calf muscle, muscle area in the leg with lower ABI, and other confounders (P<.05 for all comparisons). CONCLUSION These data support the hypothesis that lower extremity ischemia has a direct adverse effect on calf skeletal muscle area. This association may mediate previously established relationships between PAD and functional impairment. PMID:17341243

  9. Functions of the Lyn tyrosine kinase in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Src family kinases such as Lyn are important signaling intermediaries, relaying and modulating different inputs to regulate various outputs, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration and metabolism. Intriguingly, Lyn can mediate both positive and negative signaling processes within the same or different cellular contexts. This duality is exemplified by the B-cell defect in Lyn−/− mice in which Lyn is essential for negative regulation of the B-cell receptor; conversely, B-cells expressing a dominant active mutant of Lyn (Lynup/up) have elevated activities of positive regulators of the B-cell receptor due to this hyperactive kinase. Lyn has well-established functions in most haematopoietic cells, viz. progenitors via influencing c-kit signaling, through to mature cell receptor/integrin signaling, e.g. erythrocytes, platelets, mast cells and macrophages. Consequently, there is an important role for this kinase in regulating hematopoietic abnormalities. Lyn is an important regulator of autoimmune diseases such as asthma and psoriasis, due to its profound ability to influence immune cell signaling. Lyn has also been found to be important for maintaining the leukemic phenotype of many different liquid cancers including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia (BCLL). Lyn is also expressed in some solid tumors and here too it is establishing itself as a potential therapeutic target for prostate, glioblastoma, colon and more aggressive subtypes of breast cancer. Lay Abstract To relay information, a cell uses enzymes that put molecular markers on specific proteins so they interact with other proteins or move to specific parts of the cell to have particular functions. A protein called Lyn is one of these enzymes that regulate information transfer within cells to modulate cell growth, survival and movement. Depending on which type of cell and the source of the information input, Lyn can

  10. Physical Activity and Cognitive Function in Older Adults: The Mediating Effect of Depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Vance, David E; Marson, Daniel C; Triebel, Kristen L; Ball, Karlene K; Wadley, Virginia G; Cody, Shameka L

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and social networks may influence the relationship between physical activity and cognition. Using structural equation modeling, depressive symptoms and social networks were examined as mediators between physical activity and cognition in community-dwelling older adults (N = 122), with a range of cognitive abilities (e.g., normal, mild cognitive impairment). The model included age, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleeping, social networks, depressive symptoms, and cognitive function. A path was observed between physical activity, depressive symptoms, and cognition; specifically, those who were more physically active experienced less depression and better cognitive functioning. No relationship between social networks and cognition was found. This model fits the data well (goodness-of-fit index = .93, adjusted goodness-of-fit index = .90, root mean square error of approximation = .06). Results suggest that physical activity may mitigate depressive symptoms, with beneficial effects on cognitive functioning in both those with and without mild cognitive impairment. Suggestions for managing depression and improving cognitive functioning are provided. PMID:27224681

  11. Factors that influence physical function and emotional well-being among Medicare-Medicaid enrollees.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathy D; Pepper, Ginette A; Caserta, Michael; Wong, Bob; Brunker, Cherie P; Morris, Diana L; Burant, Christopher J; Hazelett, Susan; Kropp, Denise; Allen, Kyle R

    2015-01-01

    Dually enrolled Medicare-Medicaid older adults are a vulnerable population. We tested House's Conceptual Framework for Understanding Social Inequalities in Health and Aging in Medicare-Medicaid enrollees by examining the extent to which disparities indicators, which included race, age, gender, neighborhood poverty, education, income, exercise (e.g., walking), and physical activity (e.g., housework) influence physical function and emotional well-being. This secondary analysis included 337 Black (31%) and White (69%) older Medicare-Medicaid enrollees. Using path analysis, we determined that race, neighborhood poverty, education, and income did not influence physical function or emotional well-being. However, physical activity (e.g., housework) was associated with an increased self-report of physical function and emotional well-being of β = .23, p < .001; β = .17, p < .01, respectively. Future studies of factors that influence physical function and emotional well-being in this population should take into account health status indicators such as allostatic load, comorbidity, and perceived racism/discrimination.

  12. Disruption of the 'disease triangle' by chemical and physical environmental change.

    PubMed

    Chappelka, A H; Grulke, N E

    2016-01-01

    The physical and chemical environment of the Earth has changed rapidly over the last 100 years and is predicted to continue to change into the foreseeable future. One of the main concerns with potential alterations in climate is the propensity for increases in the magnitude and frequency of extremes to occur. Even though precipitation is predicted to increase in some locations, in others precipitation is expected to decrease and evapotranspiration increase with air temperature, resulting in exacerbated drought in the future. Chemical [ozone (O3 ) and other air contaminants] and subsequent physical alterations in the environment will have a profound effect on the 'disease triangle' (a favourable environment, a susceptible host and a virulent pathogen) and should be included in any analysis of biological response to climate change. The chemical and physical environment affects plant health and alters plant susceptibility to insect and pathogen attack through increased frequency, duration and severity of drought and reduction in host vigour. The potential effects of climate change and O3 on tree diseases with emphasis on the western United States are discussed. We describe a generalised modelling approach to incorporate the complexities of the 'disease triangle' into dynamic vegetation models.

  13. Disruption of the 'disease triangle' by chemical and physical environmental change.

    PubMed

    Chappelka, A H; Grulke, N E

    2016-01-01

    The physical and chemical environment of the Earth has changed rapidly over the last 100 years and is predicted to continue to change into the foreseeable future. One of the main concerns with potential alterations in climate is the propensity for increases in the magnitude and frequency of extremes to occur. Even though precipitation is predicted to increase in some locations, in others precipitation is expected to decrease and evapotranspiration increase with air temperature, resulting in exacerbated drought in the future. Chemical [ozone (O3 ) and other air contaminants] and subsequent physical alterations in the environment will have a profound effect on the 'disease triangle' (a favourable environment, a susceptible host and a virulent pathogen) and should be included in any analysis of biological response to climate change. The chemical and physical environment affects plant health and alters plant susceptibility to insect and pathogen attack through increased frequency, duration and severity of drought and reduction in host vigour. The potential effects of climate change and O3 on tree diseases with emphasis on the western United States are discussed. We describe a generalised modelling approach to incorporate the complexities of the 'disease triangle' into dynamic vegetation models. PMID:26012894

  14. Effects of a DVD-Delivered Exercise Intervention on Physical Function in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. Given the rapidly increasing demographic of older adults, it is vital to implement effective behavioral strategies to improve physical function to maintain activities of daily living. However, changing physical activity in older adults remains extremely difficult. The current trial tested the efficacy of a novel, 6-month, home-based, DVD-delivered exercise program focusing on flexibility, balance, and toning on the physical function of older adults. Methods. Older adults (N = 307) were recruited from 83 towns and cities throughout central Illinois. The trial consisted of 4 waves of recruitment and randomization from May 2010 through January 2012. Inclusion criteria included being inactive, at least 65 years of age, English speaking, providing physician’s consent, and willingness to be randomized. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment conditions: the exercise intervention or a healthy aging, attentional control. Functional assessments were completed at baseline and following the 6-month DVD intervention. Measures included the Short Physical Performance Battery, assessments of flexibility and strength, and self-reported functional limitations. Results. Participants in the DVD intervention condition demonstrated significant improvements in the Short Physical Performance Battery (p = .005), lower extremity flexibility (p = .04), and upper body strength (p = .003). There were no effects of the intervention on self-reported functional limitations. Conclusions. The exercise intervention produced a clinically significant improvement in the Short Physical Performance Battery and improvements in flexibility and strength, demonstrating the effectiveness of a low-cost DVD exercise program in improving physical function in older adults. PMID:23401566

  15. Could physical exercises modulate Nrf2-Keap1 pathway in chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Abreu, C C; Cardozo, L F M F; Mafra, D

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have various metabolic disorders caused by a chronic state of oxidative stress and inflammation, and recently, nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has emerged as a factor that plays a significant role in cellular protection against oxidative stress and inflammation. This transcription factor when activated can regulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory cellular responses leading to the expression of detoxifying enzymes. Studies have shown that Nrf2 expression can be modulated by several factors, such as bioactive compounds and physical exercise. In fact, exercise in CKD patients can bring many benefits; however, there are no studies correlating physical activity and Nrf2 expression in CKD patients. This review aims to discuss whether there is any evidence to justify a recommendation of physical exercise in CKD patients as a non-pharmacological option to activate the Nrf2 pathway. PMID:25466297

  16. Rapid cognitive and functional decline: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Dameron, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of "mad cow disease" has sparked interest in prion diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a spongiform encephalopathy that can mimic other rapidly progressive dementias. A systematic approach to evaluation and diagnostic testing can help rule out other causes. PMID:24317229

  17. Physical activity in people with asbestos related pleural disease and dust-related interstitial lung disease: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Dale, Marita T; McKeough, Zoe J; Munoz, Phillip A; Corte, Peter; Bye, Peter T P; Alison, Jennifer A

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to measure the levels of physical activity (PA) in people with dust-related pleural and interstitial lung diseases and to compare these levels of PA to a healthy population. There is limited data on PA in this patient population and no previous studies have compared PA in people with dust-related respiratory diseases to a healthy control group. Participants with a diagnosis of a dust-related respiratory disease including asbestosis and asbestos related pleural disease (ARPD) and a healthy age- and gender-matched population wore the SenseWear(®) Pro3 armband for 9 days. Six-minute walk distance, Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were also measured. Fifty participants were recruited and 46 completed the study; 22 with ARPD, 10 with dust-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) and 14 healthy age-matched participants. The mean (standard deviation) steps/day were 6097 (1939) steps/day for dust-related ILD, 9150 (3392) steps/day for ARPD and 10,630 (3465) steps/day for healthy participants. Compared with the healthy participants, dust-related ILD participants were significantly less active as measured by steps/day ((mean difference 4533 steps/day (95% confidence interval (CI): 1888-7178)) and energy expenditure, ((mean difference 512 calories (95% CI: 196-827)) and spent significantly less time engaging in moderate, vigorous or very vigorous activities (i.e. >3 metabolic equivalents; mean difference 1.2 hours/day (95% CI: 0.4-2.0)). There were no differences in levels of PA between healthy participants and those with ARPD. PA was reduced in people with dust-related ILD but not those with ARPD when compared with healthy age and gender-matched individuals.

  18. An interdisciplinary approach to study individuality in biological and physical systems functioning

    PubMed Central

    Mygal, V. P.; But, A. V.; Mygal, G. V.; Klimenko, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    Signals of system functioning of different nature are presented in the parameter space (state-velocity-acceleration) as a trajectory of dynamic events. Such signals geometrization allows to reveal the hidden spatio-temporal correlation in dynamics of systems functioning. It is shown that the nature of relationship between the dynamic parameters of signal determines the natural cycle of sensor functioning. Its restructuring displays the inherited features of systems functioning in signature package. The universal differential-geometry parameters and new integrative indexes of system functioning are used to analyze the signatures of biological and physical signals. PMID:27412253

  19. An interdisciplinary approach to study individuality in biological and physical systems functioning.

    PubMed

    Mygal, V P; But, A V; Mygal, G V; Klimenko, I A

    2016-01-01

    Signals of system functioning of different nature are presented in the parameter space (state-velocity-acceleration) as a trajectory of dynamic events. Such signals geometrization allows to reveal the hidden spatio-temporal correlation in dynamics of systems functioning. It is shown that the nature of relationship between the dynamic parameters of signal determines the natural cycle of sensor functioning. Its restructuring displays the inherited features of systems functioning in signature package. The universal differential-geometry parameters and new integrative indexes of system functioning are used to analyze the signatures of biological and physical signals. PMID:27412253

  20. Screened hybrid density functionals for solid-state chemistry and physics.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2009-01-21

    Density functional theory incorporating hybrid exchange-correlation functionals has been extraordinarily successful in providing accurate, computationally tractable treatments of molecular properties. However, conventional hybrid functionals can be problematic for solids. Their nonlocal, Hartree-Fock-like exchange term decays slowly and incorporates unphysical features in metals and narrow-bandgap semiconductors. This article provides an overview of our group's work on designing hybrid functionals for solids. We focus on the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid functional [J. Chem. Phys. 2003, 118, 8207], its applications to the chemistry and physics of solids and surfaces, and our efforts to build upon its successes.

  1. Acupuncture modulates resting state hippocampal functional connectivity in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqun; Liang, Peipeng; Zhao, Zhilian; Han, Ying; Song, Haiqing; Xu, Jianyang; Lu, Jie; Li, Kuncheng

    2014-01-01

    Our objective is to clarify the effects of acupuncture on hippocampal connectivity in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-eight right-handed subjects (14 AD patients and 14 healthy elders) participated in this study. Clinical and neuropsychological examinations were performed on all subjects. MRI was performed using a SIEMENS verio 3-Tesla scanner. The fMRI study used a single block experimental design. We first acquired baseline resting state data during the initial 3 minutes and then performed acupuncture stimulation on the Tai chong and He gu acupoints for 3 minutes. Last, we acquired fMRI data for another 10 minutes after the needle was withdrawn. The preprocessing and data analysis were performed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM5) software. Two-sample t-tests were performed using data from the two groups in different states. We found that during the resting state, several frontal and temporal regions showed decreased hippocampal connectivity in AD patients relative to control subjects. During the resting state following acupuncture, AD patients showed increased connectivity in most of these hippocampus related regions compared to the first resting state. In conclusion, we investigated the effect of acupuncture on AD patients by combing fMRI and traditional acupuncture. Our fMRI study confirmed that acupuncture at Tai chong and He gu can enhance the hippocampal connectivity in AD patients.

  2. Functional neuroanatomy of spatial sound processing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Hannah L.; Agustus, Jennifer L.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Deficits of auditory scene analysis accompany Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the functional neuroanatomy of spatial sound processing has not been defined in AD. We addressed this using a “sparse” fMRI virtual auditory spatial paradigm in 14 patients with typical AD in relation to 16 healthy age-matched individuals. Sound stimulus sequences discretely varied perceived spatial location and pitch of the sound source in a factorial design. AD was associated with loss of differentiated cortical profiles of auditory location and pitch processing at the prescribed threshold, and significant group differences were identified for processing auditory spatial variation in posterior cingulate cortex (controls > AD) and the interaction of pitch and spatial variation in posterior insula (AD > controls). These findings build on emerging evidence for altered brain mechanisms of auditory scene analysis and suggest complex dysfunction of network hubs governing the interface of internal milieu and external environment in AD. Auditory spatial processing may be a sensitive probe of this interface and contribute to characterization of brain network failure in AD and other neurodegenerative syndromes. PMID:26923412

  3. Cognitive Function in Parkinson's Disease Patients with and without Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Walton, C. C.; Lewis, S. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the implications of anxiety in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been neglected despite its prevalence in nearly 50% of patients and its negative impact on quality of life. Previous reports have noted that neuropsychiatric symptoms impair cognitive performance in PD patients; however, to date, no study has directly compared PD patients with and without anxiety to examine the impact of anxiety on cognitive impairments in PD. This study compared cognitive performance across 50 PD participants with and without anxiety (17 PDA+; 33 PDA−), who underwent neurological and neuropsychological assessment. Group performance was compared across the following cognitive domains: simple attention/visuomotor processing speed, executive function (e.g., set-shifting), working memory, language, and memory/new verbal learning. Results showed that PDA+ performed significantly worse on the Digit Span forward and backward test and Part B of the Trail Making Task (TMT-B) compared to the PDA− group. There were no group differences in verbal fluency, logical memory, or TMT-A performance. In conclusion, anxiety in PD has a measurable impact on working memory and attentional set-shifting. PMID:27800180

  4. The Dynamic Relationship Between Physical Function and Cognition in Longitudinal Aging Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Clouston, Sean A. P.; Brewster, Paul; Kuh, Diana; Richards, Marcus; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Rubin, Marcie S.; Hofer, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    On average, older people remember less and walk more slowly than do younger persons. Some researchers argue that this is due in part to a common biologic process underlying age-related declines in both physical and cognitive functioning. Only recently have longitudinal data become available for analyzing this claim. We conducted a systematic review of English-language research published between 2000 and 2011 to evaluate the relations between rates of change in physical and cognitive functioning in older cohorts. Physical functioning was assessed using objective measures: walking speed, grip strength, chair rise time, flamingo stand time, and summary measures of physical functioning. Cognition was measured using mental state examinations, fluid cognition, and diagnosis of impairment. Results depended on measurement type: Change in grip strength was more strongly correlated with mental state, while change in walking speed was more strongly correlated with change in fluid cognition. Examining physical and cognitive functioning can help clinicians and researchers to better identify individuals and groups that are aging differently and at different rates. In future research, investigators should consider the importance of identifying different patterns and rates of decline, examine relations between more diverse types of measures, and analyze the order in which age-related declines occur. PMID:23349427

  5. Effects of physical activity in Parkinson's disease: A new tool for rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Borrione, Paolo; Tranchita, Eliana; Sansone, Pierpaolo; Parisi, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity, and postural instability. Motor disorders are composite and combined, adversely affecting the patient’s health. Tremor and rigidity are correlated with worsening manual dexterity as well as postural changes such as akinesia and camptocormia. Moreover, gait alteration as well as postural instability, with consequent impairment in balance, increase the risk of falls. It is well known that these symptoms respond poorly to pharmacologic therapy in PD patients. Physical therapy is the most effective non-pharmacological aid to PD patients. Available data in the literature indicate that any rehabilitation protocol has to focus on: cognitive movement strategies, cueing strategies, and improved physical capacity and balance. Different training programs for PD patients have been designed and evaluated but only specific training strategies, tailored and individualized for each patient, may produce improvements in gait speed and stride length, decrease motor and balance symptoms and improve quality of life. Furthermore, aerobic training may improve muscle trophism, strength and mobility. It seems reasonable to state that tailored physical activity is a valid tool to be included in the therapeutic program of PD patients, considering that this approach may ameliorate the symptoms as well as the overall physical incapacity, reduce the risk of falls and injuries, and ultimately improve quality of life. PMID:25332912

  6. The Impact of Physical Activity on Non-Motor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Cusso, Melanie E; Donald, Kenneth J; Khoo, Tien K

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder that is associated with both motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS). The management of PD is primarily via pharmaceutical treatment; however, non-pharmaceutical interventions have become increasingly recognized in the management of motor and NMS. In this review, the efficacy of physical activity, including physiotherapy and occupational therapy, as an intervention in NMS will be assessed. The papers were extracted between the 20th and 22nd of June 2016 from PubMed, Web of Science, Medline, Ovid, SportsDiscuss, and Scopus using the MeSH search terms "Parkinson's," "Parkinson," and "Parkinsonism" in conjunction with "exercise," "physical activity," "physiotherapy," "occupational therapy," "physical therapy," "rehabilitation," "dance," and "martial arts." Twenty studies matched inclusion criteria of having 10 or more participants with diagnosed idiopathic PD participating in the intervention as well as having to evaluate the effects of physical activity on NMS in PD as controlled, randomized intervention studies. The outcomes of interest were NMS, including depression, cognition, fatigue, apathy, anxiety, and sleep. Risk of bias in the studies was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Comparability of the various intervention methods, however, was challenging due to demographic variability and methodological differences. Nevertheless, physical activity can positively impact the global NMS burden including depression, apathy, fatigue, day time sleepiness, sleep, and cognition, thus supporting its therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative conditions such as PD. It is recommended that further adequately powered studies are conducted to assess the therapeutic role of physical activity on both motor and non-motor aspects of PD. These studies should be optimally designed to assess non-motor elements of disease using instruments validated in PD. PMID:27583249

  7. The associations between family history of coronary heart disease, physical activity, dietary intake and body size.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; Schumacher, M C; Hunt, S C; Williams, R R

    1993-02-01

    Physical activity has been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) as well as several CHD risk factors. In this study, we examine the association of a positive family history of CHD and physical activity on dietary intake and body size indicators among 891 healthy young adults (18 to 39 years of age) and 471 older adults (40 to 83) observed between 1980 and 1986. Participants reported the number of times per week they walked and/or jogged one mile, biked three miles, participated in sports, or performed other intense activities. Older men with a family history of CHD reported more physical activity than men without a family history of CHD (60% compared to 28.6%; p = 0.002). Younger women without a family history of CHD reported more physical activity than women with a family history of CHD (30.2% compared to 15.9%; p = 0.004). Fruit and vegetable intake increased with increasing levels of physical activity in younger adults. The only dietary association with family history was higher levels of fatty foods reported among older women with a family history versus those without a family history (p = 0.03). Young women with a family history of CHD were more likely to have higher BMI levels at all levels of physical activity and a higher percent of their ideal body weight per unit of physical activity (p = 0.01). For instance, young women who were most active with a family history of CHD were at 115% of their ideal body weight, while those without a family history were at 110.2% of their ideal body weight. There were no significant interactions between physical activity and CHD family history in this population. These findings suggest that family history of CHD alone may not be adequate to stimulate one to adopt a more healthy lifestyle.

  8. Executive cognitive function as a correlate and predictor of child food intake and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Nathaniel; Chou, Chih-Ping; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Investigated were relations among executive cognitive function (ECF), food intake, and physical activity in 184, fourth grade children. It was hypothesized that self-reported ECF proficiency would predict greater self-reported fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity, but less "snack food" intake. Structural models demonstrated that ECF was significantly correlated with less concurrent snack food intake and greater concurrent fruit/vegetable intake, but not physical activity. Baseline ECF also significantly predicted greater fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity four months later, but not snack food intake. One implication is to promote ECF as a correlate and predictor of food intake and physical activity in children by providing opportunities for youth to practice newly developing ECF capacities.

  9. Constructing lncRNA functional similarity network based on lncRNA-disease associations and disease semantic similarity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Clarence Yan, Chenggang; Luo, Cai; Ji, Wen; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that plenty of lncRNAs play important roles in many critical biological processes. Developing powerful computational models to construct lncRNA functional similarity network based on heterogeneous biological datasets is one of the most important and popular topics in the fields of both lncRNAs and complex diseases. Functional similarity network consturction could benefit the model development for both lncRNA function inference and lncRNA-disease association identification. However, little effort has been attempted to analysis and calculate lncRNA functional similarity on a large scale. In this study, based on the assumption that functionally similar lncRNAs tend to be associated with similar diseases, we developed two novel lncRNA functional similarity calculation models (LNCSIM). LNCSIM was evaluated by introducing similarity scores into the model of Laplacian Regularized Least Squares for LncRNA–Disease Association (LRLSLDA) for lncRNA-disease association prediction. As a result, new predictive models improved the performance of LRLSLDA in the leave-one-out cross validation of various known lncRNA-disease associations datasets. Furthermore, some of the predictive results for colorectal cancer and lung cancer were verified by independent biological experimental studies. It is anticipated that LNCSIM could be a useful and important biological tool for human disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. PMID:26061969

  10. Determinants of physical and global functioning in adult HIV-positive heterosexual men.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; McMahon, James M; Trabold, Nicole; Aidala, Angela A; Chen, Michael; Pouget, Enrique R; Simmons, Janie; Klostermann, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the psychosocial factors that might impact the functioning ability of heterosexual men living with HIV. We examined positive and negative coping, social support, and HIV stigma as predictors of physical and global functioning in a cross-sectional sample of 317 HIV-infected adult heterosexual male patients recruited from clinical and social service agencies in New York City. Study participants were primarily minority and low income. Sixty-four percent were African-American, 55% were single, and 90% were 40 years of age or older. The majority had long-term HIV (LTHIV), with an average duration of 15 years since diagnosis. After controlling for participant characteristics, structural equation modeling analyses revealed that positive coping and social support had a significant positive direct effect on global functioning, while stigma had a significant negative direct effect on global functioning. The physical functioning model revealed that negative coping and HIV stigma had significant negative direct effects, whereas social support had a significant positive indirect effect. Age and duration of HIV diagnosis were not associated with physical and global functioning. In conclusion, we found that heterosexual men living with LTHIV who have ineffective coping, less social support, and greater stigma have reduced functioning ability. Study findings have implications for developing interventions aimed at increasing and retaining functioning ability with the end goal of improving successful aging in this population.

  11. The effect of glutamine supplementation and physical exercise on neutrophil function.

    PubMed

    Lagranha, C J; Levada-Pires, A C; Sellitti, D F; Procopio, J; Curi, R; Pithon-Curi, T C

    2008-04-01

    Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the body. Its primary source is skeletal muscle, from where it is released into the bloodstream and transported to a variety of tissues. Several studies have shown that glutamine is important for rat and human neutrophil function and that these cells utilize glutamine at high rates. Physical exercise has also been shown to induce considerable changes in neutrophil metabolism and function. As neutrophils represent 50-60% of the total circulating leukocyte pool and play a key role in inflammation, both physical exercise and glutamine might be expected to regulate the inflammatory process. In this review, the changes in neutrophil function induced by physical exercise and glutamine supplementation are compared. PMID:17928941

  12. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  13. A Survey on the Willingness to Use Physical Activity Smartphone Applications (Apps) in Patients with Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liu; Jiao, Chen; Wang, Yanling; Xiao, Qian; Zhang, Yiling; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the willingness of using physical activity smartphone apps among patients with chronic diseases. 218 outpatients from a tertiary hospital in Beijing were involved using a questionnaire. Over half of the patients (53.7%) were willing to use smartphone apps to promote physical activities. The individuals more likely to use physical activity apps tended to be younger (≤44 years), be more educated, perceiving their disease need exercise instruction or professional support, current smartphone user, having previous experience of using physical activity apps, and accepting paid apps (P<0.05). The results could help health educator suggest chronic disease patients to use apps to do more exercises. Further research could be focus on evaluate the effects of using physical activity apps in chronic disease patients. PMID:27332468

  14. Effect of meditation on cognitive functions in context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Rafał; Sheardova, Katerina; Cermáková, Pavla; Hudeček, Daniel; Sumec, Rastislav; Hort, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Effect of different meditation practices on various aspects of mental and physical health is receiving growing attention. The present paper reviews evidence on the effects of several mediation practices on cognitive functions in the context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. The effect of meditation in this area is still poorly explored. Seven studies were detected through the databases search, which explores the effect of meditation on attention, memory, executive functions, and other miscellaneous measures of cognition in a sample of older people and people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Overall, reviewed studies suggested a positive effect of meditation techniques, particularly in the area of attention, as well as memory, verbal fluency, and cognitive flexibility. These findings are discussed in the context of MRI studies suggesting structural correlates of the effects. Meditation can be a potentially suitable non-pharmacological intervention aimed at the prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the conclusions of these studies are limited by their methodological flaws and differences of various types of meditation techniques. Further research in this direction could help to verify the validity of the findings and clarify the problematic aspects.

  15. Effect of Meditation on Cognitive Functions in Context of Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Rafał; Sheardova, Katerina; Čermáková, Pavla; Hudeček, Daniel; Šumec, Rastislav; Hort, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Effect of different meditation practices on various aspects of mental and physical health is receiving growing attention. The present paper reviews evidence on the effects of several mediation practices on cognitive functions in the context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. The effect of meditation in this area is still poorly explored. Seven studies were detected through the databases search, which explores the effect of meditation on attention, memory, executive functions, and other miscellaneous measures of cognition in a sample of older people and people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Overall, reviewed studies suggested a positive effect of meditation techniques, particularly in the area of attention, as well as memory, verbal fluency, and cognitive flexibility. These findings are discussed in the context of MRI studies suggesting structural correlates of the effects. Meditation can be a potentially suitable non-pharmacological intervention aimed at the prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the conclusions of these studies are limited by their methodological flaws and differences of various types of meditation techniques. Further research in this direction could help to verify the validity of the findings and clarify the problematic aspects. PMID:24478663

  16. A simple and rapid test of physical performance inchronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Albarrati, Ali Mufraih; Gale, Nichola S; Enright, Stephanie; Munnery, Margaret M; Cockcroft, John R; Shale, Dennis J

    2016-01-01

    Impaired physical performance is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but its assessment can be difficult in routine clinical practice. We compared the timed up and go (TUG) test and other easily applied assessments of physical performance with the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). In a longitudinal study of comorbidities in COPD, submaximal physical performance was determined in 520 patients and 150 controls using the TUG test and 6MWD. Spirometry, body composition, handgrip strength, the COPD assessment test, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea scale were also determined. Patients and controls were similar in age, body mass index, and sex proportions. The TUG in the patients was greater than that in the control group, P=0.001, and was inversely related to 6MWD (r=-0.71, P<0.001) and forced expiratory volume in one second predicted (r=-0.19, P<0.01) and was directly related to the SGRQ activity (r=0.39, P<0.001), SGRQ total (r=0.37, P<0.001), and total COPD assessment test scores (r=0.37, P<0.001). The TUG identified the difference in physical performance between patients and controls. The TUG test and validated questionnaires provide a measure of physical performance, which is rapid and could be used in clinical practice. PMID:27536090

  17. A simple and rapid test of physical performance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Albarrati, Ali Mufraih; Gale, Nichola S; Enright, Stephanie; Munnery, Margaret M; Cockcroft, John R; Shale, Dennis J

    2016-01-01

    Impaired physical performance is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but its assessment can be difficult in routine clinical practice. We compared the timed up and go (TUG) test and other easily applied assessments of physical performance with the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). In a longitudinal study of comorbidities in COPD, submaximal physical performance was determined in 520 patients and 150 controls using the TUG test and 6MWD. Spirometry, body composition, handgrip strength, the COPD assessment test, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea scale were also determined. Patients and controls were similar in age, body mass index, and sex proportions. The TUG in the patients was greater than that in the control group, P=0.001, and was inversely related to 6MWD (r=−0.71, P<0.001) and forced expiratory volume in one second predicted (r=−0.19, P<0.01) and was directly related to the SGRQ activity (r=0.39, P<0.001), SGRQ total (r=0.37, P<0.001), and total COPD assessment test scores (r=0.37, P<0.001). The TUG identified the difference in physical performance between patients and controls. The TUG test and validated questionnaires provide a measure of physical performance, which is rapid and could be used in clinical practice. PMID:27536090

  18. Physical activity and cognitive function in individuals over 60 years of age: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ashley; Rea, Irene Maeve; Parimon, Tanyalak; Cusack, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether physical activity in later life is beneficial for maintenance of cognitive function. We performed a systematic review examining the effects of exercise on cognitive function in older individuals, and present possible mechanisms whereby physical activity may improve cognition. Methods Sources consisted of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and the University of Washington, School of Medicine Library Database, with a search conducted on August 15, 2012 for publications limited to the English language starting January 1, 2000. Randomized controlled trials including at least 30 participants and lasting at least 6 months, and all observational studies including a minimum of 100 participants for one year, were evaluated. All subjects included were at least 60 years of age. Results Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-six studies reported a positive correlation between physical activity and maintenance or enhancement of cognitive function. Five studies reported a dose-response relationship between physical activity and cognition. One study showed a nonsignificant correlation. Conclusion The preponderance of evidence suggests that physical activity is beneficial for cognitive function in the elderly. However, the majority of the evidence is of medium quality with a moderate risk of bias. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the association between exercise and cognitive function and to determine which types of exercise have the greatest benefit on specific cognitive domains. Despite these caveats, the current evidence suggests that physical activity may help to improve cognitive function and, consequently, delay the progression of cognitive impairment in the elderly. PMID:24748784

  19. Association between physical activity in daily life and pulmonary function in adult smokers

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Miriane Lilian; Barbosa, Alan Carlos Brisola; Spina, Giovanna Domingues; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Arantes, Rodolfo Leite; Gagliardi, Antonio Ricardo de Toledo; Romiti, Marcello; Dourado, Victor Zuniga

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL) is associated with pulmonary function in adult smokers. Methods: We selected 62 adult smokers from among the participants of an epidemiological study conducted in the city of Santos, Brazil. The subjects underwent forced spirometry for pulmonary function assessment. The level of PADL was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and triaxial accelerometry, the device being used for seven days. The minimum level of PADL, in terms of quantity and intensity, was defined as 150 min/week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Correlations between the studied variables were tested with Pearson's or Spearman's correlation coefficient, depending on the distribution of the variables. We used linear multiple regression in order to analyze the influence of PADL on the spirometric variables. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Evaluating all predictors, corrected for confounding factors, and using pulmonary function data as outcome variables, we found no significant associations between physical inactivity, as determined by accelerometry, and spirometric indices. The values for FVC were lower among the participants with arterial hypertension, and FEV1/FVC ratios were lower among those with diabetes mellitus. Obese participants and those with dyslipidemia presented with lower values for FVC and FEV1. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no consistent association between physical inactivity and pulmonary function in adult smokers. Smoking history should be given special attention in COPD prevention strategies, as should cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities. PMID:27167434

  20. Occlusal disease revisited: Part I--Function and parafunction.

    PubMed

    Lytle, J D

    2001-06-01

    This article will address the evolution of occlusal disease from childhood and the deciduous dentition forward. It will include the evolution of anterior wear with emphasis on "cross over" of the mandible. Having classified the types and extent of occlusal disease, new evidence will be shown, on the adult dentition with pathognomonic manifestations, of cross-over or bruxed-braced occlusal disease. Its potential effect on restorative dentistry and dental implants will be discussed. PMID:11490403

  1. Effects of Physical Exercise on Executive Functions: Going beyond Simply Moving to Moving with Thought

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Adele

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the cognitive benefits of physical activity need to move beyond simple aerobic activities that require little thought (treadmill running, riding a stationary bicycle, or rapid walking) and resistance training. Many studies have looked at this in older adults, and the evidence points strongly to those activities having little or no cognitive benefit, certainly little or no improvement to the executive functions that depend on prefrontal cortex. There is encouraging evidence for other types of physical activity improving executive functions; however they have received far less study. PMID:26000340

  2. Promoting physical activity for elders with compromised function: the lifestyle Interventions and Independence for elders (LIFE) study physical activity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Rejeski, W Jack; Axtell, Robert; Fielding, Roger; Katula, Jeffrey; King, Abby C; Manini, Todd M; Marsh, Anthony P; Pahor, Marco; Rego, Alvito; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Newman, Mark; Walkup, Michael P; Miller, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study is a Phase III randomized controlled clinical trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01072500) that will provide definitive evidence regarding the effect of physical activity (PA) on major mobility disability in older adults (70–89 years old) who have compromised physical function. This paper describes the methods employed in the delivery of the LIFE Study PA intervention, providing insight into how we promoted adherence and monitored the fidelity of treatment. Data are presented on participants’ motives and self-perceptions at the onset of the trial along with accelerometry data on patterns of PA during exercise training. Prior to the onset of training, 31.4% of participants noted slight conflict with being able to meet the demands of the program and 6.4% indicated that the degree of conflict would be moderate. Accelerometry data collected during PA training revealed that the average intensity – 1,555 counts/minute for men and 1,237 counts/minute for women – was well below the cutoff point used to classify exercise as being of moderate intensity or higher for adults. Also, a sizable subgroup required one or more rest stops. These data illustrate that it is not feasible to have a single exercise prescription for older adults with compromised function. Moreover, the concept of what constitutes “moderate” exercise or an appropriate volume of work is dictated by the physical capacities of each individual and the level of comfort/stability in actually executing a specific prescription. PMID:24049442

  3. Physical models have gender‐specific effects on student understanding of protein structure–function relationships

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure–function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3‐dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2‐dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand‐held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure–function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self‐reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context‐specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender‐specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326–335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  4. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Harris, Michelle A; Chang, Wesley S; Dent, Erik W; Nordheim, Erik V; Franzen, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326-335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  5. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional (3D) mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional (2D) representations. We used a controlled, backwards design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students’ ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. PMID:26923186

  6. Associates of Physical Function and Pain in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Sara R.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Irrgang, James J.; Fritz, Julie M.; Wisniewski, Stephen; McGinty, Gerald T.; Childs, John D.; Domenech, Manuel A.; Jones, Scott; Delitto, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether impairment of muscle strength, soft tissue length, movement control, postural and biomechanic alterations, and psychologic factors are associated with physical function and pain in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Rehabilitation outpatient. Participants Seventy-four patients diagnosed with PFPS. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Measurements were self-reported function and pain; strength of quadriceps, hip abduction, and hip external rotation; length of hamstrings, quadriceps, plantar flexors, iliotibial band/tensor fasciae latae complex, and lateral retinaculum; foot pronation; Q-angle; tibial torsion; visual observation of quality of movement during a lateral step-down task; anxiety; and fear-avoidance beliefs. Results After controlling for age and sex, anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs about work and physical activity were associated with function, while only fear-avoidance beliefs about work and physical activity were associated with pain. Conclusions Psychologic factors were the only associates of function and pain in patients with PFPS. Factors related to physical impairments did not associate to function or pain. Our results should be validated in other samples of patients with PFPS. Further studies should determine the role of other psychologic factors, and how they relate to anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs in these patients. PMID:19236982

  7. A Physically Based Theoretical Model of Spore Deposition for Predicting Spread of Plant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Isard, Scott A; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    A physically based theory for predicting spore deposition downwind from an area source of inoculum is presented. The modeling framework is based on theories of turbulence dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer and applies only to spores that escape from plant canopies. A "disease resistance" coefficient is introduced to convert the theoretical spore deposition model into a simple tool for predicting disease spread at the field scale. Results from the model agree well with published measurements of Uromyces phaseoli spore deposition and measurements of wheat leaf rust disease severity. The theoretical model has the advantage over empirical models in that it can be used to assess the influence of source distribution and geometry, spore characteristics, and meteorological conditions on spore deposition and disease spread. The modeling framework is refined to predict the detailed two-dimensional spatial pattern of disease spread from an infection focus. Accounting for the time variations of wind speed and direction in the refined modeling procedure improves predictions, especially near the inoculum source, and enables application of the theoretical modeling framework to field experiment design. PMID:26595112

  8. A Physically Based Theoretical Model of Spore Deposition for Predicting Spread of Plant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Isard, Scott A; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    A physically based theory for predicting spore deposition downwind from an area source of inoculum is presented. The modeling framework is based on theories of turbulence dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer and applies only to spores that escape from plant canopies. A "disease resistance" coefficient is introduced to convert the theoretical spore deposition model into a simple tool for predicting disease spread at the field scale. Results from the model agree well with published measurements of Uromyces phaseoli spore deposition and measurements of wheat leaf rust disease severity. The theoretical model has the advantage over empirical models in that it can be used to assess the influence of source distribution and geometry, spore characteristics, and meteorological conditions on spore deposition and disease spread. The modeling framework is refined to predict the detailed two-dimensional spatial pattern of disease spread from an infection focus. Accounting for the time variations of wind speed and direction in the refined modeling procedure improves predictions, especially near the inoculum source, and enables application of the theoretical modeling framework to field experiment design.

  9. Understanding nutritional interventions and physical exercise in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, R; Carbajo-Pescador, S; Mauriz, J L; Gonzalez-Gallego, J

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in adults and its prevalence is rising around the world. This pathology is characterized by accumulation of liver fat, which exceeds 5% of liver weight in absence of alcohol consumption, viral infection or other hepatic etiology. Since NAFLD has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes or alteration of lipid profiles, it is considered as the liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Pathogenic mechanisms of NAFLD have not been clearly elucidated, but different events such as lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are involved. Modifications in lifestyle constitute the first line for the management of NAFLD. Nutritional interventions include low fat and carbohydrate diet with higher polyunsaturated fatty acids ingestion. Moreover, supplementation with antioxidant and cytoprotective agents could be useful to decrease oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Physical activity enables to reduce the expression of lipogenic genes, fat accumulation, or insulin resistance and improves cardiorespiratory fitness. Benefits have been found following both aerobic exercise and resistance training, and remain even after exercise cessation. However, more studies are required to analyze the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in nutritional and physical intervention, and to define the volume of activity required and its association with weight loss. In this paper, we offer an updated overview of the mechanisms implicated in the progression of NAFLD, and analyze the beneficial effects of nutritional interventions and physical exercise in the prevention and treatment of this condition. PMID:25601465

  10. Sedentary behavior and physical function: Objective Evidence from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwha; Chang, Rowland W.; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Kwoh, C. Kent; Nevitt, Michael; Semanik, Pamela A.; Sharma, Leena; Sohn, Min-Woong; Song, Jing; Dunlop, Dorothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Investigate the relationship between sedentary behavior and physical function in adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA), controlling for moderate-vigorous physical activity () levels. Methods Sedentary behavior was objectively measured by accelerometer on 1,168 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative aged 49–83 years with radiographic knee OA at the 48 month clinic visit. Physical function was assessed using 20-meter walk and chair stand testing. Sedentary behavior was identified by accelerometer activity counts/minute <100. The cross-sectional association between sedentary quartiles and physical function was examined by multiple linear regression adjusting for demographic factors (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education level), health factors (comorbidity, body mass index, knee pain, knee OA severity, presence of knee symptoms) and average daily MVPA minutes. Results Adults with knee OA spent 2/3 their daily time in sedentary behavior. The average gait speed among the most sedentary quartile was 3.88 feet/second, which was significantly slower than the speed of the less sedentary groups (4.23, 4.33, 4.33 feet/second, respectively). The average chair stand rate among the most sedentary group was significantly lower (25.9 stands/minute) than the rates of the less sedentary behavior groups (28.9, 29.1, 31.1 stands/minute, respectively). These trends remained significant in multivariable analyses adjusted for demographic factors, health factors and average daily MVPA minutes. Conclusion Being less sedentary was related to better physical function in adults with knee OA independent of MVPA time. These findings support guidelines to encourage adults with knee OA to decrease time spent in sedentary behavior in order to improve physical function. PMID:25155652

  11. Hearing Loss and Auditory Function in Sickle Cell Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch-Sims, G.P.; Matlock, V.R.

    2005-01-01

    Sickle cell disease was first reported in 1910 by J. Herrick, and since then, various associated conditions and complications have been described. Sickle cell disease is a hereditary disorder characterized by abnormality of the hemoglobin in the red blood cell. During periods of decreased oxygen tension in the red blood cell's environment, the…

  12. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of co...

  13. Leisure time physical activity and subsequent physical and mental health functioning among midlife Finnish, British and Japanese employees: a follow-up study in three occupational cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Jouni; Sabia, Séverine; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimäki, Mika; Tatsuse, Takashi; Yamada, Masaaki; Sekine, Michikazu; Lallukka, Tea

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine whether leisure time physical activity contributes to subsequent physical and mental health functioning among midlife employees. The associations were tested in three occupational cohorts from Finland, Britain and Japan. Design Cohort study. Setting Finland, Britain and Japan. Participants Prospective employee cohorts from the Finnish Helsinki Health Study (2000–2002 and 2007, n=5958), British Whitehall II study (1997–1999 and 2003–2004, n=4142) and Japanese Civil Servants Study (1998–1999 and 2003, n=1768) were used. Leisure time physical activity was classified into three groups: inactive, moderately active and vigorously active. Primary outcome measure Mean scores of physical and mental health functioning (SF-36) at follow-up were examined. Results Physical activity was associated with better subsequent physical health functioning in all three cohorts, however, with varying magnitude and some gender differences. Differences were the clearest among Finnish women (inactive: 46.0, vigorously active: 49.5) and men (inactive: 47.8, active vigorous: 51.1) and British women (inactive: 47.3, active vigorous: 50.4). In mental health functioning, the differences were generally smaller and not that clearly related to the intensity of physical activity. Emerging differences in health functioning were relatively small. Conclusions Vigorous physical activity was associated with better subsequent physical health functioning in all three cohorts with varying magnitude. For mental health functioning, the intensity of physical activity was less important. Promoting leisure time physical activity may prove useful for the maintenance of health functioning among midlife employees. PMID:26739736

  14. Fat Modulates the Relationship between Sarcopenia and Physical Function in Nonobese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Robin L.; Brixner, Diana I.; Ghate, Sameer; LaStayo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    It is intuitive to think that sarcopenia should be associated with declines in physical function though recent evidence questions this assertion. This study investigated the relationship between absolute and relative sarcopenia, with physical performance in 202 nonobese (mean BMI = 26.6 kg/ht2) community-dwelling older (mean age = 73.8 ± 5.9 years) adults. While absolute sarcopenia (appendicular skeletal mass (ASM)/ht2) was either not associated, or weakly associated with physical performance, relative sarcopenia (ASM/kg) demonstrated moderate (r = 0.31 to r = 0.51, P < 0.01) relationships with performance outcomes in both males and females. Knee extension strength (r = 0.27) and leg extension power (r = 0.41) were both related to absolute sarcopenia (P < 0.001) in females and not in males. Strength and power were associated with relative sarcopenia in both sexes (from r = 0.47 to r = 0.67, P < 0.001). The ratio of lean mass to total body mass, that is, relative sarcopenia, is an important consideration relative to physical function in older adults even in the absence of obesity. Stratifying these individuals into equal tertiles of total body fat revealed a trend of diminished regression coefficients across each incrementally higher fat grouping for performance measures, providing further evidence that total body fat modulates the relationship between sarcopenia and physical function. PMID:22312329

  15. EXTENDING THE FLOOR AND THE CEILING FOR ASSESSMENT OF PHYSICAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Fries, James F.; Lingala, Bharathi; Siemons, Liseth; Glas, Cees A. W.; Cella, David; Hussain, Yusra N; Bruce, Bonnie; Krishnan, Eswar

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of the current study was to improve the assessment of physical function by improving the precision of assessment at the floor (extremely poor function) and at the ceiling (extremely good health) of the health continuum. Methods Under the NIH PROMIS program, we developed new physical function floor and ceiling items to supplement the existing item bank. Using item response theory (IRT) and the standard PROMIS methodology, we developed 30 floor items and 26 ceiling items and administered them during a 12-month prospective observational study of 737 individuals at the extremes of health status. Change over time was compared across anchor instruments and across items by means of effect sizes. Using the observed changes in scores, we back-calculated sample size requirements for the new and comparison measures. Results We studied 444 subjects with chronic illness and/or extreme age, and 293 generally fit subjects including athletes in training. IRT analyses confirmed that the new floor and ceiling items outperformed reference items (p<0.001). The estimated post-hoc sample size requirements were reduced by a factor of two to four at the floor and a factor of two at the ceiling. Conclusion Extending the range of physical function measurement can substantially improve measurement quality, can reduce sample size requirements and improve research efficiency. The paradigm shift from Disability to Physical Function includes the entire spectrum of physical function, signals improvement in the conceptual base of outcome assessment, and may be transformative as medical goals more closely approach societal goals for health. PMID:24782194

  16. Association between APOE Genotype and Change in Physical Function in a Population-Based Swedish Cohort of Older Individuals Followed Over Four Years

    PubMed Central

    Skoog, Ingmar; Hörder, Helena; Frändin, Kerstin; Johansson, Lena; Östling, Svante; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Zettergren, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The association between decline in physical function and age-related conditions, such as reduced cognitive performance and vascular disease, may be explained by genetic influence on shared biological pathways of importance for aging. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is well-known for its association with Alzheimer’s disease, but has also been related to other disorders of importance for aging. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between APOE allele status and physical function in a population-based longitudinal study of older individuals. In 2005, at the age of 75, 622 individuals underwent neuropsychiatric and physical examinations, including tests of physical function, and APOE-genotyping. Follow-up examinations were performed at age 79. A significantly larger decline in grip strength (p = 0.015) between age 75 and 79 was found when comparing APOE 𝜀4 allele carriers with non-carriers [10.3 (±10.8) kg versus 7.8 (±10.1) kg]. No association was seen with decline in gait speed, chair-stand, or balance. The association with grip strength remained after correction for cognitive and educational level, depression, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and BMI. PMID:27757080

  17. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint. PMID:27504021

  18. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint. PMID:27504021

  19. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint.

  20. Effects of Exercise on Physical and Mental Health, and Cognitive and Brain Functions in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Rimes, Ridson Rosa; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Manochio, João; Paes, Flávia; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Mura, Gioia; Wegner, Mirko; Budde, Henning; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Rocha, Joana; Tavares, João Manuel R S; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Exercise promotes several health benefits, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory improvements. It is believed that the practice of exercise in individuals with psychiatric disorders, e.g. schizophrenia, can cause significant changes. Schizophrenic patients have problematic lifestyle habits compared with general population; this may cause a high mortality rate, mainly caused by cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate changes in physical and mental health, cognitive and brain functioning due to the practice of exercise in patients with schizophrenia. Although still little is known about the benefits of exercise on mental health, cognitive and brain functioning of schizophrenic patients, exercise training has been shown to be a beneficial intervention in the control and reduction of disease severity. Type of training, form of execution, duration and intensity need to be better studied as the effects on physical and mental health, cognition and brain activity depend exclusively of interconnected factors, such as the combination of exercise and medication. However, one should understand that exercise is not only an effective nondrug alternative, but also acts as a supporting linking up interventions to promote improvements in process performance optimization. In general, the positive effects on mental health, cognition and brain activity as a result of an exercise program are quite evident. Few studies have been published correlating effects of exercise in patients with schizophrenia, but there is increasing evidence that positive and negative symptoms can be improved. Therefore, it is important that further studies be undertaken to expand the knowledge of physical exercise on mental health in people with schizophrenia, as well as its dose-response and the most effective type of exercise. PMID:26556069

  1. Effects of Exercise on Physical and Mental Health, and Cognitive and Brain Functions in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Rimes, Ridson Rosa; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Manochio, João; Paes, Flávia; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Mura, Gioia; Wegner, Mirko; Budde, Henning; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Rocha, Joana; Tavares, João Manuel R S; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Exercise promotes several health benefits, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory improvements. It is believed that the practice of exercise in individuals with psychiatric disorders, e.g. schizophrenia, can cause significant changes. Schizophrenic patients have problematic lifestyle habits compared with general population; this may cause a high mortality rate, mainly caused by cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate changes in physical and mental health, cognitive and brain functioning due to the practice of exercise in patients with schizophrenia. Although still little is known about the benefits of exercise on mental health, cognitive and brain functioning of schizophrenic patients, exercise training has been shown to be a beneficial intervention in the control and reduction of disease severity. Type of training, form of execution, duration and intensity need to be better studied as the effects on physical and mental health, cognition and brain activity depend exclusively of interconnected factors, such as the combination of exercise and medication. However, one should understand that exercise is not only an effective nondrug alternative, but also acts as a supporting linking up interventions to promote improvements in process performance optimization. In general, the positive effects on mental health, cognition and brain activity as a result of an exercise program are quite evident. Few studies have been published correlating effects of exercise in patients with schizophrenia, but there is increasing evidence that positive and negative symptoms can be improved. Therefore, it is important that further studies be undertaken to expand the knowledge of physical exercise on mental health in people with schizophrenia, as well as its dose-response and the most effective type of exercise.

  2. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes themmore » useful for physics simulations in many fields.« less

  3. GENASIS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-11-01

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual 'unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. These classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GENASIS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  4. GENASIS   Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-11-01

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual 'unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. These classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GENASIS  (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  5. GenASiS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-06-11

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual `unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. Lastly, these classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  6. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  7. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  8. Utility of Consumer Physical Activity Trackers as an Intervention Tool in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Amanda M; Freedson, Patty S

    2016-01-01

    Consumer activity trackers have grown in popularity over the last few years. These devices are typically worn on the hip or wrist and provide the user with information about physical activity measures such as steps taken, energy expenditure, and time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity. The consumer may also use the computer interface (e.g. device websites, smartphone applications) to monitor and track achievement of PA goals and compete with other users. This review will describe some of the most popular consumer devices and discuss the user feedback tools. We will also present the limited evidence available about the accuracy of these devices and highlight how they have been used in cardiovascular disease management. We conclude with some recommendations for future research, focusing on how consumer devices might be used to assess effectiveness of various cardiovascular treatments.

  9. "Exercise is Medicine": curbing the burden of chronic disease and physical inactivity.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Jeff S; Law, Jen; Lancashire, Bill; Fassett, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    An exercise program designed to improve fitness is essential for most adults. Exercise decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, depression, and anxiety. Most fail to achieve recommended exercise levels. Only 1.3% of Australian general practice (GP) consultations provide exercise counseling and advice. Australia provides Medicare reimbursement for consultations with Accredited Exercise Physiologists through allied health care plans initiated through primary care. Exercise Is Medicine is an initiative to equip primary care providers with resources, education, and strategies to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. The objective of Exercise Is Medicine is to improve the health and well-being of our nation. We describe Exercise Is Medicine and encourage primary care providers to discuss physical activity and exercise with their patients and provide them with resources to encourage this activity and referral pathways to train exercise professionals. This will assist primary care providers in treating their patients.

  10. Functional role of apoptosis in oral diseases: An update

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Akansha; Rai, Shalu; Misra, Deepankar

    2016-01-01

    Cell death appears to be a basic biological phenomenon which is maintained by the human body. The term apoptosis, also known as programmed cell death, is characterized by several unique morphological and biochemical features. Apoptosis and its different forms are essential for tissue homeostasis. Alteration in molecular mechanisms involved in apoptotic signaling contributes to a vast range of oral diseases. An understanding of the regulation of apoptosis has led to the development of many therapeutic approaches and better management of oral diseases. The review updates us the correlation between apoptosis in normal oral tissues and oral diseases. PMID:27721616

  11. Emerging role of autophagy in kidney function, diseases and aging.

    PubMed

    Huber, Tobias B; Edelstein, Charles L; Hartleben, Björn; Inoki, Ken; Jiang, Man; Koya, Daisuke; Kume, Shinji; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Pallet, Nicolas; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Susztak, Katalin; Yoshida, Sei; Dong, Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy plays a critical role in kidney maintenance, diseases and aging. Ischemic, toxic, immunological, and oxidative insults can cause an induction of autophagy in renal epithelial cells modifying the course of various kidney diseases. This review summarizes recent insights on the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and diseases alluding to possible novel intervention strategies for treating specific kidney disorders by modifying autophagy. PMID:22692002

  12. Subliminal strengthening: improving older individuals' physical function over time with an implicit-age-stereotype intervention.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Pilver, Corey; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    Negative age stereotypes that older individuals assimilate from their culture predict detrimental outcomes, including worse physical function. We examined, for the first time, whether positive age stereotypes, presented subliminally across multiple sessions in the community, would lead to improved outcomes. Each of 100 older individuals (age=61-99 years, M=81) was randomly assigned to an implicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, an explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, a combined implicit- and explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, or a control group. Interventions occurred at four 1-week intervals. The implicit intervention strengthened positive age stereotypes, which strengthened positive self-perceptions of aging, which, in turn, improved physical function. The improvement in these outcomes continued for 3 weeks after the last intervention session. Further, negative age stereotypes and negative self-perceptions of aging were weakened. For all outcomes, the implicit intervention's impact was greater than the explicit intervention's impact. The physical-function effect of the implicit intervention surpassed a previous study's 6-month-exercise-intervention's effect with participants of similar ages. The current study's findings demonstrate the potential of directing implicit processes toward physical-function enhancement over time. PMID:25326508

  13. Subliminal strengthening: improving older individuals' physical function over time with an implicit-age-stereotype intervention.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Pilver, Corey; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    Negative age stereotypes that older individuals assimilate from their culture predict detrimental outcomes, including worse physical function. We examined, for the first time, whether positive age stereotypes, presented subliminally across multiple sessions in the community, would lead to improved outcomes. Each of 100 older individuals (age=61-99 years, M=81) was randomly assigned to an implicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, an explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, a combined implicit- and explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, or a control group. Interventions occurred at four 1-week intervals. The implicit intervention strengthened positive age stereotypes, which strengthened positive self-perceptions of aging, which, in turn, improved physical function. The improvement in these outcomes continued for 3 weeks after the last intervention session. Further, negative age stereotypes and negative self-perceptions of aging were weakened. For all outcomes, the implicit intervention's impact was greater than the explicit intervention's impact. The physical-function effect of the implicit intervention surpassed a previous study's 6-month-exercise-intervention's effect with participants of similar ages. The current study's findings demonstrate the potential of directing implicit processes toward physical-function enhancement over time.

  14. A Functional Analysis of Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Tracy A.; Normand, Matthew P.; Morley, Allison J.; Miller, Bryon G.

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate physical activity increases the risks related to a number of health problems in children, most notably obesity and the corresponding range of associated health problems. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a functional analysis to investigate the effects of several consequent variables on moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  15. Residential Modifications and Decline in Physical Function among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Sze Y.; Lapane, Kate L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of residential modification on decreasing risk of physical function decline in 2 years. Design: Cohort study using propensity scores method to control for baseline differences between individuals with residential modifications and those without residential modifications. Participants:…