Science.gov

Sample records for physical modeling improvements

  1. Improving the physics models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Fang, F.; Frazin, R. A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Manchester, W. B.; Meng, X.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Vichare, G.; Yigit, E.; Yu, Y.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. H.; Glocer, A.; Jordanova, V. K.; Welling, D. T.; Zaharia, S. G.

    2010-12-01

    The success of physics based space weather forecasting depends on several factors: we need sufficient amount and quality of timely observational data, we have to understand the physics of the Sun-Earth system well enough, we need sophisticated computational models, and the models have to run faster than real time on the available computational resources. This presentation will focus on a single ingredient, the recent improvements of the mathematical and numerical models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework. We have developed a new physics based CME initiation code using flux emergence from the convection zone solving the equations of radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Our new lower corona and solar corona models use electron heat conduction, Alfven wave heating, and boundary conditions based on solar tomography. We can obtain a physically consistent solar wind model from the surface of the Sun all the way to the L1 point without artificially changing the polytropic index. The global magnetosphere model can now solve the multi-ion MHD equations and take into account the oxygen outflow from the polar wind model. We have also added the options of solving for Hall MHD and anisotropic pressure. Several new inner magnetosphere models have been added to the framework: CRCM, HEIDI and RAM-SCB. These new models resolve the pitch angle distribution of the trapped particles. The upper atmosphere model GITM has been improved by including a self-consistent equatorial electrodynamics and the effects of solar flares. This presentation will very briefly describe the developments and highlight some results obtained with the improved and new models.

  2. Problem solving based learning model with multiple representations to improve student's mental modelling ability on physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haili, Hasnawati; Maknun, Johar; Siahaan, Parsaoran

    2017-08-01

    Physics is a lessons that related to students' daily experience. Therefore, before the students studying in class formally, actually they have already have a visualization and prior knowledge about natural phenomenon and could wide it themselves. The learning process in class should be aimed to detect, process, construct, and use students' mental model. So, students' mental model agree with and builds in the right concept. The previous study held in MAN 1 Muna informs that in learning process the teacher did not pay attention students' mental model. As a consequence, the learning process has not tried to build students' mental modelling ability (MMA). The purpose of this study is to describe the improvement of students' MMA as a effect of problem solving based learning model with multiple representations approach. This study is pre experimental design with one group pre post. It is conducted in XI IPA MAN 1 Muna 2016/2017. Data collection uses problem solving test concept the kinetic theory of gasses and interview to get students' MMA. The result of this study is clarification students' MMA which is categorized in 3 category; High Mental Modelling Ability (H-MMA) for 7Modelling Ability (M-MMA) for 3< x ≤ 7 score, and Low Mental Modelling Ability (L-MMA) for 0 ≤ x ≤ 3 score. The result shows that problem solving based learning model with multiple representations approach can be an alternative to be applied in improving students' MMA.

  3. Physics Students' Performance Using Computational Modelling Activities to Improve Kinematics Graphs Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Ives Solano; Veit, Eliane Angela; Moreira, Marco Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate students' performance while exposed to complementary computational modelling activities to improve physics learning, using the software "Modellus." Interpretation of kinematics graphs was the physics topic chosen for investigation. The theoretical framework adopted was based on Halloun's…

  4. Physics Students' Performance Using Computational Modelling Activities to Improve Kinematics Graphs Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Ives Solano; Veit, Eliane Angela; Moreira, Marco Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate students' performance while exposed to complementary computational modelling activities to improve physics learning, using the software "Modellus." Interpretation of kinematics graphs was the physics topic chosen for investigation. The theoretical framework adopted was based on Halloun's…

  5. Improved Characters and Student Learning Outcomes through Development of Character Education Based General Physics Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derlina; Sabani; Mihardi, Satria

    2015-01-01

    Education Research in Indonesia has begun to lead to the development of character education and is no longer fixated on the outcomes of cognitive learning. This study purposed to produce character education based general physics learning model (CEBGP Learning Model) and with valid, effective and practical peripheral devices to improve character…

  6. CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

  7. Improving the physics of a coupled physical biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic through data assimilation: Impact on the ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berline, Léo; Brankart, Jean-Michel; Brasseur, Pierre; Ourmières, Yann; Verron, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Several studies on coupled physical-biogeochemical models have shown that major deficiencies in the biogeochemical fields arise from the deficiencies in the physical flow fields. This paper examines the improvement of the physics through data assimilation, and the subsequent impact on the ecosystem response in a coupled model of the North Atlantic. Sea surface temperature and sea surface height data are assimilated with a sequential method based on the SEEK filter adapted to the coupling needs. The model domain covers the Atlantic from 20°S to 70°N at eddy-permitting resolution. The biogeochemical model is a NPZD-DOM model based on the P3ZD formulation. The results of an annual assimilated simulation are compared with an annual free simulation. With assimilation, the representation of the mixed layer depth is significantly improved in mid latitudes, even though the mixed layer depth is generally overestimated compared to the observations. The representation of the mean and variance of the currents is also significantly improved. The nutrient input in the euphotic zone is used to assess the data assimilation impact on the ecosystem. Data assimilation results in a 50% reduction of the input due to vertical mixing in mid-latitudes, and in a four- to six-fold increase of the advective fluxes in mid-latitudes and subtropics. Averaged zonally, the net impact is a threefold increase for the subtropical gyre, and a moderate (20-30%) decrease at mid and high latitudes. Surface chlorophyll concentration increases along the subtropical gyre borders, but little changes are detected at mid and high latitudes. An increase of the primary production appears along the Gulf Stream path, but it represents only 12% on average for mid and high latitudes. In the subtropical gyre centre, primary production is augmented but stays underestimated (20% of observations). These experiments show the benefits of physical data assimilation in coupled physical-biogeochemical applications.

  8. Toward Improving Water Supply Forecasts on the Carson River with a Physically Based Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Boyle, D. P.; Lamorey, G.; Bassett, S.; Coors, S.; Mann, M.

    2005-12-01

    Researchers at the Desert Research Institute and the USBR are conducting research aimed at improving water supply forecasts on the Carson River as part of the Water 2025 initiative. The primary goal of the effort is to improve short, seasonal, and long term streamflow forecasts through the use of a physically based hydrologic model (MMS-PRMS) coupled with an operational river routing model (Riverware). Streamflow from high-altitude headwater basins is simulated with MMS-PRMS model and routed with the Riverware model through the Carson valley where a number of ungauged agricultural diversions and returns complicate the real system. The water supply forecasts made with the coupled model are evaluated through comparison with forecasts made by the National Weather Service, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and historic streamflow using multiple objective measures

  9. Improving Physical Activity and Metabolic Syndrome Indicators in Women: A Transtheoretical Model-Based Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Ghofranipour, Fazllolah; Feizi, Awat; Pirzadeh, Asiyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed at investigating the impact of an educational intervention based on transtheoretical model to increase physical activity and improve metabolic syndrome indicators in women. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 142 women with metabolic syndrome were randomly assigned to the case and control group (each group 71 participants). SECQ (Marcus), processes of change (Marcus), decisional balance (Bandura) and self-efficacy (Nigg) questionnaires and International Physical Activities Standard Questionnaire in preintervention, 3 and 6 months after intervention were completed. Furthermore, abdominal obesity, triglycerides (TG), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were measured. Physical activity intervention based on transtheoretical model (TTM) was performed in the case group. Finally, data were analyzed by SPSS (16) (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) and repeated measure ANOVA, independent t-test and Freidman was used. A two-tailed P value, lower than 0.05, was considered to be statistically significant. Results: After the intervention, physical activity level increased in the intervention group, and they also progressed in stages of change, but the people in the control group had regressed. All changes in TTM constructs were significant in the intervention group during the time and differences in pros and cons were not significant in the control group. Abdominal obesity and TG has significantly reduced, and HDL has increased in the intervention group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in TGs and a decrease in HDL. Conclusions: Physical activity training based on TTM can improve physical activity and metabolic syndrome indicators in women. PMID:25949778

  10. Wind-US Code Physical Modeling Improvements to Complement Hypersonic Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Towne, Charles S.; Engblom, William A.; Bhagwandin, Vishal A.; Power, Greg D.; Lankford, Dennis W.; Nelson, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    This report gives an overview of physical modeling enhancements to the Wind-US flow solver which were made to improve the capabilities for simulation of hypersonic flows and the reliability of computations to complement hypersonic testing. The improvements include advanced turbulence models, a bypass transition model, a conjugate (or closely coupled to vehicle structure) conduction-convection heat transfer capability, and an upgraded high-speed combustion solver. A Mach 5 shock-wave boundary layer interaction problem is used to investigate the benefits of k- s and k-w based explicit algebraic stress turbulence models relative to linear two-equation models. The bypass transition model is validated using data from experiments for incompressible boundary layers and a Mach 7.9 cone flow. The conjugate heat transfer method is validated for a test case involving reacting H2-O2 rocket exhaust over cooled calorimeter panels. A dual-mode scramjet configuration is investigated using both a simplified 1-step kinetics mechanism and an 8-step mechanism. Additionally, variations in the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers are considered for this scramjet configuration.

  11. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  12. Improving Throughput of the ACME Climate Model by Parallel Splitting Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, P.; Taylor, M.

    2015-12-01

    If fluid dynamics and atmospheric physics parameterizations were computed in parallel, they could be calculated simultaneously on separate cores of a supercomputer. This would greatly increase model throughput for high-resolution simulations. Additionally, because atmospheric physics is embarrassingly parallel, more sophisticated physics parameterizations could be used without slowing simulations down by simply increasing the number of cores used. The downside to this approach is that it increases time-truncation error. In this presentation, we demonstrate that parallel splitting the ACME model and using a smaller timestep for physics results in faster, more accurate solutions.

  13. Towards more accurate wind and solar power prediction by improving NWP model physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrea; Köhler, Carmen; von Schumann, Jonas; Ritter, Bodo

    2014-05-01

    The growing importance and successive expansion of renewable energies raise new challenges for decision makers, economists, transmission system operators, scientists and many more. In this interdisciplinary field, the role of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) is to reduce the errors and provide an a priori estimate of remaining uncertainties associated with the large share of weather-dependent power sources. For this purpose it is essential to optimize NWP model forecasts with respect to those prognostic variables which are relevant for wind and solar power plants. An improved weather forecast serves as the basis for a sophisticated power forecasts. Consequently, a well-timed energy trading on the stock market, and electrical grid stability can be maintained. The German Weather Service (DWD) currently is involved with two projects concerning research in the field of renewable energy, namely ORKA*) and EWeLiNE**). Whereas the latter is in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute (IWES), the project ORKA is led by energy & meteo systems (emsys). Both cooperate with German transmission system operators. The goal of the projects is to improve wind and photovoltaic (PV) power forecasts by combining optimized NWP and enhanced power forecast models. In this context, the German Weather Service aims to improve its model system, including the ensemble forecasting system, by working on data assimilation, model physics and statistical post processing. This presentation is focused on the identification of critical weather situations and the associated errors in the German regional NWP model COSMO-DE. First steps leading to improved physical parameterization schemes within the NWP-model are presented. Wind mast measurements reaching up to 200 m height above ground are used for the estimation of the (NWP) wind forecast error at heights relevant for wind energy plants. One particular problem is the daily cycle in wind speed. The transition from stable stratification during

  14. Analysis of scheme interrelationships for model calibration and improvement using the Noah land surface model with multi-physics options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.; Park, S. K.; Choi, Y.; Myoung, B.

    2013-12-01

    As the importance of the land surface models (LSMs) has been increasingly magnified due to their pivotal role in the complete Earth environmental system, linking the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere, modeling accuracy at regional scales has been important to ensure better representations of increased land surface heterogeneities with the increase of spatial resolutions. However, every model has its own weaknesses induced by such problems as the reality of physical schemes by uncertain parameterizing methods and even structural unreality by simplified model designs. One of the major uncertainties is Interrelationships between implemented physical schemes and their impact on simulation accuracy. Using the new version of Noah land surface model with multi-physics option (Noah-MP) that enables to create various scheme combinations, we examined how each scheme in different scheme combinations contributes to better simulations and how their interrelationships vary with uncertain parameter changes. Targeting long term (5 year) monthly surface hydrology of Han River watershed in South Korea, we mainly explored the simulation accuracy of runoff and evapotranspiration, and additionally that of leaf area index in order to see the vegetation impact on surface water partitioning. The result indicates that the primary contributor for simulation accuracies were the schemes of surface heat exchange coefficient. These schemes are very sensitive to vegetation amount due to their different treatment of heat transfer between on bare and vegetated surface. Showing that further improvement through uncertain parameter calibration, this study also demonstrated that the combination of analyses of scheme interrelationships and parameter calibration promises improved model calibration. In addition, revealing remained uncertainty about the vegetation effect on surface energy and water partitioning, this study also showed that the scheme interrelationship analyses is useful for model

  15. Deep sea water improves exercise and inhibits oxidative stress in a physical fatigue mouse model

    PubMed Central

    FAN, HUIJIE; TAN, ZHANGBIN; HUA, YUE; HUANG, XIAOFANG; GAO, YITING; WU, YUTING; LIU, BIN; ZHOU, YINGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    Physical fatigue is extremely common and occurs daily, and is considered to be associated with oxidative stress. The diverse functions of deep sea water (DSW) have recently gained increasing attention. Previous studies have emphasized the anti-fatigue effect of DSW, but the intrinsic mechanism behind the effect remains to be elucidated. In the imprinting control region (ICR) mice model, DSW delayed the exhaustive swimming time. In addition, DSW decreased the area under the blood lactate (BLA) curve, which was associated with the area under the BLA curve of pre-swimming, post-swimming and post-rest. Furthermore, DSW reduced the basal levels of malondialdehyde and the post-swimming concentration of blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase after swimming, along with an increase in the normal level of antioxidant enzyme activity such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. However, no significant effect on body weight, hepatic glycogen and muscle glycogen was observed between any group. In conclusion, DSW can improve the athletic ability and alleviate physical fatigue of ICR mice. This effect is achieved by enhancing the antioxidant capacity. PMID:27284418

  16. Deep sea water improves exercise and inhibits oxidative stress in a physical fatigue mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huijie; Tan, Zhangbin; Hua, Yue; Huang, Xiaofang; Gao, Yiting; Wu, Yuting; Liu, Bin; Zhou, Yingchun

    2016-06-01

    Physical fatigue is extremely common and occurs daily, and is considered to be associated with oxidative stress. The diverse functions of deep sea water (DSW) have recently gained increasing attention. Previous studies have emphasized the anti-fatigue effect of DSW, but the intrinsic mechanism behind the effect remains to be elucidated. In the imprinting control region (ICR) mice model, DSW delayed the exhaustive swimming time. In addition, DSW decreased the area under the blood lactate (BLA) curve, which was associated with the area under the BLA curve of pre-swimming, post-swimming and post-rest. Furthermore, DSW reduced the basal levels of malondialdehyde and the post-swimming concentration of blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase after swimming, along with an increase in the normal level of antioxidant enzyme activity such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. However, no significant effect on body weight, hepatic glycogen and muscle glycogen was observed between any group. In conclusion, DSW can improve the athletic ability and alleviate physical fatigue of ICR mice. This effect is achieved by enhancing the antioxidant capacity.

  17. Improved Flood Prediction in an Urban Watershed Using a Physically-Based Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R.; Rees, P. L.; Bedient, P. B.; Vieux, B. E.

    2005-05-01

    A modeling strategy has been developed to improve the real-time forecasting of medium to large magnitude floods in an urban watershed, Brays Bayou (260 km2), in Houston, TX. Severe flooding of downstream areas of the watershed around the Texas Medical Center (TMC) has been an increasing problem over the past few decades, particularly during Tropical Storm (TS) Allison in June 2001. Since late 2003, the physically-based distributed hydraulic model, VfloTM, using a relatively coarse (122m) finite element grid, has been run alongside HEC-1 as an ensemble for real-time flood forecasting at strategic locations on the main channel. The models are driven by local NEXRAD L2 radar data. Both VfloTM and HEC-1 are incorporated into the Flood Alert System 2 (FAS2), which was developed for the TMC through Rice University. Both FAS2 and its predecessor FAS have done well in predicting the magnitude and timing of flooding. However, during TS Allison, stormwater in Harris Gully (20.7 km2) overflowed, resulting in millions of dollars in damages. In addition, the City of Houston is currently installing new stormwater conduits which will change the pattern of flow from Harris Gully to the larger Brays Bayou. The SWMM model has been applied to this subcatchment; however its long run-time precludes its use for real-time forecasting. It is intended to develop a more detailed VfloTM model of the smaller Harris Gully subcatchment to explore several questions, including: 1) in order to improve real-time forecasts further for the TMC, highly accurate quantitative precipitation estimate data at the spatial resolution relevant for urban areas (e.g. a city block) and a distributed hydrologic model of the same spatial resolution are necessary, 2) even in heavily urbanized areas, dependence on flood properties on a basin scale derives from the space-time scaling properties of rainfall, 3) urbanization, particularly in small (less than 100 km2) basins, alters traditional scaling theories of flood

  18. Applying Socioecological Model to Improve Women’s Physical Activity: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Hadi; Majlessi, Fershteh; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Sadeghi, Roya; Hasani Kabootarkhani, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A sedentary life without sufficient physical activity is recognized as a risk factor for various diseases, and a major modifiable risk factor for noncommunicable diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of intervention using socioecological model in promoting women’s physical activity in the city of Kerman, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double-blinded, controlled study, 360 women were studied at health and medical centers of Kerman. This educational intervention was based on socioecological model and conducted on 4 levels of personal, social, organizational, and political. Data collection tool included a researcher-made questionnaire based on constructs of socioecological model and the international physical activity inventory. Results: The results indicated insignificant differences between the two groups in terms of perceived social, physical, and political support and also with regard to level of physical activity before intervention. However after the intervention and according to independent t test, significant differences were observed between two groups in perceived social, physical, and political support and also level of physical activity (P < 0.001). Furthermore, mean values of the above terms increased in the intervention group. Conclusions: According to the results, interventions based on socioecological model can positively affect women’s physical activity. PMID:27247781

  19. Estimation of anisotropy parameters for shale based on an improved rock physics model, part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiang-yang; Qian, Keran

    2017-02-01

    Shale is observed to have strong transverse isotropy due to its complex intrinsic properties on a small scale. An improved rock physics model has been developed to effectively model this intrinsic anisotropy. Several effective medium theories (Backus averaging, differential effective medium theory and self-consistent approximation) are validated and used in different steps of the workflow to simulate the effects of clay minerals, crack-like pores, kerogen and their preferred orientation on the elastic anisotropy. Anisotropic solid clay is constructed by using different clay mineral constituents instead of assuming it to be an equivalent isotropic or transversely isotropic medium. We differentiate between the voids associated with clay and the voids associated with other minerals based on their varied geometries and their different contributions to the anisotropy. The degree of alignment of clay particles, interconnected pore fluid and kerogen has a great influence on the elastic properties of shale. Therefore, in addition to the pore aspect ratio (asp), a new parameter called the lamination index (LI) related to the distribution of clay particle orientation is proposed and needs to be estimated during the modeling. We then present a practical inversion scheme to enable the prediction of anisotropy parameters for both vertical and horizontal well logs by estimating the lamination index and the pore aspect ratio simultaneously. The predicted elastic constants are demonstrated by using the published laboratory measurements of some Greenhorn shale, and they show better accuracy than the estimations in the existing literature. This model takes different rock properties into consideration and is thus generalized for shale formations from different areas. The application of this model to the well logs of some Upper Triassic shale in the Sichuan basin, and the analyzed results, are presented in part 2 of this paper.

  20. Simulated colonoscopy training using a low-cost physical model improves responsiveness of surgery interns.

    PubMed

    Buscaglia, J M; Fakhoury, J; Loyal, J; Denoya, P I; Kazi, E; Stein, S A; Scriven, R; Bergamaschi, R

    2015-06-01

    Surgery residents are required to become proficient in colonoscopy before completing training. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of surgery interns to simulated colonoscopy training. Interns, defined as postgraduate year 1 residents without exposure to endoscopy, underwent training in a physical model including colonoscopy, synthetic anatomy trays with luminal tattoos and a hybrid simulator. After baseline testing and mentored training, final testing was performed using five predetermined proficiency criteria. Content-valid metrics defined by the extent of departure from clinical reality were evaluated by two blinded assessors. Responsiveness was defined as change in performance over time and assessed comparing baseline testing with nonmentored final testing. Twelve interns (eight male, mean age 26, 80% right-handed) performed 48 colonoscopies each over 1 year. Improvement was seen in the overall procedure time (24 min 46 s vs 20 min 54 s; P = 0.03), passing the splenic flexure (20 min 33 s vs 10 min 45 s; P = 0.007), passing the hepatic flexure (23 min 31 s vs 12 min 45 s; P = 0.003), caecal intubation time (23 min 38 s vs 13 min 26 s; P = 0.008), the duration of loss of view of the lumen (75% vs 8.3%; P = 0.023), incomplete colonoscopy (100% vs 33.3%; P = 0.042), colonoscope withdrawal < 6 min (16.7% vs 8.3%; P = 0.052). Tattoo identification time (9 min 16 s vs 12 min 25 s; P = 0.50), colon looped time (2 min 12 s vs 1 min 45 s; P = 0.50) and rate of colon perforation (8.3% vs 8.3%; P = 1) remained unchanged. Interrater reliability was 1.0 for all measures. Simulated colonoscopy training in a low-cost physical model improved the performance of surgery interns with decreased procedure time, increased rates of complete colonoscopy and appropriate scope withdrawal. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Improvements of Physically-Based Hydrological Modelling using the ACRU Agro-Hydrological Modelling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, C. M. T.; Kienzle, S. W.; Xu, W.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The uncertainty of future water availability due to climate change in the Upper Oldman River Basin in Alberta, Canada, and downstream users is considered in this study. A changing climate can significantly perturb hydrological response within a region, thereby affecting the available water resources within southern Alberta. The ACRU agro-hydrological modelling system is applied to simulate historical (1950-2010) and future (2041-2070) streamflows and volumes of a major irrigation reservoir. Like many highly complex, process-based distributed models, major limitations include the data availability and data quality at finer spatial resolutions. With the use of a scripting language, certain limitations can be greatly reduced. Three phases of the project will be emphasized. First, the assimilation of solar radiation, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed daily data into the Canadian 10KM daily climate data that contains daily precipitation, maximum and minimum temperature data for the period 1950-2010, so as to enable potential evapotranspiration calculations using the Penman-Monteith equation. Second, the downscaling of five regional climate model (RCM) data to match the 10KM spatial resolution was undertaken. Third, a total of 1722 hydrological response units (HRUs) were delineated within the 4403 km2 large upper Oldman River Basin. In all phases of model input data parameterization and calibration, the automation of known external procedures greatly decreased erroneous model inputs and increased the efficiency of validating the quality of input data to be used within the ACRU model.

  2. FAMULATUR PLUS - A successful model for improving students' physical examination skills?

    PubMed

    Jerg, Achim; Öchsner, Wolfgang; Traue, Harald; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Project description: Several studies have revealed insufficient physical examination skills among medical students, both with regard to the completeness of the physical examination and the accuracy of the techniques used. FAMULATUR PLUS was developed in response to these findings. As part of this practice-oriented instructional intervention, physical examination skills should be taught through examination seminars and problem-oriented learning approaches. In order to ensure practical relevance, all courses are integrated into a 30-day clinical traineeship in the surgery or internal medicine department of a hospital (FAMULATUR PLUS). Research question: Does participation in the FAMULATUR PLUS project lead to a more optimistic self-assessment of examination skills and/or improved performance of the physical examination? Methodology: A total of 49 medical students participated in the study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: enrollment in the clinical studies element of their degree program at the University of Ulm and completion of the university course in internal medicine examinations. Based on their personal preferences, students were assigned to either the intervention (surgery/internal medicine; n=24) or the control group (internal medicine; n=25). All students completed a self-assessment of their physical examination skills in the form of a questionnaire. However, practical examination skills were only assessed in the students in the intervention group. These students were asked to carry out a general physical examination of the simulation patient, which was recorded and evaluated in a standardized manner. In both instances, data collection was carried out prior to and after the intervention. Results: The scores arising from the student self-assessment in the intervention (IG) and control groups (CG) improves significantly in the pre-post comparison, with average scores increasing from 3.83 (±0.72; IG) and 3.54 (±0.37; CG) to 1.92 (±0

  3. FAMULATUR PLUS – A successful model for improving students' physical examination skills?

    PubMed Central

    Jerg, Achim; Öchsner, Wolfgang; Traue, Harald; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Project description: Several studies have revealed insufficient physical examination skills among medical students, both with regard to the completeness of the physical examination and the accuracy of the techniques used. FAMULATUR PLUS was developed in response to these findings. As part of this practice-oriented instructional intervention, physical examination skills should be taught through examination seminars and problem-oriented learning approaches. In order to ensure practical relevance, all courses are integrated into a 30-day clinical traineeship in the surgery or internal medicine department of a hospital (FAMULATUR PLUS). Research question: Does participation in the FAMULATUR PLUS project lead to a more optimistic self-assessment of examination skills and/or improved performance of the physical examination? Methodology: A total of 49 medical students participated in the study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: enrollment in the clinical studies element of their degree program at the University of Ulm and completion of the university course in internal medicine examinations. Based on their personal preferences, students were assigned to either the intervention (surgery/internal medicine; n=24) or the control group (internal medicine; n=25). All students completed a self-assessment of their physical examination skills in the form of a questionnaire. However, practical examination skills were only assessed in the students in the intervention group. These students were asked to carry out a general physical examination of the simulation patient, which was recorded and evaluated in a standardized manner. In both instances, data collection was carried out prior to and after the intervention. Results: The scores arising from the student self-assessment in the intervention (IG) and control groups (CG) improves significantly in the pre-post comparison, with average scores increasing from 3.83 (±0.72; IG) and 3.54 (±0.37; CG) to 1.92 (±0

  4. Modellus: Interactive computational modelling to improve teaching of physics in the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Rui G. M.; Neves, Maria C.; Teodoro, Vítor Duarte

    2013-07-01

    Many aspects of modern research and other professional activities in the geosciences require advanced knowledge about mathematical physics models and scientific computation methods and tools. In-depth meaningful learning of such knowledge skills is a difficult cognitive process which involves developing strong background knowledge of physics, mathematics and scientific computation appropriately contextualised in the geosciences themes. In this paper we describe an interactive engagement teaching approach that is based on Modellus, a freely available computer software system allowing (1) mathematical modelling ranging from explorative to expressive modelling, (2) the introduction of scientific computation without requiring the development of a working knowledge of programming and (3) the simultaneous manipulation and analysis of several different model representations, namely, tables, graphs and animations with interactive objects having properties defined in a visible and modifiable mathematical model. As examples of application, with insights for the development of other activities in a wide range of geosciences courses, we discuss a set of interactive computational modelling activities for introductory meteorology we have implemented in undergraduate university courses.

  5. Testing a path-analytic mediation model of how motivational enhancement physiotherapy improves physical functioning in pain patients.

    PubMed

    Cheing, Gladys; Vong, Sinfia; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Brooks, Jessica; Chan, Chetwyn

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a complex phenomenon not easily discerned from psychological, social, and environmental characteristics and is an oft cited barrier to return to work for people experiencing low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate a path-analytic mediation model to examine how motivational enhancement physiotherapy, which incorporates tenets of motivational interviewing, improves physical functioning of patients with chronic LBP. Seventy-six patients with chronic LBP were recruited from the outpatient physiotherapy department of a government hospital in Hong Kong. The re-specified path-analytic model fit the data very well, χ (2)(3, N = 76) = 3.86, p = .57; comparative fit index = 1.00; and the root mean square error of approximation = 0.00. Specifically, results indicated that (a) using motivational interviewing techniques in physiotherapy was associated with increased working alliance with patients, (b) working alliance increased patients' outcome expectancy and (c) greater outcome expectancy resulted in a reduction of subjective pain intensity and improvement in physical functioning. Change in pain intensity also directly influenced improvement in physical functioning. The effect of motivational enhancement therapy on physical functioning can be explained by social-cognitive factors such as motivation, outcome expectancy, and working alliance. The use of motivational interviewing techniques to increase outcome expectancy of patients and improve working alliance could further strengthen the impact of physiotherapy on rehabilitation outcomes of patients with chronic LBP.

  6. Multi-physics Modeling for Improving Li-Ion Battery Safety; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Yang, C.

    2015-04-21

    Battery performance, cost, and safety must be further improved for larger market share of HEVs/PEVs and penetration into the grid. Significant investment is being made to develop new materials, fine tune existing ones, improve cell and pack designs, and enhance manufacturing processes to increase performance, reduce cost, and make batteries safer. Modeling, simulation, and design tools can play an important role by providing insight on how to address issues, reducing the number of build-test-break prototypes, and accelerating the development cycle of generating products.

  7. An improved hindcast approach for evaluation and diagnosis of physical processes in global climate models

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, H. -Y.; Chuang, C. C.; Klein, S. A.; ...

    2015-11-06

    Here, we present an improved procedure of generating initial conditions (ICs) for climate model hindcast experiments with specified sea surface temperature and sea ice. The motivation is to minimize errors in the ICs and lead to a better evaluation of atmospheric parameterizations' performance in the hindcast mode. We apply state variables (horizontal velocities, temperature and specific humidity) from the operational analysis/reanalysis for the atmospheric initial states. Without a data assimilation system, we apply a two-step process to obtain other necessary variables to initialize both the atmospheric (e.g., aerosols and clouds) and land models (e.g., soil moisture). First, we nudge onlymore » the model horizontal velocities towards operational analysis/reanalysis values, given a 6-hour relaxation time scale, to obtain all necessary variables. Compared to the original strategy in which horizontal velocities, temperature and specific humidity are nudged, the revised approach produces a better representation of initial aerosols and cloud fields which are more consistent and closer to observations and model's preferred climatology. Second, we obtain land ICs from an offline land model simulation forced with observed precipitation, winds, and surface fluxes. This approach produces more realistic soil moisture in the land ICs. With this refined procedure, the simulated precipitation, clouds, radiation, and surface air temperature over land are improved in the Day 2 mean hindcasts. Following this procedure, we propose a “Core” integration suite which provides an easily repeatable test allowing model developers to rapidly assess the impacts of various parameterization changes on the fidelity of modelled cloud-associated processes relative to observations.« less

  8. An improved hindcast approach for evaluation and diagnosis of physical processes in global climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H. -Y.; Chuang, C. C.; Klein, S. A.; Lo, M. -H.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, S.; Zheng, X.; Ma, P. -L.; Zhang, Y.; Phillips, T. J.

    2015-11-06

    Here, we present an improved procedure of generating initial conditions (ICs) for climate model hindcast experiments with specified sea surface temperature and sea ice. The motivation is to minimize errors in the ICs and lead to a better evaluation of atmospheric parameterizations' performance in the hindcast mode. We apply state variables (horizontal velocities, temperature and specific humidity) from the operational analysis/reanalysis for the atmospheric initial states. Without a data assimilation system, we apply a two-step process to obtain other necessary variables to initialize both the atmospheric (e.g., aerosols and clouds) and land models (e.g., soil moisture). First, we nudge only the model horizontal velocities towards operational analysis/reanalysis values, given a 6-hour relaxation time scale, to obtain all necessary variables. Compared to the original strategy in which horizontal velocities, temperature and specific humidity are nudged, the revised approach produces a better representation of initial aerosols and cloud fields which are more consistent and closer to observations and model's preferred climatology. Second, we obtain land ICs from an offline land model simulation forced with observed precipitation, winds, and surface fluxes. This approach produces more realistic soil moisture in the land ICs. With this refined procedure, the simulated precipitation, clouds, radiation, and surface air temperature over land are improved in the Day 2 mean hindcasts. Following this procedure, we propose a “Core” integration suite which provides an easily repeatable test allowing model developers to rapidly assess the impacts of various parameterization changes on the fidelity of modelled cloud-associated processes relative to observations.

  9. Improving predictive power of physically based rainfall-induced shallow landslide models: a probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raia, S.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Baum, R. L.; Godt, J. W.; Guzzetti, F.

    2014-03-01

    runs obtained varying the input parameters are analyzed statistically, and compared to the original (deterministic) model output. The comparison suggests an improvement of the predictive power of the model of about 10% and 16% in two small test areas, that is, the Frontignano (Italy) and the Mukilteo (USA) areas. We discuss the computational requirements of TRIGRS-P to determine the potential use of the numerical model to forecast the spatial and temporal occurrence of rainfall-induced shallow landslides in very large areas, extending for several hundreds or thousands of square kilometers. Parallel execution of the code using a simple process distribution and the message passing interface (MPI) on multi-processor machines was successful, opening the possibly of testing the use of TRIGRS-P for the operational forecasting of rainfall-induced shallow landslides over large regions.

  10. Improving predictive power of physically based rainfall-induced shallow landslide models: a probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raia, S.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Baum, R. L.; Godt, J. W.; Guzzetti, F.

    2013-02-01

    are analyzed statistically, and compared to the original (deterministic) model output. The comparison suggests an improvement of the predictive power of the model of about 10% and 16% in two small test areas, i.e. the Frontignano (Italy) and the Mukilteo (USA) areas, respectively. We discuss the computational requirements of TRIGRS-P to determine the potential use of the numerical model to forecast the spatial and temporal occurrence of rainfall-induced shallow landslides in very large areas, extending for several hundreds or thousands of square kilometers. Parallel execution of the code using a simple process distribution and the Message Passing Interface (MPI) on multi-processor machines was successful, opening the possibly of testing the use of TRIGRS-P for the operational forecasting of rainfall-induced shallow landslides over large regions.

  11. Improving predictive power of physically based rainfall-induced shallow landslide models: a probablistic approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raia, S.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Baum, R.L.; Godt, J.W.; Guzzetti, F.

    2013-01-01

    are analyzed statistically, and compared to the original (deterministic) model output. The comparison suggests an improvement of the predictive power of the model of about 10% and 16% in two small test areas, i.e. the Frontignano (Italy) and the Mukilteo (USA) areas, respectively. We discuss the computational requirements of TRIGRS-P to determine the potential use of the numerical model to forecast the spatial and temporal occurrence of rainfall-induced shallow landslides in very large areas, extending for several hundreds or thousands of square kilometers. Parallel execution of the code using a simple process distribution and the Message Passing Interface (MPI) on multi-processor machines was successful, opening the possibly of testing the use of TRIGRS-P for the operational forecasting of rainfall-induced shallow landslides over large regions.

  12. Improved constraint on magmatic systems from geodetic and other data using physics-based eruption models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Segall, P.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of ground deformation at volcanoes can be used with simple kinematic models of idealized magma chambers to place valuable constraints on the location, depth, volume change history, and possibly shape of volcanic source reservoirs, but cannot generally be used to estimate their total volume or the properties of the melt in the chamber (including pressure). Analysis of gas emissions, lava dome growth, and the petrology of extruded rock can provide constraints on melt properties and possibly chamber volume, but considered independently, these observations can paint only an incomplete picture of the volcanic system. We argue that a physics-based model of a volcanic eruption can link realistic magmatic processes with diverse time-evolving observations, and thereby make it possible to use all available information simultaneously to place better constraints on properties of the magmatic system than is possible by considering each independently. We have developed a model of an effusive silicic volcanic eruption that is capable of predicting time-evolving pressures, volatile concentrations, and other properties of melt in the chamber and conduit, and from which observations of ground deformation and lava dome extrusion may be calculated. A Bayesian inverse formulation allows for the incorporation of additional information into the problem and generates probabilistic estimates for model parameters. We have applied the technique to the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), constraining model parameters using geodetic and extrusive flux time series, as well as independent estimates of chamber pressure (from plagioclase equilibration data) and dissolved water concentration (derived from gas emissions). In contrast to more traditional inversions using only geodetic data and kinematic forward models, we are able to provide constraint on the absolute volume of the magma chamber, properties of the melt including its compressibility and volatile content, and

  13. Improving Advanced High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spital, Robin David

    2003-04-01

    A National Research Council study committee recently commissioned a "Physics Panel" to evaluate and make recommendations for improving advanced physics education in American high schools [1]. The Physics Panel recommends the creation of a nationally standardized Newtonian Mechanics Unit that would form the foundation of all advanced physics programs. In a one-year program, the Panel recommends that advanced physics students study at most one other major area of physics, so that sufficient time is available to develop the deep conceptual understanding that is the primary goal of advanced study. The Panel emphasizes that final assessments must be improved to focus on depth of understanding, rather than technical problem-solving skill. The Physics Panel strongly endorses the inclusion of meaningful real-world experiences in advanced physics programs, but believes that traditional "cook-book" laboratory exercises are not worth the enormous amount of time and effort spent on them. The Physics Panel believes that the talent and preparation of teachers are the most important ingredients in effective physics instruction; it therefore calls for a concerted effort by all parts of the physics community to remedy the desperate shortage of highly qualified teachers. [1] Jerry P. Gollub and Robin Spital, "Advanced Physics in the High Schools", Physics Today, May 2002.

  14. Physics Lectures and Laboratories. A Model To Improve Preservice Elementary Science Teacher Development. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresser, Miles

    A group of scientists and science educators has developed and pilot tested an integrated physical science program designed for preservice elementary school teachers. This document includes the syllabus and class materials for the Physics block of the physical science courses developed by the group. Included are diagrams, lecture notes, homework…

  15. Towards a More Accurate Solar Power Forecast By Improving NWP Model Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, C.; Lee, D.; Steiner, A.; Ritter, B.

    2014-12-01

    The growing importance and successive expansion of renewable energies raise new challenges for decision makers, transmission system operators, scientists and many more. In this interdisciplinary field, the role of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) is to reduce the uncertainties associated with the large share of weather-dependent power sources. Precise power forecast, well-timed energy trading on the stock market, and electrical grid stability can be maintained. The research project EWeLiNE is a collaboration of the German Weather Service (DWD), the Fraunhofer Institute (IWES) and three German transmission system operators (TSOs). Together, wind and photovoltaic (PV) power forecasts shall be improved by combining optimized NWP and enhanced power forecast models. The conducted work focuses on the identification of critical weather situations and the associated errors in the German regional NWP model COSMO-DE. Not only the representation of the model cloud characteristics, but also special events like Sahara dust over Germany and the solar eclipse in 2015 are treated and their effect on solar power accounted for. An overview of the EWeLiNE project and results of the ongoing research will be presented.

  16. Development Status of the PEBBLES Code for Pebble Mechanics: Improved Physical Models and Speed-up

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2009-12-01

    PEBBLES is a code for simulating the motion of all the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. Since pebble bed reactors are packed randomly and not precisely placed, the location of the fuel elements in the reactor is not deterministically known. Instead, when determining operating parameters the motion of the pebbles can be simulated and stochastic locations can be found. The PEBBLES code can output information relevant for other simulations of the pebble bed reactors such as the positions of the pebbles in the reactor, packing fraction change in an earthquake, and velocity profiles created by recirculation. The goal for this level three milestone was to speedup the PEBBLES code through implementation on massively parallel computer. Work on this goal has resulted in speeding up both the single processor version and creation of a new parallel version of PEBBLES. Both the single processor version and the parallel running capability of the PEBBLES code have improved since the fiscal year start. The hybrid MPI/OpenMP PEBBLES version was created this year to run on the increasingly common cluster hardware profile that combines nodes with multiple processors that share memory and a cluster of nodes that are networked together. The OpenMP portions use the Open Multi-Processing shared memory parallel processing model to split the task across processors in a single node that shares memory. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) portion uses messages to communicate between different nodes over a network. The following are wall clock speed up for simulating an NGNP-600 sized reactor. The single processor version runs 1.5 times faster compared to the single processor version at the beginning of the fiscal year. This speedup is primarily due to the improved static friction model described in the report. When running on 64 processors, the new MPI/OpenMP hybrid version has a wall clock speed up of 22 times compared to the current single processor version. When using 88 processors, a

  17. Development Status of the PEBBLES Code for Pebble Mechanics: Improved Physical Models and Speed-up

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2009-09-01

    PEBBLES is a code for simulating the motion of all the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. Since pebble bed reactors are packed randomly and not precisely placed, the location of the fuel elements in the reactor is not deterministically known. Instead, when determining operating parameters the motion of the pebbles can be simulated and stochastic locations can be found. The PEBBLES code can output information relevant for other simulations of the pebble bed reactors such as the positions of the pebbles in the reactor, packing fraction change in an earthquake, and velocity profiles created by recirculation. The goal for this level three milestone was to speedup the PEBBLES code through implementation on massively parallel computer. Work on this goal has resulted in speeding up both the single processor version and creation of a new parallel version of PEBBLES. Both the single processor version and the parallel running capability of the PEBBLES code have improved since the fiscal year start. The hybrid MPI/OpenMP PEBBLES version was created this year to run on the increasingly common cluster hardware profile that combines nodes with multiple processors that share memory and a cluster of nodes that are networked together. The OpenMP portions use the Open Multi-Processing shared memory parallel processing model to split the task across processors in a single node that shares memory. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) portion uses messages to communicate between different nodes over a network. The following are wall clock speed up for simulating an NGNP-600 sized reactor. The single processor version runs 1.5 times faster compared to the single processor version at the beginning of the fiscal year. This speedup is primarily due to the improved static friction model described in the report. When running on 64 processors, the new MPI/OpenMP hybrid version has a wall clock speed up of 22 times compared to the current single processor version. When using 88 processors, a

  18. Improving doctor-patient communication: content validity examination of a novel urinary system-simulating physical model.

    PubMed

    Hu, WenGang; Song, YaJun; Zhong, Xiao; Feng, JiaYu; Wang, PingXian; Huang, ChiBing

    2016-01-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication is essential for establishing a successful doctor-patient relationship and implementing high-quality health care. In this study, a novel urinary system-simulating physical model was designed and fabricated, and its content validity for improving doctor-patient communication was examined by conducting a randomized controlled trial in which this system was compared with photographs. A total of 240 inpatients were randomly selected and assigned to six doctors for treatment. After primary diagnosis and treatment had been determined, these patients were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group. Patients in the experimental group participated in model-based doctor-patient communication, whereas control group patients received picture-based communication. Within 30 min after this communication, a Demographic Information Survey Scale and a Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS) were distributed to investigate patients' demographic characteristics and their assessments of total satisfaction, distress relief, communication comfort, rapport, and compliance intent. The study results demonstrated that the individual groups were comparable with respect to demographic variables but that relative to patients in the picture-based communication group, patients in the model-based communication group had significantly higher total satisfaction scores and higher ratings for distress relief, communication comfort, rapport, and compliance intent. These results indicate that the physical model is more effective than the pictures at improving doctor-patient communication and patient outcomes. The application of the physical model in doctor-patient communication is helpful and valuable and therefore merits widespread clinical popularization.

  19. Improving doctor–patient communication: content validity examination of a novel urinary system-simulating physical model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, WenGang; Song, YaJun; Zhong, Xiao; Feng, JiaYu; Wang, PingXian; Huang, ChiBing

    2016-01-01

    Effective doctor–patient communication is essential for establishing a successful doctor–patient relationship and implementing high-quality health care. In this study, a novel urinary system-simulating physical model was designed and fabricated, and its content validity for improving doctor–patient communication was examined by conducting a randomized controlled trial in which this system was compared with photographs. A total of 240 inpatients were randomly selected and assigned to six doctors for treatment. After primary diagnosis and treatment had been determined, these patients were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group. Patients in the experimental group participated in model-based doctor–patient communication, whereas control group patients received picture-based communication. Within 30 min after this communication, a Demographic Information Survey Scale and a Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS) were distributed to investigate patients’ demographic characteristics and their assessments of total satisfaction, distress relief, communication comfort, rapport, and compliance intent. The study results demonstrated that the individual groups were comparable with respect to demographic variables but that relative to patients in the picture-based communication group, patients in the model-based communication group had significantly higher total satisfaction scores and higher ratings for distress relief, communication comfort, rapport, and compliance intent. These results indicate that the physical model is more effective than the pictures at improving doctor–patient communication and patient outcomes. The application of the physical model in doctor–patient communication is helpful and valuable and therefore merits widespread clinical popularization. PMID:28008237

  20. Investigation for improving Global Positioning System (GPS) orbits using a discrete sequential estimator and stochastic models of selected physical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, Clyde C.; Chadwell, C. David

    1993-01-01

    GEODYNII is a conventional batch least-squares differential corrector computer program with deterministic models of the physical environment. Conventional algorithms were used to process differenced phase and pseudorange data to determine eight-day Global Positioning system (GPS) orbits with several meter accuracy. However, random physical processes drive the errors whose magnitudes prevent improving the GPS orbit accuracy. To improve the orbit accuracy, these random processes should be modeled stochastically. The conventional batch least-squares algorithm cannot accommodate stochastic models, only a stochastic estimation algorithm is suitable, such as a sequential filter/smoother. Also, GEODYNII cannot currently model the correlation among data values. Differenced pseudorange, and especially differenced phase, are precise data types that can be used to improve the GPS orbit precision. To overcome these limitations and improve the accuracy of GPS orbits computed using GEODYNII, we proposed to develop a sequential stochastic filter/smoother processor by using GEODYNII as a type of trajectory preprocessor. Our proposed processor is now completed. It contains a correlated double difference range processing capability, first order Gauss Markov models for the solar radiation pressure scale coefficient and y-bias acceleration, and a random walk model for the tropospheric refraction correction. The development approach was to interface the standard GEODYNII output files (measurement partials and variationals) with software modules containing the stochastic estimator, the stochastic models, and a double differenced phase range processing routine. Thus, no modifications to the original GEODYNII software were required. A schematic of the development is shown. The observational data are edited in the preprocessor and the data are passed to GEODYNII as one of its standard data types. A reference orbit is determined using GEODYNII as a batch least-squares processor and the

  1. Improving physics education in radiology.

    PubMed

    Hendee, William R

    2007-08-01

    Concern is growing that the physics education of radiologists is flawed and that without knowledge of physics principles and applications, mastery of the technology of medical imaging is impaired. Furthermore, it is proposed that a mastery of imaging technology is necessary to perfect the clinical acumen of radiologists and to preserve the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of imaging procedures. These issues were the focus of a multiorganizational educational summit on physics education of radiologists held in January 2006 in Atlanta. Recommendations for improving the physics education and knowledge of radiologists that evolved from this summit are presented here, together with progress made to date on their fulfillment.

  2. Improving Regional Climate Modeling of the North American Monsoon Through Physically Consistent Bias Corrected CCSM4 Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Jin, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to simulate a 32-year climatology of the North American Monsoon (NAM) using forcing data provided by 1) the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), and 2) the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM). Systematic biases in the CCSM output such as significant dry biases in the tropics are transmitted into the WRF model through the lateral boundary conditions and degrade the performance of the model when compared to both observations and simulations forced with the CFSR dataset. To improve the ability of CCSM output to appropriately prescribe the NAM, we introduce a process using simple linear regression and the CFSR dataset to perform a mean bias correction that also maintains the physical dependencies across variables. A third NAM climatology was simulated using this bias corrected CCSM output, which showed marked improvement to the NAM precipitation, most notably in the Mexican core of the NAM. Additionally, the climatology of NAM evolutionary characteristics (i.e. onset, intensity, decay) are much better represented in the bias corrected CCSM WRF model than in the original CCSM WRF model, and closely resemble the CFSR simulations. NAM precipitation simulated by each of the three forcing datasets show the bias corrected CCSM simulations produce the most consistent trends when compared to observations, providing confidence for future projections of the NAM.

  3. Physical properties of particulate matter from animal houses-empirical studies to improve emission modelling.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ehab; Nannen, Christoph; Henseler, Jessica; Diekmann, Bernd; Gates, Richard; Buescher, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Maintaining and preserving the environment from pollutants are of utmost importance. Particulate matter (PM) is considered one of the main air pollutants. In addition to the harmful effects of PM in the environment, it has also a negative indoor impact on human and animal health. The specific forms of damage of particulate emission from livestock buildings depend on its physical properties. The physical properties of particulates from livestock facilities are largely unknown. Most studies assume the livestock particles to be spherical with a constant density which can result in biased estimations, leading to inaccurate results and errors in the calculation of particle mass concentration in livestock buildings. The physical properties of PM, including difference in density as a function of particle size and shape, can have a significant impact on the predictions of particles' behaviour. The aim of this research was to characterize the physical properties of PM from different animal houses and consequently determine PM mass concentration. The mean densities of collected PM from laying hens, dairy cows and pig barns were 1450, 1520 and 2030 kg m(-3), respectively, whilst the mass factors were 2.17 × 10(-3), 2.18 × 10(-3) and 5.36 × 10(-3) μm, respectively. The highest mass concentration was observed in pig barns generally followed by laying hen barns, and the lowest concentration was in dairy cow buildings. Results are presented in such a way that they can be used in subsequent research for simulation purposes and to form the basis for a data set of PM physical properties.

  4. Improvement of Spatial Ability Using Innovative Tools: Alternative View Screen and Physical Model Rotator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Brad L.; Towle, Erick; Onyancha, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial ability, which is positively correlated with retention and achievement in engineering, mathematics, and science disciplines, has been shown to improve over the course of a Computer-Aided Design course or through targeted training. However, which type of training provides the most beneficial improvements to spatial ability and whether other…

  5. Improvement of Spatial Ability Using Innovative Tools: Alternative View Screen and Physical Model Rotator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Brad L.; Towle, Erick; Onyancha, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial ability, which is positively correlated with retention and achievement in engineering, mathematics, and science disciplines, has been shown to improve over the course of a Computer-Aided Design course or through targeted training. However, which type of training provides the most beneficial improvements to spatial ability and whether other…

  6. Improving the Physical Realism and Structural Accuracy of Protein Models by a Two-Step Atomic-Level Energy Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Most protein structural prediction algorithms assemble structures as reduced models that represent amino acids by a reduced number of atoms to speed up the conformational search. Building accurate full-atom models from these reduced models is a necessary step toward a detailed function analysis. However, it is difficult to ensure that the atomic models retain the desired global topology while maintaining a sound local atomic geometry because the reduced models often have unphysical local distortions. To address this issue, we developed a new program, called ModRefiner, to construct and refine protein structures from Cα traces based on a two-step, atomic-level energy minimization. The main-chain structures are first constructed from initial Cα traces and the side-chain rotamers are then refined together with the backbone atoms with the use of a composite physics- and knowledge-based force field. We tested the method by performing an atomic structure refinement of 261 proteins with the initial models constructed from both ab initio and template-based structure assemblies. Compared with other state-of-art programs, ModRefiner shows improvements in both global and local structures, which have more accurate side-chain positions, better hydrogen-bonding networks, and fewer atomic overlaps. ModRefiner is freely available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/ModRefiner. PMID:22098752

  7. Physical calculations of resistance to water loss improve species range models: Reply.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Eric A; Sears, Michael W

    2017-09-13

    Christian et al. (2017) proposed several possible flaws in the methods and logic presented by Riddell et al. (2017) that included potential activity of salamanders during measurements, trimming of the agar model's legs, misinterpretations of the empirical data, limitations on agar models, and the relationship between body size and skin resistance to water loss (ri ). We argue that these criticisms are easily addressable, and here, we reinforce our original claim that the agar method for determination of resistance to water loss is flawed. Before responding to these individual critiques, we begin with a deeper criticism of the agar model method and general methodology for determining resistance to water loss that has resulted in the reification of the boundary layer's ecological and physiological importance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvement of Modeling HTGR Neutron Physics by Uncertainty Analysis with the Use of Cross-Section Covariance Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Grol, A. V.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Ternovykh, M. Yu

    2017-01-01

    This work is aimed at improvement of HTGR neutron physics design calculations by application of uncertainty analysis with the use of cross-section covariance information. Methodology and codes for preparation of multigroup libraries of covariance information for individual isotopes from the basic 44-group library of SCALE-6 code system were developed. A 69-group library of covariance information in a special format for main isotopes and elements typical for high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) was generated. This library can be used for estimation of uncertainties, associated with nuclear data, in analysis of HTGR neutron physics with design codes. As an example, calculations of one-group cross-section uncertainties for fission and capture reactions for main isotopes of the MHTGR-350 benchmark, as well as uncertainties of the multiplication factor (k∞) for the MHTGR-350 fuel compact cell model and fuel block model were performed. These uncertainties were estimated by the developed technology with the use of WIMS-D code and modules of SCALE-6 code system, namely, by TSUNAMI, KENO-VI and SAMS. Eight most important reactions on isotopes for MHTGR-350 benchmark were identified, namely: 10B(capt), 238U(n,γ), ν5, 235U(n,γ), 238U(el), natC(el), 235U(fiss)-235U(n,γ), 235U(fiss).

  9. Physical modelling in biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, M A R

    2003-01-01

    Physical models, like mathematical models, are useful tools in biomechanical research. Physical models enable investigators to explore parameter space in a way that is not possible using a comparative approach with living organisms: parameters can be varied one at a time to measure the performance consequences of each, while values and combinations not found in nature can be tested. Experiments using physical models in the laboratory or field can circumvent problems posed by uncooperative or endangered organisms. Physical models also permit some aspects of the biomechanical performance of extinct organisms to be measured. Use of properly scaled physical models allows detailed physical measurements to be made for organisms that are too small or fast to be easily studied directly. The process of physical modelling and the advantages and limitations of this approach are illustrated using examples from our research on hydrodynamic forces on sessile organisms, mechanics of hydraulic skeletons, food capture by zooplankton and odour interception by olfactory antennules. PMID:14561350

  10. Estimation of anisotropy parameters for shales based on an improved rock physics model, part 2: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Part 1 of this paper presented an improved shale rock physics model to enable the prediction of anisotropy parameters from both vertical and horizontal well logs. The predicted elastic constants were demonstrated using the published laboratory measurements of a Greenhorn shale in paper 1, and are more accurate than the estimations in the existing literature. In this paper, this model is applied to the well log data of an Upper Triassic shale formation to predict the VTI anisotropy parameters, which are usually difficult to measure directly in the borehole. The effective elastic constants are calculated for solid clay, aligned clay-fluid-kerogen, a rotated clay-fluid-kerogen mixture and shale step by step using different effective medium theories. The input to this workflow includes the volume fraction of minerals, kerogen and two different pore spaces. Two parameters (the lamination index and pore aspect ratio) need to be inverted simultaneously by fitting the vertical or horizontal logs. An estimation of the anisotropy parameters from the vertical well logs uses a least square inversion in terms of C 33 and C 44. The result is demonstrated by calibration with the seismic amplitude versus angle (AVA) response. Correlations are found between the anisotropy parameters (ɛ and δ) and rock properties (pore aspect ratio, lamination index, clay content and total porosity). In the horizontal well, the anisotropy parameters are predicted by minimizing the objective function in terms of C 11 and C 44. The overestimated qP-wave velocity of clay-rich shales in the horizontal well is anisotropy-corrected and thus provides a more appropriate V p-V s relation. The impact of strong VTI anisotropy on Poisson’s ratio is also overcome by the anisotropy-correction, thus improving the brittleness characterization of shale reservoirs.

  11. Putting the Hydrology Back in Water Resources: Recent Efforts to Improve Representation of Physical Hydrology in Water Resources Planning and Operations Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, I. M.; Parker, N.; Draper, A.; Dogrul, E. C.; Condon, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Water resources planners and managers rely on a broad range of data analysis and modeling tools. Data analysis, statistical models, and physical hydrology models are used to estimate water supply, while systems-based planning and operations models are used to simulate system operation with respect to competing objectives—e.g., water supply vs. flood control vs. in-stream flows—under physical and regulatory constraints. In general, physical hydrology models neglect water operations, while planning and operations models lack physically-based representation hydrologic processes. Accurate assessment of climate change impacts on water resources requires modeling tools that integrate physical hydrology and water resources operations. This presentation will discuss recent efforts to improve representation of physical hydrology in water resources planning and operations models, focusing on key challenges, trade-offs between various approaches, and implications for climate change risk assessment and adaptation studies. Discussion will focus on recent model development by the US Bureau of Reclamation, California Department of Water Resources, and collaborators for the Sacramento-San Joaquin watershed in California.

  12. Improved Screened Hydrogenic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, T.

    1996-05-01

    Screened Hydrogenic Model is widely used for energy level calculation in hydrodynamic code of inertial confinement fusion because Screened Hydrogenic Model is simple algebraic calculation. More{close_quote}s Screened Hydrogenic Model and his screening constants are usually used to calculate opacity and equation of state. By the use of his model, energy level can be consistently calculated with ion{close_quote}s total energy. But his model take into account the principal quantum number dependence only and cannot reproduce hydrogenic energy levels. As the precise experiment about opacity measurement is performed, it becomes clear that his model is not enough to use for opacity calculation. In this paper, his model is improved in the framework of Screened Hydrogenic Model. The improved model can reproduce the hydrogenic energy levels and include azimuthal quantum number dependence and the effect from another quantum state (a kind of inner quantum number). Screening constants are fitted by spectroscopic data and sophisticate calculations. By the use of improved model, energy levels are calculated more accurately for low-{ital z} ions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Optimizing the characterization of forest structure with remote sensing to improve physically-based hydrologic modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varhola, A.; Coops, N.; Teti, P.; Weiler, M.

    2013-12-01

    For more than a decade, the lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests of British Columbia have been affected by mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae), constituting one of the most destructive insect outbreaks in North America. In such a snow-dominated environment, a receding forest cover is known to be associated with an increase in snow accumulation during winter, an enhancement in snowmelt rates and the suppression of transpiration during spring. These changes can exacerbate the risk of flooding, with the corresponding threats to infrastructure and society. However, the unprecedented extent of the disturbance (180,000 km2) and the particular nature of the beetles' severe but gradual effect on the forests' structural and physiological integrity have challenged scientists aiming to more confidently quantify the real ecological impacts. Even though hydrologic models remain as the only tool currently available to evaluate the effects of MPB on snow and streamflow dynamics, they are impaired in their present form because they rely on coarse and oversimplified characterizations of forest structure unable to capture the changes caused by MPB on vegetation over large areas. Remote sensing technologies such as Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) and Landsat Thematic Mapper offer remarkable alternatives to fill this knowledge gap. First, this study presents a novel methodology to calibrate ALS data with in-situ optical hemispherical camera images to obtain the plot-level forest structure metrics that are traditionally used in physically-based hydrologic models. The approach minimizes geometrical differences between these two techniques by transforming the Cartesian coordinates of ALS data to generate synthetic images with a polar projection directly comparable to optical photography. We demonstrate how these new coordinate-transformed ALS metrics, along with additional standard vegetation variables, can be estimated at any individual location within the extent of an

  14. Building mental models by dissecting physical models.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to ensure focused learning; models that are too constrained require less supervision, but can be constructed mechanically, with little to no conceptual engagement. We propose "model-dissection" as an alternative to "model-building," whereby instructors could make efficient use of supervisory resources, while simultaneously promoting focused learning. We report empirical results from a study conducted with biology undergraduate students, where we demonstrate that asking them to "dissect" out specific conceptual structures from an already built 3D physical model leads to a significant improvement in performance than asking them to build the 3D model from simpler components. Using questionnaires to measure understanding both before and after model-based interventions for two cohorts of students, we find that both the "builders" and the "dissectors" improve in the post-test, but it is the latter group who show statistically significant improvement. These results, in addition to the intrinsic time-efficiency of "model dissection," suggest that it could be a valuable pedagogical tool. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Machine Learning Based Multi-Physical-Model Blending for Enhancing Renewable Energy Forecast -- Improvement via Situation Dependent Error Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Siyuan; Hwang, Youngdeok; Khabibrakhmanov, Ildar; Marianno, Fernando J.; Shao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Hamann, Hendrik F.

    2015-07-15

    With increasing penetration of solar and wind energy to the total energy supply mix, the pressing need for accurate energy forecasting has become well-recognized. Here we report the development of a machine-learning based model blending approach for statistically combining multiple meteorological models for improving the accuracy of solar/wind power forecast. Importantly, we demonstrate that in addition to parameters to be predicted (such as solar irradiance and power), including additional atmospheric state parameters which collectively define weather situations as machine learning input provides further enhanced accuracy for the blended result. Functional analysis of variance shows that the error of individual model has substantial dependence on the weather situation. The machine-learning approach effectively reduces such situation dependent error thus produces more accurate results compared to conventional multi-model ensemble approaches based on simplistic equally or unequally weighted model averaging. Validation over an extended period of time results show over 30% improvement in solar irradiance/power forecast accuracy compared to forecasts based on the best individual model.

  16. Beyond Standard Model Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bellantoni, L.

    2009-11-01

    There are many recent results from searches for fundamental new physics using the TeVatron, the SLAC b-factory and HERA. This talk quickly reviewed searches for pair-produced stop, for gauge-mediated SUSY breaking, for Higgs bosons in the MSSM and NMSSM models, for leptoquarks, and v-hadrons. There is a SUSY model which accommodates the recent astrophysical experimental results that suggest that dark matter annihilation is occurring in the center of our galaxy, and a relevant experimental result. Finally, model-independent searches at D0, CDF, and H1 are discussed.

  17. Towards Improved High-Resolution Land Surface Hydrologic Reanalysis Using a Physically-Based Hydrologic Model and Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Davis, K. J.; Zhang, F.; Duffy, C.; Yu, X.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled physically based land surface hydrologic model, Flux-PIHM, has been developed by incorporating a land surface scheme into the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). The land surface scheme is adapted from the Noah land surface model. Flux-PIHM has been implemented and manually calibrated at the Shale Hills watershed (0.08 km2) in central Pennsylvania. Model predictions of discharge, point soil moisture, point water table depth, sensible and latent heat fluxes, and soil temperature show good agreement with observations. When calibrated only using discharge, and soil moisture and water table depth at one point, Flux-PIHM is able to resolve the observed 101 m scale soil moisture pattern at the Shale Hills watershed when an appropriate map of soil hydraulic properties is provided. A Flux-PIHM data assimilation system has been developed by incorporating EnKF for model parameter and state estimation. Both synthetic and real data assimilation experiments have been performed at the Shale Hills watershed. Synthetic experiment results show that the data assimilation system is able to simultaneously provide accurate estimates of multiple parameters. In the real data experiment, the EnKF estimated parameters and manually calibrated parameters yield similar model performances, but the EnKF method significantly decreases the time and labor required for calibration. The data requirements for accurate Flux-PIHM parameter estimation via data assimilation using synthetic observations have been tested. Results show that by assimilating only in situ outlet discharge, soil water content at one point, and the land surface temperature averaged over the whole watershed, the data assimilation system can provide an accurate representation of watershed hydrology. Observations of these key variables are available with national and even global spatial coverage (e.g., MODIS surface temperature, SMAP soil moisture, and the USGS gauging stations). National atmospheric reanalysis

  18. The development of an improved physical surrogate model of the human spinal cord--tension and transverse compression.

    PubMed

    Kroeker, Shannon G; Morley, Philip L; Jones, Claire F; Bilston, Lynne E; Cripton, Peter A

    2009-05-11

    To prevent spinal cord injury, optimize treatments for it, and better understand spinal cord pathologies such as spondylotic myelopathy, the interaction between the spinal column and the spinal cord during injury and pathology must be understood. The spinal cord is a complex and very soft tissue that changes properties rapidly after death and is difficult to model. Our objective was to develop a physical surrogate spinal cord with material properties closely corresponding to the in vivo human spinal cord that would be suitable for studying spinal cord injury under a variety of injurious conditions. Appropriate target material properties were identified from published studies and several candidate surrogate materials were screened, under uniaxial tension, in a materials testing machine. QM Skin 30, a silicone elastomer, was identified as the most appropriate material. Spinal cords manufactured from QM Skin 30 were tested under uniaxial tension and transverse compression. Rectangular specimens of QM Skin 30 were also tested under uniform compression. QM Skin 30 produced surrogate cords with a Young's modulus in tension and compression approximately matching values reported for in vivo animal spinal cords (0.25 and 0.20 MPa, respectively). The tensile and compressive Young's modulus and the behavior of the surrogate cord simulated the nonlinear behavior of the in vivo spinal cord.

  19. Practical Ways to Improve Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Daryao S.

    2006-12-01

    Research shows that the single most important factor contributing to the general decrease in the number of students entering physics in general and those of minority groups in particular is the way we teach physics at both the high school and college levels. When College faculty and high school teachers try to seek practical assistance in their teaching, they are bombarded with theoretical models of student learning rather than being provided with proven and effective teaching techniques. Moreover, these models remain that way in the minds of both the presenters and the conference attendees. No wonder then that nothing ever improves. Almost everyone in the field of education research has put the blame on the lecture method used by most college faculty and high school teachers, but nothing workable is offered in its place. We at the University of the District of Columbia have researched, documented and tested a model in faculty/teacher training with phenomenal success. We will share with conference participants the practical pedagogical tactics that have worked and had profound impact on the teaching of a faculty member once these tactics are demonstrated by the trainer(s) and habituated by the faculty.

  20. Application of Hellison's Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model in physical education to improve self-efficacy for adolescents at risk of dropping-out of school.

    PubMed

    Escartí, Amparo; Gutiérrez, Melchor; Pascual, Carmina; Marín, Diana

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluated improvement in self-efficacy and personal and social responsibility among at-risk of dropping-out of school adolescents participating in a program in which Hellison's Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model was applied in physical education classes during the course of an academic year. Thirty at-risk adolescents aged 13-14 years old (23 boys, 7 girls) were assigned to an intervention group (12 boys and 3 girls) or a comparison group (11 boys, 4 girls), the latter of which did not participate in the program. Quantitative results showed a significant improvement in the students' self-efficacy for enlisting social resources and in self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Qualitative results showed an improvement in responsibility behaviors of participants in the intervention group. This suggests that the model could be effective for improving psychological and social development in at-risk adolescents, and that physical education classes may be an appropriate arena for working with these young people.

  1. Improvement of blood compatibility on polysulfone-polyvinylpyrrolidone blend films as a model membrane of dialyzer by physical adsorption of recombinant soluble human thrombomodulin (ART-123).

    PubMed

    Omichi, Masaaki; Matsusaki, Michiya; Maruyama, Ikuro; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    ART-123 is a recombinant soluble human thrombomodulin (hTM) with potent anticoagulant activity, and is available for developing antithrombogenic surfaces by immobilization. We focused on improving blood compatibility on the dialyzer surface by the physical adsorption of ART-123 as a safe yet simple method without using chemical reagents. The physical adsorption mechanism and anticoagulant activities of adsorbed hTM on the surface of a polysulfone (PSF) membrane containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a model dialyzer were investigated in detail. The PVP content of the PSF-PVP films was saturated at 20 wt% after immersion in Tris-HCl buffer, even with the addition of over 20 wt% PVP. The surface morphology of the PSF-PVP films was strongly influenced by the PVP content, because PVP covered the outermost surface of the PSF-PVP films. The adsorption speed of hTM slowed dramatically with increasing PVP content up to 10 wt%, but the maximum adsorption amount of hTM onto the PSF-PVP film surface was almost the same, regardless of the PVP content. The PSF-PVP film with the physically adsorbed hTM showed higher protein C activity as compared to the PSF film, it showed excellent blood compatibility due to the protein C activity and the inhibition properties of platelet adhesion. The physical adsorption of hTM can be useful as a safe yet simple method to improve the blood compatibility of a dialyzer surface.

  2. Improvement of Physical Decline Through Combined Effects of Muscle Enhancement and Mitochondrial Activation by a Gastric Hormone Ghrelin in Male 5/6Nx CKD Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Masanori; Hagiwara, Aika; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Wakino, Shu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Kentaro; Fujii, Chikako; Sato, Masaaki; Mitsuishi, Masanori; Muraki, Ayako; Hayashi, Koichi; Doi, Toshio; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Because a physical decline correlates with an increased risk of a wide range of disease and morbidity, an improvement of physical performance is expected to bring significant clinical benefits. The primary cause of physical decline in 5/6 nephrectomized (5/6Nx) chronic kidney disease model mice has been regarded as a decrease in muscle mass; however, our recent study showed that a decrease in muscle mitochondria plays a critical role. In the present study, we examined the effects of a gastric hormone ghrelin, which has been reported to promote muscle mitochondrial oxidation, on the physical decline in the chronic kidney disease model mice, focusing on the epigenetic modulations of a mitochondrial activator gene, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Ghrelin treatment improved a decline in exercise endurance of 5/6Nx mice, associated with an increase in both of the muscle mass and mitochondrial amount. The expression level of PGC-1α was decreased in the skeletal muscle of 5/6Nx mice, which was associated with an increase in the methylation ratio of the cytosine residue at 260 base pairs upstream of the initiation point. Conversely, ghrelin treatment de-methylated the cytosine residue and increased the expression of PGC-1α. A representative muscle anabolic factor, IGF-1, did not affect the expression of PGC-1α and muscle mitochondrial amount, although it increased muscle mass. As a result, IGF-1 treatment in 5/6Nx mice did not increase the decreased exercise endurance as effectively as ghrelin treatment did. These findings indicate an advantage of ghrelin treatment for a recovery of physical decline.

  3. Physical models of cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Michail

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents and discusses physical models for simulating some aspects of neural intelligence, and, in particular, the process of cognition. The main departure from the classical approach here is in utilization of a terminal version of classical dynamics introduced by the author earlier. Based upon violations of the Lipschitz condition at equilibrium points, terminal dynamics attains two new fundamental properties: it is spontaneous and nondeterministic. Special attention is focused on terminal neurodynamics as a particular architecture of terminal dynamics which is suitable for modeling of information flows. Terminal neurodynamics possesses a well-organized probabilistic structure which can be analytically predicted, prescribed, and controlled, and therefore which presents a powerful tool for modeling real-life uncertainties. Two basic phenomena associated with random behavior of neurodynamic solutions are exploited. The first one is a stochastic attractor—a stable stationary stochastic process to which random solutions of a closed system converge. As a model of the cognition process, a stochastic attractor can be viewed as a universal tool for generalization and formation of classes of patterns. The concept of stochastic attractor is applied to model a collective brain paradigm explaining coordination between simple units of intelligence which perform a collective task without direct exchange of information. The second fundamental phenomenon discussed is terminal chaos which occurs in open systems. Applications of terminal chaos to information fusion as well as to explanation and modeling of coordination among neurons in biological systems are discussed. It should be emphasized that all the models of terminal neurodynamics are implementable in analog devices, which means that all the cognition processes discussed in the paper are reducible to the laws of Newtonian mechanics.

  4. Physical Models of Cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses physical models for simulating some aspects of neural intelligence, and, in particular, the process of cognition. The main departure from the classical approach here is in utilization of a terminal version of classical dynamics introduced by the author earlier. Based upon violations of the Lipschitz condition at equilibrium points, terminal dynamics attains two new fundamental properties: it is spontaneous and nondeterministic. Special attention is focused on terminal neurodynamics as a particular architecture of terminal dynamics which is suitable for modeling of information flows. Terminal neurodynamics possesses a well-organized probabilistic structure which can be analytically predicted, prescribed, and controlled, and therefore which presents a powerful tool for modeling real-life uncertainties. Two basic phenomena associated with random behavior of neurodynamic solutions are exploited. The first one is a stochastic attractor ; a stable stationary stochastic process to which random solutions of a closed system converge. As a model of the cognition process, a stochastic attractor can be viewed as a universal tool for generalization and formation of classes of patterns. The concept of stochastic attractor is applied to model a collective brain paradigm explaining coordination between simple units of intelligence which perform a collective task without direct exchange of information. The second fundamental phenomenon discussed is terminal chaos which occurs in open systems. Applications of terminal chaos to information fusion as well as to explanation and modeling of coordination among neurons in biological systems are discussed. It should be emphasized that all the models of terminal neurodynamics are implementable in analog devices, which means that all the cognition processes discussed in the paper are reducible to the laws of Newtonian mechanics.

  5. Physical Models of Cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses physical models for simulating some aspects of neural intelligence, and, in particular, the process of cognition. The main departure from the classical approach here is in utilization of a terminal version of classical dynamics introduced by the author earlier. Based upon violations of the Lipschitz condition at equilibrium points, terminal dynamics attains two new fundamental properties: it is spontaneous and nondeterministic. Special attention is focused on terminal neurodynamics as a particular architecture of terminal dynamics which is suitable for modeling of information flows. Terminal neurodynamics possesses a well-organized probabilistic structure which can be analytically predicted, prescribed, and controlled, and therefore which presents a powerful tool for modeling real-life uncertainties. Two basic phenomena associated with random behavior of neurodynamic solutions are exploited. The first one is a stochastic attractor ; a stable stationary stochastic process to which random solutions of a closed system converge. As a model of the cognition process, a stochastic attractor can be viewed as a universal tool for generalization and formation of classes of patterns. The concept of stochastic attractor is applied to model a collective brain paradigm explaining coordination between simple units of intelligence which perform a collective task without direct exchange of information. The second fundamental phenomenon discussed is terminal chaos which occurs in open systems. Applications of terminal chaos to information fusion as well as to explanation and modeling of coordination among neurons in biological systems are discussed. It should be emphasized that all the models of terminal neurodynamics are implementable in analog devices, which means that all the cognition processes discussed in the paper are reducible to the laws of Newtonian mechanics.

  6. Improving the Efficiency of Physical Examination Services

    PubMed Central

    Chih, Mingchang; Bair, Aaron E.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of our project was to improve the efficiency of the physical examination screening service of a large hospital system. We began with a detailed simulation model to explore the relationships between four performance measures and three decision factors. We then attempted to identify the optimal physician inquiry starting time by solving a goal-programming problem, where the objective function includes multiple goals. One of our simulation results shows that the proposed optimal physician inquiry starting time decreased patient wait times by 50% without increasing overall physician utilization. Electronic supplementary material  The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10916-009-9271-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20703912

  7. Physical and mathematical cochlear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kian-Meng

    2000-10-01

    The cochlea is an intricate organ in the inner ear responsible for our hearing. Besides acting as a transducer to convert mechanical sound vibrations to electrical neural signals, the cochlea also amplifies and separates the sound signal into its spectral components for further processing in the brain. It operates over a broad-band of frequency and a huge dynamic range of input while maintaining a low power consumption. The present research takes the approach of building cochlear models to study and understand the underlying mechanics involved in the functioning of the cochlea. Both physical and mathematical models of the cochlea are constructed. The physical model is a first attempt to build a life- sized replica of the human cochlea using advanced micro- machining techniques. The model takes a modular design, with a removable silicon-wafer based partition membrane encapsulated in a plastic fluid chamber. Preliminary measurements in the model are obtained and they compare roughly with simulation results. Parametric studies on the design parameters of the model leads to an improved design of the model. The studies also revealed that the width and orthotropy of the basilar membrane in the cochlea have significant effects on the sharply tuned responses observed in the biological cochlea. The mathematical model is a physiologically based model that includes three-dimensional viscous fluid flow and a tapered partition with variable properties along its length. A hybrid asymptotic and numerical method provides a uniformly valid and efficient solution to the short and long wave regions in the model. Both linear and non- linear activity are included in the model to simulate the active cochlea. The mathematical model has successfully reproduced many features of the response in the biological cochlea, as observed in experiment measurements performed on animals. These features include sharply tuned frequency responses, significant amplification with inclusion of activity

  8. Applying the Model of Goal-Directed Behavior, Including Descriptive Norms, to Physical Activity Intentions: A Contribution to Improving the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gabriele; van Bavel, René; Baranowski, Tom; Duch-Brown, Néstor

    2016-08-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has received its fair share of criticism lately, including calls for it to retire. We contribute to improving the theory by testing extensions such as the model of goal-directed behavior (MGDB, which adds desire and anticipated positive and negative emotions) applied to physical activity (PA) intention. We also test the inclusion of a descriptive norms construct as an addition to the subjective norms construct, also applied to PA, resulting in two additional models: TPB including descriptive norms (TPB + DN) and MGDB including descriptive norms (MGDB + DN). The study is based on an online survey of 400 young adult Internet users, previously enrolled in a subject pool. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed that TPB and TPB + DN were not fit for purpose, while MGDB and MGDB + DN were. Structural equation modelling (SEM) conducted on MGDB and MGDB + DN showed that the inclusion of descriptive norms took over the significance of injunctive norms, and increased the model's account of total variance in intention to be physically active. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. MODELING PHYSICAL HABITAT PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonid populations can be affected by alterations in stream physical habitat. Fish productivity is determined by the stream's physical habitat structure ( channel form, substrate distribution, riparian vegetation), water quality, flow regime and inputs from the watershed (sedim...

  10. MODELING PHYSICAL HABITAT PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonid populations can be affected by alterations in stream physical habitat. Fish productivity is determined by the stream's physical habitat structure ( channel form, substrate distribution, riparian vegetation), water quality, flow regime and inputs from the watershed (sedim...

  11. Evolutionary Industrial Physical Model Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascal, Alberto; Alberdi, Amaia

    Both complexity and lack of knowledge associated to physical processes makes physical models design an arduous task. Frequently, the only available information about the physical processes are the heuristic data obtained from experiments or at best a rough idea on what are the physical principles and laws that underlie considered physical processes. Then the problem is converted to find a mathematical expression which fits data. There exist traditional approaches to tackle the inductive model search process from data, such as regression, interpolation, finite element method, etc. Nevertheless, these methods either are only able to solve a reduced number of simple model typologies, or the given black-box solution does not contribute to clarify the analyzed physical process. In this paper a hybrid evolutionary approach to search complex physical models is proposed. Tests carried out on a real-world industrial physical process (abrasive water jet machining) demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  12. Improved method for calibration of exchange flows for a physical transport box model of Tampa Bay, FL USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results for both sequential and simultaneous calibration of exchange flows between segments of a 10-box, one-dimensional, well-mixed, bifurcated tidal mixing model for Tampa Bay are reported. Calibrations were conducted for three model options with different mathematical expressi...

  13. Improving physics instruction by analyzing video games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Ian D.

    2013-01-01

    Video games can be very powerful teaching systems, and game designers have become adept at optimizing player engagement while scaffolding development of complex skills and situated knowledge. One implication is that we might create games to teach physics. Another, which I explore here, is that we might learn to improve classroom physics instruction by studying effective games. James Gee, in his book What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy (2007), articulates 36 principles that make good video games highly effective as learning environments. In this theoretical work, I identify 16 themes running through Gee's principles, and explore how these themes and Gee's principles could be applied to the design of an on-campus physics course. I argue that the process pushes us to confront aspects of learning that physics instructors and even physics education researchers generally neglect, and suggest some novel ideas for course design.

  14. Automated Student Model Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  15. Linking statistically-and physically-based models for improved streamflow simulation in gaged and ungaged watersheds

    Treesearch

    Jacob LaFontaine; Lauren Hay; Stacey Archfield; William Farmer; Julie Kiang

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a National Hydrologic Model (NHM) to support coordinated, comprehensive and consistent hydrologic model development, and facilitate the application of hydrologic simulations within the continental US. The portion of the NHM located within the Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GCPO LCC) is...

  16. Physical model of kitesurfing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimoch, Pawel; Paxson, Adam; Obropta, Edward; Peleg, Tom; Parker, Sam; Hosoi, A. E.

    2013-11-01

    Kitesurfing is a popular water sport, similar to windsurfing, utilizing a surfboard-like platform pulled by a large kite operated by the surfer. While the kite generates thrust that propels the surfer across the water, much like a traditional sail, it is also capable of generating vertical forces on the surfer, reducing the hydrodynamic lift generated by the surfboard required to support the surfer's weight. This in turn reduces drag acting on the surfboard, making sailing possible in winds lower than required by other sailing sports. We describe aerodynamic and hydrodynamic models for the forces acting on the kite and the surfboard, and couple them while considering the kite's position in space and the requirement for the kite to support its own weight. We then use these models to quantitatively characterize the significance of the vertical force component generated by the kite on sailing performance (the magnitude of achievable steady-state velocities and the range of headings, relative to the true wind direction, in which sailing is possible), and the degradation in sailing performance with decreasing wind speeds. Finally, we identify the areas of kite and surfboard design whose development could have the greatest impact on improving sailing performance in low wind conditions.

  17. Building Mental Models by Dissecting Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to…

  18. Building Mental Models by Dissecting Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Anveshna

    2016-01-01

    When students build physical models from prefabricated components to learn about model systems, there is an implicit trade-off between the physical degrees of freedom in building the model and the intensity of instructor supervision needed. Models that are too flexible, permitting multiple possible constructions require greater supervision to…

  19. Improving Learning Ability Through Compensatory Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, James H.

    This book presents a procedure for improving, through the medium of physical education activities, the learning ability of children. Rather than using systematic exercises for the correction of certain perceptual-motor deficiencies, learning ability can be enhanced through active games, rhythmic activities, and self-testing activities. Covering a…

  20. Improving Instruction of Veteran Physics Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; Miron, Mordechai

    1990-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of two methods, workshop and individualized consultation, for improving instruction of full professors of physics with substantial teaching experience. It is concluded that neither method is very effective and that substantial and continuous expert consultation and investment of time and effort are required.…

  1. Improving Learning Ability Through Compensatory Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, James H.

    This book presents a procedure for improving, through the medium of physical education activities, the learning ability of children. Rather than using systematic exercises for the correction of certain perceptual-motor deficiencies, learning ability can be enhanced through active games, rhythmic activities, and self-testing activities. Covering a…

  2. The Teacher Improvement Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokalo, Mariann

    The Teacher Improvement Model was begun as an Organizational Development Project using the parallel systems approach in a school for emotionally disturbed junior high school students. Teachers volunteered for committee work and requested observations and evaluations in an effort to define and establish a discipline model best suited to them. Such…

  3. An improved linear ion trap physics package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes an improvement in the architecture of the physics package used in the Linear Ion Trap (LIT)-based frequency standard recently developed at JPL. This new design is based on the observation that ions can be moved along the axis of an LIT by applied dc voltages. The state selection and interrogation region can be separated from the more critical microwave resonance region where the multiplied local oscillator signal is compared with the stable atomic transition. This separation relaxes many of the design constraints of the present units. Improvements include increased frequency stability and a substantial reduction in size, mass, and cost of the final frequency standard.

  4. Multi-initial-conditions and Multi-physics Ensembles in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model to Improve Coastal Stratocumulus Forecasts for Solar Power Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.

    2015-12-01

    In coastal Southern California, variation in solar energy production is predominantly due to the presence of stratocumulus clouds (Sc), as they greatly attenuate surface solar irradiance and cover most distributed photovoltaic systems on summer mornings. Correct prediction of the spatial coverage and lifetime of coastal Sc is therefore vital to the accuracy of solar energy forecasts in California. In Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations, underprediction of Sc inherent in the initial conditions directly leads to an underprediction of Sc in the resulting forecasts. Hence, preprocessing methods were developed to create initial conditions more consistent with observational data and reduce spin-up time requirements. Mathiesen et al. (2014) previously developed a cloud data assimilation system to force WRF initial conditions to contain cloud liquid water based on CIMSS GOES Sounder cloud cover. The Well-mixed Preprocessor and Cloud Data Assimilation (WEMPPDA) package merges an initial guess of cloud liquid water content obtained from mixed-layer theory with assimilated CIMSS GOES Sounder cloud cover to more accurately represent the spatial coverage of Sc at initialization. The extent of Sc inland penetration is often constrained topographically; therefore, the low inversion base height (IBH) bias in NAM initial conditions decreases Sc inland penetration. The Inversion Base Height (IBH) package perturbs the initial IBH by the difference between model IBH and the 12Z radiosonde measurement. The performance of these multi-initial-condition configurations was evaluated over June, 2013 against SolarAnywhere satellite-derived surface irradiance data. Four configurations were run: 1) NAM initial conditions, 2) RAP initial conditions, 3) WEMPPDA applied to NAM, and 4) IBH applied to NAM. Both preprocessing methods showed significant improvement in the prediction of both spatial coverage and lifetime of coastal Sc. The best performing configuration was then

  5. Automated dynamic analytical model improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A.

    1981-01-01

    A method is developed and illustrated which finds minimum changes in analytical mass and stiffness matrices to make them consistent with a set of measured normal modes and natural frequencies. The corrected model is an improved base for studies of physical changes, changes in boundary conditions, and for prediction of forced responses. Features of the method are: efficient procedures not requiring solutions of the eigenproblem; the model may have more degrees of freedom than the test data; modal displacements at all the analytical degrees of freedom are obtained; the frequency dependence of the coordinate transformations are properly treated.

  6. Improvement of Learning Process and Learning Outcomes in Physics Learning by Using Collaborative Learning Model of Group Investigation at High School (Grade X, SMAN 14 Jakarta)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astra, I. Made; Wahyuni, Citra; Nasbey, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to improve the quality of physics learning through application of collaborative learning of group investigation at grade X MIPA 2 SMAN 14 Jakarta. The method used in this research is classroom action research. This research consisted of three cycles was conducted from April to May in 2014. Each cycle consists of…

  7. Modeling Physical Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    of the conference will be published by Oxford University Press . At the ASME Conference on Design Automation in Chicago. D. Dmtta and I presented... University Press , 1991. .1. Jung-Hong (’huang, "Surface Approximations in Geometric Modeling," PhD Diss., Dept. of ComIp. Sci., Purdue University: Rept. CER-90-37. September 1990. 3 ...utoination. Chicago, 1990: (with D. Dutta). 3. "How to Construct the Skeleton of CSG Objects," Proc. ,Ith JA1A Con!. Math. of Suifaces. Oxford

  8. Physical Modeling of Microtubules Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Pierre; Kervrann, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Microtubules (MT) are highly dynamic tubulin polymers that are involved in many cellular processes such as mitosis, intracellular cell organization and vesicular transport. Nevertheless, the modeling of cytoskeleton and MT dynamics based on physical properties is difficult to achieve. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, we propose to model the rigidity of microtubules on a physical basis using forces, mass and acceleration. In addition, we link microtubules growth and shrinkage to the presence of molecules (e.g. GTP-tubulin) in the cytosol. The overall model enables linking cytosol to microtubules dynamics in a constant state space thus allowing usage of data assimilation techniques.

  9. Model-Based Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Model-Based Improvement 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Carnegie Mellon University ,Software Engineering...Institute (SEI),Pittsburgh,PA,15213 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S

  10. Integrated Hydrologic Validation to Improve Physical Precipitation Retrievals for GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Harrison, K. W.; Tian, Y.; Kumar, S.

    2011-12-01

    One of the five scientific objectives for GPM is to "Improve hydrological modeling and prediction", including advancing prediction skill for high-impact hazards such as floods, droughts, landslides and landfalling hurricanes. Given the focus on land hydrology, and the range of hydrologic regimes targeted by GPM, it follows that a hydrologically-oriented ground validation program that covers these regimes from both the physical retrieval and the hydrological prediction perspectives is required for the successful application of GPM to land hydrology. In order to investigate the robustness of both hydrologic model predictions and physical precipitation retrievals, this talk will present recent evaluations of skill in land surface hydrologic models forced with TRMM-era multisensor products, with and without land data assimilation. In addition to LSM skill, we will also demonstrate how physical precipitation retrievals can be supported by land surface emissivity and temperature estimates obtained by coupling microwave emission models (e.g., the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation Community Radiative Transfer Model CRTM and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting's Community Microwave Emission Model CMEM) to the land surface models in the Land Information System (LIS; http://lis.gsfc.nasa.gov). Evaluation at multiple frequencies, with and without land data assimilation, demonstrates the critical impact of certain real-time ancillary data (e.g., snow cover) on the microwave background states required for physical retrievals.

  11. Modelling Mathematical Reasoning in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhden, Olaf; Karam, Ricardo; Pietrocola, Maurício; Pospiech, Gesche

    2012-04-01

    Many findings from research as well as reports from teachers describe students' problem solving strategies as manipulation of formulas by rote. The resulting dissatisfaction with quantitative physical textbook problems seems to influence the attitude towards the role of mathematics in physics education in general. Mathematics is often seen as a tool for calculation which hinders a conceptual understanding of physical principles. However, the role of mathematics cannot be reduced to this technical aspect. Hence, instead of putting mathematics away we delve into the nature of physical science to reveal the strong conceptual relationship between mathematics and physics. Moreover, we suggest that, for both prospective teaching and further research, a focus on deeply exploring such interdependency can significantly improve the understanding of physics. To provide a suitable basis, we develop a new model which can be used for analysing different levels of mathematical reasoning within physics. It is also a guideline for shifting the attention from technical to structural mathematical skills while teaching physics. We demonstrate its applicability for analysing physical-mathematical reasoning processes with an example.

  12. Sustaining the Progress to Improve Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2010-01-01

    One of the problems we face in teaching introductory physics courses at the college level is that about 2/3 of students never had physics prior coming to college. Thus, many students find it very difficult to learn physics for the first time at the relatively fast-paced teaching of college physics courses. Sometimes the drop/failure/withdrawal…

  13. Sustaining the Progress to Improve Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2010-01-01

    One of the problems we face in teaching introductory physics courses at the college level is that about 2/3 of students never had physics prior coming to college. Thus, many students find it very difficult to learn physics for the first time at the relatively fast-paced teaching of college physics courses. Sometimes the drop/failure/withdrawal…

  14. Standard Model of Particle Physics--a health physics perspective.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2010-11-01

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics is reviewed with an emphasis on its relationship to the physics supporting the health physics profession. Concepts important to health physics are emphasized and specific applications are presented. The capability of the Standard Model to provide health physics relevant information is illustrated with application of conservation laws to neutron and muon decay and in the calculation of the neutron mean lifetime.

  15. Detector Modeling in Astroparticle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrera, Sergio

    2007-12-01

    Detector modeling is an important step for the interpretation of experimental data in astroparticle physics. In this paper the most specific features of such process are shown, making use of two remarkable examples: the atmospheric neutrinos in MACRO and the Ultra High Energy cosmic rays in the Pierre Auger experiment.

  16. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  17. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  18. A physical model for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Gaggero-Sager, L. M.; Becker, J. T.; Maestu, F.; Sotolongo-Grau, O.

    2017-04-01

    Aging associated brain decline often result in some kind of dementia. Even when this is a complex brain disorder a physical model can be used in order to describe its general behavior. A probabilistic model for the development of dementia is obtained and fitted to some experimental data obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. It is explained how dementia appears as a consequence of aging and why it is irreversible.

  19. A physical model for dementia.

    PubMed

    Sotolongo-Costa, O; Gaggero-Sager, L M; Becker, J T; Maestu, F; Sotolongo-Grau, O

    2017-04-15

    Aging associated brain decline often result in some kind of dementia. Even when this is a complex brain disorder a physical model can be used in order to describe its general behavior. A probabilistic model for the development of dementia is obtained and fitted to some experimental data obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. It is explained how dementia appears as a consequence of aging and why it is irreversible.

  20. Spray combustion model improvement study, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study involves the development of numerical and physical modeling in spray combustion. These modeling efforts are mainly motivated to improve the physical submodels of turbulence, combustion, atomization, dense spray effects, and group vaporization. The present mathematical formulation can be easily implemented in any time-marching multiple pressure correction methodologies such as MAST code. A sequence of validation cases includes the nonevaporating, evaporating and_burnin dense_sprays.

  1. Applying the model of Goal-Directed Behavior, including descriptive norms, to physical activity intentions: A contribution to improving the Theory of Planned Behavior

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has received its fair share of criticism lately, including calls for it to retire. We contributed to improving the theory by testing extensions such as the model of goal-directed behavior (MGDB, which adds desire and anticipated positive and negative emotions) ap...

  2. Modeling Cyber Physical War Gaming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-07

    model-based analysis with experiences of an actual tabletop war game, and offer recommendations on using game-theoretic analysis for enhancing accuracy...execution of the scenario; let the Red cell attack, Blue cell defend, and White cell declare the status as it evolves; and inject additional events to...Description Cost ($) No action (j=0) Basic security (j=1) IDS+ (j=2) IDS enhanced (j=3) IDS+ and physical security (j=4) 1 Upgrade WiFi

  3. A 30-Minute Physical Education Program Improves Students' Executive Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubesch, Sabine; Walk, Laura; Spitzer, Manfred; Kammer, Thomas; Lainburg, Alyona; Heim, Rudiger; Hille, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is not only beneficial to physical health but also to cognitive functions. In particular, executive functions that are closely related to learning achievement can be improved by acute and recurring physical activity. We examined the effects of a single 30-min physical education program in contrast to a 5-min movement break on…

  4. A 30-Minute Physical Education Program Improves Students' Executive Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubesch, Sabine; Walk, Laura; Spitzer, Manfred; Kammer, Thomas; Lainburg, Alyona; Heim, Rudiger; Hille, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is not only beneficial to physical health but also to cognitive functions. In particular, executive functions that are closely related to learning achievement can be improved by acute and recurring physical activity. We examined the effects of a single 30-min physical education program in contrast to a 5-min movement break on…

  5. Patient specific physical anatomy models.

    PubMed

    Cameron, B M; Holmes, D R; Rettmann, M E; Robb, R A

    2008-01-01

    The advent of small footprint stereo-lithographic printers and the ready availability of segmentation and surface modeling software provide a unique opportunity to create patient-specific physical models of anatomy, validation of image guided intervention applications against phantoms that exhibit naturally occurring anatomic variation. Because these models can incorporate all structures relevant to a procedure, this allows validation to occur under realistic conditions using the same or similar techniques as would be used in a clinical application. This in turn reduces the number of trials and time spent performing in-vivo validation experiments. In this paper, we describe our general approach for the creation of both non-tissue and tissue-mimicking patient-specific models as part of a general-purpose patient emulation system used to validate image guided intervention applications.

  6. Instructional Improvement Materials for Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    This document is designed to assist physical education teachers in addressing deficiencies found in Michigan students when they were tested on physical education performance objectives. The objectives included are: (1) locomotion--run, hop, skip; (2) body projection--horizontal and vertical jump; (3) rhythm--move to an even beat; (4) object…

  7. Modelling the Physical System of Belawan Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, A. P. M.; Swandana, D.; Isma, F.

    2017-03-01

    Belawan estuary represents one of the most complex and fascinating mixed environments of sea and land, where not only habitat of rich biodiversity but also international seaport infrastructure are at stake. It is therefore a matter of considerable importance to understand the physical system which characterizes the dynamics of the estuarine water. The purpose of this study is to model the changing water depths, tidal currents, salt, temperature and sediment concentration over a long stretch of Belawan estuary on an hourly basis. The first essential step is to define the bathymetry based on which other physical parameters are simulated. The study is accomplished by building working computer modules which simplify and model the systems complexities. It should be noted that model validation and improvement is the subject of the next study.

  8. Excellence in Physics Education Award: Modeling Theory for Physics Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestenes, David

    2014-03-01

    All humans create mental models to plan and guide their interactions with the physical world. Science has greatly refined and extended this ability by creating and validating formal scientific models of physical things and processes. Research in physics education has found that mental models created from everyday experience are largely incompatible with scientific models. This suggests that the fundamental problem in learning and understanding science is coordinating mental models with scientific models. Modeling Theory has drawn on resources of cognitive science to work out extensive implications of this suggestion and guide development of an approach to science pedagogy and curriculum design called Modeling Instruction. Modeling Instruction has been widely applied to high school physics and, more recently, to chemistry and biology, with noteworthy results.

  9. Prototyping of cerebral vasculature physical models.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imad S; Kelly, Patrick D; Singer, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Prototyping of cerebral vasculature models through stereolithographic methods have the ability to accurately depict the 3D structures of complicated aneurysms with high accuracy. We describe the method to manufacture such a model and review some of its uses in the context of treatment planning, research, and surgical training. We prospectively used the data from the rotational angiography of a 40-year-old female who presented with an unruptured right paraclinoid aneurysm. The 3D virtual model was then converted to a physical life-sized model. The model constructed was shown to be a very accurate depiction of the aneurysm and its associated vasculature. It was found to be useful, among other things, for surgical training and as a patient education tool. With improving and more widespread printing options, these models have the potential to become an important part of research and training modalities.

  10. Cabin Environment Physics Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattenberger, Christopher J.; Mathias, Donovan Leigh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a Cabin Environment Physics Risk (CEPR) model that predicts the time for an initial failure of Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) functionality to propagate into a hazardous environment and trigger a loss-of-crew (LOC) event. This physics-of failure model allows a probabilistic risk assessment of a crewed spacecraft to account for the cabin environment, which can serve as a buffer to protect the crew during an abort from orbit and ultimately enable a safe return. The results of the CEPR model replace the assumption that failure of the crew critical ECLSS functionality causes LOC instantly, and provide a more accurate representation of the spacecraft's risk posture. The instant-LOC assumption is shown to be excessively conservative and, moreover, can impact the relative risk drivers identified for the spacecraft. This, in turn, could lead the design team to allocate mass for equipment to reduce overly conservative risk estimates in a suboptimal configuration, which inherently increases the overall risk to the crew. For example, available mass could be poorly used to add redundant ECLSS components that have a negligible benefit but appear to make the vehicle safer due to poor assumptions about the propagation time of ECLSS failures.

  11. Service Learning In Physics: The Consultant Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, David

    2005-04-01

    Each year thousands of students across the country and across the academic disciplines participate in service learning. Unfortunately, with no clear model for integrating community service into the physics curriculum, there are very few physics students engaged in service learning. To overcome this shortfall, a consultant based service-learning program has been developed and successfully implemented at Saint Anselm College (SAC). As consultants, students in upper level physics courses apply their problem solving skills in the service of others. Most recently, SAC students provided technical and managerial support to a group from Girl's Inc., a national empowerment program for girls in high-risk, underserved areas, who were participating in the national FIRST Lego League Robotics competition. In their role as consultants the SAC students provided technical information through brainstorming sessions and helped the girls stay on task with project management techniques, like milestone charting. This consultant model of service-learning, provides technical support to groups that may not have a great deal of resources and gives physics students a way to improve their interpersonal skills, test their technical expertise, and better define the marketable skill set they are developing through the physics curriculum.

  12. A Multivariate Model of Physics Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Farley, John

    2013-01-01

    A model of expertise in physics problem solving was tested on undergraduate science, physics, and engineering majors enrolled in an introductory-level physics course. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to expertise in physics problem solving including motivation, metacognitive planning,…

  13. A Multivariate Model of Physics Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Farley, John

    2013-01-01

    A model of expertise in physics problem solving was tested on undergraduate science, physics, and engineering majors enrolled in an introductory-level physics course. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to expertise in physics problem solving including motivation, metacognitive planning,…

  14. Improvements in the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, A. J.; Liemohn, M.; Dezeeuw, D.; Ilie, R.; Sokolov, I.; Toth, G.; Yu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The magnetosphere within the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) has been represented by a global magnetosphere model (BATSRUS), an inner magnetosphere model (the Rice Convection Model) and a model of the ionospheric electrodynamics. We present significant improvements in the SWMF: (1) We have implemented a spherical grid within BATSRUS and have utilized this for modeling the magnetosphere; (2) We have significantly improved the physics of the auroral oval within the ionospheric electrodynamics code, modeling a self-consistent diffuse and discrete auroral oval; (3) We utilize the multifluid MHD code within BATSRUS to allow for more accurate specification and differentiation of the density within the magnetosphere; and (4) we have incorporated the Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) ring current code within the SWMF. We will present these improvements and show the quantitative differences within the model results when comparing to a suite of measurements for a number of different intervals.

  15. Improved analytic nutation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Ivins, E. R.

    1988-01-01

    Models describing the earth's nutations are discussed. It is found that the simple model of Sasao et al., (1981) differs from Wahr's (1981) theory term by term by less than 0.3 marcsec if a modern earth structure model is used to evaluate the nutation structure constants. In addition, the effect of oceans is estimated.

  16. Recent improvements of reactor physics codes in MHI

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, Shinya Yamaji, Kazuya; Kirimura, Kazuki; Kamiyama, Yohei; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2015-12-31

    This paper introduces recent improvements for reactor physics codes in Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd(MHI). MHI has developed a new neutronics design code system Galaxy/Cosmo-S(GCS) for PWR core analysis. After TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi accident, it is required to consider design extended condition which has not been covered explicitly by the former safety licensing analyses. Under these circumstances, MHI made some improvements for GCS code system. A new resonance calculation model of lattice physics code and homogeneous cross section representative model for core simulator have been developed to apply more wide range core conditions corresponding to severe accident status such like anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) analysis and criticality evaluation of dried-up spent fuel pit. As a result of these improvements, GCS code system has very wide calculation applicability with good accuracy for any core conditions as far as fuel is not damaged. In this paper, the outline of GCS code system is described briefly and recent relevant development activities are presented.

  17. Analysis of Orbital Prediction Accuracy Improvements Using High Fidelity Physical Solar Radiation Pressure Models for Tracking High Area-to-Mass Ratio Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelecy, Tom; Jah, Moriba

    2009-03-01

    Inactive high area-to-mass ratio (A/m) resident space objects (RSOs) in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) regime pose a hazard to active GEO RSOs. This attribute results in their increased sensitivity to non-conservative force effects manifested as perturbations of mean motion, inclination and eccentricity. This work examines the sensitivity of the trajectory prediction accuracies to various fidelities of complexity in the modeling of the SRP acceleration contributions to the overall dynamics. A physics-based solar radiation pressure model which includes the effects of refraction and absorption from the Earth's atmosphere during penumbral transitions is implemented. Additionally, variations in the area with respect to the sun are examined using representative orbits with associated eclipsing cycles. The trajectory prediction errors from combined modeling errors show significant growth consistent with loss of tracking. The errors are, in general, non normally distributed given their rejection of the null hypothesis to a standard normal distribution in various normality tests. This contributes to the prediction errors through errors in the orbit determination assumptions.

  18. Constructing a Model of Physics Expertise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Idaykis; Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird

    2010-10-01

    Research on physics expertise has predominantly focused on cognitive differences between physics experts and novices where the novices are high school or introductory college students and the experts are university physics professors or graduate doctoral students. Most physics expertise studies declare the experts to be the physics faculty without justifying this decision. To establish more clearly the characteristics of physics experts, we conducted a qualitative interview pilot study of three university physics professors. The professors each had an hour-long interview where they were asked about their experiences of becoming a physics expert. We present the analysis of the question, `What makes a physics expert?' Analysis of the data resulted in the construction of a model of physics expertise, which indicates that a physics expert is a specific physics expert first, acquires general physics expert characteristics and then becomes an expert in physics or a boundary crosser.

  19. Testing Physical Models of Passive Membrane Permeation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Siegfried S. F.; Mijalkovic, Jona; Borrelli, Kenneth; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    The biophysical basis of passive membrane permeability is well understood, but most methods for predicting membrane permeability in the context of drug design are based on statistical relationships that indirectly capture the key physical aspects. Here, we investigate molecular mechanics-based models of passive membrane permeability and evaluate their performance against different types of experimental data, including parallel artificial membrane permeability assays (PAMPA), cell-based assays, in vivo measurements, and other in silico predictions. The experimental data sets we use in these tests are diverse, including peptidomimetics, congeneric series, and diverse FDA approved drugs. The physical models are not specifically trained for any of these data sets; rather, input parameters are based on standard molecular mechanics force fields, such as partial charges, and an implicit solvent model. A systematic approach is taken to analyze the contribution from each component in the physics-based permeability model. A primary factor in determining rates of passive membrane permeation is the conformation-dependent free energy of desolvating the molecule, and this measure alone provides good agreement with experimental permeability measurements in many cases. Other factors that improve agreement with experimental data include deionization and estimates of entropy losses of the ligand and the membrane, which lead to size-dependence of the permeation rate. PMID:22621168

  20. Modeling QCD for Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tandy, P. C.

    2011-10-24

    We review the approach to modeling soft hadron physics observables based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations of QCD. The focus is on light quark mesons and in particular the pseudoscalar and vector ground states, their decays and electromagnetic couplings. We detail the wide variety of observables that can be correlated by a ladder-rainbow kernel with one infrared parameter fixed to the chiral quark condensate. A recently proposed novel perspective in which the quark condensate is contained within hadrons and not the vacuum is mentioned. The valence quark parton distributions, in the pion and kaon, as measured in the Drell Yan process, are investigated with the same ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations.

  1. Improved cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, N. C.; Woodard, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    We study a class of nonlocal, action-based, and purely gravitational models. These models seek to describe a cosmology in which inflation is driven by a large, bare cosmological constant that is screened by the self-gravitation between the soft gravitons that inflation rips from the vacuum. Inflation ends with the Universe poised on the verge of gravitational collapse, in an oscillating phase of expansion and contraction that should lead to rapid reheating when matter is included. After the attainment of a hot, dense Universe the nonlocal screening terms become constant as the Universe evolves through a conventional phase of radiation domination. The onset of matter domination triggers a much smaller antiscreening effect that could explain the current phase of acceleration.

  2. Can physical activity improve peak bone mass?

    PubMed

    Specker, Bonny; Minett, Maggie

    2013-09-01

    The pediatric origin of osteoporosis has led many investigators to focus on determining factors that influence bone gain during growth and methods for optimizing this gain. Bone responds to bone loading activities by increasing mass or size. Overall, pediatric studies have found a positive effect of bone loading on bone size and accrual, but the types of loads necessary for a bone response have only recently been investigated in human studies. Findings indicate that responses vary by sex, maturational status, and are site-specific. Estrogen status, body composition, and nutritional status also may influence the bone response to loading. Despite the complex interrelationships among these various factors, it is prudent to conclude that increased physical activity throughout life is likely to optimize bone health.

  3. Physics modeling support contract: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    This document is the final report for the Physics Modeling Support contract between TRW, Inc. and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fiscal year 1987. It consists of following projects: TIBER physics modeling and systems code development; advanced blanket modeling task; time dependent modeling; and free electron maser for TIBER II.

  4. Model Formulation for Physics Problem Solving. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Gordon S., Jr.

    The major task in solving a physics problem is to construct an appropriate model of the problem in terms of physical principles. The functions performed by such a model, the information which needs to be represented, and the knowledge used in selecting and instantiating an appropriate model are discussed. An example of a model for a mechanics…

  5. Improving the status of Iranian women in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraji zad, A.; Roshani, F.; Izadi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Iranian women have shown improving contribution in the field of physics as students and researchers in recent years. More than 60% of BSc and MSc students, 47% of PhD students, and 18% of faculty members in the physics departments in Iran are female. However, in higher levels of academic fields and management, participation by women is still below the expected values. The Women in Physics branch of the Physics Society of Iran studies the related cases to find suitable strategies to improve the situation.

  6. From surface wave to cloud: An atmosphere physical process in improving the too cold tongue bias and precipitation in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yajuan; Qiao, Fangli; Song, Zhenya

    2015-04-01

    The coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) without flux correction still show defects in simulating sea surface temperature (SST) and precipitation, with too cold tongue and obvious double-ITCZ biases in the tropical Pacific. We make an effort to improve SST too cold tongue bias and the north-south asymmetry of zonal-averaged precipitation distribution in the Community Climate System Model version3 (CCSM3) by incorporating the non-breaking wave-induced vertical mixing. The oceanic thermocline depth deepens in the central and eastern tropical Pacific under the wave mixing effect. SST warming characterized as a conspicuous maximum in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific contributes to moisture increasing in atmosphere through evaporation process. The non-uniform SST brings out distinct horizontal gradient in air pressure across the tropics, which result in an abnormal wind convergence in the central Pacific. As a result, an enhanced Walker circulation and Hadley cell are driven by wind gradient and more latent heat. The subsidence branch of the Walker circulation in the eastern Pacific suppress the formation of clouds, so that more shortwave radiation is absorbed by the ocean. However, in the central to western Pacific, the updraft of the Walker circulation with abundant water vapor provides favorable conditions for cloud formation in middle and high troposphere. A positive feedback between water vapor and cloud fraction warms the SST by less longwave radiation releasing. The warm anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific restrict the westward expansion of cold tongue. Furthermore, the intensive updraft of Hadley circulation with high humidity increases rainfall in the low-latitudes of the northern hemisphere.

  7. Physical modeling of Tibetan bowls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Inacio, Octavio

    2001-05-01

    Tibetan bowls produce rich penetrating sounds, used in musical contexts and to induce a state of relaxation for meditation or therapy purposes. To understand the dynamics of these instruments under impact and rubbing excitation, we developed a simulation method based on the modal approach, following our previous papers on physical modeling of plucked/bowed strings and impacted/bowed bars. This technique is based on a compact representation of the system dynamics, in terms of the unconstrained bowl modes. Nonlinear contact/friction interaction forces, between the exciter (puja) and the bowl, are computed at each time step and projected on the bowl modal basis, followed by step integration of the modal equations. We explore the behavior of two different-sized bowls, for extensive ranges of excitation conditions (contact/friction parameters, normal force, and tangential puja velocity). Numerical results and experiments show that various self-excited motions may arise depending on the playing conditions and, mainly, on the contact/friction interaction parameters. Indeed, triggering of a given bowl modal frequency mainly depends on the puja material. Computed animations and experiments demonstrate that self-excited modes spin, following the puja motion. Accordingly, the sensed pressure field pulsates, with frequency controlled by the puja spinning velocity and the spatial pattern of the singing mode.

  8. Physical modeling of Tibetan bowls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Inacio, Octavio

    2004-05-01

    Tibetan bowls produce rich penetrating sounds, used in musical contexts and to induce a state of relaxation for meditation or therapy purposes. To understand the dynamics of these instruments under impact and rubbing excitation, we developed a simulation method based on the modal approach, following our previous papers on physical modeling of plucked/bowed strings and impacted/bowed bars. This technique is based on a compact representation of the system dynamics, in terms of the unconstrained bowl modes. Nonlinear contact/friction interaction forces, between the exciter (puja) and the bowl, are computed at each time step and projected on the bowl modal basis, followed by step integration of the modal equations. We explore the behavior of two different-sized bowls, for extensive ranges of excitation conditions (contact/friction parameters, normal force, and tangential puja velocity). Numerical results and experiments show that various self-excited motions may arise depending on the playing conditions and, mainly, on the contact/friction interaction parameters. Indeed, triggering of a given bowl modal frequency mainly depends on the puja material. Computed animations and experiments demonstrate that self-excited modes spin, following the puja motion. Accordingly, the sensed pressure field pulsates, with frequency controlled by the puja spinning velocity and the spatial pattern of the singing mode.

  9. Physical Modelling of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozernoy, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    This review is based on an extensive work aimed at the physical modeling of the interplanetary dust (IPD) cloud, i.e. establishing a link between the observable characteristics of the zodiacal cloud and the dynamical and physical properties of the parent minor bodies of the Solar System, which has been done in collaboration with N. Gorkavyi, J. Mather, and T. Taidakova. We use a new computational approach proposed by the authors, which makes it possible to elaborate high-quality 3D models of the IPD cloud with the number of particle positions in each model as high as 1010-11. This approach enables us to simulate the distribution of the major sources of dust in the Solar System. In particular, they include 20-30 million cold comets gravitationally scattered by the four giant planets in cometary journey from the Kuiper belt inward in the Solar System. These comets are found to be distributed in the form of four `cometary belts' associated with the orbits of the giant planets. Our 3D physical model of the IPD cloud, which includes three dust components -- asteroidal, cometary, and kuiperoidal, explains three different kinds of data: (i) the distribution of sources of dust, both known and predicted to exist from computer simulations; (ii) zodiacal light distribution in the Solar System, which fits the COBE data with an average accuracy of 0.85%; and (iii) the experimental data of Pioneers and Voyagers dust detectors. Further improvements of our modeling and their importance for astronomy and cosmology are outlined.

  10. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  11. Improving Hydrology in Land Ice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Stephen; Flowers, Gwenn; Schoof, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Community Earth System Model Land Ice Working Group Meeting; Boulder, Colorado, 13 January 2011 ; Recent observations indicate that mass loss from glaciers and ice sheets (“land ice”) is increasing. The drivers of these changes are not well understood, and modeling the land ice response to them remains challenging. As a result, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change explicitly avoided speculating on 21st-century sea level rise from ice dynamical processes in its fourth assessment report. The mismatch between observations of land ice change and model skill at mimicking those changes is behind recent efforts to develop next-generation land ice models. Necessary improvements to existing models include improved dynamics, coupling to climate models, and better representations of important boundary conditions and physical processes. Basal sliding, the primary control on the rate of land ice delivery to the oceans, is one such boundary condition that is largely controlled by land ice hydrology.

  12. Profiles of Change: Lessons for Improving High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This feature has told stories of high school physical educators who have refused to accept the status quo of high school physical education programs. They have identified problems, initiated innovations in their own classes, implemented changes beyond their classes, and moved toward institutionalizing improvements throughout their programs and…

  13. Profiles of Change: Lessons for Improving High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This feature has told stories of high school physical educators who have refused to accept the status quo of high school physical education programs. They have identified problems, initiated innovations in their own classes, implemented changes beyond their classes, and moved toward institutionalizing improvements throughout their programs and…

  14. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  15. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  16. The value of oxygen-isotope data and multiple discharge records in calibrating a fully-distributed, physically-based rainfall-runoff model (CRUM3) to improve predictive capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Aaron; Reaney, Sim

    2015-04-01

    Fully-distributed, physically-based rainfall-runoff models attempt to capture some of the complexity of the runoff processes that operate within a catchment, and have been used to address a variety of issues including water quality and the effect of climate change on flood frequency. Two key issues are prevalent, however, which call into question the predictive capability of such models. The first is the issue of parameter equifinality which can be responsible for large amounts of uncertainty. The second is whether such models make the right predictions for the right reasons - are the processes operating within a catchment correctly represented, or do the predictive abilities of these models result only from the calibration process? The use of additional data sources, such as environmental tracers, has been shown to help address both of these issues, by allowing for multi-criteria model calibration to be undertaken, and by permitting a greater understanding of the processes operating in a catchment and hence a more thorough evaluation of how well catchment processes are represented in a model. Using discharge and oxygen-18 data sets, the ability of the fully-distributed, physically-based CRUM3 model to represent the runoff processes in three sub-catchments in Cumbria, NW England has been evaluated. These catchments (Morland, Dacre and Pow) are part of the of the River Eden demonstration test catchment project. The oxygen-18 data set was firstly used to derive transit-time distributions and mean residence times of water for each of the catchments to gain an integrated overview of the types of processes that were operating. A generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation procedure was then used to calibrate the CRUM3 model for each catchment based on a single discharge data set from each catchment. Transit-time distributions and mean residence times of water obtained from the model using the top 100 behavioural parameter sets for each catchment were then compared to

  17. Improving physical activity in COPD: towards a new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating disease affecting patients in daily life, both physically and emotionally. Symptoms such as dyspnea and muscle fatigue, lead to exercise intolerance, which, together with behavioral issues, trigger physical inactivity, a key feature of COPD. Physical inactivity is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, including hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Increasing activity levels is crucial for effective management strategies and could lead to improved long-term outcomes. In this review we summarize objective and subjective instruments for evaluating physical activity and focus on interventions such as pulmonary rehabilitation or bronchodilators aimed at increasing activity levels. To date, only limited evidence exists to support the effectiveness of these interventions. We suggest that a multimodal approach comprising pulmonary rehabilitation, pharmacotherapy, and counselling programs aimed at addressing emotional and behavioural aspects of COPD may be an effective way to increase physical activity and improve health status in the long term. PMID:24229341

  18. Improved AWG Fourier optics model.

    PubMed

    Molina-Fernández, I; Wangüemert-Pérez, J

    2004-10-04

    In this paper we present an improved Fourier Optics model to calculate the transmission characteristics between any arbitrary pair of input/output ports (IOPs) of an Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG). In this model the input and output sections of the AWG are modeled using the same approximations, thus removing some reciprocity-related inconsistencies present in previously existing models. The expressions which summarize the model are compact and easily interpretable. Simple quasi-analytical expressions are also derived under the Gaussian approximation of the mode field profiles.

  19. Using data assimilation for systematic model improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Matthew S.; van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Browne, Phil

    2016-04-01

    In Numerical Weather Prediction parameterisations are used to simulate missing physics in the model. These can be due to a lack of scientific understanding or a lack of computing power available to address all the known physical processes. Parameterisations are sources of large uncertainty in a model as parameter values used in these parameterisations cannot be measured directly and hence are often not well known, and the parameterisations themselves are approximations of the processes present in the true atmosphere. Whilst there are many efficient and effective methods for combined state/parameter estimation in data assimilation, such as state augmentation, these are not effective at estimating the structure of parameterisations. A new method of parameterisation estimation is proposed that uses sequential data assimilation methods to estimate errors in the numerical models at each space-time point for each model equation. These errors are then fitted to predetermined functional forms of missing physics or parameterisations, that are based upon prior information. The method picks out the functional form, or that combination of functional forms, that bests fits the error structure. The prior information typically takes the form of expert knowledge. We applied the method to a one-dimensional advection model with additive model error, and it is shown that the method can accurately estimate parameterisations, with consistent error estimates. It is also demonstrated that state augmentation is not successful. The results indicate that this new method is a powerful tool in systematic model improvement.

  20. Improve SSME power balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    Effort was dedicated to development and testing of a formal strategy for reconciling uncertain test data with physically limited computational prediction. Specific weaknesses in the logical structure of the current Power Balance Model (PBM) version are described with emphasis given to the main routing subroutines BAL and DATRED. Selected results from a variational analysis of PBM predictions are compared to Technology Test Bed (TTB) variational study results to assess PBM predictive capability. The motivation for systematic integration of uncertain test data with computational predictions based on limited physical models is provided. The theoretical foundation for the reconciliation strategy developed in this effort is presented, and results of a reconciliation analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel side turbopump subsystem are examined.

  1. A GIS-based Adaptive Management Decision Support System to Develop a Multi-Objective Framework: A case study utilizing GIS technologies and physically-based models to archieve improved decision making for site management.

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Lane, Leonard J.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Roberts, Damon

    2008-06-26

    The notion of Adaptive Management (AM) allows for the realization and adjustment of management practices in response to elements of uncertainty. In terms of natural resource management, this will typically integrate monitoring, databases, simulation modeling, decision theory, and expert judgment to evaluate management alternatives and adapt them as necessary to continually improve the natural resource condition as defined by the stakeholders. Natural resource management scenarios can often be expressed, viewed, and understood as a spatial and temporal problem. The integration of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies and physically-based models provide an effective state-of-the-art solution for deriving, understanding, and applying AM scenarios for land use and remediation. A recently developed GIS-based adaptive management decision support system is presented for the U.S. Department of Defense Yakima Training Center near Yakima, Washington.

  2. [Improvement of physical fitness as anti-aging intervention].

    PubMed

    Castillo Garzón, Manuel J; Ortega Porcel, Francisco B; Ruiz Ruiz, Jonatan

    2005-02-05

    Several recent important studies have clearly shown that a low physical fitness represents a potent risk factor and even a predictor of both cardiovascular and all-causes morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, physical fitness assessment should be performed at the clinical level since, when properly assessed, it is a highly valuable health and life expectancy indicator. Based on the results of fitness assessment in a particular person and knowing his/her life style and daily physical activity, an individually adapted training program can be prescribed. This training program will allow that person to develop his/her maximal physical potential while improving his/her physical and mental health and attenuating the deleterious consequences of aging. In fact, physical exercise is today proposed as a highly effective means to treat and prevent major morbidity and mortality causes in industrialized countries. Most of these causes are associated with the aging process. In order to be effective, this type of intervention should be directed to improve the aerobic capacity and strength. In addition, it should be complemented with work directed to improve the general coordination and flexibility. Finally, diet optimization and use of nutritional supplements and legal ergogenic aids are key elements to improve the functional capacity and health, all of which is synonymous of anti-aging interventions.

  3. Comprehensive Physical Education Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamiya, Artie

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the Wake County Public School System (North Carolina) received $1.3 million as one of 237 national winners of the $70 million federal Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) Grant competition. The PEP Grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and provides monies to school districts able to demonstrate the…

  4. Comprehensive Physical Education Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamiya, Artie

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the Wake County Public School System (North Carolina) received $1.3 million as one of 237 national winners of the $70 million federal Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) Grant competition. The PEP Grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and provides monies to school districts able to demonstrate the…

  5. Improving High School Physics Through An Outreach Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2006-04-01

    We want to discuss our outreach initiative at Jacksonville State University designed to help improve the teaching of physics at a number of high schools in Northeast Alabama. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. IMPACTSEED is designed to achieve a double aim: (a) to make physics and chemistry understandable and fun to learn within a hands-on, inquiry-based setting; (b) to overcome the fear-factor for physics and chemistry among students. Through a two-week long summer institute, a series of weekend workshops designed to help bring technology into physics classrooms, onsite support, and a hotline, we have been providing year-round support to the physics/chemistry teachers in this area. IMPACTSEED aims at providing our students with a physics/chemistry education that enjoys a great deal of continuity and consistency from high school to college.

  6. The Role of Exergaming in Improving Physical Activity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sween, Jennifer; Wallington, Sherrie Flynnt; Sheppard, Vanessa; Taylor, Teletia; Llanos, Adana A.; Adams-Campbell, Lucile Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Background The high prevalence of obesity in America can be attributed to inadequate energy expenditure as a result of high levels of physical inactivity. This review presents an overview of the current literature on physical activity, specifically through active videogame systems (exergaming) and how these systems can help to increase physical activity levels. Methods The search strategy for this review was to identify previous studies which investigated energy expenditure levels using a single active video game or a combination of active videogames. Results Based on data from 27 studies, a strong correlation exists between exergaming and increased energy expenditure (up to 300% above resting levels). The majority of active videogames tested were found to achieve physical activity levels of moderate intensity, which meet American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for health and fitness. Conclusions Exergaming is a new and exciting strategy to potentially improve physical activity levels and reduce obesity among Americans. PMID:25078529

  7. Resist development modeling for OPC accuracy improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yongfa; Zavyalova, Lena; Zhang, Yunqiang; Zhang, Charlie; Lucas, Kevin; Falch, Brad; Croffie, Ebo; Li, Jianliang; Melvin, Lawrence; Ward, Brian

    2009-03-01

    in the same way that current model calibration is done. The method is validated with a rigorous lithography process simulation tool which is based on physical models to simulate and predict effects during the resist PEB and development process. Furthermore, an experimental lithographic process was modeled using this new methodology, showing significant improvement in modeling accuracy in compassion to a traditional model. Layout correction test has shown that the new model form is equivalent to traditional model forms in terms of correction convergence and speed.

  8. TraMoS project - III. Improved physical parameters, timing analysis and starspot modelling of the WASP-4b exoplanet system from 38 transit observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, S.; López-Morales, M.; Rojo, P.; Nascimbeni, V.; Hidalgo, S.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Concha, F.; Contreras, Y.; Servajean, E.; Hinse, T. C.

    2013-09-01

    We report 12 new transit observations of the exoplanet WASP-4b from the Transit Monitoring in the South (TraMoS) project. These transits are combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide an improved radius measurement of Rp = 1.395 ± 0.022Rjup and improved transit ephemerides. In a new homogeneous analysis in search for transit timing variations (TTVs) we find no evidence of those with rms amplitudes larger than 20 s over a 4-yr time span. This lack of TTVs rules out the presence of additional planets in the system with masses larger than about 2.5, 2.0 and 1.0 M⊕ around the 1:2, 5:3 and 2:1 orbital resonances. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth, also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. Finally, we perform a simple study of stellar spots configurations of the system and conclude that the star rotational period is about 34 d.

  9. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  10. Introductory physics in biological context: An approach to improve introductory physics for life science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Catherine H.; Heller, Kenneth

    2014-05-01

    We describe restructuring the introductory physics for life science students (IPLS) course to better support these students in using physics to understand their chosen fields. Our courses teach physics using biologically rich contexts. Specifically, we use examples in which fundamental physics contributes significantly to understanding a biological system to make explicit the value of physics to the life sciences. This requires selecting the course content to reflect the topics most relevant to biology while maintaining the fundamental disciplinary structure of physics. In addition to stressing the importance of the fundamental principles of physics, an important goal is developing students' quantitative and problem solving skills. Our guiding pedagogical framework is the cognitive apprenticeship model, in which learning occurs most effectively when students can articulate why what they are learning matters to them. In this article, we describe our courses, summarize initial assessment data, and identify needs for future research.

  11. Aircraft Observations for Improved Physical Parameterization for Seasonal Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    of extended forecasts . The objectives of the NRL project are to obtain measurements of the solar and IR irradiance throughout the cloudy...fractional cloud condition in forecast models . The radiometer measurements (NRL effort) are important to this study because the solar radiative...range forecast models . OBJECTIVES The objectives of the NPS project is to understand the physical processes involved in boundary layers

  12. Improving the Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO{sub 2} Sequestered in Geologic Systems with Multicomponent Seismic Technology and Rock Physics Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Alkan, Engin; DeAngelo, Michael; Hardage, Bob; Sava, Diana; Sullivan, Charlotte; Wagner, Donald

    2012-12-31

    concept that the same weight must be given to S-wave sequences and facies as is given to P-wave sequences and facies. This philosophy differs from the standard practice of depending on only conventional P-wave seismic stratigraphy to characterize reservoir units. The fundamental physics of elastic wavefield seismic stratigraphy is that S- wave modes sense different sequences and facies across some intervals than does a P-wave mode because S-wave displacement vectors are orthogonal to P- wave displacement vectors and thus react to a different rock fabric than do P waves. Although P and S images are different, both images can still be correct in terms of the rock fabric information they reveal.

  13. Bridging physics and biology teaching through modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskinson, Anne-Marie; Couch, Brian A.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hinko, Kathleen A.; Caballero, Marcos D.

    2014-05-01

    As the frontiers of biology become increasingly interdisciplinary, the physics education community has engaged in ongoing efforts to make physics classes more relevant to life science majors. These efforts are complicated by the many apparent differences between these fields, including the types of systems that each studies, the behavior of those systems, the kinds of measurements that each makes, and the role of mathematics in each field. Nonetheless, physics and biology are both sciences that rely on observations and measurements to construct models of the natural world. In this article, we propose that efforts to bridge the teaching of these two disciplines must emphasize shared scientific practices, particularly scientific modeling. We define modeling using language common to both disciplines and highlight how an understanding of the modeling process can help reconcile apparent differences between the teaching of physics and biology. We elaborate on how models can be used for explanatory, predictive, and functional purposes and present common models from each discipline demonstrating key modeling principles. By framing interdisciplinary teaching in the context of modeling, we aim to bridge physics and biology teaching and to equip students with modeling competencies applicable in any scientific discipline.

  14. Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Wolfgang; Esquembre, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Modeling has been shown to correct weaknesses of traditional instruction by engaging students in the design of physical models to describe, explain, and predict phenomena. Although the modeling method can be used without computers, the use of computers allows students to study problems that are difficult and time consuming, to visualize their…

  15. Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Wolfgang; Esquembre, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Modeling has been shown to correct weaknesses of traditional instruction by engaging students in the design of physical models to describe, explain, and predict phenomena. Although the modeling method can be used without computers, the use of computers allows students to study problems that are difficult and time consuming, to visualize their…

  16. The trinucleons: Physical observables and model properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.

    1992-01-01

    Our progress in understanding the properties of {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He in terms of a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian picture employing realistic nuclear forces is reviewed. Trinucleon model properties are summarized for a number of contemporary force models, and predictions for physical observables are presented. Disagreement between theoretical model results and experimental results are highlighted.

  17. The trinucleons: Physical observables and model properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.

    1992-05-01

    Our progress in understanding the properties of {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He in terms of a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian picture employing realistic nuclear forces is reviewed. Trinucleon model properties are summarized for a number of contemporary force models, and predictions for physical observables are presented. Disagreement between theoretical model results and experimental results are highlighted.

  18. Using Physical Education to Improve Literacy Skills in Struggling Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachob, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Literacy skills are an essential part of academic performance. When physical educators collaborate with classroom teachers to address these skills, student engagement in the learning process can greatly improve. This article begins by reviewing the growing issues surrounding student literacy and its impact on academic performance. The discussion…

  19. Improving Students' Vocabulary Mastery by Using Total Physical Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrurrozi

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to describe how Total Physical Response improves students' vocabulary learning outcomes at the third-grade elementary school Guntur 03 South Jakarta, Indonesia. This research was conducted in the first semester of the academic year 2015-2016 with the number of students as many as 40 students. The method used in this research is a…

  20. Android-assisted physics mobile learning to improve senior high school students' divergent thinking skills and physics HOTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardiana, Nana; Kuswanto, Heru

    2017-08-01

    The aims of the research concerned here were to reveal (1) the characteristics of Android-assisted PML (physics mobile learning) to improve SMA (sekolah menengah atas, Indonesian senior high school) students' divergent thinking skills and physics HOTS (higher order thinking skills); (2) the feasibility of the Android-assisted PML; and (3) the influence of using the Android-assisted PML on improvement in SMA students' divergent thinking skills and physics HOTS. The7 research was of the R&D (research and development) type, adapted from theBorg-&-Gall development model. The research data were analyzed by means of MANOVA with the significance level of 5%. The results are as follows. (1) The product of the development, a learning media in software form with the android package(apk) format, is named PML (to refer to Physics Mobile Learning), which has such characterictics as being operable with use of Android devicesand being very good in quality in the aspect oflearning, material, software technology, and audiovisual appearance. 2) The developed learning media referred to as PML is appropriate for learning activity according to evaluation by a material expert, a media expert, peer reviewers, and physics teachers as well as according to results of students' tryouts. (3) The use of the Android-assisted PML media product could improve SMA students' divergent thinking skillsand physics HOTS with the respective high-category gain scores of 0.701 and 0.759.

  1. The role of physical activity in improving physical fitness in children with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kyla; Staples, Kerri

    2017-10-01

    One in three children in North America are considered overweight or obese. Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are at an increased risk for obesity than their typically developing peers. Decreased physical activity (PA) and low physical fitness may be contributing factors to this rise in obesity. Because children with IDD are at an increased risk of diseases related to inactivity, it is important to improve health-related physical fitness to complete activities of daily living and improve health. The focus of this research is on improving the performance of physical fitness components through physical activity programming among a group of children with IDD, ages 7-12 years. The Brockport Physical Fitness Test was used assess levels of physical fitness of 35 children with IDD (25 boys, 10 girls) before and after participation in a 10-week program. The results of paired sampled t-tests showed participation in 15-h PA program can significantly increase aerobic capacity and muscular strength and endurance in children with IDD. This study is aimed at understanding the role of PA in helping children with IDD to develop the fitness capacities essential to participation in a wide variety of activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Standard Model of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, William

    2015-04-01

    At its core, nuclear physics, which describes the properties and interactions of hadrons, such as protons and neutrons, and atomic nuclei, arises from the Standard Model of particle physics. However, the complexities of nuclei result in severe computational difficulties that have historically prevented the calculation of central quantities in nuclear physics directly from this underlying theory. The availability of petascale (and prospect of exascale) high performance computing is changing this situation by enabling us to extend the numerical techniques of lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD), applied successfully in particle physics, to the more intricate dynamics of nuclear physics. In this talk, I will discuss this revolution and the emerging understanding of hadrons and nuclei within the Standard Model.

  3. Developing + Using Models in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd; Neilson, Drew; Oh, Phil Seok

    2013-01-01

    Of the eight practices of science identified in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" (NRC 2012), helping students develop and use models has been identified by many as an anchor (Schwarz and Passmore 2012; Windschitl 2012). In instruction, disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and scientific practices can be meaningfully…

  4. Developing + Using Models in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd; Neilson, Drew; Oh, Phil Seok

    2013-01-01

    Of the eight practices of science identified in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" (NRC 2012), helping students develop and use models has been identified by many as an anchor (Schwarz and Passmore 2012; Windschitl 2012). In instruction, disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and scientific practices can be meaningfully…

  5. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  6. Physics of the Quark Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the charge independence, wavefunctions, magnetic moments, and high-energy scattering of hadrons on the basis of group theory and nonrelativistic quark model with mass spectrum calculated by first-order perturbation theory. The presentation is explainable to advanced undergraduate students. (CC)

  7. [Increase of physical activity by improvement of the nutritional status].

    PubMed

    Torún, B

    1989-09-01

    Physical activity is affected by nutritional modifications and, in turn, influences growth, cognition, social behavior, work performance and other functions. Studies in preschool children showed that: 1. A decrease in energy intake during four to seven days reduced the time allocated to energy-demanding activities and increased sedentary activities. 2. Children with mild weight deficit were more sedentary than well-nourished counterparts. 3. Children became more active when nutritional status improved. 4. A 10% reduction in energy intake reduced total energy expenditure by 15% without affecting weight gain nor basal metabolism. Studies of men working in non-mechanized agriculture showed that: 1. Dietary improvements led to faster salaried work, reduction of napping time and greater physical activity after work. 2. An increase in energy intake increased total daily energy expenditure, tending to maintain energy balance and relatively stable body weight within the cyclic variations of the agricultural year. 3. Food supplementation did not necessarily improve productivity. Other labor incentives without dietary improvements increased energy expenditure during working hours, which resulted in weight loss. In conclusion, good health and nutrition provide the biological basis for adequate physical activity that may improve cognitive development, social interactions, economic productivity and the quality of life of an individual or a population, but other incentives are required for the optimal expression of that biologic potential.

  8. NUCFRG3: Light ion improvements to the nuclear fragmentation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Anne; Norman, Ryan; Sriprisan, Sirikul; Townsend, Lawrence; Norbury, John; Blattnig, Steve; Slaba, Tony

    2011-10-01

    Light ion improvements to the nuclear fragmentation model NUCFRG are reported. Improvements include the replacement of the simple light ion production model with a light ion coalescence model and an improved electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) formalism. Prior versions of the model provide reasonable overall agreement with measured data; however, those versions lack a physics-based description for coalescence and EMD. The NUCFRG3 model has improved theoretical descriptions of these mechanisms and offers additional benefits. Previous work established the improved EMD formalism to be more accurate than the predecessor. The predictive capability of NUCFRG has been improved and strengthened by the light ion physics-based changes. Based on increased capability and better theoretical grounding of NUCFRG3, it is recommended that it replace NUCFRG2 for space radiation assessments and other applications.

  9. Improvements in accuracy of dense OPC models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallingal, Chidam; Oberschmidt, James; Viswanathan, Ramya; Abdo, Amr; Park, OSeo

    2008-10-01

    Performing model-based optical proximity correction (MBOPC) on layouts has become an integral part of patterning advanced integrated circuits. Earlier technologies used sparse OPC, the run times of which explode when the density of layouts increases. With the move to 45 nm technology node, this increase in run time has resulted in a shift to dense simulation OPC, which is pixel-based. The dense approach becomes more efficient at 45nm technology node and beyond. New OPC model forms can be used with the dense simulation OPC engine, providing the greater accuracy required by smaller technology nodes. Parameters in the optical model have to be optimized to achieve the required accuracy. Dense OPC uses a resist model with a different set of parameters than sparse OPC. The default search ranges used in the optimization of these resist parameters do not always result in the best accuracy. However, it is possible to improve the accuracy of the resist models by understanding the restrictions placed on the search ranges of the physical parameters during optimization. This paper will present results showing the correlation between accuracy of the models and some of these optical and resist parameters. The results will show that better optimization can improve the model fitness of features in both the calibration and verification set.

  10. Improving Climate and Gender Equity in Physics Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennello, Sherry

    2010-02-01

    We need to open the door of science to women and minorities. We need to invite them in and encourage them to succeed. We need to teach them the secret handshake and transfer all the writing on the men's room walls and all-white country clubs into accessible places. We need to promote them to positions of national prominence. We need to do this out of respect to our mothers and the pioneering scientists who have come before us. We need to do this for our daughters and sons, so that our grandchildren may only know this discrimination as a piece of history. We need to do this now -- for the sake of our country, our science, our technical workforce, our economy and because it is the right thing to do. The Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP) has been helping physics departments improve their climate as a means to enhance gender equity. The CSWP site visit program has been giving departments valuable feedback on their climate for many years. In May 2007, a workshop on ``Gender Equity: Enhancing the Physics Enterprise in Universities and National Laboratories'' was held to address the issue of underrepresentation of women in physics by engaging the stake holders. This fall a new ``Conversation on Gender Equity'' has begun. Successful strategies for improving the climate and increasing the representation of women in physics will be presented. )

  11. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  12. Modeling theory applied: Modeling Instruction in introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Modeling Instruction is a pedagogical approach which has been widely and successfully employed in high school physics instruction but is not commonly used at the university level. The goal of this paper is to describe the nature of Modeling Instruction at the university level and to clarify the role of models in physics instruction. A university physics class is described as it progresses through a typical modeling cycle, Introduction and Representation, Coordination of Representations, Abstraction and Generalization, and Application and Refinement. The benefits of modeling instruction are discussed.

  13. Improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiao; Ben-Zhuo, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of biomolecular systems plays an essential role in understanding biological processes, such as ionic flow across channels, protein modification or interaction, and cell signaling. The continuum model described by the Poisson- Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations has made great contributions towards simulation of these processes. However, the model has shortcomings in its commonly used form and cannot capture (or cannot accurately capture) some important physical properties of the biological systems. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the continuum model to account for discrete particle interactions and to make progress in numerical methods to provide accurate and efficient simulations. This review will summarize recent main improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems, with focus on the size-modified models, the coupling of the classical density functional theory and the PNP equations, the coupling of polar and nonpolar interactions, and numerical progress. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91230106) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences Program for Cross & Cooperative Team of the Science & Technology Innovation.

  14. Physical Modelling of Sedimentary Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, David A.

    2003-04-24

    The main goals of the first three years have been achieved, i.e., the development of particle-based and continuum-based algorithms for cross-scaleup-scale analysis of complex fluid flows. The U. Minnesota team has focused on particle-based methods, wavelets (Rustad et al., 2001) and visualization and has had great success with the dissipative and fluid particle dynamics algorithms, as applied to colloidal, polymeric and biological systems, wavelet filtering and visualization endeavors. We have organized two sessions in nonlinear geophysics at the A.G.U. Fall Meeting (2000,2002), which have indeed synergetically stimulated the community and promoted cross-disciplinary efforts in the geosciences. The LANL team has succeeded with continuum-based algorithms, in particular, fractal interpolating functions (fif). These have been applied to 1-D flow and transport equations (Travis, 2000; 2002) as a proof of principle, providing solutions that capture dynamics at all scales. In addition, the fif representations can be integrated to provide sub-grid-scale homogenization, which can be used in more traditional finite difference or finite element solutions of porous flow and transport. Another useful tool for fluid flow problems is the ability to solve inverse problems, that is, given present-time observations of a fluid flow, what was the initial state of that fluid system? We have demonstrated this capability for a large-scale problem of 3-D flow in the Earth's crust (Bunge, Hagelberg & Travis, 2002). Use of the adjoint method for sensitivity analysis (Marchuk, 1995) to compute derivatives of models makes the large-scale inversion feasible in 4-D, , space and time. Further, a framework for simulating complex fluid flow in the Earth's crust has been implemented (Dutrow et al, 2001). The remaining task of the first three-year campaign is to extend the implementation of the fif formalism to our 2-D and 3-D computer codes, which is straightforward, but involved.

  15. Physical-scale models of engineered log jams in rivers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stream restoration and river engineering projects are employing engineered log jams increasingly for stabilization and in-stream improvements. To further advance the design of these structures and their morphodynamic effects on corridors, the basis for physical-scale models of rivers with engineere...

  16. Improving Learning by Discussing Controversies in 20th Century Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Rodriguez, Maria A.

    2002-01-01

    Textbooks rarely emphasize how controversial some physics theories were at the time of their proposal. Makes the case that useful classroom debate can be generated by considering the controversy that arose over models of the atom such as Rutherford's and Bohr's, and ideas about fractional charges put forward by Millikan and arising from quark…

  17. Improving Learning by Discussing Controversies in 20th Century Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Rodriguez, Maria A.

    2002-01-01

    Textbooks rarely emphasize how controversial some physics theories were at the time of their proposal. Makes the case that useful classroom debate can be generated by considering the controversy that arose over models of the atom such as Rutherford's and Bohr's, and ideas about fractional charges put forward by Millikan and arising from quark…

  18. A SUPER Model for Teaching Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Compares and contrasts high school physics philosophies, curricula, and textbooks of early 1900s to present, indicating that current textbooks are teacher and subject-oriented, lack examples of daily life, and are highly mathematical and too abstract. Suggestions for helping students experience success and improve self-esteem (which leads to…

  19. NUCFRG3: Light ion improvements to the nuclear fragmentation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, A. M.; Norman, R. B.; Sriprisan, S. I.; Townsend, L. W.; Norbury, J. W.; Blattnig, S. R.; Slaba, T. C.

    2012-06-01

    Light ion improvements to the nuclear fragmentation model, NUCFRG, are reported. Improvements include the replacement of the simple light ion production model with a light ion coalescence model and an improved electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) formalism. Prior versions of the model provide reasonable overall agreement with measured data; however, those versions lack a physics-based description for coalescence and EMD. The version reported herein, NUCFRG3, has improved the theoretical descriptions of these mechanisms and offers additional benefits, such as the capability to calculate EMD cross-sections for single deuteron, triton, helion, and alpha particle emission. NUCFRG3 model evaluation and validation show that the predictive capability has been improved and strengthened by the light ion physics-based changes. Based on increased capability and better theoretical grounding, it is recommended that NUCFRG3 replace its predecessors for space radiation assessments and other applications.

  20. Chicken essence improves exercise performance and ameliorates physical fatigue.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Lin, Ching-I; Chiu, Chien-Chao; Lin, Yi-Ting; Huang, Wei-Kai; Huang, Hui-Yu; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2014-07-18

    Chicken essence (CE) is a liquid nutritional supplement made from cooking whole chickens. In traditional Chinese medicine, CE is used to support health, promote healing, increase metabolism, and relieve fatigue. However, few studies have examined the effect of CE on exercise performance and physical fatigue. We aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CE on fatigue and ergogenic functions following physical challenge in mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups to receive vehicle or CE by oral gavage at 0, 845, 1690, or 4225 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of physical fatigue-related biomarkers serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK) after physical challenge. CE supplementation dose-dependently elevated endurance and grip strength. CE supplementation significantly decreased lactate, ammonia, and CK levels after physical challenge. Tissue glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise, was significantly increased with CE supplementation. In addition, CE supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. The supplementation with CE can have a wide spectrum of bioactivities on health promotion, performance improvement and anti-fatigue.

  1. Chicken Essence Improves Exercise Performance and Ameliorates Physical Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Lin, Ching-I; Chiu, Chien-Chao; Lin, Yi-Ting; Huang, Wei-Kai; Huang, Hui-Yu; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Chicken essence (CE) is a liquid nutritional supplement made from cooking whole chickens. In traditional Chinese medicine, CE is used to support health, promote healing, increase metabolism, and relieve fatigue. However, few studies have examined the effect of CE on exercise performance and physical fatigue. We aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CE on fatigue and ergogenic functions following physical challenge in mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups to receive vehicle or CE by oral gavage at 0, 845, 1690, or 4225 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of physical fatigue-related biomarkers serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK) after physical challenge. CE supplementation dose-dependently elevated endurance and grip strength. CE supplementation significantly decreased lactate, ammonia, and CK levels after physical challenge. Tissue glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise, was significantly increased with CE supplementation. In addition, CE supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. The supplementation with CE can have a wide spectrum of bioactivities on health promotion, performance improvement and anti-fatigue. PMID:25045938

  2. Composing Models of Geographic Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Barbara; Frank, Andrew U.

    Processes are central for geographic information science; yet geographic information systems (GIS) lack capabilities to represent process related information. A prerequisite to including processes in GIS software is a general method to describe geographic processes independently of application disciplines. This paper presents such a method, namely a process description language. The vocabulary of the process description language is derived formally from mathematical models. Physical processes in geography can be described in two equivalent languages: partial differential equations or partial difference equations, where the latter can be shown graphically and used as a method for application specialists to enter their process models. The vocabulary of the process description language comprises components for describing the general behavior of prototypical geographic physical processes. These process components can be composed by basic models of geographic physical processes, which is shown by means of an example.

  3. Simplified Models for LHC New Physics Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Daniele; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Buckley, Matthew; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Chivukula, R.Sekhar; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig, Rouven,; Evans, Jared A.; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto; /more authors..

    2012-06-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the 'Topologies for Early LHC Searches' workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first {approx} 50-500 pb{sup -1} of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  4. Simplified models for LHC new physics searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Daniele; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Arora, Sanjay; Bai, Yang; Baumgart, Matthew; Berger, Joshua; Buckley, Matthew; Butler, Bart; Chang, Spencer; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Cheung, Clifford; Sekhar Chivukula, R.; Cho, Won Sang; Cotta, Randy; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; El Hedri, Sonia; Essig (Editor, Rouven; Evans, Jared A.; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Fox, Patrick; Franceschini, Roberto; Freitas, Ayres; Gainer, James S.; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Gregoire, Thomas; Gripaios, Ben; Gunion, Jack; Han, Tao; Haas, Andy; Hansson, Per; Hewett, JoAnne; Hits, Dmitry; Hubisz, Jay; Izaguirre, Eder; Kaplan, Jared; Katz, Emanuel; Kilic, Can; Kim, Hyung-Do; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Koay, Sue Ann; Ko, Pyungwon; Krohn, David; Kuflik, Eric; Lewis, Ian; Lisanti (Editor, Mariangela; Liu, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Lu, Ran; Luty, Markus; Meade, Patrick; Morrissey, David; Mrenna, Stephen; Nojiri, Mihoko; Okui, Takemichi; Padhi, Sanjay; Papucci, Michele; Park, Michael; Park, Myeonghun; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael; Phalen, Daniel; Rehermann, Keith; Rentala, Vikram; Roy, Tuhin; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Sanz, Veronica; Schmaltz, Martin; Schnetzer, Stephen; Schuster (Editor, Philip; Schwaller, Pedro; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Schwartzman, Ariel; Shao, Jing; Shelton, Jessie; Shih, David; Shu, Jing; Silverstein, Daniel; Simmons, Elizabeth; Somalwar, Sunil; Spannowsky, Michael; Spethmann, Christian; Strassler, Matthew; Su, Shufang; Tait (Editor, Tim; Thomas, Brooks; Thomas, Scott; Toro (Editor, Natalia; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker (Editor, Jay; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Yavin, Itay; Yu, Felix; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn; LHC New Physics Working Group

    2012-10-01

    This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the ‘Topologies for Early LHC Searches’ workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first ˜50-500 pb-1 of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.

  5. Model reduction in the physical coordinate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yae, K. Harold; Joeng, K. Y.

    1989-01-01

    In the dynamics modeling of a flexible structure, finite element analysis employs reduction techniques, such as Guyan's reduction, to remove some of the insignificant physical coordinates, thus producing a dynamics model that has smaller mass and stiffness matrices. But this reduction is limited in the sense that it removes certain degrees of freedom at a node points themselves in the model. From the standpoint of linear control design, the resultant model is still too large despite the reduction. Thus, some form of the model reduction is frequently used in control design by approximating a large dynamical system with a fewer number of state variables. However, a problem arises from the placement of sensors and actuators in the reduced model, because a model usually undergoes, before being reduced, some form of coordinate transformations that do not preserve the physical meanings of the states. To correct such a problem, a method is developed that expresses a reduced model in terms of a subset of the original states. The proposed method starts with a dynamic model that is originated and reduced in finite element analysis. Then the model is converted to the state space form, and reduced again by the internal balancing method. At this point, being in the balanced coordinate system, the states in the reduced model have no apparent resemblance to those of the original model. Through another coordinate transformation that is developed, however, this reduced model is expressed by a subset of the original states.

  6. Physical and stochastic models of earthquake clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Console, Rodolfo; Murru, Maura; Catalli, Flaminia

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of earthquake clustering, i.e., the increase of occurrence probability for seismic events close in space and time to other previous earthquakes, has been modeled both by statistical and physical processes. From a statistical viewpoint the so-called epidemic model (ETAS) introduced by Ogata in 1988 and its variations have become fairly well known in the seismological community. Tests on real seismicity and comparison with a plain time-independent Poissonian model through likelihood-based methods have reliably proved their validity. On the other hand, in the last decade many papers have been published on the so-called Coulomb stress change principle, based on the theory of elasticity, showing qualitatively that an increase of the Coulomb stress in a given area is usually associated with an increase of seismic activity. More specifically, the rate-and-state theory developed by Dieterich in the '90s has been able to give a physical justification to the phenomenon known as Omori law. According to this law, a mainshock is followed by a series of aftershocks whose frequency decreases in time as an inverse power law. In this study we give an outline of the above-mentioned stochastic and physical models, and build up an approach by which these models can be merged in a single algorithm and statistically tested. The application to the seismicity of Japan from 1970 to 2003 shows that the new model incorporating the physical concept of the rate-and-state theory performs not worse than the purely stochastic model with two free parameters only. The numerical results obtained in these applications are related to physical characters of the model as the stress change produced by an earthquake close to its edges and to the A and σ parameters of the rate-and-state constitutive law.

  7. Outpatient rehabilitation as an intervention to improve employees' physical capacity.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Birgitta; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Nikkari, Seppo T

    2016-01-01

    The aging of the workforce poses new challenges for maintaining work ability. Because of limited information on the effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation performed in traditional inpatient programs, extended interest in outpatient rehabilitation has risen in the past few years. We examined the effects of a new outpatient rehabilitation program where every participant defined their own goals to improve work ability by the aid of a goal-oriented multi-professional team. This report will focus on the employees' physical capacity during a nine-month program. A total of 605 municipal employees from different production areas of the City of Tampere took part in the outpatient rehabilitation program, implemented by the occupational health unit. Groups of 12 employees participated in eight one-day sessions at intervals of two to three weeks; the final follow-up was 9 months from the beginning. Submaximal aerobic capacity was tested by a calibrated cycle ergometer with a commercial program (Aino Fitware pro, Helsinki, Finland). Musculoskeletal tests assessed muscle strength, balance and mobility. During the 9-month follow-up of the rehabilitation program, the employees' physical capacity was improved. The follow-up test scores from a total of 329 employees were significantly higher in the submaximal aerobic capacity test (p < 0.001). Other tests were also improved, such as standing on one foot (p = 0.001), back side bending flexibility test (p < 0.001), dynamic sit up (p = 0.001), upper extremity right (p < 0.001), and knee bending (p = 0.029). About 40% of the participants did not have an adequate health situation to take part in physical capacity tests; however they took part in the intervention. The new outpatient rehabilitation program organized by the occupational health unit had a positive influence on employees' physical capacity during a nine-month follow up.

  8. Topos models for physics and topos theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Sander

    2014-08-01

    What is the role of topos theory in the topos models for quantum theory as used by Isham, Butterfield, Döring, Heunen, Landsman, Spitters, and others? In other words, what is the interplay between physical motivation for the models and the mathematical framework used in these models? Concretely, we show that the presheaf topos model of Butterfield, Isham, and Döring resembles classical physics when viewed from the internal language of the presheaf topos, similar to the copresheaf topos model of Heunen, Landsman, and Spitters. Both the presheaf and copresheaf models provide a "quantum logic" in the form of a complete Heyting algebra. Although these algebras are natural from a topos theoretic stance, we seek a physical interpretation for the logical operations. Finally, we investigate dynamics. In particular, we describe how an automorphism on the operator algebra induces a homeomorphism (or isomorphism of locales) on the associated state spaces of the topos models, and how elementary propositions and truth values transform under the action of this homeomorphism. Also with dynamics the focus is on the internal perspective of the topos.

  9. Topos models for physics and topos theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wolters, Sander

    2014-08-15

    What is the role of topos theory in the topos models for quantum theory as used by Isham, Butterfield, Döring, Heunen, Landsman, Spitters, and others? In other words, what is the interplay between physical motivation for the models and the mathematical framework used in these models? Concretely, we show that the presheaf topos model of Butterfield, Isham, and Döring resembles classical physics when viewed from the internal language of the presheaf topos, similar to the copresheaf topos model of Heunen, Landsman, and Spitters. Both the presheaf and copresheaf models provide a “quantum logic” in the form of a complete Heyting algebra. Although these algebras are natural from a topos theoretic stance, we seek a physical interpretation for the logical operations. Finally, we investigate dynamics. In particular, we describe how an automorphism on the operator algebra induces a homeomorphism (or isomorphism of locales) on the associated state spaces of the topos models, and how elementary propositions and truth values transform under the action of this homeomorphism. Also with dynamics the focus is on the internal perspective of the topos.

  10. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  11. Silver yoga exercises improved physical fitness of transitional frail elders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuei-Min; Fan, Jue-Ting; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Wu, Shu-Ju; Li, Chun-Huw; Lin, Huey-Shyan

    2010-01-01

    Promoting the health of transitional frail elders (e.g., through therapeutic-based yoga exercises) is essential to reduce healthcare expenditures caused by chronic health problems. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of 24 weeks of the senior-tailored silver yoga (SY) exercise program for transitional frail elders. A convenience sample of 69 elders in assisted living facilities were assigned randomly to the SY group (n = 38) or to the control group (n = 31) on the basis of the facilities where they resided, and 55 of them completed this quasi-experimental pretest and posttest study. Intervention was conducted three times per week, 70 minutes per session, for 24 weeks. Physical fitness (body composition, cardiovascular-respiratory functions, body flexibility, muscle power and endurance, balance, and agility) were examined at baseline, at 12 weeks, and at the end of the 24th week of the study. At the end of the study, the physical fitness indicators of participants in the SY group had improved significantly, and they had better physical fitness than participants in the control group (all p values < .05). It was recommended that the SY exercises be incorporated as an activity program in assisted living facilities to promote the physical fitness of transitional frail elders.

  12. Ladder physics in the spin fermion model

    DOE PAGES

    Tsvelik, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    A link is established between the spin fermion (SF) model of the cuprates and the approach based on the analogy between the physics of doped Mott insulators in two dimensions and the physics of fermionic ladders. This enables one to use nonperturbative results derived for fermionic ladders to move beyond the large-N approximation in the SF model. Here, it is shown that the paramagnon exchange postulated in the SF model has exactly the right form to facilitate the emergence of the fully gapped d-Mott state in the region of the Brillouin zone at the hot spots of the Fermi surface.more » Hence, the SF model provides an adequate description of the pseudogap.« less

  13. Physical models of tissue in shear fields.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Edwin L; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-04-01

    This review considers three general classes of physical as opposed to phenomenological models of the shear elasticity of tissues. The first is simple viscoelasticity. This model has a special role in elastography because it is the language in which experimental and clinical data are communicated. The second class of models involves acoustic relaxation, in which the medium contains inner time-dependent systems that are driven through the external bulk medium. Hysteresis, the phenomenon characterizing the third class of models, involves losses that are related to strain rather than time rate of change of strain. In contrast to the vast efforts given to tissue characterization through their bulk moduli over the last half-century, similar research using low-frequency shear data is in its infancy. Rather than a neat summary of existing facts, this essay is a framework for hypothesis generation-guessing what physical mechanisms give tissues their shear properties.

  14. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  15. Mental Models in Expert Physics Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Greeno, James G.

    Proposed is a relational framework for characterizing experienced physicists' representations of physics problem situations and the process of constructing these representations. A representation includes a coherent set of relations among: (1) a mental model of the objects in the situation, along with their relevant properties and relations; (2) a…

  16. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored. PMID:24957121

  17. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-02-24

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored.

  18. Physical models for classroom teaching in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodhe, A.

    2012-09-01

    Hydrology teaching benefits from the fact that many important processes can be illustrated and explained with simple physical models. A set of mobile physical models has been developed and used during many years of lecturing at basic university level teaching in hydrology. One model, with which many phenomena can be demonstrated, consists of a 1.0-m-long plexiglass container containing an about 0.25-m-deep open sand aquifer through which water is circulated. The model can be used for showing the groundwater table and its influence on the water content in the unsaturated zone and for quantitative determination of hydraulic properties such as the storage coefficient and the saturated hydraulic conductivity. It is also well suited for discussions on the runoff process and the significance of recharge and discharge areas for groundwater. The flow paths of water and contaminant dispersion can be illustrated in tracer experiments using fluorescent or colour dye. This and a few other physical models, with suggested demonstrations and experiments, are described in this article. The finding from using models in classroom teaching is that it creates curiosity among the students, promotes discussions and most likely deepens the understanding of the basic processes.

  19. Keeping the options open: concept improvements and stellarator physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J.; Tribaldos, V.

    2005-12-01

    The roadmap to a feasible fusion reactor based on the tokamak line is already established. However, options for further improvement are very desirable in order to be ready to meet the future requirements of the energy market. In this respect, stellarators have a significant role to play as candidates for steady state operation reactors. Like tokamaks, stellarators are toroidal confining devices but they show two fundamental differences: the fact that the confining magnetic field is generated by external coils; and the lack of toroidal symmetry. The history of tokamaks shows that from the original concept, solutions have converged into a given range of configurations, and, in fact, all large tokamak are relatively similar. On the other hand most of the stellarators are apparently very different (coil structure, plasma shape, size, ...). The advantage of the higher dimensionality of stellarators has been perceived as a shortcoming, but recent developments, both theoretical and computational, have permitted us to develop improved concepts and design new stellarators with outstanding physics properties. Moreover, most of the devices presently under construction are stellarators. This work is devoted to discuss, firstly, the present role of stellarators in the understanding of basic physical processes in fusion devices, secondly the role of future devices, based on different concept improvements, which will significantly expand the stellarator plasma parameter range, and finally, the potential of the concept as a fusion reactor.

  20. A thermodynamic model of physical gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yonghao; Solis, Francisco J.; Jiang, Hanqing

    2010-12-01

    Physical gels are characterized by dynamic cross-links that are constantly created and broken, changing its state between solid and liquid under influence of environmental factors. This restructuring ability of physical gels makes them an important class of materials with many applications, such as in drug delivery. In this article, we present a thermodynamic model for physical gels that considers both the elastic properties of the network and the transient nature of the cross-links. The cross-links' reformation is captured through a connectivity tensor M at the microscopic level. The macroscopic quantities, such as the volume fraction of the monomer ϕ, number of monomers per cross-link s, and the number of cross-links per volume q, are defined by statistic averaging. A mean-field energy functional for the gel is constructed based on these variables. The equilibrium equations and the stress are obtained at the current state. We study the static thermodynamic properties of physical gels predicted by the model. We discuss the problems of un-constrained swelling and stress driven phase transitions of physical gels and describe the conditions under which these phenomena arise as functions of the bond activation energy Ea, polymer/solvent interaction parameter χ, and external stress p.

  1. Degradation and Improvement of Argiudolls in Centre Santa Fe (Argentina): Changes in Physical and Chemical Soil Properties and in its Productive Capacity Using a sSmulation Model of Crop Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatti, M. A.; Marano, R.; Felli, O.; Alesso, A.; Carrizo, M. E.; Miretti, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional tillage without adequate crop rotation and restoration of nutrients had generated degradation of the soils in Santa Fe. For this reason, it is important to find alternative systems to improve them. The A horizon of a typical Argiudoll of the centre of Santa Fe was chosen in 1983 and 2003 to evaluate: (to) physical and chemical properties of the natural soil (SN), (b) level of deterioration or improvement of those properties due to the management system (LC: traditional till during 50 years with the last 15 years of wheat-soya; RAG: crop-grass rotation under no-till with partial reposition of N, P and S), (c) productive capacity (CP) of the SN and the soil changes according to its management (LC and RAG). Soil data were introduced into a model of crop production (FitoSim), using corn as pattern and 30 years of meteorological data, to evaluate the effect of the soil use on the productive capacity. LC and RAG significantly differ from SN. The former have smaller values of CO, Nt, P e, pH, Ca, K, soil bulk density, relative aggregates stability, least limiting water range and crust infiltration. However the indexes are worse in LC. RAG has greater values of P, Nt and particulate N. The mean potential yield was 16200 kg/ha. The index of production capacity of SN was 75%, i.e. the limitations of the soil and rain only allow taking advantage of 75% of the environment potential capacity. In LC that loss reached 72%. The loss of productive capacity of the evaluated management systems was 21 and 69% for RAG and LC, standing out that although RAG is degraded with regard to the SN, however it is a more conservationist management system that LC. Subsidiado por CA+ID 2009 (UNL) 12/C114; SECTEI- Ley23877-09-04; INTA PNECO-093012

  2. Multiscale physics-based modeling of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriten, Melih

    Frictional contacts between solids exist in nature and in a wide range of engineering applications. Friction causes energy loss, and it is the main source of wear and surface degradation which limits the lifetime of mechanical systems. Yet, friction is needed to walk, run, accelerate, slow down or stop moving systems. Whether desirable or not, friction is a very complex physical phenomenon. The behavior of systems with friction is nonlinear, and the physical mechanisms governing friction behavior span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A thorough study of friction should employ experimentalists and theoreticians in chemistry, materials science, tribology, mechanics, dynamics, and structural engineering. High spatial and temporal resolutions are required to capture and model essential physics of a frictional contact. However, such a detailed model is impractical in large-scale structural dynamics simulations; especially since frictional contacts can be numerous in a given application. Reduced-order models (ROMs) achieve broader applicability by compromising several aspects and accounting for the important physics. Hence, rather simple Coulomb friction is still the most ubiquitous model in the modeling and simulation literature. As an alternative, a reduced-order friction model built-up from micromechanics of surfaces is proposed in this work. Continuum-scale formulation of pre-sliding friction behavior is combined with material-strength-based friction coefficients to develop a physics-based friction model at asperity-scale. Then, the statistical summation technique is utilized to build a multiscale modeling framework. A novel joint fretting setup is designed for friction experiments in a practical setting, and the developed models are tested. Both asperity and rough surface friction models show good agreement with experimental data. The influences of materials, surface roughness and contact contamination on the friction are also studied. Finally, the

  3. Transforming teacher knowledge: Modeling instruction in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, Lloyd H.

    I show that the Modeling physics curriculum is readily accommodated by most teachers in favor of traditional didactic pedagogies. This is so, at least in part, because Modeling focuses on a small set of connected models embedded in a self-consistent theoretical framework and thus is closely congruent with human cognition in this context which is to generate mental models of physical phenomena as both predictive and explanatory devices. Whether a teacher fully implements the Modeling pedagogy depends on the depth of the teacher's commitment to inquiry-based instruction, specifically Modeling instruction, as a means of promoting student understanding of Newtonian mechanics. Moreover, this commitment trumps all other characteristics: teacher educational background, content coverage issues, student achievement data, district or state learning standards, and district or state student assessments. Indeed, distinctive differences exist in how Modeling teachers deliver their curricula and some teachers are measurably more effective than others in their delivery, but they all share an unshakable belief in the efficacy of inquiry-based, constructivist-oriented instruction. The Modeling Workshops' pedagogy, duration, and social interactions impacts teachers' self-identification as members of a professional community. Finally, I discuss the consequences my research may have for the Modeling Instruction program designers and for designers of professional development programs generally.

  4. Investigations of physical model of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, Kirill G.; Kisselev, Gennady L.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    1996-12-01

    Physical model of a biological tissue for comparison with earlier created mathematical model of a biological tissue and researches of distribution photosensitizer in a depth was created and investigated. Mathematical model is based on granulated representation of optical medium. The model of a biological tissue was created on the basis of enough thin layers of a special material. For fluorescence excitation laser sources with a various wavelength were used. For investigation of scattering and fluorescent signal laser- fiber spectrum-analyzer LESA-5 was applied. Water solution of aluminum phthalocyanine and oil solution of zinc phthalocyanine were used for receiving of fluorescent signal. Created samples have certain absorbing and fluorescent properties. Scattering properties of samples are close to scattering properties of real human skin. By virtue of layered structure the model permits to simulate as a biological tissue without photosensitizer accumulation in it, as tissue with photosensitizer accumulation with certain distribution in a depth. Dependence of fields distribution on a surface was investigated at change of parameters of a model. Essential changes of distribution on a surface depending on the characteristics of model was revealed. The space and angular characteristics was investigated also. The investigations with physical model correspond to predicted results of theoretical model.

  5. Improvements in physical fitness in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, James H; Heller, Tamar; Wang, Edward; Valerio, Irene

    2004-03-01

    The effectiveness of an exercise training program for 52 adults with Down syndrome (M age = 39.4 years) was evaluated. The training program consisted of cardiovascular (30 minutes) and strength exercise (15 minutes) for 12 weeks, 3 days a week for 45-minutes per session. Compared to control subjects, the training group improved significantly in cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength and endurance and had a slight but significant reduction in body weight. Greater effort must be made to promote increases in physical activity participation among persons with Down syndrome and developmental disabilities in order to reduce the potential health risks associated with low fitness and sedentary behavior.

  6. Modelling Students' Construction of Energy Models in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devi, Roshni; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines students' construction of experimentation models for physics theories in energy storage, transformation, and transfers involving electricity and mechanics. Student problem solving dialogs and artificial intelligence modeling of these processes is analyzed. Construction of models established relations between elements with linear causal…

  7. Modelling Students' Construction of Energy Models in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devi, Roshni; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines students' construction of experimentation models for physics theories in energy storage, transformation, and transfers involving electricity and mechanics. Student problem solving dialogs and artificial intelligence modeling of these processes is analyzed. Construction of models established relations between elements with linear causal…

  8. Physics Beyond the Standard Model at Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchev, Konstantin

    These lectures introduce the modern machinery used in searches and studies of new physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) at colliders. The first lecture provides an overview of the main simulation tools used in high energy physics, including automated parton-level calculators, general purpose event generators, detector simulators, etc. The second lecture is a brief introduction to low energy supersymmetry (SUSY) as a representative BSM paradigm. The third lecture discusses the main collider signatures of SUSY and methods for measuring the masses of new particles in events with missing energy.

  9. Modeling quantum physics with machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Arsenault, Louis-Francois; Millis, Andrew; Littlewood, Peter; von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    2014-03-01

    Machine Learning (ML) is a systematic way of inferring new results from sparse information. It directly allows for the resolution of computationally expensive sets of equations by making sense of accumulated knowledge and it is therefore an attractive method for providing computationally inexpensive 'solvers' for some of the important systems of condensed matter physics. In this talk a non-linear regression statistical model is introduced to demonstrate the utility of ML methods in solving quantum physics related problem, and is applied to the calculation of electronic transport in 1D channels. DOE contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  10. Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Nojiri, M.M.; Plehn, T.; Polesello, G.; Alexander, John M.; Allanach, B.C.; Barr, Alan J.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Freitas, A.; Gwenlan, C.; Jager, S.; /CERN /LPSC, Grenoble

    2008-02-01

    This collection of studies on new physics at the LHC constitutes the report of the supersymmetry working group at the Workshop 'Physics at TeV Colliders', Les Houches, France, 2007. They cover the wide spectrum of phenomenology in the LHC era, from alternative models and signatures to the extraction of relevant observables, the study of the MSSM parameter space and finally to the interplay of LHC observations with additional data expected on a similar time scale. The special feature of this collection is that while not each of the studies is explicitly performed together by theoretical and experimental LHC physicists, all of them were inspired by and discussed in this particular environment.

  11. Mathematical Modeling Is Also Physics--Interdisciplinary Teaching between Mathematics and Physics in Danish Upper Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics plays a crucial role in physics. This role is brought about predominantly through the building, employment, and assessment of mathematical models, and teachers and educators should capture this relationship in the classroom in an effort to improve students' achievement and attitude in both physics and mathematics. But although there…

  12. Mathematical Modeling Is Also Physics--Interdisciplinary Teaching between Mathematics and Physics in Danish Upper Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics plays a crucial role in physics. This role is brought about predominantly through the building, employment, and assessment of mathematical models, and teachers and educators should capture this relationship in the classroom in an effort to improve students' achievement and attitude in both physics and mathematics. But although there…

  13. Physical modeling of the composting ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Hogan, J A; Miller, F C; Finstein, M S

    1989-05-01

    A composting physical model with an experimental chamber with a working volume of 14 x 10 cm (0.5 ft) was designed to avoid exaggerated conductive heat loss resulting from, relative to field-scale piles, a disproportionately large outer surface-area-to-volume ratio. In the physical model, conductive flux (rate of heat flow through chamber surfaces) was made constant and slight through a combination of insulation and temperature control of the surrounding air. This control was based on the instantaneous conductive flux, as calculated from temperature differentials via a conductive heat flow model. An experiment was performed over a 10-day period in which control of the composting process was based on ventilative heat removal in reference to a microbially favorable temperature ceiling (temperature feedback). By using the conduction control system (surrounding air temperature controlled), 2.4% of the total heat evolved from the chamber was through conduction, whereas the remainder was through the ventilative mechanisms of the latent heat of vaporization and the sensible temperature increase of air. By comparison, with insulation alone (the conduction control system was not used) conduction accounted for 33.5% of the total heat evolved. This difference in conduction resulted in substantial behavioral differences with respect to the temperature of the composting matrix and the amount of water removed. By emphasizing the slight conduction system (2.4% of total heat flow) as being a better representative of field conditions, a comparison was made between composting system behavior in the laboratory physical model and field-scale piles described in earlier reports. Numerous behavioral patterns were qualitatively similar in the laboratory and field (e.g., temperature gradient, O(2) content, and water removal). It was concluded that field-scale composting system behavior can be simulated reasonably faithfully in the physical model.

  14. Application of physical parameter identification to finite-element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronowicki, Allen J.; Lukich, Michael S.; Kuritz, Steven P.

    1987-01-01

    The time domain parameter identification method described previously is applied to TRW's Large Space Structure Truss Experiment. Only control sensors and actuators are employed in the test procedure. The fit of the linear structural model to the test data is improved by more than an order of magnitude using a physically reasonable parameter set. The electro-magnetic control actuators are found to contribute significant damping due to a combination of eddy current and back electro-motive force (EMF) effects. Uncertainties in both estimated physical parameters and modal behavior variables are given.

  15. Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  16. Electromagnetic physics models for parallel computing architectures

    DOE PAGES

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; ...

    2016-11-21

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part ofmore » the GeantV project. Finally, the results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.« less

  17. Electromagnetic physics models for parallel computing architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-11-21

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Finally, the results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  18. Statistical Physics of Pairwise Probability Models

    PubMed Central

    Roudi, Yasser; Aurell, Erik; Hertz, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical models for describing the probability distribution over the states of biological systems are commonly used for dimensional reduction. Among these models, pairwise models are very attractive in part because they can be fit using a reasonable amount of data: knowledge of the mean values and correlations between pairs of elements in the system is sufficient. Not surprisingly, then, using pairwise models for studying neural data has been the focus of many studies in recent years. In this paper, we describe how tools from statistical physics can be employed for studying and using pairwise models. We build on our previous work on the subject and study the relation between different methods for fitting these models and evaluating their quality. In particular, using data from simulated cortical networks we study how the quality of various approximate methods for inferring the parameters in a pairwise model depends on the time bin chosen for binning the data. We also study the effect of the size of the time bin on the model quality itself, again using simulated data. We show that using finer time bins increases the quality of the pairwise model. We offer new ways of deriving the expressions reported in our previous work for assessing the quality of pairwise models. PMID:19949460

  19. Video Analysis and Modeling in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Doug

    2008-03-01

    The Tracker video analysis program allows users to overlay simple dynamical models on a video clip. Video modeling offers advantages over both traditional video analysis and animation-only modeling. In traditional video analysis, for example, students measure ``g'' by tracking a dropped or tossed ball, constructing a position or velocity vs. time graph, and interpreting the graphs to obtain initial conditions and acceleration. In video modeling, by contrast, the students interactively construct theoretical force expressions and define initial conditions for a dynamical particle model that synchs with and draws itself on the video. The behavior of the model is thus compared directly with that of the real-world motion. Tracker uses the Open Source Physics code library so sophisticated models are possible. I will demonstrate and compare video modeling with video analysis and I will discuss the advantages of video modeling over animation-only modeling. The Tracker video analysis program is available at: http://www.cabrillo.edu/˜dbrown/tracker/.

  20. Evaluating nuclear physics inputs in core-collapse supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Hix, William Raphael; Baird, Mark L; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We also investigate the feedback between different EoSs and opacities in the context of different progenitors.

  1. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Anderson, D.; Atlas, R.; Chern, J.; Houser, P.; Hou, A.; Lang, S.; Lau, W.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kakar, R.; Kumar, S.; Lapenta, W.; Li, X.; Matsui, T.; Rienecker, M.; Shen, B.W.; Shi, J.J.; Simpson, J.; Zeng, X.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical cloud resolving models (CRMs), which are based the non-hydrostatic equations of motion, have been extensively applied to cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that CRMs agree with observations in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and regional scale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a szrper-parameterization or multi-scale modeling -framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign can provide initial conditions as well as validation through utilizing the Earth Satellite simulators. At Goddard, we have developed a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics. The modeling system consists a coupled GCM-CRM (or MMF); a state-of-the-art weather research forecast model (WRF) and a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model). In these models, the same microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 3ICE), radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models are applied. In addition, a comprehensive unified Earth Satellite

  2. Physical security and vulnerability modeling for infrasturcture facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Nozick, Linda Karen; Jones, Dean A.; Davis, Chad Edward; Turnquist, Mark Alan

    2006-07-01

    A model of malicious intrusions in infrastructure facilities is developed, using a network representation of the system structure together with Markov models of intruder progress and strategy. This structure provides an explicit mechanism to estimate the probability of successful breaches of physical security, and to evaluate potential improvements. Simulation is used to analyze varying levels of imperfect information on the part of the intruders in planning their attacks. An example of an intruder attempting to place an explosive device on an airplane at an airport gate illustrates the structure and potential application of the model.

  3. Generomak: Fusion physics, engineering and costing model

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.

    1988-06-01

    A generic fusion physics, engineering and economics model (Generomak) was developed as a means of performing consistent analysis of the economic viability of alternative magnetic fusion reactors. The original Generomak model developed at Oak Ridge by Sheffield was expanded for the analyses of the Senior Committee on Environmental Safety and Economics of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM). This report describes the Generomak code as used by ESECOM. The input data used for each of the ten ESECOM fusion plants and the Generomak code output for each case is given. 14 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Physical models of polarization mode dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Menyuk, C.R.; Wai, P.K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of randomly varying birefringence on light propagation in optical fibers is studied theoretically in the parameter regime that will be used for long-distance communications. In this regime, the birefringence is large and varies very rapidly in comparison to the nonlinear and dispersive scale lengths. We determine the polarization mode dispersion, and we show that physically realistic models yield the same result for polarization mode dispersion as earlier heuristic models that were introduced by Poole. We also prove an ergodic theorem.

  5. Benchmarking patient improvement in physical therapy with data envelopment analysis.

    PubMed

    Friesner, Daniel; Neufelder, Donna; Raisor, Janet; Khayum, Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a case study that documents how management science techniques (in particular data envelopment analysis) can be applied to performance improvement initiatives in an inpatient physical therapy setting. The data used in this study consist of patients referred for inpatient physical therapy following total knee replacement surgery (at a medium-sized medical facility in the Midwestern USA) during the fiscal year 2002. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) was applied to determine the efficiency of treatment, as well as to identify benchmarks for potential patient improvement. Statistical trends in the benchmarking and efficiency results were subsequently analyzed using non-parametric and parametric methods. Our analysis indicated that the rehabilitation process was largely effective in terms of providing consistent, quality care, as more than half of the patients in our study achieved the maximum amount of rehabilitation possible given available inputs. Among patients that did not achieve maximum results, most could obtain increases in the degree of flexion gain and reductions in the degree of knee extension. The study is retrospective in nature, and is not based on clinical trial or experimental data. Additionally, DEA results are inherently sensitive to sampling: adding or subtracting individuals from the sample may change the baseline against which efficiency and rehabilitation potential are measured. As such, therapists using this approach must ensure that the sample is representative of the general population, and must not contain significant measurement error. Third, individuals who choose total knee arthroplasty will incur a transient disability. However, this population does not generally fit the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health definition of disability if the surgical procedure is successful. Since the study focuses on the outcomes of physical therapy, range of

  6. Climate model forecast biases assessed with a perturbed physics ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, David P.; Haines, Keith; Sparrow, Sarah N.; Wallom, David

    2017-09-01

    Perturbed physics ensembles have often been used to analyse long-timescale climate model behaviour, but have been used less often to study model processes on shorter timescales. We combine a transient perturbed physics ensemble with a set of initialised forecasts to deduce regional process errors present in the standard HadCM3 model, which cause the model to drift in the early stages of the forecast. First, it is shown that the transient drifts in the perturbed physics ensembles can be used to recover quantitatively the parameters that were perturbed. The parameters which exert most influence on the drifts vary regionally, but upper ocean mixing and atmospheric convective processes are particularly important on the 1-month timescale. Drifts in the initialised forecasts are then used to recover the `equivalent parameter perturbations', which allow identification of the physical processes that may be at fault in the HadCM3 representation of the real world. Most parameters show positive and negative adjustments in different regions, indicating that standard HadCM3 values represent a global compromise. The method is verified by correcting an unusually widespread positive bias in the strength of wind-driven ocean mixing, with forecast drifts reduced in a large number of areas as a result. This method could therefore be used to improve the skill of initialised climate model forecasts by reducing model biases through regional adjustments to physical processes, either by tuning or targeted parametrisation refinement. Further, such regionally tuned models might also significantly outperform standard climate models, with global parameter configurations, in longer-term climate studies.

  7. Climate model forecast biases assessed with a perturbed physics ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, David P.; Haines, Keith; Sparrow, Sarah N.; Wallom, David

    2016-10-01

    Perturbed physics ensembles have often been used to analyse long-timescale climate model behaviour, but have been used less often to study model processes on shorter timescales. We combine a transient perturbed physics ensemble with a set of initialised forecasts to deduce regional process errors present in the standard HadCM3 model, which cause the model to drift in the early stages of the forecast. First, it is shown that the transient drifts in the perturbed physics ensembles can be used to recover quantitatively the parameters that were perturbed. The parameters which exert most influence on the drifts vary regionally, but upper ocean mixing and atmospheric convective processes are particularly important on the 1-month timescale. Drifts in the initialised forecasts are then used to recover the `equivalent parameter perturbations', which allow identification of the physical processes that may be at fault in the HadCM3 representation of the real world. Most parameters show positive and negative adjustments in different regions, indicating that standard HadCM3 values represent a global compromise. The method is verified by correcting an unusually widespread positive bias in the strength of wind-driven ocean mixing, with forecast drifts reduced in a large number of areas as a result. This method could therefore be used to improve the skill of initialised climate model forecasts by reducing model biases through regional adjustments to physical processes, either by tuning or targeted parametrisation refinement. Further, such regionally tuned models might also significantly outperform standard climate models, with global parameter configurations, in longer-term climate studies.

  8. Statistical physical models of cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.

    Cellular motility is required for a wide range of biological behaviors and functions, and the topic poses a number of interesting physical questions. In this work, we construct and analyze models of various aspects of cellular motility using tools and ideas from statistical physics. We begin with a Brownian dynamics model for actin-polymerization-driven motility, which is responsible for cell crawling and "rocketing" motility of pathogens. Within this model, we explore the robustness of self-diffusiophoresis, which is a general mechanism of motility. Using this mechanism, an object such as a cell catalyzes a reaction that generates a steady-state concentration gradient that propels the object in a particular direction. We then apply these ideas to a model for depolymerization-driven motility during bacterial chromosome segregation. We find that depolymerization and protein-protein binding interactions alone are sufficient to robustly pull a chromosome, even against large loads. Next, we investigate how forces and kinetics interact during eukaryotic mitosis with a many-microtubule model. Microtubules exert forces on chromosomes, but since individual microtubules grow and shrink in a force-dependent way, these forces lead to bistable collective microtubule dynamics, which provides a mechanism for chromosome oscillations and microtubule-based tension sensing. Finally, we explore kinematic aspects of cell motility in the context of the immune system. We develop quantitative methods for analyzing cell migration statistics collected during imaging experiments. We find that during chronic infection in the brain, T cells run and pause stochastically, following the statistics of a generalized Levy walk. These statistics may contribute to immune function by mimicking an evolutionarily conserved efficient search strategy. Additionally, we find that naive T cells migrating in lymph nodes also obey non-Gaussian statistics. Altogether, our work demonstrates how physical

  9. Evolutionary Developmental Robotics: Improving Morphology and Control of Physical Robots.

    PubMed

    Vujovic, Vuk; Rosendo, Andre; Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms have previously been applied to the design of morphology and control of robots. The design space for such tasks can be very complex, which can prevent evolution from efficiently discovering fit solutions. In this article we introduce an evolutionary-developmental (evo-devo) experiment with real-world robots. It allows robots to grow their leg size to simulate ontogenetic morphological changes, and this is the first time that such an experiment has been performed in the physical world. To test diverse robot morphologies, robot legs of variable shapes were generated during the evolutionary process and autonomously built using additive fabrication. We present two cases with evo-devo experiments and one with evolution, and we hypothesize that the addition of a developmental stage can be used within robotics to improve performance. Moreover, our results show that a nonlinear system-environment interaction exists, which explains the nontrivial locomotion patterns observed. In the future, robots will be present in our daily lives, and this work introduces for the first time physical robots that evolve and grow while interacting with the environment.

  10. Aircraft Observations for Improved Physical Parameterization for Seasonal Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    not shown). Most cumulus cases show positive skewness throughout the cloud layer in ASTEX, while DYCOMS-II q skewness are largely negative in the...kinetic energy. Figure 3. Effects of cumulus clouds on vertical velocity skewness. 5 Figure 4. Sensible heat and latent heat fluxes...goal of this project is to improve the representation of fractional low-level clouds in the medium-range forecast models. OBJECTIVES The

  11. Models in Physics, Models for Physics Learning, and Why the Distinction May Matter in the Case of Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Models are important both in the development of physics itself and in teaching physics. Historically, the consensus models of physics have come to embody particular ontological assumptions and epistemological commitments. Educators have generally assumed that the consensus models of physics, which have stood the test of time, will also work well…

  12. Models in Physics, Models for Physics Learning, and Why the Distinction May Matter in the Case of Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Models are important both in the development of physics itself and in teaching physics. Historically, the consensus models of physics have come to embody particular ontological assumptions and epistemological commitments. Educators have generally assumed that the consensus models of physics, which have stood the test of time, will also work well…

  13. Modelling the physics in iterative reconstruction for transmission computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nuyts, Johan; De Man, Bruno; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Beekman, Freek J.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in iterative reconstruction (IR) as a key tool to improve quality and increase applicability of X-ray CT imaging. IR has the ability to significantly reduce patient dose, it provides the flexibility to reconstruct images from arbitrary X-ray system geometries and it allows to include detailed models of photon transport and detection physics, to accurately correct for a wide variety of image degrading effects. This paper reviews discretisation issues and modelling of finite spatial resolution, Compton scatter in the scanned object, data noise and the energy spectrum. Widespread implementation of IR with highly accurate model-based correction, however, still requires significant effort. In addition, new hardware will provide new opportunities and challenges to improve CT with new modelling. PMID:23739261

  14. Shape Models and Physical Properties of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana-Ros, T.; Dudziński, G.; Bartczak, P.

    Despite the large amount of high quality data generated in recent space encounters with asteroids, the majority of our knowledge about these objects comes from ground based observations. Asteroids travelling in orbits that are potentially hazardous for the Earth form an especially interesting group to be studied. In order to predict their orbital evolution, it is necessary to investigate their physical properties. This paper briefly describes the data requirements and different techniques used to solve the lightcurve inversion problem. Although photometry is the most abundant type of observational data, models of asteroids can be obtained using various data types and techniques. We describe the potential of radar imaging and stellar occultation timings to be combined with disk-integrated photometry in order to reveal information about physical properties of asteroids.

  15. Beyond the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2016-08-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its experiments were conceived to tackle open questions in particle physics. The mechanism of the generation of mass of fundamental particles has been elucidated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. It is clear that the standard model is not the final theory. The open questions still awaiting clues or answers, from the LHC and other experiments, include: What is the composition of dark matter and of dark energy? Why is there more matter than anti-matter? Are there more space dimensions than the familiar three? What is the path to the unification of all the fundamental forces? This talk will discuss the status of, and prospects for, the search for new particles, symmetries and forces in order to address the open questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'.

  16. Systems and models with anticipation in physics and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarenko, A.

    2012-11-01

    Investigations of recent physics processes and real applications of models require the new more and more improved models which should involved new properties. One of such properties is anticipation (that is taking into accounting some advanced effects).It is considered the special kind of advanced systems - namely a strong anticipatory systems introduced by D. Dubois. Some definitions, examples and peculiarities of solutions are described. The main feature is presumable multivaluedness of the solutions. Presumable physical examples of such systems are proposed: self-organization problems; dynamical chaos; synchronization; advanced potentials; structures in micro-, meso- and macro- levels; cellular automata; computing; neural network theory. Also some applications for modeling social, economical, technical and natural systems are described.

  17. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. Toward the Increased Model Fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prša, A.; Conroy, K. E.; Horvat, M.; Pablo, H.; Kochoska, A.; Bloemen, S.; Giammarco, J.; Hambleton, K. M.; Degroote, P.

    2016-12-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures, and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. In particular, we discuss triangulation as a superior surface discretization algorithm, meshing of rotating single stars, light travel time effects, advanced phase computation, volume conservation in eccentric orbits, and improved computation of local intensity across the stellar surfaces that includes the photon-weighted mode, the enhanced limb darkening treatment, the better reflection treatment, and Doppler boosting. Here we present the concepts on which PHOEBE is built and proofs of concept that demonstrate the increased model fidelity.

  18. Improving Physical Task Performance with Counterfactual and Prefactual Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Hammell, Cecilia; Chan, Amy Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    Counterfactual thinking (reflecting on “what might have been”) has been shown to enhance future performance by translating information about past mistakes into plans for future action. Prefactual thinking (imagining “what might be if…”) may serve a greater preparative function than counterfactual thinking as it is future-orientated and focuses on more controllable features, thus providing a practical script to prime future behaviour. However, whether or not this difference in hypothetical thought content may translate into a difference in actual task performance has been largely unexamined. In Experiment 1 (n = 42), participants performed trials of a computer-simulated physical task, in between which they engaged in either task-related hypothetical thinking (counterfactual or prefactual) or an unrelated filler task (control). As hypothesised, prefactuals contained more controllable features than counterfactuals. Moreover, participants who engaged in either form of hypothetical thinking improved significantly in task performance over trials compared to participants in the control group. The difference in thought content between counterfactuals and prefactuals, however, did not yield a significant difference in performance improvement. Experiment 2 (n = 42) replicated these findings in a dynamic balance task environment. Together, these findings provide further evidence for the preparatory function of counterfactuals, and demonstrate that prefactuals share this same functional characteristic. PMID:27942041

  19. Improvements to the High Energy Density Physics Capabilities in FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shravan; Bachan, J.; Couch, S.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Weide, K.

    2011-10-01

    FLASH is a modular and extensible compressible spatially adaptive radiation-hydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of existing advanced computer architectures, and has a broad user base. We have been adding capabilities to FLASH to make it an open science code for the academic HEDP community. We summarize the improvements we have made to the HEDP capabilities of FLASH during the past year. A semi-implicit multi-group flux-limited diffusion solver has been implemented. A JFNK-based implicit hydrodynamic solver has been developed that relaxes stability constraints, leading to larger time steps. Numerous improvements have been made to the multi-material equation of state in FLASH and the laser ray-trace package. Finally, the results of several verification tests involving radiative/non-radiative shocks will also be presented. This work was supported in part at U. Chicago by ASC, National Nuclear Security Administration, DOE.

  20. Improving cultural diversity awareness of physical therapy educators.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Rolando T; Umphred, Darcy A

    2007-01-01

    In a climate of increasing diversity in the population of patients requiring physical therapy (PT) services, PT educators must prepare students and future clinicians to work competently in culturally diverse environments. To be able to achieve this goal, PT educators must be culturally competent as well. The purposes of the study were to develop a valid and reliable instrument to assess cultural diversity awareness and to develop an educational workshop to improve cultural diversity awareness of PT academic and clinical educators. Phase 1 of the study involved the development of an instrument to assess cultural diversity awareness. The Cultural Diversity Awareness Questionnaire (CDAQ) was developed, validated for content, analyzed for reliability, and field and pilot tested. Results indicated that the CDAQ has favorable psychometric properties. Phase 2 of the study involved the development and implementation of the Cultural Diversity Workshop (CDW). The seminar contents and class materials were developed, validated, and implemented as a one-day cultural diversity awareness seminar. A one-group, pretest-posttest experimental design was used, with participants who completed the CDAQ before and after the workshop. Results indicated that the workshop was effective in improving cultural diversity awareness of the participants. Results of the workshop evaluation affirmed the achievement of objectives and effectiveness of the facilitator. This study provided a solid initial foundation upon which a comprehensive cultural competence program can be developed.

  1. Improving Physical Task Performance with Counterfactual and Prefactual Thinking.

    PubMed

    Hammell, Cecilia; Chan, Amy Y C

    2016-01-01

    Counterfactual thinking (reflecting on "what might have been") has been shown to enhance future performance by translating information about past mistakes into plans for future action. Prefactual thinking (imagining "what might be if…") may serve a greater preparative function than counterfactual thinking as it is future-orientated and focuses on more controllable features, thus providing a practical script to prime future behaviour. However, whether or not this difference in hypothetical thought content may translate into a difference in actual task performance has been largely unexamined. In Experiment 1 (n = 42), participants performed trials of a computer-simulated physical task, in between which they engaged in either task-related hypothetical thinking (counterfactual or prefactual) or an unrelated filler task (control). As hypothesised, prefactuals contained more controllable features than counterfactuals. Moreover, participants who engaged in either form of hypothetical thinking improved significantly in task performance over trials compared to participants in the control group. The difference in thought content between counterfactuals and prefactuals, however, did not yield a significant difference in performance improvement. Experiment 2 (n = 42) replicated these findings in a dynamic balance task environment. Together, these findings provide further evidence for the preparatory function of counterfactuals, and demonstrate that prefactuals share this same functional characteristic.

  2. Intervention in Overweight Children Improves BMI and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Siwik, Violet; Kutob, Randa; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Cruz, Luis; Senf, Janet; Aickin, Mikel; Going, Scott; Shatte, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a growing epidemic in family medicine with few clinical treatment options. We implemented and evaluated a group office-visit intervention by family physicians emphasizing nutrition and physical activity within a resiliency psychosocial model, for overweight children and their parents. Methods The intervention lasted for 3 months, with half of the children crossing over to intervention after 6 months on study. Participants included 35 children who met eligibility criteria of being in third through fifth grades and having a body mass index above the 85th percentile. The 3-month twelve-session intervention, “Choices”, included topics on nutrition, physical activity, and resiliency. The sessions were developed for delivery by a family physician, and a nutritionist, who all received training in positive psychology and resilience skills. Main outcome measures were body mass index (BMI) z-scores for age-and-gender, and weight-for-age-and-gender z-scores, as well as qualitative interviews to understand individual and family processes. Results The intervention resulted in a significant effect on one primary outcome, BMI z-score (-0.138 per 9 months (p =0.017) and a trend toward significance on the other, weight for age z-score (-0.87 per 9 months (p=0.09). The net shift of activity from the low METS to the high METS had an intervention effect of 2.84 METS (p = 0.037). Families reported lasting changes in behaviors and attitudes. Discussion The innovative approach used in this study demonstrated modest efficacy in reducing BMI z-score, changing physical activity levels, and possibly shifting family dynamics. PMID:23471926

  3. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2008-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. The following is presented in this report: (1) a brief review of the GCE model and its applications on the impact of aerosols on deep precipitation processes, (2) the Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) a discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  4. Dissecting new physics models through kinematic edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Maitra, Ushoshi

    2017-02-01

    Kinematic edges in the invariant mass distributions of different final state particles are typically a signal of new physics. In this work we propose a scenario wherein these edges could be utilized in discriminating between different classes of models. To this effect, we consider the resonant production of a heavy Higgs like resonance (H1) as a case study. Such states are a characteristic feature of many new physics scenarios beyond the standard model (SM). In the event of a discovery, it is essential to identify the true nature of the underlying theory. In this work we propose a channel, H1→t2t , where t2 is a vectorlike gauge singlet top-partner that decays into W b , Z t , h t . Invariant mass distributions constructed out of these final states are characterized by the presence of kinematic edges, which are unique to the topology under consideration. Further, since all the final state particles are SM states, the position in the edges of these invariant mass distributions can be used to exclusively determine the masses of the resonances. Observation of these features are meant to serve as a trigger, thereby mandating a more detailed analysis in a particular direction of parameter space. The absence of these edge like features, in the specific invariant mass distributions considered here, in minimal versions of supersymmetric models (MSSM) also serves as a harbinger of such non-MSSM-like scenarios.

  5. Physical model for membrane protrusions during spreading

    PubMed Central

    Chamaraux, François; Ali, Olivier; Keller, Sébastien; Bruckert, Franz; Fourcade, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    During cell spreading onto a substrate, the kinetics of the contact area is an observable quantity. This paper is concerned with a physical approach to model this process in the case of ameboid motility where the membrane detaches itself from the underlying cytoskeleton at the leading edge. The physical model we propose is based on previous reports which point out that membrane tension regulates cell spreading. Using a phenomenological feedback loop to mimic stress dependent biochemistry, we show that the actin polymerisation rate can be coupled to the stress which builds up at the margin of the contact area between the cell and the substrate. In the limit of small variation of membrane tension, we show that the actin polymerisation rate can be written in closed form. Our analysis defines characteristic lengths which depend on elastic properties of the membrane-cytoskeleton complex, such as the membrane-cytoskeleton interaction, and on molecular parameters, such as the rate of actin polymerisation. We discuss our model in the case of axi-symmetric and non axi-symmetric spreading and we compute the characteristic time scales as a function of fundamental elastic constants such as the strength of membrane-cytoskeleton adherence. PMID:18824791

  6. Multiscale Atmospheric Physics Modeled by Cumulant Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Brad; Chini, Greg

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a systematic and physically based approach to modeling subgrid physics statistically with the use of an expansion in equal-time cumulants. To accomplish this we replace the zonal average employed in previous work with a low-pass filter that separates small and large scales in the zonal direction. The statistics are non-local, inhomogeneous, and anisotropic; the sole approximation is the neglect of 3-point and higher correlation functions. The closure respects the conservation of energy, enstrophy, and angular momentum. An advantage of the formulation is that correlations between large and small scale processes are treated explicitly without the introduction of phenomenological parameterizations. The approach is tested against full numerical simulation of idealized 1- and 2-layer models of the atmospheric general circulation and shown to yield accurate low-order statistics. (The computer model used to perform these tests runs on OS X and is publicly available.) We identify important multiscale interactions and discuss the computational cost of the new scheme. Supported in part by NSF DMR-1306806 and CCF-1048701.

  7. Neighborhood Design, Physical Activity, and Wellbeing: Applying the Walkability Model

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga-Teran, Adriana A.; Orr, Barron J.; Gimblett, Randy H.; Chalfoun, Nader V.; Guertin, David P.; Marsh, Stuart E.

    2017-01-01

    Neighborhood design affects lifestyle physical activity, and ultimately human wellbeing. There are, however, a limited number of studies that examine neighborhood design types. In this research, we examine four types of neighborhood designs: traditional development, suburban development, enclosed community, and cluster housing development, and assess their level of walkability and their effects on physical activity and wellbeing. We examine significant associations through a questionnaire (n = 486) distributed in Tucson, Arizona using the Walkability Model. Among the tested neighborhood design types, traditional development showed significant associations and the highest value for walkability, as well as for each of the two types of walking (recreation and transportation) representing physical activity. Suburban development showed significant associations and the highest mean values for mental health and wellbeing. Cluster housing showed significant associations and the highest mean value for social interactions with neighbors and for perceived safety from crime. Enclosed community did not obtain the highest means for any wellbeing benefit. The Walkability Model proved useful in identifying the walkability categories associated with physical activity and perceived crime. For example, the experience category was strongly and inversely associated with perceived crime. This study provides empirical evidence of the importance of including vegetation, particularly trees, throughout neighborhoods in order to increase physical activity and wellbeing. Likewise, the results suggest that regular maintenance is an important strategy to improve mental health and overall wellbeing in cities. PMID:28098785

  8. Neighborhood Design, Physical Activity, and Wellbeing: Applying the Walkability Model.

    PubMed

    Zuniga-Teran, Adriana A; Orr, Barron J; Gimblett, Randy H; Chalfoun, Nader V; Guertin, David P; Marsh, Stuart E

    2017-01-13

    Neighborhood design affects lifestyle physical activity, and ultimately human wellbeing. There are, however, a limited number of studies that examine neighborhood design types. In this research, we examine four types of neighborhood designs: traditional development, suburban development, enclosed community, and cluster housing development, and assess their level of walkability and their effects on physical activity and wellbeing. We examine significant associations through a questionnaire (n = 486) distributed in Tucson, Arizona using the Walkability Model. Among the tested neighborhood design types, traditional development showed significant associations and the highest value for walkability, as well as for each of the two types of walking (recreation and transportation) representing physical activity. Suburban development showed significant associations and the highest mean values for mental health and wellbeing. Cluster housing showed significant associations and the highest mean value for social interactions with neighbors and for perceived safety from crime. Enclosed community did not obtain the highest means for any wellbeing benefit. The Walkability Model proved useful in identifying the walkability categories associated with physical activity and perceived crime. For example, the experience category was strongly and inversely associated with perceived crime. This study provides empirical evidence of the importance of including vegetation, particularly trees, throughout neighborhoods in order to increase physical activity and wellbeing. Likewise, the results suggest that regular maintenance is an important strategy to improve mental health and overall wellbeing in cities.

  9. Pre-Service Physics Teachers' Argumentation in a Model Rocketry Physics Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gürel, Cem; Süzük, Erol

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of argumentation developed by a group of pre-service physics teachers' (PSPT) as an indicator of subject matter knowledge on model rocketry physics. The structure of arguments and scientific credibility model was used as a design framework in the study. The inquiry of model rocketry physics was employed in…

  10. Improved reclassification of mortality risk by assessment of physical activity in patients referred for exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Nead, Kevin T; Chang, Peter; Abella, Joshua; Kokkinos, Peter; Leeper, Nicholas J

    2015-04-01

    Inability to meet minimal guidelines on physical activity is associated with poor health outcomes, but quantifying activity can be complex. We studied whether a simple question regarding participation in regular activity improves risk classification for all-cause mortality. Maximal exercise testing was performed in 6962 patients (mean age, 58.9 ± 11 years) for clinical reasons. Subjects also were assessed for participation in regular activity using a simple yes/no response to meeting minimal recommendations on activity. The incremental value of adding a simple physical activity assessment to clinical, demographic, and exercise test information to predict mortality was determined using Cox proportional hazards models, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination index during a mean follow-up of 9.7 ± 4 years. Subjects who did not meet the minimal guidelines on activity had a lower exercise capacity (7.4 ± 4.3 vs 9.1 ± 3.6 metabolic equivalents, P < .0001) and a higher annual mortality rate (2.42% vs 1.71%, P < .001). Not meeting activity guidelines was associated with an age-adjusted 36% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.51, P < .0001). Among clinical and exercise test variables, fitness had the highest C-index for predicting mortality (0.72, P < .001). The addition of physical activity classification to a model including traditional risk factors resulted in a net reclassification improvement of 22.8% (P < .001); adding fitness to the traditional risk factor model resulted in a net reclassification improvement of 43.5% (P < .001). The addition of a simple assessment of physical activity status significantly improves reclassification of risk for all-cause mortality among patients who are referred for exercise testing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Approximate input physics for stellar modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pols, Onno R.; Tout, Christopher A.; Eggleton, Peter P.; Han, Zhanwen

    1995-06-01

    We present a simple and efficient, yet reasonably accurate, equation of state, which at the moderately low temperatures and high densities found in the interiors of stars less massive than the Sun is substantially more accurate than its predecessor by Eggleton, Faulkner & Flannery. Along with the most recently available values in tabular form of opacities, neutrino loss rates, and nuclear reaction rates for a selection of the most important reactions, this provides a convenient package of input physics for stellar modelling. We briefly discuss a few results obtained with the updated stellar evolution code.

  12. Physical model studies of water column separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, R.; Rodal, E.; Sánchez, A.; Carmona, L.

    2012-11-01

    Results of physical model studies of water column separation following an upstream valve closure in a horizontal pipe are presented, using three dimensionless parameters: the magnitude of the transient, M, or the ratio between the Joukowsky pressure and the initial absolute head; ΔHr, or the ratio between the maximum overpressure and the Joukowsky pressure, and tcr, the duration of the vapor cavity relative to the pipeline period. Conclusions are derived, aiming to a better understanding of water column separation extreme pressures and to the establishment of useful preliminary design guidelines.

  13. The improved physical activity index for measuring physical activity in EPIC Germany.

    PubMed

    Wientzek, Angelika; Vigl, Matthäus; Steindorf, Karen; Brühmann, Boris; Bergmann, Manuela M; Harttig, Ulrich; Katzke, Verena; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    In the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (EPIC), physical activity (PA) has been indexed as a cross-tabulation between PA at work and recreational activity. As the proportion of non-working participants increases, other categorization strategies are needed. Therefore, our aim was to develop a valid PA index for this population, which will also be able to express PA continuously. In the German EPIC centers Potsdam and Heidelberg, a clustered sample of 3,766 participants was re-invited to the study center. 1,615 participants agreed to participate and 1,344 participants were finally included in this study. PA was measured by questionnaires on defined activities and a 7-day combined heart rate and acceleration sensor. In a training sample of 433 participants, the Improved Physical Activity Index (IPAI) was developed. Its performance was evaluated in a validation sample of 911 participants and compared with the Cambridge Index and the Total PA Index. The IPAI consists of items covering five areas including PA at work, sport, cycling, television viewing, and computer use. The correlations of the IPAI with accelerometer counts in the training and validation sample ranged r = 0.40-0.43 and with physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) r = 0.33-0.40 and were higher than for the Cambridge Index and the Total PA Index previously applied in EPIC. In non-working participants the IPAI showed higher correlations than the Cambridge Index and the Total PA Index, with r = 0.34 for accelerometer counts and r = 0.29 for PAEE. In conclusion, we developed a valid physical activity index which is able to express PA continuously as well as to categorize participants according to their PA level. In populations with increasing rates of non-working people the performance of the IPAI is better than the established indices used in EPIC.

  14. Physical modeling synthesis of recorder sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, Hiroko; Kishi, Kenshi; Nakamura, Isao

    2003-04-01

    A time-domain simulation of the soprano baroque recorder based on the digital waveguide model (DWM) and an air reed model is introduced. The air reed model is developed upon the negative acoustic displacement model (NADM), which was proposed for the organ flue-pipe simulation [Adachi, Proc. of ISMA 1997, pp. 251-260], based on the semiempirical model by Fletcher [Fletcher and Rossing, The Physics of Musical Instruments, 2nd ed. (Springer, Berlin, 2000)]. Two models are proposed to couple DWM and NADM. The jet amplification coefficient is remodeled for the application of NADM for the recorder, regarding the recent experimental reports [Yoshikawa and Arimoto, Proc. of ISMA 2001, pp. 309-312]. The simulation results are presented in terms of the mode transient characteristics and the spectral characteristics of the synthesized sounds. They indicate that the NADM is not sufficient to describe the realistic mode transient of the recorder, while the synthesized sounds maintained almost resemble timbre to the recorder sounds.

  15. Problems with heterogeneity in physically based agricultural catchment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Jeppe Rølmer; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Hansen, Søren; Ernstsen, Vibeke

    2007-08-01

    SummaryLumped conceptual rainfall-runoff models and physically based distributed models are being used successfully for simulating daily discharge at catchment scale. Physically based models are more desirable for simulation of the fate of agrochemicals (e.g. nitrate) because they rely on physical equations for flow and transport. The literature shows that the average response (e.g. percolation and leaching) at field scale can be simulated successfully by using effective or standard values in the parameterisation of these models. However, in areas characterised by a high degree of spatial variability the physically based models sometimes fail to simulate the discharge dynamics at catchment scale properly possibly due to the lack of representation of sub-grid variability. This paper presents an agricultural physically based distributed model concept which included 3561 combinations of root zone simulations of percolation and leaching that was distributed within a 622 km 2 catchment according to land use, climate, soil types, etc. This was thought to account for all heterogeneity within the catchment but did not. It was shown that a much simpler model with less than 100 combinations of root zone calculations partially including important variability at the catchment scale could simulate discharge equally well and in some cases better than the complex one. The most important parameter heterogeneity to include in the conceptualisation step apparently was sub-grid variation of soil physical parameters and variability of crop growth. The variation of crop growth was forced by restricting the rooting depth which potentially lumped other heterogeneities into this property. The results also suggest that the groundwater table that constitutes the lower boundary condition in the unsaturated zone is another important factor. However, this was difficult to examine because of the modelling approach that did not feature feedback from the saturated to the unsaturated zone. A list

  16. Improved model for statistical alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Miklos, I.; Toroczkai, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The statistical approach to molecular sequence evolution involves the stochastic modeling of the substitution, insertion and deletion processes. Substitution has been modeled in a reliable way for more than three decades by using finite Markov-processes. Insertion and deletion, however, seem to be more difficult to model, and thc recent approaches cannot acceptably deal with multiple insertions and deletions. A new method based on a generating function approach is introduced to describe the multiple insertion process. The presented algorithm computes the approximate joint probability of two sequences in 0(13) running time where 1 is the geometric mean of the sequence lengths.

  17. Model-based software process improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zettervall, Brenda T.

    1994-01-01

    The activities of a field test site for the Software Engineering Institute's software process definition project are discussed. Products tested included the improvement model itself, descriptive modeling techniques, the CMM level 2 framework document, and the use of process definition guidelines and templates. The software process improvement model represents a five stage cyclic approach for organizational process improvement. The cycles consist of the initiating, diagnosing, establishing, acting, and leveraging phases.

  18. Caffeine improves physical and cognitive performance during exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Eef; Bandelow, Stephan; Schmitt, Jeroen; Jentjens, Roy; Oliveira, Marta; Allgrove, Judith; Carter, Tom; Gleeson, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Caffeine is thought to act as a central stimulant and to have effects on physical, cognitive, and psychomotor functioning. To examine the effects of ingesting a performance bar, containing caffeine, before and during cycling exercise on physical and cognitive performance. Twenty-four well-trained cyclists consumed the products [a performance bar containing 45 g of carbohydrate and 100 mg of caffeine (CAF), an isocaloric noncaffeine performance bar (CHO), or 300 mL of placebo beverage (BEV)] immediately before performing a 2.5-h exercise at 60% VO2max followed by a time to exhaustion trial (T2EX) at 75% VO2max. Additional products were taken after 55 and 115 min of exercise. Cognitive function measures (computerized Stroop and Rapid Visual Information Processing tests) were performed before exercise and while cycling after 70 and 140 min of exercise and again 5 min after completing the T2EX ride. Participants were significantly faster after CAF when compared with CHO on both the computerized complex information processing tests, particularly after 140 min and after the T2EX ride (P < 0.001). On the BEV trial, performance was significantly slower than after both other treatments (P < 0.0001). There were no speed-accuracy tradeoffs (P > 0.10). T2EX was longer after CAF consumption compared with both CHO and BEV trials (P < 0.05), and T2EX was longer after CHO than after BEV (P < 0.05). No differences were found in the ratings of perceived exertion, mean heart rate, and relative exercise intensity (% VO2max; P > 0.05). Caffeine in a performance bar can significantly improve endurance performance and complex cognitive ability during and after exercise. These effects may be salient for sports performance in which concentration plays a major role.

  19. Demonstrating the improvement of predictive maturity of a computational model

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M; Unal, Cetin; Atamturktur, Huriye S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an improvement of predictive capability brought to a non-linear material model using a combination of test data, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, and calibration. A model that captures increasingly complicated phenomena, such as plasticity, temperature and strain rate effects, is analyzed. Predictive maturity is defined, here, as the accuracy of the model to predict multiple Hopkinson bar experiments. A statistical discrepancy quantifies the systematic disagreement (bias) between measurements and predictions. Our hypothesis is that improving the predictive capability of a model should translate into better agreement between measurements and predictions. This agreement, in turn, should lead to a smaller discrepancy. We have recently proposed to use discrepancy and coverage, that is, the extent to which the physical experiments used for calibration populate the regime of applicability of the model, as basis to define a Predictive Maturity Index (PMI). It was shown that predictive maturity could be improved when additional physical tests are made available to increase coverage of the regime of applicability. This contribution illustrates how the PMI changes as 'better' physics are implemented in the model. The application is the non-linear Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) strength model applied to Beryllium metal. We demonstrate that our framework tracks the evolution of maturity of the PTW model. Robustness of the PMI with respect to the selection of coefficients needed in its definition is also studied.

  20. Modelling biological complexity: a physical scientist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V; Fowler, Philip W

    2005-09-22

    We discuss the modern approaches of complexity and self-organization to understanding dynamical systems and how these concepts can inform current interest in systems biology. From the perspective of a physical scientist, it is especially interesting to examine how the differing weights given to philosophies of science in the physical and biological sciences impact the application of the study of complexity. We briefly describe how the dynamics of the heart and circadian rhythms, canonical examples of systems biology, are modelled by sets of nonlinear coupled differential equations, which have to be solved numerically. A major difficulty with this approach is that all the parameters within these equations are not usually known. Coupled models that include biomolecular detail could help solve this problem. Coupling models across large ranges of length- and time-scales is central to describing complex systems and therefore to biology. Such coupling may be performed in at least two different ways, which we refer to as hierarchical and hybrid multiscale modelling. While limited progress has been made in the former case, the latter is only beginning to be addressed systematically. These modelling methods are expected to bring numerous benefits to biology, for example, the properties of a system could be studied over a wider range of length- and time-scales, a key aim of systems biology. Multiscale models couple behaviour at the molecular biological level to that at the cellular level, thereby providing a route for calculating many unknown parameters as well as investigating the effects at, for example, the cellular level, of small changes at the biomolecular level, such as a genetic mutation or the presence of a drug. The modelling and simulation of biomolecular systems is itself very computationally intensive; we describe a recently developed hybrid continuum-molecular model, HybridMD, and its associated molecular insertion algorithm, which point the way towards the

  1. Modelling biological complexity: a physical scientist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Peter V; Fowler, Philip W

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the modern approaches of complexity and self-organization to understanding dynamical systems and how these concepts can inform current interest in systems biology. From the perspective of a physical scientist, it is especially interesting to examine how the differing weights given to philosophies of science in the physical and biological sciences impact the application of the study of complexity. We briefly describe how the dynamics of the heart and circadian rhythms, canonical examples of systems biology, are modelled by sets of nonlinear coupled differential equations, which have to be solved numerically. A major difficulty with this approach is that all the parameters within these equations are not usually known. Coupled models that include biomolecular detail could help solve this problem. Coupling models across large ranges of length- and time-scales is central to describing complex systems and therefore to biology. Such coupling may be performed in at least two different ways, which we refer to as hierarchical and hybrid multiscale modelling. While limited progress has been made in the former case, the latter is only beginning to be addressed systematically. These modelling methods are expected to bring numerous benefits to biology, for example, the properties of a system could be studied over a wider range of length- and time-scales, a key aim of systems biology. Multiscale models couple behaviour at the molecular biological level to that at the cellular level, thereby providing a route for calculating many unknown parameters as well as investigating the effects at, for example, the cellular level, of small changes at the biomolecular level, such as a genetic mutation or the presence of a drug. The modelling and simulation of biomolecular systems is itself very computationally intensive; we describe a recently developed hybrid continuum-molecular model, HybridMD, and its associated molecular insertion algorithm, which point the way towards the

  2. Detailed Physical Trough Model for NREL's Solar Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A.

    2010-10-01

    Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software package made available by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy. SAM contains hourly system performance and economic models for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, photovoltaic, solar hot-water, and generic fuel-use technologies. Versions of SAM prior to 2010 included only the parabolic trough model based on Excelergy. This model uses top-level empirical performance curves to characterize plant behavior, and thus is limited in predictive capability for new technologies or component configurations. To address this and other functionality challenges, a new trough model; derived from physical first principles was commissioned to supplement the Excelergy-based empirical model. This new 'physical model' approaches the task of characterizing the performance of the whole parabolic trough plant by replacing empirical curve-fit relationships with more detailed calculations where practical. The resulting model matches the annual performance of the SAM empirical model (which has been previously verified with plant data) while maintaining run-times compatible with parametric analysis, adding additional flexibility in modeled system configurations, and providing more detailed performance calculations in the solar field, power block, piping, and storage subsystems.

  3. Physics model for wringing of wet cloth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dany Rahmayanti, Handika; Utami, Fisca Dian; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2016-11-01

    One activity that has been performed by human beings for a long time is washing clothes. Before the invention of the washing machine, clothes were washed by hand and then wrung before drying in the open air. When observed carefully, the wringing of cloth presents some interesting phenomena. However, there are no reports on the physical modelling of this very old activity. This paper reports a simple model to explain the discharge of water from clothes when squeezed. A simple tool was also designed to retrieve data to confirm the theory. We found that the theoretical predictions accurately explained the experimental results. The experiments were conducted on two types of cloth: towels and batik cloth. We also obtained a universal curve to which all the data converged.

  4. High precision modeling for fundamental physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rievers, Benny; Nesemann, Leo; Costea, Adrian; Andres, Michael; Stephan, Ernst P.; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    With growing experimental accuracies and high precision requirements for fundamental physics space missions the needs for accurate numerical modeling techniques are increasing. Motivated by the challenge of length stability in cavities and optical resonators we propose the develop-ment of a high precision modeling tool for the simulation of thermomechanical effects up to a numerical precision of 10-20 . Exemplary calculations for simplified test cases demonstrate the general feasibility of high precision calculations and point out the high complexity of the task. A tool for high precision analysis of complex geometries will have to use new data types, advanced FE solver routines and implement new methods for the evaluation of numerical precision.

  5. Semi-Empirical Modeling of SLD Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of supercooled large droplets (SLD) in icing have been an area of much interest in recent years. As part of this effort, the assumptions used for ice accretion software have been reviewed. A literature search was performed to determine advances from other areas of research that could be readily incorporated. Experimental data in the SLD regime was also analyzed. A semi-empirical computational model is presented which incorporates first order physical effects of large droplet phenomena into icing software. This model has been added to the LEWICE software. Comparisons are then made to SLD experimental data that has been collected to date. Results will be presented for the comparison of water collection efficiency, ice shape and ice mass.

  6. Tutorial: Physics and modeling of Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Hall thrusters are very efficient and competitive electric propulsion devices for satellites and are currently in use in a number of telecommunications and government spacecraft. Their power spans from 100 W to 20 kW, with thrust between a few mN and 1 N and specific impulse values between 1000 and 3000 s. The basic idea of Hall thrusters consists in generating a large local electric field in a plasma by using a transverse magnetic field to reduce the electron conductivity. This electric field can extract positive ions from the plasma and accelerate them to high velocity without extracting grids, providing the thrust. These principles are simple in appearance but the physics of Hall thrusters is very intricate and non-linear because of the complex electron transport across the magnetic field and its coupling with the electric field and the neutral atom density. This paper describes the basic physics of Hall thrusters and gives a (non-exhaustive) summary of the research efforts that have been devoted to the modelling and understanding of these devices in the last 20 years. Although the predictive capabilities of the models are still not sufficient for a full computer aided design of Hall thrusters, significant progress has been made in the qualitative and quantitative understanding of these devices.

  7. Physics-based models of the plasmasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Pierrard, Vivane; Goldstein, Jerry; Andr'e, Nicolas; Lemaire, Joseph F; Liemohn, Mike W; Matsui, H

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent progress in physics-based models of the plasmasphere using the Auid and the kinetic approaches. Global modeling of the dynamics and inAuence of the plasmasphere is presented. Results from global plasmasphere simulations are used to understand and quantify (i) the electric potential pattern and evolution during geomagnetic storms, and (ii) the inAuence of the plasmasphere on the excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (ElvIIC) waves a.nd precipitation of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. The interactions of the plasmasphere with the ionosphere a.nd the other regions of the magnetosphere are pointed out. We show the results of simulations for the formation of the plasmapause and discuss the inAuence of plasmaspheric wind and of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves for transport of plasmaspheric material. Theoretical formulations used to model the electric field and plasma distribution in the plasmasphere are given. Model predictions are compared to recent CLUSTER and MAGE observations, but also to results of earlier models and satellite observations.

  8. 3-D physical models of amitosis (cytokinesis).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Zou, Changhua

    2005-01-01

    Based on Newton's laws, extended Coulomb's law and published biological data, we develop our 3-D physical models of natural and normal amitosis (cytokinesis), for prokaryotes (bacterial cells) in M phase. We propose following hypotheses: Chromosome rings exclusion: No normally and naturally replicated chromosome rings (RCR) can occupy the same prokaryote, a bacterial cell. The RCR produce spontaneous and strong electromagnetic fields (EMF), that can be alternated environmentally, in protoplasm and cortex. The EMF is approximately a repulsive quasi-static electric (slowly variant and mostly electric) field (EF). The EF forces between the RCR are strong enough, and orderly accumulate contractile proteins that divide the procaryotes in the cell cortex of division plane or directly split the cell compartment envelope longitudinally. The radial component of the EF forces could also make furrows or cleavages of procaryotes. The EF distribution controls the protoplasm partition and completes the amitosis (cytokinesis). After the cytokinesis, the spontaneous and strong EF disappear because the net charge accumulation becomes weak, in the protoplasm. The exclusion is because the two sets of informative objects (RCR) have identical DNA codes information and they are electro magnetically identical, therefore they repulse from each other. We also compare divisions among eukaryotes, prokaryotes, mitochondria and chloroplasts and propose our hypothesis: The principles of our models are applied to divisions of mitochondria and chloroplasts of eucaryotes too because these division mechanisms are closer than others in a view of physics. Though we develop our model using 1 division plane (i.e., 1 cell is divided into 2 cells) as an example, the principle of our model is applied to the cases with multiple division planes (i.e., 1 cell is divided into multiple cells) too.

  9. Propulsion Physics Using the Chameleon Density Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will require a new theory of propulsion. Specifically one that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. The Chameleon Density Model (CDM) is one such model that could provide new paths in propulsion toward this end. The CDM is based on Chameleon Cosmology a dark matter theory; introduced by Khrouy and Weltman in 2004. Chameleon as it is hidden within known physics, where the Chameleon field represents a scalar field within and about an object; even in the vacuum. The CDM relates to density changes in the Chameleon field, where the density changes are related to matter accelerations within and about an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to its environment. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the environmental coupling about an object. As a demonstration to show that the CDM fits within known propulsion physics, this paper uses the model to estimate the thrust from a solid rocket motor. Under the CDM, a solid rocket constitutes a two body system, i.e., the changing density of the rocket and the changing density in the nozzle arising from the accelerated mass. Whereby, the interactions between these systems cause a differential coupling to the local gravity environment of the earth. It is shown that the resulting differential in coupling produces a calculated value for the thrust near equivalent to the conventional thrust model used in Sutton and Ross, Rocket Propulsion Elements. Even though imbedded in the equations are the Universe energy scale factor, the reduced Planck mass and the Planck length, which relates the large Universe scale to the subatomic scale.

  10. Dynamic inverse models in human-cyber-physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan M.; Scobee, Dexter R. R.; Burden, Samuel A.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Human interaction with the physical world is increasingly mediated by automation. This interaction is characterized by dynamic coupling between robotic (i.e. cyber) and neuromechanical (i.e. human) decision-making agents. Guaranteeing performance of such human-cyber-physical systems will require predictive mathematical models of this dynamic coupling. Toward this end, we propose a rapprochement between robotics and neuromechanics premised on the existence of internal forward and inverse models in the human agent. We hypothesize that, in tele-robotic applications of interest, a human operator learns to invert automation dynamics, directly translating from desired task to required control input. By formulating the model inversion problem in the context of a tracking task for a nonlinear control system in control-a_ne form, we derive criteria for exponential tracking and show that the resulting dynamic inverse model generally renders a portion of the physical system state (i.e., the internal dynamics) unobservable from the human operator's perspective. Under stability conditions, we show that the human can achieve exponential tracking without formulating an estimate of the system's state so long as they possess an accurate model of the system's dynamics. These theoretical results are illustrated using a planar quadrotor example. We then demonstrate that the automation can intervene to improve performance of the tracking task by solving an optimal control problem. Performance is guaranteed to improve under the assumption that the human learns and inverts the dynamic model of the altered system. We conclude with a discussion of practical limitations that may hinder exact dynamic model inversion.

  11. Performance of GeantV EM Physics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Amadio, G.; et al.

    2016-10-14

    The recent progress in parallel hardware architectures with deeper vector pipelines or many-cores technologies brings opportunities for HEP experiments to take advantage of SIMD and SIMT computing models. Launched in 2013, the GeantV project studies performance gains in propagating multiple particles in parallel, improving instruction throughput and data locality in HEP event simulation on modern parallel hardware architecture. Due to the complexity of geometry description and physics algorithms of a typical HEP application, performance analysis is indispensable in identifying factors limiting parallel execution. In this report, we will present design considerations and preliminary computing performance of GeantV physics models on coprocessors (Intel Xeon Phi and NVidia GPUs) as well as on mainstream CPUs.

  12. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  13. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  14. Computer Integrated Manufacturing: Physical Modelling Systems Design. A Personal View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) Physical Modeling Systems Design project was undertaken in a time of rapid change in the industrial, business, technological, training, and educational areas in Australia. A specification of a manufacturing physical modeling system was drawn up. Physical modeling provides a flexibility and configurability…

  15. A Physical Model for Gravitation and Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasor, Ned

    2011-11-01

    A physical/analytical model of gravitation and inertia is described. The model is based on proportional expansion of the universe and its contents, along with special relativistic time delay within nucleons. An expression of the gravitational constant G is derived from the model in terms of fundamental constants and properties without adjustable parameters, [ G=he^2c^2 1pt 1ptτu(mpme)^3/2=6.67x10-8cm^3g.s^2 ] where h = Planck constant, e = electronic charge, c = speed of light, mp and me are the nucleonic and electronic masses, and τu= age of the universe. The value τu = 13.6 Gy that corresponds with the accepted value of G shown is within the uncertainty of the empirical value ofτu currently estimated from cosmic ray background and other astronomical data. A modified Newtonian dynamics and other relationships derived from the model are consistent quantitatively and functionally with a variety of observed astronomical data, some of which have been considered previously to be anomalous or based on dark matter.

  16. Fuzzy modelling of Atlantic salmon physical habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Hilaire, André; Mocq, Julien; Cunjak, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Fish habitat models typically attempt to quantify the amount of available river habitat for a given fish species for various flow and hydraulic conditions. To achieve this, information on the preferred range of values of key physical habitat variables (e.g. water level, velocity, substrate diameter) for the targeted fishs pecies need to be modelled. In this context, we developed several habitat suitability indices sets for three Atlantic salmon life stages (young-of-the-year (YOY), parr, spawning adults) with the help of fuzzy logic modeling. Using the knowledge of twenty-seven experts, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, we defined fuzzy sets of four variables (depth, substrate size, velocity and Habitat Suitability Index, or HSI) and associated fuzzy rules. When applied to the Romaine River (Canada), median curves of standardized Weighted Usable Area (WUA) were calculated and a confidence interval was obtained by bootstrap resampling. Despite the large range of WUA covered by the expert WUA curves, confidence intervals were relatively narrow: an average width of 0.095 (on a scale of 0 to 1) for spawning habitat, 0.155 for parr rearing habitat and 0.160 for YOY rearing habitat. When considering an environmental flow value corresponding to 90% of the maximum reached by WUA curve, results seem acceptable for the Romaine River. Generally, this proposed fuzzy logic method seems suitable to model habitat availability for the three life stages, while also providing an estimate of uncertainty in salmon preferences.

  17. Improved Systematic Pointing Error Model for the DSN Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Withington, Philip M.; Richter, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    New pointing models have been developed for large reflector antennas whose construction is founded on elevation over azimuth mount. At JPL, the new models were applied to the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-meter antenna s subnet for corrections of their systematic pointing errors; it achieved significant improvement in performance at Ka-band (32-GHz) and X-band (8.4-GHz). The new models provide pointing improvements relative to the traditional models by a factor of two to three, which translate to approximately 3-dB performance improvement at Ka-band. For radio science experiments where blind pointing performance is critical, the new innovation provides a new enabling technology. The model extends the traditional physical models with higher-order mathematical terms, thereby increasing the resolution of the model for a better fit to the underlying systematic imperfections that are the cause of antenna pointing errors. The philosophy of the traditional model was that all mathematical terms in the model must be traced to a physical phenomenon causing antenna pointing errors. The traditional physical terms are: antenna axis tilts, gravitational flexure, azimuth collimation, azimuth encoder fixed offset, azimuth and elevation skew, elevation encoder fixed offset, residual refraction, azimuth encoder scale error, and antenna pointing de-rotation terms for beam waveguide (BWG) antennas. Besides the addition of spherical harmonics terms, the new models differ from the traditional ones in that the coefficients for the cross-elevation and elevation corrections are completely independent and may be different, while in the traditional model, some of the terms are identical. In addition, the new software allows for all-sky or mission-specific model development, and can utilize the previously used model as an a priori estimate for the development of the updated models.

  18. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems. In addition, high - resolution (spatial. 2km, and temporal, I minute) visualization showing the model results will be presented.

  19. Compass models: Theory and physical motivations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Zohar; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Compass models are theories of matter in which the couplings between the internal spin (or other relevant field) components are inherently spatially (typically, direction) dependent. A simple illustrative example is furnished by the 90° compass model on a square lattice in which only couplings of the form τixτjx (where {τia}a denote Pauli operators at site i ) are associated with nearest-neighbor sites i and j separated along the x axis of the lattice while τiyτjy couplings appear for sites separated by a lattice constant along the y axis. Similar compass-type interactions can appear in diverse physical systems. For instance, compass models describe Mott insulators with orbital degrees of freedom where interactions sensitively depend on the spatial orientation of the orbitals involved as well as the low-energy effective theories of frustrated quantum magnets, and a host of other systems such as vacancy centers, and cold atomic gases. The fundamental interdependence between internal (spin, orbital, or other) and external (i.e., spatial) degrees of freedom which underlies compass models generally leads to very rich behaviors, including the frustration of (semi-)classical ordered states on nonfrustrated lattices, and to enhanced quantum effects, prompting, in certain cases, the appearance of zero-temperature quantum spin liquids. As a consequence of these frustrations, new types of symmetries and their associated degeneracies may appear. These intermediate symmetries lie midway between the extremes of global symmetries and local gauge symmetries and lead to effective dimensional reductions. In this article, compass models are reviewed in a unified manner, paying close attention to exact consequences of these symmetries and to thermal and quantum fluctuations that stabilize orders via order-out-of-disorder effects. This is complemented by a survey of numerical results. In addition to reviewing past works, a number of other models are introduced and new results

  20. Engaging the Community to Improve Nutrition and Physical Activity Among Houses of Worship

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Shawna V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been linked to many chronic diseases. Research indicates that interventions in community-based settings such as houses of worship can build on attendees’ trust to address health issues and help them make behavioral changes. Community Context New Brunswick, New Jersey, has low rates of physical activity and a high prevalence of obesity. An adapted community-based intervention was implemented there to improve nutrition and physical activity among people who attend houses of worship and expand and enhance the network of partners working with Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Methods An adapted version of Body & Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Living and Eating was created using a 3-phase model to 1) educate lay members on nutrition and physical activity, 2) provide sustainable change through the development of physical activity programming, and 3) increase access to local produce through collaborations with community partners. Outcome Nineteen houses of worship were selected for participation in this program. Houses of worship provided a questionnaire to a convenience sample of its congregation to assess congregants’ physical activity levels and produce consumption behaviors at baseline using questions from the Health Information National Trends Survey instrument. This information was also used to inform future program activities. Interpretation Community-based health education can be a promising approach when appropriate partnerships are identified, funding is adequate, ongoing information is extracted to inform future action, and there is an expectation from all parties of long-term engagement and capacity building. PMID:24625362

  1. Engaging the community to improve nutrition and physical activity among houses of worship.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kiameesha R; Hudson, Shawna V

    2014-03-13

    Obesity, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been linked to many chronic diseases. Research indicates that interventions in community-based settings such as houses of worship can build on attendees' trust to address health issues and help them make behavioral changes. New Brunswick, New Jersey, has low rates of physical activity and a high prevalence of obesity. An adapted community-based intervention was implemented there to improve nutrition and physical activity among people who attend houses of worship and expand and enhance the network of partners working with Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. An adapted version of Body & Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Living and Eating was created using a 3-phase model to 1) educate lay members on nutrition and physical activity, 2) provide sustainable change through the development of physical activity programming, and 3) increase access to local produce through collaborations with community partners. Nineteen houses of worship were selected for participation in this program. Houses of worship provided a questionnaire to a convenience sample of its congregation to assess congregants' physical activity levels and produce consumption behaviors at baseline using questions from the Health Information National Trends Survey instrument. This information was also used to inform future program activities. Community-based health education can be a promising approach when appropriate partnerships are identified, funding is adequate, ongoing information is extracted to inform future action, and there is an expectation from all parties of long-term engagement and capacity building.

  2. A Holoinformational Model of the Physical Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Biase, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    The author proposes a holoinformational view of the observer based, on the holonomic theory of brain/mind function and quantum brain dynamics developed by Karl Pribram, Sir John Eccles, R.L. Amoroso, Hameroff, Jibu and Yasue, and in the quantumholographic and holomovement theory of David Bohm. This conceptual framework is integrated with nonlocal information properties of the Quantum Field Theory of Umesawa, with the concept of negentropy, order, and organization developed by Shannon, Wiener, Szilard and Brillouin, and to the theories of self-organization and complexity of Prigogine, Atlan, Jantsch and Kauffman. Wheeler's "it from bit" concept of a participatory universe, and the developments of the physics of information made by Zureck and others with the concepts of statistical entropy and algorithmic entropy, related to the number of bits being processed in the mind of the observer are also considered. This new synthesis gives a self-organizing quantum nonlocal informational basis for a new model of awareness in a participatory universe. In this synthesis, awareness is conceived as meaningful quantum nonlocal information interconnecting the brain and the cosmos, by a holoinformational unified field (integrating nonlocal holistic (quantum) and local (Newtonian). We propose that the cosmology of the physical observer is this unified nonlocal quantum-holographic cosmos manifesting itself through awareness, interconnected in a participatory holistic and indivisible way the human mind-brain to all levels of the self-organizing holographic anthropic multiverse.

  3. Impact of improved snowmelt modelling in a monthly hydrological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folton, Nathalie; Garcia, Florine

    2016-04-01

    The quantification and the management of water resources at the regional scale require hydrological models that are both easy to implement and efficient. To be reliable and robust, these models must be calibrated and validated on a large number of catchments that are representative of various hydro-meteorological conditions, physiographic contexts, and specific hydrological behavior (e.g. mountainous catchments). The GRLoiEau monthly model, with its simple structure and its two free parameters, answer our need of such a simple model. It required the development of a snow routine to model catchments with temporarily snow-covered areas. The snow routine developed here does not claim to represent physical snowmelt processes but rather to simulate them globally on the catchment. The snowmelt equation is based on the degree-day method which is widely used by the hydrological community, in particular in engineering studies (Etchevers 2000). A potential snowmelt (Schaefli et al. 2005) was computed, and the parameters of the snow routine were regionalized for each mountain area. The GRLoiEau parsimonious structure requires meteorological data. They come from the distributed mesoscale atmospheric analysis system SAFRAN, which provides estimations of daily solid and liquid precipitations and temperatures on a regular square grid at the spatial resolution of 8*8 km², throughout France. Potential evapotranspiration was estimated using the formula by Oudin et al. (2005). The aim of this study is to improve the quality of monthly simulations for ungauged basins, in particular for all types of mountain catchments, without increasing the number of free parameters of the model. By using daily SAFRAN data, the production store and snowmelt can be run at a daily time scale. The question then arises whether simulating the monthly flows using a production function at a finer time step would improve the results. And by using the SAFRAN distributed climate series, a distributed approach

  4. Physical activity and weight loss are independent predictors of improved insulin sensitivity following energy restriction.

    PubMed

    Camps, Stefan G J A; Verhoef, Sanne P M; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2016-02-01

    The role of physical activity and the joint effect with sleep duration on insulin sensitivity (IS) during energy restriction followed by weight maintenance were determined. One hundred and two subjects (28 males) (mean ± SD age: 40 ± 9 years; BMI: 31.9 ± 3.0 kg/m(2) ) followed a very-low-energy diet for 8 weeks, followed by a 44-week period of weight maintenance. Body composition (three-compartment model based on body weight, total body water, and body volume), physical activity (accelerometry), sleep (questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations were assessed before the diet and at 8, 20, and 52 weeks after the start. Compared to baseline, IS was improved significantly after 8 weeks (P < 0.001) and was higher after 20 weeks (P < 0.001) and 52 weeks (P < 0.05). After 8, 20, and 52 weeks, 23% (P < 0.01), 19% (P < 0.05), and 13% (P < 0.05), respectively, of the variance in IS improvement was explained by weight loss percentage and change in physical activity counts. Maintaining daily physical activity during energy restriction is as important as weight loss itself in the improvement of IS; there was no additional effect of change in sleep duration. During weight maintenance, improved IS is maintained better if physical activity returns to baseline or higher. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  5. Improving Physical Education Activities for Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    This document is designed to assist physical education teachers to design curricula which can help students with learning disabilities, emotional impairments, and educable mental impairments achieve Michigan's essential goals and objectives for physical education. Chapter I discusses legal mandates, terminology, movement characteristics of the…

  6. Regulating emotion to improve physical health through the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Song, Yiying; Lu, Huanhua; Hu, Siyuan; Xu, Miao; Li, Xueting; Liu, Jia

    2015-04-01

    The opinion of mind-body interaction has been increasingly acknowledged in recent years, as exemplified by accumulating evidence indicating that physical health (body) is associated with emotion and emotion regulation (mind). Yet, the neural basis linking emotion regulation with physical health remains largely uninvestigated. Here we used magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of this pathway in a large population of healthy young adults. With a systematic study revealing the association of self-reported physical health and emotion traits of personality and general affective experiences, we further demonstrated that, for better physical health, individuals needed to regulate their emotion more effectively. Importantly, individuals who had larger gray matter (GM) volume in the amygdala reported not only a higher ability of emotion regulation but also better physical health. Further, GM volume in the amygdala mediated the correlation between emotion regulation ability and physical health. Our findings suggest that the amygdala plays a critical role in the neural circuit through which emotion regulation may influence physical health. Therefore, our study takes the first step toward exploring the neuroanatomical basis for body-mind interaction and may inform interventions aimed at promoting physical health by augmenting skills of emotion regulation. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Actoprotective effect of ginseng: improving mental and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Oliynyk, Sergiy; Oh, Seikwan

    2013-04-01

    Actoprotectors are preparations that increase the mental performance and enhance body stability against physical loads without increasing oxygen consumption. Actoprotectors are regarded as a subclass of adaptogens that hold a significant capacity to increase physical performance. The focus of this article is studying adaptogen herbs of genus Panax (P. ginseng in particular) and their capabilities as actoprotectors. Some animal experiments and human studies about actoprotective properties of genus Panax attest that P. ginseng (administered as an extract) significantly increased the physical and intellectual work capacities, and the data provided suggests that ginseng is a natural source of actoprotectors. Preparations of ginseng can be regarded as potential actoprotectors which give way to further research of its influence on physical and mental work capacity, endurance and restoration after exhaustive physical loads while compared with reference actoprotectors.

  8. Actoprotective effect of ginseng: improving mental and physical performance

    PubMed Central

    Oliynyk, Sergiy; Oh, Seikwan

    2013-01-01

    Actoprotectors are preparations that increase the mental performance and enhance body stability against physical loads without increasing oxygen consumption. Actoprotectors are regarded as a subclass of adaptogens that hold a significant capacity to increase physical performance. The focus of this article is studying adaptogen herbs of genus Panax (P. ginseng in particular) and their capabilities as actoprotectors. Some animal experiments and human studies about actoprotective properties of genus Panax attest that P. ginseng (administered as an extract) significantly increased the physical and intellectual work capacities, and the data provided suggests that ginseng is a natural source of actoprotectors. Preparations of ginseng can be regarded as potential actoprotectors which give way to further research of its influence on physical and mental work capacity, endurance and restoration after exhaustive physical loads while compared with reference actoprotectors. PMID:23717168

  9. The s process: Nuclear physics, stellar models, and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käppeler, F.; Gallino, R.; Bisterzo, S.; Aoki, Wako

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis in the s process takes place in the He-burning layers of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and during the He- and C-burning phases of massive stars. The s process contributes about half of the element abundances between Cu and Bi in solar system material. Depending on stellar mass and metallicity the resulting s-abundance patterns exhibit characteristic features, which provide comprehensive information for our understanding of the stellar life cycle and for the chemical evolution of galaxies. The rapidly growing body of detailed abundance observations, in particular, for AGB and post-AGB stars, for objects in binary systems, and for the very faint metal-poor population represents exciting challenges and constraints for stellar model calculations. Based on updated and improved nuclear physics data for the s-process reaction network, current models are aiming at an ab initio solution for the stellar physics related to convection and mixing processes. Progress in the intimately related areas of observations, nuclear and atomic physics, and stellar modeling is reviewed and the corresponding interplay is illustrated by the general abundance patterns of the elements beyond iron and by the effect of sensitive branching points along the s-process path. The strong variations of the s-process efficiency with metallicity bear also interesting consequences for galactic chemical evolution.

  10. Particle physics and cosmology in supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, David Edgar

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics provides an excellent description of the elementary particle interactions observed in particle collider experiments, but the model does less well when it is applied to cosmology. Recent measurements of the Universe over very large distances indicate the existence of non-luminous dark matter and an excess of baryons over anti-baryons. The SM is unable to account for either of these results, implying that an extension of the SM description is needed. One such extension is supersymmetry. Within the minimal supersymmetric version of the SM, the MSSM, the lightest superpartner particle can make up the dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry can be generated by the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis (EWBG). In this work, we examine these issues together in order to find out whether the MSSM can account for both of them simultaneously. We find that the MSSM can explain both the baryon asymmetry and the dark matter, but only over a very constrained region of the model parameter space. The strongest constraints on this scenario come from the lower bound on the Higgs boson mass, and the upper bound on the electric dipole moment of the electron. Moreover, upcoming experiments will probe the remaining allowed parameter space in the near future. Some of these constraints may be relaxed by going beyond the MSSM. With this in mind, we also investigate the nMSSM, a minimal singlet extension of the MSSM. We find that this model can also explain both the dark matter and the baryon asymmetry.

  11. Data assimilation with improved prior models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F.; Tu, X.; Chorin, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Due to computationally expensive forward models, ensemble filters often either use the full model with a small ensemble, or use a reduced model with a large ensemble. In either case, the sampling error or the model error poses a challenge to ensemble filter performance. Covariance localization and inflation techniques have been developed to ameliorate the errors. However, tuning localization and inflation is expensive, and they introduce further filter errors. We investigate an alternative approach of using improved reduced prior models. The improved reduced model is a non-Markovian model obtained by quantifying the model error using a discrete-time stochastic parametrization, so that it captures the statistical and dynamical features of the full model. The improved reduced model achieves good filter performance using a reasonable size of ensemble without any localization or inflation. Tests on the two-layer Lorenz 96 model show that an improved reduced model has better filter performance than the original reduced system with tuned localization and inflation, and it has comparable performance to the full system with a small ensemble and tuned localization and inflation.

  12. A Conceptual Model of Observed Physical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Dean A.

    2015-01-01

    Physical literacy is a concept that is gaining greater acceptance around the world with the United Nations Educational, Cultural, and Scientific Organization (2013) recognizing it as one of several central tenets in a quality physical education framework. However, previous attempts to understand progression in physical literacy learning have been…

  13. A Conceptual Model of Observed Physical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Dean A.

    2015-01-01

    Physical literacy is a concept that is gaining greater acceptance around the world with the United Nations Educational, Cultural, and Scientific Organization (2013) recognizing it as one of several central tenets in a quality physical education framework. However, previous attempts to understand progression in physical literacy learning have been…

  14. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 3--Recommended Amounts of Physical Activity for Optimal Health)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the third in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  15. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 3--Recommended Amounts of Physical Activity for Optimal Health)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the third in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  16. A Structural Equation Model of Conceptual Change in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Sinatra, Gale M.

    2011-01-01

    A model of conceptual change in physics was tested on introductory-level, college physics students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to conceptual change in physics including an approach goal orientation, need for cognition, motivation, and course grade. Conceptual change in physics…

  17. A Structural Equation Model of Expertise in College Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Carr, Martha

    2009-01-01

    A model of expertise in physics was tested on a sample of 374 college students in 2 different level physics courses. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to expert performance in physics including strategy use, pictorial representation, categorization skills, and motivation, and these…

  18. Kaon physics: Probing the standard model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The status and prospects of current and future kaon physics experiments is discussed. Both precision measurements and the search for and measurement of ultra-rare decays are powerful probes of many models of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The physics reach of these experiments is briefly discussed.

  19. Models for Curriculum and Pedagogy in Elementary School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review current models for curriculum and pedagogy used in elementary school physical education programs. Historically, physical educators have developed and used a multiactivity curriculum in order to educate students through physical movement. More recently, a variety of alternative curricular models have been…

  20. The Role of Various Curriculum Models on Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Dean O.; Tarr, Susan J.; Killion, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that physical education curricula can be highly effective in increasing physical activity levels at school (Sallis & Owen, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of various curriculum models on physical activity. Total steps were measured on 1,111 subjects and three curriculum models were studied…

  1. The Role of Various Curriculum Models on Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Dean O.; Tarr, Susan J.; Killion, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that physical education curricula can be highly effective in increasing physical activity levels at school (Sallis & Owen, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of various curriculum models on physical activity. Total steps were measured on 1,111 subjects and three curriculum models were studied…

  2. Models Based Practices in Physical Education: A Sociocritical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landi, Dillon; Fitzpatrick, Katie; McGlashan, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on models-based practices in physical education using a sociocritical lens. Drawing links between neoliberal moves in education, and critical approaches to the body and physicality, we take a view that models are useful tools that are worth integrating into physical education, but we are apprehensive to suggest they…

  3. A Structural Equation Model of Expertise in College Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Carr, Martha

    2009-01-01

    A model of expertise in physics was tested on a sample of 374 college students in 2 different level physics courses. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to expert performance in physics including strategy use, pictorial representation, categorization skills, and motivation, and these…

  4. Physical modeling of transverse drainage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, J. C.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    Streams that incise across bedrock highlands such as anticlines, upwarps, cuestas, or horsts are termed transverse drainages. Their relevance today involves such diverse matters as highway and dam construction decisions, location of wildlife corridors, better-informed sediment budgets, and detailed studies into developmental histories of late Cenozoic landscapes. The transient conditions responsible for transverse drainage incision have been extensively studied on a case-by-case basis, and the dominate mechanisms proposed include: antecedence, superimposition, overflow, and piracy. Modeling efforts have been limited to antecedence, and such the specific erosional conditions required for transverse drainage incision, with respect to the individual mechanisms, remains poorly understood. In this study, fifteen experiments attempted to simulate the four mechanisms and constructed on a 9.15 m long, 2.1 m wide, and 0.45 m deep stream table. Experiments lasted between 50 and 220 minutes. The stream table was filled with seven tons of sediment consisting of a silt and clay (30%) and a fine to coarse sand (70%) mixture. The physical models highlighted the importance of downstream aggradation with regard to antecedent incision versus possible defeat and diversion. The overflow experiments indicate that retreating knickpoints across a basin outlet produce a high probability of downstream flooding when associated with a deep lake. Misters used in a couple of experiments illustrate a potential complication with regard to headward erosion driven piracy. Relatively level asymmetrically sloped ridges allow for the drainage divide across the ridge to retreat from headward erosion, but hindered when the ridge's apex undulates or when symmetrically sloped. Although these physical models cannot strictly simulate natural transverse drainages, the observed processes, their development over time, and resultant landforms roughly emulate their natural counterparts. Proposed originally from

  5. Improvement of the Scintillation-Irregularity Model in WBMOD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-28

    DNA-TR-81-241 IMPROVEMENT OF THE SCINTILLATION- IRREGULARITY MODEL IN WBMOD James A. Secan Edward J. Fremouw Physical Dynamics, Inc. P.O. Box 3027 r...CONTENTS Section Page LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 2 LIST OF TABLES 4 1 INTRODUCTION 5 2 IMPROVEMENTS IN WBMOD 7 2-1 MAGNETIC TIME 7 2-1.1 Revision 3A2 7 2...Calculations 39 3 WBMOD REVISION 6B3 52 3-1 OVERVIEW 52 3-2 STRUCTURE OF THE CODE 52 3-3 MODEL 83 54 3-4 USE OF THE CODE 59 4 RESEARCH TOPICS 66 4-1

  6. An innovation in physical modelling for testing marine renewables technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, David; Whitehouse, Richard; Harris, John; Liddiard, Mark

    2015-04-01

    HR Wallingford has undertaken physical modelling of scour around structures since its creation as a government research laboratory in 1947. Since privatisation in 1982 HR Wallingford has carried out a large number of studies for offshore developments including renewable energy developments and offshore wind in particular, looking at scour around offshore foundations and cables. To maintain our position as both a research and consultancy organisation delivering high quality work we have developed a new purpose built physical modelling facility. The Fast Flow Facility is a dual-channel, race track shaped flume and the only large scale physical modelling facility of this kind offering wave, fast tidal current and recirculating sediment capabilities. The 75 m long, 8 m wide and 2.5 m deep Fast Flow Facility has two working channels of 4 m and 2.6 m width. Holding up to a million litres of water the facility can generate waves with significant wave heights, Hs, of up to 0.5 m and maximum wave heights of up to 1 m in combination with flows of up to 2 m/s (~4 knots). This state-of-the-art facility combines fast, reversible currents with wave generation and sediment transport modelling in a single flume, allowing us to further develop our understanding of sediment transport within the marine environment and keep us at the forefront of sediment transport research. The facility has been designed with the marine renewables sector in mind, with a 4 x 4 x 1m deep sediment pit in the centre of the flume allowing investigations to provide improved understanding of the detailed processes which lead to scour, and enabling improvements in prediction capabilities for marine scour in different sediment seabed compositions (non-cohesive and cohesive) for a range of structure types (monopiles, jackets, gravity base foundations, jack-ups etc.). The facility also enables the testing of scour protection methodologies at relatively large scale (typically 1: 10 - 1:20) and allows for

  7. Agricultural model intercomparison and improvement project: Overview of model intercomparisons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improvement of crop simulation models to better estimate growth and yield is one of the objectives of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The overall goal of AgMIP is to provide an assessment of crop model through rigorous intercomparisons and evaluate future clim...

  8. Improved understanding of physics processes in pedestal structure, leading to improved predictive capability for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groebner, R. J.; Chang, C. S.; Hughes, J. W.; Maingi, R.; Snyder, P. B.; Xu, X. Q.; Boedo, J. A.; Boyle, D. P.; Callen, J. D.; Canik, J. M.; Cziegler, I.; Davis, E. M.; Diallo, A.; Diamond, P. H.; Elder, J. D.; Eldon, D. P.; Ernst, D. R.; Fulton, D. P.; Landreman, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Lore, J. D.; Osborne, T. H.; Pankin, A. Y.; Parker, S. E.; Rhodes, T. L.; Smith, S. P.; Sontag, A. C.; Stacey, W. M.; Walk, J.; Wan, W.; Wang, E. H.-J.; Watkins, J. G.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Yan, Z.; Belli, E. A.; Bray, B. D.; Candy, J.; Churchill, R. M.; Deterly, T. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Joseph, I.; Kinsey, J. E.; LaBombard, B.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lin, Z.; Lipschultz, B. L.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; McKee, G. R.; Ponce, D. M.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Staebler, G. M.; Sugiyama, L. E.; Terry, J. L.; Umansky, M. V.; Waltz, R. E.; Wolfe, S. M.; Zeng, L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    Joint experiment/theory/modelling research has led to increased confidence in predictions of the pedestal height in ITER. This work was performed as part of a US Department of Energy Joint Research Target in FY11 to identify physics processes that control the H-mode pedestal structure. The study included experiments on C-Mod, DIII-D and NSTX as well as interpretation of experimental data with theory-based modelling codes. This work provides increased confidence in the ability of models for peeling-ballooning stability, bootstrap current, pedestal width and pedestal height scaling to make correct predictions, with some areas needing further work also being identified. A model for pedestal pressure height has made good predictions in existing machines for a range in pressure of a factor of 20. This provides a solid basis for predicting the maximum pedestal pressure height in ITER, which is found to be an extrapolation of a factor of 3 beyond the existing data set. Models were studied for a number of processes that are proposed to play a role in the pedestal ne and Te profiles. These processes include neoclassical transport, paleoclassical transport, electron temperature gradient turbulence and neutral fuelling. All of these processes may be important, with the importance being dependent on the plasma regime. Studies with several electromagnetic gyrokinetic codes show that the gradients in and on top of the pedestal can drive a number of instabilities.

  9. An Improved Model for the Turbulent PBL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Y.; Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A. M.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Second order turbulence models of the Mellor and Yamada type have been widely used to simulate the PBL. It is however known that these models have several deficiencies. For example, they all predict a critical Richardson number which is about four times smaller than the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) data, they are unable to match the surface data, and they predict a boundary layer height lower than expected. In the present model, we show that these difficulties are all overcome by a single new physical input: the use of the most complete expression for both the pressure-velocity and the pressure-temperature correlations presently available. Each of the new terms represents a physical process that, was not accounted for by previous models. The new model is presented in three different levels according to Mellor and Yamada's terminology, with new, ready-to-use expressions for the turbulent, moments. We show that the new model reproduces several experimental and LES data better than previous models. As far as the PBL is concerned, we show that the model reproduces both the Kansas data as analyzed by Businger et al. in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for smaller Richardson numbers, as well as the LES and laboratory data up to Richardson numbers of order unity. We also show that the model yields a higher PBL height than the previous models.

  10. Physical activity promotion as a strategic corporate priority to improve worker health and business performance.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Kottke, Thomas E

    2009-10-01

    The increasingly sedentary nature of work and its impact on health and productivity indicators demands the promotion of physical activity at the worksite. This paper aims to present considerations for broad-scale application of corporate strategies designed to promote physical activity among employees and their families through employer-sponsored initiatives. The benefits of physical activity are multifold, including health and wellbeing and productivity related outcomes. The workplace setting may be leveraged to promote physical activity levels through frequent and sustained exposures to effective interventions that reach employees and, indirectly, their families. Furthermore, employers represent a powerful stakeholder group that should leverage its influence on health policy initiatives designed to create supportive environments inside the workplace as well as the broader community. Specific principles, recommendations for action, and considerations for the prioritization of initiatives are provided based on essential elements for comprehensive programs and health policy initiatives and in the context of a social-ecological model and supportive research. Physical activity promotion at the worksite should be an integrated initiative that measurably improves worker health and enhances business performance.

  11. Modified Polypropylene with Improved Physical-Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervakov, D. O.; Bashtanyk, P. I.; Burmistr, M. V.

    2015-03-01

    The use of mixtures of benzoyl peroxide and polysiloxane polyol compounds as polypropylene modifiers is suggested. It is established that, in such a way, its physical-mechanical properties can be changed purposefully.

  12. A mixed model reduction method for preserving selected physical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Gangtie

    2017-03-01

    A new model reduction method in the frequency domain is presented. By mixedly using the model reduction techniques from both the time domain and the frequency domain, the dynamic model is condensed to selected physical coordinates, and the contribution of slave degrees of freedom is taken as a modification to the model in the form of effective modal mass of virtually constrained modes. The reduced model can preserve the physical information related to the selected physical coordinates such as physical parameters and physical space positions of corresponding structure components. For the cases of non-classical damping, the method is extended to the model reduction in the state space but still only contains the selected physical coordinates. Numerical results are presented to validate the method and show the effectiveness of the model reduction.

  13. Improved parallel performance of the CICE model in CESM1

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, A. P.; Mickelson, S. A.; Hunke, E. C.; Bailey, D. A.

    2014-09-03

    The Los Alamos sea ice model, CICE, is a sophisticated finite difference grid point model. It has been a part of the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy community climate models (Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and Community Earth System Model (CESM)) for over a decade. It includes various physical and dynamical processes and is parallelized to run on large-scale computer systems. The CICE model was assessed in the CESM at different resolutions and target processor counts to better understand and optimize the performance. Several new decompositions and a new feature to reduce the halo cost were added to the model. The new decompositions better leverage land block elimination and take advantage of scaling opportunities in different computational kernels. As a result of these new features, the CICE model performance has been improved by up to 45% and has more flexibility to be run efficiently at arbitrary Message Passing Interface (MPI) task counts

  14. Improving physical quality of life with group physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to compare the change in quality of life over 32 weeks in depressed women assuming antidepressant drug with (experimental group) or without (control group) physical exercise from a study which results on objective dimension of outcome were already published. Methods Trial with randomized naturalistic control. Patients selected from the clinical activity registries of a Psychiatric University Unit. Inclusion criteria: female, between 40 and 60 years, diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorders (MMD, DSM-IV TR) resistant to ongoing treatment. Exclusion criteria: diagnosis of psychotic disorders; any contraindications to physical activity. 30 patients (71.4% of the eligible) participated to the study. Cases: 10 randomized patients undergoing pharmacological treatment plus physical activity. Controls: 20 patients undergoing only pharmacological therapy. Quality of life was measured by means of WHOQOL-Bref. Results The patients that made physical activity had their WHOQOL-Bref physical score improved from T0 to T8, the differences was statistically significant. In the control group WHOQOL-Bref physical remains the same and, consequentially, the difference between T0 and T8 do not reach any statistical significance. The perceived quality of life in the other domains did not change during the treatment in both groups. Thus no other differences were found between and within groups. Discussion and Conclusion The data presented in the previous paper found that physical activity seems a good adjunctive treatment in the long term management of patients with MDD. These new data indicated that physical activity may also improve the perceived physical quality of life. The dimensions related with social functioning, environment and psychical well being seem do not improved, unexpectedly, during the trial. Two objective dimension not strictly related to the depressive symptoms improved: social functioning and Clinical Global Impression, this

  15. Outstanding issues concerning future thermospheric model improvements and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jerry

    Significant improvements in the accuracy of thermosphere models have recently been achieved for the first time in more than thirty years. However, additional important issues remain to be addressed in the future in order to further improve both the current and future estimates of density values that affect the various assets, satellite and spacecraft, that society has come to depend upon. These include high latitude processes that are not yet treated adequately in the models, as well as accuracy of future estimates of model inputs such as both short and long term solar activity plus physical model structure and reliability. Orbiting spacecraft are affected by the total density as well as its composition. These parameters affect satellite and spacecraft tracking, operations, performance, orbital debris, lifetime estimation, and logistics planning for re-boost activities. This paper will review the various issues and relative importance for users of thermospheric model products.

  16. Guided-Inquiry Experiments for Physical Chemistry: The POGIL-PCL Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnicutt, Sally S.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of process-oriented, guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. The inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments being developed emphasize modeling of chemical phenomena. In each experiment, students work through at least…

  17. Guided-Inquiry Experiments for Physical Chemistry: The POGIL-PCL Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnicutt, Sally S.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of process-oriented, guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. The inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments being developed emphasize modeling of chemical phenomena. In each experiment, students work through at least…

  18. Tool for physics beyond the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Christopher A.

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics is a well studied theory, but there are hints that the SM is not the final story. What the full picture is, no one knows, but this thesis looks into three methods useful for exploring a few of the possibilities. To begin I present a paper by Spencer Chang, Nirmal Raj, Chaowaroj Wanotayaroj, and me, that studies the Higgs boson. The scalar particle first seen in 2012 may be the vanilla SM version, but there is some evidence that its couplings are different than predicted. By means of increasing the Higgs' coupling to vector bosons and fermions, we can be more consistent with the data. Next, in a paper by Spencer Chang, Gabriel Barello, and me, we elaborate on a tool created to study dark matter (DM) direct detection. The original work by Anand. et al. focused on elastic dark matter, whereas we extended this work to include the in elastic case, where different DM mass states enter and leave the collision. We also examine several direct detection experiments with our new framework to see if DAMA's modulation can be explained while avoiding the strong constraints imposed by the other experiments. We find that there are several operators that can do this. Finally, in a paper by Spencer Chang, Gabriel Barello, and me, we study an interesting phenomenon know as kinetic mixing, where two gauge bosons can share interactions with particles even though these particles aren't charged under both gauge groups. This, in and of itself, is not new, but we discuss a different method of obtaining this mixing where instead of mixing between two Abelian groups one of the groups is Nonabelian. Using this we then see that there is an inherent mass scale in the mixing strength; something that is absent in the Abelian-Abelian case. Furthermore, if the Nonabelian symmetry is the SU(2)L of the SM then the mass scale of the physics responsible for the mixing is about 1 TeV, right around the sweet spot for detection at the LHC. This dissertation

  19. Engaging Students In Modeling Instruction for Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Teaching introductory physics is arguably one of the most important things that a physics department does. It is the primary way that students from other science disciplines engage with physics and it is the introduction to physics for majors. Modeling instruction is an active learning strategy for introductory physics built on the premise that science proceeds through the iterative process of model construction, development, deployment, and revision. We describe the role that participating in authentic modeling has in learning and then explore how students engage in this process in the classroom. In this presentation, we provide a theoretical background on models and modeling and describe how these theoretical elements are enacted in the introductory university physics classroom. We provide both quantitative and video data to link the development of a conceptual model to the design of the learning environment and to student outcomes. This work is supported in part by DUE #1140706.

  20. Improving the theoretical underpinnings of process-based hydrologic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Martyn P.; Schaefli, Bettina; Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Samaniego, Luis; Luce, Charles H.; Jackson, Bethanna M.; Freer, Jim E.; Arnold, Jeffrey R.; Moore, R. Dan; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Ceola, Serena

    2016-03-01

    In this Commentary, we argue that it is possible to improve the physical realism of hydrologic models by making better use of existing hydrologic theory. We address the following questions: (1) what are some key elements of current hydrologic theory; (2) how can those elements best be incorporated where they may be missing in current models; and (3) how can we evaluate competing hydrologic theories across scales and locations? We propose that hydrologic science would benefit from a model-based community synthesis effort to reframe, integrate, and evaluate different explanations of hydrologic behavior, and provide a controlled avenue to find where understanding falls short.

  1. Improved learning in a large-enrollment physics class.

    PubMed

    Deslauriers, Louis; Schelew, Ellen; Wieman, Carl

    2011-05-13

    We compared the amounts of learning achieved using two different instructional approaches under controlled conditions. We measured the learning of a specific set of topics and objectives when taught by 3 hours of traditional lecture given by an experienced highly rated instructor and 3 hours of instruction given by a trained but inexperienced instructor using instruction based on research in cognitive psychology and physics education. The comparison was made between two large sections (N = 267 and N = 271) of an introductory undergraduate physics course. We found increased student attendance, higher engagement, and more than twice the learning in the section taught using research-based instruction.

  2. [Improve cardiovascular health by physical activity: take the good measure].

    PubMed

    Houle, Julie; Trudeau, François

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to physical activity is low among persons with cardiac disease. To influence this behaviour positively, it is suggested clinicians adapt the recommendations to each patient. Besides estimating needs and the values and the preferences of the person, professionals need to measure the physical activity. This measure also allows clinicians to follow the evolution of the behaviour further to the interventions. Subjective methods (questionnaire, logbook) and objective methods (pedometer, accelerometer, and heart rate monitor) can be used. There are advantages and inconveniences to each of these methods. This clinical column provides a review of these various methods to choose the one that is the most suited to the clinical context.

  3. Modelling Mathematical Reasoning in Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhden, Olaf; Karam, Ricardo; Pietrocola, Mauricio; Pospiech, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    Many findings from research as well as reports from teachers describe students' problem solving strategies as manipulation of formulas by rote. The resulting dissatisfaction with quantitative physical textbook problems seems to influence the attitude towards the role of mathematics in physics education in general. Mathematics is often seen as a…

  4. Modelling Mathematical Reasoning in Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhden, Olaf; Karam, Ricardo; Pietrocola, Mauricio; Pospiech, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    Many findings from research as well as reports from teachers describe students' problem solving strategies as manipulation of formulas by rote. The resulting dissatisfaction with quantitative physical textbook problems seems to influence the attitude towards the role of mathematics in physics education in general. Mathematics is often seen as a…

  5. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  6. Teacher Fidelity to One Physical Education Curricular Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloeppel, Tiffany; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Stylianou, Michalis; van der Mars, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed teachers' fidelity to one Physical Education curricular model. The theoretical framework guiding this study included professional development and fidelity to curricular models. In this study, teachers' fidelity to the Dynamic Physical Education (DPE) curricular model was measured for high and nonsupport district groups.…

  7. Teacher Fidelity to One Physical Education Curricular Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloeppel, Tiffany; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Stylianou, Michalis; van der Mars, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed teachers' fidelity to one Physical Education curricular model. The theoretical framework guiding this study included professional development and fidelity to curricular models. In this study, teachers' fidelity to the Dynamic Physical Education (DPE) curricular model was measured for high and nonsupport district groups.…

  8. Improvements to constitutive material model for fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, Mihai I.

    2011-12-01

    The high strength to weight ratio of woven fabric offers a cost effective solution to be used in a containment system for aircraft propulsion engines. Currently, Kevlar is the only Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved fabric for usage in systems intended to mitigate fan blade-out events. This research builds on an earlier constitutive model of Kevlar 49 fabric developed at Arizona State University (ASU) with the addition of new and improved modeling details. Latest stress strain experiments provided new and valuable data used to modify the material model post peak behavior. These changes reveal an overall improvement of the Finite Element (FE) model's ability to predict experimental results. First, the steel projectile is modeled using Johnson-Cook material model and provides a more realistic behavior in the FE ballistic models. This is particularly noticeable when comparing FE models with laboratory tests where large deformations in projectiles are observed. Second, follow-up analysis of the results obtained through the new picture frame tests conducted at ASU provides new values for the shear moduli and corresponding strains. The new approach for analysis of data from picture frame tests combines digital image analysis and a two-level factorial optimization formulation. Finally, an additional improvement in the material model for Kevlar involves checking the convergence at variation of mesh density of fabrics. The study performed and described herein shows the converging trend, therefore validating the FE model.

  9. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  10. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  11. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE PAGES

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; ...

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore » clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  12. Physical Training Improves Insulin Resistance Syndrome Markers in Obese Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sik; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Owens, Scott; Lemmon, Christian R.; Allison, Jerry; Litaker, Mark S.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that physical training (PT), especially high-intensity PT, would favorably affect components of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in obese adolescents. Data on teens randomized into lifestyle education (LSE) alone, LSE plus moderate -intensity PT, and LSE plus high-intensity PT indicated that PT, especially high-intensity…

  13. Identification of Physically Underdeveloped Pupils: Activities to Improve Their Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    Screening tests consisting of observation procedures and simple physical exercises requiring only a chinning bar, stopwatch, and record forms are suggested for identifying pupils aged ten to seventeen who are underdeveloped in strength, flexibility, agility, or cardiorespiratory endurance. Classes should be divided into pairs with one pupil acting…

  14. Identification of Physically Underdeveloped Pupils: Activities to Improve Their Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    Screening tests consisting of observation procedures and simple physical exercises requiring only a chinning bar, stopwatch, and record forms are suggested for identifying pupils aged ten to seventeen who are underdeveloped in strength, flexibility, agility, or cardiorespiratory endurance. Classes should be divided into pairs with one pupil acting…

  15. Integrating Animations, Narratives and Textual Information for Improving Physics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adegoke, Benson Adesina

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This article examined the effect of multimedia instruction on students' learning outcomes (achievement and interest) in secondary school physics. Method: The sample comprised of 517 (294 boys and 223 girls) students who came from 12 senior secondary schools in Ibadan Educational Zone 1, Oyo State, Nigeria. Their ages ranged between…

  16. Physical Training Improves Insulin Resistance Syndrome Markers in Obese Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sik; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Owens, Scott; Lemmon, Christian R.; Allison, Jerry; Litaker, Mark S.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that physical training (PT), especially high-intensity PT, would favorably affect components of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in obese adolescents. Data on teens randomized into lifestyle education (LSE) alone, LSE plus moderate -intensity PT, and LSE plus high-intensity PT indicated that PT, especially high-intensity…

  17. Classical Cepheid Pulsation Models. IX. New Input Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, Silvia; Bono, Giuseppe; Marconi, Marcella; Stellingwerf, Robert F.

    2003-12-01

    We constructed several sequences of classical Cepheid envelope models at solar chemical composition (Y=0.28,Z=0.02) to investigate the dependence of the pulsation properties predicted by linear and nonlinear hydrodynamic models on input physics. To study the dependence on the equation of state (EOS) we performed several numerical experiments by using the simplified analytical EOS originally developed by Stellingwerf and the recent analytical EOS developed by Irwin. Current findings suggest that the pulsation amplitudes, as well as the topology of the instability strip, marginally depend on the adopted EOS. To compromise between accuracy and numerical complexity we computed new EOS tables using the Irwin analytical EOS. We found that the difference between analytical and tabular thermodynamic quantities and their derivatives are smaller than 2% when adopting suitable steps in temperature and density. To improve the numerical accuracy of physical quantities, we are now adopting bicubic splines to interpolate both opacity and EOS tables. The new approach presents a substantial advantage to avoiding numerical derivatives in both linear and nonlinear models. The EOS first- and second-order derivatives are estimated by means of the analytical EOS or by means of analytical derivatives of the interpolating function. The opacity first-order derivatives are evaluated by means of analytical derivatives of the interpolating function. We also investigated the dependence of observables predicted by theoretical models on the mass-luminosity (ML) relation and on the spatial resolution across the hydrogen and the helium partial ionization regions. We found that nonlinear models are marginally affected by these physical and numerical assumptions. In particular, the difference between new and old models in the location as well as in the temperature width of the instability strip is, on average, less than 200 K. However, the spatial resolution somehow affects the pulsation properties

  18. Reframing conceptual physics: Improving relevance to elementary education and sonography majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFazia, David Gregory

    This study outlines the steps taken to reframe the Waves and Periodicity unit within a conceptual physics course. Beyond this unit reframing process, this paper explores the activities that made up the reframed unit and how each was developed and revised. The unit was reframed to improve relevance of the activities to the Elementary Education and Diagnostic Medical Sonography majors who make up the bulk of the course roster. The unit was reframed around ten design principles that were built on best practices from the literature, survey responses, and focused interviews. These principles support the selection of a biology-integrated themed approach to teaching physics. This is done through active and highly kinesthetic learning across three realms of human experience: physical, social, and cognitive. The unit materials were designed around making connections to students' future careers while requiring students to take progressively more responsibility in activities and assessments. Several support strategies are employed across these activities and assessments, including an energy-first, guided-inquiry approach to concept scaffolding and accommodations for diverse learners. Survey responses were solicited from physics instructors experienced with this population, Elementary Education and Sonography program advisors, and curriculum design, learning strategies, and educational technology experts. The reframed unit was reviewed by doctoral-level science education experts and revised to further improve the depth and transparency with which the design principles reframe the unit activities. The reframed unit contains a full unit plan, lesson plans, and full unit materials. These include classroom and online activities, assessments, and templates for future unit and lesson planning. Additional supplemental materials are provided to support Elementary Education and Sonography students and program advisors and also further promote the reframed unit materials and design

  19. IMPROVING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN ARTHRITIS CLINICAL TRIAL (IMPAACT): STUDY DESIGN, RATIONALE, RECRUITMENT, AND BASELINE DATA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rowland W.; Semanik, Pamela A.; Lee, Jungwha; Feinglass, Joseph; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Dunlop, Dorothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Over 21 million Americans report an arthritis-attributable activity limitation. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two of the most common/disabling forms of arthritis. Various forms of physical activity (PA) can improve a variety of health outcomes and reduce health care costs, but the proportion of the US population engaging in the recommended amount of PA is low and even lower among those with arthritis. The Improving Motivation for Physical Activity in Arthritis Clinical Trial (IMPAACT) is a randomized clinical trial that studied the effects of a lifestyle PA promotion intervention on pain and physical function outcomes. The IMPAACT intervention was based on a chronic care/disease management model in which allied health professionals promote patient self-management activities outside of traditional physician office encounters. The program was a motivational interviewing-based, individualized counseling and referral intervention, directed by a comprehensive assessment of individual patient barriers and strengths related to PA performance. The specific aims of IMPAACT were to test the efficacy of the IMPAACT intervention for persons with arthritis (N=185 persons with RA and 155 persons with knee OA) in improving arthritis-specific and generic self-reported pain and physical function outcomes, observed measures of function, and objectively measured and self-reported PA levels. Details of the stratified-randomized study design, subject recruitment, and data collection are described. The results from IMPAACT will generate empiric evidence pertaining to increasing PA levels in persons with arthritis and result in widely applicable strategies for health behavior change. PMID:25183043

  20. Improving physical activity in arthritis clinical trial (IMPAACT): study design, rationale, recruitment, and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Chang, Rowland W; Semanik, Pamela A; Lee, Jungwha; Feinglass, Joseph; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Dunlop, Dorothy D

    2014-11-01

    Over 21 million Americans report an arthritis-attributable activity limitation. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two of the most common/disabling forms of arthritis. Various forms of physical activity (PA) can improve a variety of health outcomes and reduce health care costs, but the proportion of the US population engaging in the recommended amount of PA is low and even lower among those with arthritis. The Improving Motivation for Physical Activity in Arthritis Clinical Trial (IMPAACT) is a randomized clinical trial that studied the effects of a lifestyle PA promotion intervention on pain and physical function outcomes. The IMPAACT intervention was based on a chronic care/disease management model in which allied health professionals promote patient self-management activities outside of traditional physician office encounters. The program was a motivational interviewing-based, individualized counseling and referral intervention, directed by a comprehensive assessment of individual patient barriers and strengths related to PA performance. The specific aims of IMPAACT were to test the efficacy of the IMPAACT intervention for persons with arthritis (N=185 persons with RA and 155 persons with knee OA) in improving arthritis-specific and generic self-reported pain and Physical Function outcomes, observed measures of function, and objectively measured and self-reported PA levels. Details of the stratified-randomized study design, subject recruitment, and data collection are described. The results from IMPAACT will generate empiric evidence pertaining to increasing PA levels in persons with arthritis and result in widely applicable strategies for health behavior change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Control group improvements in physical activity intervention trials and possible explanatory factors: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Waters, Lauren; Reeves, Marina; Fjeldsoe, Brianna; Eakin, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Several recent physical activity intervention trials have reported physical activity improvements in control group participants. Explanations have been proposed, but not systematically investigated. A systematic review of physical activity intervention trials was conducted to investigate the frequency of meaningful improvements in physical activity among control group participants (increase of ≥60 minutes [4 MET·hours] of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week, or a 10% increase in the proportion of participants meeting physical activity recommendations), and possible explanatory factors. Explanatory factors include aspects of behavioral measurement, participant characteristics, and control group treatment. Eight (28%) of 29 studies reviewed reported meaningful improvements in control group physical activity, most of which were of similar magnitude to improvements observed in the intervention group. A number of factors were related to meaningful control group improvements in physical activity, including the number of assessments, mode of measurement administration, screening to exclude active participants, and preexisting health status. Control group improvement in physical activity intervention trials is not uncommon and may be associated with behavioral measurement and participant characteristics. Associations observed in this review should be evaluated empirically in future research. Such studies may inform minimal contact approaches to physical activity promotion.

  2. Improving Student Learning and Views of Physics in a Large Enrollment Introductory Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Kathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Introductory physics courses often serve as gatekeepers for many scientific and engineering programs and, increasingly, colleges are relying on large, lecture formats for these courses. Many students, however, leave having learned very little physics and with poor views of the subject. In interactive engagement (IE), classroom activities encourage…

  3. Improving Student Learning and Views of Physics in a Large Enrollment Introductory Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Kathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Introductory physics courses often serve as gatekeepers for many scientific and engineering programs and, increasingly, colleges are relying on large, lecture formats for these courses. Many students, however, leave having learned very little physics and with poor views of the subject. In interactive engagement (IE), classroom activities encourage…

  4. Physical health nurse consultant role to improve physical health in mental health services: A carer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Karen; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general population. Awareness of this health disparity is increasing; however, strategies to address the problem are limited. Carers play an important role in the physical health care of people with mental illness, particularly in facilitating navigation of and advocating in the health care system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant position has been suggested as a way to address the physical health care disparity and limited research available suggests that positive outcomes are possible. In the present study, a qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken, involving in-depth interviews with people identifying as mental health carers. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted involving a total of 13 carers. The resulting data were analyzed thematically. Views and opinions about the proposed physical health nurse consultant (PHNC) position were sought during these interviews and are reported in this paper. Two main sub-themes were evident relating to characteristics of this role: reliability and consistency; and communication and support. Essentially carers expressed a need for support for themselves and consumers in addressing physical health concerns. Successful implementation of this position would require a consistent and reliable approach. Carers are significant stakeholders in the physical health of consumers of mental health services and their active involvement in identifying and tailoring services, including development of the physical health nurse consultant must be seen as a priority. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Improving Students' Knowledge and Values in Physical Education through "Physical Best" Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonetti, Melissa; Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of using "Physical Best" lessons to promote adolescent energy balance knowledge and task values. Seventh graders (N = 90) were randomly assigned to the experiment and the comparison groups. The experiment group took 10 selected "Physical Best" lessons, while the comparison experienced 10 district…

  6. Intentional Development: A Model to Guide Lifelong Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherubini, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Framed in the context of researching influences on physical activity and actually working with individuals and groups seeking to initiate, increase or maintain physical activity, the purpose of this review is to present the model of Intentional Development as a multi-theoretical approach to guide research and applied work in physical activity.…

  7. A review of recent research on improvement of physical parameterizations in the GLA GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic assessment of the effect of a series of improvements in physical parameterizations of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) are summarized. The implementation of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) in the GCM is followed by a comparison of SiB GCM simulations with that of the earlier slab soil hydrology GCM (SSH-GCM) simulations. In the Sahelian context, the biogeophysical component of desertification was analyzed for SiB-GCM simulations. Cumulus parameterization is found to be the primary determinant of the organization of the simulated tropical rainfall of the GLA GCM using Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization. A comparison of model simulations with station data revealed excessive shortwave radiation accompanied by excessive drying and heating to the land. The perpetual July simulations with and without interactive soil moisture shows that 30 to 40 day oscillations may be a natural mode of the simulated earth atmosphere system.

  8. Physical vulnerability modelling in natural hazard risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, J.

    2007-04-01

    An evaluation of the risk to an exposed element from a hazardous event requires a consideration of the element's vulnerability, which expresses its propensity to suffer damage. This concept allows the assessed level of hazard to be translated to an estimated level of risk and is often used to evaluate the risk from earthquakes and cyclones. However, for other natural perils, such as mass movements, coastal erosion and volcanoes, the incorporation of vulnerability within risk assessment is not well established and consequently quantitative risk estimations are not often made. This impedes the study of the relative contributions from different hazards to the overall risk at a site. Physical vulnerability is poorly modelled for many reasons: the cause of human casualties (from the event itself rather than by building damage); lack of observational data on the hazard, the elements at risk and the induced damage; the complexity of the structural damage mechanisms; the temporal and geographical scales; and the ability to modify the hazard level. Many of these causes are related to the nature of the peril therefore for some hazards, such as coastal erosion, the benefits of considering an element's physical vulnerability may be limited. However, for hazards such as volcanoes and mass movements the modelling of vulnerability should be improved by, for example, following the efforts made in earthquake risk assessment. For example, additional observational data on induced building damage and the hazardous event should be routinely collected and correlated and also numerical modelling of building behaviour during a damaging event should be attempted.

  9. Improved inland water levels from SAR altimetry using novel empirical and physical retrackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Heidi; Deng, Xiaoli; Andersen, Ole B.; Stenseng, Lars; Nielsen, Karina; Knudsen, Per

    2016-06-01

    Satellite altimetry has proven a valuable resource of information on river and lake levels where in situ data are sparse or non-existent. In this study several new methods for obtaining stable inland water levels from CryoSat-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) altimetry are presented and evaluated. In addition, the possible benefits from combining physical and empirical retrackers are investigated. The retracking methods evaluated in this paper include the physical SAR Altimetry MOde Studies and Applications (SAMOSA3) model, a traditional subwaveform threshold retracker, the proposed Multiple Waveform Persistent Peak (MWaPP) retracker, and a method combining the physical and empirical retrackers. Using a physical SAR waveform retracker over inland water has not been attempted before but shows great promise in this study. The evaluation is performed for two medium-sized lakes (Lake Vänern in Sweden and Lake Okeechobee in Florida), and in the Amazon River in Brazil. Comparing with in situ data shows that using the SAMOSA3 retracker generally provides the lowest root-mean-squared-errors (RMSE), closely followed by the MWaPP retracker. For the empirical retrackers, the RMSE values obtained when comparing with in situ data in Lake Vänern and Lake Okeechobee are in the order of 2-5 cm for well-behaved waveforms. Combining the physical and empirical retrackers did not offer significantly improved mean track standard deviations or RMSEs. Based on these studies, it is suggested that future SAR derived water levels are obtained using the SAMOSA3 retracker whenever information about other physical properties apart from range is desired. Otherwise we suggest using the empirical MWaPP retracker described in this paper, which is both easy to implement, computationally efficient, and gives a height estimate for even the most contaminated waveforms.

  10. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  11. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27051507

  12. Physical activity for people with a disability: a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Hidde P; van der Beek, Allard J; van der Woude, Luc H V; van Mechelen, Willem

    2004-01-01

    The promotion of a physically active lifestyle has become an important issue in health policy in first-world countries. A physically active lifestyle is accompanied by several fitness and health benefits. Individuals with a disability can particularly benefit from an active lifestyle: not only does it reduce the risk for secondary health problems, but all levels of functioning can be influenced positively. The objective of this article is to propose a conceptual model that describes the relationships between physical activity behaviour, its determinants and functioning of people with a disability. The literature was systematically searched for articles considering physical activity and disability, and models relating both topics were looked for in particular. No models were found relating physical activity behaviour, its determinants and functioning in people with a disability. Consequently, a new model, the Physical Activity for people with a Disability (PAD) model, was constructed based on existing models of disability and models of determinants of physical activity behaviour. The starting point was the new WHO Model of Functioning and Disability, part of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which describes the multidimensional aspects of functioning and disability. Physical activity behaviour and its determinants were integrated into the ICF model. The factors determining physical activity were based mainly on those used in the Attitude, Social influence and self-Efficacy (ASE) model. The proposed model can be used as a theoretical framework for future interventions and research on physical activity promotion in the population of people with a disability. The model currently forms the theoretical basis for a large physical activity promotion trial in ten Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  13. Does requiring graded online homework improve physics exam performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Norma

    2012-02-01

    In a first experiment with using Mastering Physics in a first semester calculus-based course, homework and exam performance was tracked periodically during the semester. As expected, the use of novel technology (and its ability to track which students were persistently working at problem exercises) motivated many students to become more involved with work on assigned physics problems. Although there did appear to be a significant correlation between exam averages and homework scores in the upper half of the exam average distribution, individuals spanning the full range of exam averages (down to 45 percent) earned homework scores as high as those who had performed outstandingly well in exams. In this work, we present results and proposed plausible explanations for the apparent anomaly.

  14. The exercise prescription: a tool to improve physical activity.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Edward M; Kennedy, Mary A

    2012-11-01

    The current epidemic of sedentary behavior is a serious public health issue that requires the attention of the medical community. Although the benefits of physical activity are well established, research indicates that Americans are not heeding the message, and new strategies are warranted to bring about change in this arena. The health care community can and should play a key role in this movement. Patients respect their physicians as credible sources of information and look to them for health-related guidance. Unfortunately, many physicians are not talking to their patients about physical activity and are missing a unique opportunity to raise awareness about its benefits. Exercise needs to be discussed as a serious form of treatment, similar to medication, and should be thoughtfully prescribed to every patient. Physicians need to be familiar with the level of exercise necessary to achieve health benefits as defined by the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Furthermore, they should be competent in their ability to identify a patient's level of risk for starting or increasing exercise and provide guidance on the frequency, intensity, time, and type of activity necessary to safely elicit maximal health benefits. These basic competencies can be easily understood by physicians and incorporated into their practices. Resources have been established to help support physicians in this process. Physiatrists are uniquely positioned to lead the effort for change in this area because they are well-established proponents of exercise and are trained to prescribe therapeutic exercise to address the complex medical issues of their patients. This skill-set should be used for every patient in an effort to reduce the widespread prevalence of the "chronic disease" physical inactivity.

  15. Possibilities: A framework for modeling students' deductive reasoning in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Jonathan David Housley

    possibilities framework provides. For example, this framework allows us to detect subtle differences in students' reasoning errors, even when those errors result in the same final answer. It also illuminates how simply mentioning overlooked quantities can instigate new lines of student reasoning. It allows us to better understand how well-known psychological biases, such as the belief bias, affect the reasoning process by preventing reasoners from fleshing out all of the possibilities. The possibilities framework also allows us to track student discussions about physics, revealing the need for all parties in communication to use the same set of possibilities in the conversations to facilitate successful understanding. The framework also suggests some of the influences that affect how reasoners choose between possible solutions to a given problem. This new framework for understanding how students reason when solving conceptual physics problems opens the door to a significant field of research. The framework itself needs to be further tested and developed, but it provides substantial suggestions for instructional interventions. If we hope to improve student reasoning in physics, the possibilities framework suggests that we are perhaps best served by teaching students how to fully flesh out the possibilities in every situation. This implies that we need to ensure students have a deep understanding of all of the implied possibilities afforded by the fundamental principles that are the cornerstones of the models we teach in physics classes.

  16. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the ph ysical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems.

  17. Improving student learning and views of physics in a large enrollment introductory physics class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehzadeh Einabad, Omid

    Introductory physics courses often serve as gatekeepers for many scientific and engineering programs and, increasingly, colleges are relying on large, lecture formats for these courses. Many students, however, leave having learned very little physics and with poor views of the subject. In interactive engagement (IE), classroom activities encourage students to engage with each other and with physics concepts and to be actively involved in their own learning. These methods have been shown to be effective in introductory physics classes with small group recitations. This study examined student learning and views of physics in a large enrollment course that included IE methods with no separate, small-group recitations. In this study, a large, lecture-based course included activities that had students explaining their reasoning both verbally and in writing, revise their ideas about physics concepts, and apply their reasoning to various problems. The questions addressed were: (a) What do students learn about physics concepts and how does student learning in this course compare to that reported in the literature for students in a traditional course?, (b) Do students' views of physics change and how do students' views of physics compare to that reported in the literature for students in a traditional course?, and (c) Which of the instructional strategies contribute to student learning in this course? Data included: pre-post administration of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI), classroom exams during the term, pre-post administration of the Colorado Learning Attitudes About Science Survey (CLASS), and student work, interviews, and open-ended surveys. The average normalized gain (=0.32) on the FCI falls within the medium-gain range as reported in the physics education literature, even though the average pre-test score was very low (30%) and this was the instructor's first implementation of IE methods. Students' views of physics remained relatively unchanged by instruction

  18. Improved models of dense anharmonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenau, P.; Zilburg, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present two improved quasi-continuous models of dense, strictly anharmonic chains. The direct expansion which includes the leading effect due to lattice dispersion, results in a Boussinesq-type PDE with a compacton as its basic solitary mode. Without increasing its complexity we improve the model by including additional terms in the expanded interparticle potential with the resulting compacton having a milder singularity at its edges. A particular care is applied to the Hertz potential due to its non-analyticity. Since, however, the PDEs of both the basic and the improved model are ill posed, they are unsuitable for a study of chains dynamics. Using the bond length as a state variable we manipulate its dispersion and derive a well posed fourth order PDE.

  19. A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-13

    A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a ‘‘tributary subnetwork’’ before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

  20. An improved theoretical model of acoustic agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L. ); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration); Hoffmann, T.L. )

    1994-04-01

    An improved theoretical model is developed to describe the acoustic agglomeration of particles entrained in a gas medium. The improvements to the present theories are twofold: first, wave scattering is included in the orthokinetic interaction of particles and second, hydrodynamic interaction, shown to be an important agglomeration mechanism for certain operation conditions, is incorporated into the model. The influence of orthokinetic and hydrodynamic interactions introduce associated convergent velocities that cause particles to approach each other and collide. The convergent velocities are related with an acoustic agglomeration frequency function (AAFF) through a semi-statistical method. This function is the key parameter for the theoretical simulation of acoustic agglomeration.

  1. An improved approach for tank purge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Jacob R.; Chintalapati, Sunil; Gutierrez, Hector M.; Kirk, Daniel R.

    2013-05-01

    Many launch support processes use helium gas to purge rocket propellant tanks and fill lines to rid them of hazardous contaminants. As an example, the purge of the Space Shuttle's External Tank used approximately 1,100 kg of helium. With the rising cost of helium, initiatives are underway to examine methods to reduce helium consumption. Current helium purge processes have not been optimized using physics-based models, but rather use historical 'rules of thumb'. To develop a more accurate and useful model of the tank purge process, computational fluid dynamics simulations of several tank configurations were completed and used as the basis for the development of an algebraic model of the purge process. The computationally efficient algebraic model of the purge process compares well with a detailed transient, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation as well as with experimental data from two external tank purges.

  2. Hybrid Modeling Improves Health and Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Scientific Monitoring Inc. was awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to create a new, simplified health-monitoring approach for flight vehicles and flight equipment. The project developed a hybrid physical model concept that provided a structured approach to simplifying complex design models for use in health monitoring, allowing the output or performance of the equipment to be compared to what the design models predicted, so that deterioration or impending failure could be detected before there would be an impact on the equipment's operational capability. Based on the original modeling technology, Scientific Monitoring released I-Trend, a commercial health- and performance-monitoring software product named for its intelligent trending, diagnostics, and prognostics capabilities, as part of the company's complete ICEMS (Intelligent Condition-based Equipment Management System) suite of monitoring and advanced alerting software. I-Trend uses the hybrid physical model to better characterize the nature of health or performance alarms that result in "no fault found" false alarms. Additionally, the use of physical principles helps I-Trend identify problems sooner. I-Trend technology is currently in use in several commercial aviation programs, and the U.S. Air Force recently tapped Scientific Monitoring to develop next-generation engine health-management software for monitoring its fleet of jet engines. Scientific Monitoring has continued the original NASA work, this time under a Phase III SBIR contract with a joint NASA-Pratt & Whitney aviation security program on propulsion-controlled aircraft under missile-damaged aircraft conditions.

  3. A Physically-based Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Lin, N.; Smith, J. A.; Emanuel, K.; Chavas, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall from tropical cyclones (TCs) can cause extreme flooding. Predicting and understanding TC rainfall is thus important but has received relatively less attention, compared to the wind and surge. Here we present a simple, physically-based rainfall model, where the rain rate is obtained from estimated vertical velocity and specific humidity in the lower troposphere. The involved rainfall mechanisms include: 1) vertical motion at the top of the boundary layer owing to frictional effects; 2) vertical motion in the middle troposphere resulted from the time evolution of the gradient wind; 3) vertical motion forced by topographic interaction as well as 4) baroclinic effect. The model has been applied to Texas and shown to generate rainfall statistics comparable to observations (Zhu et al, 2013). Here we further evaluate this model on an event basis; case studies include Hurricane Irene (2011) and Isabel (2003). Without any calibration, hourly rainfall estimated from this model compares well with those from full numerical weather prediction model (WRF) as well as rainfall climatology models (R-CLIPPER and PHRaM). This comparison demonstrates the model's ability to capture main TC rainfall mechanisms, and it can be used as an effective tool to study the relative contribution of each rainfall mechanism. Ongoing work includes possibly improving the rainfall model by coupling it with a more accurate boundary layer model. Given its high computational efficiency, this rainfall model can be applied to large numbers of ensemble or synthetic simulations. This study fits into our long-term goal to quantify the risk of inland flooding associated with landfalling TCs.

  4. Are There Ethical Limitations for Improving Physical Performance in Soldiers?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    que les fondements d’une éthique du sport ont été pris naissance, qui prônent l’implication de l’Homme dans son intégralité, et respectant la santé ...physical and mental training, and then depends on the individual talent and degree of preparation. However, whatever the sport activity, taking exams...pharmaceutical enhancements and gene doping create profound ethical dilemmas and concerns about the integrity of sport and the health effects of long-term

  5. Improving Student Learning and Views of Physics in a Large Enrollment Introductory Physics Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Kathy

    2014-03-01

    Interactive engagement (IE) strategies can be helpful for students learning introductory physics with small group recitations. Less is known about their impact for large lecture-based courses. This study examined student learning and views of physics in a large enrollment course that included IE but no small-group recitation. The questions addressed were: (a) What do students learn about physics and how does this compare to reports for traditional courses?, (b) How do students' views of physics change and how does this compare to reports for traditional courses?, and (c) Which instructional strategies contribute to student outcomes? Data included pre-post FCI scores, classroom examinations during the term, pre-post CLASS scores, and student work, interviews, and open-ended surveys. Findings include a FCI average normalized gain of 0.32, which is high for students with low pre-test score (30% for this group) and instructors new to IE methods. Students' views of physics remained relatively unchanged, which is promising given the typical decline for student views. And instructional strategies as a set, not individual strategies, impacted student outcomes. Findings support the recommendation to adopt IE methods in introductory physics classes, particularly when pre-tests are low.

  6. Real time refractivity from clutter using a best fit approach improved with physical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvenot, RéMi; Fabbro, Vincent; Gerstoft, Peter; Bourlier, Christophe; Saillard, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Refractivity from clutter (RFC) retrieves the radio frequency refractive conditions along a propagation path by inverting the measured radar sea clutter return. In this paper, a real-time RFC technique is proposed called "Improved Best Fit" (IBF). It is based on finding the environment with best fit to one of many precomputed, modeled radar returns for different environments in a database. The method is improved by considering the mean slope of the propagation factor, and physical considerations are added: smooth variations of refractive conditions with azimuth and smooth variations of duct height with range. The approach is tested on data from 1998 Wallops Island, Virginia, measurement campaign with good results on most of the data, and questionable results are detected with a confidence criterion. A comparison between the refractivity structures measured during the measurement campaign and the ones retrieved by inversion shows a good match. Radar coverage simulations obtained from these inverted refractivity structures demonstrate the potential utility of IBF.

  7. TOWARD EFFICIENT RIPARIAN RESTORATION: INTEGRATING ECONOMIC, PHYSICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper integrates economic, biological, and physical models to determine the efficient combination and spatial allocation of conservation efforts for water quality protection and salmonid habitat enhancement in the Grande Ronde basin, Oregon. The integrated modeling system co...

  8. TOWARD EFFICIENT RIPARIAN RESTORATION: INTEGRATING ECONOMIC, PHYSICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper integrates economic, biological, and physical models to determine the efficient combination and spatial allocation of conservation efforts for water quality protection and salmonid habitat enhancement in the Grande Ronde basin, Oregon. The integrated modeling system co...

  9. An improved computational constitutive model for glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, Timothy J.; Johnson, Gordon R.; Gerlach, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    In 2011, Holmquist and Johnson presented a model for glass subjected to large strains, high strain rates and high pressures. It was later shown that this model produced solutions that were severely mesh dependent, converging to a solution that was much too strong. This article presents an improved model for glass that uses a new approach to represent the interior and surface strength that is significantly less mesh dependent. This new formulation allows for the laboratory data to be accurately represented (including the high tensile strength observed in plate-impact spall experiments) and produces converged solutions that are in good agreement with ballistic data. The model also includes two new features: one that decouples the damage model from the strength model, providing more flexibility in defining the onset of permanent deformation; the other provides for a variable shear modulus that is dependent on the pressure. This article presents a review of the original model, a description of the improved model and a comparison of computed and experimental results for several sets of ballistic data. Of special interest are computed and experimental results for two impacts onto a single target, and the ability to compute the damage velocity in agreement with experiment data. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  10. Forecast improvement by interactive ensemble of atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnarkov, L.; Duane, G. S.; Kocarev, L.

    2013-12-01

    The advances in weather forecast traditionally have been based on two lines of improvement: 1 - deepening the understanding of physical phenomena that underlies the atmospheric dynamics; and 2 - steady increase in computer power that enables use of finer grid resolution. The meteorological centers model dynamics of the atmosphere with the same basic physical laws, but sometimes take different approaches in capturing small-scale phenomena and generally use different grid sizes. As a result there are dozens operational models around the globe with various parameterizations of the unresolved processes. Newest attempts in forecast improvements are based on using ensemble prediction. Multiple outputs are taken from runs with perturbed initial conditions, or perturbed parameter values. A novel paradigm is exploiting dynamical exchange of variables between simultaneously running models. There are already simulations of models exchanging fluxes between ocean and atmospheric models, but examples with direct coupling of different atmospheric models are rather new. Within this approach the coupling schemes can be different, but as simplest appear those that combine corresponding dynamical variables or tendency components. In this work we present results with an artificial toy model-Lorenz 96 model. To make more faithful example as reality (the atmosphere) is considered one Lorenz 96 class III system, while as its imperfect models are taken three class II systems that have different forcing terms. These resemble the models used in three different meteorological centers. The interactive ensemble has tendency that is weighted combination of the individual models' tendencies. The weights are obtained with statistical techniques based on past observations that target to minimize the mismatch between the truth's and interactive ensemble's tendencies. By means of anomaly correlation it is numerically verified that this ensemble has longer range of forecast than the individual models.

  11. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    This paper describes the improvements introduced into the original version of ozone reference model of Keating and Young (1985, 1987) which is to be incorporated in the next COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide information on the global ozone distribution (including the ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from 25 to 90 km) combining data from five recent satellite experiments: the Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE), Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV Spectrometer, and SME 1.27 Micron Airglow. The improved version of the reference model uses reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extends the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the 1981-1983 time period. Comparisons are presented between the results of this ozone model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  12. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the improvements introduced into the original version of ozone reference model of Keating and Young (1985, 1987) which is to be incorporated in the next COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide information on the global ozone distribution (including the ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from 25 to 90 km) combining data from five recent satellite experiments: the Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE), Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV Spectrometer, and SME 1.27 Micron Airglow. The improved version of the reference model uses reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extends the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the 1981-1983 time period. Comparisons are presented between the results of this ozone model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  13. An Empirical-Mathematical Modelling Approach to Upper Secondary Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Carl; Kind, Per Morten; Henriksen, Ellen K.; Guttersrud, Oystein

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a teaching approach focusing on modelling in physics, emphasizing scientific reasoning based on empirical data and using the notion of multiple representations of physical phenomena as a framework. We describe modelling activities from a project (PHYS 21) and relate some experiences from implementation of the modelling…

  14. An Empirical-Mathematical Modelling Approach to Upper Secondary Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Carl; Kind, Per Morten; Henriksen, Ellen K.; Guttersrud, Oystein

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a teaching approach focusing on modelling in physics, emphasizing scientific reasoning based on empirical data and using the notion of multiple representations of physical phenomena as a framework. We describe modelling activities from a project (PHYS 21) and relate some experiences from implementation of the modelling…

  15. Correction of biased climate simulated by biased physics through parameter estimation in an intermediate coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shaoqing; Liu, Zhengyu; Wu, Xinrong; Han, Guijun

    2016-09-01

    Imperfect physical parameterization schemes are an important source of model bias in a coupled model and adversely impact the performance of model simulation. With a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model of intermediate complexity, the impact of imperfect parameter estimation on model simulation with biased physics has been studied. Here, the biased physics is induced by using different outgoing longwave radiation schemes in the assimilation and "truth" models. To mitigate model bias, the parameters employed in the biased longwave radiation scheme are optimized using three different methods: least-squares parameter fitting (LSPF), single-valued parameter estimation and geography-dependent parameter optimization (GPO), the last two of which belong to the coupled model parameter estimation (CMPE) method. While the traditional LSPF method is able to improve the performance of coupled model simulations, the optimized parameter values from the CMPE, which uses the coupled model dynamics to project observational information onto the parameters, further reduce the bias of the simulated climate arising from biased physics. Further, parameters estimated by the GPO method can properly capture the climate-scale signal to improve the simulation of climate variability. These results suggest that the physical parameter estimation via the CMPE scheme is an effective approach to restrain the model climate drift during decadal climate predictions using coupled general circulation models.

  16. Assessing Program Learning Objectives to Improve Undergraduate Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, Carrie

    2014-03-01

    Our physics undergraduate program has five program learning objectives (PLOs) focusing on (1) physical principles, (2) mathematical expertise, (3) experimental technique, (4) communication and teamwork, and (5) research proficiency. One PLO is assessed each year, with the results guiding modifications in our curriculum and future assessment practices; we have just completed our first cycle of assessing all PLOs. Our approach strives to maximize the ease and applicability of our assessment practices while maintaining faculty's flexibility in course design and delivery. Objectives are mapped onto our core curriculum with identified coursework collected as direct evidence. We've utilized mostly descriptive rubrics, applying them at the course and program levels as well as sharing them with the students. This has resulted in more efficient assessment that is also applicable to reaccreditation efforts, higher inter-rater reliability than with other rubric types, and higher quality capstone projects. We've also found that the varied quality of student writing can interfere with our assessment of other objectives. This poster outlines our processes, resources, and how we have used PLO assessment to strengthen our undergraduate program.

  17. Low Complexity Models to improve Incomplete Sensitivities for Shape Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, Mugurel; Mohammadi, Bijan; Moreau, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    The present global platform for simulation and design of multi-model configurations treat shape optimization problems in aerodynamics. Flow solvers are coupled with optimization algorithms based on CAD-free and CAD-connected frameworks. Newton methods together with incomplete expressions of gradients are used. Such incomplete sensitivities are improved using reduced models based on physical assumptions. The validity and the application of this approach in real-life problems are presented. The numerical examples concern shape optimization for an airfoil, a business jet and a car engine cooling axial fan.

  18. Improvements in Physical Fitness in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; Heller, Tamar; Wang, Edward; Valerio, Irene

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of an exercise training program for 52 adults with Down syndrome (M age = 39.4 years) was evaluated. The training program consisted of cardiovascular (30 minutes) and strength exercise (15 minutes) for 12 weeks, 3 days a week for 45-minutes per session. Compared to control subjects, the training group improved significantly in…

  19. Improvements in Physical Fitness in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; Heller, Tamar; Wang, Edward; Valerio, Irene

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of an exercise training program for 52 adults with Down syndrome (M age = 39.4 years) was evaluated. The training program consisted of cardiovascular (30 minutes) and strength exercise (15 minutes) for 12 weeks, 3 days a week for 45-minutes per session. Compared to control subjects, the training group improved significantly in…

  20. Improving subsurface hydrology in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, J. M.; Clark, M. P.; Swenson, S. C.; Lawrence, D. M.; Tyler, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrologic processes that govern storage and transport of soil water and groundwater can have strong dynamic relationships with biogeochemical and atmospheric processes. This understanding has lead to a push to improve subsurface hydrologic parametrization in Earth System Models. Here we present results related to improving the implementation of soil moisture distribution, groundwater recharge/discharge, and subsurface drainage in the Community Land Model (CLM) which is the land surface model in the Community Earth System Model. First we identified geo-climatically different locations around the world to develop test cases. For each case we compare the vertical soil moisture distribution from the different implementations of 1D Richards equation, considering the boundary conditions, the treatment of the groundwater sink term, the vertical discretization, and the time stepping schemes. Generally, large errors in the hydrologic mass balance within the soil column occur when there is a large vertical gradient in soil moisture or when there is a shallow water table within a soil column. We then test the sensitivity of the algorithmic parameters that control temporal discretization and error tolerance of the adaptive time-stepping scheme to help optimize its computational efficiency. In addition, we vary the spatial discretization of soil layers (i.e. quantity of layers and their thicknesses) to better understand the sensitivity of vertical discretization of soil columns on soil moisture variability in ESMs. We present multivariate and multi-scale evaluation for the different model options and suggest ways to move forward with future model improvements.

  1. Physical models of hydrofracturing across material interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Thorpe, R.K.; Heuze, F.E.

    1988-10-01

    We have performed a series of laboratory tests to study the propagation of a hydrofracture into and through an interface between two rock-like materials. The aim of this research is to provide improved diagnostics for stimulating lenticular gas sand reservoirs by interpreting features of the injection pressure-time record caused by interaction of a hydrofracture with a geologic discontinuity. Results will also be used to validate conceptual models of hydrofracture behavior in discontinuous media, such as are embodied in the LLNL FEFFLAP code, a two-dimensional fracture propagation computer program. We prepared test specimens by embedding sandstone tablets (lenses) in blocks of gypsum cement. These blocks were hydrofractured under true triaxial loading conditions, at a constant injection rate. The injection path was designed so that we obtained a single-wing fracture, propagating in a plane perpendicular to the interface. The vertical extent of the fractures was controlled by means of wire mesh screen embedded in the blocks, perpendicular to the injection tube. Growth of the fractures was tracked via extension failure of fine tungsten wires embedded in the gypsum. After testing, we dissected the blocks and recorded the extent of fracturing and fluid penetration. Cross-sections of the fractures indicate that they were of constant height and propagated through the sandstone tablet. All the fractures showed step-crack behavior upon entering or exiting the sandstone tablet. Pressure-time and fracture tracking data were consistent for all tests. Distinct step increases on the pressure- time record were also noted in all tests, and are related to the interaction of the hydrofracture with the sandstone lens. 16 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Does continuing education improve physical therapists' effectiveness in treating neck pain? A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Joshua A; Fritz, Julie M; Brennan, Gerard P; Magel, Jake

    2009-01-01

    Physical therapists often attend continuing education (CE) courses to improve their overall clinical performance and patient outcomes. However, evidence suggests that CE courses may not improve the outcomes for patients receiving physical therapy for the management of neck pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an ongoing educational intervention for improving the outcomes for patients with neck pain. The study participants were 19 physical therapists who attended a 2-day CE course focusing on the management of neck pain. All patients treated by the therapists in this study completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and a pain rating scale at the initial examination and at their final visit. Therapists from 11 clinics were invited to attend a 2-day CE course on the management of neck pain. After the CE course, the therapists were randomly assigned to receive either ongoing education consisting of small group sessions and an educational outreach session or no further education. Clinical outcomes achieved by therapists who received ongoing education and therapists who did not were compared for both pretraining and posttraining periods. The effects of receiving ongoing education were examined by use of linear mixed-model analyses with time period and group as fixed factors; improvements in disability and pain as dependent variables; and age, sex, and the patient's initial NDI and pain rating scores as covariates. Patients treated by therapists who received ongoing education experienced significantly greater reductions in disability during the study period (pretraining to posttraining) than those treated by therapists who did not receive ongoing training (mean difference=4.2 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.69, 7.7). Changes in pain did not differ for patients treated by the 2 groups of therapists during the study period (mean difference=0.47 point; 95% CI=-0.11, 1.0). Therapists in the ongoing education group also used fewer

  3. Modelers and policymakers : improving the relationships.

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2004-06-01

    On April 22 and 23, 2004, a diverse group of 14 policymakers, modelers, analysts, and scholars met with some 22 members of the Sandia National Laboratories staff to explores ways in which the relationships between modelers and policymakers in the energy and environment fields (with an emphasis on energy) could be made more productive for both. This report is not a transcription of that workshop, but draws very heavily on its proceedings. It first describes the concept of modeling, the varying ways in which models are used to support policymaking, and the institutional context for those uses. It then proposes that the goal of modelers and policymakers should be a relationship of mutual trust, built on a foundation of communication, supported by the twin pillars of policy relevance and technical credibility. The report suggests 20 guidelines to help modelers improve the relationship, followed by 10 guidelines to help policymakers toward the same goal.

  4. Modeling the Discrimination Power of Physics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesic, Vanes

    2011-01-01

    For the purposes of tailoring physics instruction in accordance with the needs and abilities of the students it is useful to explore the knowledge structure of students of different ability levels. In order to precisely differentiate the successive, characteristic states of student achievement it is necessary to use test items that possess…

  5. An Amotivation Model in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Bo; Wingert, Robert K.; Li, Weidong; Sun, Haichun; Rukavina, Paul Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Amotivation refers to a state in which individuals cannot perceive a relationship between their behavior and that behavior's subsequent outcome. With the belief that considering amotivation as a multidimensional construct could reflect the complexity of motivational deficits in physical education, we developed this study to validate an amotivation…

  6. School Improvement Model to Foster Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulloda, Rudolfo Barcena

    2011-01-01

    Many classroom teachers are still using the traditional teaching methods. The traditional teaching methods are one-way learning process, where teachers would introduce subject contents such as language arts, English, mathematics, science, and reading separately. However, the school improvement model takes into account that all students have…

  7. Improving Representational Competence with Concrete Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Scopelitis, Stephanie; Lira, Matthew E.; DeSutter, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Representational competence is a primary contributor to student learning in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines and an optimal target for instruction at all educational levels. We describe the design and implementation of a learning activity that uses concrete models to improve students' representational competence and…

  8. INHALATION EXPOSURE AND INTAKE DOSE MODEL IMPROVEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation highlights recent human exposure model improvements and products developed by the EMRB in coordination with scientists in the OAQPS and provides insight into how these products are used by the OAQPS in its regulatory process. Besides providing a status report of...

  9. Improving Representational Competence with Concrete Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Scopelitis, Stephanie; Lira, Matthew E.; DeSutter, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Representational competence is a primary contributor to student learning in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines and an optimal target for instruction at all educational levels. We describe the design and implementation of a learning activity that uses concrete models to improve students' representational competence and…

  10. INHALATION EXPOSURE AND INTAKE DOSE MODEL IMPROVEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation highlights recent human exposure model improvements and products developed by the EMRB in coordination with scientists in the OAQPS and provides insight into how these products are used by the OAQPS in its regulatory process. Besides providing a status report of...

  11. Models To Improve Service Delivery. Chapter 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This collection of papers presented at a 1996 conference on children's mental health focuses on models to improve service delivery. Papers have the following titles and authors: (1) "Empirical Evaluation of an Alternative to Hospitalization for Youth Presenting Psychiatric Emergencies" (Scott W. Henggeler); (2) "An Experimental Study of the…

  12. Testing a Theoretical Model of Immigration Transition and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Ju; Im, Eun-Ok

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to develop a theoretical model to explain the relationships between immigration transition and midlife women's physical activity and test the relationships among the major variables of the model. A theoretical model, which was developed based on transitions theory and the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity theory, consists of 4 major variables, including length of stay in the United States, country of birth, level of acculturation, and midlife women's physical activity. To test the theoretical model, a secondary analysis with data from 127 Hispanic women and 123 non-Hispanic (NH) Asian women in a national Internet study was used. Among the major variables of the model, length of stay in the United States was negatively associated with physical activity in Hispanic women. Level of acculturation in NH Asian women was positively correlated with women's physical activity. Country of birth and level of acculturation were significant factors that influenced physical activity in both Hispanic and NH Asian women. The findings support the theoretical model that was developed to examine relationships between immigration transition and physical activity; it shows that immigration transition can play an essential role in influencing health behaviors of immigrant populations in the United States. The NH theoretical model can be widely used in nursing practice and research that focus on immigrant women and their health behaviors. Health care providers need to consider the influences of immigration transition to promote immigrant women's physical activity.

  13. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service.

  14. Implementing active-learning strategies to improve physics learning in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon, Hugo; Zavala, G.; Fernandez, R.; Benegas, J.

    2006-12-01

    It is evident that the most effective active-learning strategies to improve physics learning at the college level have been developed in the United States. Recently, some universities in Latin America have begun adopting such methods as a part of institutional projects, or motivated by national projects led by education authorities. In this work we will present two cases, a large-scale implementation of Tutorials in Introductory Physics (1) in Mexico supported by the institution as a part of a change in its educational model, and a medium-scale implementation of this method in Chile supported by the national government. In both experiences, the professors involved in the educational experience have previously participated in a training workshop that prepared them for implementing this strategy in the classroom. The training workshop, described elsewhere (2), was designed also under active learning premises, so teachers completed the proposed activities in the same way as their students will do. We will present the first results of these two projects. References: (1) McDermott, L. C., Shaffer, P. S., & PER (1998). "Tutorials in Introductory Physics", Prentice Hall, translated as "Tutoriales para Física Introductoria" (2001) Prentice Hall, Buenos Aires.. (2) Zavala, G., Alarcón, H. and Benegas, J. (2005). "Innovative training of in-service teachers for active learning: A short teacher development course based on Physics Education Research", accepted for publication, J. of Sc. Teach. Ed. This work has been partially supported by Tecnológico de Monterrey through the Chair in Physics Education Research and by MECE Educación Superior Program (Chile).

  15. Model of the physical space from quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Otto C. W.

    2017-08-01

    The physical world is quantum. However, our description of the quantum physics still relies much on concepts in classical physics and in some cases with ‘quantized’ interpretations. The most important case example is that of spacetime. We examine the picture of the physical space as described by simple, so-called non-relativisitic, quantum mechanics instead of assuming the Newtonian model. The key perspective is that of (relativity) symmetry representation, and the idea that the physical space is to be identified as the configuration space for a free particle. Parallel to the case of the phase space, we have a model of the quantum physical space which reduces to the Newtonian classical model under the classical limit. The latter is to be obtained as a contraction limit of the relativity symmetry.

  16. Continuous Improvement of Physical Functioning in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients by Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors: Three-Year Followup and Predictors.

    PubMed

    van Weely, Salima F E; Kneepkens, Eva L; Nurmohamed, Mike T; Dekker, Joost; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E

    2016-10-01

    To establish the 3-year outcome and course of physical functioning and spinal mobility impairments in patients routinely treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) and to find predictors of physical functioning and spinal mobility impairments. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients eligible for TNFi were followed in a 3-year prospective observational study. Prediction models were developed with linear mixed modeling. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) were used as outcome measures for physical functioning and spinal mobility. A total of 257 patients were included and treated with etanercept (n = 174) or adalimumab (n = 83). Physical functioning improved significantly during the first 6 months after the start of TNFi. The BASFI score decreased from mean ± SD 5.4 ± 2.4 to 3.3 ± 2.6 at 6 months, and stabilized thereafter (BASFI third year score mean ± SD 3.6 ± 2.5). The BASMI showed no significant changes over time. Lower baseline BASFI and BASMI scores predicted a better level of physical functioning and spinal mobility after 3 years of TNFi therapy. Other predictors for a better 3-year outcome and course of physical functioning included absence of comorbidity, physical activity, younger age, and lower body mass index at baseline. Physical functioning in routinely TNFi-treated AS patients improved up to 6 months and stabilized thereafter. Therefore, it would be better to extend the period of evaluation of TNFi treatment to 6 months rather than the 3 months currently used. The risk factors of long-term physical functioning found in this study might help to identify patients at risk at an earlier stage and improve treatment strategy. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Building an advanced climate model: Program plan for the CHAMMP (Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics) Climate Modeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The issue of global warming and related climatic changes from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has received prominent attention during the past few years. The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Climate Modeling Program is designed to contribute directly to this rapid improvement. The goal of the CHAMMP Climate Modeling Program is to develop, verify, and apply a new generation of climate models within a coordinated framework that incorporates the best available scientific and numerical approaches to represent physical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes, that fully utilizes the hardware and software capabilities of new computer architectures, that probes the limits of climate predictability, and finally that can be used to address the challenging problem of understanding the greenhouse climate issue through the ability of the models to simulate time-dependent climatic changes over extended times and with regional resolution.

  18. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts frequently generate an observable "flash" of light with two components: a short-duration spike due to emissions from vaporized material, and a long-duration peak due to thermal emissions from expanding hot debris. The intensity and duration of these peaks depend on the impact velocity, angle, and the target and projectile mass and composition. Thus remote sensing measurements of planetary impact flashes have the potential to constrain the properties of impacting meteors and improve our understanding of impact flux and cratering processes. Interpreting impact flash measurements requires a thorough understanding of how flash characteristics correlate with impact conditions. Because planetary-scale impacts cannot be replicated in the laboratory, numerical simulations are needed to provide this insight for the solar system. Computational hydrocodes can produce detailed simulations of the impact process, but they lack the radiation physics required to model the optical flash. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) developed a model to calculate the optical signature from the hot debris cloud produced by an impact. While the phenomenology of the optical signature is understood, the details required to accurately model it are complicated by uncertainties in material and optical properties and the simplifications required to numerically model radiation from large-scale impacts. Comparisons with laboratory impact experiments allow us to validate our approach and to draw insight regarding processes that occur at all scales in impact events, such as melt generation. We used Sandia National Lab's CTH shock physics hydrocode along with the optical signature model developed at APL to compare with a series of laboratory experiments conducted at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. The experiments used Pyrex projectiles to impact pumice powder targets with velocities ranging from 1 to 6 km/s at angles of 30 and 90 degrees with respect to

  19. HEMETβ: improvement of hepatocyte metabolism mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Orsi, G; De Maria, C; Guzzardi, M; Vozzi, F; Vozzi, G

    2011-10-01

    This article describes hepatocyte metabolism mathematical model (HEMETβ), which is an improved version of HEMET, an effective and versatile virtual cell model based on hepatic cell metabolism. HEMET is based on a set of non-linear differential equations, implemented in Simulink®, which describes the biochemical reactions and energetic cell state, and completely mimics the principal metabolic pathways in hepatic cells. The cell energy function and modular structure are the core of this model. HEMETβ as HEMET model describes hepatic cellular metabolism in standard conditions (cell culture in a plastic multi-well placed in an incubator at 37° C with 5% of CO2) and with excess substrates concentration. The main improvements in HEMETβ are the introductions of Michaelis-Menten models for reversible reactions and enzymatic inhibition. In addition, we eliminated hard non-linearities and modelled cell proliferation and every single aminoacid degradation pathway. All these innovations, combined with a user-friendly aspect, allow researchers to create new cell types and validate new experimental protocols just varying 'peripheral' pathways or model inputs.

  20. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Bussey, R. M.; Fremouw, E. J.; Basu, Sa.

    1995-05-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over the past year this section of the WBMOD model has been replaced by a model developed using data from three additional stations (Ascension Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean, Huancayo, Peru, and Manila, Phillipines; data collected under the auspices of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Directorate) which provide a greater diversity in both latitude and longitude, as well as cover the entire day. The new model includes variations with latitude, local time, longitude, season, solar epoch, and geomagnetic activity levels. The way in which the irregularity strength parameter CkL is modeled has also been changed. The new model provides the variation of the full probability distribution function (PDF) of log (CkL) rather than simply the average of log (CkL). This permits the user to specify a threshold on scintillation level, and the model will calculate the percent of the time that scintillation will exceed that level in the user-specified scenario. It will also permit calculation of scintillation levels at a user-specified percentile. A final improvement to the WBMOD model is the implementation of a new theory for calculating S4 on a two-way channel.

  1. Teacher Fidelity to a Physical Education Curricular Model and Physical Activity Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Michalis; Kloeppel, Tiffany; Kulinna, Pamela; van der Mars, Han

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was informed by the bodies of literature emphasizing the role of physical education in promoting physical activity (PA) and addressing teacher fidelity to curricular models. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare student PA levels, lesson context, and teacher PA promotion behavior among classes where teachers were…

  2. Teacher Fidelity to a Physical Education Curricular Model and Physical Activity Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Michalis; Kloeppel, Tiffany; Kulinna, Pamela; van der Mars, Han

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was informed by the bodies of literature emphasizing the role of physical education in promoting physical activity (PA) and addressing teacher fidelity to curricular models. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare student PA levels, lesson context, and teacher PA promotion behavior among classes where teachers were…

  3. Double multiple streamtube model with recent improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.

    1983-05-01

    The objective of the present paper is to show the new capabilities of the double multiple streamtube (DMS) model for predicting the aerodynamic loads and performance of the Darrieus vertical-axis turbine. The original DMS model has been improved (DMSV model) by considering the variation in the upwind and downwind induced velocities as a function of the azimuthal angle for each streamtube. A comparison is made of the rotor performance for several blade geometries (parabola, catenary, troposkien, and Sandia shape). A new formulation is given for an approximate troposkien shape by considering the effect of the gravitational field. The effects of three NACA symmetrical profiles, 0012, 0015 and 0018, on the aerodynamic performance of the turbine are shown. Finally, a semiempirical dynamic-stall model has been incorporated and a better approximation obtained for modeling the local aerodynamic forces and performance for a Darrieus rotor.

  4. Double multiple streamtube model with recent improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.

    1983-05-01

    The objective is to show the new capabilities of the double multiple streamtube (DMS) model for predicting the aerodynamic loads and performance of the Darrieus vertical-axis turbine. The original DMS model has been improved (DMSV model) by considering the variation in the upwind and downwind induced velocities as a function of the azimuthal angle for each streamtube. A comparison is made of the rotor performance for several blade geometries (parabola, catenary, troposkien, and Sandia shape). A new formulation is given for an approximate troposkien shape by considering the effect of the gravitational field. The effects of three NACA symmetrical profiles, 0012, 0015 and 0018, on the aerodynamic performance of the turbine are shown. Finally, a semiempirical dynamic-stall model has been incorporated and a better approximation obtained for modeling the local aerodynamic forces and performance for a Darrieus rotor.

  5. An improved ephemeris and physical elements of ER Vul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmanec, P.; Božić, H.; Thanjavur, K.; Robb, R. M.; Ruždjak, D.; Sudar, D.

    2004-02-01

    New photoelectric U B{V} and BV RI observations, secured during August-November of 2002 at two observatories distant in local time are analyzed together with two earlier photometric data sets and all available radial velocities to derive the most accurate ephemeris of the binary and to set limits on its basic physical elements. These observations were obtained as a support for a high-dispersion spectroscopic study, results of which will be published separately. It was found that radial velocities and photometric observations spanning 53 years can be reconciled with the linear ephemeris T_prim.min.=HJD 2 440 182.25628(46) + 0698095113(29)d × E, where the rms errors of the last digits are given in brackets. Masses of the stars are 1.02 \\fms and 0.97 \\fms and the binary separation is 4.170 R⊙. There is still a large uncertainty in the stellar radii. We also report the discovery of rapid light variations on a time scale of hours seen in the U band light curve and offer a few thoughts on the future investigation of this binary. This research is based on photoelectric observations from Hvar and University of Victoria Observatories. Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/415/289

  6. Physical consistency in modeling interplanetary magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Velli, Grappin and Mangeney (1989) model is evaluated. It is argued that the model is incorrect because it mixes different dynamical models, assumes weak nonlinearities, makes predictions that vary with observations, and violates causality. It is proposed that self-similar behavior in the coronal source region of the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations cause the Kolmogorov-like spectra.

  7. Physical consistency in modeling interplanetary magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Velli, Grappin and Mangeney (1989) model is evaluated. It is argued that the model is incorrect because it mixes different dynamical models, assumes weak nonlinearities, makes predictions that vary with observations, and violates causality. It is proposed that self-similar behavior in the coronal source region of the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations cause the Kolmogorov-like spectra.

  8. Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kieran T; Pasch, Lauri A; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels whereas positive support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and divorce status. These findings emphasize the need to look beyond conflict when explaining how aggression affects relationships and when working with couples with a history of physical aggression who are seeking to improve their relationships.

  9. Morphological Evolution of Physical Robots through Model-Free Phenotype Development

    PubMed Central

    Brodbeck, Luzius; Hauser, Simon; Iida, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Artificial evolution of physical systems is a stochastic optimization method in which physical machines are iteratively adapted to a target function. The key for a meaningful design optimization is the capability to build variations of physical machines through the course of the evolutionary process. The optimization in turn no longer relies on complex physics models that are prone to the reality gap, a mismatch between simulated and real-world behavior. We report model-free development and evaluation of phenotypes in the artificial evolution of physical systems, in which a mother robot autonomously designs and assembles locomotion agents. The locomotion agents are automatically placed in the testing environment and their locomotion behavior is analyzed in the real world. This feedback is used for the design of the next iteration. Through experiments with a total of 500 autonomously built locomotion agents, this article shows diversification of morphology and behavior of physical robots for the improvement of functionality with limited resources. PMID:26091255

  10. Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; MacCready, Parker; Whitney, Michael M.

    2016-09-30

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  11. Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Frank; Dennis, John; MacCready, Parker; Whitney, Michael

    2016-10-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  12. Improving Agricultural Drought Monitoring in East Africa with Unbiased Rainfall Fields and Detailed Land Surface Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, A.; Yatheendradas, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Michaelsen, J.

    2010-12-01

    Monitoring drought is particularly challenging within rainfed agricultural and pastoral systems, where it can serve the greatest need. Such locations often have sparse or non-existent ground based measurements of precipitation, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture. For more effective drought monitoring with limited hydroclimate observations, we simulate land surface states using the Community Noah Land Surface Model forced with different merged rainfall products inside a Land Information System (LIS). Using model outputs we will answer the questions: How sensitive are soil moisture and ET fields to differences in rainfall forcing and model physics? What are acceptable drought-specific tradeoffs between near-real time availability and skill of rainfall data? Preliminary results with the African Rainfall Estimation Algorithm Version 2 (RFE2.0) outperformed global products, suggesting that sub-global rainfall estimates are the way forward for regional drought monitoring. Specifically, the Noah model forced with RFE2.0 better resolved the heterogeneous patterns in crop stress than the Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) operational Water Requirement Satisfaction Index (WRSI) model. To further investigate the improvement in drought monitoring while maintaining timeliness, we unbias (using Africa specific climatology) the precipitation products from CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP), Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), and RFE2.0. The skill (relative accuracy) and reliability (average agreement) of the unbiased rainfall are calculated against an unbiased precipitation product augmented with station data from Ethiopia and Kenya. Soil moisture and ET fields from Noah are compared to the operational FEWS NET WRSI, soil water anomaly index, and the World Food Program’s Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission reports. We anticipate that the unbiased rainfall fields will improve the accuracy, spatio-temporal resolution, and

  13. Physical stability of amorphous acetanilide derivatives improved by polymer excipients.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tamaki; Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio

    2006-08-01

    Crystallization rates of drug-polymer solid dispersions prepared with acetaminophen (ACA) and p-aminoacetanilide (AAA) as model drugs, and polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as model polymers were measured in order to further examine the significance of drug-polymer interactions. The crystallization of AAA and ACA was inhibited by mixing those polymers. The most effective inhibition was observed with solid dispersions of AAA and PAA. The combination of AAA and PAA showed a markedly longer enthalpy relaxation time relative to drug alone as well as a higher T(g) than predicted by the Gordon-Taylor equation, indicating the existence of a strong interaction between the two components. These observations suggest that crystallization is effectively inhibited by combinations of drug and polymer that show a strong intermolecular interaction due to proton transfer between acidic and basic functional groups.

  14. The physical model of a terraced plot: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlotto, Chiara; D'Agostino, Vincenzo; Buzzanca, Giacomo

    2017-04-01

    response have been monitored and analyzed, well corroborating the findings on the kinematics of the terrace plot. Finally, the computation of the specific Curve Number (Soil Conservation Service) of the physical model has revealed values rather large if compared with those reported in the literature. This phenomena was likely caused by the high values of the inflow discharge, the limited cross-width of the model (1 m) and the increasing compactness of the soil owing to the experiment repetition. These pioneering experiments have produced some remarkable outcomes on the important role of lag-times (runoff and groundwater) of a terraced system as well as many ideas on improving the physical model and its setting in a next investigation.

  15. A 1/8° coupled biochemical-physical Indian Ocean Regional Model: Physical results and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Derada, Sergio; Xue, Huijie; Xiu, Peng; Chai, Fei; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-08-01

    A coupled physical-biochemical Indian Ocean Regional Model (IORM), based on the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the Carbon Silicate Nitrogen Ecosystem (CoSiNE) model was configured with the primary objective of providing an accurate estimate of the oceanic physical state along with the biochemical processes simulated by CoSiNE to understand the variability in the Indian Ocean (IO). The model did not assimilate any data; instead, weak relaxation of temperature and salinity was implemented to keep the model stable in the long-term simulations. In this study, the skill of the IORM in simulating physical states in the IO was evaluated. Basin-scale surface circulation and cross-sectional transports were compared to observations, which demonstrated that the model replicated most of the observed features with reasonably good accuracy. Consistency and biases in the upper ocean temperature, salinity, and mixed layer depth were also analyzed. Lastly, the seasonality in the IO, its response to monsoonal forcing, and the evolution and dynamics of surface and subsurface dipole events were examined. The IORM reproduced most of the dynamic features including Ekman pumping, wave propagation, and climate variability at both annual and interannual time scales. The internal ocean dynamics and behavior of the modeled sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) suggest a coupled ocean/atmosphere instability that will require further research, including sensitivity experiments to realize improvements in model parameterization.

  16. Models in Physics, Models for Physics Learning, and Why the Distinction may Matter in the Case of Electric Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Christina

    2008-11-01

    Models are important both in the development of physics itself and in teaching physics. Historically, the consensus models of physics have come to embody particular ontological assumptions and epistemological commitments. Educators have generally assumed that the consensus models of physics, which have stood the test of time, will also work well as teaching models, and for many topics this assumption is at least unproblematic and in many cases productive. However, in the case of electric circuits the consensus models are highly abstract and consequently inaccessible to beginning learners. Certain historically derived analogues for the consensus models are accepted in texts, but these are demonstrably ineffective for helping learners grasp the fundamental concepts of electric circuits. While awareness of other models circulates informally in the teaching community, these are not well documented in the science education literature and rarely referred to in authoritative texts, possibly because the models do not share the ontological assumptions and epistemological commitments that characterise consensus models. Consequently these models have not been subjected to a disciplined critique of their effectiveness for teaching purposes. In this paper I use criteria drawn from the science education literature to reflect on why I have found particular models valuable in teaching electric circuits. These criteria contrast with the epistemological and ontological features that characterise the consensus models of science, and my reflection leads me to attend explicitly to the ways in which meanings are created within physics. This suggests that all models, whether consensus models or not, can be used more knowingly for important educational ends.

  17. Can leisure-time physical activity improve health checkup results? Evidence from Japanese occupational panel data.

    PubMed

    Oshio, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Inoue, Akiomi

    2016-07-22

    We examined the extent to which changes in worker health, as measured by health checkup items, were associated with increased intensity of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) after controlling for individual time-invariant attributes. We used panel data from two to four waves of a Japanese occupational cohort survey, focusing on 30,206 observations of 10,106 individuals (7,669 men and 2,437 women) aged 18-76 years. We estimated first-difference and mean-centered fixed effects models to examine how changes in 10 health checkup items were associated with changes in LTPA intensity. We considered four LTPA intensity levels (none, low, moderate, and vigorous), based on self-reported assessments. For men, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, glycated hemoglobin levels, body mass index, and waist circumference improved when LTPA intensity was increased even at a low level, whereas triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose levels improved when LTPA intensity was increased to moderate or vigorous levels. Blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) and total cholesterol levels were only modestly responsive to changes in LTPA intensity. For women, blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) and waist circumference were negatively associated with LTPA intensity, whereas the other variables showed more modest effects. The results suggest that even low- to moderate-intensity LTPA can improve health checkup results; however, the lowest LTPA intensity associated with improvement in health depends on health-risk factors as well as gender.

  18. Physical exercise improves arterial stiffness after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle; Currie, Katharine D.; West, Christopher R.; Gee, Cameron M.; Krassioukov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/background Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), the gold-standard assessment of central arterial stiffness, has prognostic value for cardiovascular disease risk in able-bodied individuals. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV in athletes and non-athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional comparison. Methods Aortic PWV was assessed in 20 individuals with motor-complete, chronic SCI (C2–T5; 18 ± 8 years post-injury) using applanation tonometry at the carotid and femoral arterial sites. Ten elite hand-cyclists were matched for sex to 10 non-athletes; age and time since injury were comparable between the groups. Heart rate and discrete brachial blood pressure measurements were collected throughout testing. Outcome measures Aortic PWV, blood pressure, heart rate. Results Aortic PWV was significantly lower in athletes vs. non-athletes (6.9 ± 1.0 vs. 8.7 ± 2.5 m/second, P = 0.044). There were no significant between-group differences in resting supine mean arterial blood pressure (91 ± 19 vs. 81 ± 10 mmHg) and heart rate (60 ± 10 vs. 58 ± 6 b.p.m.). Conclusion Athletes with SCI exhibited improved central arterial stiffness compared to non-athletes, which is in agreement with the previous able-bodied literature. This finding implies that chronic exercise training may improve arterial health and potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in the SCI population. PMID:24976366

  19. Coarsening of physics for biogeochemical model in NEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricaud, Clement; Le Sommer, Julien; Madec, Gurvan; Deshayes, Julie; Chanut, Jerome; Perruche, Coralie

    2017-04-01

    Ocean mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence contribute to ocean tracer transport and to shaping ocean biogeochemical tracers distribution. Representing adequately tracer transport in ocean models therefore requires to increase model resolution so that the impact of ocean turbulence is adequately accounted for. But due to supercomputers power and storage limitations, global biogeochemical models are not yet run routinely at eddying resolution. Still, because the "effective resolution" of eddying ocean models is much coarser than the physical model grid resolution, tracer transport can be reconstructed to a large extent by computing tracer transport and diffusion with a model grid resolution close to the effective resolution of the physical model. This observation has motivated the implementation of a new capability in NEMO ocean model (http://www.nemo-ocean.eu/) that allows to run the physical model and the tracer transport model at different grid resolutions. In a first time, we present results obtained with this new capability applied to a synthetic age tracer in a global eddying model configuration. In this model configuration, ocean dynamic is computed at ¼° resolution but tracer transport is computed at 3/4° resolution. The solution obtained is compared to 2 reference setup ,one at ¼° resolution for both physics and passive tracer models and one at 3/4° resolution for both physics and passive tracer model. We discuss possible options for defining the vertical diffusivity coefficient for the tracer transport model based on information from the high resolution grid. We describe the impact of this choice on the distribution and one the penetration of the age tracer. In a second time we present results obtained by coupling the physics with the biogeochemical model PISCES. We look at the impact of this methodology on some tracers distribution and dynamic. The method described here can found applications in ocean forecasting, such as the Copernicus Marine

  20. Does physical exercise improve quality of life of advanced cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Navigante, Alfredo; Morgado, Pablo Cresta

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the principal issues about physical activity in advanced cancer patients through the analyses of the last articles and our experience in this field. The efficacy of exercise training intervention could improve quality of life (QOL), fatigue and well being in advanced cancer patients. Several published studies have included, nevertheless, patients with early stage of disease and more recently, populations of patients with local advanced tumors of the breast, rectum and lung, who are undergoing neoadjuvant therapy. Despite the insufficient sample of patients in these studies, physical exercise is considered to improve both cardiopulmonary function and physical muscle fitness. Cancer-related fatigue is a devastating symptom in advanced cancer patients that implies loss of mobility and independence. Physical exercise could be a treatment to increase skeletal muscle endurance and improve well being. In palliative medicine, physical activity could be applied to medical assistance or to design prospective and controlled trials so as to evaluate possible usefulness.

  1. Relativistic models in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of different approaches to the construction of phenomenological dynamical models that respect basic principles of quantum theory and relativity. Wave functions defined as matrix elements of products of field operators on one hand and wave functions that are defined as representatives of state vectors in model Hilbert spaces are related differently to observables and dynamical models for these wave functions have each distinct advantages and disadvantages 34 refs.

  2. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  3. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  4. Improving residential miscellaneous electrical load modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgett, Joseph M.

    Over the past 30 years, the intensity of all major energy use categories has decreased in the residential market with the exception of miscellaneous electrical loads (MELs). MELs include primarily 120V plug-loads and some hard wired loads. MELs stand alone as the only category in which energy intensity has steadily increased over time. While MELs constitute approximately 15% - 25% of a typical home's total energy use, it is projected to increase to 36% by 2020. Despite the significant percentage of the home's total load, MELs are the least researched energy end use category and most poorly modeled. The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index is the most widely used residential energy rating system and uses a simple square foot multiplier to model MELs. This study improves upon the HERS model by including occupant characteristics as part of the MEL model. This "new model" was created by regressing and explanatory equation from the Energy Information Agency's Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The RECS has a very large sample size of 12,083 respondents who answered over 90 pages of questions related to home structure, appliances they own and demographical information. The information provided by the respondents was used to calculate a MEL for all the RECS households. A stepwise regression process was used to create a model that included size of the home, household income, number of household members and presence of a home business to predict the MEL. The new model was then tested on 24 actual homes to compare its predictive power with the HERS model. The new model more closely predicted the actual MEL for 17 of the 24 test houses (71%). Additionally, the standard deviation or the "tightness of fit" of the new model was less than half of the HERS model when used on the RECS respondents. What this study found was that using occupant characteristics to supplement a square foot multiplier significantly increased the precision of MEL modeling.

  5. Searching for Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon

    2016-12-01

    This final report summarizes the work carried out by the Syracuse component of a multi-institutional SciDAC grant led by USQCD. This grant supported software development for theoretical high energy physics. The Syracuse component specifically targeted the development of code for the numerical simulation of N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. The work described in the final report includes this and a summary of results achieve in exploring the structure of this theory. It also describes the personnel - students and a postdoc who were directly or indirectly involved in this project. A list of publication is also described.

  6. Representing Watersheds with Physics Based Distributed Hydrologic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, C. W.; Ogden, F. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologic models are useful tools for representing watershed response, helping to understand the dominant hydrologic processes in the watershed, and for estimating system response under different forcing, climatic, or physical conditions in the watershed. Model skill in predicting system response is most often demonstrated by history matching. Useful models for predicting system response under varying conditions must include the dominant processes controlling the system response. While many types of hydrologic models are capable of simulating watershed response, physics- based models are capable of simulating the actual physical conditions and responses within the watershed. There are a variety of physics-based hydrologic models available to the practicing community. Like simpler models, these models vary in formulation and complexity. Many of these models, such as the US Army of Corps of Engineers Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model, allow flexibility in terms of both processes simulated and the formulation used to approximate the process. This flexibility allows the user to build the model according to his or her understanding or conceptualization, of the system, including processes that are thought to be important to system response. This also allows the user to use more rigorous methods of simulating critical processes and less rigorous methods of simulating non-critical processes or when data limitations preclude the use of more rigorous methods. In this presentation we will discuss how physics based models can, and have, been used to describe various hydrologic systems to both represent the physical processes in the system and the system response. Using examples from a variety of applications we will demonstrate and discuss the utility of utilizing a flexible physics-based model design for realizing watershed conceptualizations for hydrologic analysis.

  7. Improving Localization Accuracy: Successive Measurements Error Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ali, Najah; Abu-Elkheir, Mervat

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle self-localization is an essential requirement for many of the safety applications envisioned for vehicular networks. The mathematical models used in current vehicular localization schemes focus on modeling the localization error itself, and overlook the potential correlation between successive localization measurement errors. In this paper, we first investigate the existence of correlation between successive positioning measurements, and then incorporate this correlation into the modeling positioning error. We use the Yule Walker equations to determine the degree of correlation between a vehicle’s future position and its past positions, and then propose a p-order Gauss–Markov model to predict the future position of a vehicle from its past p positions. We investigate the existence of correlation for two datasets representing the mobility traces of two vehicles over a period of time. We prove the existence of correlation between successive measurements in the two datasets, and show that the time correlation between measurements can have a value up to four minutes. Through simulations, we validate the robustness of our model and show that it is possible to use the first-order Gauss–Markov model, which has the least complexity, and still maintain an accurate estimation of a vehicle’s future location over time using only its current position. Our model can assist in providing better modeling of positioning errors and can be used as a prediction tool to improve the performance of classical localization algorithms such as the Kalman filter. PMID:26140345

  8. A General Model for Measurement Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Reiner; Yazbek, Hashem; Asfoura, Evan; Georgieva, Konstantina

    The following paper describes our approach for characterizing software measurement in a holistic manner. Therefore software measurement was defined as a system including all aspects of software measurement, evaluation, estimation and exploration. First of all, we define these components of software measurement considering the different levels of each component in order to classify the different levels of the software measurement itself. First examples have shown the appropriateness of this approach for paradigm related measurement comparisons and improvements. In this paper, we extend our modelling approach and demonstrate the meaningfulness of comparing software measurement practices for different standards and process improvement approaches. These examples help for identifying essential key areas for measurement improvement as basics of quality assurance.

  9. Improved CHAID algorithm for document structure modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belaïd, A.; Moinel, T.; Rangoni, Y.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a technique for the logical labelling of document images. It makes use of a decision-tree based approach to learn and then recognise the logical elements of a page. A state-of-the-art OCR gives the physical features needed by the system. Each block of text is extracted during the layout analysis and raw physical features are collected and stored in the ALTO format. The data-mining method employed here is the "Improved CHi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection" (I-CHAID). The contribution of this work is the insertion of logical rules extracted from the logical layout knowledge to support the decision tree. Two setups have been tested; the first uses one tree per logical element, the second one uses a single tree for all the logical elements we want to recognise. The main system, implemented in Java, coordinates the third-party tools (Omnipage for the OCR part, and SIPINA for the I-CHAID algorithm) using XML and XSL transforms. It was tested on around 1000 documents belonging to the ICPR'04 and ICPR'08 conference proceedings, representing about 16,000 blocks. The final error rate for determining the logical labels (among 9 different ones) is less than 6%.

  10. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, Francesco

    2015-01-22

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.

  11. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.

  12. A Hydrological Model To Bridge The Gap Between Conceptual and Physically Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, M.; Ostrowski, M.; Blöschl, G.

    In the last decade it has become evident that models are needed to account for more realistic physical assumptions and for improved data availability and computational facilities. In general it seems to be a dominant objective to better account for nonlin- earity and for less uncertain parameter identification. This allows its application also to ungaged catchments. To account for these objectives and for improved computa- tional boundary conditions a new model has been developed, tested and validated at Darmstadt University of Technology. The model is a quasi non linear model, it uses GIS provided data and includes physically based (not physical) model parameters, quite readily available from digitally stored information. Surface runoff determined after physically based non linear soil moisture modelling is routed with the kinematic cascade approach according to digital elevation grid models while sub-surface flow is routed through linear conceptual modules. The model uses generally accepted param- eters for soil moisture modelling including vegetation canopy such as total porosity, field cvapacity, wilting point, hydraulic conductivities and leaf area index and canopy coverage. The model has been successfully applied to several test sites and catchments at local, micro and lower macro scales. It is the objective of the paper to - explain the background of model development - briefly explain algorithms - discuss model parameter identification - present case study results

  13. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" Between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this study, a group of high school students designed computer models of bacterial growth with reference to a simultaneous physical experiment they were conducting, and were able to validate the correctness of their model against the results of their experiment. Our findings suggest that as the students compared their virtual models with physical experiments, they encountered "discrepant events" that contradicted their existing conceptions and elicited a state of cognitive disequilibrium. This experience of conflict encouraged students to further examine their ideas and to seek more accurate explanations of the observed natural phenomena, improving the design of their computer models.

  14. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  15. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  16. Acute Exercise Improves Physical Sexual Arousal in Women Taking Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Tierney A.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antidepressants can impair sexual arousal. Exercise increases genital arousal in healthy women, likely due to increasing sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Purpose Test if exercise increases genital arousal in women taking antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which suppress SNS activity, and selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), which suppress the SNS less. Method Women reporting antidepressant-related sexual arousal problems (N=47) participated in three counterbalanced sessions where they watched an erotic film while we recorded genital and SNS arousal. In two sessions, women exercised for 20 min, either 5 or 15 min prior to the films. Results During the no-exercise condition, women taking SSRIs showed significantly less genital response than women taking SNRIs. Exercise prior to sexual stimuli increased genital arousal in both groups. Women reporting greater sexual dysfunction had larger increases in genital arousal post-exercise. For women taking SSRIs, genital arousal was linked to SNS activity. Conclusions Exercise may improve antidepressant-related genital arousal problems. PMID:22403029

  17. The Image Transceiver Device: Studies of Improved Physical Design

    PubMed Central

    David, Yitzhak; Efron, Uzi

    2008-01-01

    The Image Transceiver Device (ITD) design is based on combining LCOS micro-display, image processing tools and back illuminated APS imager in single CMOS chip [1]. The device is under development for Head-Mounted Display applications in augmented and virtual reality systems. The main issues with the present design are a high crosstalk of the backside imager and the need to shield the pixel circuitry from the photo- charges generated in the silicon substrate. In this publication we present a modified, “deep p-well” ITD pixel design, which provides a significantly reduced crosstalk level, as well as an effective shielding of photo-charges for the pixel circuitry. The simulation performed using Silvaco software [ATLAS Silicon Device Simulator, Ray Trace and Light Absorption programs, Silvaco International, 1998] shows that the new approach provides high photo response and allows increasing the optimal thickness of the die over and above the 10-15 micrometers commonly used for back illuminated imaging devices, thereby improving its mechanical ruggedness following the thinning process and also providing a more efficient absorption of the long wavelength photons. The proposed deep p-well pixel structure is also a technology solution for the fabrication of high performance back illuminated CMOS image sensors. PMID:27879940

  18. The Image Transceiver Device: Studies of Improved Physical Design.

    PubMed

    David, Yitzhak; Efron, Uzi

    2008-07-25

    The Image Transceiver Device (ITD) design is based on combining LCOS micro-display, image processing tools and back illuminated APS imager in single CMOS chip [1]. The device is under development for Head-Mounted Display applications in augmented and virtual reality systems. The main issues with the present design are a high crosstalk of the backside imager and the need to shield the pixel circuitry from the photocharges generated in the silicon substrate. In this publication we present a modified, "deep p-well" ITD pixel design, which provides a significantly reduced crosstalk level, as well as an effective shielding of photo-charges for the pixel circuitry. The simulation performed using Silvaco software [ATLAS Silicon Device Simulator, Ray Trace and Light Absorption programs, Silvaco International, 1998] shows that the new approach provides high photo response and allows increasing the optimal thickness of the die over and above the 10-15 micrometers commonly used for back illuminated imaging devices, thereby improving its mechanical ruggedness following the thinning process and also providing a more efficient absorption of the long wavelength photons. The proposed deep p-well pixel structure is also a technology solution for the fabrication of high performance back illuminated CMOS image sensors.

  19. Performance results of HESP physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanumolu, Anantha; Thirupathi, Sivarani; Jones, Damien; Giridhar, Sunetra; Grobler, Deon; Jakobsson, Robert

    2017-02-01

    As a continuation to the published work on model based calibration technique with HESP(Hanle Echelle Spectrograph) as a case study, in this paper we present the performance results of the technique. We also describe how the open parameters were chosen in the model for optimization, the glass data accuracy and handling the discrepancies. It is observed through simulations that the discrepancies in glass data can be identified but not quantifiable. So having an accurate glass data is important which is possible to obtain from the glass manufacturers. The model's performance in various aspects is presented using the ThAr calibration frames from HESP during its pre-shipment tests. Accuracy of model predictions and its wave length calibration comparison with conventional empirical fitting, the behaviour of open parameters in optimization, model's ability to track instrumental drifts in the spectrum and the double fibres performance were discussed. It is observed that the optimized model is able to predict to a high accuracy the drifts in the spectrum from environmental fluctuations. It is also observed that the pattern in the spectral drifts across the 2D spectrum which vary from image to image is predictable with the optimized model. We will also discuss the possible science cases where the model can contribute.

  20. Improving data transfer for model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Liu, L.; Yang, G.; Li, R.; Wang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Data transfer, which means transferring data fields between two component models or rearranging data fields among processes of the same component model, is a fundamental operation of a coupler. Most of state-of-the-art coupler versions currently use an implementation based on the point-to-point (P2P) communication of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) (call such an implementation "P2P implementation" for short). In this paper, we reveal the drawbacks of the P2P implementation, including low communication bandwidth due to small message size, variable and big number of MPI messages, and jams during communication. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a butterfly implementation for data transfer. Although the butterfly implementation can outperform the P2P implementation in many cases, it degrades the performance in some cases because the total message size transferred by the butterfly implementation is larger than that by the P2P implementation. To make the data transfer completely improved, we design and implement an adaptive data transfer library that combines the advantages of both butterfly implementation and P2P implementation. Performance evaluation shows that the adaptive data transfer library significantly improves the performance of data transfer in most cases and does not decrease the performance in any cases. Now the adaptive data transfer library is open to the public and has been imported into a coupler version C-Coupler1 for performance improvement of data transfer. We believe that it can also improve other coupler versions.

  1. Quantum-like Probabilistic Models Outside Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    We present a quantum-like (QL) model in that contexts (complexes of e.g. mental, social, biological, economic or even political conditions) are represented by complex probability amplitudes. This approach gives the possibility to apply the mathematical quantum formalism to probabilities induced in any domain of science. In our model quantum randomness appears not as irreducible randomness (as it is commonly accepted in conventional quantum mechanics, e.g. by von Neumann and Dirac), but as a consequence of obtaining incomplete information about a system. We pay main attention to the QL description of processing of incomplete information. Our QL model can be useful in cognitive, social and political sciences as well as economics and artificial intelligence. In this paper we consider in a more detail one special application — QL modeling of brain's functioning. The brain is modeled as a QL-computer.

  2. Soluble Milk Protein Supplementation with Moderate Physical Activity Improves Locomotion Function in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lafoux, Aude; Baudry, Charlotte; Bonhomme, Cécile; Le Ruyet, Pascale; Huchet, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional capacity. Present study was designed to compare the impact of specific dairy proteins on muscular function with or without a low-intensity physical activity program on a treadmill in an aged rat model. We investigated the effects of nutritional supplementation, five days a week over a 2-month period with a slow digestible protein, casein or fast digestible proteins, whey or soluble milk protein, on strength and locomotor parameters in sedentary or active aged Wistar RjHan rats (17–19 months of age). An extensive gait analysis was performed before and after protein supplementation. After two months of protein administration and activity program, muscle force was evaluated using a grip test, spontaneous activity using an open-field and muscular mass by specific muscle sampling. When aged rats were supplemented with proteins without exercise, only minor effects of different diets on muscle mass and locomotion were observed: higher muscle mass in the casein group and improvement of stride frequencies with soluble milk protein. By contrast, supplementation with soluble milk protein just after physical activity was more effective at improving overall skeletal muscle function in old rats compared to casein. For active old rats supplemented with soluble milk protein, an increase in locomotor activity in the open field and an enhancement of static and dynamic gait parameters compared to active groups supplemented with casein or whey were observed without any differences in muscle mass and forelimb strength. These results suggest that consumption of soluble milk protein as a bolus immediately after a low intensity physical activity may be a suitable nutritional intervention to prevent decline in locomotion in aged rats and strengthen the interest to analyze the longitudinal aspect of locomotion in aged rodents. PMID:27973615

  3. Houttuynia cordata Extract Improves Physical Endurance Performance by Regulating Endothelial Production of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ui-Jeong; Maeng, Hyojin; Park, Tae-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2015-09-01

    Vascular function is mediated by various regulatory molecules, including endothelial nitric oxide (NO), which regulates the vasodilation of smooth muscle cells. We investigated whether standardized Houttuynia cordata extract (SHCE) could improve physical endurance performance by regulating the endothelial production of NO. For the standardization of Houttuynia cordata (HC) extract, its bioactive components were identified and quantified using ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioaccessibility and biological activity were measured by the in vitro digestion model system and free radical scavenging capacity, respectively. The vascular function in the endothelium was assessed by the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). A preliminary clinical trial was carried out to assess the physical endurance performance. HC extract was standardized to bioactive components, including chlorogenic acid, rutin, and quercitrin, with the concentration of 5.53, 6.09, and 16.15 mg from 1 g of dry weight, respectively. Bioaccessibility was 33.17%, 31.67%, and 11.18% for chlorogenic acid, rutin, and quercitrin, respectively. Antioxidant activities of SHCE were expressed as vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity in 55.81 and 17.23 mg/g of HC extract using ABTS and DPPH scavenging assay, respectively. In human aortic endothelial cells, insulin-mediated phosphorylation of eNOS was increased by SHCE in the presence of palmitate. However, the expression of blood pressure-regulating genes was not altered. The level of blood lactate concentration and the heart rate of subjects who drank SHCE were lower than those of subjects who drank plain water. Oxygen uptake from subjects drinking SHCE was slightly higher than that from those who drank plain water. This study demonstrated that SHCE decreased heart rate and blood lactate, increased oxygen uptake, and improved physical performance, presumably due to the increased NO production.

  4. Community-based strength training improves physical function in older women and arthritis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exercise is recognized as a mainstay treatment of arthritis, yet more than 40% of adults with arthritis report no leisure time physical activity participation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to identify and promote evidence-based physical activity programs to improve physi...

  5. Improving Physical Fitness of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disability through a Virtual Reality Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotan, Meir; Yalon-Chamovitz, Shira; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are in need of effective physical fitness training programs. The aim was to test the effectiveness of a Virtual Reality (VR)-based exercise program in improving the physical fitness of adults with IDD. A research group (N = 30; mean age = 52.3 plus or minus 5.8 years; moderate IDD…

  6. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 2-Mental Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the second in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  7. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 2-Mental Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the second in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  8. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  9. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  10. Improving Physical Fitness of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disability through a Virtual Reality Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotan, Meir; Yalon-Chamovitz, Shira; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are in need of effective physical fitness training programs. The aim was to test the effectiveness of a Virtual Reality (VR)-based exercise program in improving the physical fitness of adults with IDD. A research group (N = 30; mean age = 52.3 plus or minus 5.8 years; moderate IDD…

  11. Improving the Teaching of Science through Discipline-Based Education Research: An Example from Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Lillian C.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the learning and teaching of science is an important field for scholarly inquiry by faculty in science departments. Such research has proved to be an efficient means for improving the effectiveness of instruction in physics. A basic topic in introductory physics is used to illustrate how discipline-based education research has helped…

  12. Cognitive-behavioral-based physical therapy to improve surgical spine outcomes: a case series.

    PubMed

    Archer, Kristin R; Motzny, Nicole; Abraham, Christine M; Yaffe, Donna; Seebach, Caryn L; Devin, Clinton J; Spengler, Dan M; McGirt, Matthew J; Aaronson, Oran S; Cheng, Joseph S; Wegener, Stephen T

    2013-08-01

    Fear of movement is a risk factor for poor postoperative outcomes in patients following spine surgery. The purposes of this case series were: (1) to describe the effects of a cognitive-behavioral-based physical therapy (CBPT) intervention in patients with high fear of movement following lumbar spine surgery and (2) to assess the feasibility of physical therapists delivering cognitive-behavioral techniques over the telephone. Eight patients who underwent surgery for a lumbar degenerative condition completed the 6-session CBPT intervention. The intervention included empirically supported behavioral self-management, problem solving, and cognitive restructuring and relaxation strategies and was conducted in person and then weekly over the phone. Patient-reported outcomes of pain and disability were assessed at baseline (6 weeks after surgery), postintervention (3 months after surgery), and at follow-up (6 months after surgery). Performance-based outcomes were tested at baseline and postintervention. The outcome measures were the Brief Pain Inventory, Oswestry Disability Index, 5-Chair Stand Test, and 10-Meter Walk Test. Seven of the patients demonstrated a clinically significant reduction in pain, and all 8 of the patients had a clinically significant reduction in disability at 6-month follow-up. Improvement on the performance-based tests also was noted postintervention, with 5 patients demonstrating clinically meaningful change on the 10-Meter Walk Test. The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement cognitive-behavioral skills over the telephone and may positively affect outcomes after spine surgery. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the CBPT intervention. Clinical implications include broadening the availability of well-accepted cognitive-behavioral strategies by expanding implementation to physical therapists and through a telephone delivery model.

  13. “Using Statistical Comparisons between SPartICus Cirrus Microphysical Measurements, Detailed Cloud Models, and GCM Cloud Parameterizations to Understand Physical Processes Controlling Cirrus Properties and to Improve the Cloud Parameterizations”

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The dual objectives of this project were improving our basic understanding of processes that control cirrus microphysical properties and improvement of the representation of these processes in the parameterizations. A major effort in the proposed research was to integrate, calibrate, and better understand the uncertainties in all of these measurements.

  14. A Model of Physical Performance for Occupational Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Joyce

    This report acknowledges the problems faced by industrial/organizational psychologists who must make personnel decisions involving physically demanding jobs. The scarcity of criterion-related validation studies and the difficulty of generalizing validity are considered, and a model of physical performance that builds on Fleishman's (1984)…

  15. Educational Value and Models-Based Practice in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, David

    2013-01-01

    A models-based approach has been advocated as a means of overcoming the serious limitations of the traditional approach to physical education. One of the difficulties with this approach is that physical educators have sought to use it to achieve diverse and sometimes competing educational benefits, and these wide-ranging aspirations are rarely if…

  16. Early Childhood Educators' Experience of an Alternative Physical Education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsangaridou, Niki; Genethliou, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Alternative instructional and curricular models are regarded as more comprehensive and suitable approaches to providing quality physical education (Kulinna 2008; Lund and Tannehill 2010; McKenzie and Kahan 2008; Metzler 2011; Quay and Peters 2008). The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of the Early Steps Physical Education…

  17. A Model of Physical Performance for Occupational Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Joyce

    This report acknowledges the problems faced by industrial/organizational psychologists who must make personnel decisions involving physically demanding jobs. The scarcity of criterion-related validation studies and the difficulty of generalizing validity are considered, and a model of physical performance that builds on Fleishman's (1984)…

  18. Hidden sector DM models and Higgs physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.

    2014-06-24

    We present an extension of the standard model to dark sector with an unbroken local dark U(1){sub X} symmetry. Including various singlet portal interactions provided by the standard model Higgs, right-handed neutrinos and kinetic mixing, we show that the model can address most of phenomenological issues (inflation, neutrino mass and mixing, baryon number asymmetry, dark matter, direct/indirect dark matter searches, some scale scale puzzles of the standard collisionless cold dark matter, vacuum stability of the standard model Higgs potential, dark radiation) and be regarded as an alternative to the standard model. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken U(1){sub X} case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if U(1){sub X} is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models.

  19. A physically-based Distributed Hydrologic Model for Tropical Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe, N. A.; Ogden, F. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological models are mathematical formulations intended to represent observed hydrological processes in a watershed. Simulated watersheds in turn vary in their nature based on their geographic location, altitude, climatic variables and geology and soil formation. Due to these variations, available hydrologic models vary in process formulation, spatial and temporal resolution and data demand. Many tropical watersheds are characterized by extensive and persistent biological activity and a large amount of rain. The Agua Salud catchments located within the Panama Canal Watershed, Panama, are such catchments identified by steep rolling topography, deep soils derived from weathered bedrock, and limited exposed bedrock. Tropical soils are highly affected by soil cracks, decayed tree roots and earthworm burrows forming a network of preferential flow paths that drain to a perched water table, which forms at a depth where the vertical hydraulic conductivity is significantly reduced near the bottom of the bioturbation layer. We have developed a physics-based, spatially distributed, multi-layered hydrologic model to simulate the dominant processes in these tropical watersheds. The model incorporates the major flow processes including overland flow, channel flow, matrix and non-Richards film flow infiltration, lateral downslope saturated matrix and non-Darcian pipe flow in the bioturbation layer, and deep saturated groundwater flow. Emphasis is given to the modeling of subsurface unsaturated zone soil moisture dynamics and the saturated preferential lateral flow from the network of macrospores. Preliminary results indicate that the model has the capability to simulate the complex hydrological processes in the catchment and will be a useful tool in the ongoing comprehensive ecohydrological studies in tropical catchments, and help improve our understanding of the hydrological effects of deforestation and aforestation.

  20. Linear unmixing using endmember subspaces and physics based modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, David; Bowles, Jeffrey; Ientilucci, Emmett J.; Messinger, David W.

    2007-09-01

    One of the biggest issues with the Linear Mixing Model (LMM) is that it is implicitly assumed that each of the individual material components throughout the scene may be described using a single dimension (e.g. an endmember vector). In reality, individual pixels corresponding to the same general material class can exhibit a large degree of variation within a given scene. This is especially true in broad background classes such as forests, where the single dimension assumption clearly fails. In practice, the only way to account for the multidimensionality of the class is to choose multiple (very similar) endmembers, each of which represents some part of the class. To address these issues, we introduce the endmember subgroup model, which generalizes the notion of an 'endmember vector' to an 'endmember subspace'. In this model, spectra in a given hyperspectral scene are decomposed as a sum of constituent materials; however, each material is represented by some multidimensional subspace (instead of a single vector). The dimensionality of the subspace will depend on the within-class variation seen in the image. The endmember subgroups can be determined automatically from the data, or can use physics-based modeling techniques to include 'signature subspaces', which are included in the endmember subgroups. In this paper, we give an overview of the subgroup model; discuss methods for determining the endmember subgroups for a given image, and present results showing how the subgroup model improves upon traditional single endmember linear mixing. We also include results that use the 'signature subspace' approach to identifying mixed-pixel targets in HYDICE imagery.

  1. Two is better than one: Physical interactions improve motor performance in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, G.; Takagi, A.; Osu, R.; Yoshioka, T.; Kawato, M.; Burdet, E.

    2014-01-01

    How do physical interactions with others change our own motor behavior? Utilizing a novel motor learning paradigm in which the hands of two - individuals are physically connected without their conscious awareness, we investigated how the interaction forces from a partner adapt the motor behavior in physically interacting humans. We observed the motor adaptations during physical interactions to be mutually beneficial such that both the worse and better of the interacting partners improve motor performance during and after interactive practice. We show that these benefits cannot be explained by multi-sensory integration by an individual, but require physical interaction with a reactive partner. Furthermore, the benefits are determined by both the interacting partner's performance and similarity of the partner's behavior to one's own. Our results demonstrate the fundamental neural processes underlying human physical interactions and suggest advantages of interactive paradigms for sport-training and physical rehabilitation.

  2. Two is better than one: Physical interactions improve motor performance in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, G.; Takagi, A.; Osu, R.; Yoshioka, T.; Kawato, M.; Burdet, E.

    2014-01-01

    How do physical interactions with others change our own motor behavior? Utilizing a novel motor learning paradigm in which the hands of two - individuals are physically connected without their conscious awareness, we investigated how the interaction forces from a partner adapt the motor behavior in physically interacting humans. We observed the motor adaptations during physical interactions to be mutually beneficial such that both the worse and better of the interacting partners improve motor performance during and after interactive practice. We show that these benefits cannot be explained by multi-sensory integration by an individual, but require physical interaction with a reactive partner. Furthermore, the benefits are determined by both the interacting partner's performance and similarity of the partner's behavior to one's own. Our results demonstrate the fundamental neural processes underlying human physical interactions and suggest advantages of interactive paradigms for sport-training and physical rehabilitation. PMID:24452767

  3. Improving land surface models with FLUXNET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Richardson, A. D.; Reichstein, M.; Stoy, P. C.; Peylin, P.; Verbeeck, H.; Carvalhais, N.; Jung, M.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Kattge, J.; Leuning, R.; Luo, Y.; Tomelleri, E.; Trudinger, C. M.; Wang, Y.-P.

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing consensus that land surface models (LSMs) that simulate terrestrial biosphere exchanges of matter and energy must be better constrained with data to quantify and address their uncertainties. FLUXNET, an international network of sites that measure the land surface exchanges of carbon, water and energy using the eddy covariance technique, is a prime source of data for model improvement. Here we outline a multi-stage process for "fusing" (i.e. linking) LSMs with FLUXNET data to generate better models with quantifiable uncertainty. First, we describe FLUXNET data availability, and its random and systematic biases. We then introduce methods for assessing LSM model runs against FLUXNET observations in temporal and spatial domains. These assessments are a prelude to more formal model-data fusion (MDF). MDF links model to data, based on error weightings. In theory, MDF produces optimal analyses of the modelled system, but there are practical problems. We first discuss how to set model errors and initial conditions. In both cases incorrect assumptions will affect the outcome of the MDF. We then review the problem of equifinality, whereby multiple combinations of parameters can produce similar model output. Fusing multiple independent and orthogonal data provides a means to limit equifinality. We then show how parameter probability density functions (PDFs) from MDF can be used to interpret model validity, and to propagate errors into model outputs. Posterior parameter distributions are a useful way to assess the success of MDF, combined with a determination of whether model residuals are Gaussian. If the MDF scheme provides evidence for temporal variation in parameters, then that is indicative of a critical missing dynamic process. A comparison of parameter PDFs generated with the same model from multiple FLUXNET sites can provide insights into the concept and validity of plant functional types (PFT) - we would expect similar parameter estimates among

  4. Improving land surface models with FLUXNET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Richardson, A. D.; Reichstein, M.; Stoy, P. C.; Peylin, P.; Verbeeck, H.; Carvalhais, N.; Jung, M.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Kattge, J.; Leuning, R.; Luo, Y.; Tomelleri, E.; Trudinger, C.; Wang, Y.-P.

    2009-03-01

    There is a growing consensus that land surface models (LSMs) that simulate terrestrial biosphere exchanges of matter and energy must be better constrained with data to quantify and address their uncertainties. FLUXNET, an international network of sites that measure the land surface exchanges of carbon, water and energy using the eddy covariance technique, is a prime source of data for model improvement. Here we outline a multi-stage process for fusing LSMs with FLUXNET data to generate better models with quantifiable uncertainty. First, we describe FLUXNET data availability, and its random and systematic biases. We then introduce methods for assessing LSM model runs against FLUXNET observations in temporal and spatial domains. These assessments are a prelude to more formal model-data fusion (MDF). MDF links model to data, based on error weightings. In theory, MDF produces optimal analyses of the modelled system, but there are practical problems. We first discuss how to set model errors and initial conditions. In both cases incorrect assumptions will affect the outcome of the MDF. We then review the problem of equifinality, whereby multiple combinations of parameters can produce similar model output. Fusing multiple independent data provides a means to limit equifinality. We then show how parameter probability density functions (PDFs) from MDF can be used to interpret model process validity, and to propagate errors into model outputs. Posterior parameter distributions are a useful way to assess the success of MDF, combined with a determination of whether model residuals are Gaussian. If the MDF scheme provides evidence for temporal variation in parameters, then that is indicative of a critical missing dynamic process. A comparison of parameter PDFs generated with the same model from multiple FLUXNET sites can provide insights into the concept and validity of plant functional types (PFT) - we would expect similar parameter estimates among sites sharing a single PFT

  5. Massive Stars: Input Physics and Stellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, M. F.; The, L.-S.; Meyer, B. S.

    2009-10-01

    We present a general overview of the structure and evolution of massive stars of masses ≥12 M ⊙ during their pre-supernova stages. We think it is worth reviewing this topic owing to the crucial role of massive stars in astrophysics, especially in the evolution of galaxies and the universe. We have performed several test computations with the aim to analyze and discuss many physical uncertainties still encountered in massive-star evolution. In particular, we explore the effects of mass loss, convection, rotation, 12C( α, γ)16O reaction and initial metallicity. We also compare and analyze the similarities and differences among various works and ours. Finally, we present useful comments on the nucleosynthesis from massive stars concerning the s-process and the yields for 26Al and 60Fe.

  6. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  7. Automated Qualitative Modeling of Dynamic Physical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    paths of states that match a qualitative history. DATMI differs from QSIM- CHECK in that it first constructs an envisionment of the model, a graph...containing all possible model states where an arc connects two states if one could be a successor of the other. Once it has constructed the envisionment ...DATMI is fairly efficient in finding paths through it that correspond to interpretations of the measurements. However, the number of envisionment

  8. Propulsion Physics Under the Changing Density Field Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will requires new propulsion physics. Specifically a propulsion physics model that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they called Chameleon Cosmology, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. This theory represents a scalar field within and about an object, even in the vacuum. Whereby, these scalar fields can be viewed as vacuum energy fields with definable densities that permeate all matter; having implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties; implying a new force mechanism for propulsion physics. Using Chameleon Cosmology, the author has developed a new propulsion physics model, called the Changing Density Field (CDF) Model. This model relates to density changes in these density fields, where the density field density changes are related to the acceleration of matter within an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to the surrounding density fields. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the coupling to these density fields about an object. Since the model indicates that the density of the density field in an object can be changed by internal mass acceleration, even without exhausting mass, the CDF model implies a new propellant-less propulsion physics model

  9. A Physically Based Coupled Chemical and Physical Weathering Model for Simulating Soilscape Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willgoose, G. R.; Welivitiya, D.; Hancock, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    A critical missing link in existing landscape evolution models is a dynamic soil evolution models where soils co-evolve with the landform. Work by the authors over the last decade has demonstrated a computationally manageable model for soil profile evolution (soilscape evolution) based on physical weathering. For chemical weathering it is clear that full geochemistry models such as CrunchFlow and PHREEQC are too computationally intensive to be couplable to existing soilscape and landscape evolution models. This paper presents a simplification of CrunchFlow chemistry and physics that makes the task feasible, and generalises it for hillslope geomorphology applications. Results from this simplified model will be compared with field data for soil pedogenesis. Other researchers have previously proposed a number of very simple weathering functions (e.g. exponential, humped, reverse exponential) as conceptual models of the in-profile weathering process. The paper will show that all of these functions are possible for specific combinations of in-soil environmental, geochemical and geologic conditions, and the presentation will outline the key variables controlling which of these conceptual models can be realistic models of in-profile processes and under what conditions. The presentation will finish by discussing the coupling of this model with a physical weathering model, and will show sample results from our SSSPAM soilscape evolution model to illustrate the implications of including chemical weathering in the soilscape evolution model.

  10. Improved Real-Time Helicopter Flight Dynamics Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycock, Bruce Charles

    The University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies has a number of previously developed real-time helicopter models for piloted simulations. An area of concern with physics-based helicopter models is that they often have an inaccurate off-axis response to cyclic control inputs compared to flight test data. To explain the cause of this problem, several theories have been put forth in the literature concerning which aspects are modelled incorrectly or not at all, including blade elasticity, rotor wake distortion and curvature, and unsteady aerodynamic effects. In this thesis these modelling improvements were implemented and their effectiveness evaluated. To include blade elasticity, a rotor model was developed using a Ritz expansion approach with constrained elastic modes. The effect of including these features on the on-axis and off-axis response of the UTIAS helicopter models was examined. The various improvements were successful in altering the off-axis response, with notable improvements in some areas, without disrupting the on-axis response. In some conditions, the magnitude of change due to flexibility was greater than differences noted due to dynamic wake distortion or unsteady aerodynamics. The best results were obtained when blade flexibility and wake distortion were used together, which is also the most physically accurate model. The impact of these changes was also evaluated from a pilot-in-the-loop perspective, quantifying the perceived changes using simulation fidelity ratings. Since this is a newly developed metric, the simulator was first evaluated using the original baseline vehicle models. Through this process, experience could be gained in the usage of the fidelity rating scale, while also examining what effect changes to the dynamics had on the overall simulator fidelity rating obtained. While an improved match to flight test data was found to lead to a higher rated fidelity, there was a limit to how high these improvements could increase

  11. An improved gravity model for Mars: Goddard Mars Model 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Zuber, M. T.; Patel, G. B.; Fricke, S. K.; Lemoine, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    Doppler tracking data of three orbiting spacecraft have been reanalyzed to develop a new gravitational field model for the planet Mars, Goddard Mars Model 1 (GMM-1). This model employs nearly all available data, consisting of approximately 1100 days of S band tracking data collected by NASA's Deep Space Network from the Mariner 9 and Viking 1 and Viking 2 spacecraft, in seven different orbits, between 1971 and 1979. GMM-1 is complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 50, which corresponds to a half-wavelength spatial resolution of 200-300 km where the data permit. GMM-1 represents satellite orbits with considerably better accuracy than previous Mars gravity models and shows greater resolution of identifiable geological structures. The notable improvement in GMM-1 over previous models is a consequence of several factors: improved computational capabilities, the use of otpimum weighting and least squares collocation solution techniques which stabilized the behavior of the solution at high degree and order, and the use of longer satellite arcs than employed in previous solutions that were made possible by improved force and measurement models. The inclusion of X band tracking data from the 379-km altitude, nnear-polar orbiting Mars Observer spacecraft should provide a significant improvement over GMM-1, particularly at high latitudes where current data poorly resolve the gravitational signature of the planet.

  12. An improved gravity model for Mars: Goddard Mars Model 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Zuber, M. T.; Patel, G. B.; Fricke, S. K.; Lemoine, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    Doppler tracking data of three orbiting spacecraft have been reanalyzed to develop a new gravitational field model for the planet Mars, Goddard Mars Model 1 (GMM-1). This model employs nearly all available data, consisting of approximately 1100 days of S band tracking data collected by NASA's Deep Space Network from the Mariner 9 and Viking 1 and Viking 2 spacecraft, in seven different orbits, between 1971 and 1979. GMM-1 is complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 50, which corresponds to a half-wavelength spatial resolution of 200-300 km where the data permit. GMM-1 represents satellite orbits with considerably better accuracy than previous Mars gravity models and shows greater resolution of identifiable geological structures. The notable improvement in GMM-1 over previous models is a consequence of several factors: improved computational capabilities, the use of otpimum weighting and least squares collocation solution techniques which stabilized the behavior of the solution at high degree and order, and the use of longer satellite arcs than employed in previous solutions that were made possible by improved force and measurement models. The inclusion of X band tracking data from the 379-km altitude, nnear-polar orbiting Mars Observer spacecraft should provide a significant improvement over GMM-1, particularly at high latitudes where current data poorly resolve the gravitational signature of the planet.

  13. Distances in spaces of physical models: partition functions versus spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Gunther; Kontogeorgis, Aristides

    2017-01-01

    We study the relation between convergence of partition functions (seen as general Dirichlet series) and convergence of spectra and their multiplicities. We describe applications to convergence in physical models, e.g., related to topology change and averaging in cosmology.

  14. Transfer of Learning: From Physical Models to Understanding Complex Phenomena*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Bijaya; Zollman, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    This study describes the student associations made in order to understand the application of physics to a medical imaging technology positron emission tomography. We define this association as the transfer of learning. The physical models, which have a functional resemblance to portions of the positron emission tomography (PET) process, were introduced to the students without any mention of PET during a teaching session. After a hiatus of a few days they attended another session where PET was briefly mentioned to them. Immediately after that they were asked questions that involved the application of physics ideas underlying the model to describe the PET process. Results of this study indicate that physical models are useful in this transfer of learning. We also observed facilitation in transferring ideas from the models to the problem through peer interaction. *Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant 04-2675.

  15. A hybrid (numerical-physical) model of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Kozarski, M; De Lazzari, C; Clemente, F; Merolli, M; Tosti, G; Guaragno, M; Mimmo, R; Ambrosi, D; Glapinski, J

    2001-07-01

    Hydraulic models of the circulation are used to test mechanical devices and for training and research purposes; when compared to numerical models, however, they are not flexible enough and rather expensive. The solution proposed here is to merge the characteristics and the flexibility of numerical models with the functions of physical models. The result is a hybrid model with numerical and physical sections connected by an electro-hydraulic interface - which is to some extent the main problem since the numerical model can be easily changed or modified. The concept of hybrid model is applied to the representation of ventricular function by a variable elastance numerical model. This prototype is an open loop circuit and the physical section is built out of a reservoir (atrium) and a modified windkessel (arterial tree). The corresponding equations are solved numerically using the variables (atrial and arterial pressures) coming from the physical circuit. Ventricular output flow is the computed variable and is sent to a servo amplifier connected to a DC motor-gear pump system. The gear pump, behaving roughly as a flow source, is the interface to the physical circuit. Results obtained under different hemodynamic conditions demonstrate the behaviour of the ventricular model on the pressure-volume plane and the time course of output flow and arterial pressure.

  16. Evaluation and development of physically-based embankment breach models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The CEATI Dam Safety Interest Group (DSIG) working group on embankment erosion and breach modelling has evaluated three physically-based numerical models used to simulate embankment erosion and breach development. The three models identified by the group were considered to be good candidates for fu...

  17. Evaluation and development of physically-based embankment breach models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The CEATI Dam Safety Interest Group (DSIG) working group on embankment erosion and breach modelling has evaluated three physically-based numerical models used to simulate embankment erosion and breach development. The three models identified by the group were considered to be good candidates for fu...

  18. Harmony Theory: Problem Solving, Parallel Cognitive Models, and Thermal Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolensky, Paul; Riley, Mary S.

    This document consists of three papers. The first, "A Parallel Model of (Sequential) Problem Solving," describes a parallel model designed to solve a class of relatively simple problems from elementary physics and discusses implications for models of problem-solving in general. It is shown that one of the most salient features of problem…

  19. Harmony Theory: Problem Solving, Parallel Cognitive Models, and Thermal Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolensky, Paul; Riley, Mary S.

    This document consists of three papers. The first, "A Parallel Model of (Sequential) Problem Solving," describes a parallel model designed to solve a class of relatively simple problems from elementary physics and discusses implications for models of problem-solving in general. It is shown that one of the most salient features of problem…

  20. Kinetic exchange models: From molecular physics to social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, Marco; Chakraborti, Anirban

    2013-08-01

    We discuss several multi-agent models that have their origin in the kinetic exchange theory of statistical mechanics and have been recently applied to a variety of problems in the social sciences. This class of models can be easily adapted for simulations in areas other than physics, such as the modeling of income and wealth distributions in economics and opinion dynamics in sociology.

  1. Improving Distributed Diagnosis Through Structural Model Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregon, Anibal; Daigle, Matthew John; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2011-01-01

    Complex engineering systems require efficient fault diagnosis methodologies, but centralized approaches do not scale well, and this motivates the development of distributed solutions. This work presents an event-based approach for distributed diagnosis of abrupt parametric faults in continuous systems, by using the structural model decomposition capabilities provided by Possible Conflicts. We develop a distributed diagnosis algorithm that uses residuals computed by extending Possible Conflicts to build local event-based diagnosers based on global diagnosability analysis. The proposed approach is applied to a multitank system, and results demonstrate an improvement in the design of local diagnosers. Since local diagnosers use only a subset of the residuals, and use subsystem models to compute residuals (instead of the global system model), the local diagnosers are more efficient than previously developed distributed approaches.

  2. Park-based afterschool program to improve cardiovascular health and physical fitness in children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Haney, Kanathy; Messiah, Sarah E; Arheart, Kristopher L; Hanson, Eric; Diego, Allison; Kardys, Jack; Kirwin, Kevin; Nottage, Renae; Ramirez, Shawn; Somarriba, Gabriel; Binhack, Lucy

    2014-07-01

    Children with disabilities are more likely to be overweight or obese and less likely to engage in physical activities versus their peers without disabilities. The effect of a structured afterschool program housed in a large county parks system on several obesity-related health outcomes among children with disabilities was examined. Children/adolescents with a developmental and/or intellectual disability ages 6-22 (N = 52, mean age 13.7 years) who participated in an afterschool (either 2010-2011 or 2011-2012 school year) health and wellness program called Fit-2-Play™ were assessed. Pre-post comparison of outcome variables (mean height, weight, waist/hip/midarm circumference, fitness tests, and a 9-item health and wellness knowledge assessment) via general linear mixed models analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the program for normal and overweight/obese participants. Normal weight participants significantly improved pre-post mean number of push-ups (9.69-14.23, p = 0.01) and laps on the PACER test (8.54-11.38, p < 0.01) and the overweight/obese group significantly improved the number of sit ups (7.51-9.84, p < 0.01) and push ups (4.77-9.89, p < 0.001). Pre-post mean health and wellness knowledge composite scores significantly improved for all participants (p < 0.01). Parks-based afterschool programs can be effective community resources for instilling physical health in both normal weight and overweight/obese children with disabilities. More studies are needed to ascertain whether community-based afterschool health and wellness programs can be implemented and sustained across this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A physical model of Titan's aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Mckay, C. P.; Griffith, C. A.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A modeling effort is presented for the nature of the stratospheric haze on Titan, under several simplifying assumptions; chief among these is that the aerosols in question are of a single composition, and involatile. It is further assumed that a one-dimensional model is capable of simulating the general characteristics of the aerosol. It is suggested in this light that the detached haze on Titan may be a manifestation of organized, Hadley-type motions above 300 km altitude, with vertical velocities of 1 cm/sec. The hemispherical asymmetry of the visible albedo may be due to organized vertical motions within the upper 150-200 km of the haze.

  4. ITER physics-safety interface: models and assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Putvinski, S.; Wesley, J.; Bartels, H-W.; Honda, T.; Amano, T.; Boucher, D.; Fujisawa, N.; Post, D.; Rosenbluth, M.

    1996-10-01

    Plasma operation conditions and physics requirements to be used as a basis for safety analysis studies are developed and physics results motivated by safety considerations are presented for the ITER design. Physics guidelines and specifications for enveloping plasma dynamic events for Category I (operational event), Category II (likely event), and Category III (unlikely event) are characterized. Safety related physics areas that are considered are: (i) effect of plasma on machined and safety (disruptions, runaway electrons, fast plasma shutdown) and (ii) plasma response to ex-vessel LOCA from first wall providing a potential passive plasma shutdown due to Be evaporation. Physics models and expressions developed are implemented in safety analysis code (SAFALY, couples 0-D dynamic plasma model to thermal response of the in-vessel components). Results from SAFALY are presented.

  5. Physical Modeling of Hydrologic Processes in South Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, A.; Sharif, H.; Xie, H.; Terrance, J.; Mcclelland, J.

    2012-04-01

    Flood magnitude and recurrence modeling and analysis play an important role in water resources planning, management, and permitting. In both urban and rural situations, flood analysis is important to flood plain mapping and the development of best management practices for both environmental and engineering concerns. The majority of annual precipitation in South Texas results from extreme, large storm events, which produce flash floods (the number one cause of weather-related deaths in Texas). Surface geology such as such as Edward out crop faulting zone at Balcones escarpment has different properties than the classified soil; affect the soil parameters such as infiltration or hydraulic conductivity. This result in a very high infiltration and channel loss as a recharge component to the Edward aquifer from the surface runoff and rivers that are crossing the recharge zone, such as Nueces, San Antonio, Guadalupe and Colorado Rivers. Water quality is another issue in hydrological modeling, specifically in south central Texas. Water quality assessment is another issue on hydrological modeling in south central Texas. SWAT Soil and water assessment tool model is used for water quality assessment in San Antonio River basin since the rainfall runoff simulation is a necessity to derive the surface water quality process especially in the streams. With the advances in the Geographical information system (GIS) and instant precipitation products such as next generation radar (NEXRAD) and data acquisition for these products, the accuracy of the hydrological models has improved. Different hydrological models were used to evaluate the surface water and other hydrological cycle components in different watersheds in south central Texas through different events and their different causes and effects in these watersheds. Some of them are semi distributed and lumped models such as Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) and physically based

  6. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  7. Improvements in knee biomechanics during walking are associated with increased physical activity after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Arnold, John B; Mackintosh, Shylie; Olds, Timothy S; Jones, Sara; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in people with knee osteoarthritis increases knee-specific and general physical function, but it has not been established if there is a relationship between changes in these elements of functional ability. This study investigated changes and relationships between knee biomechanics during walking, physical activity, and use of time after TKA. Fifteen people awaiting TKA underwent 3D gait analysis before and six months after surgery. Physical activity and use of time were determined in free-living conditions from a high resolution 24-h activity recall. After surgery, participants displayed significant improvements in sagittal plane knee biomechanics and improved their physical activity profiles, standing for 105 more minutes (p=0.001) and performing 64 min more inside chores on average per day (p=0.008). Changes in sagittal plane knee range of motion (ROM) and peak knee flexion positively correlated with changes in total daily energy expenditure, time spent undertaking moderate to vigorous physical activity, inside chores and passive transport (r=0.52-0.66, p=0.005-0.047). Restoration of knee function occurs in parallel and is associated with improvements in physical activity and use of time after TKA. Increased functional knee ROM is required to support improvements in total and context specific physical activity. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Physically-Based Modeling of Ecological Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C.; Barros, A. P.

    2001-05-01

    The recovery and continuance of native vegetation communities is the critical component of ecological restoration. As primary producers and basis of the food web, their success will influence and likely control the recovery and sustenance of all higher tropic levels. Intact ecosystems are perfectly designed to produce the vegetation dynamics that they produce. Hence, impacted or altered ecosystems can not be perfectly designed to produce the original vegetation. The alteration of the hydrologic system of the Florida Everglades is causing well-documented changes in the composition of the ecosystem. It is argued that this composition depends on the balance between three vegetation community types, defined here as sawgrass, cattails and periphyton. The factors that may be most critical in the success of the restoration are the factors that will restore the balance between these archetypes. These factors are identified as hydroperiod, water quality (phosphorous concentration) and fire. An investigation of ecological and hydrological models was conducted to evaluate suitability of application to ecological restoration scenarios, such as the vegetation community competition of the Florida Everglades. This investigation revealed aspects of three model types, defined here as ecosystem, hydrologic and competition, are necessary for such a simulation of ecological restoration. A comparison of how each model type treats the common factors of water flow, vegetation dynamics and climate inputs revealed avenues for extension of each model type to better capture the whole system dynamics.

  9. Area-based approach improves global sediment discharge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-07-01

    By approaching the challenge of calculating global sediment discharge rates from a new angle, Pelletier developed a model that outperforms many existing simulations while minimizing the number of free parameters. Knowing how sediment is transported by the world's rivers is a key factor in understanding how landscapes change over time, with important consequences for agricultural viability, ecological health, and soil properties. Traditionally, the majority of discharge models calculate sediment redistribution at the watershed or drainage basin scale, using watershed average values of the physical properties known to affect sediment transport. The author's model, on the other hand, partitions the planet into sections that are 5 arc minutes wide—roughly 10 kilometers across at the equator and smaller at higher latitudes. This decision to use an area-based grid rather than drainage basin averages allows for an improved representation of small-scale processes that are often washed out at the watershed scale.

  10. Modeling an integrative physical examination program for the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Scott G

    2006-10-01

    Current policies governing the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs physical examination programs are out of step with current evidence-based medical practice. Replacing periodic and other routine physical examination types with annual preventive health assessments would afford our service members additional health benefit at reduced cost. Additionally, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs repeat the physical examination process at separation and have been unable to reconcile their respective disability evaluation systems to reduce duplication and waste. A clear, coherent, and coordinated strategy to improve the relevance and utility of our physical examination programs is long overdue. This article discusses existing physical examination programs and proposes a model for a new integrative physical examination program based on need, science, and common sense.

  11. Studio Physics at the Colorado School of Mines: A model for iterative development and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Patrick; Kuo, Vincent

    2009-05-01

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) has taught its first-semester introductory physics course using a hybrid lecture/Studio Physics format for several years. Based on this previous success, over the past 18 months we have converted the second semester of our traditional calculus-based introductory physics course (Physics II) to a Studio Physics format. In this talk, we describe the recent history of the Physics II course and of Studio at Mines, discuss the PER-based improvements that we are implementing, and characterize our progress via several metrics, including pre/post Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) scores, Colorado Learning About Science Survey scores (CLASS), failure rates, and exam scores. We also report on recent attempts to involve students in the department's Senior Design program with our course. Our ultimate goal is to construct one possible model for a practical and successful transition from a lecture course to a Studio (or Studio-like) course.

  12. A model for improving cancer patient education.

    PubMed

    Fredette, S L

    1990-08-01

    Adjustment to cancer requires modification of behavior that may be aided through patient education. Numerous programs have been developed to meet this need; however, studies show that even after being taught, patients are not well informed. It seems that the process of educating cancer patients needs to be improved. Authors suggest a progression of psychosocial stages of adjustment to serious illness during which specific behaviors are exhibited and coping mechanisms utilized. Understanding the nature of this process forms the basis for effective patient education since theories of adaptation describe behaviors that impact on motivation to learn, information required, and teaching methodology. Failure to attend to this variable of emotional response to the disease can prevent learning. This article integrates the theories of Weisman, Crate, Engle, and Kubler-Ross into an educational model for the cancer patient consisting of six periods. The model suggests nursing approaches, educational topics, and teaching strategies based on the patient's behavioral responses. Use of this model can improve teaching effectiveness in clinical practice by ensuring that the patient is ready to learn prior to teaching and by utilizing teaching strategies appropriate to the educational period. It can further be used as a tool to teach students of nursing how to use the stages of adjustment to chronic illness when planning patient teaching.

  13. Aligned genomic data compression via improved modeling.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Idoia; Hernaez, Mikel; Weissman, Tsachy

    2014-12-01

    With the release of the latest Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) machine, the HiSeq X by Illumina, the cost of sequencing the whole genome of a human is expected to drop to a mere $1000. This milestone in sequencing history marks the era of affordable sequencing of individuals and opens the doors to personalized medicine. In accord, unprecedented volumes of genomic data will require storage for processing. There will be dire need not only of compressing aligned data, but also of generating compressed files that can be fed directly to downstream applications to facilitate the analysis of and inference on the data. Several approaches to this challenge have been proposed in the literature; however, focus thus far has been on the low coverage regime and most of the suggested compressors are not based on effective modeling of the data. We demonstrate the benefit of data modeling for compressing aligned reads. Specifically, we show that, by working with data models designed for the aligned data, we can improve considerably over the best compression ratio achieved by previously proposed algorithms. Our results indicate that the pareto-optimal barrier for compression rate and speed claimed by Bonfield and Mahoney (2013) [Bonfield JK and Mahoneys MV, Compression of FASTQ and SAM format sequencing data, PLOS ONE, 8(3):e59190, 2013.] does not apply for high coverage aligned data. Furthermore, our improved compression ratio is achieved by splitting the data in a manner conducive to operations in the compressed domain by downstream applications.

  14. Improved Estimation Model of Lunar Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar surface temperature (LST) is of great scientific interest both uncovering the thermal properties and designing the lunar robotic or manned landing missions. In this paper, we proposed the improved LST estimation model based on the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE). The shadow and surface tilts effects were combined into the model. Using the Chang'E (CE-1) DEM data from the Laser Altimeter (LA), the topographic effect can be estimated with an improved effective solar irradiance (ESI) model. In Fig. 1, the highest LST of the global Moon has been estimated with the spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel, applying the solar albedo data derived from Clementine UV-750nm in solving the PDE function. The topographic effect is significant in the LST map. It can be identified clearly the maria, highland, and craters. The maximum daytime LST presents at the regions with low albedo, i.g. mare Procellarum, mare Serenitatis and mare Imbrium. The results are consistent with the Diviner's measurements of the LRO mission. Fig. 2 shows the temperature variations at the center of the disk in one year, assuming the Moon to be standard spherical. The seasonal variation of LST at the equator is about 10K. The highest LST occurs in early May. Fig.1. Estimated maximum surface temperatures of the global Moon in spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel

  15. Validation and upgrading of physically based mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    The validation of the results of physically-based mathematical models against experimental results was discussed. Systematic techniques are used for: (1) isolating subsets of the simulator mathematical model and comparing the response of each subset to its experimental response for the same input conditions; (2) evaluating the response error to determine whether it is the result of incorrect parameter values, incorrect structure of the model subset, or unmodeled external effects of cross coupling; and (3) modifying and upgrading the model and its parameter values to determine the most physically appropriate combination of changes.

  16. Characterizing, modeling, and addressing gender disparities in introductory college physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost-Smith, Lauren Elizabeth

    2011-12-01

    The underrepresentation and underperformance of females in physics has been well documented and has long concerned policy-makers, educators, and the physics community. In this thesis, we focus on gender disparities in the first- and second-semester introductory, calculus-based physics courses at the University of Colorado. Success in these courses is critical for future study and careers in physics (and other sciences). Using data gathered from roughly 10,000 undergraduate students, we identify and model gender differences in the introductory physics courses in three areas: student performance, retention, and psychological factors. We observe gender differences on several measures in the introductory physics courses: females are less likely to take a high school physics course than males and have lower standardized mathematics test scores; males outscore females on both pre- and post-course conceptual physics surveys and in-class exams; and males have more expert-like attitudes and beliefs about physics than females. These background differences of males and females account for 60% to 70% of the gender gap that we observe on a post-course survey of conceptual physics understanding. In analyzing underlying psychological factors of learning, we find that female students report lower self-confidence related to succeeding in the introductory courses (self-efficacy) and are less likely to report seeing themselves as a "physics person". Students' self-efficacy beliefs are significant predictors of their performance, even when measures of physics and mathematics background are controlled, and account for an additional 10% of the gender gap. Informed by results from these studies, we implemented and tested a psychological, self-affirmation intervention aimed at enhancing female students' performance in Physics 1. Self-affirmation reduced the gender gap in performance on both in-class exams and the post-course conceptual physics survey. Further, the benefit of the self

  17. Physical exercise in myasthenia gravis is safe and improves neuromuscular parameters and physical performance-based measures: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Westerberg, Elisabet; Molin, Carl Johan; Lindblad, Ida; Emtner, Margareta; Punga, Anna Rostedt

    2017-08-01

    Due to the shortage of exercise-related research in Myasthenia Gravis (MG), there are no consensus guidelines on physical exercise for MG patients. In this prospective pilot study, 10 MG patients with mild disease performed supervised aerobic and resistance training twice weekly for 12 weeks. The Myasthenia Gravis Composite (MGC) score, compound motor action potential (CMAP), repetitive nerve stimulation, muscle force, physical performance-based measures, serum levels of interleukin-6, muscle enzymes, and immuno-microRNAs miR-150-5p and miR-21-5p were assessed before and after the training period. Physical exercise was well tolerated, and the MGC score was unchanged. Muscle resistance weights and CMAP amplitudes increased for biceps brachii and rectus femoris muscles, and physical performance-based measures improved. Muscle enzymes remained normal, whereas disease-specific microRNAs miR-150-5p and miR-21-5p were reduced after the training period. We propose that general recommendations regarding physical exercise can be applied safely to well-regulated MG patients. Muscle Nerve 56: 207-214, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Physics of the Vicsek model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginelli, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    In these lecture notes, prepared for the Microswimmers Summer School 2015 at Forschungszentrum Jülich, I discuss the well known Vicsek model for collective motion and its main properties. In particular, I discuss its algorithmic implementation and the basic properties of its universality class. I present results from numerical simulations and insist on the role played by symmetries and conservation laws. Analytical arguments are presented in an accessible and simplified way, but ample references are given for more advanced readings.

  19. Improving Mass Balance Modeling of Benchmark Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beusekom, A. E.; March, R. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2009-12-01

    The USGS monitors long-term glacier mass balance at three benchmark glaciers in different climate regimes. The coastal and continental glaciers are represented by Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers in Alaska, respectively. Field measurements began in 1966 and continue. We have reanalyzed the published balance time series with more modern methods and recomputed reference surface and conventional balances. Addition of the most recent data shows a continuing trend of mass loss. We compare the updated balances to the previously accepted balances and discuss differences. Not all balance quantities can be determined from the field measurements. For surface processes, we model missing information with an improved degree-day model. Degree-day models predict ablation from the sum of daily mean temperatures and an empirical degree-day factor. We modernize the traditional degree-day model as well as derive new degree-day factors in an effort to closer match the balance time series and thus better predict the future state of the benchmark glaciers. For subsurface processes, we model the refreezing of meltwater for internal accumulation. We examine the sensitivity of the balance time series to the subsurface process of internal accumulation, with the goal of determining the best way to include internal accumulation into balance estimates.

  20. Novel models on fluid's variable thermo-physical properties for extensive study on convection heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, De-Yi; Zhong, Liang-Cai

    2017-01-01

    Our novel models for fluid's variable physical properties are improved and reported systematically in this work for enhancement of theoretical and practical value on study of convection heat and mass transfer. It consists of three models, namely (1) temperature parameter model, (2) polynomial model, and (3) weighted-sum model, respectively for treatment of temperature-dependent physical properties of gases, temperature-dependent physical properties of liquids, and concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. Two related components are proposed, and involved in each model for fluid's variable physical properties. They are basic physic property equations and theoretical similarity equations on physical property factors. The former, as the foundation of the latter, is based on the typical experimental data and physical analysis. The latter is built up by similarity analysis and mathematical derivation based on the former basic physical properties equations. These models are available for smooth simulation and treatment of fluid's variable physical properties for assurance of theoretical and practical value of study on convection of heat and mass transfer. Especially, so far, there has been lack of available study on heat and mass transfer of film condensation convection of vapour-gas mixture, and the wrong heat transfer results existed in widespread studies on the related research topics, due to ignorance of proper consideration of the concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. For resolving such difficult issues, the present novel physical property models have their special advantages.