Science.gov

Sample records for physics community funding

  1. Efforts of a Kansas Foundation to Increase Physical Activity and Improve Health by Funding Community Trails, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Katie M.; Lightner, Joseph; Oestman, Katherine B.; Kaczynski, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Trails are associated with increased physical activity; however, little is known about the process of building trails by various types of organizations. From 2005 through 2012 the Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans (Sunflower) funded multiple organizations to construct 70 trails of varying lengths and surfaces in municipalities, schools, and communities across Kansas. The purpose of this study was to assess the process of developing and implementing community trail projects across Kansas with funding from a public foundation. Methods In 2012, we stratified funded organizations by type and conducted proportional random sampling to select 20 key informants from those organizations to participate in structured telephone interviews. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers coded interview transcripts according to issues identified by participants. Results Issues associated with trail-building identified as important were collaboration among groups, unexpected construction costs, champions for the project, and level of difficulty of construction. Participants indicated that trails facilitated physical activity. Trails were integrated into communities through events such as walking events and other promotional efforts; these efforts were thought to increase trail use. The perceived outcomes of building the trails included providing the community with a physical activity resource, inspiring the community to start additional trail projects, and increasing the physical activity of local residents. Conclusion Sunflower’s funding was instrumental in developing trail projects to provide new physical activity resources across Kansas. Public health practitioners seeking to increase physical activity should seek funding from foundations that focus on health. PMID:25427316

  2. Efforts of a Kansas foundation to increase physical activity and improve health by funding community trails, 2012.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Katie M; Lightner, Joseph; Oestman, Katherine B; Hughey, S Morgan; Kaczynski, Andrew T

    2014-11-26

    Trails are associated with increased physical activity; however, little is known about the process of building trails by various types of organizations. From 2005 through 2012 the Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans (Sunflower) funded multiple organizations to construct 70 trails of varying lengths and surfaces in municipalities, schools, and communities across Kansas. The purpose of this study was to assess the process of developing and implementing community trail projects across Kansas with funding from a public foundation. In 2012, we stratified funded organizations by type and conducted proportional random sampling to select 20 key informants from those organizations to participate in structured telephone interviews. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers coded interview transcripts according to issues identified by participants. Issues associated with trail-building identified as important were collaboration among groups, unexpected construction costs, champions for the project, and level of difficulty of construction. Participants indicated that trails facilitated physical activity. Trails were integrated into communities through events such as walking events and other promotional efforts; these efforts were thought to increase trail use. The perceived outcomes of building the trails included providing the community with a physical activity resource, inspiring the community to start additional trail projects, and increasing the physical activity of local residents. Sunflower's funding was instrumental in developing trail projects to provide new physical activity resources across Kansas. Public health practitioners seeking to increase physical activity should seek funding from foundations that focus on health.

  3. Higher Education Active Community Fund: Proposals. Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This document outlines proposals for a Higher Education Active Community Fund (HEACF) in England to enhance the key role played by higher education institutions in the community. The initiative follows from the objectives of the Higher Education Reach-Out to Business and the Community Fund and proposals from the British Department of the…

  4. 77 FR 37742 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Funding Opportunity Title: Notice of Funds Availability... administered by the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, a wholly owned government... Communities, and financial assistance to CDFIs through grants, stock purchases, loans, deposits, and...

  5. Current Developments in Community College Performance Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Mark M.; Friedel, Janice N.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Thornton, Zoë M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the initiation of performance funding in Tennessee in the late 1970s, approximately 30 states have, at some point, attempted a funding model that includes performance on a set of indicators. The purpose of the present study was to capture the current status of performance funding in public statewide community college systems and to assess…

  6. Current Developments in Community College Performance Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Mark M.; Friedel, Janice N.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Thornton, Zoë M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the initiation of performance funding in Tennessee in the late 1970s, approximately 30 states have, at some point, attempted a funding model that includes performance on a set of indicators. The purpose of the present study was to capture the current status of performance funding in public statewide community college systems and to assess…

  7. The Funding of Community Colleges: Formulas & Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullin, Christopher M.; Honeyman, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This study identified governing state entities charged with the development of a funding formula for community colleges. Analysis of the data revealed that 40 states utilized a funding formula. Twenty-one states had a "Higher Education" entity with governing control of the formula, 5 states had a "Community College" entity with distinct funding…

  8. Community College Funding: Adopting a Team Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Thomas E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to structure, governance, mission, or size, community colleges differ from state to state. One common element in many states, however, is state funding. Whether a state prepares its budget annually or biennially, the human behavior governing the budget process remains the same. Funds are finite. Everyone wants more than can be…

  9. The Fundamentals of Community College Fund Raising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumbach, Mary A.; Bumphus, Walter G.

    1993-01-01

    Presents a guide for community college fund raising. Discusses organizational principles and structural models; operational concerns such as stewardship of funds, information dissemination, and donor research; and the importance of presidential support, institutional reputation and environment, and experienced grants managers. Includes practical…

  10. The Fundamentals of Community College Fund Raising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumbach, Mary A.; Bumphus, Walter G.

    1993-01-01

    Presents a guide for community college fund raising. Discusses organizational principles and structural models; operational concerns such as stewardship of funds, information dissemination, and donor research; and the importance of presidential support, institutional reputation and environment, and experienced grants managers. Includes practical…

  11. Alternate Sources of Funding: Scholarship Fund Raising. and Anne Arundel Community College Scholarship Fund Raising Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Barry M.

    This two-part paper provides guidance on alternative sources of funding for college scholarships and describes Anne Arundel Community College's (AACC's) Scholarship Fund Raising Campaign. First, an outline is presented, covering: (1) prerequisites to fundraising (i.e., leadership, sense of direction, commitment, and a plan for identifying,…

  12. Research Funding and Women in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen E.; Eblen-Zayas, Melissa; Michelman-Ribeiro, Ariel; Valentine, Jami M.

    2005-10-01

    A round table discussion on research funding and its relation to women in physics was held during the Second IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics. Panelists were the director of the Office of Education, Science, and Technology of the Organization of American States; the director of Programs on Women, Science, and Technology for UNESCO; the Minister of Women for Brazil; and a professor of physics from the University of Yamanashi, Japan.

  13. 77 FR 76606 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-31164] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Funding Opportunity Title: Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) inviting Applications for the Community Development Financial Institutions the Native American CDFI Assistance (NACA) Program FY 2013 funding round...

  14. 76 FR 30286 - Community Development Revolving Loan Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... 3133-AD91 Community Development Revolving Loan Fund AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA... assistance grants from the Community Development Revolving Loan Fund (CDRLF or Fund). The proposed changes... other community development lending programs and believes it is necessary to ensure that credit unions...

  15. 76 FR 67021 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice and... Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the Community Development... Mia Sowell, Policy and Program Officer, at the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, U.S...

  16. Creative Funding Ideas for Your Physical Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodie, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Physical educators often find it difficult to secure funding for their programs in these tough economic times. However, there is funding out there, if one knows where to look and how to ask for it. This article describes how physical education teachers can make a funding action plan, who to contact, where to write to, and how to get equipment for…

  17. Creative Funding Ideas for Your Physical Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodie, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Physical educators often find it difficult to secure funding for their programs in these tough economic times. However, there is funding out there, if one knows where to look and how to ask for it. This article describes how physical education teachers can make a funding action plan, who to contact, where to write to, and how to get equipment for…

  18. Funding evaluation hits Portuguese physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2014-08-01

    At least half of Portugal's scientific research “units” will receive either no cash or only limited funds over the next five years from the country's main funding agency, the Science and Technology Foundation (FCT).

  19. Successful Community College Fund-Raising Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Spencer

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a study whose primary purposes were to determine the characteristics of an effective fund-raising program, the marketing practices that contribute to the success of a fund-raising program, and factors of the development system's influence on a fund-raising program. This study utilized a Delphi research instrument. Initially,…

  20. Mental health community based funding: Ohio's experience in revising its funding allocation methodology.

    PubMed

    Seiber, Eric E; Sweeney, Helen Anne; Partridge, Jamie; Dembe, Allard E; Jones, Holly

    2012-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, states have increasingly moved away from centrally financed, state-operated facilities to financing models built around community-based service delivery mechanisms. This paper identifies four important broad factors to consider when developing a funding formula to allocate state funding for community mental health services to local boards in an equitable manner, based on local community need: (1) funding factors used by other states; (2) state specific legislative requirements; (3) data availability; and (4) local variation of factors in the funding formula. These considerations are illustrated with the recent experience of Ohio using available evidence and data sources to develop a new community-based allocation formula. We discuss opportunities for implementing changes in formula based mental health funding related to Medicaid expansions for low income adults scheduled to go into effect under the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

  1. Corporation for National and Community Service: Funding Opportunities for Afterschool. Funding Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelow, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    This Funding Note focuses on finding funding opportunities for afterschool through the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the federal agency charged with fostering civic engagement for citizens of all ages through service and volunteering. CNCS's mission includes: (1) Providing support to volunteer organizations which provide…

  2. Alternative Funding Sources. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catanzaro, James L., Ed.; Arnold, Allen D., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to identify and tap new sources of funds for community colleges, this monograph presents a series of descriptive articles on the most successful alternative funding ventures. In addition, the sourcebook provides a sense of where and how new ventures have aided two-year colleges and how other institutions might follow in this pursuit.…

  3. Funding Models of Community Colleges in 10 Midwest States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenton, Carol Piper; Schuh, John H.; Huba, Mary E.; Shelley, Mack C., II

    2004-01-01

    The extent to which community colleges in 10 Midwest states relied on 12 current funds revenue sources between 1990 and 2000 is presented in this study. Four models of funding were identified and evaluated. All models generated revenue in excess of the change in the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI), a measure of inflation over the period…

  4. Community Crowd-Funded Solar Finance

    SciTech Connect

    Jagerson, Gordon "Ty"

    2016-07-08

    The award supported the demonstration and development of the Village Power Platform, which enables community organizations to more readily develop, finance and operate solar installations on local community organizations. The platform enables partial or complete local ownership of the solar installation. The award specifically supported key features including financial modeling tools, community communications tools, crowdfunding mechanisms, a mobile app, and other critical features.

  5. Kansas Community College Funding: Problems & Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockley, Dennis

    Since the establishment of a two-year college system in Kansas in 1917, funding has been a source of consternation, with governance issues often exacerbating financial problems. The colleges received no state financial support until 1961, when an expenditure of $3 per credit hour was authorized, increased as of 1996 to $28.40 per credit hour. The…

  6. 78 FR 53005 - Proposed Data Collection; Comment Request: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Proposed Data Collection; Comment Request: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund: Comment Request on Continuing Data Collection Through the Community Investment Impact System (CIIS) of Information From Community Development Financial Institutions...

  7. 78 FR 38361 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Rural Capacity Building for Community Development and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Rural Capacity Building for Community... Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Announcement of funding awards. SUMMARY: In accordance with... the 2012 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Rural Capacity Building for...

  8. Funding of community-based interventions for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Poku, Nana K; Bonnel, René

    2016-07-01

    Since the start of the HIV epidemic, community responses have been at the forefront of the response. Following the extraordinary expansion of global resources, the funding of community responses rose to reach at least US$690 million per year in the period 2005-2009. Since then, many civil society organisations (CSOs) have reported a drop in funding. Yet, the need for strong community responses is even more urgent, as shown by their role in reaching the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) Fast-Track targets. In the case of antiretroviral treatment, interventions need to be adopted by most people at risk of HIV in order to have a substantial effect on the prevention of HIV at the population level. This paper reviews the published literature on community responses, funding and effectiveness. Additional funding is certainly needed to increase the coverage of community-based interventions (CBIs), but current evidence on their effectiveness is extremely mixed, which does not provide clear guidance to policy makers. This is especially an issue for adolescent girls and young women in Eastern and Southern Africa, who face extremely high infection risk, but the biomedical prevention tools that have been proven effective for the general population still remain pilot projects for this group. Research is especially needed to isolate the factors affecting the likelihood that interventions targeting this group are consistently successful. Such work could be focused on the community organisations that are currently involved in delivering gender-sensitive interventions.

  9. Physics Funding: The Evolving Federal Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piore, Emanuel R.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the federal government's role in support of physics within the context of four time periods: (1) about 1930-40; (2) 1940-45 (World War II); (3) 1945-present (post-World War II); and (4) the present time, as the administration in Washington strives for a balanced budget. (Author/SK)

  10. 75 FR 10561 - Request for Public Comment: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Initiatives, and Bank Enterprise Awards AGENCY: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, U.S... assistance awards, the Native Initiatives and the Bank Enterprise Awards (BEA). In particular, the CDFI Fund..., thereby providing an incentive to banks to invest in their communities and in other CDFIs; (d) the...

  11. Sharing of grant funds between academic institutions and community partners in community-based participatory research.

    PubMed

    Cain, Katrice D; Theurer, Jacqueline R; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2014-04-01

    To determine how grant funds are shared between academic institutions and community partners in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Review of all 62 investigator-initiated R01 CBPR grants funded by the National Institutes of Health from January 2005 to August 2012. Using prespecified criteria, two reviewers independently categorized each budget item as being for an academic institution or a community partner. A third reviewer helped resolve any discrepancies. Among 49 evaluable grants, 68% of all grant funds were for academic institutions and 30% were for community partners. For 2% of funds, it was unclear whether they were for academic institutions or for community partners. Community partners' share of funds was highest in the categories of other direct costs (62%) and other personnel (48%) and lowest in the categories of equipment (1%) and indirect costs (7%). A majority of CBPR grant funds are allocated to academic institutions. In order to enhance the share that community partners receive, funders may wish to specify a minimum proportion of grant funds that should be allocated to community partners in CBPR projects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Representing Family: Community Funds of Knowledge, Bilingualism, and Multimodality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Elizabeth; Toohey, Kelleen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Elizabeth Marshall and Kelleen Toohey use critical discourse analysis to examine educators' efforts to incorporate funds of knowledge from the communities and families of Punjabi Sikh students in a Canadian elementary school. Using MP3 players, students first recorded and then translated their grandparents' stories of life in…

  13. The Clear and Present Funding Crisis in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the impact of major changes in community college funding on its open-access mission, as well as on the work and responsibilities of college leaders as they attempt to balance the increasing demands made of their institutions while concomitantly grappling with diminished public fiscal support.

  14. Illinois Community College Funding Formula Survey. Volume 21, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonte, Richard; And Others

    A survey was conducted of Illinois community college presidents and business managers to determine current institutional thinking on the Illinois funding formula. Study findings, based on responses from 36 out of the 39 colleges in the state included the following: (1) 64% of the respondents favored the concept of averaging credit hours and unit…

  15. The Clear and Present Funding Crisis in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the impact of major changes in community college funding on its open-access mission, as well as on the work and responsibilities of college leaders as they attempt to balance the increasing demands made of their institutions while concomitantly grappling with diminished public fiscal support.

  16. An experiment with community health funds in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna D; Waters, Hugh; Steinhardt, Laura; Alam, Sahibullah; Hansen, Peter; Naeem, Ahmad Jan

    2009-07-01

    As Afghanistan rebuilds its health system, it faces key challenges in financing health services. To reduce dependence on donor funds, it is important to develop sustainable local financing mechanisms. A second challenge is to reduce high levels of out-of-pocket payments. Community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes offer the possibility of raising revenues from communities and at the same time providing financial protection. This paper describes the performance of one type of CBHI scheme, the Community Health Fund (CHF), which was piloted for the first time in five provinces of Afghanistan between June 2005 and October 2006. The performance of the CHF programme demonstrates that complex community-based health financing schemes can be implemented in post-conflict settings like Afghanistan, except in areas of high insecurity. The funds raised from the community, via premiums and user fees, enabled the pilot facilities to overcome temporary shortages of drugs and supplies, and to conduct outreach services via mobile clinics. However, enrolment and cost-recovery were modest. The median enrolment rate for premium-paying households was 6% of eligible households in the catchment areas of the clinics. Cost recovery rates ranged up to 16% of total operating costs and 32% of non-salary operating costs. No evidence of reduced out-of-pocket health expenditures was observed at the community level, though CHF members had markedly higher utilization of health services. The main reasons among non-members for not enrolling were being unaware of the programme; high premiums; and perceived low quality of services at the CHF clinics. The performance of Afghanistan's CHF was similar to other CHF-type programmes operating at the primary care level internationally. The solution to building local capacity to finance health services lies in a combination of financing sources rather than any single mechanism. In this context, it is critical that international assistance for Afghanistan

  17. The funding of community health center dental programs in California.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Irene V

    2009-05-01

    The financing of dental services in community health centers, CHCs, is a mystery to most dentists in private practice, and this lack of knowledge has resulted in misconceptions that hamper mutual support. This review seeks to explain and demystify how CHC dental clinics remain financially viable. The mechanisms of financing dental care in CHCs are described including types of revenues received, financing constraints unique to CHCs and how services to indigent patients are funded.

  18. 77 FR 10543 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Capacity Building for Sustainable Communities Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Capacity Building for Sustainable Communities... Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Community Challenge Planning Grant Program (Challenge Grants). This... Information Service at (800) 877-8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Capacity Building for...

  19. Communities of color seek reform in HIV funding.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    AIDS is having a devastating impact on communities of color, leading the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to promote a new agenda to allocate Federal HIV prevention funds. The new agenda will compensate for the changing demographics in the epidemic. Two recent summits in Boston and Atlanta gave African Americans an opportunity to voice their opinions about the issue. There is a growing level of alarm that the community planning process has not been effective in addressing the needs within the African-American community, where AIDS now kills more people under the age of 45 than cancer, homicide, and heart disease. A national survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that African Americans are twice as concerned as the general US population about becoming infected with HIV. African Americans agree that the government should fund needle-exchange programs. Some activists are calling for a movement within the African American community that will mirror the tactics and effectiveness of programs developed by and for gay men.

  20. 77 FR 16267 - Community Development Revolving Loan Fund Access for Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... union's marketing strategy to reach members and the community; and include financial projections. 6. Non... funds. However, each Applicant should address in the Application its strategy for raising matching funds... Funds: Submit a narrative describing its strategy for raising matching funds from non-federal sources...

  1. Florida's Community College Funding Process: An Historical Analysis, 1965-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, William F.

    In order to assess the effects of changes in funding processes in Florida, this report describes and compares financing under: the Minimum Foundation Programs (MFP), which for 25 years served as the funding model for elementary, secondary, and community college education; the Community College Program Fund, a multi-level program cost formula,…

  2. 75 FR 66117 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Community Development Technical Assistance Programs Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Community Development Technical Assistance... Availability (NOFA) for the Community Development Technical Assistance programs. This announcement contains the...: Holly A. Kelly, Acting Director, Technical Assistance Division, Office of Community Planning and...

  3. Federal Funding and Knowledge Growth in Ionospheric Physics, 1945-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillmor, C. Stewart

    1986-01-01

    Presents a historical overview of developments in ionospheric physics and examines relationships between federal funding and knowledge growth in this field. Summarizes the views of ionsphere researchers on funding, the role of funding program managers, and the nature of funding agencies. Reviews advancements related to entrepreneurs and resources…

  4. How Community Colleges Are Closing the Skills Gap through CTE and STEM Funding Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Kimberly; Thomas-Anderson, Tricia

    2017-01-01

    This chapter summarizes funding trends to support career and technical education (CTE) and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs at community colleges compared to funding for similar programs at 4-year colleges and universities. Examples of intramural and extramural funding strategies as well as lessons learned and…

  5. 78 FR 5870 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund: Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice and... Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, an office within the Department of the Treasury, is soliciting comments... Development Financial Institutions Fund, U.S. Department of the Treasury, 1500 Pennsylvania Avenue NW...

  6. Emerging Trends and Critical Issues Affecting Private Fund-Raising among Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Karen Luke; Glass, Jr., J. Conrad

    2000-01-01

    Identifies and rank orders emerging trends and critical issues affecting private fund-raising among community colleges. Development officers representing 42 North Carolina community colleges participated in the study. The greatest number of participants identified trends related to business and industry, the need for private funds, and increased…

  7. State Higher Education Performance Funding for Community Colleges: Diverse Effects and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandberg, David A.; Hillman, Nichola; Barakat, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Community colleges are central to the United States' college completion goals. A popular strategy pushed by a number of influential policy organizations and foundations is a policy of tying state funding to community college completions, otherwise known simply as performance funding. This is happening despite little to no…

  8. 78 FR 76638 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Capital Fund Community and Education Training...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... for the development of facilities to provide early childhood education, adult education, and/or job... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Capital Fund Community and Education... Collection Title of Information Collection: Capital Fund Education and Training Community Facilities. OMB...

  9. State Higher Education Performance Funding for Community Colleges: Diverse Effects and Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandberg, David A.; Hillman, Nichola; Barakat, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Community colleges are central to the United States' college completion goals. A popular strategy pushed by a number of influential policy organizations and foundations is a policy of tying state funding to community college completions, otherwise known simply as performance funding. This is happening despite little to no…

  10. Citizen Support for Northern Ohio Community College Funding Initiatives during an Economic Recession Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The current research, "Citizen Support for Northern Ohio Community College Funding Initiatives during an Economic Recession Recovery", asks the question: Do the citizens of Northern Ohio support community college funding during difficult economic times? Based on the theory of Stakeholder Analysis, the purpose of this concurrent,…

  11. California Community Colleges: The Chancellor's Office Should Collect Additional Funds for Questionable Training Agreements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Office of the Auditor General, Sacramento.

    This audit report addresses the issue of state funds for community college training courses that should be recovered from several California community colleges. These colleges did not meet the minimum conditions necessary to qualify their training courses for apportionment funding. The report reveals that the Chancellor's Office has only partially…

  12. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?...

  13. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?...

  14. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?...

  15. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?...

  16. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?...

  17. 77 FR 29681 - Announcement of Funding Awards, Capital Fund Education and Training Community Facilities (CFCF...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ..., adult education, and/or job training programs for public housing residents. More specifically, in... announced in this Notice were selected for funding in a competition posted on HUD's Web site on May 24, 2011. Applications were scored and selected for funding based on the selection criteria in that NOFA. These...

  18. Rural Hispanic Community. Community Education Proven Practices II. Federally Funded Local Community Education Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros, Ricardo

    Focusing on the Chama Valley School District's attempt to plan and implement a community council as a foundation for community education efforts in the rural Hispanic community of Chama, this publication offers "hands-on" suggestions in methods of implementing a community education program. Following a description of the school district…

  19. Mathematics Funds of Knowledge: "Sotmaute" and "Sermaute" Fish in a Torres Strait Islander Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a project with one Torres Strait Islander Community. It provides some insights into parents' funds of knowledge that are mathematical in nature, such as sorting shells and giving fish. The idea of funds of knowledge is based on the premise that people are competent and have knowledge that has been…

  20. Community College Funding 2008-09. Enrollment Growth Outpaces Resources. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Brian; Leichty, Julian

    2009-01-01

    California community colleges are expected to provide a broad range of affordable educational opportunities to an increasing number of students, but the current system does not have sufficient funding to serve them all well. This report describes present budgetary sources and explains that colleges receive mostly discretionary funding. With the…

  1. An Evaluation of Tennessee's Performance Funding Policy at Walters State Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thomas A.

    Walters State Community College (WSCC) (Tennessee), founded in 1970, began participating in Tennessee's Performance Funding Project in 1979. Changes made in the state funding formula in 1979 were intended to provide an impetus for improving the quality of education on Tennessee's college campuses. The Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC)…

  2. Early Childhood Funding at the Community Level: A Case Study from Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, David; Joseph, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG) distributes state funding for preschool and birth-to-three programs in Illinois. The authors conducted a case study in Evanston, a city in north Cook County, Illinois, interviewing community representatives and analyzing ECBG program data to discern how ECBG funds are used to provide early childhood services.…

  3. The Revised European Social Fund and Action to Combat Unemployment in the European Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandamme, Francois

    1984-01-01

    The tasks of the European Social Fund, the European Economic Community's social policy instrument, were reviewed in l983 in the light of the worsening unemployment situation and the priority placed on employment and vocational training policies. (Author/SSH)

  4. "They Shall Walk Again!" The Physical Rehabilitation Program of the UMWA Welfare and Retirement Fund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the history of the United Mine Workers Welfare and Retirement Fund and its efforts in providing physical rehabilitation and job retraining to disabled miners. Created in 1946, the fund was successful in providing vocational rehabilitation services to over 1,200 miners and could serve as a model of a comprehensive cost-effective approach…

  5. "They Shall Walk Again!" The Physical Rehabilitation Program of the UMWA Welfare and Retirement Fund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the history of the United Mine Workers Welfare and Retirement Fund and its efforts in providing physical rehabilitation and job retraining to disabled miners. Created in 1946, the fund was successful in providing vocational rehabilitation services to over 1,200 miners and could serve as a model of a comprehensive cost-effective approach…

  6. Does external funding help adaptation? Evidence from community-based water management in the Colombian Andes.

    PubMed

    Murtinho, Felipe; Eakin, Hallie; López-Carr, David; Hayes, Tanya M

    2013-11-01

    Despite debate regarding whether, and in what form, communities need external support for adaptation to environmental change, few studies have examined how external funding impacts adaptation decisions in rural resource-dependent communities. In this article, we use quantitative and qualitative methods to assess how different funding sources influence the initiative to adapt to water scarcity in the Colombian Andes. We compare efforts to adapt to water scarcity in 111 rural Andean communities with varied dependence on external funding for water management activities. Findings suggest that despite efforts to use their own internal resources, communities often need external support to finance adaptation strategies. However, not all external financial support positively impacts a community's abilities to adapt. Results show the importance of community-driven requests for external support. In cases where external support was unsolicited, the results show a decline, or "crowding-out," in community efforts to adapt. In contrast, in cases where communities initiated the request for external support to fund their own projects, findings show that external intervention is more likely to enhance or "crowds-in" community-driven adaptation.

  7. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  8. Community Travel for Physically Impaired Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet Learning Center, Saginaw, MI.

    The community travel program for physically impaired children at the Millet Learning Center (Saginaw, Michigan) blends skills from two professions: orientation and mobility, and physical therapy. Program goals include enabling students to overcome travel fears, to learn travel skills, to learn to make adaptations necessary for successful travel,…

  9. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  10. Community Colleges Must Step up Their Fund Raising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanning, Paul

    2008-01-01

    America's community colleges are a key link in the chain of upward mobility, and they need more support than they're getting. This is an obvious statement for many in the community-college world, but with the growing challenges facing the system that educates almost half of the nation's undergraduates, the author contends that there is need to…

  11. 76 FR 59152 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community... Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Notice of funding awards. SUMMARY: In accordance with... the 2010 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Section 4 Capacity Building for...

  12. A Decision-Making Analysis of Fund Raising Options in a Public Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitwood, James P.

    Because financial stability of colleges and universities is threatened by level or decreased funding from all government sources, private resource development looms as a crucial element of community college operations in the next century. In order to determine the optimal private sources to target, Okaloosa-Walton Community College (OWCC), in…

  13. Community College Noncredit Occupational Programming: A Study of State Policies and Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleksiw, Catherine A.; Kremidas, Chloe C.; Johnson-Lewis, Mark; Lekes, Natasha

    2007-01-01

    This study inventoried state policies and regulations on and financial support for noncredit occupational programming offered by community colleges. Information collected from state- and community college-level administrators and Web-based searches is organized by a range of issues related to noncredit occupational programming and funding, such as…

  14. Local Evaluation of Programs Funded under the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashjian, Michael D.; Elliott, Barbara

    In September 1993 the U.S. Department of Education (ED) released a handbook to assist school- and community-based practitioners in designing and conducting evaluations of drug- and violence-prevention programs funded under the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA). A study was undertaken to assess the level of customer satisfaction with…

  15. Navajo Community College Funding Problems. Report by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Funding for the Navajo Community College was reviewed by the Comptroller General of the United States to determine if the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) regulations and method of computing full-time equivalent enrollments were consistent with the Tribally Controlled Community College Assistance Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-471). The investigation…

  16. Countering and Exceeding "Capital": A "Funds of Knowledge" Approach to Re-Imagining Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipin, Lew; Sellar, Sam; Hattam, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how the "funds of knowledge" approach (FoK) offers a socially just alternative to the logics of capital, by drawing on knowledge assets from students' family and community lifeworlds to build engaging and rigorous learning, supporting school-community interactions that build capacities. We explain how we applied…

  17. Does External Funding Help Adaptation? Evidence from Community-Based Water Management in the Colombian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtinho, Felipe; Eakin, Hallie; López-Carr, David; Hayes, Tanya M.

    2013-11-01

    Despite debate regarding whether, and in what form, communities need external support for adaptation to environmental change, few studies have examined how external funding impacts adaptation decisions in rural resource-dependent communities. In this article, we use quantitative and qualitative methods to assess how different funding sources influence the initiative to adapt to water scarcity in the Colombian Andes. We compare efforts to adapt to water scarcity in 111 rural Andean communities with varied dependence on external funding for water management activities. Findings suggest that despite efforts to use their own internal resources, communities often need external support to finance adaptation strategies. However, not all external financial support positively impacts a community’s abilities to adapt. Results show the importance of community-driven requests for external support. In cases where external support was unsolicited, the results show a decline, or “crowding-out,” in community efforts to adapt. In contrast, in cases where communities initiated the request for external support to fund their own projects, findings show that external intervention is more likely to enhance or “crowds-in” community-driven adaptation.

  18. A National Analysis of Noncredit Community College Education: Enrollment, Funding, Accountability, and Contextual Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Mark M.; Morgan, Grant B.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Adair, J. Lucas; Miller, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Noncredit community college enrollment accounts for approximately 40% of all enrollment in the two-year sector, or five million students (American Association of Community Colleges, 2016). Yet, this population is seldom discussed in the higher education literature due to inconsistent definitions, funding, and data reporting at the state level.…

  19. Funding to Meet the Need for Community College Education in Baltimore City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschechtelin, James D.

    A study of community college funding in Maryland found that the Community College of Baltimore (CCB) faces unique educational circumstances warranting additional state aid. These circumstances largely result from the special needs of Baltimore City, which has a disproportionate concentration of the state's poor and dependent citizens, the greatest…

  20. A National Analysis of Noncredit Community College Education: Enrollment, Funding, Accountability, and Contextual Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Mark M.; Morgan, Grant B.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Adair, J. Lucas; Miller, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Noncredit community college enrollment accounts for approximately 40% of all enrollment in the two-year sector, or five million students (American Association of Community Colleges, 2016). Yet, this population is seldom discussed in the higher education literature due to inconsistent definitions, funding, and data reporting at the state level.…

  1. Funding and expenditure of a sample of community-based organizations in Kenya, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Krivelyova, Anya; Kakietek, Jakub; Connolly, Helen; Bonnel, Rene; Manteuffel, Brigitte; Rodriguez-García, Rosalía; N'Jie, N'Della; Berruti, Andres; Gregson, Simon; Agrawal, Ruchika

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, international donors, technical specialists, and governments have come to recognize the potential of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Recent empirical studies suggest that community engagement, including the involvement of CBOs, adds value to the national response to HIV/AIDS. With the emerging evidence of the effectiveness of engaging communities in the fight against AIDS, it is crucial to understand the economic dimension of community engagement. This article provides an analysis of funding and expenditure data collected from CBOs in three African countries: Kenya, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. It presents descriptive information regarding CBO funding and expenditure and examines the factors associated with the total amount of funds received and with the proportions of the funds allocated to programmatic activities and program management and administration. An average CBO in the sample received US$29,800 annually or about US$2480 per month. The highest percentage of CBO funding (37%) came from multilateral organizations. CBOs in the sample spent most of their funds (71%) on programmatic activities including provision of treatment, support, care, impact mitigation, and treatment services. PMID:23745626

  2. Funding and expenditure of a sample of community-based organizations in Kenya, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Krivelyova, Anya; Kakietek, Jakub; Connolly, Helen; Bonnel, Rene; Manteuffel, Brigitte; Rodriguez-García, Rosalía; N'Jie, N'Della; Berruti, Andres; Gregson, Simon; Agrawal, Ruchika

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, international donors, technical specialists, and governments have come to recognize the potential of community-based organizations (CBOs) in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Recent empirical studies suggest that community engagement, including the involvement of CBOs, adds value to the national response to HIV/AIDS. With the emerging evidence of the effectiveness of engaging communities in the fight against AIDS, it is crucial to understand the economic dimension of community engagement. This article provides an analysis of funding and expenditure data collected from CBOs in three African countries: Kenya, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. It presents descriptive information regarding CBO funding and expenditure and examines the factors associated with the total amount of funds received and with the proportions of the funds allocated to programmatic activities and program management and administration. An average CBO in the sample received US$29,800 annually or about US$2480 per month. The highest percentage of CBO funding (37%) came from multilateral organizations. CBOs in the sample spent most of their funds (71%) on programmatic activities including provision of treatment, support, care, impact mitigation, and treatment services.

  3. Project Sunshine: a cook book approach to generating funds for community solar energy projects

    SciTech Connect

    Brenninger, B.; Grundy, R.

    1981-01-01

    The first Solar Energy Program in Illinois' politically conservative DuPage County was a multi-governmental sponsored program which came to be widely known as Project Sunshine. Project Sunshine was unique as a truly community project because of its support locally by schools, community colleges, youth agencies, senior citizen's groups, private sector interest groups, private community service clubs, et al. Project Sunshine also received heavy financial support through city, township, county, state, and federal funding agencies.

  4. Drawing minority students into the physics community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul

    2013-03-01

    In the past few years, the number of African-American undergraduate physics students in the US had a steady decrease with dramatic consequences at many physics departments within Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). A similar trend seems to also appear at the graduate level. HBCUs have been known to graduate more than 50% of undergraduate physics majors within this community for many years, a role that is now evaporating. The US African-American community cannot lose the historical and sometimes unnoticed impact of HBCUs in the physics community. The ability for these institutions to recruit, maintain and graduate students with the highest degree has turned a corner and is endangered with the recent closings of many programs. We not only must reverse this trend but also implement a sustainable growth for the future. This is an enormous task for the education community. While there are many outstanding and successful programs that have been developed over the years to target particular areas ranging from early K-12 exposure to producing MS and PhD students, each community/culture is different: one cannot transport someone else's experience and/or program and infuse it into another community. Moreover, the focus must now be comprehensive and not anymore single-centered. This talk will outline some ongoing efforts within the National Society of Black Physicists aimed at infusing a global approach to this problem that targets school districts (K-12) and after school programs, undergraduate and graduate programs within HBCUs, and the larger physic and scientific community.

  5. Community Parity in Federally Funded Programs. A Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recruitment Leadership and Training Inst., Philadelphia, PA.

    This paper supports the contention that community parity is an essential condition for the successful implementation of all projects supported by the U.S. Office of Education. The paper begins with a summary of the reasoning underlying this position, followed by some recommendations designed to guide planners of future government programs in…

  6. Revenue Diversification: A New Source of Funds for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightman, Richard W.

    In this period of financial austerity in education, community colleges can diversify their sources of revenue as an alternative to reducing or eliminating programs or accepting a decline in the quality of education. One such approach involves the colleges in commercial activities undertaken to support educational programs and services. Although…

  7. 75 FR 5338 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community... the 2009 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: HUD's Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing program...

  8. 78 FR 14110 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community... the 2012 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community... Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing program is authorized by Section 4 of...

  9. A map of community-based obesity prevention initiatives in Australia following obesity funding 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jillian; Love, Penny; Romanus, Anne; Pettman, Tahna; Bolton, Kristy; Smith, Erin; Gill, Tim; Coveney, John; Waters, Elizabeth; Allender, Steve

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is the single biggest public health threat to developed and developing economies. In concert with healthy public policy, multi-strategy, multi-level community-based initiatives appear promising in preventing obesity, with several countries trialling this approach. In Australia, multiple levels of government have funded and facilitated a range of community-based obesity prevention initiatives (CBI), heterogeneous in their funding, timing, target audience and structure. This paper aims to present a central repository of CBI operating in Australia during 2013, to facilitate knowledge exchange and shared opportunities for learning, and to guide professional development towards best practice for CBI practitioners. A comprehensive search of government, non-government and community websites was undertaken to identify CBI in Australia in 2013. This was supplemented with data drawn from available reports, personal communication and key informant interviews. The data was translated into an interactive map for use by preventive health practitioners and other parties. We identified 259 CBI; with the majority (84%) having a dual focus on physical activity and healthy eating. Few initiatives, (n=37) adopted a four-pronged multi-strategy approach implementing policy, built environment, social marketing and/or partnership building. This comprehensive overview of Australian CBI has the potential to facilitate engagement and collaboration through knowledge exchange and information sharing amongst CBI practitioners, funders, communities and researchers. An enhanced understanding of current practice highlights areas of strengths and opportunities for improvement to maximise the impact of obesity prevention initiatives. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  10. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  11. Research for improved health: variability and impact of structural characteristics in federally funded community engaged research.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Cythina R; Duran, Bonnie; Oetzel, John; Margarati, Maya; Villegas, Malia; Lucero, Julie; Wallerstein, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Although there is strong scientific, policy, and community support for community-engaged research (CEnR)-including community-based participatory research (CBPR)-the science of CEnR is still developing. To describe structural differences in federally funded CEnR projects by type of research (i.e., descriptive, intervention, or dissemination/policy change) and race/ethnicity of the population served. We identified 333 federally funded projects in 2009 that potentially involved CEnR, 294 principal investigators/project directors (PI/PD) were eligible to participate in a key informant (KI) survey from late 2011 to early 2012 that asked about partnership structure (68% response rate). The National Institute on Minority Health & Health Disparities (19.1%), National Cancer Institute (NCI; 13.3%), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 12.6%) funded the most CEnR projects. Most were intervention projects (66.0%). Projects serving American Indian or Alaskan Native (AIAN) populations (compared with other community of color or multiple-race/unspecified) were likely to be descriptive projects (p<.01), receive less funding (p<.05), and have higher rates of written partnership agreements (p<.05), research integrity training (p<.05), approval of publications (p<.01), and data ownership (p<.01). AIAN-serving projects also reported similar rates of research productivity and greater levels of resource sharing compared with those serving multiple-race/unspecified groups. There is clear variability in the structure of CEnR projects with future research needed to determine the impact of this variability on partnering processes and outcomes. In addition, projects in AIAN communities receive lower levels of funding yet still have comparable research productivity to those projects in other racial/ethnic communities.

  12. Funding sources and consequences: the subverting of an Indigenous community outreach program.

    PubMed

    Wearne, Ben; Chesters, Janice; Whyte, Sue

    2006-01-01

    The Yolngu people of North-east Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia, have lived with alcohol for just over 30 years. For some it has had devastating health, social, family and cultural impacts. This is particularly the case for a group of Yolngu people who permanently or transiently camp on the fringes of the predominately non-Indigenous township of Nhulunbuy. The Miwatj Health Aboriginal Corporation Outreach Program was a response to alcohol use by this Aboriginal community. An evaluation, in consultation with Miwatj Health, sought to examine the conception, development and success of the Outreach Program. This was a qualitative study that used: unconcealed participant observation, formal semi-structured interviews, group interviews, opportunistic impromptu discussion, and documentary/archival review. Interviews were conducted with Outreach Program staff, Yolngu community members, Aboriginal health workers, Miwatj Health doctors, Living with Alcohol representatives, the town administrator, Nhulunbuy police sergeant, the publican and local council officer. Group interviews were conducted with two groups of campers, Outreach Program workers and Aboriginal health care workers. For the Yolngu people the focus of the Outreach Program was meant to be on talking with and counselling drinkers, cultural activities, and liaising with other substance misuse programs and the police. The Outreach Program has achieved some success and helped a small number of Yolngu to limit their alcohol use and reconnect with the community. However, the Outreach Program has come to focus more and more on cleaning up litter; a key issue for the non-Indigenous community. This article focused on one key finding from the evaluation and that is the impact that funding (or lack of funding), the source of funding and the parameters imposed by funding bodies can have on the success or otherwise of a community driven program. The ability of Indigenous communities to determine appropriate

  13. Research for Improved Health: Variability and Impact of Structural Characteristics in Federally Funded Community Engaged Research

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Cythina R.; Duran, Bonnie; Oetzel, John; Margarati, Maya; Villegas, Malia; Lucero, Julie; Wallerstein, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there is strong scientific, policy, and community support for community-engaged research (CEnR)—including community-based participatory research (CBPR)—the science of CEnR is still developing. Objective To describe structural differences in federally funded CEnR projects by type of research (i.e., descriptive, intervention, or dissemination/policy change) and race/ethnicity of the population served. Methods We identified 333 federally funded projects in 2009 that potentially involved CEnR, 294 principal investigators/project directors (PI/PD) were eligible to participate in a key informant (KI) survey from late 2011 to early 2012 that asked about partnership structure (68% response rate). Results The National Institute on Minority Health & Health Disparities (19.1%), National Cancer Institute (NCI; 13.3%), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 12.6%) funded the most CEnR projects. Most were intervention projects (66.0%). Projects serving American Indian or Alaskan Native (AIAN) populations (compared with other community of color or multiple-race/unspecified) were likely to be descriptive projects (p < .01), receive less funding (p < .05), and have higher rates of written partnership agreements (p < .05), research integrity training (p < .05), approval of publications (p < .01), and data ownership (p < .01). AIAN-serving projects also reported similar rates of research productivity and greater levels of resource sharing compared with those serving multiple-race/unspecified groups. Conclusions There is clear variability in the structure of CEnR projects with future research needed to determine the impact of this variability on partnering processes and outcomes. In addition, projects in AIAN communities receive lower levels of funding yet still have comparable research productivity to those projects in other racial/ethnic communities. PMID:25981421

  14. Community wide interventions for increasing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Baker, Philip R A; Francis, Daniel P; Soares, Jesus; Weightman, Alison L; Foster, Charles

    2015-01-05

    Multi-strategic community wide interventions for physical activity are increasingly popular but their ability to achieve population level improvements is unknown. To evaluate the effects of community wide, multi-strategic interventions upon population levels of physical activity. We searched the Cochrane Public Health Group Segment of the Cochrane Register of Studies,The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in Process, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, ASSIA, the British Nursing Index, Chinese CNKI databases, EPPI Centre (DoPHER, TRoPHI), ERIC, HMIC, Sociological Abstracts, SPORT Discus, Transport Database and Web of Science (Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index). We also scanned websites of the EU Platform on Diet, Physical Activity and Health; Health-Evidence.org; the International Union for Health Promotion and Education; the NIHR Coordinating Centre for Health Technology (NCCHTA); the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and NICE and SIGN guidelines. Reference lists of all relevant systematic reviews, guidelines and primary studies were searched and we contacted experts in the field. The searches were updated to 16 January 2014, unrestricted by language or publication status. Cluster randomised controlled trials, randomised controlled trials, quasi-experimental designs which used a control population for comparison, interrupted time-series studies, and prospective controlled cohort studies were included. Only studies with a minimum six-month follow up from the start of the intervention to measurement of outcomes were included. Community wide interventions had to comprise at least two broad strategies aimed at physical activity for the whole population. Studies which randomised individuals from the same community were excluded. At least two review authors independently extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias. Each study was assessed for the setting, the number of included components

  15. Fiscal Year 1978 State Funding Claims Processed and Paid by the Illinois Community College Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, R. Michael; Wellman, Fred L.

    The appropriation, payments, and amounts lapsed during fiscal year (FY) 1978 of state aid payments for the public community colleges in Illinois are outlined in tabular form. A total of $111,771,600 was appropriated from the State General Revenue Funds for the colleges in FY 1978. Of that amount, only $108,749,229.98 actually was paid out. The…

  16. Measuring Institutional Effectiveness of California Community Colleges through Existing Governance Structures and External Funding Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson-Meledy, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the differing structures of governance within the California Community College (CCC) system in relation to resource development and grant management. This is to explain how governance may impact the effectiveness of institutions to strengthen services to students with funding resources secured through…

  17. The Massachusetts Community College Performance-Based Funding Formula: A New Model for New England?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon-Fernandez, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The Massachusetts community college system is entering a second year with funding for each of its 15 schools determined using a new performance-based formula. Under the new model, 50% of each college's allocation is based on performance on metrics related to enrollment and student success, with added incentives for "at-risk" students…

  18. 75 FR 38514 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Notice of Funding Availability for the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Community Challenge Planning Grants and the Department of Transportation's TIGER II Planning Grants Correction In notice document 2010-15353 beginning on page 36246 in the...

  19. Measuring Institutional Effectiveness of California Community Colleges through Existing Governance Structures and External Funding Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson-Meledy, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the differing structures of governance within the California Community College (CCC) system in relation to resource development and grant management. This is to explain how governance may impact the effectiveness of institutions to strengthen services to students with funding resources secured through…

  20. Initiating a Fund-Raising Program: A Model for the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Advancement and Support of Education, Washington, DC.

    Prepared to assist community colleges in improving their ability to raise money from the private sector, this monograph guides educators from the exploratory phase into the actual implementation of a new fund-raising program. Chapter 1 raises considerations that should be addressed before a college decides to initiate a major private-sector…

  1. Community investment in wind farms: funding structure effects in wind energy infrastructure development.

    PubMed

    Beery, Joshua A; Day, Jennifer E

    2015-03-03

    Wind energy development is an increasingly popular form of renewable energy infrastructure in rural areas. Communities generally perceive socioeconomic benefits accrue and that community funding structures are preferable to corporate structures, yet lack supporting quantitative data to inform energy policy. This study uses the Everpower wind development, to be located in Midwestern Ohio, as a hypothetical modeling environment to identify and examine socioeconomic impact trends arising from corporate, community and diversified funding structures. Analysis of five National Renewable Energy Laboratory Jobs and Economic Development Impact models incorporating local economic data and review of relevant literature were conducted. The findings suggest that community and diversified funding structures exhibit 40-100% higher socioeconomic impact levels than corporate structures. Prioritization of funding sources and retention of federal tax incentives were identified as key elements. The incorporation of local shares was found to mitigate the negative effects of foreign private equity, local debt financing increased economic output and opportunities for private equity investment were identified. The results provide the groundwork for energy policies focused to maximize socioeconomic impacts while creating opportunities for inclusive economic participation and improved social acceptance levels fundamental to the deployment of renewable energy technology.

  2. State Funding of Contract Courses at Community Colleges: The First Year. Analysis Paper No. 824.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Office for Community Colleges.

    Focusing on the period from September 1981 to September 1982, this report describes issues and activities related to New York State's funding of contract courses at the community colleges of the State University of New York (SUNY). Introductory material notes that since the passage of authorizing legislation, about 45,000 employees of more than…

  3. 75 FR 34488 - Community Development Revolving Loan Fund for Credit Unions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... NCUA Web site. ADDRESSES: Applications for participation may also be obtained from and should be... Administration. ACTION: Notice of application period. SUMMARY: The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) will accept applications for participation in the Community Development Revolving Loan Fund's Loan...

  4. The Massachusetts Community College Performance-Based Funding Formula: A New Model for New England?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon-Fernandez, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The Massachusetts community college system is entering a second year with funding for each of its 15 schools determined using a new performance-based formula. Under the new model, 50% of each college's allocation is based on performance on metrics related to enrollment and student success, with added incentives for "at-risk" students…

  5. State Share of Instruction Funding to Ohio Public Community Colleges: A Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated various state policies to determine their impact on the state share of instruction (SSI) funding to community colleges in the state of Ohio. To complete the policy analysis, the researcher utilized three policy analysis tools, defined by Gill and Saunders (2010) as iterative processes, intuition and judgment, and advice and…

  6. Going Lean: Impending Money Woes Force Tough Choices, Forecast Fundamental Shift in Community College Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joch, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The numbers were already bad, and they keep getting worse, for the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD). Given the weak economy, administrators planned for a 5 percent reduction in state funding in the 2010-11 academic year. The actual reduction ballooned to more than 7.5 percent, an additional $13 million that DCCCD would be forced to…

  7. Going Lean: Impending Money Woes Force Tough Choices, Forecast Fundamental Shift in Community College Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joch, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The numbers were already bad, and they keep getting worse, for the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD). Given the weak economy, administrators planned for a 5 percent reduction in state funding in the 2010-11 academic year. The actual reduction ballooned to more than 7.5 percent, an additional $13 million that DCCCD would be forced to…

  8. Emerging Issues and Critical Trends Affecting Fund Raising by Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Spencer

    This paper discusses fund raising in America's community colleges. During 1997, approximately 1,755 two-year colleges in the United States enrolled more than 5.4 million first-time college freshmen, or 46% of the total students in higher education. However, these colleges received only five percent of the private financial support given to…

  9. Impacts of agency coordination on nonprofit domestic violence and sexual assault programs in communities with STOP formula grant funding.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Janine M; Burt, Martha R

    2004-10-01

    The goals of the current study are (a) to understand the community and state context in which STOP(Services* Training* Officers* Prosecutors)-funded victim service (VS) programs operate, (b) to assess the degree to which receipt of STOP funding for VS programs and the degree of state-level STOP agency support for collaboration among community agencies have led to improved program services and community interaction, and (c) to assess the degree to which improved interaction between community agencies leads to improvements for VS programs. The results show that community interaction between VS programs and other community agencies can improve VS program services as reported by service providers. In addition, the higher the pre-STOP levels of activity around violence against women issues in communities, the more agencies can enhance their service system with STOP funding. Also, STOP funding has facilitated greater levels of change for communities whose pre-STOP attention to violence against women was lower.

  10. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors.

  11. Slush Fund: Modeling the Multiphase Physics of Oceanic Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, J.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of ice interacting with an ocean, both on Earth and throughout the solar system, and its crucial role as the mediator of exchange between the hydrosphere below and atmosphere above, have made quantifying the thermodynamic, chemical, and physical properties of the ice highly desirable. While direct observations of these quantities exist, their scarcity increases with the difficulty of obtainment; the basal surfaces of terrestrial ice shelves remain largely unexplored and the icy interiors of moons like Europa and Enceladus have never been directly observed. Our understanding of these entities thus relies on numerical simulation, and the efficacy of their incorporation into larger systems models is dependent on the accuracy of these initial simulations. One characteristic of seawater, likely shared by the oceans of icy moons, is that it is a solution. As such, when it is frozen a majority of the solute is rejected from the forming ice, concentrating in interstitial pockets and channels, producing a two-component reactive porous media known as a mushy layer. The multiphase nature of this layer affects the evolution and dynamics of the overlying ice mass. Additionally ice can form in the water column and accrete onto the basal surface of these ice masses via buoyancy driven sedimentation as frazil or platelet ice. Numerical models hoping to accurately represent ice-ocean interactions should include the multiphase behavior of these two phenomena. While models of sea ice have begun to incorporate multiphase physics into their capabilities, no models of ice shelves/shells explicitly account for the two-phase behavior of the ice-ocean interface. Here we present a 1D multiphase model of floating oceanic ice that includes parameterizations of both density driven advection within the `mushy layer' and buoyancy driven sedimentation. The model is validated against contemporary sea ice models and observational data. Environmental stresses such as supercooling and

  12. 45 CFR 96.101 - Review of a State decision to discontinue funding of a community health center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Review of a State decision to discontinue funding of a community health center. 96.101 Section 96.101 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Primary Care Block Grants § 96.101 Review of a State decision to discontinue funding of a community...

  13. Should community-based services be publicly funded or contracted out?

    PubMed

    Lyzwinski, Lynnette Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    The introduction of Canada's Medicare in 1966 established precedence for a universally accessible and equitable healthcare system. Although Canada has been a leader in building the foundations of socialized medicine, it has stalled short of fulfilling a vision promulgated by its architects of a system that operates on a continuum of care. The aim of this review was to examine whether the expansion of publicly funded services under the Canada Health Act would be an economically and socially viable policy option. A literature review of the direct and indirect social and economic costs associated with contracting out community-based services in the form of outpatient rehabilitative care, palliative care, and home care was conducted. This article concludes that the private financing of community-based services increases healthcare costs in the long term through increased density and frequency of acute care utilization. It is associated with increased indirect costs in the form of caregiver burden and reduced labor market participation of informal caregivers. The expansion of publicly funded community-based services minimizes these direct health and indirect societal costs. The integration of publicly funded community-based services under the Canada Health Act would ensure that the principles of Medicare in the form of equity and accessibility would be enforced while maintaining an economically sustainable healthcare system.

  14. Physical Heterogeneity and Aquatic Community Function in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The geomorphological character of a river network provides the template upon which evolution acts to create unique biological communities. Deciphering commonly observed patterns and processes within riverine landscapes resulting from the interplay between physical and biological components is a central tenet for the interdisciplinary field of river science. Relationships between the physical heterogeneity and food web character of functional process zones (FPZs) – large tracts of river with a similar geomorphic character - in the Kanawha River (West Virginia, USA) are examined in this study. Food web character was measured as food chain length (FCL), which reflects ecological community structure and ecosystem function. Our results show the same basal resources were present throughout the Kanawha River but their assimilation into the aquatic food web by primary consumers differed between FPZs. Differences in the trophic position of secondary consumers – fish - were also recorded between FPZs. Overall, both the morphological heterogeneity and heterogeneity of the river bed sediment of FPZs were significantly correlated with FCL. Specifically, FCL increases with greater FPZ physical heterogeneity, supporting tenet 8 of the river ecosystem synthesis. In previous research efforts, we delineated the functional process zones (FPZs) of the Kanawha River. In this study, we examined the relationship between the hydrogeomorphically-derived zones with food webs.

  15. Community wide interventions for increasing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Baker, Philip Ra; Francis, Daniel P; Soares, Jesus; Weightman, Alison L; Foster, Charles

    2011-04-13

    Multi-strategic community wide interventions for physical activity are increasingly popular but their ability to achieve population level improvements is unknown. To evaluate the effects of community wide, multi-strategic interventions upon population levels of physical activity. We searched the Cochrane Public Health Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in Process, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, ASSIA, The British Nursing Index, Chinese CNKI databases, EPPI Centre (DoPHER, TRoPHI), ERIC, HMIC, Sociological Abstracts, SPORTDiscus, Transport Database and Web of Science (Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index). We also scanned websites of the EU Platform on Diet, Physical Activity and Health; Health-Evidence.ca; the International Union for Health Promotion and Education; the NIHR Coordinating Centre for Health Technology (NCCHTA) and NICE and SIGN guidelines. Reference lists of all relevant systematic reviews, guidelines and primary studies were followed up. We contacted experts in the field from the National Obesity Observatory Oxford, Oxford University; Queensland Health, Queensland University of Technology, the University of Central Queensland; the University of Tennessee and Washington University; and handsearched six relevant journals. The searches were last updated to the end of November 2009 and were not restricted by language or publication status. Cluster randomised controlled trials, randomised controlled trials (RCT), quasi-experimental designs which used a control population for comparison, interrupted time-series (ITS) studies, and prospective controlled cohort studies (PCCS) were included. Only studies with a minimum six-month follow up from the start of the intervention to measurement of outcomes were included. Community wide interventions had to comprise at least two broad strategies aimed at physical activity for the whole population. Studies which randomised

  16. Sharing of Grant Funds between Academic Institutions and ­Community Partners in Community‐Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Katrice D.; Theurer, Jacqueline R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To determine how grant funds are shared between academic institutions and community partners in community‐based participatory research (CBPR). Methods Review of all 62 investigator‐initiated R01 CBPR grants funded by the National Institutes of Health from January 2005 to August 2012. Using prespecified criteria, two reviewers independently categorized each budget item as being for an academic institution or a community partner. A third reviewer helped resolve any discrepancies. Results Among 49 evaluable grants, 68% of all grant funds were for academic institutions and 30% were for community partners. For 2% of funds, it was unclear whether they were for academic institutions or for community partners. Community partners’ share of funds was highest in the categories of other direct costs (62%) and other personnel (48%) and lowest in the categories of equipment (1%) and indirect costs (7%). Conclusions A majority of CBPR grant funds are allocated to academic institutions. In order to enhance the share that community partners receive, funders may wish to specify a minimum proportion of grant funds that should be allocated to community partners in CBPR projects. PMID:24655929

  17. A theory-based evaluation of a community-based funding scheme in a disadvantaged suburban city area.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Gráinne; McGilloway, Sinead; O'Brien, Morgan; Leckey, Yvonne; Devlin, Maurice

    2015-10-01

    Community-driven development (CDD) initiatives frequently involve funding schemes which are aimed at channelling financial investment into local need and fostering community participation and engagement. This exploratory study examined, through a program theory approach, the design and implementation of a small-scale, community-based fund in Ireland. Observations, documentary analysis, interviews and group discussions with 19 participants were utilized to develop a detailed understanding of the program mechanisms, activities and processes, as well as the experiences of key stakeholders engaged with the funding scheme and its implementation. The findings showed that there were positive perceptions of the scheme and its function within the community. Overall, the availability of funding was perceived by key stakeholders as being beneficial. However, there were concerns over the accessibility of the scheme for more marginalized members of the community, as well as dissatisfaction with the openness and transparency surrounding funding eligibility. Lessons for the implementation of small-scale CDD funds are elaborated and the utility of program theory approaches for evaluators and planners working with programs that fund community-based initiatives is outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Out-of-School TIme and Community School Initiatives. Revised and Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgette, Heather Clapp

    Noting the growing nation-wide demand for affordable, high-quality, out-of-school time and community school programs, this guide is intended to assist program developers, policy makers, and community leaders identify federal funding sources to support out-of-school time or broader-based community school services. The guide provides an overview of…

  19. Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Out-of-School TIme and Community School Initiatives. Revised and Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgette, Heather Clapp

    Noting the growing nation-wide demand for affordable, high-quality, out-of-school time and community school programs, this guide is intended to assist program developers, policy makers, and community leaders identify federal funding sources to support out-of-school time or broader-based community school services. The guide provides an overview of…

  20. Financing health care at the local level: the community drug funds of Honduras.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, J L; Wight, J B

    2000-01-01

    In response to UNICEF's Bamako Initiative, hundreds of privately run Community Drug Funds were established in Honduras during the 1990s, generally under the auspices of a non-government organization and usually with the financial assistance of international agencies. Honduras' Community Drug Funds (CDF) are rotating drug funds intended to: (1) serve as a means of increasing access to care in isolated rural populations, (2) promote the more rational use of medicines and (3) promote community participation in the financing and oversight of primary health care activities. This study is the first to analyse empirically the impact and efficiency of these institutions, relying upon primary data obtained from a survey of 51 of the 450 active CDFs in Honduras. Archival data from Ministry of Health and other sources were also analysed. The structure, operations, and impact of CDFs are detailed, with special attention given to access and quality of care issues. The study found that CDFs are rapidly becoming under-capitalized because of basic management problems, principally in pricing and in medicine purchasing practices. These shortcomings, and more generally, increasing financial pressures on NGO sponsors, are negatively affecting quality and access to care. Given the rate of erosion in CDF assets, unless they are recapitalized, the current average estimated lifespan of a CDF is 5.5 years. If these funds are to be sustainable, changes in their financing, training and supervision will be required. In addressing these issues, Honduran health policy-makers must decide how best to balance the competing goals of holding down costs, while maintaining adequate quality and improving access to care.

  1. Nobel Prize In Physics Awarded To Astronomer For NASA-Funded Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    Riccardo Giacconi, the "father of X-ray astronomy," has received the Nobel Prize in physics for "pioneering contributions to astrophysics," which have led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources. Giaconni, president of the Associated Universities Inc., in Washington, and Research Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, discovered the first X-ray stars and the X-ray background in the 1960s and conceived of and led the implementation of the Uhuru and High Energy Astronomy Observatory-2 (HEAO-2) X-ray observatories in the 1970s. With funding from NASA, he also detected sources of X-rays that most astronomers now consider to contain black holes. Giacconi said that receiving the award confirms the importance of X-ray astronomy. "I think I'm one of the first to get the Nobel prize for work with NASA, so that's good for NASA and I think it's also good for the field," he said. "It's also nice for all the other people who've worked in this field. I recognize that I was never alone. I'm happy for me personally, I'm happy for my family, and I'm happy for the field and for NASA," Giacconi added. In 1976, Giacconi along with Harvey Tananbaum of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass., submitted a proposal letter to NASA to initiate the study and design of a large X-ray telescope. In 1977 work began on the program, which was then known as the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and in 1998 renamed the Chandra X-ray Observatory. "Partnerships with universities and scientists are essential in our quest to answer the fundamental questions of the universe," said Dr. Ed Weiler, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science, Headquarters, Washington. "Dr. Giacconi's achievements are a brilliant example of this synergy among NASA, universities and their community of scientists and students," he said. Giacconi is Principal Investigator for the ultradeep survey with Chandra - the "Chandra Deep Field South" - that has

  2. Review of the Community College System's Performance-Based Program Budgeting Measures and Incentive Fund. Report 97-49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

    This report addresses the Florida Community College System's (FCCS) performance based on measures established by the General Appropriations Act. Discussed are: (1) FCCS' performance on the measures used in the performance-based budgeting (PBB) incentive fund; (2) improvements that can be made to the PBB incentive fund; and (3) changes to community…

  3. Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Out-of-School Time and Community School Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reder, Nancy D.

    Noting the increasing need for improved access to quality after-school services, this guide to federal funding sources for out-of-school time programs and community schools (OST/CS) is designed to assist program leaders, policymakers, and others in nonprofit, public, and private organizations in taking advantage of federal funding opportunities.…

  4. Securing Funding in Rural Programs for Young Handicapped Children. Making It Work in Rural Communities. A Rural Network Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Corinne Welt, Comp.

    The problem of securing funds to support programs for the young handicapped child is a major one for rural service providers. The process of securing funds from within the rural community itself should include nine steps: (1) defining the needy; (2) determining responsibility; (3) identifying resources; (4) considering the message; (5) choosing…

  5. Preference and Priority in Federal Funding: Aligning Federal Resources to Maximize Program Investment Efficiency and Impacts in Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the document, Preference and Priority in Federal Funding: Aligning Federal Resources to Maximize Program Investment Efficiency and Impacts in Communities - Lessons from EPA’s Brownfields Program.

  6. Funding, Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Micah

    2009-01-01

    I show herein how to develop fundable proposals to support your research. Although the proposal strategy I discuss is commonly used in successful proposals, most junior faculty (and many senior scholars) in political science and other social sciences seem to be unaware of it. I dispel myths about funding, and discuss how to find funders and target…

  7. Funding, Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Micah

    2009-01-01

    I show herein how to develop fundable proposals to support your research. Although the proposal strategy I discuss is commonly used in successful proposals, most junior faculty (and many senior scholars) in political science and other social sciences seem to be unaware of it. I dispel myths about funding, and discuss how to find funders and target…

  8. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-01-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged. PMID:24334331

  9. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-02-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged.

  10. Engaging the Community to Improve Nutrition and Physical Activity Among Houses of Worship

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Shawna V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been linked to many chronic diseases. Research indicates that interventions in community-based settings such as houses of worship can build on attendees’ trust to address health issues and help them make behavioral changes. Community Context New Brunswick, New Jersey, has low rates of physical activity and a high prevalence of obesity. An adapted community-based intervention was implemented there to improve nutrition and physical activity among people who attend houses of worship and expand and enhance the network of partners working with Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Methods An adapted version of Body & Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Living and Eating was created using a 3-phase model to 1) educate lay members on nutrition and physical activity, 2) provide sustainable change through the development of physical activity programming, and 3) increase access to local produce through collaborations with community partners. Outcome Nineteen houses of worship were selected for participation in this program. Houses of worship provided a questionnaire to a convenience sample of its congregation to assess congregants’ physical activity levels and produce consumption behaviors at baseline using questions from the Health Information National Trends Survey instrument. This information was also used to inform future program activities. Interpretation Community-based health education can be a promising approach when appropriate partnerships are identified, funding is adequate, ongoing information is extracted to inform future action, and there is an expectation from all parties of long-term engagement and capacity building. PMID:24625362

  11. Wait Times for Publicly Funded Outpatient and Community Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Services: Implications for the Increasing Number of Persons with Chronic Conditions in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Passalent, Laura A.; Landry, Michel D.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Timely access to publicly funded health services has emerged as a priority policy issue across the continuum of care from hospitals to the home and community sector. The purpose of this study was to examine wait lists and wait times for publicly funded outpatient and community occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) services. Methods: A mailed self-administered questionnaire was sent in December 2005 to all publicly funded sites across Ontario that deliver outpatient or community OT or PT services (N = 374). Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study sample and to examine wait lists and wait times by setting and client condition. Results: Overall response rate was 57.2% (n = 214). More than 10,000 people were reported to be waiting for OT or PT services across Ontario. Of these, 16% (n = 1,664) were waiting for OT and 84% (n = 8,842) for PT. Of those waiting for OT, 59% had chronic conditions and half were waiting for home care rehabilitation services. Of those waiting for PT, 73% had chronic conditions and 81% were waiting at hospital outpatient departments. Conclusions: Individuals with chronic conditions experience excessive wait times for outpatient and community OT and PT services in Ontario, particularly if they are waiting for services in hospital outpatient departments. PMID:20145747

  12. 76 FR 30376 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ...] Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable... Availability (NOFA) for the Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing grants...-9999 or visit the HUD Web site at http://www.hud.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: HUD's...

  13. An Examination of the Relationships among Student Services Expenditures, Pell Grant Funding, and Completion Rates at Public Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racioppi, Gerald William

    2014-01-01

    Because of shrinking budgets, increasing demand, and calls for more graduates, community college leaders are forced to make difficult resource allocation decisions. In many states, sizable percentages of the state funds available to community colleges are conditional on performance measures, including graduations; the number of states with funding…

  14. An Analysis of Programs Serving Men of Color in the Community College: An Examination of Funding Streams, Interventions, and Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keflezighi, Fnann; Sebahari, Levi; Wood, J. Luke

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to assess the effectiveness of community college initiatives serving men of color when there is a lack of understanding of the nature of the programming taking place. The purpose of this study was to understand the funding streams, interventions, and objectives of programs serving men of color in the community college. This study…

  15. Engaging community college students in physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Megan; Napoli, Maria; Lubin, Arica; Kramer, Liu-Yen; Aguirre, Ofelia; Kuhn, Jens-Uwe; Arnold, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    Recruiting talent and fostering innovation in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) disciplines demands that we attract, educate, and retain a larger and more diverse cohort of students. In this regard, Community Colleges (CC), serving a disproportionate number of underrepresented minority, female and nontraditional students, represent a pool of potential talent that, due to a misguided perception of its students as being less capable, often remains untapped. We will present our strategies to attract and support the academic advancement of CC students in the STEM fields through our NSF-sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduates program entitled Internships in Nanosystems Science Engineering and Technology (INSET). For more than a decade, INSET has offered a physics research projects to CC students. The key components of INSET success are: 1) the involvement of CC faculty with a strong interest in promoting student success in all aspects of program planning and execution; 2) the design of activities that provide the level of support that students might need because of lack of confidence and/or unfamiliarity with a university environment; and 3) setting clear goals and high performance expectations.

  16. Feasibility of introducing compulsory community health fund in low resource countries: views from the communities in Liwale district of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Marwa, Boniphace; Njau, Bernard; Kessy, Joachim; Mushi, Declare

    2013-08-08

    In 1995, Tanzania introduced the voluntary Community Health Fund (CHF) with the aim of ensuring universal health coverage by increasing financial investment in the health sector. The uptake of the CHF is low, with an enrolment of only 6% compared to the national target of 75%. Mandatory models of community health financing have been suggested to increase enrolment and financial capacity. This study explores communities' views on the introduction of a mandatory model, the Compulsory Community Health Fund (CCHF) in the Liwale district of Tanzania. A cross-sectional study which involved 387 participants in a structured face to face survey and 33 in qualitative interviews (26 in focus group discussions (FGD) and 7 in in-depth interviews (IDI). Structured survey data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 to produce descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. 387 people completed a survey (58% males), mean age 38 years. Most participants (347, 89.7%) were poor subsistence farmers and 229 (59.2%) had never subscribed to any form of health insurance scheme. The idea of a CCHF was accepted by 221 (57%) survey participants. Reasons for accepting the CCHF included: reduced out of pocket expenditure, improved quality of health care and the removal of stigma for those who receive waivers at health care delivery points. The major reason for not accepting the CCHF was the poor quality of health care services currently offered. Participants suggested that enrolment to the CCHF be done after harvesting when the population were more likely to have disposable income, and that the quality care of care and benefits package be improved. The CHF is acceptable to the most of study participants and feasible in rural Tanzania as an alternative mechanism to finance health care for the rural poor. Community members are willing to join the scheme provided they are well informed, involved in the design and implementation, and assured quality health care. Strong

  17. Getting to know the competition: a content analysis of publicly and corporate funded physical activity advertisements.

    PubMed

    Berry, Tanya R; McCarville, Ron E; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a content analysis of physical activity advertisements in an effort to determine which advertisements were more likely to include features that may attract and maintain attention levels. Fifty-seven advertisements were collected from top circulation Canadian magazines. The advertisements ranged from publicly funded health promotion pieces to corporate sponsored advertisements using physical activity to sell a product. Advertisements were examined for textual and pictorial factors thought to increase attention allocated to advertising of this nature. Only two public health advertisements were found, and the majority of advertisements (57.9%) were from commercial advertisers using physical activity images to sell products or to encourage brand recognition. The advertisements originating with the private sector tended to possess most of the characteristics thought to attract the attention of readers. Once this attention was gained, however, most of these advertisements failed to highlight the benefits of physical activity. As a result, the positive effect of these advertisements may have been compromised. Public health advertisements were so infrequent that we could not compare their characteristics with those originating with the private sector. The characteristics with those we did find were inconsistent with those thought to attract and maintain attention levels. Results are discussed in terms of potential implications for promoting physical activity.

  18. Engaging the community to improve nutrition and physical activity among houses of worship.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kiameesha R; Hudson, Shawna V

    2014-03-13

    Obesity, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been linked to many chronic diseases. Research indicates that interventions in community-based settings such as houses of worship can build on attendees' trust to address health issues and help them make behavioral changes. New Brunswick, New Jersey, has low rates of physical activity and a high prevalence of obesity. An adapted community-based intervention was implemented there to improve nutrition and physical activity among people who attend houses of worship and expand and enhance the network of partners working with Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. An adapted version of Body & Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Living and Eating was created using a 3-phase model to 1) educate lay members on nutrition and physical activity, 2) provide sustainable change through the development of physical activity programming, and 3) increase access to local produce through collaborations with community partners. Nineteen houses of worship were selected for participation in this program. Houses of worship provided a questionnaire to a convenience sample of its congregation to assess congregants' physical activity levels and produce consumption behaviors at baseline using questions from the Health Information National Trends Survey instrument. This information was also used to inform future program activities. Community-based health education can be a promising approach when appropriate partnerships are identified, funding is adequate, ongoing information is extracted to inform future action, and there is an expectation from all parties of long-term engagement and capacity building.

  19. From brothel to boardroom: prospects for community leadership of HIV interventions in the context of global funding practices.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Flora; Campbell, Catherine; Shukla, Anuprita; Banerji, Riddhi

    2012-05-01

    The empowerment of marginalised communities to lead local responses to HIV/AIDS is a key strategy of funding agencies' globalised HIV/AIDS policies, given evidence that disempowerment is a root source of vulnerability to HIV. We report on two multi-level ethnographies at the interface between HIV prevention projects for sex workers in India and their funding environment, examining the extent to which the funding environment itself promotes or undermines sex worker empowerment. We show how the 'new managerialism' characteristic of the funding system undermines sex worker leadership of HIV interventions. By requiring local projects to conform to global management standards, funding agencies risk undermining the very localism and empowerment that their intervention policies espouse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility of introducing compulsory community health fund in low resource countries: views from the communities in Liwale district of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1995, Tanzania introduced the voluntary Community Health Fund (CHF) with the aim of ensuring universal health coverage by increasing financial investment in the health sector. The uptake of the CHF is low, with an enrolment of only 6% compared to the national target of 75%. Mandatory models of community health financing have been suggested to increase enrolment and financial capacity. This study explores communities’ views on the introduction of a mandatory model, the Compulsory Community Health Fund (CCHF) in the Liwale district of Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional study which involved 387 participants in a structured face to face survey and 33 in qualitative interviews (26 in focus group discussions (FGD) and 7 in in-depth interviews (IDI). Structured survey data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 to produce descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. Results 387 people completed a survey (58% males), mean age 38 years. Most participants (347, 89.7%) were poor subsistence farmers and 229 (59.2%) had never subscribed to any form of health insurance scheme. The idea of a CCHF was accepted by 221 (57%) survey participants. Reasons for accepting the CCHF included: reduced out of pocket expenditure, improved quality of health care and the removal of stigma for those who receive waivers at health care delivery points. The major reason for not accepting the CCHF was the poor quality of health care services currently offered. Participants suggested that enrolment to the CCHF be done after harvesting when the population were more likely to have disposable income, and that the quality care of care and benefits package be improved. Conclusions The CHF is acceptable to the most of study participants and feasible in rural Tanzania as an alternative mechanism to finance health care for the rural poor. Community members are willing to join the scheme provided they are well informed, involved in the design and implementation

  1. Medicaid Expansion And Grant Funding Increases Helped Improve Community Health Center Capacity.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinxin; Luo, Qian; Ku, Leighton

    2017-01-01

    Through the expansion of Medicaid eligibility and increases in core federal grant funding, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) sought to increase the capacity of community health centers to provide primary care to low-income populations. We examined the effects of the ACA Medicaid expansion and changes in federal grant levels on the centers' numbers of patients, percentages of patients by type of insurance, and numbers of visits from 2012 to 2015. In the period after expansion (2014-15), health centers in expansion states had a 5 percent higher total patient volume, larger shares of Medicaid patients, smaller shares of uninsured patients, and increases in overall visits and mental health visits, compared to centers in nonexpansion states. Increases in federal grant funding levels were associated with increases in numbers of patients and of overall, medical, and preventive service visits. If federal grant levels are not sustained after 2017, there could be marked reductions in health center capacity in both expansion and nonexpansion states. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  2. Is community-based ecotourism a good use of biodiversity conservation funds?

    PubMed

    Kiss, Agnes

    2004-05-01

    Community-based ecotourism (CBET) has become a popular tool for biodiversity conservation, based on the principle that biodiversity must pay for itself by generating economic benefits, particularly for local people. There are many examples of projects that produce revenues for local communities and improve local attitudes towards conservation, but the contribution of CBET to conservation and local economic development is limited by factors such as the small areas and few people involved, limited earnings, weak linkages between biodiversity gains and commercial success, and the competitive and specialized nature of the tourism industry. Many CBET projects cited as success stories actually involve little change in existing local land and resource-use practices, provide only a modest supplement to local livelihoods, and remain dependent on external support for long periods, if not indefinitely. Investment in CBET might be justified in cases where such small changes and benefits can yield significant conservation and social benefits, although it must still be recognized as requiring a long term funding commitment. Here, I aim to identify conditions under which CBET is, and is not, likely to be effective, efficient and sustainable compared with alternative approaches for conserving biodiversity. I also highlight the need for better data and more rigorous analysis of both conservation and economic impacts.

  3. Contributions to a herpetological community of practice: Funds of knowledge of Lumbee youth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Mary Callis

    ASH, MARY CALLIS, Ph.D. Contributions to a Herpetological Community of Practice: Funds of Knowledge of Lumbee Youth. (2015) Directed by Dr. Catherine Matthews. 348 pp. American Indian K-12 students comprise less than 1% of the student population in the US. In southeastern North Carolina, the largest North Carolina tribe of American Indians, Lumbees, live and attend schools where they often perform poorly on standardized tests. The Lumbee Indians generally live in areas that are rural and economically disadvantaged and they speak a dialect of English, which is seldom heard except near their homeland. Away from their homeland, Lumbee speech is often construed as non-Standard English. The Lumbees have close knit family relationships and where you come from and where you live are important facts to assess. Because Lumbees live in rural areas, they are often involved in outdoor activities such as hunting, fishing, and gardening. They have a strong sense of place, particularly regarding the Lumber River, which runs through their homeland. Historically, schools, community organizations and universities have not provided sufficient informal science education opportunities for Lumbee youth. The purpose of this study was to document the experiences of nine Lumbee youths at a residential, week-long herpetological education experience for Lumbee students and others. The Funds of Knowledge (FoK) that these students brought to this experience and how these FoK were integrated into the herpetology program's Community of Practice (CoP) were examined. A mixed methods, ethnographically inspired, single case study was conducted and both qualitative and quantitative data were collected. Data collected included individual interviews, pre/post-tests, pre/post-surveys, observations and field notes. Analyses of qualitative and quantitative data demonstrated specific FoK of these Lumbee youths and the strategies they employed to be dynamic, contributing members of the informal science

  4. Physical Heterogeneity and Aquatic Community Function in River Networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The geomorphological character of a river network provides the template upon which evolution acts to create unique biological communities. Deciphering commonly observed patterns and processes within riverine landscapes resulting from the interplay between physical and biological...

  5. Using "Dialogue" Labs in a Community-College Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uretsky, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a community-college curriculum that incorporates Socratic Dialogue Inducing (SDI) laboratories into a new calculus-based preengineering physics sequence. SDI allows for group discussion labs that emphasize the concepts being taught in the lectures. (ZWH)

  6. Federal Funding for Special Recreation. Institute Report #4. National Institute on New Models of Community Based Recreation and Leisure Programs and Services for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, John A.

    The fourth of nine documents on community based recreation for handicapped persons (EC 114 401-409) examines federal funding for special recreation. The first section reviews functions of assistance in the federal budget, scope of federal programs, and barriers to receiving funds. Three major problem areas (lack of funds for provision of local…

  7. Mission, Enrollment and Staffing Patterns, Funding Procedures, and Administration and Governance. The North Carolina Community College Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Junius A.; And Others

    The study described in this report was conducted by by the Research Triangle Institute as an inquiry into the staffing patterns, funding allocation formulas and procedures, enrollment trends, and mission and governance of the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) and its 58 institutions. Section I of the report provides an introduction…

  8. 34 CFR 380.5 - What activities may the Secretary fund under community-based supported employment projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities may the Secretary fund under community-based supported employment projects? 380.5 Section 380.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...

  9. 34 CFR 426.6 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects? 426.6 Section 426.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  10. 34 CFR 426.6 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects? 426.6 Section 426.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  11. 34 CFR 426.6 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects? 426.6 Section 426.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  12. 34 CFR 426.6 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects? 426.6 Section 426.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  13. 34 CFR 426.6 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under the Community-Based Organization Projects? 426.6 Section 426.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  14. Revisiting the Coleman Report: Deficit Ideologies and Federal Compensatory Funding in Low-Income Latino School Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Castellanos, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    The essay argues that the Coleman Report helped give credence to contemporary deficit ideologies in education by proclaiming that schools do not make much of a difference in the educational outcomes of students in poverty including Latino communities. Furthermore, the author explores how deficit ideologies influence compensatory funding, in…

  15. The Promise of a Community-Based Approach to Economic Opportunity: New York City's Change Capital Fund. No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aceves, Aurelia De La Rosa; Greenberg, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Low-income neighborhoods no longer experience the levels of community wide disinvestment that they did through the 1990s, but their residents still face significant poverty, risk of displacement, and limited economic mobility. For this reason, Change Capital Fund (CCF), a New York City donor collaborative, formed to invest in sophisticated…

  16. Helping Community College Students Cope with Financial Emergencies: Lessons from the Dreamkeepers and Angel Fund Emergency Financial Aid Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geckeler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lumina Foundation for Education created the Dreamkeepers and Angel Fund Emergency Financial Aid Programs to assist community college students who are at risk of dropping out because of unexpected financial crises. Both programs are multiyear pilot projects that began in 2005 and are administered by Scholarship America and the American Indian…

  17. Assessment of the Funding Formula Used by the North Carolina Community College System: Economy of Scale Supplemental Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    In its phase one report, MGT of America, Inc., a management research and consulting firm, recommended several improvements in the funding model used by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges. In addition to an overall call for a simplified approach to presenting the financial needs of the 58 colleges, the report identified several…

  18. Revisiting the Coleman Report: Deficit Ideologies and Federal Compensatory Funding in Low-Income Latino School Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Castellanos, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    The essay argues that the Coleman Report helped give credence to contemporary deficit ideologies in education by proclaiming that schools do not make much of a difference in the educational outcomes of students in poverty including Latino communities. Furthermore, the author explores how deficit ideologies influence compensatory funding, in…

  19. 77 FR 9955 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Community Challenge Planning Grant Program for Fiscal Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Community Challenge Planning Grant Program for... 86039-123 Thurston Regional Planning Council, 2424 Heritage Ct. 763,962 SW., Suite A, Olympia, WA... Montachusett Regional Planning Commission, 1427 Water 129,500 Street Rear Building, Fitchburg, MA...

  20. Community Group Involvement in a Fund Raising Project for a University Library: Examples from "A Trial for the Books".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Mary M.

    This paper describes a unique library fund raiser at California State University (Northridge). "A Trial for the Books" was a dog agility trial held on April 26-27, 1996 as a benefit for the university's Oviatt Library. The event was hosted by West Valley DogSports, a community group. The event raised approximately $2,500 for the…

  1. A Community-Engaged Approach to Translating Research into Practice: A Physical Education Story.

    PubMed

    Cutforth, Nick; Belansky, Elaine S

    2015-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Sciences Award program emphasizes the need to speed up the process of putting evidence-based practices into place. One strategy they promote is community engagement; however, few studies describe a process for meaningfully engaging communities in the translation process. This article describes steps taken by a university- community partnership to create a plan for implementing evidence-based physical education (PE) practices in rural schools. This partnership's efforts resulted in the acquisition of a $1.86 million grant to implement the plan. Qualitative data collected during the planning process were analyzed using content analysis. Key steps included undertaking a baseline assessment of community needs, reviewing and selecting evidence-based practices, developing a multilevel, community-driven action plan and establishing its feasibility with community stakeholders. These steps could be applied to other health topics across a variety of settings. Several strategies that made the process successful are described. Recommendations are made for expanding the roles of Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) and local health foundations in supporting community-engaged translational research. University-community partnerships have the potential to create plans and obtain large-scale funding for translating evidence-based research into practice.

  2. Communities of on-line physics educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIsaac, Dan

    2000-04-01

    I briefly describe the nature, content, scope, history, and culture of PHYS-L and related electronic mailing lists dedicated to the teaching and learning of physics (including PHYSHARE, TAP-L and PhysLrnR). I also describe etiquette and writing guidelines for contributing to discussions on mailing lists. Finally, I review technical guidelines for controlling physics list subscriptions and related archive software.

  3. 75 FR 12272 - Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) for Community-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ...The Employment and Training Administration (ETA), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL, or the Department), announces the availability of approximately $125 million in grant funds for Community-Based Job Training Grants (CBJTGs). Community-Based Job Training Grants will be awarded through a competitive process to support workforce training for high-growth/high- demand industries through the national system of community, technical, and Tribal colleges. In order to be eligible for consideration under this solicitation, the applicant must be either: (1) An individual Community or Technical College, such as a public community college, a nonprofit community college, a Tribally controlled college, or a Tribally controlled university; (2) a Community College District; (3) a State Community College System; (4) a One-Stop Career Center in partnership with its Local Workforce Investment Board, that specifies one or more community or technical colleges where education/training activities will occur; or (5) an applicant proposing to serve an educationally underserved community without access to community or technical colleges that meet the requirements in section III.A.5. See section III.A for additional information related to eligible applicants. It is anticipated that awards will range generally from $1 million to $3 million. The exception is that applicants that include three or more community, technical, or Tribal colleges will be considered ``consortium applications,'' and may request an award ranging from $1 million to $5 million. See section III.B for additional information related to consortium applications. ETA expects to allot up to $50 million of the total designated funds to organizations that have never received a grant through a CBJTG SGA. This Solicitation provides background information and describes the application submission requirements, outlines the process that eligible entities must use to apply for funds covered by this Solicitation, and details how grantees

  4. Funding Issues in U.S. Community Colleges: Findings from a 2008 Survey of the National Council of State Directors of Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; Tollefson, Terrence A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to summarize the impact the economic recession had on funding, access, and overall support for U. S. community colleges in 2008. Mortgage foreclosures, reduction in stock values, and an enormous credit crunch were headlines of economic news in the final quarter of 2007 and throughout 2008. A survey conducted by the…

  5. Determinants of community health fund membership in Tanzania: a mixed methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Macha, Jane; Kuwawenaruwa, August; Makawia, Suzan; Mtei, Gemini; Borghi, Josephine

    2014-11-20

    In many developing countries, initiatives are underway to strengthen voluntary community based health insurance as a means of expanding access to affordable care among the informal sector. However, increasing coverage with voluntary health insurance in low income settings can prove challenging. There are limited studies on determinants of enrolling in these schemes using mixed methods. This study aims to shed light on the characteristics of those joining a community health fund, a type of community based health insurance, in Tanzania and the reasons for their membership and subsequent drop out using mixed methods. A cross sectional survey of households in four rural districts was conducted in 2008, covering a total of 1,225 (524 members of CHF and 701 non-insured) households and 7,959 individuals. In addition, 12 focus group discussions were carried out with CHF members, non-scheme members and members of health facility governing committees in two rural districts. Logistic regression was used to assess the determinants of CHF membership while thematic analysis was done to analyse qualitative data. The quantitative analysis revealed that the three middle income quintiles were more likely to enrol in the CHF than the poorest and the richest. CHF member households were more likely to be large, and headed by a male than uninsured households from the same areas. The qualitative data supported the finding that the poor rather than the poorest were more likely to join as were large families and of greater risk of illness, with disabilities or persons with chronic diseases. Households with elderly members or children under-five years were also more likely to enrol. Poor understanding of risk pooling deterred people from joining the scheme and was the main reason for not renewing membership. On the supply side, poor quality of public care services, the limited benefit package and a lack of provider choice were the main factors for low enrolment. Determinants of CHF

  6. Strategic planning with multitype libraries in the community: a model with extra funding as the main goal.

    PubMed Central

    Gall, C F; Miller, E G

    1997-01-01

    Medical libraries are discovering that ongoing collaboration in fundraising with other types of community libraries is mutually beneficial. Such partnerships may lead to joint grants, increase library visibility and access to decision makers, allow participation in community information networks, and provide leverage in additional fundraising projects. These partnerships have the potential to raise the profile of libraries. The accompanying community recognition for the parent organization may create a positive image, draw patients to the health center, and position the library and institution for future success in fundraising. Within institutions, development officers may become allies, mentors, and beneficiaries of the medical librarian's efforts. For a planned approach to community outreach with extra funding as the major objective, busy medical library administrators need guidelines. Standard participative techniques were applied to strategic planning by Indianapolis libraries to help achieve successful community outreach and to write joint statements of mission, vision, goals, and objectives. PMID:9285125

  7. The policy basis for community health financing in Cameroon: establishment of the North West Provincial Special Fund for Health.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Ehry, B; Massow, F V; Monekosso, G; Amida, G; Cosmas, C

    1997-01-01

    National health systems in Africa and around the world have and are still undergoing reforms in response to the Alma Ata Declaration. In Africa, people centred, community based and locally managed strategies are widely accepted. And in many countries like Cameroon, revolving funds for essential drugs have been adopted as an entry point to the implementation of primary health care elements in community health centres. The current reforms are leading to a sharing of financing responsibilities between people and government, with catalytic support from external agencies. Economic, social and political crises in Africa in the past decade have earned the countries stiff structural adjustment policies with severe consequences on health budgets, health manpower, and health status. This paper describes the policy basis for community financing in Cameroon. It suggests that revolving essential drugs funds (as proposed in the Bamako Initiative) cannot be viewed in isolation, but as part of the community and national response to the crises situation; it also demonstrated the capacity of the health sector to fight back to overcome the ill effects of structural adjustment. And last but not the least, these funds have provided an opportunity for the exercise of democracy and the participatory management by these officials of public goods and services.

  8. Cultural toolkits in the urban physics learning community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Mel S.; Van Duzor, Andrea Gay

    2013-01-01

    Chicago State University has been involved in curriculum development, teacher preparation, and education research that targets urban physics learners on the south-side of Chicago. Through this work we have begun to recognize specific cultural norms that our students bring to the classroom. These cultural norms appear to help our students establish strong communities in classes. Because of the homogeneity of our population, with most students coming from within a five-mile radius of our campus, there are a set of shared experiences that help establish a level of trust and sense of community that manifests itself in the science learning environment. Aspects of community play a major role in the preparation of teachers. In this paper we discuss our understanding of CSU student culture, its importance in the development of community, and its role in the preparation of future physics teachers. [1

  9. Impact of Intended and Unintended Outcomes of Performance-Based Funding on Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Charanne P.

    2015-01-01

    Nationally, state and federal legislative bodies are increasingly requiring higher education institutions to demonstrate a solid return on investment. One of the key ways to do this is through performance based funding which links funding received to specific institutional performance measures and outcomes including graduation, and/or completion…

  10. Impact of Intended and Unintended Outcomes of Performance-Based Funding on Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Charanne P.

    2015-01-01

    Nationally, state and federal legislative bodies are increasingly requiring higher education institutions to demonstrate a solid return on investment. One of the key ways to do this is through performance based funding which links funding received to specific institutional performance measures and outcomes including graduation, and/or completion…

  11. Public College and University Development: Fund Raising at State Universities, State Colleges, and Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Michael J., Ed.

    Differences in fund raising in public and private colleges are considered in 14 papers, with attention to different strategies, the organization of the effort, and special considerations. Article titles and authors are: "Private Support of Public Higher Education" (Michael J. Worth); "Organization of Fund Raising at Public…

  12. 78 FR 65431 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Community Development Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... financial management skill-building. (iv) Loan Loss Reserves...... Funds set aside in the form of cash..., facsimile, or other forms of communication, except in circumstances approved by the CDFI Fund beforehand. If... communication with Applicants. Every Applicant is responsible for ensuring its myCDFIFund account is up-to-date...

  13. Funds of Knowledge of Sorting and Patterning: Networks of Exchange in a Torres Strait Island Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the funds of knowledge that are mathematical in nature and how they might be used to support parents and children with their learning of mathematics that is taught and learned in the early years of school. Funds of knowledges are those that have been historically and culturally accumulated into a body of knowledge and…

  14. The creation of management systems for funding priorities in wastewater project in rural communities in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, M; Hajrasoliha, M; Meemari, G; Fahiminia, M; Talebi, M; Kohansal, M

    2008-01-01

    For sustainable development an integrated cost-effective approach focused on the goal of health and environmental protection is necessary. In Iran more than 22 million people live in rural communities. A little more than 92% of the rural population in Iran have access to safe drinking water supply, but only less than 0.2% have sanitary wastewater disposal system. Groundwater is the main resource of water supply in rural communities in Iran and contaminated or untreated groundwater can be the major reason for waterborne diseases outbreak and wastewater discharge is the main cause of groundwater contamination. In new strategy in Iran's wastewater company, the importance of wastewater treatment is equal to water treatment in rural communities and the main goal in this section is providing sanitary wastewater disposal system for 8% of rural areas until 2010 and 30% until 2020. One of the most important limitations for establishment of wastewater disposal system is the limitation of governmental funds. For this reason, a national program was performed for ranking of rural communities with the goal of improving the funding effectiveness in wastewater management in rural communities. Many important criteria were considered for determination of priorities, these criteria include: population, population density, water consumption and wastewater generation, wastes disposal systems at present, environmental and health risks, agricultural and industrial wastewater, social conditions specially public participation, investment simplicity and type of living (seasonal or permanent). For collection of information about rural community, according to the criteria, a questionnaire was designed with 40 quantified questions. Questionnaires completed for all rural areas with more than 400 people population (more than 77% of rural population of the country). Completed questionnaires were analyzed with specific software for ranking of villages according to above mentioned criteria. Right

  15. Engaging the community through an undergraduate biomedical physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ness, G. R.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    We report on the development of an undergraduate biomedical physics course at Portland State University, motivated by both student interest and the desire of the university's Physics Department to provide an interdisciplinary intermediate-level physics course. The course was developed through the community engagement of physicians, clinical researchers, and basic science researchers. Class meetings were a combination of regular and guest lectures, hands-on exercises, web-based activities, class discussions, and a student poster information session for patrons at a local science museum. The course inspired students to engage in research projects in biomedical physics that enhance their understanding of science and education as well as benefit the learning of future students. Furthermore, this course offers an opportunity for traditionally underrepresented groups in physics courses, such as women, to gain additional exposure to physics.

  16. UWALK: the development of a multi-strategy, community-wide physical activity program.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Cally A; Berry, Tanya R; Carson, Valerie; Culos-Reed, S Nicole; Duncan, Mitch J; Loitz, Christina C; McCormack, Gavin R; McHugh, Tara-Leigh F; Spence, John C; Vallance, Jeff K; Mummery, W Kerry

    2017-03-01

    UWALK is a multi-strategy, multi-sector, theory-informed, community-wide approach using e and mHealth to promote physical activity in Alberta, Canada. The aim of UWALK is to promote physical activity, primarily via the accumulation of steps and flights of stairs, through a single over-arching brand. This paper describes the development of the UWALK program. A social ecological model and the social cognitive theory guided the development of key strategies, including the marketing and communication activities, establishing partnerships with key stakeholders, and e and mHealth programs. The program promotes the use of physical activity monitoring devices to self-monitor physical activity. This includes pedometers, electronic devices, and smartphone applications. In addition to entering physical activity data manually, the e and mHealth program provides the function for objective data to be automatically uploaded from select electronic devices (Fitbit®, Garmin and the smartphone application Moves) The RE-AIM framework is used to guide the evaluation of UWALK. Funding for the program commenced in February 2013. The UWALK brand was introduced on April 12, 2013 with the official launch, including the UWALK website on September 20, 2013. This paper describes the development and evaluation framework of a physical activity promotion program. This program has the potential for population level dissemination and uptake of an ecologically valid physical activity promotion program that is evidence-based and theoretically framed.

  17. Did augmenting the VERB campaign advertising in select communities have an effect on awareness, attitudes, and physical activity?

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Judy M; Huhman, Marian; Nolin, Mary Jo

    2008-06-01

    Although VERB was designed as a national media campaign, funding and donated media time enabled more-intensive advertising and marketing in certain communities. To investigate the effect of increased advertising on physical activity outcomes, six "high-dose" communities were selected to receive more hours of advertising and additional promotional activities. Longitudinal quasi-experimental design comparing outcomes in six communities that received additional VERB marketing activities with outcomes in a comparison group that received only the national dose of advertising. Two cohorts of dyads of youth aged 9-13 years (tweens) and one parent at baseline (2002), followed for 2 years. During the first year of the VERB campaign, each of the six high-dose communities received 50% more advertising and conducted special campaign activities. During the second year, only four of the six communities received the larger dose of advertising and additional promotional activities because of reduced funding. Awareness and understanding of VERB messages; attitudes about physical activity (self-efficacy, social influences, and outcome expectations); and physical activity behaviors. After 1 year, tweens in the high-dose communities reported higher levels of awareness and understanding of VERB and scored higher on the social influences scale than did tweens in a comparison group in areas that received only the national dose of advertising. After 2 years, tweens in the high-dose communities reported higher awareness and understanding of VERB, greater self-efficacy, more sessions of free-time physical activity per week, and were more active on the day before being surveyed than tweens in the comparison group who received the average national dose. Providing communities with a higher dose of marketing activities and sustaining those activities over time yields more positive outcomes.

  18. Surrounding community residents’ expectations of HOPE VI for their community, health and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Dulin-Keita, Akilah; Hannon, Lonnie; Buys, David; Casazza, Krista; Clay, Olivio

    2016-01-01

    Using a community-engaged participatory research approach, this study identified surrounding community residents’ expectations for how a HOPE VI housing initiative might affect their community and individual health and physical activity. Fifty-nine women and men engaged in concept mapping, which is a mixed methods approach, where participants generate, sort, and rate ideas. Participants generated 197 unique statements. Thirteen thematic clusters related to expected changes for the community, health and physical activity emerged. Residents’ rated ‘Increased Pride in the Neighborhood’ and ‘Increased Safety’ as the most important factors related to HOPE VI whereas ‘Drawbacks of HOPE VI’ was rated as least important. This research provides insight into the potential impacts of housing initiatives from the perspective of those most affected by such initiatives. The findings also highlight environmental changes as potential mechanisms that may improve residents’ perceptions of the community and encourage healthy lifestyles. PMID:27667912

  19. Introducing Physical Geography: A Laboratory Sourcebook for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Office of Academic Interinstitutional Programs.

    This sourcebook contains a collection of laboratory exercises assembled for use in introductory physical geography classes taught at community colleges. Introductory sections address the origins of the sourcebook, the ways it differs from traditional laboratory manuals, and its form and anticipated use. Next, a list of terms or concepts,…

  20. Information Technology and Physicality in Community, Place, and Presence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streibel, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Raises several questions about information technology. After arguing for the importance of physical place and presence in how people construct meaning, form personal biographies and public histories, and develop living communities, the article contrasts this with the consequences of the abstractions of place and presence in virtual, on-line…

  1. Introducing Physical Geography: A Laboratory Sourcebook for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Office of Academic Interinstitutional Programs.

    This sourcebook contains a collection of laboratory exercises assembled for use in introductory physical geography classes taught at community colleges. Introductory sections address the origins of the sourcebook, the ways it differs from traditional laboratory manuals, and its form and anticipated use. Next, a list of terms or concepts,…

  2. Generic results of the space physics community survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Rikhi R.; Cohen, Nathaniel B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of the members of the space physics research community conducted in 1990-1991 to ascertain demographic information on the respondents and information on their views on a number of facets of their space physics research. The survey was conducted by questionnaire and the information received was compiled in a database and analyzed statistically. The statistical results are presented for the respondent population as a whole and by four different respondent cross sections: individual disciplines of space physics, type of employers, age groups, and research techniques employed. Data from a brief corresponding survey of the graduate students of respondents are also included.

  3. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Recovery Act Funded Cleanups, National Layer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data layer provides access to Recovery Act Funded Cleanup sites as part of the CIMC web service. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed into law by President Obama on February 17th, 2009 and all reporting on ARRA for these 3 programs was complete as of 2013. Out of the five EPA programs that distributed recovery act funding, three of them were cleanup programs: Brownfields, Superfund and Leaking Underground Storage Tanks. CIMC provides information on site cleanups that received ARRA Recovery Act funding for Superfund and Brownfields, but not Leaking Underground Storage Tanks. Data for Brownfields came from the ACRES database. Data for Superfund came from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) database. Data in CIMC no longer need to be updated for the ARRA program. For information on all EPA Recovery Act funded work, please see: http://archive.epa.gov/recovery/web/html/ and http://epamap17.epa.gov/arra/.

  4. 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Stable Funding for Innovation and Continuous Improvement. Research Update: Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimer, Christopher; Harris, Erin

    2012-01-01

    As the only federal funding stream that provides dedicated funds for afterschool programs across the country, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative plays an important role in supporting the innovation that takes place in afterschool programs. Social innovation has been defined as "a novel solution to a social…

  5. 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Stable Funding for Innovation and Continuous Improvement. Research Update: Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimer, Christopher; Harris, Erin

    2012-01-01

    As the only federal funding stream that provides dedicated funds for afterschool programs across the country, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative plays an important role in supporting the innovation that takes place in afterschool programs. Social innovation has been defined as "a novel solution to a social…

  6. Summative service and stakeholder evaluation of an NHS-funded community Pharmacy Emergency Repeat Medication Supply Service (PERMSS)

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Hamde; Nazar, Zachariah; Simpson, Jill; Yeung, Andre; Whittlesea, Cate

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Service and stakeholder evaluation of an NHS-funded service providing out-ofhours (OOH) emergency repeat medications to patients self-presenting at community pharmacies. Setting Community pharmacies across the North East of England accredited to provide this service. Participants Patients self-presenting to community pharmacies during OOH periods with emergency repeat medication supply requests. Intervention Community pharmacists assessed each request for clinical appropriateness and when suitable provide an emergency repeat medication supply, with additional pharmaceutical advice and services if required. Primary outcomes Number of emergency repeat medication supplies, time of request, reason for access, medication(s), pharmaceutical advice and services provided. Secondary outcomes were community pharmacist and patient satisfaction. Results A total of 2485 patients were managed across 227 community pharmacies (15 December 2014 to 7 April 2015). Most patients presented on Saturdays, with increased activity over national holidays. Older age was associated with increased service use. Of the 3226 medications provided, 439 were classified as high risk. Patients found this service easy to access and were willing to access the community pharmacy in the future for medication-related issues. In the absence of this service, 50% of patients would have missed their medication(s) until they saw their doctor and a further 46% would have accessed an alternative service. The cost of National Health Service (NHS) service(s) for patients who would have accessed an alternative OOH service was estimated as 37 times that of the community pharmacy service provided. Community pharmacists were happy to provide this service despite increased consultation times and workload. Conclusions Community pharmacists were able to manage patients’ OOH requests for emergency repeat medication and patients were happy with the service provided. Since the service cost was favourable when

  7. Community-based priorities for improving nutrition and physical activity in childhood.

    PubMed

    McCarron, David A; Richartz, Ninon; Brigham, Steve; White, Molly K; Klein, Stephen P; Kessel, Samuel S

    2010-11-01

    Overweight among America's youth has prompted a large response from foundations, government, and private organizations to support programmatic interventions. The architecture for many of these programs was derived from "experts," whereas the perspective of families, and communities--those most affected and most instrumental in altering behavior--is rarely the driving force. Shaping America's Youth (SAY) was established to assess programs that target nutrition and physical activity and to promote the necessary family and community input. In a 2004 report, SAY documented how community efforts are motivated, funded, structured, and evaluated. It identified discordance between that effort and the opinions of experts. To ensure that the voices of families and communities are integrated into such local and national policies and programs, SAY initiated a unique series of 5-day-long town meetings, input from which was independently statistically analyzed. Across a range of demographics, the results indicated that participants perceive the barriers and solutions similarly. There was broad agreement that the family has primary responsibility, starting with a need to focus on improved quality and duration of family time directed at nutrition and activity. Concurrently they identified needed actions from external sources, including clear and consistent nutrition information; ready access to healthy foods; and a built environment that promotes physical activity. Rather than one-dimensional or governmental solutions, they expressed a need for community-based partnerships integrating health care, education, environment, government, and business. Although this citizen-engagement process did not identify specific actions, it defined basic steps that communities must integrate into future approaches.

  8. Expanding federal funding to community health centers slows decline in access for low-income adults.

    PubMed

    McMorrow, Stacey; Zuckerman, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    To identify the impact of the Health Center Growth Initiative on access to care for low-income adults. Data on federal funding for health centers are from the Bureau of Primary Health Care's Uniform Data System (2000-2007), and individual-level measures of access and use are derived from the National Health Interview Survey (2001-2008). We estimate person-level models of access and use as a function of individual- and market-level characteristics. By using market-level fixed effects, we identify the effects of health center funding on access using changes within markets over time. We explore effects on low-income adults and further examine how those effects vary by insurance coverage. We calculate health center funding per poor person in a health care market and attach this information to individual observations on the National Health Interview Survey. Health care markets are defined as hospital referral regions. Low-income adults in markets with larger funding increases were more likely to have an office visit and to have a general doctor visit. These results were stronger for uninsured and publicly insured adults. Expansions in federal health center funding had some mitigating effects on the access declines that were generally experienced by low-income adults over this time period. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  9. A method for achieving reciprocity of funding in community-based participatory research.

    PubMed

    Gehlert, Sarah; Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M; Jackson, Sherrill; Kenkel, Sandi; McCullough, Isaac C; Oliver, Cheryl; Sanford, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The St. Louis Komen Project was conceived to address disparities in breast cancer treatment and outcomes between African-American and White women in St. Louis, Missouri. Our goal was to apportion tasks and funding through a process to which all researcher partners had input and to which all could agree, thus eliminating institutionalized inequalities. This paper describes the collaborative process and resulting division of responsibilities, determination of costs, and ultimate allocation of funds and resources, as well as the documentation employed to achieve funding reciprocity and equal accountability. Both communication and documentation are critical. Although the Memoranda of Understanding employed are not a panacea, they codify roles and expectations and promote trust. The process of developing financial transparency set the tone for subsequent steps in the research process. The exhaustive planning process and project-specific procedures developed by its partners have helped the project foster reciprocity, facilitate participation, and equitably distribute resources.

  10. A Method for Achieving Reciprocity of Funding in Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Gehlert, Sarah; Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M.; Jackson, Sherrill; Kenkel, Sandi; McCullough, Isaac C.; Oliver, Cheryl; Sanford, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background The St. Louis Komen Project was conceived to address disparities in breast cancer treatment and outcomes between African-American and White women in St. Louis, Missouri. Our goal was to apportion tasks and funding through a process to which all researcher partners had input and to which all could agree, thus eliminating institutionalized inequalities. Methods This paper describes the collaborative process and resulting division of responsibilities, determination of costs, and ultimate allocation of funds and resources, as well as the documentation employed to achieve funding reciprocity and equal accountability. Results Both communication and documentation are critical. Although the Memoranda of Understanding employed are not a panacea, they codify roles and expectations and promote trust. The process of developing financial transparency set the tone for subsequent steps in the research process. Conclusions The exhaustive planning process and project-specific procedures developed by its partners have helped the project foster reciprocity, facilitate participation, and equitably distribute resources. PMID:25727989

  11. After the Funding Is Gone: Evaluating the Sustainability of a Community-based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulk, Debbie; Farley, Sharon; Coker, Renee

    2001-01-01

    The Rural Elderly Enhancement Project, in which a nursing school development a model of community participation and involvement, was evaluated through interviews with 73 community members. Many projects designed to foster community competence in elder care and youth/school-based health have been sustained. (SK)

  12. An Investigation of Strategies of Operation under Conditions of Reduced Funding in Selected Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman D.

    This four-part report examines the management of retrenchment at six representative Southern California community colleges and two community college districts: Victor Valley College, Mount San Jacinto College, Citrus College, Chaffey College, Mount San Antonio College, Riverside City College, the San Bernardino Community College District, and the…

  13. An Investigation of Strategies of Operation under Conditions of Reduced Funding in Selected Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman D.

    This four-part report examines the management of retrenchment at six representative Southern California community colleges and two community college districts: Victor Valley College, Mount San Jacinto College, Citrus College, Chaffey College, Mount San Antonio College, Riverside City College, the San Bernardino Community College District, and the…

  14. Information on the possibilities of Cracow community in the field of the elimination of low emission under the community fund for environmental protection and water management

    SciTech Connect

    Roznowski, W.

    1995-12-31

    The Act dated May 17, 1990 regarding the division of tasks and competencies, as described in the detailed regulations, among the community organs and civil service units has actually awarded no competence to the commune organs as far as the air protection against pollution is concerned (except the matters regarding town and county planning and the location of certain investments). It arises out of the Act on Environmental Protection that no right to limit or stop any activity causing air pollution by the so-called low emission is granted to the community organs. The investments given supplementary financing consisted in eliminating the solid-fuel-fired boiler houses being noxious to the environment through a total eradication of local boiler houses via either connecting to the municipal heat distribution network or modernization of the local heating system by applying modern gas - or oil-fired boilers. An important criterion for selecting the tasks to be given supplementary financing from the Community Fund was the location of the structure - because the highest concentration of air pollution brought about by low emission sources takes place in the central regions of the town, the structures situated at the center were preferred. All scheduled tasks given supplementary financing from the Community Fund in 1994 and related with the elimination of low emission sources were completed in time and have already generated an ecological effect in the heating season 1994/95.

  15. Involving Community Stakeholders to Increase Park Use and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Terry; Mariscal, Mark; Pina-Cortez, Sophia; Cohen, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe implementation of a randomized controlled trial of community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches to increase park use and physical activity across 33 diverse neighborhoods in Los Angeles. Methods Fifty parks were randomly assigned based on park size, facilities and programs, and neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics to: park director (PD, 17 parks); PD and park advisory board of interested community members (PD+PAB, 16 parks); and no-intervention control (17 parks) arms. Between 2007 and 2012, PDs and PABs from the 33 intervention parks participated in community engagement, baseline assessment, marketing training, intervention design and implementation, and follow-up assessment. Results Intervention parks (PD and PD+PAB) invested in new and diversified signage, promotional items, outreach or support for group activities like fitness classes and walking clubs, and various marketing strategies. Scaling up CBPR methods across parks in 33 diverse neighborhoods was challenging. Working with departmental management and established structures for community input (PABs) and park policy (PDs) facilitated implementation and sustainability. Conclusion Scaling up CBPR methods across diverse communities involved tradeoffs. CBPR is useful for tailoring research and enhancing community impact and sustainability, but more work is needed to understand how to conduct multi-site trials across diverse settings using CBPR. PMID:24674853

  16. Physical Activity Influences in a Disadvantaged African American Community and the Communities' Proposed Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Sarah F.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Wilcox, Sara; Buck, Jacqueline; Ainsworth, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to increase our understanding of how safety and environmental factors influence physical activity among African American residents living in a low-income, high-crime neighborhood and to get input from these residents about how to best design physical activity interventions for their neighborhood. Twenty-seven African American adult residents of a low-income, high-crime neighborhood in a suburban southeastern community participated in three focus groups. Participants were asked questions about perceptions of what would help them, their families, and their neighbors be more physically active. Two independent raters coded the responses into themes. Participants suggested three environmental approaches in an effort to increase physical activity: increasing law enforcement, community connectedness and social support, and structured programs. Findings suggest that safety issues are an important factor for residents living in disadvantaged conditions and that the residents know how they want to make their neighborhoods healthier. PMID:17728204

  17. The "ins" and "outs" of physical activity policy implementation: inadequate capacity, inappropriate outcome measures, and insufficient funds.

    PubMed

    Howie, Erin K; Stevick, E Doyle

    2014-09-01

    Despite broad public support and legislative activity, policies intended to promote physical activity in schools have not produced positive outcomes in levels of physical activity or student health. What explains the broad failure of Physical Activity Policies (PAPs)? Thus far, PAP research has used limited quantitative methods to assess PAP outcomes. New paradigms of qualitative policy implementation research can make important contributions to explaining the causes of policy failure and to the future design of more efficacious PAP legislation. This analysis is a case study of South Carolina's 2005 Student Health and Fitness Act (SHFA). Written documents, investigators' observation and experience, and an interview with a key stakeholder were analyzed to for themes based on theoretical frameworks from education implementation research including (1) bottom-up and top-down perspectives, (2) conceptualizing policy as practice, and (3) the implementer as learner. "Weak policy signals" in SHFA undermined the implementation of PAP in 3 problematic areas: inadequate capacity development for implementers, inappropriate measures of implementation, and insufficient funding. These findings illustrate the contributions of qualitative research and establish the need for further qualitative research into PAP implementation processes. To ensure successful future physical activity policies, policymakers, and stakeholders need to consider implementation, evaluation, and funding from the beginning phases of policy development. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  18. The European solar physics community: outcome from a questionnaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Susanna

    2002-12-01

    At the SPM10 meeting held in Prague, for the first time was organized a "young section" which was dedicated to "the career in Solar Physics" (Aulanier, this issue). Prior to the meeting a questionnaire was distributed to the community with the aim to build statistic on the career. The informations collected in this way relate to personal and professional aspects of the career, how much the countries' policy and the working environment can affect it. Moreover, particular attention was given to the PhD and post-doctorate (post-doc) conditions. From the statistics it comes clear that the European Solar Physics is having a difficult period. Besides the main problems, we found the lack of an integrated European community, the lack of permanent positions, the low salary and the lost of popularity among students. Several ideas were proposed to improve the situation.

  19. 75 FR 36245 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... residential areas and with passenger and non-motorized traffic. In this type of project, DOT might fund the... appropriate siting of freight facilities and route the freight traffic around town centers, residential areas..., religion, sex, national origin, disability or familial status; 2. Are a defendant in a Fair Housing...

  20. Performance-Based Funding: State Policy Influences on Small Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Zoë Mercedes; Friedel, Janice Nahra

    2016-01-01

    Performance-based funding (PBF) models intend to increase efficiency and productivity of the institution, thereby influencing organizational change. This change may be structural, programmatic, or procedural, and it may affect institutional practice and/or policy. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand the organizational…

  1. Distribution of Federal Funds for Vocational Education to Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, T. Harry; Davis, Dale A.

    In 1988, a study was conducted to determine the extent to which vocational and technical programs at two-year colleges have been supported by federal aid. State directors of two-year college education were surveyed for background information on the last three years of vocational education funding under the Vocational Education Act (VEA) of 1963,…

  2. Performance-Based Funding: State Policy Influences on Small Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Zoë Mercedes; Friedel, Janice Nahra

    2016-01-01

    Performance-based funding (PBF) models intend to increase efficiency and productivity of the institution, thereby influencing organizational change. This change may be structural, programmatic, or procedural, and it may affect institutional practice and/or policy. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand the organizational…

  3. Canopy interactions and physical stress gradients in subtidal communities.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Scott; Wernberg, Thomas; de Bettignies, Thibaut; Kendrick, Gary A; Anderson, Robert J; Bolton, John J; Rodgers, Kirsten L; Shears, Nick T; Leclerc, Jean-Charles; Lévêque, Laurent; Davoult, Dominique; Christie, Hartvig C

    2015-07-01

    Species interactions are integral drivers of community structure and can change from competitive to facilitative with increasing environmental stress. In subtidal marine ecosystems, however, interactions along physical stress gradients have seldom been tested. We observed seaweed canopy interactions across depth and latitudinal gradients to test whether light and temperature stress structured interaction patterns. We also quantified interspecific and intraspecific interactions among nine subtidal canopy seaweed species across three continents to examine the general nature of interactions in subtidal systems under low consumer pressure. We reveal that positive and neutral interactions are widespread throughout global seaweed communities and the nature of interactions can change from competitive to facilitative with increasing light stress in shallow marine systems. These findings provide support for the stress gradient hypothesis within subtidal seaweed communities and highlight the importance of canopy interactions for the maintenance of subtidal marine habitats experiencing environmental stress.

  4. Physical activity in parks: A randomized controlled trial using community engagement.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Deborah A; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Williamson, Stephanie; Marsh, Terry; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2013-11-01

    Physical inactivity is an important health risk factor that could be addressed at the community level. The goal of the study was to determine whether using a community-based participatory approach with park directors and park advisory boards (PABs) could increase physical activity in local parks. Whether involving PABs would be more effective than working with park directors alone was also tested. An RCT intervention from October 2007 to April 2012 was used, with partial blinding of observers to the condition. All data were analyzed in 2012. Of 183 eligible parks in the City of Los Angeles, 50 neighborhood park/recreation centers serving diverse populations participated. Parks were randomized to three study arms: (1) park-director intervention (PD-only); (2) PAB intervention (PAB/PD); and (3) a control arm. Physical activity in each park was systematically observed, and park users and residents living within 1 mile of the park were interviewed. The intervention included assessing park use, obtaining feedback from park users and community residents, training on outreach and marketing, and giving each intervention park $4000 to increase park-based physical activity. The PAB/PD arm required participation and concurrence on all purchases by the PAB. Change in the number of park users and change in the level of park-based physical activity, expressed as MET-hours. Relative to control parks where physical activity declined, in both the PD-only and PAB/PD parks, physical activity increased, generating an estimated average of 600 more visits/week/park, and 1830 more MET-hours of physical activity/week/park. Both residents and park users in the intervention arms in the intervention arms reported increased frequency of exercise. No differences were noted between the PD-only and PAB/PD study arms. Providing park directors and PABs with training on outreach and marketing, feedback on park users, and modest funds increased the amount of physical activity observed in parks.

  5. Retirement community residents' physical activity, depressive symptoms, and functional limitations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lorraine J

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the types of physical activity (PA) retirement community residents report and the effects of PA and depressive symptoms on functional limitations. Elders (N=38) enrolled in a 2-year sensor technology study in senior housing completed regular assessments of functional limitations and depressive symptoms with the Short Physical Performance Battery and Geriatric Depression Scale, respectively. Evaluation of reported PA using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly coincided with 12-month functional limitation testing. Subjects were 69% female with mean age of 85 years. Individuals reporting greater PA had significantly fewer functional limitations at 12 months. In multiple regression analysis, baseline functional limitations explained 66% of the variance in 12-month functional limitations, while current PA explained an additional 5%. Although PA explained a small amount of variance in 12-month functional limitations, as a modifiable behavior, PA should be championed and supported to help ameliorate functional limitations in older adults. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Weathering the Storm: Besieged by Funding Cuts, Community Colleges Must Get Creative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiss, P. Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Economic downturns have decreased most community college budgets as no other time in history. Public revenues are down significantly. Enrollments are up. Competition from the private sector is increasing. This environment, which developed with surprising rapidity, presents a challenge for community and technical college leaders and a paradigm…

  7. Weathering the Storm: Besieged by Funding Cuts, Community Colleges Must Get Creative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiss, P. Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Economic downturns have decreased most community college budgets as no other time in history. Public revenues are down significantly. Enrollments are up. Competition from the private sector is increasing. This environment, which developed with surprising rapidity, presents a challenge for community and technical college leaders and a paradigm…

  8. Public Higher Education Funding, Budget Drivers, and Related Issues: The State Community College Director Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; D'Amico, Mark M.; Friedel, Janice N.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents results from the 2012 National Survey of Access and Finance Issues conducted by the National Council of State Directors of Community Colleges (NCSDCC), an affiliated council of the American Association of Community Colleges, and includes a comparison of survey results from previous years dating back to 2003, with the…

  9. Public Higher Education Funding, Budget Drivers, and Related Issues: The State Community College Director Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; D'Amico, Mark M.; Friedel, Janice N.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents results from the 2012 National Survey of Access and Finance Issues conducted by the National Council of State Directors of Community Colleges (NCSDCC), an affiliated council of the American Association of Community Colleges, and includes a comparison of survey results from previous years dating back to 2003, with the…

  10. Disparities in Community College Finance: In-District versus Out-of-District Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Lee "Rusty"

    2003-01-01

    Describes the 1995 Texas Senate Bill 390, which established community college service areas in portions of the state where community colleges deliver services without the benefit of a local tax base. Examines the disparity in revenue streams generated by these two categories of in-state students. (Contains six references.) (CB)

  11. Physical Activity Measures in the Healthy Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Pate, Russell R.; McIver, Kerry; Colabianchi, Natalie; Troiano, Richard P.; Reis, Jared P.; Carroll, Dianna D.; Fulton, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    The risk of obesity is reduced when youth engage in recommended levels of physical activity (PA). For that reason, public health organizations in the U.S. have encouraged communities to implement programs and policies designed to increase PA in youth, and many communities have taken on that challenge. However, the long-term effects of those programs and policies on obesity are largely unknown. The Healthy Communities Study (HCS) is a large-scale observational study of U.S. communities that is examining the characteristics of programs and policies designed to promote healthy behaviors (e.g., increase PA and improve diet) and determining their association with obesity-related outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used to measure PA in children and the personal and community factors that may influence it. The study used both self-reported and objective measures of PA, and measured personal, family, and home influences on PA via three constructs: (1) PA self-schema; (2) parental support; and (3) parental rules regarding PA. Neighborhood and community factors related to PA were assessed using three measures: (1) child perceptions of the neighborhood environment; (2) availability of PA equipment; and (3) attributes of the child's street segment via direct observation. School influences on children's PA were assessed via three constructs: (1) school PA policies; (2) child perceptions of the school PA environment; and (3) school outdoor PA environment. These measures will enable examination of the associations between characteristics of community PA programs and policies and obesity-related outcomes in children and youth. PMID:26384937

  12. Physical Activity Measures in the Healthy Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Pate, Russell R; McIver, Kerry L; Colabianchi, Natalie; Troiano, Richard P; Reis, Jared P; Carroll, Dianna D; Fulton, Janet E

    2015-10-01

    The risk of obesity is reduced when youth engage in recommended levels of physical activity (PA). For that reason, public health organizations in the U.S. have encouraged communities to implement programs and policies designed to increase PA in youth, and many communities have taken on that challenge. However, the long-term effects of those programs and policies on obesity are largely unknown. The Healthy Communities Study is a large-scale observational study of U.S. communities that is examining the characteristics of programs and policies designed to promote healthy behaviors (e.g., increase PA and improve diet) and determining their association with obesity-related outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used to measure PA in children and the personal and community factors that may influence it. The study used both self-reported and objective measures of PA, and measured personal, family, and home influences on PA via three constructs: (1) PA self-schema; (2) parental support; and (3) parental rules regarding PA. Neighborhood and community factors related to PA were assessed using three measures: (1) child perceptions of the neighborhood environment; (2) availability of PA equipment; and (3) attributes of the child's street segment via direct observation. School influences on children's PA were assessed via three constructs: (1) school PA policies; (2) child perceptions of the school PA environment; and (3) school outdoor PA environment. These measures will enable examination of the associations between characteristics of community PA programs and policies and obesity-related outcomes in children and youth.

  13. Exploring Park Director Roles in Promoting Community Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Terence; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Cohen, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Parks provide numerous opportunities for physical activity (PA). Previous studies have evaluated parks’ physical features, but few have assessed how park staff influence PA. Methods We conducted semi -structured interviews with 49 park directors, focusing on perceptions of their role, park programs, marketing and outreach, external collaborations, and PA promotion. Directors also completed a questionnaire providing demographics, education and training, and other personal characteristics. Results Park directors’ descriptions of their roles varied widely, from primarily administrative to emphasizing community interaction, though most (70–80%) reported offering programs and community interaction as primary. Including PA in current programs and adding PA-specific programs were the most commonly reported ways of increasing PA. Also noted were facility and staffing improvements, and conducting citywide marketing. Many directors felt inadequately trained in marketing. Most parks reported community collaborations, but they appeared fairly superficial. An increasing administrative burden and bureaucracy were recurring themes throughout the interviews. Conclusions Staff training in marketing and operation of PA programs is needed. Partnerships with health departments and organizations can help facilitate the PA promotion potential of parks. As there are competing views of how parks should be managed, standardized benchmarks to evaluate efficiency may help to optimize usage and PA promotion. PMID:22733875

  14. 77 FR 14426 - Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant Applications for Senior Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...-profit agencies and are paid the higher of the Federal, State, or local minimum wage, or the prevailing wage for similar employment, for approximately 20 hours per week while in community service and other...

  15. 75 FR 27801 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Indian Community Development Block Grant Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Isaac Perez, Executive Director, P.O. to existing homeowners. Box 4222, San Felipe Pueblo, NM 87000... Multi-purpose community Tribe, Paula Salazar, Chairperson, Center. center. P.O. Box 809, Wells, NV...

  16. 77 FR 16519 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Rural Community Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... old, as of the application due date in this Notice, will not be eligible to apply for this round of... community at large. 14. If a grantee has an outstanding RCDI grant over 3 years old, as of the application...

  17. Learning in a Physics Classroom Community: Physics Learning Identity Construct Development, Measurement and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sissi L.

    At the university level, introductory science courses usually have high student to teacher ratios which increases the challenge to meaningfully connect with students. Various curricula have been developed in physics education to actively engage students in learning through social interactions with peers and instructors in class. This learning environment demands not only conceptual understanding but also learning to be a scientist. However, the success of student learning is typically measured in test performance and course grades while assessment of student development as science learners is largely ignored. This dissertation addresses this issue with the development of an instrument towards a measure of physics learning identity (PLI) which is used to guide and complement case studies through student interviews and in class observations. Using the conceptual framework based on Etienne Wenger's communities of practice (1998), I examine the relationship between science learning and learning identity from a situated perspective in the context of a large enrollment science class as a community of practice. This conceptual framework emphasizes the central role of identity in the practices negotiated in the classroom community and in the way students figure out their trajectory as members. Using this framework, I seek to understand how the changes in student learning identity are supported by active engagement based instruction. In turn, this understanding can better facilitate the building of a productive learning community and provide a measure for achievement of the curricular learning goals in active engagement strategies. Based on the conceptual framework, I developed and validated an instrument for measuring physics learning identity in terms of student learning preferences, self-efficacy for learning physics, and self-image as a physics learner. The instrument was pilot tested with a population of Oregon State University students taking calculus based

  18. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (<80% of the time) recommended nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  19. The Impact of NSF-funded Physics Education Research at the University of Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Paula

    2015-03-01

    It is now well known that many students who complete introductory physics courses are unable to apply fundamental concepts in situations that involve qualitative reasoning. Systematic investigations have helped researchers understand why so many students fail to develop robust and coherent conceptual frameworks, and have led to the development of new teaching practices and materials that are far more effective than conventional ones. The Physics Education Group at the University of Washington has played a leading role in raising awareness of the need to improve instruction, and in supporting physics faculty in their efforts to do so. With support from the National Science Foundation, the group has helped build a research base that instructors can draw on, and has produced practical, flexible instructional materials that promote deeper learning in physics classrooms. Both ``Tutorials in Introductory Physics'' (Pearson, 2002) and ``Physics by Inquiry'' (Wiley, 1996) have been developed in an iterative process in which ongoing assessment of student learning plays an integral role. These materials have had a widespread and significant impact on physics teaching and on student learning from kindergarten through graduate school. In this talk I will describe the role of research in curriculum development, and speculate on the next generation of tools and resources to support physics teaching and learning.

  20. Physical activity in daily life in physically independent elderly participating in community-based exercise program.

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Nidia A; Probst, Vanessa S; Da Silva, Rubens A; Januário, Renata S B; Pitta, Fabio; Teixeira, Denilson C

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear whether participation in exercise programs specifically developed for elderly translates into a more active lifestyle. To compare the objectively measured level of physical activity in daily life (PADL) between physically independent elderly who participate or do not participate in community-based exercise programs; and to evaluate which factors are associated with the higher level of PADL in these subjects. 134 elderly participants in community-based exercise programs (PG) and 104 non-participants (NPG) had their level of PADL measured using pedometers during 7 days. 6-minute walking test (6MWT), incremental shuttle walking test (ISWT), muscle strength, flexibility and balance. The PG had higher 1-week mean daily step count than NPG (8314 [IQR 5971-10060] vs. 6250 [IQR 4346-8207] steps/day, p<0.0001), as well as higher step count in any day of the week. There was a higher proportion of physically active subjects (>8000 steps/day) in PG than in NPG (37% vs. 16%, respectively; p<0.001), as well as the proportion of sedentary subjects (<5000 steps/day) (14% vs. 33%, respectively; p<0.001). Participation in exercise programs, 6MWT and ISWT explained a higher daily steps count (model r(2)=0.56, p<0.0001). In physically independent elderly, a higher level of physical activity in daily life occurs in those who participate in community-based exercise programs, regardless of the weekday and including non-program days. Participation of elderly in community-based exercise programs should be more systematically available and encouraged due to its close link to higher activity levels and better exercise capacity.

  1. The Intersection of Massage Practice and Research: Community Massage Therapists as Research Personnel on an NIH-funded Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Niki; Stewart, Katie; Love, Margaret M.; Carter, Eddie; Elder, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few NIH funded studies give community massage therapists the opportunity to become study personnel. A recent NIH/NCCAM-funded study investigating chronic low back pain (CLBP) recruited, trained, and utilized community massage practitioners (CMPs) as study personnel. This study’s aim was to determine whether health-related outcomes for CLBP improve when patients are referred from primary care to select CAM modalities including massage therapy (MT). The purpose of this paper is to report the results of the study’s three massage practice-driven study objectives which were to: 1) identify challenges and solutions to recruiting and retaining ample CMPs, 2) develop a practice-informed protocol reflecting real-world MT, and 3) determine the extent to which CMPs comply with rigorous research methodology in their clinical practices as study personnel. Methods Eligible CMPs in urban and rural Kentucky counties were identified through licensure board records, professional organizations, and personal contact opportunities. Interested CMPs completed 6 CE hours of research and Human Subjects Protection training and agreed to comply with a study protocol reflecting MT as practiced. Once trained, study CMPs were matched with study participants to provide and document up to 10 MT sessions per participant. Results Utilizing prominent MT community members proved invaluable to CMP recruitment and protocol development. CMP recruitment challenges included mixed interest, low number of available rural CMPs, busy clinic schedules, and compensation. Ethics CE credits were offered to encourage CMP interest. A total of 28 Kentucky licensed massage therapists with 5–32 years of experience completed study training. A total of 127 CLBP patients consented to participate (n = 104 for MT). Twenty-five CMPs were assigned CLBP patients and provided 1–10 treatments for 94 study participants. Treatment documentation was provided by CMPs for 97% of treatments provided. Conclusions

  2. Local Health Department Engagement in Community Physical Activity Policy.

    PubMed

    Goins, Karin V; Ye, Jiali; Leep, Carolyn J; Robin, Nathalie; Lemon, Stephenie C

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed correlates of self-reported local health department (LHD) participation in community policy/advocacy activities that support physical activity. In 2014, cross-sectional data from the nationally representative 2013 National Profile of Local Health Departments study administered by the National Association of County and City Health Officials were analyzed. Outcomes were participation in policy/advocacy activities related to urban design/land use, active transportation, and access to recreational facilities. Independent variables included structural characteristics, performance improvement efforts, and collaboration. Multivariate logistic regression models were computed. Representatives of 490 LHDs participated (79% response rate). Respondents reported similar participation in urban design/land use (25%); active transportation (16%); and recreational facility access (23%) policy/advocacy. LHDs with populations of ≥500,000 were more likely to report urban design/land use (p=0.004) as well as active transportation policy/advocacy participation (p=0.007) compared with those with populations of ≤50,000. LHDs with a community health improvement plan were more likely to participate in urban design/land use policy/advocacy (p=0.001). LHDs who regularly use the Community Guide were more likely to report policy/advocacy activity on active transportation (p=0.007) and expanding access to recreation facilities (p=0.009). LHDs engaged in a land use partnership were more likely to report urban design/land use (p<0.001) and active transportation (p=0.001) policy/advocacy participation. Participation in community physical activity policy/advocacy among LHDs was low in this study and varied by LHD characteristics. Intervention opportunities include assisting smaller LHDs and promoting performance improvement efforts and evidence-based practice resources. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Capitalizing the NHIN: a strategy for funding an integrated nationwide network of community HIEs.

    PubMed

    Thornewill, Judah; Esterhay, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Lack of capital investment is limiting progress towards NHIN goals. A 10-step strategy for engaging new private-sector investment is presented. The vision involves developing an integrated nationwide network of community health record banks that contain costs and improve quality through robust community-wide process improvement efforts. Purchasers, such as employers, Medicare and Medicaid, jump-start the process, beginning with pilots, by making advance commitments of low per-member per-month fees for 10 percent to 30 percent of each community's population. Additional revenue opportunities are identified, includin value-added services for consumers, pharmaceutical manufacturers and providers. Competing for-profit service providers then are offered exclusive multi-year contracts to build and operate the community health record bank using a revenue share contract. After they're selected, service providers invest capital to build record bank technologies, services and infrastructure. Successful service provider gain opportunities to develop record banks nationwide. To achieve success, the private sector, and federal and state purchasers must work together to support robust community-wide pilots.

  4. Neighborhoods on the move: a community-based participatory research approach to promoting physical activity.

    PubMed

    Suminski, Richard R; Petosa, Rick L; Jones, Larry; Hall, Lisa; Poston, Carlos W

    2009-01-01

    There is a scientific and practical need for high-quality effectiveness studies of physical activity interventions in "real-world" settings. To use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop, implement, operate, and evaluate an intervention for promoting physical activity called Neighborhoods on the Move. Two communities with similar physical and social characteristics participated in this study. One community was involved in Neighborhoods on the Move; the other (comparison community) participated only in the assessments. Academic personnel and residents/organizations in the Neighborhoods on the Move community worked together to create a community environment that was more conducive for physical activity. Pre- and posttest data on new initiatives promoting physical activity, existing physical activity initiatives, and business policies supporting physical activity were collected simultaneously in both communities. The success of the CBPR approach was evidenced by several developments, including substantial resident involvement and the formation of a leadership committee, marketing campaign, and numerous community partnerships. The number of businesses with policies promoting physical activity and breadth of existing physical activity initiatives (participants, activities, hours) increased substantially more in the Neighborhoods on the Move community than in the comparison community. A total of sixty new initiatives promoting physical activity were implemented in the Neighborhoods on the Move community during the intervention. The CBPR approach is an effective strategy for inducing environmental changes that promote physical activity. Additional research is needed to assess the portability and sustainability of Neighborhoods on the Move.

  5. Organizations in R.I., Conn. and Mass. Awarded Funding for Environmental Work in Area Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Four non-profit organizations in New England were awarded a total of $120,000 by the US EPA to address local health and environmental issues in minority and low-income communities, which face more than their fair share of pollution.

  6. Texas Community College Funding: Nonmetropolitan and Metropolitan Ad Valorem Tax Rates and Revenue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Lee; Flannery, Joseph; Adams, Kenneth; Bowen, Stephen; Norvell, Kevin; Sherman, Suzanne; Watt, Jacqueline; Waller, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    This article examines ad valorem tax rates per $100 valuation and the resultant tax revenues per in-district contact hour for Texas nonmetropolitan and metropolitan public community colleges. The results of the analyses indicate no difference in ad valorem tax rates between these institutions but demonstrate differences in the resultant tax…

  7. Latina/o Community Funds of Knowledge for Health and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanoni, Joseph; Rucinski, Dianne; Flores, Jovita; Perez, Idida; Gomez, Guillermo; Davis, Rochelle; Jones, Rise

    2011-01-01

    Community organizing brings Latina/o families together to enhance repertoires of culturally relevant practices to promote health and curriculum. The Healthy Schools Campaign, a 4-year environmental justice partnership between public health researchers and Latina/o organizations in 2 neighborhoods of Chicago, was formed to confront the epidemics of…

  8. 78 FR 49451 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Rural Community Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... support micro-enterprise and sustainable development. 4. Develop the capacity of recipients to increase..., e.g., architectural, engineering, or legal. 7. Improve recipient's organizational capacity by... enable them to support sustainable economic development in their communities on an ongoing basis. 3....

  9. A Larger and Wealthier Hispanic Community Draws the Attention of College Fund Raisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L.

    1997-01-01

    Statistics showing that the U.S. Hispanic population is getting larger and wealthier have altered perceptions that this is a community in need. College officials, particularly in states with large Hispanic populations, are courting Hispanic business owners and establishing networks through Hispanic alumni groups. However, some fear that…

  10. Texas Community College Funding: Nonmetropolitan and Metropolitan Ad Valorem Tax Rates and Revenue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Lee; Flannery, Joseph; Adams, Kenneth; Bowen, Stephen; Norvell, Kevin; Sherman, Suzanne; Watt, Jacqueline; Waller, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    This article examines ad valorem tax rates per $100 valuation and the resultant tax revenues per in-district contact hour for Texas nonmetropolitan and metropolitan public community colleges. The results of the analyses indicate no difference in ad valorem tax rates between these institutions but demonstrate differences in the resultant tax…

  11. State Funding and the Engaged University: Understanding Community Engagement and State Appropriations for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Some higher education leaders have suggested that colleges and universities could generate state support if they were more productively engaged in addressing societal needs. This multi-case study examines how community engagement is expressed and understood at institutions that vary in their expected levels of state appropriations. The findings…

  12. Strengthening Humanities at Genesee Community College: An NEH-Funded Faculty Development Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Margaret D.

    Genesee Community College (GCC), in New York, received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to conduct a faculty seminar focusing on the role and historical context of the computer as a medium for writing. Twenty GCC faculty from the humanities, as well as from career/technical programs, participated in the seminar in the summer of 1992.…

  13. Latina/o Community Funds of Knowledge for Health and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanoni, Joseph; Rucinski, Dianne; Flores, Jovita; Perez, Idida; Gomez, Guillermo; Davis, Rochelle; Jones, Rise

    2011-01-01

    Community organizing brings Latina/o families together to enhance repertoires of culturally relevant practices to promote health and curriculum. The Healthy Schools Campaign, a 4-year environmental justice partnership between public health researchers and Latina/o organizations in 2 neighborhoods of Chicago, was formed to confront the epidemics of…

  14. Tying Funding to Community College Outcomes: Models, Tools, and Recommendations for States. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altstadt, David, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by economic and educational imperatives, public policymakers, higher education leaders, and philanthropic and advocacy groups are mobilizing aggressive national and state campaigns to bolster college completion. Campaigns to improve student success are particularly concerned about the performance of the nation's community colleges. In…

  15. Tying Funding to Community College Outcomes: Models, Tools, and Recommendations for States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altstadt, David, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by economic and educational imperatives, public policymakers, higher education leaders, and philanthropic and advocacy groups are mobilizing aggressive national and state campaigns to bolster college completion. Campaigns to improve student success are particularly concerned about the performance of the nation's community colleges. In…

  16. A Guide to Federal Funding in the Physical and Mathematical Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficklen, Myra

    This guide provides summaries of federal programs in the physical and mathematical sciences of interest to colleges and universities. Programs from the following federal agencies are included: National Science Foundation; Department of Energy; Environmental Protection Agency; Office of Education; Department of Interior; Smithsonian Institution;…

  17. From community to commodity: the ethics of pharma-funded social networking sites for physicians.

    PubMed

    Landa, Amy Snow; Elliott, Carl

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of doctors in the United States are joining online professional networks that cater exclusively to licensed physicians. The most popular are Sermo, with more than 135,000 members, and Doximity, with more than 100,000. Both companies claim to offer a valuable service by enabling doctors to "connect" in a secure online environment. But their business models raise ethical concerns. The sites generate revenue by selling access to their large networks of physician-users to clients that include global pharmaceutical companies, market research and consulting firms, and hedge funds and other investors. In exchange for a fee, these clients are offered a variety of tools to monitor, analyze, and solicit physicians' opinions. In Sermo's case, clients are also offered opportunities to conduct "awareness campaigns" on the site that are aimed at influencing physician sentiment about specific drugs and medical devices. In effect, these online networks have created an even more efficient means for the pharmaceutical industry to track physician sentiment, disseminate messages, and cultivate key opinion leaders. This paper argues that the dual nature of these sites (a) undermines their integrity and transparency as forums for the exchange of medical opinion and (b) presents an ethical conflict for the doctors who use them.

  18. Maximizing Federal Food and Nutrition Funds for Out-of-School Time and Community School Initiatives. Strategy Brief, Volume 1, Number 3. Tools for Out-of-School Time and Community School Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langford, Barbara Hanson

    Noting the importance of good nutrition to out-of-school time programs serving children, this strategy brief provides an overview of the major sources of federal food and nutrition funds that can support out-of-school time and community school programs. The brief then highlights five strategies that community leaders and program developers can…

  19. Physical control of zooplankton communities in the Catalan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Calbet, A.; Estrada, M.; Marrasé, C.; Saiz, E.; Trepat, I.

    2007-08-01

    The study of the response of planktonic systems to environmental variability, and particularly to differences in the intensity and frequency of mechanical energy inputs, one of the leading objectives of GLOBEC, has been an important part of the research developed in the Spanish Mediterranean over the last decades. In this review we will discuss the research conducted at different space and time scales, intended to cope with the broad space and time variability scales of plankton. The time- and space scales considered range from small- (i.e., from seconds and mm, affecting zooplankton at individual level) to meso- (weeks and tens of km) and large scales (i.e., seasonal changes in the density structure of the water column). The discussion includes laboratory research using visual observation techniques at individual level, the use of experimental micro- and mesocosms, as well as data obtained by sampling natural systems during oceanographic cruises. At the smaller scales, mechanical energy inputs produce turbulent water movements that enhance the encounter probability between zooplankton and their prey, modify their swimming behaviour (higher frequency of fast-swimming events, escape responses), increase metabolic rates and affect energetic balances. Consequently, the development of organisms is accelerated, and the size of adults significantly reduced. The changes induced by turbulence on zooplankton at individual levels modify, by cumulative processes, the characteristics of zooplankton populations and of the whole planktonic ecosystems. Such changes can be observed by using micro- and mesocosm experiments. The physical control of zooplankton communities can also be observed, even at larger scales, in the highly hydrodynamic physical structures (i.e., fronts and ergoclines) of the Catalan Sea (NW Mediterranean). In these structures mechanical energy inputs are amplified, resulting in turbulence increases that contribute to modify, from individual rate processes

  20. Prevalence of Physical Activity Policies and Environmental Strategies in Communities and Worksites: The Iowa Community Transformation Grant.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Catherine J; Daniel-Ulloa, Jason D; Nothwehr, Faryle

    2016-01-01

    This study describes results of community and worksite assessments of physical activity policies and environmental strategies in 26 Iowa counties. Community coalition members completed the Community Health Assessment and Group Evaluation tool. The study explored findings using descriptive statistics and examined rural-urban differences in two of the five assessed sectors: community and worksites. Lower community scores (ie, needing improvement) were found for complete streets, bicycle use, and street calming. Higher scores (ie, identified strengths) were found for land use plans, maintain parks, and sidewalks Americans with Disabilities Act compliant. Worksites scored lower on promote stairwells, encourage non-motorized commuting, and implement activity breaks but higher on subsidize gym membership and provide area for physical activity. No rural-urban differences were found. Results identify opportunities to enhance community and worksite policies and environmental strategies to increase physical activity.

  1. Uncertain Recovery: Access and Funding Issues in Public Higher Education. Findings from the 2010 Survey of the National Council of State Directors of Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; Friedel, Janice N.

    2010-01-01

    There are growing pressures for community colleges and regional universities to accommodate the rise in student enrollment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate access and funding issues across public higher education institutions in the United States. Responses to a survey, conducted by the Education Policy Center at the University of…

  2. Making Connections in Practice: How Prospective Elementary Teachers Connect to Children's Mathematical Thinking and Community Funds of Knowledge in Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Turner, Erin E.; Bartell, Tonya Gau; Kalinec-Craig, Crystal; Foote, Mary Q.; Roth McDuffie, Amy; Drake, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the ways prospective elementary teachers (PSTs) made connections to children's mathematical thinking and children's community funds of knowledge in mathematics lesson plans. We analyzed the work of 70 PSTs from across three university sites associated with an instructional module for elementary mathematics methods courses that…

  3. Funding and Administrative Coordination of the Baja Field Studies Program at Glendale Community College during the Years 1974 to 1983: A Historical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercade, Jose A.

    Glendale Community College's (GCC's) Baja Field Studies Program began in 1974 as a faculty-initiated overseas field program in marine biology and developed into a college-wide, interdisciplinary program offering different courses under the leadership of a program coordinator. As changes in funding and administration took place due to the altered…

  4. Funds of Knowledge and Community Cultural Wealth: Exploring How Pre-Service Teachers Can Work Effectively with Mexican and Mexican American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saathoff, Stacy D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how pre-service teachers can work effectively with Mexican and Mexican American students. Using the foundation of funds of knowledge (González, Moll, & Amanti, 2005) and the critical race theory concept of community cultural wealth (Yosso, 2005), the article weaves together these ideas to discuss how they can be…

  5. Internationalization beyond the Curriculum: Rend Lake College as a Replicable Model of an Integrated Approach to Internationalizing the Community College Making Use of Existing Structures and Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rust, Joseph Henry

    Rend Lake College (RLC), in Ina, Illinois, has taken an integrated approach to internationalizing its college community by utilizing existing structures and funding to create six programs designed to foster global awareness and understanding. The first program offers student study abroad opportunities allowing students with 15 credit hours of…

  6. Increasing Physical Activity in Parks: Results of a Randomized Controlled Intervention Trial Using Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Williamson, Stephanie; Marsh, Terry; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is an important health risk factor that could be addressed at the community level. Purpose To determine whether using a community-based participatory approach with park directors and park advisory boards (PABs) could increase physical activity in local parks. We also tested whether involving PABs would be more effective than working with park directors alone. Design Randomized controlled intervention trial from 10/2007-4/2012 with partial blinding of observers to the condition. Setting/Participants Of 183 eligible parks in the City of Los Angeles, 50 neighborhood park/recreation centers serving diverse populations participated. Parks were randomized to three study arms, 1) Park-director intervention (PD-only), 2) Park Advisory Board intervention (PAB/PD), and 3) a control arm. We systematically observed physical activity in each park and interviewed park users and residents living within one mile of the park. Intervention(s) The intervention including assessing park use, obtaining feedback from park users and community residents, offering training on outreach and marketing, and giving each intervention park $4000 to increase park-based physical activity. The PAB/PD arm required participation and concurrence on all purchases by the PAB. Main Outcome Measure(s) Change in the number of park users and change in the level of physical activity, expressed as MET-hours. Results Relative to control parks where physical activity declined, in both the PD-only and PAB/PD parks physical activity increased, generating an estimated average of 600 more person visits/week/park, and 1830 MET-hours more physical activity/week/park. Both residents and park users reported increased frequency of exercise. No differences were noted between the PD-only and PAB/PD study arms. Conclusions Overall, providing feedback on park use and community perspectives and offering park directors training on outreach and marketing with modest discretionary funding increased

  7. An Integrated Approach to Falls Prevention: A Model for Linking Clinical and Community Interventions through the Massachusetts Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Laura J.; St. John, Julie Ann; Hariprasad, Santhi; Shankar, Kalpana N.; MacCulloch, Patricia A.; Bettano, Amy L.; Zotter, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Older adult falls continue to be a public health priority across the United States—Massachusetts (MA) being no exception. The MA Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund (PWTF) program within the MA Department of Public Health aims to reduce the physical and economic burdens of chronic health conditions by linking evidence-based clinical care with community intervention programs. The PWTF partnerships that focused on older adult falls prevention integrated the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Stopping Elderly Accidents, Death and Injuries toolkit into clinical settings. Partnerships also offer referrals for home safety assessments, Tai Chi, and Matter of Balance programs. This paper describes the PWTF program implementation process involving 49 MA organizations, while highlighting the successes achieved and lessons learned. With the unprecedented expansion of the U.S. Medicare beneficiary population, and the escalating incidence of falls, widespread adoption of effective prevention strategies will become increasingly important for both public health and for controlling healthcare costs. The lessons learned from this PWTF initiative offer insights and recommendations for future falls prevention program development and implementation. PMID:28321393

  8. Characteristics of Successful Community Partnerships to Promote Physical Activity Among Young People, North Carolina, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joni D.; Blake, Christine; Morris, Sara F.; Kolbe, Mary Bea

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Success of community-based projects has been thought to hinge on the strength of partnerships between those involved in design and implementation. However, characteristics of successful partnerships have not been fully described, particularly in the context of community-based physical activity promotion. We sought to identify characteristics of successful partnerships from the perspective of project coordinators involved in a mini-grant program to promote physical activity among young people. Methods Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with county coordinators (n = 19) of 20 North Carolina’s “Eat Smart, Move More” Community Grants projects funded during 2010 through 2012. Emergent themes were coded; then, overarching themes in the coded data were identified and grouped with similar codes under thematic headings. On the basis of project coordinators’ responses, each partnership was classified as strong, moderate, or weak. Results Three overarching themes characterized partnership relationships: continuity (history with partner and willingness to engage in a future partnership), community connectedness, and capacity (interest, enthusiasm, engagement, communication, and clarity of roles and responsibilities). Strong partnerships were those in which project coordinators indicated a positive working history with partners, experienced a high level of engagement from partners, had clearly defined roles and responsibilities of partners, and expressed a clear interest in working with their partners in the future. Conclusion In community partnerships aimed at increasing physical activity among young people, the perspectives of project coordinators are vital to identifying the characteristics of strong, moderate, and weak partnerships. These perspectives will be useful for future community program development and will influence potential health outcomes. PMID:24331281

  9. A community-organizing approach to promoting physical activity in older adults: the southeast senior physical activity network.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Allen; Egger, Ruth; LoGerfo, James P; Walwick, Julie; Schwartz, Sheryl

    2010-03-01

    This article describes a community organizing approach to promoting physical activity among underserved older adults in southeast Seattle: the Southeast Senior Physical Activity Network (SESPAN). The organizing strategy involves networking with a variety of community-based organizations, with two broad objectives: (a) program objective-to make connections between two (or more) community-based organizations to create senior physical activity programs where none existed before; and (b) coalition objective-to build a broader network or coalition of groups and organizations to assist in making larger scale environmental and policy changes. Networking among organizations led to the creation of a number of potentially sustainable walking and exercise programs that are reaching previously underserved communities within Southeast Seattle. In addition, a major community event led to the establishment of a health coalition that has the potential to continue to generate new broad-based programs and larger scale environmental changes.

  10. Overview: Permanent University Fund (PUF)/Higher Education Fund (HEF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    All public institutions of higher education except community colleges and the Texas A&M University System College of Dentistry receive funding for construction and other capital purposes from the Permanent University Fund (PUF) or the Higher Education Fund (HEF) (sometimes referred to as the Higher Education Assistance Fund or HEAF). The…

  11. 5 CFR 792.230 - May an agency use appropriated funds to improve the physical space of the family child care homes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May an agency use appropriated funds to improve the physical space of the family child care homes or child care centers? 792.230 Section 792.230 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' HEALTH AND COUNSELIN...

  12. Revolving Loan Fund: A Novel Approach to Increasing Access to Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Methods in Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Megan L; Breeze, Janis L; Paulus, Jessica K; Meadows, Audra

    2017-06-16

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a revolving loan fund (RLF) on timing of device insertion and long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) access among a high-risk urban population at 3 Boston community health centers. Three health centers were identified to implement a RLF. Each clinic received $5000 from the RLF to purchase LARC devices. Data collected through medical record review retrospectively 1 year prior to start of the RLF and prospectively for 1 year thereafter included patient demographics, type of LARC selected, patient's date of documented interest in a LARC device, and date of insertion. The effect of a RLF on delay to LARC insertion was tested using negative binomial regression, controlling for site and potential confounding variables between the pre- and post-RLF periods. Three urban community health centers. Reproductive-aged women who received family planning services at the 3 participating health centers. Increasing access to LARC and decreasing wait times to LARC insertion after implementation of the RLF. Data on 133 patients in the pre-RLF group and 205 in the post-RLF group were collected. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic or clinical characteristics between the 2 time periods. LARC uptake increased significantly from the pre- to post-RLF period, specifically among implant users. There was a statistically significant decrease in the mean number of days in delay from interest to insertion from the pre- to post-RLF period (pre-RLF: 31.3 ± 50.6 days; post-RLF: 13.6 ± 16.7 days, adjusted P < .001). The reasons for the delay did not differ significantly between the 2 time periods. The RLF decreased wait time for the devices and increased overall insertion rates. This may serve as a promising solution to improve LARC access in community health centers. This project could be expanded to include more health centers, creating a city wide RLF. This expansion could allow for further data analysis

  13. Implementing Physical Activity Recommendations in a Tri-ethnic Rural Community through a Community-University Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sally M.; Cruz, Theresa; Hess, Julia Meredith; Kozoll, Richard; Page-Reeves, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Background A tri-ethnic rural community with limited resources and a university Prevention Research Center developed a partnership to promote evidence-based physical activity. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate how a community-university partnership can disseminate and implement The Community Guide’s recommendations for increasing physical activity and create a model for other under-resourced communities experiencing high rates of chronic disease. Methods Qualitative data collected through 47 semi-structured interviews, meeting minutes, and local newspaper articles were coded for themes and analyzed for patterns across the data. Results Implementation resulted in the creation of new paths and trails, increased walkability throughout the community, local park enhancements, and a community-wide campaign. Lessons learned included the importance of community-defined goals and outcomes, leadership, volunteerism, mutually beneficial goals, synergy, and having non-traditional partners. Conclusion This research provides a community-university partnership model for implementing evidence-based strategies to increase physical activity in rural communities. PMID:28736407

  14. The Impact of the Physical Environment on the Social Integration of Individuals with Disabilities in Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    Social integration in community is especially important for individuals with disabilities well-being. Although individuals with disabilities reside within the community's physical environment, they are often marginalized in the social environment. This may be the result of individuals with disabilities residing in physical environments that…

  15. [Analysis on funds application of community based organizations involved in HIV/AIDS response and government financial investment in China, 2014].

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Zhu, Y X; Wang, P; Liu, P; Li, J F; Sha, S; Yang, W Z; Li, H

    2017-03-06

    Objective: To understand the government financial investments to community based organizations (CBO) involved in HIV/AIDS Control and Prevention of China and its influencing factors. Methods: Questionnaire of the situation of CBO involved in HIV/AIDS control and prevention were designed, and filled by the staff of Provincial Health Administrative Departments of 31 provinces (autonomous regions and municipalities). The research focused on the fields of CBO involved in HIV/AIDS response in 31 provinces (autonomous regions and municipalities), including intervention on HIV/AIDS high risk population (female sex worker (FSW), man who sex with man (MSM), drug user (DU) and case management and care for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH)). 29 valid questionnaires were collecting, with Shanxi Province and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Regions not filled. Questionnaire included financial supports from local governments, transfer payment from central government for CBO involved in HIV/AIDS response in 2014, and unit cost for CBO involved in HIV/AIDS control and prevention. Multivariate analysis was conducted on the project application and financial investment of community based organizations involved in HIV/AIDS control and prevention in 2014. Results: The total amount of CBO to apply for participation in AIDS prevention and control was 64 482 828 Yuan in 2014. The actual total amount of investment was 50 616 367 Yuan, The investment came from the central government funding, the provincial level government funding, the prefecture and county level government funding investment and other sources of funding. 22 of 28 provinces (autonomous regions and municipalities) received the funds from the central government finance, and median of investment funds 500 000 Yuan. 15 provinces (autonomous regions and municipalities) gained the funds from the provincial government finance, and median of investment funds 350 000 Yuan. 12 provinces (autonomous regions and municipalities) got the funds

  16. Promoting Physical Activity among Youth through Community-Based Prevention Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Carol A.; Courtney, Anita H.; McDermott, Robert J.; Alfonso, Moya L.; Baldwin, Julie A.; Nickelson, Jen; Brown, Kelli R. McCormack; DeBate, Rita D.; Phillips, Leah M.; Thompson, Zachary; Zhu, Yiliang

    2010-01-01

    Background: Community-based prevention marketing (CBPM) is a program planning framework that blends community-organizing principles with a social marketing mind-set to design, implement, and evaluate public health interventions. A community coalition used CBPM to create a physical activity promotion program for tweens (youth 9-13 years of age)…

  17. Creating Sustainable Community Engagement Initiatives in a Graduate Physical Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palombaro, Kerstin M.; Lattanzi, Jill B.; Dole, Robin L.

    2010-01-01

    Many institutions of higher learning engage in activities related to community building. At Widener University, the Institute for Physical Therapy Education has undergone a process to build on relationships with those in its community to create service-learning and community engagement activities that were first initiated with short-term, one-time…

  18. Gendered Communities of Practice and the Construction of Masculinities in Turkish Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atencio, Matthew; Koca, Canan

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the construction of masculinities in Turkish physical education through Carrie Paechter's conceptualisation of gendered communities of practice. According to Paechter, educational communities of practice operate as sites of gendered activity. Membership within these communities contributes to the construction of a gendered…

  19. Promoting Physical Activity among Youth through Community-Based Prevention Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Carol A.; Courtney, Anita H.; McDermott, Robert J.; Alfonso, Moya L.; Baldwin, Julie A.; Nickelson, Jen; Brown, Kelli R. McCormack; DeBate, Rita D.; Phillips, Leah M.; Thompson, Zachary; Zhu, Yiliang

    2010-01-01

    Background: Community-based prevention marketing (CBPM) is a program planning framework that blends community-organizing principles with a social marketing mind-set to design, implement, and evaluate public health interventions. A community coalition used CBPM to create a physical activity promotion program for tweens (youth 9-13 years of age)…

  20. Gendered Communities of Practice and the Construction of Masculinities in Turkish Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atencio, Matthew; Koca, Canan

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the construction of masculinities in Turkish physical education through Carrie Paechter's conceptualisation of gendered communities of practice. According to Paechter, educational communities of practice operate as sites of gendered activity. Membership within these communities contributes to the construction of a gendered…

  1. Creating Sustainable Community Engagement Initiatives in a Graduate Physical Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palombaro, Kerstin M.; Lattanzi, Jill B.; Dole, Robin L.

    2010-01-01

    Many institutions of higher learning engage in activities related to community building. At Widener University, the Institute for Physical Therapy Education has undergone a process to build on relationships with those in its community to create service-learning and community engagement activities that were first initiated with short-term, one-time…

  2. Initial integration of chiropractic services into a provincially funded inner city community health centre: a program description

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Steven R.; Toth, Audrey; Kanovsky, Joel; Olin, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background: The burden of fees for chiropractic services rendered often falls on the patient and must be provided out-of-pocket regardless of their socioeconomic status and clinical need. Universal healthcare coverage reduces the financial barrier to healthcare utilization, thereby increasing the opportunity for the financially disadvantaged to have access to care. In 2011 the Canadian Province of Manitoba initiated a pilot program providing access to chiropractic care within the Mount Carmel Clinic (MCC), a non-secular, non-profit, inner city community health centre. Objective: To describe the initial integration of chiropractic services into a publically funded healthcare facility including patient demographics, referral patterns, treatment practices and clinical outcomes. Method: A retrospective database review of chiropractic consultations in 2011 (N=177) was performed. Results: The typical patient referred for chiropractic care was a non-working (86%), 47.3(SD=16.8) year old, who self-identified as Caucasian (52.2%), or Aboriginal (35.8%) and female (68.3%) with a body mass index considered obese at 30.4(SD=7.0). New patient consultations were primarily referrals from other health providers internal to the MCC (71.2%), frequently primary care physicians (76%). Baseline to discharge comparisons of numeric rating scale scores for the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacroiliac and extremity regions all exceeded the minimally clinically important difference for reduction in musculoskeletal pain. Improvements occurred over an average of 12.7 (SD=14.3) treatments, and pain reductions were also statistically significant at p<0.05. Conclusion: Chiropractic services are being utilized by patients, and referring providers. Clinical outcomes indicate that services rendered decrease musculoskeletal pain in an inner city population. PMID:26816049

  3. Funding. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    This paper provides tips and resources that communities can use to reduce substance abuse and gun violence. The names of national organizations, publications, and community leaders with expertise in funding are included. It describes how Join Together Online, a national resource for communities working to reduce substance abuse and gun violence,…

  4. Adapting a Community-Based Physical Activity Promotion Program for Rural, Diverse Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colquitt, Gavin; Walker, Ashley; Alfonso, Moya

    2014-01-01

    With school-aged youth spending less time in physical education, school-community-university partnerships offer potential to promote physical activity among school-aged youth. The VERB™ Summer Scorecard (VSS) program was designed in Lexington, Kentucky, to promote physical activity among "tweens" (8- to 13-year-olds). VSS since has been…

  5. The Play Community: A Student-Centered Model for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler G.; Bolter, Nicole D.; Stoll, Sharon Kay

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their participation in K-12 physical education, students should obtain high levels of physical activity and learn motor and/or sport skills. How to accomplish these outcomes in the context of K-12 physical education is a continuous challenge for teachers. The purpose of this article is to introduce the play community model, which…

  6. Promoting youth physical activity in rural southern communities: practitioner perceptions of environmental opportunities and barriers.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael B; Theriault, Daniel S; Shores, Kindal A; Melton, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    Research on youth physical activity has focused on urban areas. Rural adolescents are more likely to be physically inactive than urban youth, contributing to higher risk of obesity and chronic diseases. Study objectives were to: (1) identify perceived opportunities and barriers to youth physical activity within a rural area and (2) identify rural community characteristics that facilitate or inhibit efforts to promote youth physical activity. Thirty in-depth interviews were conducted with expert informants in 2 rural southern US counties. Interviewees were recruited from diverse positions across multiple sectors based on their expert knowledge of community policies and programs for youth physical activity. Informants saw ball fields, natural amenities, and school sports as primary resources for youth physical activity, but they were divided on whether opportunities were abundant or scarce. Physical distance, social isolation, lack of community offerings, and transportation were identified as key barriers. Local social networks facilitated political action and volunteer recruitment to support programs. However, communities often lacked human capital to sustain initiatives. Racial divisions influenced perceptions of opportunities. Despite divisions, there were also examples of pooling resources to create and sustain physical activity opportunities. Developing partnerships and leveraging local resources may be essential to overcoming barriers for physical activity promotion in rural areas. Involvement of church leaders, school officials, health care workers, and cooperative extension is likely needed to establish and sustain youth rural physical activity programs. Allocating resources to existing community personnel and volunteers for continuing education may be valuable. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  7. Measuring Physical Activity in Outdoor Community Recreational Environments: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Aytur, Semra A; Jones, Sydney A; Stransky, Michelle; Evenson, Kelly R

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major contributors to escalating health care costs in the USA. Physical activity is an important protective factor against CVD, and the National Prevention Strategy recognizes active living (defined as a way of life that integrates physical activity into everyday routines) as a priority for improving the nation's health. This paper focuses on developing more inclusive measures of physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, specifically parks and trails, to enhance their usability for at-risk populations such as persons with mobility limitations. We develop an integrated conceptual framework for measuring physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, describe examples of evidence-based tools for measuring physical activity in these settings, and discuss strategies to improve measurement of physical activity for persons with mobility limitations. Addressing these measurement issues is critically important to making progress towards national CVD goals pertaining to active community environments.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity in Outdoor Community Recreational Environments: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sydney A.; Stransky, Michelle; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major contributors to escalating health care costs in the USA. Physical activity is an important protective factor against CVD, and the National Prevention Strategy recognizes active living (defined as a way of life that integrates physical activity into everyday routines) as a priority for improving the nation’s health. This paper focuses on developing more inclusive measures of physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, specifically parks and trails, to enhance their usability for at-risk populations such as persons with mobility limitations. We develop an integrated conceptual framework for measuring physical activity in outdoor community recreational environments, describe examples of evidence-based tools for measuring physical activity in these settings, and discuss strategies to improve measurement of physical activity for persons with mobility limitations. Addressing these measurement issues is critically important to making progress towards national CVD goals pertaining to active community environments. PMID:26005510

  9. Outcomes of a multicomponent physical activity program for sedentary, community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Toto, Pamela E; Raina, Ketki D; Holm, Margo B; Schlenk, Elizabeth A; Rubinstein, Elaine N; Rogers, Joan C

    2012-07-01

    This single-group repeated-measures pilot study evaluated the effects of a 10-wk, multicomponent, best-practice exercise program on physical activity, performance of activities of daily living (ADLs), physical performance, and depression in community-dwelling older adults from low-income households (N = 15). Comparison of pretest and posttest scores using a one-tailed paired-samples t test showed improvement (p < .05) for 2 of 3 ADL domains on the Activity Measure-Post Acute Care and for 6 physical-performance measures of the Senior Fitness Test. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significant main effects for 3 of 8 physical activity measures using the Yale Physical Activity Scale. Retention rate was 78.9%, and the adherence rate for group sessions was 89.7%. Results suggest that participation in a multicomponent, best-practice physical activity program may positively affect sedentary, community-dwelling older adults' physical activity, ADL performance, and physical performance.

  10. $32 Million in EPA funds help Northwest and Alaska tribes protect communities' health, water, air and natural resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $32 million in funding for the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) capacity building grants to tribes and tribal consortia in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

  11. Finding communities in linear time: a physics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F.; Huberman, B. A.

    2004-03-01

    We present a method that allows for the discovery of communities within graphs of arbitrary size in times that scale linearly with their size. This method avoids edge cutting and is based on notions of voltage drops across networks that are both intuitive and easy to solve regardless of the complexity of the graph involved. We additionally show how this algorithm allows for the swift discovery of the community surrounding a given node without having to extract all the communities out of a graph.

  12. Promoting physical activity in low-income African-American communities: the PARR project.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C E; Raczynski, J M; Heath, G W; Levinson, R; Hilyer, J C; Cutter, G R

    1993-01-01

    Data suggest that low-income and minority individuals are less physically active than the general population. We conducted a constituency-based physical activity promotion program, the Physical Activity for Risk Reduction (PARR) project, from 1988 to 1991, with residents of rental communities administered by the Housing Authority of the Birmingham District in Birmingham, Alabama. Data collected through focus groups and by survey of randomly selected residents' exercise practices, beliefs, barriers to and facilitators of physical activity were used to develop specific intervention programs that were implemented and evaluated in six intervention and two control communities through surveys and process evaluations. Trained community residents conducted data collection and interventions. Ninety-nine percent of respondents in the baseline survey were African Americans. Thirty-one percent reported no participation in any of 13 physical activities in the previous year. Significant differences (P < .05) in average attendance by community at group exercise sessions indicated substantial variability in effectiveness of the intervention, due at least in part to factors related to both the communities and the leaders. This variability appeared to explain patterns of change in preintervention and postintervention physical activity scores in intervention communities. Data and experiences from PARR will be applicable to the delivery of similar types of health-related programs in undeserved communities.

  13. Comprehensive Community Model for Physical Processes in the Nearshore Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    community model that predicts Nearshore hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and seabed morphology changes given offshore wave conditions and initial...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Delaware,Center for Applied Coastal...the NOPP community model with observations of waves, currents, and bathymetric evolution acquired with the sensor arrays shown here. WORK COMPLETED An

  14. How community environment shapes physical activity: perceptions revealed through the PhotoVoice method.

    PubMed

    Belon, Ana Paula; Nieuwendyk, Laura M; Vallianatos, Helen; Nykiforuk, Candace I J

    2014-09-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that community environment plays an important role in individuals' physical activity engagement. However, while attributes of the physical environment are widely investigated, sociocultural, political, and economic aspects of the environment are often neglected. This article helps to fill these knowledge gaps by providing a more comprehensive understanding of multiple dimensions of the community environment relative to physical activity. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore how people's experiences and perceptions of their community environments affect their abilities to engage in physical activity. A PhotoVoice method was used to identify barriers to and opportunities for physical activity among residents in four communities in the province of Alberta, Canada, in 2009. After taking pictures, the thirty-five participants shared their perceptions of those opportunities and barriers in their community environments during individual interviews. Using the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO) framework, themes emerging from these photo-elicited interviews were organized in four environment types: physical, sociocultural, economic, and political. The data show that themes linked to the physical (56.6%) and sociocultural (31.4%) environments were discussed more frequently than the themes of the economic (5.9%) and political (6.1%) environments. Participants identified nuanced barriers and opportunities for physical activity, which are illustrated by their quotes and photographs. The findings suggest that a myriad of factors from physical, sociocultural, economic, and political environments influence people's abilities to be physically active in their communities. Therefore, adoption of a broad, ecological perspective is needed to address the barriers and build upon the opportunities described by participants to make communities more healthy and active. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. Promoting physical activity among children and youth in disadvantaged South Australian CALD communities through alternative community sport opportunities.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Edoardo; McGrath, Richard

    2016-02-29

    Issue addressed: Recently arrived migrants and refugees from a culturally and linguistically diverse background (CALD) may be particularly vulnerable to social exclusion. Participation in sport is endorsed as a vehicle to ease the resettlement process; however, in Australia, this is often thought as a simple matter of integration into existing sport structures (e.g. clubs). This approach fails to place actual community needs at the centre of sport engagement efforts.Methods: A consultation framework was established with South Australian CALD community leaders and organisations to scope needs for community-based alternatives to participation in traditional sport (e.g. clubs), co-design a suitable community sport program and pilot it in five communities. Interviews and questionnaire surveys were conducted with participants, community representatives, stakeholders and volunteers.Results: Regular, free soccer activities engaged 263 young people from a great variety of nationalities, including over 50% refugees, in secondary state school and community-based sites.Conclusion: Alternative community sport programs can provide a basic but valuable forum to promote physical activity and associated well being in CALD and refugee communities.So what?: Alternative approaches can extend the health benefits of sport participation to disadvantaged children and youth who are excluded from traditional sport participation opportunities.

  16. The Status of Physical Education within Junior/Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, William F., Jr.

    A study of the status of physical education and athletics programs in two-year colleges was part of a followup to an earlier national study conducted in 1971. Questionnaires were sent to a national sample of 300 institutions; 174 (58 percent) were returned. Data on the size of physical education departments, type of school governance, size of…

  17. Communities of Molecules: A Physical Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVoe, Howard; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching physical chemistry. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students see that chemistry is a unified science. Contents include: (1) "Introduction of Physical Chemistry"; (2) "The…

  18. Perspectives on physical activity among immigrants and refugees to a small urban community in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Mark L.; Tiedje, Kristina; Meiers, Sonja J.; Mohamed, Ahmed A.; Formea, Christine M.; Ridgeway, Jennifer L.; Asiedu, Gladys B.; Boyum, Ginny; Weis, Jennifer A.; Nigon, Julie A.; Patten, Christi; Sia, Irene G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immigrants and refugees to the United States exhibit relatively low levels of physical activity, but reasons for this disparity are poorly understood. METHODS 16 gender and age-stratified focus groups were conducted among 127 participants from heterogenous immigrant and refugee groups (Cambodian, Mexican, Somali, Sudanese) in a small Minnesota urban community. RESULTS We found many similarities in perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity between heterogeneous immigrant and refugee groups. While the benefits of physical activity were widely acknowledged, lack of familiarity and comfort with taking the first steps towards being physically active were the most significant barriers to physical activity. Participants described being motivated by social support from family, friends, and communities to be physically active. DISCUSSION Our findings suggest that shared experiences of immigration and associated social, economic, and linguistic factors influence how physical activity is understood, conceptualized and practiced. PMID:24052480

  19. High School Physical Education Students and Experiential Learning in the Community: A Classroom Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapps, Tyler; Passmore, Tim; Lindenmeier, Donna; Kensinger, Weston

    2014-01-01

    The experiential learning model for students working with community groups was developed for specific experiential learning experiences involving 40 hours of actual experience for high school physical education students working with groups in the community. This article discusses the development and specific segments of the model, as well as how…

  20. High School Physical Education Students and Experiential Learning in the Community: A Classroom Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapps, Tyler; Passmore, Tim; Lindenmeier, Donna; Kensinger, Weston

    2014-01-01

    The experiential learning model for students working with community groups was developed for specific experiential learning experiences involving 40 hours of actual experience for high school physical education students working with groups in the community. This article discusses the development and specific segments of the model, as well as how…

  1. Investigating Student Communities with Network Analysis of Interactions in a Physics Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2012-01-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and…

  2. A Framework for Physical Activity Programs within School-Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Ragnar; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; De Martelaer, Kristine; Seghers, Jan; Kirk, David; Haerens, Leen; De Cocker, Katrien; Cardon, Greet

    2011-01-01

    School-community partnerships have shown their potential as incubators for innovations and for contributing to comprehensive physical activity (PA) programs. However, implementation frameworks for school-community partnerships that allow local tailoring of PA programs remain scarce. The present paper aims at documenting the composition of a…

  3. Newspaper Content Analysis in Evaluation of a Community-Based Participatory Project to Increase Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granner, Michelle L.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Burroughs, Ericka L.; Fields, Regina; Hallenbeck, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    This study conducted a newspaper content analysis as part of an evaluation of a community-based participatory research project focused on increasing physical activity through policy and environmental changes, which included activities related to media advocacy and media-based community education. Daily papers (May 2003 to December 2005) from both…

  4. Investigating Student Communities with Network Analysis of Interactions in a Physics Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2012-01-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and…

  5. AGU Scholarship Fund Reaches Its Goal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Claire

    2014-11-01

    The Edmond M. Dewan Young Scientist Scholarship fund has reached its goal of $25,000. Those who donated to the fund share AGU's mission in taking an active role in educating and nurturing the next generation of scientists and ensuring a sustainable future for society. Thanks to the generosity of more than 100 members of the AGU and science community, a deserving graduate student of atmospheric or space physics will receive financial assistance to further his or her research and advance his or her research and future career.

  6. Prospective Physical Sciences Teachers' Willingness to Engage in Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Laurinda

    2006-01-01

    Teachers' professional development is a lifelong learning process that should start with teaching practice, is best developed from experience and can be promoted by socio-professional interactions. Thus, a learning community of teachers might be a valuable environment for continuing professional development. This paper reports research carried out…

  7. Community Resources for Promoting Youth Nutrition and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kelly R.; McGowan, Melissa K.; Donato, Karen A.; Kollipara, Sobha; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a national public health crisis. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the National Institutes of Health and Kaiser Permanente have developed community tools and resources for children and families to lower their risk for obesity through healthier, active lifestyles. The authors describe innovative practices and…

  8. Announcement: Community Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation for Built Environment Interventions to Increase Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    2017-05-05

    The Community Preventive Services Task Force recently posted new information on its website: "Physical Activity: Built Environment Approaches Combining Transportation System Interventions with Land Use and Environmental Design." This information is available at https://www.thecommunityguide.org/findings/physical-activity-built-environment-approaches.

  9. Posttraumatic Distress and Physical Functioning: A Longitudinal Study of Injured Survivors of Community Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.; Jaycox, Lisa H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the cross-lagged relationships between posttraumatic distress symptoms and physical functioning, using a sample of 413 persons who were hospitalized for injuries resulting from community violence. Posttraumatic distress was assessed at 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months postinjury, and posttraumatic physical functioning was…

  10. Barriers Affecting Physical Activity in Rural Communities: Perceptions of Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinney, Sharon; McDonald, Andrea; Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna; Outley, Corliss; McKyer, E. Lisako; Thomas, Audrene

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the barriers inhibiting physical activity among children is critical in the fight against childhood obesity. This qualitative interview study examined parents' and children's perceptions of the barriers to physical activity in rural communities of low socioeconomic status. Parents and children concurred that the…

  11. Barriers Affecting Physical Activity in Rural Communities: Perceptions of Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinney, Sharon; McDonald, Andrea; Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna; Outley, Corliss; McKyer, E. Lisako; Thomas, Audrene

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the barriers inhibiting physical activity among children is critical in the fight against childhood obesity. This qualitative interview study examined parents' and children's perceptions of the barriers to physical activity in rural communities of low socioeconomic status. Parents and children concurred that the…

  12. The Administration's American Competitiveness Initiative: Providing Federal Funding for Basic Research in the Physical Sciences. BHEF Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Investing in research, which drives industrial development and innovation, is essential to ensuring America's economic prosperity, national security, and leadership in a global economy. Although U.S. commitment to research and development (R&D) has traditionally been strong and sustained, federal funding of R&D as a share of U.S. gross domestic…

  13. How To Analyze Your State's Education Funding System. A Workbook from the Rural School and Community Trust Policy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, William J.

    This booklet aims to help concerned citizens change laws and school funding systems to improve equity and adequacy for rural education programs. It will help readers gather the information they need, evaluate its meaning, put it in context, establish networks with others, and work with their legislatures and courts to solve the problems. Chapter 1…

  14. Delivering Coordinated, Community-Based Services by Putting Networks into Action: New York City's Change Capital Fund. No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aceves, Aurelia De La Rosa; Greenberg, David M.; Schell, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This brief is the third in a series documenting the implementation of an economic mobility initiative supported by New York City's Change Capital Fund (CCF). CCF is a consortium of New York City donors formed to invest in local nonprofits that undertake data-driven antipoverty strategies integrating housing, education, and employment services. CCF…

  15. Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts

    DOE PAGES

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-09-14

    In biological soil crusts (biocrusts)—communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface— fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover are present.Though there has been long-standing concern over impacts of physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, in this paper we examined the effects of 10 y of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrustmore » communities and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical disturbance (>10 y of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increases in cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects on lichens. Although the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, these results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. Finally, this is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed as treatments in our study.« less

  16. Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts)—communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface—are fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover. While there has been long-standing concern over impacts of 5 physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is also increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, USA, we examined the effects of 10 years of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrust communities, and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical 10 disturbance (>10 years of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increased cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects 15 on lichens. While the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, our results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. This is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed by the climate treatments used in our study.

  17. Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Reed, Sasha C; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-09-29

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts)—communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface—are fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover. Although there has been long-standing concern over impacts of physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, we examined the effects of 10 y of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrust communities and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical disturbance (>10 y of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increases in cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects on lichens. Although the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, our results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. This is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed as treatments in our study.

  18. Physics, Physicists and Revolutionary Capabilities for the Intelligence Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Lisa

    2009-05-01

    Over the past several decades, physicists have made seminal contributions to technological capabilities that have enabled the U.S. intelligence community to provide unexpected and unparalleled information to our nation's decision makers and help dispel the cloud of uncertainty they face in dealing with crises and challenges around the world. As we look to the future, we recognize that the ever-quickening pace of changes in the world and the threats we must confront demand continued innovation and improvement in the capabilities needed to provide the information on which our leaders depend. This talk will focus on some of the major technological challenges that the intelligence community faces in the coming years, and the many ways that physicists can help to overcome those challenges. The potential impact of physicists on the future capabilities of the US intelligence community is huge. In addition to the more obvious and direct impact through research in areas ranging from novel sensors to quantum information science, the unique approach physicists bring to a problem can also have an indirect but important effect by influencing how challenges in areas ranging from cybersecurity to advanced analytics are approached and solved. Several examples will be given.

  19. Funding Art with Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Orland is a small agricultural town in Northern California. The community has been deluged with fundraisers and requests for money. The author knew there must be a way to self-fund. She took a closer look at what made some of their community artists successful, and she looked at what the public bought. Her challenge was to put together a project…

  20. Diffusing a research-based physical activity promotion program for seniors into diverse communities: CHAMPS III.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Anita L; Gillis, Dawn; Grossman, Melanie; Castrillo, Martha; Pruitt, Leslie; McLellan, Barbara; Sperber, Nina

    2006-04-01

    Increasing the physical activity levels of older adults through diffusion of successful research-based programs into community settings is challenging because of differences between research and real-world settings. This project diffused the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) II, an individual-level research-based physical activity promotion program, through three community organizations to reach lower-income and minority (primarily Hispanic or Latino and African American) seniors. Through an academic-community partnership, university staff worked with each organization to adapt the program to be appealing and effective, enable their staff and volunteers to provide the program, increase participants' physical activity, and leave sustainable programs in place. Evaluation was based on methods recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The adapted programs, referred to as CHAMPS III, differed from the original program and among organizations. Group-based components and resource guides were included and new features were added; however, individualized components were not offered because of limited resources. A total of 321 people enrolled among three organizations; there was a trend toward increased physical activity at two organizations (an estimated increase of 481 kcal/week [P = .08] and 437 kcal/week [P = .06] expended in physical activity). Evaluation revealed challenges and unexpected community-level benefits. All organizations are continuing efforts to promote physical activity for older adults. This project enabled community organizations to implement physical activity promotion programs. The overarching challenge was to retain original program features within each organization's resources yet be sustainable. Although the programs differed from the original research program, they were a catalyst for numerous community-level changes. Our findings can guide similar projects to reach underserved older adults.

  1. Community Leaders' Training in Environmental Studies: A Cooperative Community Project Funded under Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965. Warp to Environmental Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F.; LaHart, David

    This document is the final report of the Community Leaders' Training in Environmental Studies Project conducted at Florida State University. The project sought to increase community environmental awareness and to expand the educational uses of the Tallahassee Junior Museum through the cooperation of museum staff, a variety of community groups, and…

  2. Predictors of cessation of regular leisure-time physical activity in community-dwelling elderly people.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Lord, Stephen R; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kim, Hunkyung; Suzuki, Takao

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining regular physical activity is important for physical and mental health, providing benefits including protection against chronic disease. However, little is known about the causes of cessation of habitual physical activity in older people. To identify predictors of cessation of regular physical activity in community-dwelling elderly people. 582 community-dwelling people aged 70 years and over who were living in Tokyo, Japan, were surveyed regarding physical activity levels 2 years after completing an initial survey where they indicated they took part in physical activity at least 5 days a week. Baseline demographic, health, physical functioning and psychological status measures were used as predictors of exercise cessation. At the 2-year follow-up, 192 subjects (33%) had ceased taking part in regular physical activity. In univariate analyses, women, smokers, those who reported a fear of falling and those with a slower walking speed at baseline were significantly more likely to cease regular physical activity. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified 3 of these variables as significant and independent predictors of activity cessation: female gender (adjusted OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.13-2.47); smoking (OR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.33-4.13), and slow walking speed (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.07-2.98). The study identified simple screening measures for identifying elderly people at risk of ceasing regular physical activity. Currently active older people with these factors may benefit from counseling and interventions to enable them to continue participating in regular physical activity.

  3. Growing the physics community in the Philippines in a changing landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, May T.; Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2015-12-01

    Since the participation of the Philippines in the 3rd IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics in 2008, the biggest change in the environment has happened online: Social media use is now pervasive. After the change in country leadership in 2010, policy directions were taken that directly affected the science research agenda, which in turn changed the research funding landscape. The uptake of government scholarship support for physics degrees continues to be popular with bachelor's and master's students regardless of gender. The country has also adopted the K-12 education system, and its impact on university employment remains to be seen.

  4. The "Ins" and "Outs" of Physical Activity Policy Implementation: Inadequate Capacity, Inappropriate Outcome Measures, and Insufficient Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Stevick, E. Doyle

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite broad public support and legislative activity, policies intended to promote physical activity in schools have not produced positive outcomes in levels of physical activity or student health. What explains the broad failure of Physical Activity Policies (PAPs)? Thus far, PAP research has used limited quantitative methods to…

  5. 78 FR 27249 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2012/2013; Strong Cities, Strong Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Communities National Resource Network AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and... Resource Network (SC2 Network). The purpose of this document is to announce the name and address of the..., Strong Communities Initiative (SC2), the SC2 Network is a capacity building program targeted to assisting...

  6. A Broad Mission, Clear Public Image, and Private Funding: Can Community Colleges Have It All? In Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunderman, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    Community colleges have an opportunity to engage in institutional advancement while conveying a timely and inspiring message, but the collective voice of the institution needs to be focused and clear. As a result, community colleges need to carefully evaluate their mission, public image, financial needs, and donor base in order to identify a…

  7. The Power To Choose: An Examination of Service Brokerage and Individualized Funding as Implemented by the Community Living Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    G. Allan Roeher Inst., Toronto (Ontario).

    This report evaluates how effective the brokerage system operated by the Community Living Society in Vancouver (British Columbia) has been in meeting the needs of individuals with a mental handicap living in the community. The program stresses service brokerage, a mechanism to deliver the planning resources required to arrange and purchase…

  8. Physical activity in adults with cystic fibrosis receiving intravenous antibiotics in hospital and in the community.

    PubMed

    Khiroya, Heena; Pound, Rebecca; Qureshi, Ushna; Brown, Catherine; Barrett, Joanne; Rashid, Rifat; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Turner, Alice M; Nash, Edward F

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous antibiotic therapy (IVAT) for CF acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE) can be delivered in hospital or in the community. This study aimed to compare physical activity in CF patients receiving hospital and community-delivered IVAT, as well as other health outcomes. This was a non-randomised parallel group prospective observational study. Hospitalised and community-treated CF adults receiving IVAT for APE were asked to wear ActiGraph® activity monitors, complete the habitual activity estimation scale (HAES), food diary, modified shuttle test (MST) and CFQ-R at the start and end of therapy. Nutritional and clinical outcomes were also compared between the cohorts. The primary outcomes was physical activity measured by the ActiGraph® activity monitors at the beginning and end of treatment in both cohorts. Physical activity (measured and self-reported) was no different between the cohorts, with both hospitalised and community-treated subjects being generally sedentary. Body weight increased significantly in the hospitalised cohort, whereas no difference was seen in the community-treated cohort. FEV1 % predicted and FVC % predicted increased in community-treated subjects, whereas only FVC % predicted increased in hospitalised subjects. CFQ-R respiratory domain increased to a greater extent in community-treated subjects. CF adults receiving IVAT for APE, both in hospital and in the community, are generally sedentary and we found no difference in physical activity between the two groups. These findings suggests the need to further promote physical activity in suitable patients during APE where considered appropriate.

  9. Determinants of Perceived Physical Environment Barriers among Community-Dwelling Elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lien, W-C; Chang, J-H; Guo, N-W; Lin, Y-C; Hsieh, P-C; Kuan, T-S

    2015-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that mobility, activities of daily living, and the interaction between them can play a key role in determining perceived physical environment barriers among community-dwelling elderly. Cross-sectional. Community. One hundred and ninety-seven community-dwelling elderly with more than 7 points on the Short Portable Mental State Questionnaire and less than 7 points on the Geriatric Depression Scale (15 items). None. Time Get-up and Go test (TUG), the subscales of basic activity of daily living (BADL)/instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) of the Hierarchy of Care Required (HCR), and the physical/structural subscale of the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors in Community-dwelling Elderly in Taiwan were used to measure mobility, activities of daily living and perceived physical environment barriers, respectively. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to test the study hypothesis. Significant and positive relations were found to exist between perceived physical environment barriers and (1) the TUG time (β=.300, p<.05), and (2) the IADL score for the HCR (β=.322, p<.05), respectively. A significant and negative relation existed between perceived physical environment barriers and the interaction term (the TUG time and the IADL score for the HCR) (β=-.211, p<.05). Mobility, IADL and the interaction between them are found to be significant determinants of perceived physical environment barriers in the community-dwelling elderly under consideration. Strategies targeting the enhancement of mobility among community-dwelling elderly are suggested to lead to improvements in the degree to which physical environment barriers are perceived. This beneficial effect could be greater in the case of elderly individuals with better IADL function.

  10. Community level predictors of physical activity among women in the preconception period.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Cheryl A; Sun, Haichun; Flory, Sara B; DeBate, Rita; Daley, Ellen M; Thompson, Erika; Bleck, Jennifer; Merrell, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Although physical activity is a key behavior targeted during the preconception period given its significant impact on pregnancy/birth outcomes and psychological well-being, few women meet national guidelines. While intrapersonal factors influencing physical activity among this population have been studied, community factors remain unexplored. The objective of this study was to examine community level predictors of physical activity among preconception women. Data from Add Health were limited to women (Wave III; age 18-28; n = 7,596) and excluded respondents who were pregnant, physically disabled, and missing data. The outcome variable was ≥5 instances of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in 1 week. Community predictor variables included neighborhood-level structural and social determinants (e.g., socio-demographic composition; landscape diversity; urbanization; access to resources; crime; vehicle availability). Multilevel logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the odds of engaging in ≥5 instances of MVPA. Few women (26 %) reported ≥5 instances of MVPA in 1 week. Adjusted multilevel analysis revealed women in the preconception period were more likely to report high MVPA when living in communities with larger population densities (OR 1.34, 95 % CI 1.02-1.77) and median household income greater than $50,000 (OR 1.33, 95 % CI 1.06-1.66). Additionally, a significant inverse trend was found between high MVPA and proportion of the community without a high school diploma. Findings suggest that neighborhood composition may have an impact on preconception physical activity status. Implications include increased efforts targeting community conditions for facilitating physical activity; ultimately, improving health among women and subsequent offspring.

  11. Children's Readiness Gains in Publically Funded, Community-Based Pre-Kindergarten Programs for 4 Year Olds and Preschool for 3 Year Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Peggy; Warde, Beverly; Peluso, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many states provide public funding to facilitate school readiness for community-based pre-K and preschool programs for 4 year old children and "at risk" 3 year old children. Little research exists on the school readiness gains of children participating in these "garden variety" community-based programs. Objective:…

  12. Community-based physical activity interventions among women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Amiri Farahani, Leila; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Eesa; Parvizy, Soroor; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Taghizadeh, Ziba

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review and assess the effectiveness of community-based physical activity interventions among women aged 18–65 years. Design Systematic review Methods To find relevant articles, the researcher selected reports published in English between 1 January 2000 and 31 March 2013. Systematic search was to find controlled-trial studies that were conducted to uncover the effect of community-based interventions to promote physical activity among women 18–65 years of age, in which physical activity was reported as one of the measured outcomes. The methodological quality assessment was performed using a critical appraisal sheet. Also, the levels of evidence were assessed for the types of interventions. Results The literature search identified nine articles. Four of the studies were randomised and the others studies had high methodological quality. There was no evidence, on the basis of effectiveness, for social cognitive theory-based interventions and inconclusive evidence of effectiveness for the rest of interventions. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence to assess the effectiveness of community-based interventions for enhancing physical activity among women. There is a need for high-quality randomised clinical trials with adequate statistical power to determine whether multicomponent and community-based intervention programmes increase physical activity among women, as well as to determine what type of interventions have a more effective and sustainable impact on women's physical activity. PMID:25833668

  13. The built environment: designing communities to promote physical activity in children.

    PubMed

    Tester, June M

    2009-06-01

    An estimated 32% of American children are overweight, and physical inactivity contributes to this high prevalence of overweight. This policy statement highlights how the built environment of a community affects children's opportunities for physical activity. Neighborhoods and communities can provide opportunities for recreational physical activity with parks and open spaces, and policies must support this capacity. Children can engage in physical activity as a part of their daily lives, such as on their travel to school. Factors such as school location have played a significant role in the decreased rates of walking to school, and changes in policy may help to increase the number of children who are able to walk to school. Environment modification that addresses risks associated with automobile traffic is likely to be conducive to more walking and biking among children. Actions that reduce parental perception and fear of crime may promote outdoor physical activity. Policies that promote more active lifestyles among children and adolescents will enable them to achieve the recommended 60 minutes of daily physical activity. By working with community partners, pediatricians can participate in establishing communities designed for activity and health.

  14. DCB Funding

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Biology (DCB) funds and supports extramural basic research that investigates the fundamental biology behind cancer. Find out more about DCB's grants process and funding opportunities.

  15. Shared Use of Physical Activity Facilities Among North Carolina Faith Communities, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Michael B.; Bocarro, Jason N.; Stein, Anna; Kanters, Michael A.; Sherman, Danielle Marie; Rhew, Lori K.; Stallings, Willona Marie; Bowen, Sarah K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Shared use of recreational facilities is a promising strategy for increasing access to places for physical activity. Little is known about shared use in faith-based settings. This study examined shared use practices and barriers in faith communities in North Carolina. Methods Faith communities in North Carolina (n = 234) completed an online survey (October–December 2013) designed to provide information about the extent and nature of shared use of recreational facilities. We used binary logistic regression to examine differences between congregations that shared use and those that did not share use. Results Most of the faith communities (82.9%) that completed the survey indicated that they share their facilities with outside individuals and organizations. Formal agreements were more common when faith communities shared indoor spaces such as gymnasiums and classroom meeting spaces than when they shared outdoor spaces such as playgrounds or athletic fields. Faith communities in the wealthiest counties were more likely to share their spaces than were faith communities in poorer counties. Faith communities in counties with the best health rankings were more likely to share facilities than faith communities in counties that had lower health rankings. The most frequently cited reasons faith communities did not share their facilities were that they did not know how to initiate the process of sharing their facilities or that no outside groups had ever asked. Conclusion Most faith communities shared their facilities for physical activity. Research is needed on the relationship between shared use and physical activity levels, including the effect of formalizing shared-use policies. PMID:28152362

  16. Physical Activity, Central Adiposity, and Functional Limitations in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Germain, Cassandra M; Vasquez, Elizabeth; Batsis, John A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and physical inactivity are independently associated with physical and functional limitations in older adults. The current study examines the impact of physical activity on odds of physical and functional limitations in older adults with central and general obesity. Data from 6279 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years or more from the Health and Retirement Study 2006 and 2008 waves were used to calculate prevalence and odds of physical and functional limitation among obese older adults with high waist circumference (waist circumference ≥88 cm in females and ≥102 cm in males) who were physically active versus inactive (engaging in moderate/vigorous activity less than once per week). Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, body mass index, and number of comorbidities. Physical activity was associated with lower odds of physical and functional limitations among older adults with high waist circumference (odds ratio [OR], 0.59; confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.68, for physical limitations; OR, 0.52; CI, 0.44-0.62, for activities of daily living; and OR, 0.44; CI, 0.39-0.50, for instrumental activities of daily living). Physical activity is associated with significantly lower odds of physical and functional limitations in obese older adults regardless of how obesity is classified. Additional research is needed to determine whether physical activity moderates long-term physical and functional limitations.

  17. Physical Activity, Central Adiposity and Functional Limitations in Community Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; Batsis, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Obesity and physical inactivity are independently associated with declines in physical and functional limitations in older adults. The current study examines the impact of physical activity on odds of physical and functional limitations in older adults with central and general obesity. Methods Data from 6,279 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years from the Health and Retirement Study 2006 and 2008 waves were used to calculate prevalence and odds of physical and functional limitation among obese older adults with high waist circumference (WC) (WC ≥ 88cm in females and ≥ 102cm in males) who were physically active vs. inactive (engaging in moderate/vigorous activity less than once per week). Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, body mass index (BMI) and number of comorbidities. Results Physical activity was associated with lower odds of physical and functional limitations among older adults with high WC odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were OR 0.59 (CI: 0.52–0.68) for physical limitations, OR 0.52 (CI: .44–.62) for activities of daily living and OR 0.44 (CI: 0.39–0.50) for instrumental activities of daily living. Conclusion Physical activity is associated with significantly lower odds of physical and functional limitations in obese older adults regardless of how obesity is classified. Additional research is needed to determine whether physical activity moderates long-term physical and functional limitations. PMID:25794309

  18. In-classroom physical activity and its impact on physical activity outside of school in a Hispanic community.

    PubMed

    Sirota, Dana; Meyer, Dodi; Nieto, Andres; Zamula, Arlen; Stockwell, Melissa; Berger-Jenkins, Evelyn

    2014-09-01

    School-based physical activity programs can reach large populations of at-risk children however evidence for the sustainability of healthy behaviors as a result of these programs is mixed. Healthy Schools Healthy Families (HSHF) is a physical activity and nutrition program for elementary students in a predominantly minority community. The program includes short teacher led classroom-based physical activities, also known as Transition Exercises (TE). Our aim was to assess whether TE was associated with children's reported recreational physical activity outside of school. We surveyed HSHF students in grade 5 (n = 383) about their recreational physical activity at the start and end of the school year. Multivariable analysis was used to determine what factors including TE contributed to their reported activity. Students were predominantly Hispanic with a mean age of 10 ± .03. There was an increase in reported recreational physical activity from the start to the end of the school year (73.6% to 82.4%, P < .05). Students who participated in more TE had a 2.75 times greater odds of reporting participation in recreational activity than students who participated in less TE. For students in HSHF, TE was significantly associated with an increase in recreational physical activity.

  19. 34 CFR 380.5 - What activities may the Secretary fund under community-based supported employment projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following activities are authorized under community-based projects: (1) Job search assistance. (2) Job development, including work site modification and use of advanced learning technology for skills training....

  20. Increasing physical activity. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    PubMed

    2001-10-26

    The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of community interventions to increase physical activity. The Task Force either strongly recommends or recommends six interventions: two informational approaches (i.e., communitywide campaigns and point-of-decision prompts to encourage use of stairs); three behavioral and social approaches (i.e., school-based physical education, social support interventions in community settings [e.g., setting up a buddy system or contracting with another person to complete specified levels of physical activity], and individually adapted health behavior change programs); and one intervention to increase physical activity by using environmental and policy approaches (i.e., creation of or enhanced access to places for physical activity, combined with informational outreach activities). The Task Force found insufficient evidence on which to base recommendations for classroom-based health education focused on information provision, behavioral skills, and social support interventions in family settings because of inconsistent findings; mass media campaigns, college-age physical education, and health education because of an insufficient number of studies; and classroom-based health education focusing on reducing television viewing and video game playing because of the lack of a demonstrated link between reduced time spent watching television or playing video games and increased physical activity. This report provides additional information regarding the recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information that can help in applying the interventions locally.

  1. Be active together: supporting physical activity in public housing communities through women-only programs.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Luiza G; Sharify, Denise; Krieger, James; Saelens, Brian E; Calleja, Jeniffer; Aden, Ayaan

    2013-01-01

    Low-income and minority groups in the United States have low levels of physical activity that contribute to health inequities. In public housing communities, both built and social environments are key factors that impact residents' physical activity levels. To develop and evaluate women-only physical activity programs that provide women from cultures in which physical activity in mixed-gender settings is not acceptable (e.g., Muslim women) with physical activity opportunities. We describe the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) process and evaluation feedback from our initial research and evaluation phases, including focus groups, to shape interventions. Active community engagement in all phases of research, including cultural tailoring of interventions, and decisions about location and affordability, was critical. Implementing interventions in public housing is feasible, but requires frequent feedback from residents and correction. The use of CBPR resulted in the implementation of a successful, culturally appropriate set of physical activity interventions, specifically for Muslim Somali women. Housing authorities should consider incorporating recreational facilities on site and women-only opportunities to provide venues for physical activity.

  2. Panel Discussion: Common Themes Across ``Bringing Newcomers Into The Physics Community''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Angela

    2014-03-01

    I will be facilitating a discussion between the audience and the four speakers in this session: Dimitri Dounas-Frazer, Catherine Good, Casey Miller, and Katie Hinko. They will all be speaking on the same general topic of supporting newcomers to the physics community at critical transition points but come from a set of diverse contexts and perspectives. Their work spans a wide age range of STEM students and they approach their work through many different lenses: as physics faculty, program directors, education and psychology researchers, and combinations thereof. Broad themes across these contexts and perspectives will be explored such as the role of growth mindset, community, and professional development.

  3. Associations between observed neighborhood characteristics and physical activity: findings from a multiethnic urban community

    PubMed Central

    Kwarteng, Jamila L.; Schulz, Amy J.; Mentz, Graciela B.; Zenk, Shannon N.; Opperman, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the contributions of characteristics of the neighborhood environment to inequalities in physical activity. However, few studies have examined the relationship between observed neighborhood environmental characteristics and physical activity in a multiethnic urban area. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess relationships between neighborhood environments and physical activity and the extent to which these associations varied by demographic characteristics or perceptions of the physical and social environment. Methods Cross-sectional analyses drew upon data collected from a stratified proportional probability sample of non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White (NHW) adults (n = 919) in low-to-moderate income neighborhoods in Detroit, Michigan. Physical activity was assessed as self-reported duration and frequency of vigorous and moderate physical activity. Observed physical environment was assessed through systematic social observation by trained observers on blocks adjacent to survey respondents' residences. Results We find a positive association of sidewalk condition with physical activity, with stronger effects for younger compared with older residents. In addition, physical disorder was more negatively associated with physical activity among NHW and older residents. Conclusions These findings suggest that sidewalk improvements and reductions in physical disorder in urban communities may promote greater equity in physical activity. PMID:24159053

  4. A Community Python Library for Solar Physics (SunPy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, A. Y.; Ireland, J.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Mumford, S.; Hughitt, V. K.; Hewett, R.; Mayer, F.; SunPy Dev Team

    2013-07-01

    Python, a free, cross platform, general purpose, high-level programming language, has seen widespread adoption among the scientific community resulting in the availability of a large range of software, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy) and machine learning to spectral analysis and visualization (Matplotlib). SunPy is a data analysis toolkit specializing in providing the software necessary to analyze solar and heliospheric datasets in Python. It aims to provide a free and open-source alternative to the IDL-based SolarSoft (SSW) solar data analysis environment. We present the latest release of SunPy (0.3). This release includes a major refactor of the main SunPy code to improve ease of use for the user as well as a more consistent interface. SunPy provides downloading capability through integration with the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) and the the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK). It can open image fits files from major solar missions (SDO/AIA, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO) into WCS-aware maps. SunPy provides advanced time-series tools for data from mission such as GOES, SDO/EVE, and Proba2/LYRA as well as support for radio spectra (e.g. e-Callisto). We present examples of solar data analysis in SunPy, and show how Python-based solar data-analysis can leverage the many existing data analysis tools already available in Python. We discuss the future goals of the project and encourage interested users to become involved in the planning and development of SunPy.

  5. Temporal organization of phytoplankton communities linked to physical forcing.

    PubMed

    Winder, Monika; Hunter, Deborah A

    2008-05-01

    The performance of individual phytoplankton species is strongly governed by the thermal stratification's impact on vertical mixing within the water column, which alters the position of phytoplankton relative to nutrients and light. The present study documents shifts in phytoplankton structure and vertical positioning that have accompanied intensified long-term stratification in a natural ecosystem. Ordination analysis is used to extract gradients in phytoplankton composition in Lake Tahoe, an extremely nutrient-poor lake, over a 23-year period of records. Community structure in the 1980s was associated most strongly with resource availability (low nitrogen to phosphorus ratios, deeper euphotic zone depth), while intensified stratification dominated the phytoplankton structure since the late 1990s. Within diatoms, small-sized cells increased with reduced mixing, suggesting that suppressed turbulence provides them with a competitive advantage over large-sized cells. Among the morphologically diverse chlorophytes, filamentous and coenobial forms were favored under intensified stratification. The selection for small-sized diatoms is accompanied by a shoaling trend in their vertical position in the water column. In contrast, the motile flagellates displayed a deeper vertical positioning in recent years, indicating that optimal growth conditions shifted likely due to reduced upwelling of nutrients. As the thermal stratification of lakes and oceans is strongly linked to climate variables, the present study confirms that climate warming will alter phytoplankton structure and dynamics largely through effects on nutrient availability and sinking velocities. Intensified stratification should favor the expansion of small-sized species and species with the capability of buoyancy regulation, which may alter primary productivity, nutrient recycling, and higher trophic productivity.

  6. The role of community programmes and mass events in promoting physical activity to patients.

    PubMed

    Bauman, A; Murphy, N; Lane, A

    2009-01-01

    The challenge for physical activity promotion in clinical contexts is finding ways of encouraging patients to become more active. Brief advice in primary care is effective, in the short term, in increasing physical activity, but is only provided by a few clinicians on a regular basis. The possibilities for public health approaches include others in the practice providing brief advice, or referral to community facilities and programmes. Even these have limited evidence regarding their population reach. Therefore, innovative and alternative solutions are required. This review discusses three potential contributors: clinician advocacy for and engagement in physical activity as role models, referral to mass community participation events, and encouraging attendance at health fairs. These will not solve the inactivity crisis, but could add new approaches for clinicians, in advising their patients to initiate and try to become more physically active.

  7. Public funding for community-based skilled delivery care in Indonesia: to what extent are the poor benefiting?

    PubMed

    Ensor, Tim; Nadjib, Mardiati; Quayyum, Zahid; Megraini, Amila

    2008-11-01

    Since the early 1990s, the Government of Indonesia has addressed high maternal mortality by attempting to ensure skilled attendance at delivery through access to trained village midwifery services in every village. Yet access to skilled services at delivery continues to prove problematic, with low levels of skilled attendance and high mortality. Making use of a funding flow analysis and population-based survey in two districts, we investigate to what extent funding allocated for maternal services enables access to skilled services by rich and poor households. The results suggest that, although resources reach remote poor areas, the poor obtain unequal access to skilled delivery services. Because rural midwives must earn a significant fraction of their income from private fees this acts to deter women from seeking their help. A new system of targeting poor women utilising the existing state insurance company (ASKES) is an important step in helping to reduce these barriers, but may not be sufficiently generous to protect all those that are considered vulnerable.

  8. Characterization of benthic communities and physical habitat in the Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers, California.

    PubMed

    Hall, Lenwood W; Killen, William D; Anderson, Ronald D

    2006-04-01

    The primary goal of this study was to characterize physical habitat and benthic communities (macroinvertebrates) in the Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Merced Rivers in California's San Joaquin Valley in 2003. These rivers have been listed as impaired water bodies (303 (d) list) by the State of California due to the presence of organophosphate (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon, Group A pesticides (i.e., organochlorine pesticides), mercury, or unknown toxicity. Based on 10 instream and riparian physical habitat metrics, total physical habitat scores in the Stanislaus River ranged from 124 to 188 (maximum possible total score is 200). The highest total habitat score was reported at the upstream site. Tuolumne River physical habitat scores ranged from 86 to 167. Various Tuolumne River physical habitat metrics, including total habitat score, increased from downstream to upstream in this river. Merced River physical habitat scores ranged from 121 to 170 with a significant increase in various physical habitat metrics, including total habitat score, reported from downstream to upstream. Channel flow (an instream metric) and bank stability (a riparian metric) were the most important physical habitat metrics influencing the various benthic metrics for all three rivers. Abundance measures of benthic macroinvertebrates (5,100 to 5,400 individuals) were similar among the three rivers in the San Joaquin watershed. Benthic communities in all three rivers were generally dominated by: (1) Baetidae species (mayflies) which are a component of EPT taxa generally considered sensitive to environmental degradation; (2) Chironomidae (midges) which can be either tolerant or sensitive to environmental stressors depending on the species; (3) Ephemerellidae (mayflies) which are considered sensitive to pollution stress; and (4) Naididae (aquatic worms) which are generally considered tolerant to environmental stressors. The presence of 117 taxa in the Stanislaus River, 114 taxa in the

  9. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of home-based physical activity promotion by community health workers].

    PubMed

    Costa, Evelyn Fabiana; Andrade, Douglas Roque; Garcia, Leandro Martin Totaro; Ribeiro, Evelyn Helena Corgosinho; Santos, Taynã Ishi dos; Florindo, Alex Antonio

    2015-10-01

    This study analyzed the effectiveness of physical activity promotion by community health workers (CHW) during home visits. This was a non-randomized controlled trial that lasted six months, with one group of CHW that received training to promote physical activity during home visits among users of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) and a control group. Physical activity and stages of behavior change were evaluated in 176 adults (n = 90 in the intervention group and n = 86 in the control group) assisted by the CHW. Associations, prevalence ratios, and generalized estimate equations were conducted to verify differences between groups. No evidence of differences in physical activity and stages of behavior change were observed between the two groups. CHW from the intervention group conducted more home visits promoting physical activity among elders, those with low schooling, unemployed, and those with chronic diseases. It is important to reassess the work and priorities of CHW to expand physical activity promotion under the SUS.

  10. Associations of specific phobia and its subtypes with physical diseases: an adult community study.

    PubMed

    Witthauer, Cornelia; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Meyer, Andrea Hans; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Preisig, Martin; Lieb, Roselind

    2016-05-21

    Specific phobia is the most prevalent anxiety disorder in the community and is associated with substantial impairment. Comorbidity with physical diseases is assumed and has important implications for etiology, treatment, or prevention of the comorbid conditions. However, due to methodological issues data are limited and subtypes of specific phobia have not been investigated yet. We examined the association of specific phobia and its subtypes with physical diseases in a representative community sample with physician-diagnosed physical diseases and diagnostic criteria of specific phobia. Data of the German Mental Health Survey from 4181 subjects aged 18-65 years were used. Specific phobia was diagnosed using M-CIDI/DIA-X interview; physical diseases were assessed through a self-report questionnaire and a medical interview. Logistic regression analyses adjusted for sex were calculated. Specific phobia was associated with cardiac diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, respiratory diseases, arthritic conditions, migraine, and thyroid diseases (odds ratios between 1.49 and 2.53). Among the subtypes, different patterns of associations with physical diseases were established. The findings were partially replicated in the Swiss PsyCoLaus Study. Our analyses show that subjects with specific phobia have an increased probability for specific physical diseases. From these analyses etiological mechanisms of specific phobia and physical disease can be deduced. As subtypes differed in their patterns of associations with physical diseases, different etiological mechanisms may play a role. The findings are highly relevant for public health in terms of prevention and therapy of the comorbid conditions.

  11. The effects of a physics learning community on student attitude toward mathematics and performance in calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltenberger, Pamela Kay

    In this study, both quantitative methods and qualitative methods were used to examine the effects of a calculus-based physics learning community upon attitude towards mathematics and performance in calculus. Quantitative methods determined whether or not differences existed in attitude or performance. Qualitative methods investigated why differences may have existed. To determine the effects of the physics learning community, two treatments were examined. One treatment involved the co-enrollment of students in a calculus-based physics course and a calculus course. The other treatment was involvement in a university-organized learning community. Students within a particular learning community enrolled in four or five of the same classes (10--13 credit hours). Differences in attitude and performance were investigated through the analysis of data, which were collected in the form of surveys, tests, interviews, and field notes. At the beginning and end of the semester, beliefs and attitudes surveys were given in six calculus classes. In the middle and end of the semester, interviews were conducted with nine students enrolled in physics and/or a learning community. Throughout the semester, the researcher observed the physics class and took field notes. The study found no significant quantitative differences that resulted from the treatments; however, the difference between the final performance scores of learning community members versus non-learning community members (with ACT Mathematics scores as a covariate) yielded a p-value of 0.072. This difference reflects the fourteen percent difference on the final performance measure; the average raw scores were 42.6 versus 35.8 out of a total of 48 points for learning community students and non-learning community students respectively. Qualitative data indicated that connections between classes and involvement in a learning community were important to students. Particularly, students enjoyed student-teacher relationships and

  12. Funding Research Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.

    2017-01-01

    Astronomical software is used by each and every member of our scientific community. Purpose-build software is becoming ever more critical as we enter the regime of large datasets and simulations of increasing complexity. However, financial investments in building, maintaining and renovating the software infrastructure have been uneven. In this talk I will summarize past and current funding sources for astronomical software development, discuss other models of funding and introduce a new initiative for supporting community software at STScI. The purpose of this talk is to prompt discussion about how we allocate resources to this vital infrastructure.

  13. Municipal Officials’ Perceived Barriers to Consideration of Physical Activity in Community Design Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Goins, Karin Valentine; Schneider, Kristin L.; Brownson, Ross; Carnoske, Cheryl; Evenson, Kelly; Eyler, Amy; Heinrich, Katie; Litt, Jill; Lyn, Rodney; Maddock, Jay; Reed, Hannah; Tompkins, Nancy O’Hara; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2016-01-01

    Context Built environment-focused interventions and policies are recommended as sustainable approaches for promoting physical activity. Physical activity has not traditionally been considered in land use and transportation decision making. Effective collaboration with non-public health partners requires knowledge of their perceived barriers to consideration of physical activity in decision making. Objective This study aimed to 1) identify barriers to the consideration of physical activity in community design and planning decisions among municipal decision makers and 2) explore differences in these barriers among a wide range of job functions and departments in a geographically diverse sample. Design A web-based survey was conducted among municipal officials in 94 cities and towns with populations of at least 50,000 residents in eight states. Participants 453 municipal officials from public health, planning, transportation/public works, community and economic development, parks and recreation, city management, and municipal legislatures responded to the survey. Main Outcome Measures Five barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design and layout were assessed. Results The most common barriers included lack of political will (23.5%), limited staff (20.4%) and lack of collaboration across municipal departments (16.2%). Fewer participants reported opposition from the business community or residents as barriers. Compared to other professionals, public health department personnel were more likely to report the barriers of limited staff and lack of collaboration across municipal departments. They were also more likely to report lack of political will compared to city managers or mayors and municipal legislators. Conclusions Barriers to increasing consideration of physical activity in decision making about community design and layout are encouragingly low. Implications for public health practice include the need to strategically increase political will

  14. The SAFE ESA-funded Project: how to approach for an integrated system of earthquake physics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, A.; De Franceschi, G.; Di Giovambattista, R.; Perrone, L.; Alfonsi, L.; Cianchini, G.; Pavón-Carrasco, F. J.; Cesaroni, C.; Spogli, L.; Malagnini, A.; Amoruso, L.; Carbone, M.; Abbattista, C.; Drimaco, D.

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of the Swarm satellite mission by ESA is to measure the magnetic signals from the Earth. The SAFE (Swarm for Earthquake study) project (funded by ESA in the framework "STSE Swarm+Innovation", 2014) aims at applying the new approach of geosystemics to the analysis of Swarm data for investigating the preparatory phase of earthquakes. The main objective is to explore the possible link between magnetic/ionospheric anomalies and large earthquakes analysing Swarm as well as ground based data (seismic, magnetic, GNSS, etc.). This presentation will show the state of the art in lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) and the expected contribution of SAFE in the field, showing some recent case studies.

  15. Home and Community-Based Waivers as a New Source of Employment Funding: Changes in Attitude, Changes in Latitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortune, Jon; Campbell, Edward M.; Heinlein, Ken B.; Fortune, Barbara; Walling, Teresa L.; Potts, Bridget; Cobb, Ginny L.

    As a result of a 1997 change in federal law, this on-going 5-year study evaluated the effects of elimination of some prior regulations on the employment choices of 854 Wyoming adults in the Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service Waiver program. The study examined who worked, who wanted to work, the average hours worked, the average percentage…

  16. Surveying for Dollars: The Role of the American Community Survey in the Geographic Distribution of Federal Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamer, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The American Community Survey (ACS) is a Census Bureau program that provides annually updated information on demographic, social, economic, and housing characteristics of U.S. households at every level of geography, from the nation to the neighborhood. ACS data are used by public and business decision-makers to more clearly identify issues and…

  17. Local Needs--Global Help: Soliciting Funds for a Library in an Isolated Community in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaima, Sam

    Rural communities in Papua New Guinea (PNG) have been having problems accessing much needed information, while traditional bodies of knowledge are slowly disappearing as the old generation passes on. This paper argues that the school library is a possible agent to spread information. In addition to providing information to school children and…

  18. A Multi-Case Study of Annual Giving and Fund Raising in Texas Gulf Coast Community College Consortium Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Alexander Charles

    2008-01-01

    Community college students are being forced to delay future educational goals, due to the lack of financial support. Grants, student loans and financial aid support from government sources are in short supply. While past resources from state legislative bodies are being restricted and have been reduced to historic levels; educational…

  19. A Multi-Case Study of Annual Giving and Fund Raising in Texas Gulf Coast Community College Consortium Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Alexander Charles

    2008-01-01

    Community college students are being forced to delay future educational goals, due to the lack of financial support. Grants, student loans and financial aid support from government sources are in short supply. While past resources from state legislative bodies are being restricted and have been reduced to historic levels; educational…

  20. Investigating student communities with network analysis of interactions in a physics learning center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2012-06-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University’s Physics Learning Center (PLC) that support the development of academic and social integration. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors that contribute to participation in the learning community. Results of the sequential multiple regression indicate that the PLC learning community is an equitable environment as we find that gender and ethnicity are not significant predictors of participation in the PLC. We find that providing students space for collaboration provides a vital element in the formation of a supportive learning community.

  1. Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Cervical Cancer Screening among Women with Physical Disabilities Living in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Li-Wei; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chen, Si-Fan; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to explore knowledge and attitudeSs regarding cervical cancer screening and to examine its determinants based on the perspectives of Taiwanese women with physical disabilities living in the community. A cross-sectional survey was employed in the study, and we recruited 498 women aged more than 15 years who were officially registered…

  2. The Effect of Online Collaboration on Adolescent Sense of Community in Eighth-Grade Physical Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Jillian L.; Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest/posttest control group design, the researchers examined the effects of online collaborative learning on eighth-grade student's sense of community in a physical science class. For a 9-week period, students in the control group participated in collaborative activities in a face-to-face learning…

  3. Community participatory physical activity intervention targets children at high risk for obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This community participatory research evaluated the feasibility of a summer soccer and nutrition education program to increase physical activity (PA) in rural Mississippi Delta children at high risk of obesity and previously not exposed to soccer. Children aged 4-12 were recruited through school and...

  4. Implementing a Nutrition and Physical Activity Curriculum in Head Start through an Academic-community Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahnd, Whitney E.; Smith, Tracey; Ryherd, Susan J.; Cleer, Melissa; Rogers, Valerie; Steward, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Schools may be an effective avenue for interventions that prevent childhood obesity. "I am Moving I am Learning/Choosy Kids"© (IMIL/CK) is a curriculum recommended by Head Start (HS) for education in nutrition, physical activity, and healthy lifestyle habits. Methods: We formed an academic-community partnership (ACP), the…

  5. Improved Physical Fitness among Older Female Participants in a Nationally Disseminated, Community-Based Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Heidkamp-Young, Eleanor; Kuder, Julia; Nelson, Miriam E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Strength training (ST) is an important health behavior for aging women; it helps maintain strength and function and reduces risk for chronic diseases. This study assessed change in physical fitness following participation in a ST program implemented and evaluated by community leaders. Method: The StrongWomen Program is a nationally…

  6. An Analytical Study of the Preparation of Community College Physics Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohm, Kenneth Ronald

    Reported is a study of the type and nature of course offerings, student teaching practices, internships, and industrial experiences for the purpose of developing a curriculum necessary for adequate preparation of community college physics teachers. Similar questionnaires were submitted to participants of the 1968 and 1971 summer institutes held at…

  7. Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Cervical Cancer Screening among Women with Physical Disabilities Living in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Li-Wei; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chen, Si-Fan; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to explore knowledge and attitudeSs regarding cervical cancer screening and to examine its determinants based on the perspectives of Taiwanese women with physical disabilities living in the community. A cross-sectional survey was employed in the study, and we recruited 498 women aged more than 15 years who were officially registered…

  8. An Analytical Study of the Preparation of Community College Physics Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohm, Kenneth Ronald

    Reported is a study of the type and nature of course offerings, student teaching practices, internships, and industrial experiences for the purpose of developing a curriculum necessary for adequate preparation of community college physics teachers. Similar questionnaires were submitted to participants of the 1968 and 1971 summer institutes held at…

  9. Is School Community Readiness Related to Physical Activity before and after the Ready for Recess Intervention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlers, Diane K.; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Beseler, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine: (i) the effect of schools' baseline community readiness (CR) on youth physical activity (PA) at recess prior to the Ready for Recess intervention; (ii) if changes in PA due to the intervention were explained by baseline CR and (iii) if specific components of the intervention altered an association…

  10. Improved Physical Fitness among Older Female Participants in a Nationally Disseminated, Community-Based Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Heidkamp-Young, Eleanor; Kuder, Julia; Nelson, Miriam E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Strength training (ST) is an important health behavior for aging women; it helps maintain strength and function and reduces risk for chronic diseases. This study assessed change in physical fitness following participation in a ST program implemented and evaluated by community leaders. Method: The StrongWomen Program is a nationally…

  11. Defining and measuring the concept of 'community stress' for nutrition and physical activity interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Community-based research suggests that our physical and social environment makes a difference in our health status and that a key mechanism that relates one's context to their individual health status is stress. A better understanding of this relationship is important to healthcare providers, resear...

  12. Physical Place on Campus: A Report on the Summit on Building Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of College Unions International (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In October 2011, a multidisciplinary group of 50 individuals (students, architects, planners, consultants, campus administrators, and higher education association leaders) met at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to consider the relationship between physical place and campus community. Because a gathering of this type and on this topic had not…

  13. Academic Planning in the Physical Education Department of Polk Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Hershel H.

    This study illustrates an attempt to quantitatively express justification for altering the workloads and compensation for members of the physical education department of Polk Community College (Florida). While equitable workloads can be det4rmined in most other fields because credit hours coincide with an instructor's time in class, the physical…

  14. The Effect of Online Collaboration on Adolescent Sense of Community in Eighth-Grade Physical Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Jillian L.; Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest/posttest control group design, the researchers examined the effects of online collaborative learning on eighth-grade student's sense of community in a physical science class. For a 9-week period, students in the control group participated in collaborative activities in a face-to-face learning…

  15. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Richard

    Biomedical imaging, and in particular MRI and CT, is often identified as among the top 10 most significant advances in healthcare in the 20th century. This presentation will describe some of the recent advances in medical physics and imaging being funded by NIH in this century and current funding opportunities. The presentation will also highlight the role of multidisciplinary research in bringing concepts from the physical sciences and applying them to challenges in biological and biomedical research.. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging.

  16. Intervention fidelity and effectiveness of a UK worksite physical activity intervention funded by the BUPA Foundation, UK.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Rebecca; Mceachan, Rosie; Jackson, Cath; West, Robert; Conner, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The main aim of this study was to test whether the effectiveness of a worksite physical activity intervention delivered in five work organizations varied as a function of intervention fidelity. We conducted a fidelity analysis as part of a large matched-pair cluster randomized controlled trial of a worksite physical activity intervention (AME for Activity). Participants (N = 1260) were employees from five organizations in the UK. The primary trial outcome was physical activity at 9 months post intervention. Adherence, exposure, quality of delivery and participant responsiveness/engagement were measured to assess fidelity. Qualitative data about the context in which the intervention was delivered were collected via focus groups, interviews and field notes. Multi-level modelling was used to provide a comparison of the effect of the intervention on increases in physical activity for worksites where intervention fidelity was good, compared with those where intervention fidelity was poor or moderate. Intervention fidelity was poor in two organizations, moderate in two organizations and good in one organization (local council). Re-analysis of the trial data comparing employees in the local council (N = 443) with employees in all other worksites (N = 611) revealed a significant effect of the intervention on physical activity levels among council employees only. These findings suggest that the measurement of fidelity and the testing of the effects of intervention fidelity on outcomes, as part of the evaluation of complex interventions, are essential to understand the context and conditions in which interventions are most effective.

  17. PlasmaPy: beginning a community developed Python package for plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Huang, Yi-Min; PlasmaPy Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, researchers in several disciplines have collaborated on community-developed open source Python packages such as Astropy, SunPy, and SpacePy. These packages provide core functionality, common frameworks for data analysis and visualization, and educational tools. We propose that our community begins the development of PlasmaPy: a new open source core Python package for plasma physics. PlasmaPy could include commonly used functions in plasma physics, easy-to-use plasma simulation codes, Grad-Shafranov solvers, eigenmode solvers, and tools to analyze both simulations and experiments. The development will include modern programming practices such as version control, embedding documentation in the code, unit tests, and avoiding premature optimization. We will describe early code development on PlasmaPy, and discuss plans moving forward. The success of PlasmaPy depends on active community involvement and a welcoming and inclusive environment, so anyone interested in joining this collaboration should contact the authors.

  18. White matter hyperintensities are an independent predictor of physical decline in community-dwelling older people.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jacqueline J J; Delbaere, Kim; Close, Jacqueline C T; Sachdev, Perminder; Wen, Wei; Brodaty, Henry; Lord, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Ageing is associated with physical disability, but little is known about the influence of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on physical function decline in older people. To investigate the role of WMHs as a predictor of decline in physical function in cognitively intact older people. 287 community-dwelling people aged 70-90 years underwent the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) and assessments of total and regional WMH volumes, cognitive function and comorbidities. Participants underwent reassessment of the PPA 12 months later, and those in the top quartile for increases in PPA scores over the year were regarded as having declined physically. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that people with WMH volumes in the 4th quartile showed greater physical decline (odds ratio 3.02, 95% confidence interval 1.02-8.95) while controlling for age, baseline physical function, general health, physical activity and cognitive function. Subsequent univariate analyses indicated that WMHs in the deep fronto-parietal and periventricular parieto-occipital regions had the strongest associations with physical decline. These findings indicate that WMHs are an independent predictor of decline in physical function and suggest that interventions that focus on preventing the development or progression of white matter lesions may help preserve physical function in older people. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Factors Associated with Physical Activity among Macedonian Adolescents in Albanian Ethnic Community

    PubMed Central

    GONTAREV, Seryozha; KALAC, Ruzdija; AMETI, Vullnet; REDJEPI, Agim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of demographic, psychological, social and environmental factors with physical activity and to determine whether indicators of physical activity differ by gender among Macedonian adolescents from Albanian ethnic community from 11 to 14 yr (N = 886). Methods: Research were conducted in 2014 in several primary schools randomly selected from Tetovo and Gostivar region of the R. Macedonia. Students completed a questionnaire which examined their level of participation in physical activity and sedentary behavior along with a number of potential correlates. Hierarchical regression was used to explore the relationship between hypothesised factors and physical activity. Results: The boys unlike the girls showed significantly higher levels of physical activity (P=0.001). Respondents of both genders who perceive greater benefits from the physical activity (P=0.010). They have more confidence in their abilities (P=0.001), enjoy more in the physical activities (P=0.016), perceive greater social support from friends (P=0.008) and parents (P=0.001) and have higher levels of physical activity. Conclusions: The results indicate the importance of developing a national plan and program to promote physical activity in order to help young people to change unhealthy lifestyle habits and increase the physical activity, thus improving their health. PMID:27252917

  20. Community Lenses Revealing the Role of Sociocultural Environment on Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Belon, Ana Paula; Nieuwendyk, Laura M; Vallianatos, Helen; Nykiforuk, Candace I J

    2016-01-01

    To identify perceptions of how sociocultural environment enabled and hindered physical activity (PA) participation. Community-based participatory research. Two semirural and two urban communities located in Alberta, Canada. Thirty-five people (74.3% females, 71.4% aged 25-64 years) across the four communities. PhotoVoice activities occurred over 3 months during the spring of 2009. Participants were asked to document perceived environmental attributes that might foster or inhibit PA in their community. Photographs and narratives were shared in one-on-one interviews. Line-by-line coding of the transcripts was independently conducted by two researchers using an inductive approach. Codes were arranged into themes and subthemes, which were then organized into the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO) framework. Six main themes (accompanied by subthemes) emerged: sociocultural aesthetics, safety, social involvement, PA motivation, cultural ideas of recreation, and car culture. Representative quotes and photographs illustrate enablers and obstacles identified by participants. This PhotoVoice study revealed how aspects of participants' sociocultural environments shaped their decisions to be physically active. Providing more PA resources is only one step in the promotion of supportive environments. Strategies should also account for the beautification and maintenance of communities, increasing feelings of safety, enhancement of social support among community members, popularization of PA, and mitigating car culture, among others.

  1. Conditions for building a community of practice in an advanced physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, Paul W.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2014-06-01

    We use the theory of communities of practice and the concept of accountable disciplinary knowledge to describe how a learning community develops in the context of an upper-division physics laboratory course. The change in accountable disciplinary knowledge motivates students' enculturation into a community of practice. The enculturation process is facilitated by four specific structural features of the course and supported by a primary instructional choice. The four structural features are "paucity of instructor time," "all in a room together," "long and difficult experiments," and "same experiments at different times." The instructional choice is the encouragement of the sharing and development of knowledge and understanding by the instructor. The combination of the instructional choice and structural features promotes the development of the learning community in which students engage in authentic practices of a physicist. This results in a classroom community that can provide students with the opportunity to have an accelerated trajectory towards being a more central participant of the community of a practice of physicists. We support our claims with video-based observations of laboratory classroom interactions and individual, semistructured interviews with students about their laboratory experiences and physics identity.

  2. Community Lenses Revealing the Role of Sociocultural Environment on Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Belon, Ana Paula; Nieuwendyk, Laura M.; Vallianatos, Helen; Nykiforuk, Candace I. J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify perceptions of how sociocultural environment enabled and hindered physical activity (PA) participation. Design Community-based participatory research. Setting Two semirural and two urban communities located in Alberta, Canada. Participants Thirty-five people (74.3% females, 71.4% aged 25–64 years) across the four communities. Method PhotoVoice activities occurred over 3 months during the spring of 2009. Participants were asked to document perceived environmental attributes that might foster or inhibit PA in their community. Photographs and narratives were shared in one-on-one interviews. Line-by-line coding of the transcripts was independently conducted by two researchers using an inductive approach. Codes were arranged into themes and subthemes, which were then organized into the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO) framework. Results Six main themes (accompanied by subthemes) emerged: sociocultural aesthetics, safety, social involvement, PA motivation, cultural ideas of recreation, and car culture. Representative quotes and photographs illustrate enablers and obstacles identified by participants. Conclusion This PhotoVoice study revealed how aspects of participants’ sociocultural environments shaped their decisions to be physically active. Providing more PA resources is only one step in the promotion of supportive environments. Strategies should also account for the beautification and maintenance of communities, increasing feelings of safety, enhancement of social support among community members, popularization of PA, and mitigating car culture, among others. PMID:25973966

  3. 25 CFR 170.105 - Are funds available for consultation, collaboration, and coordination activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Administration for Native Americans (ANA) funds; (d) Economic Development Administration (EDA) funds; (e) United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development funds; (f) Community Development Block...

  4. Community members' assessment of the physical activity environments in their neighborhood parks: utility of the community stakeholder park audit tool.

    PubMed

    Greer, Anna Elizabeth; Marcello, Rich; Graveline, Rochelle

    2015-03-01

    This study engaged community members to describe physical activity (PA) environments in parks and to examine if the PA environment in parks was related to the economic characteristics of households near parks. Twenty-four Bridgeport, adult residents examined the PA environments in 21 Bridgeport, Connecticut, parks using the Community Stakeholder Park Audit Tool (CPAT) during the summer, 2013. ESRI's Geographical Information System was used to identify the economic characteristics (i.e., median household income, percentage of households below the poverty line; from 2010 Census data) of households within 0.5 miles of a park. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze CPAT data. A negative association was identified between the parks' PA area and safety scores (p = .012). Positive associations were identified between the parks' PA area and amenities scores (p < .001), access and amenities scores (p = .006), and park safety concern and surrounding safety concern scores (p < .001). There were no significant associations between park environment indices and the economic characteristics of households less than 0.5 miles from parks. Community members recommended several strategies to enhance PA environments in parks. The findings highlight the utility of CPAT for enabling community members identify opportunities to enhance PA environments in parks. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  5. Perceived environmental barriers to recreational, community, and school participation for children and youth with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary; Petrenchik, Theresa; King, Gillian; Hurley, Patricia

    2007-12-01

    To comprehensively describe parent perceptions of environmental barriers to recreational, community, and school participation for children with physical disabilities. Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data gathered in the first wave of a longitudinal study of the child, family, and environmental factors affecting the recreational and leisure participation of school-age children with physical disabilities. General community. Parent-child pairs (N=427). Child participants included 229 boys and 198 girls with physical disabilities in 3 age cohorts (6-8, 9-11, 12-14 y). Not applicable. Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors. Barriers to participation were encountered in school and work environments (1.54+/-1.88), physical and built environments (1.36+/-1.35), within institutional and government policies (1.24+/-1.71), services and assistance (1.02+/-1.2), and attitudes and social support (.87+/-1.17). Age, socioeconomic status, level of physical functioning, and behavioral difficulties were related to the impact of barriers reported in certain areas. No significant differences by the sex of the children or rural versus urban community were found. Parents report environmental barriers in several areas, providing valuable information about the environmental factors that support or hinder participation while showing the complexity of these issues. Future research is required to further identify potential avenues for intervention.

  6. Association of day length and weather conditions with physical activity levels in older community dwelling people.

    PubMed

    Witham, Miles D; Donnan, Peter T; Vadiveloo, Thenmalar; Sniehotta, Falko F; Crombie, Iain K; Feng, Zhiqiang; McMurdo, Marion E T

    2014-01-01

    Weather is a potentially important determinant of physical activity. Little work has been done examining the relationship between weather and physical activity, and potential modifiers of any relationship in older people. We therefore examined the relationship between weather and physical activity in a cohort of older community-dwelling people. We analysed prospectively collected cross-sectional activity data from community-dwelling people aged 65 and over in the Physical Activity Cohort Scotland. We correlated seven day triaxial accelerometry data with daily weather data (temperature, day length, sunshine, snow, rain), and a series of potential effect modifiers were tested in mixed models: environmental variables (urban vs rural dwelling, percentage of green space), psychological variables (anxiety, depression, perceived behavioural control), social variables (number of close contacts) and health status measured using the SF-36 questionnaire. 547 participants, mean age 78.5 years, were included in this analysis. Higher minimum daily temperature and longer day length were associated with higher activity levels; these associations remained robust to adjustment for other significant associates of activity: age, perceived behavioural control, number of social contacts and physical function. Of the potential effect modifier variables, only urban vs rural dwelling and the SF-36 measure of social functioning enhanced the association between day length and activity; no variable modified the association between minimum temperature and activity. In older community dwelling people, minimum temperature and day length were associated with objectively measured activity. There was little evidence for moderation of these associations through potentially modifiable health, environmental, social or psychological variables.

  7. Municipal officials' perceived barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design decision making.

    PubMed

    Goins, Karin Valentine; Schneider, Kristin L; Brownson, Ross; Carnoske, Cheryl; Evenson, Kelly R; Eyler, Amy; Heinrich, Katie; Litt, Jill; Lyn, Rodney; Maddock, Jay; Reed, Hannah; Tompkins, Nancy Oʼhara; Lemon, Stephenie C

    2013-01-01

    Built environment-focused interventions and policies are recommended as sustainable approaches for promoting physical activity. Physical activity has not traditionally been considered in land use and transportation decision making. Effective collaboration with non-public health partners requires knowledge of their perceived barriers to such consideration. This analysis sought to (a) establish prevalence estimates of selected barriers to the consideration of physical activity in community design and layout decisions and (b) describe how barrier reporting by public health officials differs from other municipal officials among a wide range of job functions and departments in a geographically diverse sample. A Web-based survey was conducted among municipal officials in 94 cities and towns with populations of at least 50 000 residents in 8 states. A total of 453 municipal officials from public health, planning, transportation/public works, community and economic development, parks and recreation, city management, and municipal legislatures in 83 cities and towns responded to the survey. Five barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design and layout were assessed. The most common barriers included lack of political will (23.5%), limited staff (20.4%), and lack of collaboration across municipal departments (16.2%). Fewer participants reported opposition from the business community or residents as barriers. Public health department personnel were more likely to report the barriers of limited staff and lack of collaboration across municipal departments than other professionals. They were also more likely to report lack of political will than city managers or mayors and municipal legislators. Barriers to increasing consideration of physical activity in decision making about community design and layout are encouragingly low. Implications for public health practice include the need to strategically increase political will despite public health staffing

  8. Physics education in the Greek community schools of Istanbul (19th century). The books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Panayotis; Vlahakis, George N.

    2016-03-01

    During the 19th century a number of elementary and high schools were established for the need of the Greek community of Istanbul. Among the courses included in the curricula were those concerning the scientific study of Nature like Botany, Chemistry and Physics. In the present study we attempt to give a thorough description of the educational material used in these schools for the study of natural sciences with an emphasis in Physics. Especially we shall discuss the books used as course books as well as their probable sources. Furthermore we shall try to make a comparison with the relevant situation in the Greek state and the Ottoman Empire, where modern physics had been already introduced through textbooks based on Ganot's treatise on Physics. The results of our research will give for the first time a picture of the way Greek students in the 19th century Istanbul received their basic knowledge about Physics.

  9. 45 CFR 2517.200 - How may grant funds be used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Use of Grant Funds § 2517.200 How may grant funds be used? Funds under a community-based Learn and Serve grant may be used for the purposes...

  10. Community Health Records: Establishing a Systematic Approach to Improving Social and Physical Determinants of Health

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    To systematically improve population health in the United States, community health records (CHRs) must be defined, developed, and implemented. Like electronic and personal health records, CHRs have both unique and overlapping information. CHRs contain data about communities, including the social, physical, and lifestyle determinants of health. These records will serve to complement electronic and personal health records to provide a more complete view of population health, allowing stakeholders to target community health and quality-of-life interventions in a data-driven and evidence-based manner, establishing the basis from which organizations can develop a systematic approach to improving community health. This commentary calls on the United States to conduct a set of consensus activities to define and implement CHRs. PMID:28103072

  11. The Effect of Online Collaboration on Adolescent Sense of Community in Eighth-Grade Physical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Jillian L.; Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda J.

    2015-10-01

    Using a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent pretest/posttest control group design, the researchers examined the effects of online collaborative learning on eighth-grade student's sense of community in a physical science class. For a 9-week period, students in the control group participated in collaborative activities in a face-to-face learning environment, whereas students in the experimental group participated in online collaborative activities using the Edmodo educational platform in a hybrid learning environment. Students completed the Classroom Community Scale survey as a pretest and posttest. Results indicated that the students who participated in the face-to-face classroom had higher overall sense of community and learning community than students who participated in collaborative activities in the online environment. Results and implications are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.

  12. Community Health Records: Establishing a Systematic Approach to Improving Social and Physical Determinants of Health.

    PubMed

    Van Brunt, Deryk

    2017-03-01

    To systematically improve population health in the United States, community health records (CHRs) must be defined, developed, and implemented. Like electronic and personal health records, CHRs have both unique and overlapping information. CHRs contain data about communities, including the social, physical, and lifestyle determinants of health. These records will serve to complement electronic and personal health records to provide a more complete view of population health, allowing stakeholders to target community health and quality-of-life interventions in a data-driven and evidence-based manner, establishing the basis from which organizations can develop a systematic approach to improving community health. This commentary calls on the United States to conduct a set of consensus activities to define and implement CHRs.

  13. Comparative cost-benefit analysis of tele-homecare for community-dwelling elderly in Japan: Non-Government versus Government Supported Funding Models.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Miki; Abraham, Chon

    2017-08-01

    Tele-homecare is gaining prominence as a viable care alternative, as evidenced by the increase in financial support from international governments to fund initiatives in their respective countries. The primary reason for the funding is to support efforts to reduce lags and increase capacity in access to care as well as to promote preventive measures that can avert costly emergent issues from arising. These efforts are especially important to super-aged and aging societies such as in Japan, many European countries, and the United States (US). However, to date and to our knowledge, a direct comparison of non-government vs. government-supported funding models for tele-homecare is particularly lacking in Japan. The aim of this study is to compare these operational models (i.e., non-government vs. government-supported funding) from a cost-benefit perspective. This simulation study applies to a Japanese hypothetical cohort with implications for other super-aged and aging societies abroad. We performed a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) on two operational models for enabling tele-homecare for elderly community-dwelling cohorts based on a decision tree model, which we created with parameters from published literature. The two models examined are (a) Model 1-non-government-supported funding that includes monthly fixed charges paid by users for a portion of the operating costs, and (b) Model 2-government-supported funding that includes startup and installation costs only (i.e., no operating costs) and no monthly user charges. We performed base case cost-benefit analysis and probabilistic cost-benefit analysis with a Monte Carlo simulation. We calculated net benefit and benefit-to-cost ratios (BCRs) from the societal perspective with a five-year time horizon applying a 3% discount rate for both cost and benefit values. The cost of tele-homecare included (a) the startup system expense, averaged over a five-year depreciation period, and (b) operation expenses (i.e., labor and non

  14. Physical activity and quality of life in community dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    White, Siobhan M; Wójcicki, Thomas R; McAuley, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Background Physical activity has been consistently associated with enhanced quality of life (QOL) in older adults. However, the nature of this relationship is not fully understood. In this study of community dwelling older adults, we examined the proposition that physical activity influences global QOL through self-efficacy and health-status. Methods Participants (N = 321, M age = 63.8) completed measures of physical activity, self-efficacy, global QOL, physical self worth, and disability limitations. Data were analyzed using covariance modeling to test the fit of the hypothesized model. Results Analyses indicated direct effects of a latent physical activity variable on self-efficacy but not disability limitations or physical self-worth; direct effects of self-efficacy on disability limitations and physical self worth but not QOL; and direct effects of disability limitations and physical self-worth on QOL. Conclusion Our findings support the role of self-efficacy in the relationship between physical activity and QOL as well as an expanded QOL model including both health status indicators and global QOL. These findings further suggest future PA promotion programs should include strategies to enhance self-efficacy, a modifiable factor for improving QOL in this population. PMID:19200385

  15. Community Education: More than Just a Course. Exploring the Outcomes and Impact of Department of Education and Skills Funded Community Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Natasha; Breen, Jessica; Ward, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 AONTAS commissioned a piece of research to examine the outcomes and impact of community education in relation to the three aims that the Government has defined for it: enhancing learning; fostering empowerment, and contributing to civic society. In part, the research also responds to a need to measure the wider benefits of learning (such…

  16. Benevolent Paradox: Integrating Community-Based Empowerment and Transdisciplinary Research Approaches into Traditional Frameworks to Increase Funding and Long-Term Sustainability of Chicano-Community Research Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Adela

    2014-01-01

    Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (NSFS) is a 5-year multi-intervention study aimed at preventing childhood obesity among Mexican-origin children in rural California. Using a transdisciplinary approach and community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology, NSFS's development included a diversely trained team working in collaboration with community…

  17. Benevolent Paradox: Integrating Community-Based Empowerment and Transdisciplinary Research Approaches into Traditional Frameworks to Increase Funding and Long-Term Sustainability of Chicano-Community Research Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Adela

    2014-01-01

    Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (NSFS) is a 5-year multi-intervention study aimed at preventing childhood obesity among Mexican-origin children in rural California. Using a transdisciplinary approach and community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology, NSFS's development included a diversely trained team working in collaboration with community…

  18. Missing Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassenpflug, Ann

    2012-01-01

    A high school drama coach informs assistant principal Laura Madison that the money students earned through fund-raising activities seems to have vanished and that the male assistant principal may be involved in the disappearance of the funds. Laura has to determine how to address this situation. She considers her past experiences with problematic…

  19. Missing Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassenpflug, Ann

    2012-01-01

    A high school drama coach informs assistant principal Laura Madison that the money students earned through fund-raising activities seems to have vanished and that the male assistant principal may be involved in the disappearance of the funds. Laura has to determine how to address this situation. She considers her past experiences with problematic…

  20. Program Based Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessire, Jack

    1991-01-01

    Developed to assist two-year college administrators in understanding the application of the funding formula for California's community colleges that became effective July 1, 1991, this paper reviews revenue base limits; practical implications of the revenue base; the role of institutional growth in increasing base revenues in the absence of cost…

  1. Let's Move for Pacific Islander Communities: an Evidence-Based Intervention to Increase Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    LaBreche, Mandy; Cheri, Ashley; Custodio, Harold; Fex, Cleo Carlos; Foo, Mary Anne; Lepule, Jonathan Tana; May, Vanessa Tui'one; Orne, Annette; Pang, Jane Ka'ala; Pang, Victor Kaiwi; Sablan-Santos, Lola; Schmidt-Vaivao, Dorothy; Surani, Zul; Talavou, Melevesi Fifita; Toilolo, Tupou; Palmer, Paula Healani; Tanjasiri, Sora Park

    2016-06-01

    Pacific Islander (PI) populations of Southern California experience high obesity and low physical activity levels. Given PI's rich cultural ties, efforts to increase physical activity using a community-tailored strategy may motivate members in a more sustainable manner. In this paper, we (1) detail the program adaptation methodology that was utilized to develop the Weaving an Islander Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training (WINCART) Center's PI Let's Move Program, a culturally tailored program aimed to increase physical activity levels among members of PI organizations in Southern California, and (2) share the program's pilot evaluation results on individual and organizational changes. The WINCART Center applied the National Cancer Institute's program adaptation guidelines to tailor the evidence-based Instant Recess program to fit the needs of PIs. The end product, the PI Let's Move Program, was piloted in 2012 with eight PI organizations, reaching 106 PI adults. At baseline, 52 % of participants reported that they were not physically active, with the average number of days engaged in medium-intensity physical activity at 2.09 days/week. After the 2-month program, participants increased the number of days that they engaged in medium-intensity physical activity from 2.09 to 2.90 days/week. Post-pilot results found that 82 % of participants reported intentions to engage in physical activity for at least the next 6 months. At baseline, only one organization was currently implementing a physical activity program, and none had implemented an evidence-based physical activity program tailored for PIs. After the 2-month timeframe, despite varying levels of capacity, all eight organizations were able to successfully implement the program. In conclusion, results from our program provide evidence that disparity populations, such as PIs, can be successfully reached through programs that are culturally tailored to both individuals and their community

  2. Linking physical education with community sport and recreation: a program for adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Casey, Meghan; Mooney, Amanda; Eime, Rochelle; Harvey, Jack; Smyth, John; Telford, Amanda; Payne, Warren

    2013-09-01

    The engagement of adolescent girls in physical activity (PA) is a persistent challenge. School-based PA programs have often met with little success because of the lack of linkages between school and community PA settings. The Triple G program aimed to improve PA levels of secondary school girls (12-15 years) in regional Victoria, Australia. The program included a school-based physical education (PE) component that uniquely incorporated student-centered teaching and behavioral skill development. The school component was conceptually and practically linked to a community component that emphasized appropriate structures for participation. The program was informed by ethnographic fieldwork to understand the contextual factors that affect girls' participation in PA. A collaborative intervention design was undertaken to align with PE curriculum and coaching and instructional approaches in community PA settings. The theoretical framework for the intervention was the socioecological model that was underpinned by both individual-level (social cognitive theory) and organizational-level (building organizational/community capacity) strategies. The program model provides an innovative conceptual framework for linking school PE with community sport and recreation and may benefit other PA programs seeking to engage adolescent girls. The objective of this article is to describe program development and the unique theoretical framework and curriculum approaches.

  3. Overcoming disparities in organized physical activity: findings from Australian community strategies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ben J; Thomas, Margaret; Batras, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    Organized physical activity through sport and recreational activities is beneficial for physical and psychosocial well-being and community connectedness. However, many who could gain significantly from this have lower participation, especially the socioeconomically disadvantaged, Indigenous people, culturally diverse communities and people with a disability. This study examined barriers to participation by these underserved groups and the success of strategies for overcoming these used in 22 community projects over 3 years in the VicHealth Participation in Community Sport and Recreation Program, in Victoria, Australia. Each year, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 50-60 activity providers and 30-40 project partners. Major barriers to participation were cost, lack of transport, cultural differences, the environment of sporting groups and inaccessible facilities for people with disabilities. Projects that overcame these selected one or two priority groups, put significant effort into communication and building partnerships with community organizations, provided training to staff and volunteers and created new or modified forms of activity. Strategies were put in place to reduce cost and provide transport, but these did not appear to be sustainable. Many organizations found engaging the underserved was more difficult than anticipated and require information and support about how to develop acceptable, accessible and flexible opportunities for disadvantaged groups. Cost and lack of transport are persistent barriers to participation that need to be addressed by the sport and recreation sector and policy-makers.

  4. Active living for rural youth: addressing physical inactivity in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Yousefian, Anush; Ziller, Erika; Swartz, Jon; Hartley, David

    2009-01-01

    Rural youth are at greater risk than urban youth for obesity and physical inactivity. Active living research incorporates an ecological approach to promoting physical activity (PA) by recognizing that individual behavior, social environments, physical environments, and policies contribute to behavior change. Active living research and interventions have been limited primarily to urban settings. Because rural communities have unique environmental features and sociocultural characteristics, this project combines insights from current active living models with more focused consideration of the physical and social realities of rural areas. In this study, we report on our efforts to develop, test, and refine a conceptual model describing the interaction between the individual and the environment as it enhances or thwarts active living in rural communities. Our findings revealed a host of relevant "predisposing" and "enabling" factors, including sociodemographic, environmental, policy, and programmatic elements, that extend across the four domains of active living--transportation, recreation, occupation, and household. A one-size approach to PA promotion will not fit the needs of rural youth. Given the unique challenges that rural communities face, efforts to combat childhood obesity must consider rural residents a priority population. More research, interventions, and evaluations on ways to promote rural PA are needed.

  5. Research on a Community-based Platform for Promoting Health and Physical Fitness in the Elderly Community

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Hsu, Chien-Lung; Tseng, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the acceptability of a fitness testing platform (iFit) for installation in an assisted living community with the aim of promoting fitness and slowing the onset of frailty. The iFit platform develops a means of testing Bureau of Health Promotion mandated health assessment items for the elderly (including flexibility tests, grip strength tests, balance tests, and reaction time tests) and integrates wireless remote sensors in a game-like environment to capture and store subject response data, thus providing individuals in elderly care contexts with a greater awareness of their own physical condition. In this study, we specifically evaluated the users’ intention of using the iFit using a technology acceptance model (TAM). A total of 101 elderly subjects (27 males and 74 females) were recruited. A survey was conducted to measure technology acceptance, to verify that the platform could be used as intended to promote fitness among the elderly. Results indicate that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and usage attitude positively impact behavioral intention to use the platform. The iFit platform can offer user-friendly solutions for a community-based fitness care and monitoring of elderly subjects. In summary, iFit was determined by three key drivers and discussed as follows: risk factors among the frail elderly, mechanism for slowing the advance frailty, and technology acceptance and support for promoting physical fitness. PMID:23460859

  6. Research on a community-based platform for promoting health and physical fitness in the elderly community.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Hsu, Chien-Lung; Tseng, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the acceptability of a fitness testing platform (iFit) for installation in an assisted living community with the aim of promoting fitness and slowing the onset of frailty. The iFit platform develops a means of testing Bureau of Health Promotion mandated health assessment items for the elderly (including flexibility tests, grip strength tests, balance tests, and reaction time tests) and integrates wireless remote sensors in a game-like environment to capture and store subject response data, thus providing individuals in elderly care contexts with a greater awareness of their own physical condition. In this study, we specifically evaluated the users' intention of using the iFit using a technology acceptance model (TAM). A total of 101 elderly subjects (27 males and 74 females) were recruited. A survey was conducted to measure technology acceptance, to verify that the platform could be used as intended to promote fitness among the elderly. Results indicate that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and usage attitude positively impact behavioral intention to use the platform. The iFit platform can offer user-friendly solutions for a community-based fitness care and monitoring of elderly subjects. In summary, iFit was determined by three key drivers and discussed as follows: risk factors among the frail elderly, mechanism for slowing the advance frailty, and technology acceptance and support for promoting physical fitness.

  7. Trajectory of Declines in Physical Activity in Community-Dwelling Older Women: Social Cognitive Influences

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Katherine S.; Motl, Robert W.; White, Siobhan M.; Wójcicki, Thomas R.; Hu, Liang; Doerksen, Shawna E.

    2009-01-01

    Studies examining physical activity behavior suggest that activity levels decline with age. Such declines are particularly problematic among older adults in light of the research suggesting a protective effect of physical activity on numerous physical health outcomes associated with independent living. Despite a growing recognition of the importance of a physically active lifestyle, little is known about the role of demographic and psychosocial variables on this trajectory of change. In this study, the roles played by outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and functional limitations on changes in physical activity levels over a 2-year period in older women were assessed using latent growth curve modeling. Data were obtained from 249 community-dwelling older women (M age = 68.12, n = 81 Black, and n = 168 White). Demographic, health status, and psychosocial data were collected via self-report upon entry into the study. Self-reported physical activity was assessed at baseline and again at 12 and 24 months. As expected, physical activity declined over the 2-year period. Self-efficacy demonstrated an indirect association with the trajectory of decline in physical activity through functional limitations. Importantly, the pattern of relationships appears independent of demographic factors and chronic health conditions. PMID:19528360

  8. Lesson Study as Professional Development within Secondary Physics Teacher Professional Learning Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Tonya Monique Nicki

    Two Professional Learning Communities of physics teachers from different high schools voluntarily participated in Lesson Study as a means of professional development. The five teacher-participants and one participant-researcher partook of two Lesson Study cycles, each of which focused on student physics misconceptions. The Lesson Study resulted in two topics of physics: projectiles and gravitation. The researcher aimed to determine what happens to secondary physics teachers who undergo Lesson Study through this phenomenological case study. Specifically, (1) What is the process of Lesson Study with secondary physics teachers? and (2) What are the teacher-reported outcomes of Lesson Study with secondary physics teachers? Overall, Lesson Study provided an avenue for secondary physics teachers to conduct inquiry on their students in an attempt to better understand student thinking and learning. As a result, teachers collaborated to learn how to better meet the needs of their students and self-reported growth in many areas of teaching and teacher knowledge. The study resulted in twelve hypotheses to be tested in later research centering on idealizing the process of Lesson Study and maximizing secondary physics teacher growth.

  9. Jump step - a community based participatory approach to physical activity & mental wellness.

    PubMed

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; Vazirian, Sara; Li, Neville; Remick, Ronald; Khan, Karim

    2017-08-31

    There is a physical inactivity pandemic around the world despite the known benefits of engaging in physical activity. This is true for individuals who would receive notable benefits from physical activity, in particular those with mood disorders. In this study, we explored the factors that facilitate and impede engagement in physical activity for individuals with a mood disorder. The intent was to understand the key features of a community based physical activity program for these individuals. We recruited and interviewed 24 participants older than 18 with Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar II. The interviews were conducted by peer researchers. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using NVivo 10™. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. The facilitators to physical activity include being socially connected with family and friends, building a routine in daily life, and exposure to nature. The barriers to physical activity include the inability to build a routine owing to a mood disorder, and high cost. The ideal exercise program comprises a variety of light-to-moderate activities, offers the opportunity to connect with other participants with a mood disorder, and brings participants to nature. The average age of our participants was 52 which could have influenced the preferred level of intensity. The individuals in this study felt that the key features of a physical activity program for individuals with a mood disorder must utilize a social network approach, take into account the preferences of potential participants, and incorporate nature (both green and blue spaces) as a health promotion resource.

  10. Trajectory of declines in physical activity in community-dwelling older women: social cognitive influences.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Edward; Hall, Katherine S; Motl, Robert W; White, Siobhan M; Wójcicki, Thomas R; Hu, Liang; Doerksen, Shawna E

    2009-09-01

    Studies examining physical activity behavior suggest that activity levels decline with age. Such declines are particularly problematic among older adults in light of the research suggesting a protective effect of physical activity on numerous physical health outcomes associated with independent living. Despite a growing recognition of the importance of a physically active lifestyle, little is known about the role of demographic and psychosocial variables on this trajectory of change. In this study, the roles played by outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and functional limitations on changes in physical activity levels over a 2-year period in older women were assessed using latent growth curve modeling. Data were obtained from 249 community-dwelling older women (M age = 68.12, n = 81 Black, and n = 168 White). Demographic, health status, and psychosocial data were collected via self-report upon entry into the study. Self-reported physical activity was assessed at baseline and again at 12 and 24 months. As expected, physical activity declined over the 2-year period. Self-efficacy demonstrated an indirect association with the trajectory of decline in physical activity through functional limitations. Importantly, the pattern of relationships appears independent of demographic factors and chronic health conditions.

  11. Riding light in the minority communities and how K-12 students can shine in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul

    2010-03-01

    The National Society of Black Physicists, along with the National Society of Hispanic Physicists, has been reaching out to the minority K-12 population by revolutionizing its Science Ambassador program under its Pre-College Program Committee. Since 2005, both societies have been providing unique interactive physics demonstrations to predominantly minority schools to expose them to the exciting world of physics. In a four year span, the population of targeted students went from 25 (2005) to 400 (2009). During the 2009 joint annual meeting, a Physics Day camp was introduced during which eight physics societies combined their efforts to reach to a larger group of students in a short time period. This initiative has now tackled the unique feature to expand nationally by reaching out to the members of all physics societies. While the world of optics has been an integral part of the demonstrations being performed on stage or at individual booths, physics concepts and its applications in medical physics (such as imaging or therapy) is the focus of the 2010 effort as part of LaserFest. This talk will review the impact of this program in the minority community and the importance of physics department at minority institutions in changing the conception of science in K-12 arenas.

  12. Building mutually beneficial partnerships to improve physical activity opportunities through shared-use efforts in under-resourced communities in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Burbage, Lindsey; Gonzalez, Eloisa; Dunning, Lauren; Simon, Paul; Kuo, Tony

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate 18 shared-use agreements (SUAs) implemented in Los Angeles County during 2010-2012. SUAs opened school grounds and/or facilities in seven school districts to increase physical activity opportunities for under-resourced communities with high prevalence of obesity. We reviewed the extent to which SUAs addressed school district concerns about cost responsibility, sustainability, and scope. A school site and community partner survey was conducted to inform planning and to facilitate comparisons of the types and range of legal clauses (up to 16) contained in the agreements. We used geographic information systems and 2010 United States Census data to estimate the population reached and the potential benefits of the SUAs. SUAs varied in the degree to which they addressed the three categories of concerns. Eight of the 18 agreements included 13 of the 16 legal clauses. We estimate that these SUAs have the potential to reach nearly 165,000 children (ages 5-19) and more than 500,000 adults (ages 20-64) at a cost of about $0.38 per community member reached. SUAs that include legal clauses to address school concerns about factors such as vandalism, staffing and funding represent a promising strategy for increasing physical activity opportunities in under-resourced neighborhoods where the prevalence of obesity is high. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical activity and exercise priorities in community dwelling people with multiple sclerosis: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Stennett, Andrea; De Souza, Lorraine; Norris, Meriel

    2017-04-10

    Exercise and physical activity have been found to be beneficial in managing disabilities caused by multiple sclerosis. Despite the known benefits, many people with multiple sclerosis are inactive. This study aimed to identify the prioritised exercise and physical activity practices of people with multiple sclerosis living in the community and the reasons why they are engaged in these activities. A four Round Delphi questionnaire scoped and determined consensus of priorities for the top 10 exercise and physical activities and the reasons why people with multiple sclerosis (n = 101) are engaged in these activities. Data were analysed using content analysis, descriptive statistics, and non-parametric tests. The top 10 exercise and physical activity practices and the top 10 reasons why people with multiple sclerosis (n = 70) engaged in these activities were identified and prioritised. Consensus was achieved for the exercise and physical activities (W = 0.744, p < .0001) and for the reasons they engaged in exercise and physical activity (W = 0.723, p < .0001). The exercise and physical activity practices and the reasons people with multiple sclerosis engaged in exercise and physical activity were diverse. These self-selected activities and reasons highlighted that people with multiple sclerosis might conceptualise exercise and physical activity in ways that may not be fully appreciated or understood by health professionals. Considerations of the views of people with multiple sclerosis may be essential if the goal of increasing physical activity in this population is to be achieved. Implications for Rehabilitation Health professionals should work collaboratively with people with multiple sclerosis to understand how they prioritise activities, the underlying reasons for their prioritisations and embed these into rehabilitation programmes. Health professionals should utilise activities prioritised by people with multiple sclerosis in the community

  14. Tri-Agency Coordination: Challenges and Successes in Creating a Community of Practice among Climate Change Education Principal Investigators funded by NASA, NOAA, and NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; McDougall, C.; Karsten, J. L.; Campbell, D.; Pippin, M. R.; Chambers, L. H.

    2013-12-01

    The effort needed for comprehensive climate change education is far greater than any one institution, education sector, or even federal agency can handle. Recognizing a need to synergistically combine efforts, NSF, NASA, and NOAA have created a collaborative community of their climate change education principal investigators (PIs) through tri-agency coordination. The goals of this tri-agency collaboration are to leverage existing resources, minimize duplicate efforts, and facilitate communication among this emergent community of scientists and educators. NASA, NOAA, and NSF work together to strategically coordinate and support a portfolio of projects focused on climate literacy and education in formal and informal learning environments. The activities of the tri-agency collaboration, including annual meetings for PIs, a catalog of the agencies collective investments in climate change education and the ongoing development of a nascent common evaluation framework, have created a strong national network for effectively engaging diverse audiences with the principles of climate literacy (see Eos Vol. 92, No. 24, 14 June 2011). Last year, after 3 years of active collaboration, similar programs underway at other U.S. Global Change Research Program agencies: the EPA, National Institutes for Environmental Health Sciences, and USDA, were engaged in the collaboration. And, in an attempt to understand the interests of the private sector in this arena, conversations have begun with private philanthropic organizations. This year, as many of the funded projects are maturing, the PI meeting will have a focus on bringing this community together to create a science-theme based tangible outcome that can move the field of climate change education forward. Additional outcomes from this PI meeting will be presented as well as the challenges that were encountered in bringing together institutions with diverse missions, and approaches developed to ensure all parties feel they

  15. Community Capacity Building for Physical Activity Promotion among Older Adults-A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ubert, Tobias; Forberger, Sarah; Gansefort, Dirk; Zeeb, Hajo; Brand, Tilman

    2017-09-13

    Community-based interventions to promote physical activity (PA) among older adults are of high interest in health promotion since they promise to be effective strategies to reach this population group. Community capacity building, that is, the local promotion of knowledge, skills, commitment, structures, and leadership, is among the recommended core strategies. However, little guidance is provided on how to achieve a high degree of community capacity. This study aims to identify practical strategies to enhance community capacities for PA promotion among older adults (50 years or older) and to evaluate their success. A literature review was conducted using scientific databases (PsycInfo and Web of Sciences) and grey literature (national and international project databases), and 14 studies (16 articles) were identified. Five groups of capacity building strategies emerged from the literature: (1) building community coalitions and networks, (2) training of professionals, (3) training of laypersons, (4) strengthening competence and awareness in the target population, and (5) allocation of financial resources. All studies used more than one strategy. Coalition building and strengthening competence and awareness were most frequently used. Feasibility and acceptability of the capacity building strategies were demonstrated. However, intervention effects on PA behavior and other relevant outcomes were inconsistent. The one study that systematically compared different capacity building approaches did not find any evidence for beneficial effects of intensified capacity building. More rigorous research evaluating the efficacy of specific strategies to enhance community capacities for PA promotion is needed.

  16. Physics Education Research and Human Subjects: The PER Community and Institutional Review Boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Gordon J.

    2007-01-01

    This workshop was a discussion among participants about human subjects and Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and dealt with the following questions: (1) What are the important human subjects issues facing physics education researchers? Do few, many, or most PER projects raise issues of confidentiality, liability, withholding of learning, differences in grading policy, impact of the student lack of informed consent, or other ethical issues? (2) Should PER physicists at each institution create a common IRB form to be used by all PER researchers at that institution? (3) Should the PER community as a group address the IRB issues as a community? If so, what might the outcome be? (4) Should all PER research be exempt from IRB approval, given the extreme unlikelihood of student physical or emotional damage? How could such global exemption be achieved?

  17. Report to the Legislature on Senate Concurrent Resolution 118 SD1 HD1: Improving the Community's Understanding of the Department of Education's Programs and School Expenses Including a Comparison with Other States on Adequacy of Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Educational Policy Center, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Hawai'i State Legislature passed Senate Concurrent Resolution 118 S.D.1 HD 1 Improving the Community's Understanding of the Department of Education's Programs and School Expenses Including a Comparison with Other States on Adequacy of Funds. Among the requests contained in the resolution were the following: "Be it further resolved…

  18. Report of the Task Force to Implement Senate Bill 1346 on Funding Support for Community College Education in Michigan and Their Mission and Roles and State-Local Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board for Public Community and Junior Colleges, Lansing.

    This document presents the final recommendations and background papers of a task force empowered by the Michigan legislature to consider the mission and roles of the state community colleges, alternative funding modes, and the responsibilities and interrelationships of the state and local governing boards. Following an overview of recommendations…

  19. Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines: The Role of Personal Networks Among Residents of Low-Income Communities.

    PubMed

    Child, Stephanie; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Moore, Spencer

    2017-09-01

    Despite known benefits of regular physical activity (PA), residents of low-income communities have disproportionately high rates of physical inactivity. Mounting evidence suggests that social network characteristics may be associated with health behaviors, including PA. The purpose of the current study was to examine associations between egocentric network characteristics and meeting PA guidelines among residents of low-income and predominantly African-American communities. Data from the Greenville Healthy Neighborhoods Project (2014), a cross-sectional study, examined social network characteristics, including the PA behavior of social ties, and whether participants met PA guidelines (150 minutes per week of aerobic exercise). Respondent-driven sampling (non-random) was utilized to recruit participants (n=430) within eight low-income communities. Logistic regression analyses, performed in 2016, included robust sandwich estimation to account for clustering (non-independence) of observations. Participants were predominantly older (M=54.4 years, SD=15.1 years), African American (88.0%), and female (70.7%). More than one third of participants had an annual household income <$15,000 (41.6%) or reported meeting the current aerobic PA guidelines (45.8%). Controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, greater network extensity (based on the occupation of ego's network ties; OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.03, 1.20, p=0.02) and a higher percentage of physically active network members (OR=1.97, 95% CI=1.02, 3.82, p=0.04) were associated with higher odds of meeting PA guidelines. Social network characteristics are associated with individual PA behavior among residents of low-income communities. Interventions to increase PA among low-income and predominantly African-American communities should leverage personal networks, including the implementation of walking groups or buddy systems. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Impact of community-based forest management on forest protection: evidence from an aid-funded project in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Todo, Yasuyuki

    2012-09-01

    Many African countries have adopted community-based forest management (CBFM) to prevent deforestation. However, empirical studies have not reached a consensus on the effectiveness of CBFM. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the establishment of participatory forest management associations in Ethiopia. We used remote sensing data to gauge the change in forest area and employed a two-stage least squares model to correct for possible biases. The results indicate that the forest area managed by forest associations declines more in the year of establishment than forest areas with no association. This finding suggests that villagers may engage in "last-minute" logging. However, 1 year after the establishment of the forest associations, the forest area of the associations increased substantially, most likely because the associations monitor illegal logging, enabling the regeneration of open areas within the registered forest area. On average, the forest area of the forest associations increased by 1.5 % in the first 2 years, whereas forest areas not managed as part of an association declined by 3.3 %. The cumulative impact over 2 years yields a net increase in the rate of change of 4.8 %. These results demonstrate that it is important to improve the monitoring of forest areas during the initial establishment of participatory forest management associations to maximize the effects of association establishment.

  1. Community gardens: lessons learned from California Healthy Cities and Communities.

    PubMed

    Twiss, Joan; Dickinson, Joy; Duma, Shirley; Kleinman, Tanya; Paulsen, Heather; Rilveria, Liz

    2003-09-01

    Community gardens enhance nutrition and physical activity and promote the role of public health in improving quality of life. Opportunities to organize around other issues and build social capital also emerge through community gardens. California Healthy Cities and Communities (CHCC) promotes an inclusionary and systems approach to improving community health. CHCC has funded community-based nutrition and physical activity programs in several cities. Successful community gardens were developed by many cities incorporating local leadership and resources, volunteers and community partners, and skills-building opportunities for participants. Through community garden initiatives, cities have enacted policies for interim land and complimentary water use, improved access to produce, elevated public consciousness about public health, created culturally appropriate educational and training materials, and strengthened community building skills.

  2. Community Gardens: Lessons Learned From California Healthy Cities and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Twiss, Joan; Dickinson, Joy; Duma, Shirley; Kleinman, Tanya; Paulsen, Heather; Rilveria, Liz

    2003-01-01

    Community gardens enhance nutrition and physical activity and promote the role of public health in improving quality of life. Opportunities to organize around other issues and build social capital also emerge through community gardens. California Healthy Cities and Communities (CHCC) promotes an inclusionary and systems approach to improving community health. CHCC has funded community-based nutrition and physical activity programs in several cities. Successful community gardens were developed by many cities incorporating local leadership and resources, volunteers and community partners, and skills-building opportunities for participants. Through community garden initiatives, cities have enacted policies for interim land and complimentary water use, improved access to produce, elevated public consciousness about public health, created culturally appropriate educational and training materials, and strengthened community building skills. PMID:12948958

  3. Descriptive analysis of physical restraint (protective holding) among community living adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Luiselli, James K; Sperry, James M; Magee, Christine

    2011-06-01

    We analyzed incidence and implementation patterns of physical restraint (PR) among 448 adults with intellectual disability within community-based day habilitation programs and group homes. PR was implemented exclusively as a consequence for self-harming, aggressive, and environmentally disruptive behaviors. Less than 10% of adults received PR and more than 90% of documented restraints occurred as a planned intervention procedure. Several adults accounted for the majority of PR. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Health-related physical fitness assessment in a community-based cancer rehabilitation setting.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Amy A; Neil-Sztramko, Sarah E; Morgan, Joanne; Hodson, Sara; Weller, Sarah; McRae, Tasha; Campbell, Kristin L

    2015-09-01

    Assessment of physical fitness is important in order to set goals, appropriately prescribe exercise, and monitor change over time. This study aimed to determine the utility of a standardized physical fitness assessment for use in cancer-specific, community-based exercise programs. Tests anticipated to be feasible and suitable for a community setting and a wide range of ages and physical function were chosen to measure body composition, aerobic fitness, strength, flexibility, and balance. Cancer Exercise Trainers/Specialists at cancer-specific, community-based exercise programs assessed new clients (n = 60) at enrollment, designed individualized exercise programs, and then performed a re-assessment 3-6 months later (n = 34). Resting heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, handgrip strength, chair stands, sit-and-reach, back scratch, single-leg standing, and timed up-and-go tests were considered suitable and feasible tests/measures, as they were performed in most (≥88 %) participants. The ability to capture change was also noted for resting blood pressure (-7/-5 mmHg, p = 0.02), chair stands (+4, p < 0.01), handgrip strength (+2 kg, p < 0.01), and sit-and-reach (+3 cm, p = 0.03). While the submaximal treadmill test captured a meaningful improvement in aerobic fitness (+62 s, p = 0.17), it was not completed in 33 % of participants. Change in mobility, using the timed up-and-go was nominal and was not performed in 27 %. Submaximal treadmill testing, handgrip dynamometry, chair stands, and sit-and-reach tests were feasible, suitable, and provided meaningful physical fitness information in a cancer-specific, community-based, exercise program setting. However, a shorter treadmill protocol and more sensitive balance and upper body flexibility tests should be investigated.

  5. Physical activity and cardiovascular disease in African Americans in Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities.

    PubMed

    Bell, Elizabeth J; Lutsey, Pamela L; Windham, Beverly G; Folsom, Aaron R

    2013-05-01

    Although there is substantial evidence that physical activity reduces a person's risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), few of these studies have included African Americans. The studies that have included African Americans offer inconclusive evidence on the association, and none studied heart failure separately. We used data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study cohort to examine, in African Americans, the association of physical activity with the incidence of CVD and its major components-stroke, heart failure, and CHD. Participants age 45-64 yr (3707 African Americans and, for comparison, 10,018 Caucasians) had physical activity assessed via questionnaire in 1987 and were followed for incident CVD (n = 1039) through 2008. After adjustment for potential confounders, physical activity was inversely related to CVD, heart failure, and CHD incidence in both races (P values for trend <0.0001), and with stroke in African Americans. Hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for CVD for each higher physical activity category were similar by race: 1.0, 0.65 (0.56-0.75), and 0.59 (0.49-0.71) for African Americans and 1.0, 0.74 (0.66-0.83), and 0.67 (0.59-0.75) for Caucasians (P value for interaction = 0.38). Our findings reinforce recommendations that regular physical activity is important for CVD risk reduction in African Americans as well as Caucasians and support the idea that some physical activity is better than none.

  6. Reach and Effectiveness of an Integrated Community-Based Intervention on Physical Activity and Healthy Eating of Older Adults in a Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luten, Karla A.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the reach and effectiveness of an integrated community-based intervention designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating among older adults in a socioeconomically disadvantaged community in the Netherlands. The intervention was evaluated with a controlled pre-post quasi-experimental design, with 430…

  7. Reach and Effectiveness of an Integrated Community-Based Intervention on Physical Activity and Healthy Eating of Older Adults in a Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luten, Karla A.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the reach and effectiveness of an integrated community-based intervention designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating among older adults in a socioeconomically disadvantaged community in the Netherlands. The intervention was evaluated with a controlled pre-post quasi-experimental design, with 430…

  8. History of Physics Education Research as a Model for Geoscience Education Research Community Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.

    2011-12-01

    Discipline-based Education Research (DBER) is a research field richly combining a deep understanding of how to teach a particular discipline with an evolving understanding how people learn that discipline. At its center, DBER has an overarching goal of improving the teaching and learning of a discipline by focusing on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms learners use as they develop expertise. Geoscience Education Research, or GER, is a young but rapidly advancing field which is poised to make important contributions to the teaching and learning of earth and space science. Nascent geoscience education researchers could accelerate their community's progress by learning some of the lessons from the more mature field of Physics Education Research, PER. For the past three decades, the PER community has been on the cutting edge of DBER. PER started purely as an effort among traditionally trained physicists to overcome students' tenaciously held misconceptions about force, motion, and electricity. Over the years, PER has wrestled with the extent to which they included the faculty from the College of Education, the value placed on interpretive and qualitative research methods, the most appropriate involvement of professional societies, the nature of its PhD programs in the College of Science, and how to best disseminate the results of PER to the wider physics teaching community. Decades later, as a more fully mature field, PER still struggles with some of these aspects, but has learned important lessons in how its community progresses and evolves to be successful, valuable, and pertinent.

  9. Understanding the Learning Assistant experience with Physics Identity and Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Eleanor; Close, Hunter; Donnelly, David

    2012-10-01

    Learning Assistants (LAs) have been shown to have better conceptual understanding and more favorable beliefs about science than non-LAs, and are more likely to choose a career in K-12 science teaching [1]. We propose that connections between elements of identity, persistence, and participation in an LA program can be explained using the concept of the community of practice and its intimate relationship to identity [2]. In separate work, Hazari et al. found that physics identity was highly correlated to expressed career plans in physics [3]. We hypothesize that a thriving LA program has many features of a well-functioning community of practice and contributes to all four elements of physics identity: personal interest, student performance, competence, and recognition by others. We explore how this analysis of the LA experience might shape decisions and influence outcomes of adoption and adaptations of the LA model.[4pt] [1] Otero, Pollock, & Finkelstein, Am. J. Phys. 78 (11), 1218-1224 (2010).[0pt] [2] Wenger, Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1998).[0pt] [3] J. Res. Sci. Teach. 47 (8), 978-1003 (2010).

  10. Multicomponent exercise for physical fitness of community-dwelling elderly women.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soonhee; Hwang, Sujin; Klein, Aimee B; Kim, Seok Hun

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify whether a 4-week multicomponent exercise program could improve the level of physical fitness of community-dwelling elderly women. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy community-dwelling elderly women were randomly allocated to either an experimental or a control group. Experimental subjects performed a multicomponent exercise program that consisted of balance, strengthening, and stretching exercises for 4 weeks, whereas the control subjects did not perform any specific exercise. The subjects' level of physical fitness was assessed prior to and after training using the Senior Fitness Test which assesses muscle strength, flexibility, dynamic balance/agility, aerobic endurance, and body composition. [Results] Subjects in the experimental group showed significant improvements in lower and upper body strength, lower and upper body flexibility, dynamic balance/agility following training, but not in aerobic endurance or body composition. Significant group differences were shown in lower and upper body strength, lower body flexibility, and dynamic balance/agility. [Conclusion] The results suggest that a multicomponent training program that consists of balance, strengthening, and stretching exercises is a relevant intervention for the improvement of the level of physical fitness of community-dwelling elderly women.

  11. Implementing a Nutrition and Physical Activity Curriculum in Head Start Through an Academic-Community Partnership.

    PubMed

    Zahnd, Whitney E; Smith, Tracey; Ryherd, Susan J; Cleer, Melissa; Rogers, Valerie; Steward, David E

    2017-06-01

    Schools may be an effective avenue for interventions that prevent childhood obesity. I am Moving I am Learning/Choosy Kids(©) (IMIL/CK) is a curriculum recommended by Head Start (HS) for education in nutrition, physical activity, and healthy lifestyle habits. We formed an academic-community partnership (ACP), the Springfield Collaborative for Active Child Health, to promote prevention of childhood obesity, in part, to implement the IMIL/CK curriculum in local HS sites. The ACP included a medical school, HS program, public school district, and state health department. Community-based participatory research principles helped identify and organize important implementation activities: community engagement, curriculum support, professional teacher training, and evaluation. IMIL/CK was piloted in 1 school then implemented in all local HS sites. All sites were engaged in IMIL/CK professional teacher training, classroom curriculum delivery, and child physical activity assessments. Local HS policy changed to include IMIL/CK in lesson plans and additional avenues of collaboration were initiated. Furthermore, improvements in physical activity and/or maintenance or improvement of healthy weight prevalence was seen in 4 of the 5 years evaluated. An ACP is an effective vehicle to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention programming in HS sites. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  12. Multicomponent exercise for physical fitness of community-dwelling elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soonhee; Hwang, Sujin; Klein, Aimee B.; Kim, Seok Hun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify whether a 4-week multicomponent exercise program could improve the level of physical fitness of community-dwelling elderly women. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy community-dwelling elderly women were randomly allocated to either an experimental or a control group. Experimental subjects performed a multicomponent exercise program that consisted of balance, strengthening, and stretching exercises for 4 weeks, whereas the control subjects did not perform any specific exercise. The subjects’ level of physical fitness was assessed prior to and after training using the Senior Fitness Test which assesses muscle strength, flexibility, dynamic balance/agility, aerobic endurance, and body composition. [Results] Subjects in the experimental group showed significant improvements in lower and upper body strength, lower and upper body flexibility, dynamic balance/agility following training, but not in aerobic endurance or body composition. Significant group differences were shown in lower and upper body strength, lower body flexibility, and dynamic balance/agility. [Conclusion] The results suggest that a multicomponent training program that consists of balance, strengthening, and stretching exercises is a relevant intervention for the improvement of the level of physical fitness of community-dwelling elderly women. PMID:25931757

  13. Recent advances of the French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP) in the context of Europe funded projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, Vincent; Dufourg, Nicolas; Bouchemit, Myriam; Budnik, Elena; André, Nicolas; Cecconi, Baptiste; Gangloff, Michel; Durand, Joelle; Pitout, Frédéric; Jacquey, Christian; Rouillard, Alexis; Jourdane, Nathanael; Heulet, Dominique; Lavraud, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    The French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP, http://cdpp.eu/) addresses for nearly 20 years all issues pertaining to natural plasma data distribution and valorization. Initially established by CNES and CNRS on the ground of a solid data archive, CDPP activities diversified with the advent of broader networks and interoperability standards, and through fruitful collaborations (e.g. with NASA/PDS): providing access to remote data, designing and building science driven analysis tools then became at the forefront of CDPP developments. For instance today AMDA helps scientists all over the world accessing and analyzing data from ancient to very recent missions (from Voyager, Galileo, Giotto, ... to Maven, Rosetta, MMS, ...) as well as results from models and numerical simulations. Other tools like the Propagation Tool or 3DView allow users to put their data in context and interconnect with other databases (CDAWeb, MEDOC) and tools (Topcat). This presentation will briefly review this evolution and demonstrate technical and science use cases. The presentation will ultimately show how CDPP activities have been accelerated by its involvement in past and ongoing collaborative european projects (IMPEx, HELIO, Europlanet H2020, HELCATS, ESA/SSA, ...) and how they will serve future missions (Bepicolombo, Solar Orbiter, THOR, ...).

  14. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  15. Promoting Physical Activity Among Native American Youth: a Systematic Review of the Methodology and Current Evidence of Physical Activity Interventions and Community-wide Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Fleischhacker, Sheila; Roberts, Erica; Camplain, Ricky; Evenson, Kelly R; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2016-12-01

    Promoting physical activity using environmental, policy, and systems approaches could potentially address persistent health disparities faced by American Indian and Alaska Native children and adolescents. To address research gaps and help inform tribally led community changes that promote physical activity, this review examined the methodology and current evidence of physical activity interventions and community-wide initiatives among Native youth. A keyword-guided search was conducted in multiple databases to identify peer-reviewed research articles that reported on physical activity among Native youth. Ultimately, 20 unique interventions (described in 76 articles) and 13 unique community-wide initiatives (described in 16 articles) met the study criteria. Four interventions noted positive changes in knowledge and attitude relating to physical activity but none of the interventions examined reported statistically significant improvements on weight-related outcomes. Only six interventions reported implementing environmental, policy, and system approaches relating to promoting physical activity and generally only shared anecdotal information about the approaches tried. Using community-based participatory research or tribally driven research models strengthened the tribal-research partnerships and improved the cultural and contextual sensitivity of the intervention or community-wide initiative. Few interventions or community-wide initiatives examined multi-level, multi-sector interventions to promote physical activity among Native youth, families, and communities. More research is needed to measure and monitor physical activity within this understudied, high risk group. Future research could also focus on the unique authority and opportunity of tribal leaders and other key stakeholders to use environmental, policy, and systems approaches to raise a healthier generation of Native youth.

  16. Do Management and Leadership Practices in the Context of Decentralisation Influence Performance of Community Health Fund? Evidence From Iramba and Iringa Districts in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Chakupewa; Maluka, Stephen Oswald

    2016-09-26

    In early 1990s, Tanzania like other African countries, adopted health sector reform (HSR). The most strongly held centralisation system that informed the nature of services provision including health was, thus, disintegrated giving rise to decentralisation system. It was within the realm of HSR process, user fees were introduced in the health sector. Along with user fees, various types of health insurances, including the Community Health Fund (CHF), were introduced. While the country's level of enrolment in the CHF is low, there are marked variations among districts. This paper highlights the role of decentralised health management and leadership practices in the uptake of the CHF in Tanzania. A comparative exploratory case study of high and low performing districts was carried out. In-depth interviews were conducted with the members of the Council Health Service Board (CHSB), Council Health Management Team (CHMT), Health Facility Committees (HFCs), in-charges of health facilities, healthcare providers, and Community Development Officers (CDOs). Minutes of the meetings of the committees and district annual health plans and district annual implementation reports were also used to verify and triangulate the data. Thematic analysis was adopted to analyse the collected data. We employed both inductive and deductive (mixed coding) to arrive to the themes. There were no differences in the level of education and experience of the district health managers in the two study districts. Almost all district health managers responsible for the management of the CHF had attended some training on management and leadership. However, there were variations in the personal initiatives of the top-district health leaders, particularly the district health managers, the council health services board and local government officials. Similarly, there were differences in the supervision mechanisms, and incentives available for the health providers, HFCs and board members in the two study

  17. Translation of lifestyle modification programs focused on physical activity and dietary habits delivered in community settings.

    PubMed

    Stoutenberg, Mark; Stanzilis, Katie; Falcon, Ashley

    2015-06-01

    Lifestyle modification programs (LMPs) can provide individuals with behavioral skills to sustain long-term changes to their physical activity (PA) levels and dietary habits. Yet, there is much work to be done in the translation of these programs to community settings. This review identified LMPs that focused on changing both PA and dietary behaviors and examined common features and barriers faced in their translation to community settings. A search of multiple online databases was conducted to identify LMPs that included participants over the age of 18 who enrolled in LMPs, offered in community settings, and had the goal of improving both PA and dietary behaviors. Data were extracted on participant demographics, study design characteristics, and study outcome variables including changes in PA, dietary habits, body weight, and clinical outcomes. We identified 27 studies that met inclusion criteria. Despite high levels of retention and adherence to the interventions, varying levels of success were observed in increasing PA levels, improving dietary habits, reducing body weight, and improving clinic outcomes. LMPs addressing issues of PA and dietary habits can be successfully implemented in a community setting. However, inconsistent reporting of key components in the translation of these studies (participant recruitment, utilization of behavioral strategies) may limit their replication and advancement of future programs. Future efforts should better address issues such as identifying barriers to participation and program implementation, utilization of community resources, and evaluating changes across multiple health behaviors.

  18. Physical fitness and oral function in community-dwelling older people: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Izuno, Hiromi; Hori, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Misao; Fukuda, Masayo; Hatayama, Chikako; Ito, Kayoko; Nomura, Yoshio; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the relation between physical fitness and oral function, including tongue and lip movements. Physical fitness and oral function influence quality of life and activities of daily living in older individuals. Occlusal contact and mastication performance are associated with physical fitness, but the association between tongue and lip movements and physical fitness is unclear. Sixty-six independent community-dwelling older individuals (24 men, 42 women; mean age, 70.3 ± 5.9 years) participated in this study. Measures of physical fitness were the one-leg standing time with eyes open, the functional reach test, anteflexion, the timed up and go test, and grip strength. Measures of oral function were tongue pressure, lip pressure, tongue movement from side to side, the repetitive saliva-swallowing test (RSST), oral diadochokinesis and masticatory efficiency. Multiple regression analysis was used to quantify the relation between physical fitness and oral function. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, exercise habits and number of remaining teeth, the tongue movement from side to side and/or oral diadochokinesis were chosen as significant factors in each physical fitness measurement. Furthermore, the lip pressure and masticatory efficiency were associated with handgrip strength. Oral function, including tongue and lip movements, was associated with physical fitness in older people in this study. Tongue dexterity as characterised by tongue movement from side to side and oral diadochokinesis particularly associated with physical fitness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Texas A&M Physics Festival: bringing together the community, faculty, and students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimova, Tatiana

    Texas A&M Physics Festival started in 2003 with a dozen of hands-on exhibits and an inaugural lecture by Stephen Hawking. Over the years it evolved into one of the largest STEM outreach events in the area. The Festival attracts over 4000 visitors annually from all over Texas and other states. It features over 100 interactive exhibits displayed by faculty and students, public lectures by world-renowned scientists and astronauts, professional bubble shows, and many other activities. I will report on the structure of the Festival as well as strategies for involving undergraduate and graduate students and faculty in public outreach. I will further discuss the results of an independent evaluation of the 2015 Festival by the NSF-funded EvalFest program.

  20. Changes in physical activity and cognitive decline in older adults living in the community.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunhwan; Kim, Jinhee; Han, Eun Sook; Chae, Songi; Ryu, Mikyung; Ahn, Kwang Ho; Park, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical activity may be beneficial in preserving cognition in late life. This study examined the association between baseline and changes in physical activity and cognitive decline in community-dwelling older people. Data were from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging, with 2605 aged 65 years and older subjects interviewed in 2006 and followed up for 2 years. Cognitive decline was defined by calculating the Reliable Change Index using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Physical activity levels were categorized as sedentary, low, or high. Changes in physical activity were classified as inactive, decreaser, increaser, or active. Logistic regression analysis of baseline and changes in physical activity with cognitive decline was performed. Compared with the sedentary group at baseline, both the low and high activity groups were less likely to experience cognitive decline. The active (odds ratio [OR] = 0.40, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.23-0.68) and increaser (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI 0.27-0.74) group, compared with the inactive counterpart, demonstrated a significantly lower likelihood of cognitive decline. Older adults who remained active or increased activity over time had a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Engagement in physical activity in late life may have cognitive health benefits.

  1. Impact of physical frailty on disability in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between physical frailty and risk of disability, and to identify the component(s) of frailty with the most impact on disability in community-dwelling older adults. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting A Japanese community. Participants 4341 older adults aged ≥65 living in the community participated in a baseline assessment from 2011 to 2012 and were followed for 2 years. Main outcome measures Care-needs certification in the national long-term care insurance (LTCI) system of Japan, type of physical frailty (robust, prefrail, frail) and subitems (slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, weight loss), adjusted for several potential confounders such as demographic characteristics, analysed with Kaplan-Meier survival curves for incidence of disability by frailty phenotype. Results During the 2-year follow-up period, 168 participants (3.9%) began using the LTCI system for incidence of disability. Participants classified as frail (HR 4.65, 95% CI 2.63 to 8.22) or prefrail (2.52, 1.56 to 4.07) at the baseline assessment had an increased risk of disability incidence compared with robust participants. Analyses for subitems of frailty showed that slowness (2.32, 1.62 to 3.33), weakness (1.90, 1.35 to 2.68) and weight loss (1.61, 1.13 to 2.31) were related to increased risk of disability incidence. In stratified analyses, participants who were classified as frail and who had lower cognitive function had the highest percentage (30.3%) of disability incidence during the 2 years after baseline assessment. Conclusions Physical frailty, even being prefrail, had a strong impact on the risk of future disability. Some components of frailty, such as slowness, weakness and weight loss, are strongly associated with incident disability in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:26338685

  2. Changes in diet and physical activity resulting from the Shape Up Somerville community intervention.

    PubMed

    Folta, Sara C; Kuder, Julia F; Goldberg, Jeanne P; Hyatt, Raymond R; Must, Aviva; Naumova, Elena N; Nelson, Miriam E; Economos, Christina D

    2013-10-04

    The purpose of this study is to describe the behavioral changes in children resulting from Shape Up Somerville (SUS), a community-based, participatory obesity prevention intervention that used a multi-level, systems-based approach. It was set in Somerville, an urban, culturally diverse community in Massachusetts, USA. This was a non-randomized, controlled 2-year community-based intervention trial with children enrolled in grades 1 to 3 (ages 6-8 years). Overall, the SUS intervention was designed to create environmental and policy change to impact all aspects of a child's day. Pre-post outcomes were compared between Somerville and two control communities that were chosen based on socio-demographic similarities. Behavioral outcomes were fruit and vegetable and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption; number of organized sports and physical activities per year; walking to and from school; screen and television time; television in bedroom; and dinner in room with television on. These measures were assessed by parent/caregiver report using a 68-item Family Survey Form. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression, accounting for covariates and clustering by community. Intervention group children, compared to the control group, significantly reduced sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (-2.0 ounces per day; 95% CI -3.8 to -0.2), increased participation in organized sports and physical activities (0.20 sports or activities per year; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.33), and reduced their screen time (-0.24 hours per day; 95% CI -0.42 to -0.06). Results of this study, particularly intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and screen time, are similar to others that used a multi-level approach to realize change in behavior. These results support the efficacy of a multi-level and systems-based approach for promoting the behavioral changes necessary for childhood obesity prevention. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00153322.

  3. 12 CFR 1805.600 - Notice of Funds Availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1805.600 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM Applications for Assistance § 1805.600 Notice of Funds Availability. Each Applicant shall submit an application for financial or...

  4. 12 CFR 1805.600 - Notice of Funds Availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1805.600 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM Applications for Assistance § 1805.600 Notice of Funds Availability. Each Applicant shall submit an application for financial or...

  5. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2014 Annual Progress Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund was established in 2003 as part of the Grow Iowa Values Fund and is currently funded through the Iowa Skilled Worker and Job Creation Fund. This fund has become an important source of financing for community college new program innovation, development, and capacity building, particularly…

  6. 7 CFR 1709.208 - Use of grant funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of grant funds. 1709.208 Section 1709.208... AGRICULTURE ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES Bulk Fuel Revolving Fund Grant Program § 1709.208 Use of grant funds. Grant funds must be used to establish and support a revolving loan fund...

  7. 24 CFR 1003.402 - Availability of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS FOR INDIAN TRIBES AND ALASKA NATIVE VILLAGES Imminent Threat... subpart. The amount of funds reserved for imminent threat funding during each funding cycle will be stated in the NOFA. If any of the reserved funds are not used to fund imminent threat grants during a fiscal...

  8. 24 CFR 1003.402 - Availability of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS FOR INDIAN TRIBES AND ALASKA NATIVE VILLAGES Imminent Threat... subpart. The amount of funds reserved for imminent threat funding during each funding cycle will be stated in the NOFA. If any of the reserved funds are not used to fund imminent threat grants during a fiscal...

  9. Can Applied Naturoptics Fund Associates Degrees in Applied Optics Graduates, in the Americas and Elsewhere, into BS/MS/PhD Physics/Applied Physics Programs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Nadja; Andrade, Jennifer; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-04-01

    Youthful females and other disadvantaged minority members sometimes develop visual handicaps when educational and/or other stressors are present. Special methods already available, effective, and underutilized, can be marshaled towards correcting current technologic and academic systems demand-supply mismatches in the sciences. More efficient harvesting of intellectually advantaged youthful students may represent more-highly-productive global scientific output. RDM has found that it is possible to motivate, stimulate, teach, and foster increased science interest by interacting with students at the earliest possible academic moments. The same applied optics of burning paper with a magnifying glass, and prismatic dispersing of light, allows understanding how vision operates, and can be damaged. Providing information to all students that they safely can self-repair damaged vision could only increase their interest in physics and special work-study programs. ``Indians'' are the most poorly represented group at all levels of education and its support services. MOLLOCKET/MULLAH indicates extra-human/higher-power interactions. Why? Obvious survival value suggests possible information-transmission attempts like those accessed by ``Indians.'' To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.2

  10. Physical disturbance to ecological niches created by soil structure alters community composition of methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Abell, Guy C J; Bodrossy, Levente; Murrell, J Colin

    2011-10-01

    Aggregates of different sizes and stability in soil create a composite of ecological niches differing in terms of physico-chemical and structural characteristics. The aim of this study was to identify, using DNA-SIP and mRNA-based microarray analysis, whether shifts in activity and community composition of methanotrophs occur when ecological niches created by soil structure are physically perturbed. Landfill cover soil was subject to three treatments termed: 'control' (minimal structural disruption), 'sieved' (sieved soil using 2 mm mesh) and 'ground' (grinding using mortar and pestle). 'Sieved' and 'ground' soil treatments exhibited higher methane oxidation potentials compared with the 'control' soil treatment. Analysis of the active community composition revealed an effect of physical disruption on active methanotrophs. Type I methanotrophs were the most active methanotrophs in 'sieved' and 'ground' soil treatments, whereas both Type I and Type II methanotrophs were active in the 'control' soil treatment. The result emphasize that changes to a particular ecological niche may not result in an immediate change to the active bacterial composition and change in composition will depend on the ability of the bacterial communities to respond to the perturbation. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Getting Funded

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Thomas M; McDermott, Mary M; Ibrahim, Said A; Petersen, Laura A; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2004-01-01

    For aspiring clinical investigators, career development awards provide a primary mechanism for “getting funded.” The objective of this article is to provide information that will facilitate a successful application for a research career development award. Specifically, we discuss important issues that cut across the diverse array of awards, and we highlight the most common sources of funding, including the unique opportunities that are available for underrepresented minorities. The target audience includes junior faculty and fellows who are pursuing or considering a research career in academic medicine, as well as their mentors and program directors. PMID:15109347

  12. Physical Activity Correlates with Arterial Stiffness in Community-dwelling Individuals with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ada; Eng, Janice J.; Brasher, Penelope M.; Madden, Kenneth M.; Mohammadi, Azam; Krassioukov, Andrei V.; Tsang, Teresa S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity contributes to atherosclerotic processes, which manifest as increased arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is associated with myocardial demand and coronary perfusion and is a risk factor for stroke and other adverse cardiac outcomes. Poststroke mobility limitations often lead to physical inactivity and sedentary behaviors. This exploratory study aimed to identify functional correlates, reflective of daily physical activity levels, with arterial stiffness in community-dwelling individuals >1 year poststroke. Methods Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was measured in 35 participants (65% men; mean ± SD age 66.9 ± 6.9 years; median time poststroke 3.7 years). Multivariable regression analyses examined the relationships between cfPWV and factors associated with daily physical activity: aerobic capacity (VO2 peak), gait speed, and balance ability (Berg Balance Scale). Age and the use of antihypertensive medications, known to be associated with pulse wave velocity, were also included in the model. Results Mean cfPWV was 11.2 ± 2.4 m/s. VO2 peak and age were correlated with cfPWV (r = −0.45 [P = .006] and r = 0.46 [P = .004], respectively). In the multivariable regression analyses, age and the use of antihypertensive medication accounted for 20.4% of the variance of cfPWV, and the addition of VO2 peak explained an additional 4.5% of the variance (R2 = 0.249). Conclusions We found that arterial stiffness is elevated in community-dwelling, ambulatory individuals with stroke relative to healthy people. Multivariable regression analysis suggests that aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) may contribute to the variance of cfPWV after accounting for the effects of age and medication use. Whether intense risk modification and augmented physical activity will improve arterial stiffness in this population remains to be determined. PMID:23473623

  13. Community design and policies for free-range children: creating environments that support routine physical activity.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Growing concern over childhood obesity has prompted a focus on underlying epidemics of physical inactivity and poor nutrition. Regarding the former, there is increasing understanding that behavior change promotion alone has not increased population physical activity levels and that an ecological approach is necessary. Therefore, the public health profession has moved beyond traditional behavior change campaigns toward a growing focus on altering policies and the built environment to create settings that support increases in routine, not just exercise or leisure time, physical activity among children. A survey of the literature suggests four broad factors that define settings where routine physical activity, especially active transportation, is more likely to occur: • a compact variety of land uses, with a mix of destinations in close proximity; • a comprehensive network of bicycle, pedestrian, and transit facilities; • inviting and functional site designs for pedestrians, cyclists, and transit users; • safety and access for users of all ages, incomes, abilities and disabilities. Although these principles are increasingly accepted as beneficial, not just to health but to a community's economic, environmental, and social well-being, many contemporary ordinances and development practices undermine these outcomes. Therefore, five specific policy and intervention approaches are recommended to guide communities to these outcomes: 1. zoning and development policies to protect open space, contain sprawl, and focus investment toward thriving, mixed downtowns and village centers; 2. Complete Streets policies, which require roadways that are safe and functional for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users, as well as motor vehicles; 3. a transportation- (not just recreation-) oriented trail network; 4. creation of bicycle- and transit-friendly infrastructure and incentive policies; 5. development of policy-based Safe Routes to School interventions. This proposed

  14. Social and Physical Environments and Self-Rated Health in Urban and Rural Communities in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-A; Park, Jong Heon; Kim, Myung

    2015-11-12

    This study evaluated the associations between social and physical environments and self-rated health (SRH) for urban and rural Korean adults, using data from the Korean Community Health Survey (KCHS) of 199,790 participants (115,454 urban and 84,336 rural). The main dependent variable was SRH, while the primary independent variables were social and physical characteristics. Urban residents reported better SRH than did rural residents. Five social environmental variables (trust of neighbors, residence in the area for over 20 years, exchanging help with neighbors, friend and fellowship activities, contact with relatives and neighbors over five times per month) were more prevalent among rural residents. Satisfaction with physical environment was more common among rural residents, but satisfaction with traffic and healthcare facilities was more common among urban areas. After adjusting for relevant factors, positive associations between SRH and trust of neighbors, exchanging help with neighbors, participation in social activities or organizations, and physical environment existed in both rural and urban populations. Also, in both areas, there was no demonstrated association between SRH and years of residence or frequency of contact with relatives. Our findings suggest the existence of an association between social and physical factors and perceived health status among the general population of Korea.

  15. Climate change and physical disturbance manipulations result in distinct biological soil crust communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Blaire; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) colonize plant interspaces in many drylands and are critical to soil nutrient cycling. Multiple climate change and land use factors have been shown to detrimentally impact biocrusts on a macroscopic (i.e., visual) scale. However, the impact of these perturbations on the bacterial components of the biocrusts remain poorly understood. We employed multiple long-term field experiments to assess the impacts of chronic physical (foot trampling) and climatic changes (2 °C soil warming, altered summer precipitation (wetting), and combined warming and wetting) on biocrust bacterial biomass, composition, and metabolic profile. The biocrust bacterial communities adopted distinct states based on the mechanism of disturbance. Chronic trampling decreased biomass and caused small community compositional change. Soil warming had little effect on biocrust biomass or composition, while wetting resulted in an increase in cyanobacterial biomass and altered bacterial composition. Warming combined with wetting dramatically altered bacterial composition and decreased cyanobacteria abundance. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified four functional gene categories that differed in relative abundance among the manipulations, suggesting that climate and land use changes affected soil bacterial functional potential. This study illustrates that different types of biocrust disturbance damage biocrusts in macroscopically similar ways, but they differentially impact the resident soil bacterial communities and the community functional profile can differ depending on the disturbance type. Therefore, the nature of the perturbation and the microbial response are important considerations for management and restoration of drylands.

  16. Climate change and physical disturbance manipulations result in distinct biological soil crust communities.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; Kuske, Cheryl R; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Reed, Sasha C; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-11-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) colonize plant interspaces in many drylands and are critical to soil nutrient cycling. Multiple climate change and land use factors have been shown to detrimentally impact biocrusts on a macroscopic (i.e., visual) scale. However, the impact of these perturbations on the bacterial components of the biocrusts remains poorly understood. We employed multiple long-term field experiments to assess the impacts of chronic physical (foot trampling) and climatic changes (2°C soil warming, altered summer precipitation [wetting], and combined warming and wetting) on biocrust bacterial biomass, composition, and metabolic profile. The biocrust bacterial communities adopted distinct states based on the mechanism of disturbance. Chronic trampling decreased biomass and caused small community compositional changes. Soil warming had little effect on biocrust biomass or composition, while wetting resulted in an increase in the cyanobacterial biomass and altered bacterial composition. Warming combined with wetting dramatically altered bacterial composition and decreased Cyanobacteria abundance. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified four functional gene categories that differed in relative abundance among the manipulations, suggesting that climate and land use changes affected soil bacterial functional potential. This study illustrates that different types of biocrust disturbance damage biocrusts in macroscopically similar ways, but they differentially impact the resident soil bacterial communities, and the communities' functional profiles can differ depending on the disturbance type. Therefore, the nature of the perturbation and the microbial response are important considerations for management and restoration of drylands. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder K A; Pillai, Sharmila G K; Tan, Sin Thien; Tai, Chu Chiau; Shahar, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Physical performance and balance declines with aging and may lead to increased risk of falls. Physical performance tests may be useful for initial fall-risk screening test among community-dwelling older adults. Physiological profile assessment (PPA), a composite falls risk assessment tool is reported to have 75% accuracy to screen for physiological falls risk. PPA correlates with Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. However, the association between many other commonly used physical performance tests and PPA is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between physiological falls risk measured using PPA and a battery of physical performance tests. One hundred and forty older adults from a senior citizens club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (94 females, 46 males), aged 60 years and above (65.77±4.61), participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were screened for falls risk using PPA. A battery of physical performance tests that include ten-step test (TST), short physical performance battery (SPPB), functional reach test (FRT), static balance test (SBT), TUG, dominant hand-grip strength (DHGS), and gait speed test (GST) were also performed. Spearman's rank correlation and binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the significantly associated independent variables (physical performance tests) with falls risk (dependent variable). Approximately 13% older adults were at high risk of falls categorized using PPA. Significant differences (P<0.05) were demonstrated for age, TST, SPPB, FRT, SBT, TUG between high and low falls risk group. A significant (P<0.01) weak correlation was found between PPA and TST (r=0.25), TUG (r=0.27), SBT (r=0.23), SPPB (r=-0.33), and FRT (r=-0.23). Binary logistic regression results demonstrated that SBT measuring postural sways objectively using a balance board was the only significant predictor of physiological falls risk (P<0.05, odds ratio of 2.12). The reference values of physical performance tests

  18. Effects of Exposure to Domestic Physical Violence on Children's Behavior: A Chinese Community-based Sample.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuping; Li, Longfei; Zhao, Xingfu; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yalin; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-06-01

    Domestic physical violence (DPV) is common in China due to its long history of slavery and feudalism. This study aimed to examine the effects of exposure to DPV on children's behavior in a Chinese community. Ninety-three 12- to 16-year-old adolescents exposed to DPV were compared to 54 adolescents with no exposure to DPV. We found that DPV exposure was associated with adverse behaviors in children, especially among boys. Children witnessing DPV alone had similar behavioral scores as the abused children. We recommend that both abused and DPV witness-only adolescents in Chinese communities need treatment to mitigate the effects on maladjusted behaviors. The intervention programs for children who witness domestic violence are also important.

  19. Are self-reported physical activity levels associated with perceived desirability of activity-friendly communities?

    PubMed

    Librett, John J; Yore, Michelle M; Schmid, Thomas L; Kohl, Harold W

    2007-09-01

    People living in activity-friendly communities (AFCs) are more active but the self-selection influence is unknown. From 4856 respondents we explored mediating variables with expressed desire to live in AFCs. Association with desire to live in AFCs included ages 18-24 years (odds ratio [OR]=1.9), African American (OR=1.9) or Hispanic (OR=1.5), and believing AFCs would support activity-based transportation (OR=2.4). Regular physical activity (PA) was marginally associated with desire to live in AFCs (OR=1.3). These findings suggest that PA may be a significant factor in communities of this style. Strategies for social marketing along with changes to the built environment to increase PA levels are discussed.

  20. Fund-Raising by School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClare, Greg; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A questionnaire completed by 138 principals indicated that fund-raising by pupils was extensive and was endorsed by parents, principals, and community organizations. The Toronto Board of Education subsequently adopted guidelines to ensure pupil safety in fund-raising outside school and to enhance the benefits of fund-raising, e.g., sharing,…

  1. Physical Frailty Is Associated with Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment In Community-Based Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Patricia A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Wilson, Robert S.; Leurgans, Sue E.; Bennett, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that physical frailty is associated with an increased risk of MCI. Design Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting Approximately 40 retirement communities across the Chicago metropolitan area. Participants More than 700 older persons without cognitive impairment at baseline. Measures Physical frailty, based on four components (i.e., grip strength, timed walk, body composition and fatigue), was assessed at baseline and cognitive function was assessed annually. Proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, and education were used to examine the association of physical frailty with the risk of incident MCI, and mixed effect models were used to examine the association of frailty with the rate of change in cognition. Results During up to 12 years of annual follow-up, 305 of 761 (40%) persons developed MCI. In a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, and education, physical frailty was associated with a substantially increased risk of incident MCI, such that each one unit increase in physical frailty was associated with a 63% increase in the risk of MCI (hazard ratio: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.27, 2.08). This association persisted in analyses that required MCI to persist for at least one year and after controlling for depressive symptoms, disability, vascular risk factors, and vascular diseases. Further, a higher level of physical frailty was associated with an increased rate of decline in global cognition and 5 cognitive systems (i.e., episodic memory, semantic memory, working memory, perceptual speed, and visuospatial abilities). Conclusion Physical frailty is associated with an increased risk of MCI and a more rapid rate of cognitive decline in aging. PMID:20070417

  2. Using a Participatory Approach to the Development of a School-Based Physical Activity Policy in an Indigenous Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Lindsay; Bengoechea, Enrique García; Salsberg, Jon; Jacobs, Judi; King, Morrison; Macaulay, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study is part of a larger community-based participatory research (CBPR) project to develop, implement, and evaluate the physical activity component of a school-based wellness policy. The policy intervention is being carried out by community stakeholders and academic researchers within the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention…

  3. Impact of a Community-Based Prevention Marketing Intervention to Promote Physical Activity among Middle-Aged Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, Patricia A.; Burroughs, Ericka L.; Granner, Michelle L.; Wilcox, Sara; Hutto, Brent E.; Bryant, Carol A.; Peck, Lara; Pekuri, Linda

    2010-01-01

    A physical activity intervention applied principles of community-based participatory research, the community-based prevention marketing framework, and social cognitive theory. A nonrandomized design included women ages 35 to 54 in the southeastern United States. Women (n = 430 preprogram, n = 217 postprogram) enrolled in a 24-week behavioral…

  4. A Model for the Development of Virtual Communities for People with Long-Term, Severe Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, C. M.; Bruce, C. S.; Hallam, G.; Hills, A. P.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results of an investigation into the needs of persons with disabilities wanting to participate in the use of virtual communities. The aim was to investigate "how virtual communities for persons with long-term, severe physical disabilities can best be facilitated"? Method: A Grounded Theory approach was…

  5. Impact of a Community-Based Prevention Marketing Intervention to Promote Physical Activity among Middle-Aged Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, Patricia A.; Burroughs, Ericka L.; Granner, Michelle L.; Wilcox, Sara; Hutto, Brent E.; Bryant, Carol A.; Peck, Lara; Pekuri, Linda

    2010-01-01

    A physical activity intervention applied principles of community-based participatory research, the community-based prevention marketing framework, and social cognitive theory. A nonrandomized design included women ages 35 to 54 in the southeastern United States. Women (n = 430 preprogram, n = 217 postprogram) enrolled in a 24-week behavioral…

  6. Evaluation of a Community-Based Intervention To Promote Physical Activity in Youth: Lessons from Active Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell R.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Ward, Dianne S.; Felton, Gwen; Trost, Stewart G.; Dowda, Marsha

    2003-01-01

    Tested the effectiveness of a community-based intervention designed to promote physical activity among rural fifth graders. Data on students who participated in after-school and summer programs and home, school, and community interventions indicated that the after-school and summer interventions were implemented as planned, but the home, school,…

  7. Shared Use of School Facilities with Community Organizations and Afterschool Physical Activity Program Participation: A Cost-Benefit Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanters, Michael A.; Bocarro, Jason N.; Filardo, Mary; Edwards, Michael B.; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Floyd, Myron F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Partnerships between school districts and community-based organizations to share school facilities during afterschool hours can be an effective strategy for increasing physical activity. However, the perceived cost of shared use has been noted as an important reason for restricting community access to schools. This study examined…

  8. Shared Use of School Facilities with Community Organizations and Afterschool Physical Activity Program Participation: A Cost-Benefit Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanters, Michael A.; Bocarro, Jason N.; Filardo, Mary; Edwards, Michael B.; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Floyd, Myron F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Partnerships between school districts and community-based organizations to share school facilities during afterschool hours can be an effective strategy for increasing physical activity. However, the perceived cost of shared use has been noted as an important reason for restricting community access to schools. This study examined…

  9. Correlates of physical activity in First Nations youth residing in First Nations and northern communities in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Lucie; Janssen, Ian; Xu, Fei

    2015-02-03

    Physical activity (PA) can help youth achieve balance among physical, mental, emotional and spiritual dimensions of health. The objective was to identify individual, family and community factors associated with PA among First Nations (FN) youth residing in on-reserve and northern FN communities. Participants were 4,837 youth (12-17 years of age) responding to the 2008/10 First Nations Regional Health Survey. Through in-person interviews, youth responded to questions about moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), participation in traditional physical activities, and individuallevel, family and community factors. When averaged across all days of the year, 65% of FN youth accumulated at least 60 min/day of MVPA and 48% of youth participated in at least one traditional FN PA in the previous year. Being male, having a lower number of chronic conditions, living in balance physically, living with at least one biological parent, having more relatives help youth understand their culture, having more community challenges and having more leisure/recreation facilities were independently associated with an increased likelihood of accumulating ≥ 60 min of MVPA. Younger age, being male, knowledge and use of FN language, living in balance spiritually, living with at least one biological parent, having more relatives help youth understand their culture, living in a community of ≤ 300 people, and perceiving the natural environment and community health programs as strengths were independently associated with participation in traditional FN physical activities. There are several correlates of PA from diverse ecological levels among FN youth.

  10. Understanding Community-Based Rehabilitation and the role of physical and rehabilitation medicine: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Seijas, Vanessa; Lugo, Luz H; Cano, Blanca; Escobar, Luz M; Quintero, Carlos; Nugraha, Boya; Gutenbrunner, Christoph

    2016-12-19

    Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) is an accepted model to improve the delivery of rehabilitation in the community. It includes the access to health care, education, labor and accessible environments. The role of Specialists in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine in this strategy (SPRM) is not very well defined. On the occasion of the international consultation for the WHO Action Plan for persons with disabilities, a discussion about the meaning of CBR and the role of SPRM on CBR has occurred among the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation medicine (ISPRM) members. The following major questions were identified; what is CBR? What is the role of Specialists in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SPMR) in CBR? A review of the literature and a discussion among experts was held to answer these questions. It is of major importance to distinguish between the two concepts of CBR: The first one is the policy or management strategy of CBR that was developed by WHO about 30 years ago. The second one is the provision of basic rehabilitation services offered at the community level. CBR strategy must also addresses the need for optimal access to specialized rehabilitation services and will have a key role in the design and building of so-called "Basic Rehabilitation Services". The authors proposed a scheme, which integrates all relevant aspects surrounding the concept of CBR; levels of care rehabilitation services and the roles proposed for SPRM. In addition, the convention for the rights of persons with disabilities and the conceptual framework of the ICF was taken into account.

  11. Development of physical therapy student cultural competency through international community service.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Anne-Marie; Goodgold, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    Many healthcare professions students are unaware of their own ethnocentrism, and movement along the continuum of cultural competence may not be possible until the students encounter individuals whose cultural beliefs, values, and needs differ significantly from their own. This project was an example of an international community service immersion experience in Nicaragua that led to increased cultural competency of five physical therapy students. Through immersion, the students progressed from cultural blindness to cultural precompetence. To further foster student cultural competence, the conceptual framework needs to reflect the multiple facets of an individual's identity and influences on behavior change.

  12. Physics education of Japanese national colleges of technology in local community of Hokkaido

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushino, Akihiro; Matsui, Hidenori

    2014-03-01

    The national colleges of technology in Japan, called KOSEN, were established about 50 years ago aiming to educate 15 to 20 years old students to become engineers who were necessary in period of high economic growth of Japan. In present, environment surrounding us has changed. Examples are low birth rate in Japan and the great earthquake in Tohoku area. There are 4 KOSENs in Hokkaido and we jointly make many efforts to contribute to local community in science. We present our efforts in physics education.

  13. Computational load in model physics of the parallel NCAR community climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakes, J.G.; Nanjundiah, R.S.

    1994-11-01

    Maintaining a balance of computational load over processors is a crucial issue in parallel computing. For efficient parallel implementation, complex codes such as climate models need to be analyzed for load imbalances. In the present study we focus on the load imbalances in the physics portion of the community climate model`s (CCM2) distributed-memory parallel implementation on the Intel Touchstone DELTA computer. We note that the major source of load imbalance is the diurnal variation in the computation of solar radiation. Convective weather patterns also cause some load imbalance. Land-ocean contrast is seen to have little effect on computational load in the present version of the model.

  14. Schools as a community resource for physical activity: legal considerations for decision makers.

    PubMed

    Spengler, John O; Young, Sarah J; Linton, Leslie S

    2007-01-01

    Public schools may offer community residents access to gymnasiums, playfields, etc. When school facilities are available and/or opened up for public use in this manner, what are the legal obligations and liability concerns that arise for the schools and the users? Joint- and shared-use facilities and lands have some legal protections, which this paper introduces and reviews. Legal cases (and precedent) are shared with readers. Within this context, a model depicting factors influencing decisions to allow public use of school facilities for recreation and physical activity is introduced.

  15. Community Health Workers promoting physical activity: Targeting multiple levels of the Social Ecological Model

    PubMed Central

    Haughton, Jessica; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Burke, Kari Herzog; Elder, John P.; Montañez, Jacqueline; Arredondo, Elva M.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Community Health Workers (CHWs) as health educators and health promoters among Latino populations is widely recognized. The Affordable Care Act created important opportunities to increase the role of CHWs in preventive health. This article describes the implementation of CHW-led, culturally specific, faith-based program to increase physical activity (PA) among churchgoing Latinas. The current study augments previous research by describing the recruitment, selection, training, and evaluation of CHWs for a PA intervention targeting multiple levels of the Social Ecological Model. PMID:26280587

  16. Microbial community diversity and physical-chemical features of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Alves Junior, Nelson; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; de Oliveira Santos, Eidy; Dutilh, Bas; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Cabral, Anderson S; Rezende, Carlos; Iida, Tetsuya; de Moura, Rodrigo L; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Pereira, Renato C; Valle, Rogério; Sawabe, Tomoo; Thompson, Cristiane; Thompson, Fabiano

    2015-03-01

    Microbial oceanography studies have demonstrated the central role of microbes in functioning and nutrient cycling of the global ocean. Most of these former studies including at Southwestern Atlantic Ocean (SAO) focused on surface seawater and benthic organisms (e.g., coral reefs and sponges). This is the first metagenomic study of the SAO. The SAO harbors a great microbial diversity and marine life (e.g., coral reefs and rhodolith beds). The aim of this study was to characterize the microbial community diversity of the SAO along the depth continuum and different water masses by means of metagenomic, physical-chemical and biological analyses. The microbial community abundance and diversity appear to be strongly influenced by the temperature, dissolved organic carbon, and depth, and three groups were defined [1. surface waters; 2. sub-superficial chlorophyll maximum (SCM) (48-82 m) and 3. deep waters (236-1,200 m)] according to the microbial composition. The microbial communities of deep water masses [South Atlantic Central water, Antarctic Intermediate water and Upper Circumpolar Deep water] are highly similar. Of the 421,418 predicted genes for SAO metagenomes, 36.7 % had no homologous hits against 17,451,486 sequences from the North Atlantic, South Atlantic, North Pacific, South Pacific and Indian Oceans. From these unique genes from the SAO, only 6.64 % had hits against the NCBI non-redundant protein database. SAO microbial communities share genes with the global ocean in at least 70 cellular functions; however, more than a third of predicted SAO genes represent a unique gene pool in global ocean. This study was the first attempt to characterize the taxonomic and functional community diversity of different water masses at SAO and compare it with the microbial community diversity of the global ocean, and SAO had a significant portion of endemic gene diversity. Microbial communities of deep water masses (236-1,200 m) are highly similar, suggesting that these water

  17. Associations between television viewing and physical activity and low back pain in community-based adults

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sultana Monira; Urquhart, Donna M.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Dunstan, David; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Magliano, Dianna J.; Wluka, Anita E.; Cicuttini, Flavia M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two systematic reviews concluded that there was limited evidence to support an association between physical activity and sedentary behavior and developing low back pain (LBP). The aim of this study was to examine the associations of physical activity and television viewing time with LBP intensity and disability in community-based adults. Five thousand fifty-eight participants (44% men) of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study had physical activity and television viewing time measured in 1999 to 2000, 2004 to 2005, and 2011 to 2012, and LBP intensity and disability assessed in 2013 to 2014 using the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to estimate the odds ratio for LBP intensity and disability associated with physical activity and television viewing time. Analyses were adjusted for age, education, smoking, dietary guideline index score, body mass index, and mental component summary score. To test whether associations of physical activity or television viewing time with LBP intensity and disability were modified by sex, obesity, or age, interactions were tested using the likelihood ratio test. As gender modified the associations between physical activity and television viewing time and LBP disability (P = 0.05), men and women were examined separately. A total of 81.7% men and 82.1% women had LBP. Most men (63.6%) and women (60.2%) had low intensity LBP with fewer having high intensity LBP (18.1% men, 21.5% women). Most participants had no LBP disability (74.5% men, 71.8% women) with the remainder reporting low (15.8% men, 15.3% women) or high (9.7% men, 12.9% women) LBP disability. Insufficient physical activity (<2.5 hours/week) was not associated with LBP intensity or disability. High television viewing time (≥2 hours/day) was associated with greater prevalence of LBP disability in women (low disability OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04–1.73; high disability OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.01–1.72). Although it needs

  18. A community-school district-university partnership for assessing physical activity of tweens.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Robert J; Nickelson, Jen; Baldwin, Julie A; Bryant, Carol A; Alfonso, Moya; Phillips, Leah M; DeBate, Rita D

    2009-01-01

    Obesity among youth is related to a decline in physical activity, and data on physical activity levels among children in elementary and middle schools are limited. We leveraged a community-school district-university partnership in Sarasota County, Florida, in May of 2005 to assess physical activity levels among tweens (youth aged 9-13 years) and to measure the relationship between tweens' awareness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's VERB program and participation in physical activity, using a minimally obtrusive survey. After surveying participating schools (4 elementary schools and 3 middle schools), we obtained 1,407 responses from children in grades 5 through 7. In all, 83.1% of students met the federal recommendation for daily participation in vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA), and 58.6% had tried a new game or sport within the previous 2 months. Mean number of days in the previous week engaging in VPA was significantly higher (P < .001) for boys (5.22) than for girls (4.35). Mean number of days engaging in VPA in the previous week was significantly higher (P = .006) among 6th-grade students (4.93) than 7th-grade students (4.54), but no consistent decline through the grade levels occurred. Activity was significantly correlated with the number of friends reported as playing a game or sport daily (r = .369, P < .001). Most students (88.8%) reported having seen, read, or heard messages or ads about VERB, a tween-centric national social marketing campaign promoting physical activity and participation in new games and sports. Although participation in VPA was high, girls reported significantly fewer days spent engaged in VPA than did boys. We found a modest association between engaging in VPA and having active friends. Capitalizing on leadership from multiple community-based organizations to monitor youth physical activity may inspire implementation of strategies for motivating youth to try new games and sports that they can sustain through

  19. The path to active living: physical activity through community design in Somerville, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Burke, Noreen M; Chomitz, Virginia R; Rioles, Nicole A; Winslow, Stephen P; Brukilacchio, Lisa B; Baker, Jessie C

    2009-12-01

    Somerville, Massachusetts, an ethnically diverse, urban community northwest of Boston, presents opportunities and challenges for active living. With a dense street grid, well-maintained sidewalks, neighborhood parks, and existing Community Path, Somerville is very walkable. However, two major surface arteries traverse and bisect neighborhoods, creating pedestrian safety and environmental justice issues. Major goals included promoting increased collaboration and communication among existing active-living efforts; managing the Community Path extension project; encouraging Portuguese-speaking adults to incorporate daily physical activity; leveraging existing urban planning work to establish secure, attractive walking/biking corridors; and embedding active-living messages in everyday life. The Somerville Active Living by Design Partnership (ALbD) successfully created a robust task force that was integrated with citywide active-living efforts, secured resources to increase infrastructure and support for active living, including city-level coordinator positions, and changed decision-making practices that led to incorporation of pedestrian and bicycle transportation priorities into city planning and that influenced the extension of the Community Path. Partnerships must employ sustainability planning early on, utilize skilled facilitative leaders to manage leadership transitions, and engage new partners. Identifying, cultivating, and celebrating champions, especially those with political power, are critical. Working closely with research partners leads to rich data sources for planning and evaluation. Changing the built environment is difficult; working toward smaller wins is realistic and achievable. The synergy of ALbD and other community interventions created a foundation for short-term successes and accelerated political-cultural changes already underway with respect to active living.

  20. A Request for Planning Funds for a Research and Study Abroad Facility in Geneva, Switzerland in Affiliation with the European Laboratory for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    campbell, myron

    2013-03-31

    To create a research and study abroad program that would allow U.S. undergraduate students access to the world-leading research facilities at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the World Health Organization, various operations of the United Nations and other international organizations based in Geneva.The proposal is based on the unique opportunities currently existing in Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now operational at CERN, data are being collected, and research results are already beginning to emerge. At the same time, a related reduction of activity at U.S. facilities devoted to particle physics is expected. In addition, the U.S. higher-education community has an ever-increasing focus on international organizations dealing with world health pandemics, arms control and human rights, a nexus also centered in Geneva.

  1. Leisure-time physical activity and neuropsychiatric symptoms of community-dwelling persons with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Chen; Kolanowski, Ann M; Huang, Chien-Ying; Lin, Li-Jung; Chang, Ting-Huan; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chen, Ying-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Physical activities are recommended to reduce neuropsychiatric symptoms of nursing home residents with mild dementia. However, relevant information is not available for community-dwelling persons with cognitive impairment. Therefore, this cross-sectional study examined the effects of leisure-time physical activities on cognitively impaired persons' neuropsychiatric symptoms and their family caregivers' distress. Activities were described in terms of their frequency, duration, number of different types, and energy expenditure. Participants were 58 dyads of persons with cognitive impairment and their family caregivers. Data on leisure-time physical activities and neuropsychiatric symptoms were collected using a 7-Day Physical Activity Recall and Chinese Neuropsychiatric Inventory, respectively. The most frequently reported activity was strolling (70.7%). The mean weekly activity frequency, duration, and energy expenditure were 4.52 (SD=4.27) times, 3.7 (SD=4.38) h, and 771.47 (SD=886.38) kcal, respectively. The number of different activity types negatively and significantly predicted cognitively impaired persons' mood and psychosis as well as family caregivers' distress.

  2. Calf circumference, frailty and physical performance among older adults living in the community.

    PubMed

    Landi, Francesco; Onder, Graziano; Russo, Andrea; Liperoti, Rosa; Tosato, Matteo; Martone, Anna Maria; Capoluongo, Ettore; Bernabei, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Lean body mass loss has been indicated as a reliable marker of frailty and poor physical performance among older individuals. We evaluated the relationship between calf circumference and frailty, physical performance, muscle strength, and functional status in persons aged 80 years or older. Data are from the baseline evaluation of the Aging and Longevity Study in the Sirente geographic area (ilSIRENTE Study) (n = 357). The calf circumference was measured at the point of greatest circumference. Frailty was categorized according to the present of slow gait speed, weakness, weight loss, energy expenditure and exhaustion. Physical performance was assessed using the physical performance battery score, which is based on three timed tests: 4-m walking speed test, the balance test and the chair stand test. Analyses of covariance were performed to evaluate the relationship between different calf circumference and physical function. After adjustment for potential confounders, which included age, gender, education, body mass index, sensory impairments, cerebrovascular diseases, albumin, reactive C protein, interleukine-6, and cholesterol, physical performance (SPPB score: 7.27 versus 6.18, p = 0.02) and muscle strength (Hand Grip: 32 kg versus 28 kg, p = 0.03) measures significantly improved as calf circumference increased. The frailty index score was significantly lower among subjects with higher calf circumference (1.66 versus 2.17, p = 0.01). The present study suggests that among community-dwelling older people, calf circumference may be positively related to lower frailty index and higher functional performance. As such, calf circumference is a valuable tool for guiding public health policy and clinical decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors affecting adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability of the Redesigned Community Health Fund in Tanzania: a mixed methods protocol for process evaluation in the Dodoma region

    PubMed Central

    Kalolo, Albino; Radermacher, Ralf; Stoermer, Manfred; Meshack, Menoris; De Allegri, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the implementation of various initiatives to address low enrollment in voluntary micro health insurance (MHI) schemes in sub-Saharan Africa, the problem of low enrollment remains unresolved. The lack of process evaluations of such interventions makes it difficult to ascertain whether their poor results are because of design failures or implementation weaknesses. Objective In this paper, we describe a process evaluation protocol aimed at opening the ‘black box’ to evaluate the implementation processes of the Redesigned Community Health Fund (CHF) program in the Dodoma region of Tanzania. Design The study employs a cross-sectional mixed methods design and is being carried out 3 years after the launch of the Redesigned CHF program. The study is grounded in a conceptual framework which rests on the Diffusion of Innovation Theory and the Implementation Fidelity Framework. The study utilizes a mixture of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools (questionnaires, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and document review), and aligns the evaluation to the Theory of Intervention developed by our team. Quantitative data will be used to measure program adoption, implementation fidelity, and their moderating factors. Qualitative data will be used to explore the responses of stakeholders to the intervention, contextual factors, and moderators of adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability. Discussion This protocol describes a systematic process evaluation in relation to the implementation of a reformed MHI. We trust that the theoretical approaches and methodologies described in our protocol may be useful to inform the design of future process evaluations focused on the assessment of complex interventions, such as MHI schemes. PMID:26679408

  4. Factors affecting adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability of the Redesigned Community Health Fund in Tanzania: a mixed methods protocol for process evaluation in the Dodoma region.

    PubMed

    Kalolo, Albino; Radermacher, Ralf; Stoermer, Manfred; Meshack, Menoris; De Allegri, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the implementation of various initiatives to address low enrollment in voluntary micro health insurance (MHI) schemes in sub-Saharan Africa, the problem of low enrollment remains unresolved. The lack of process evaluations of such interventions makes it difficult to ascertain whether their poor results are because of design failures or implementation weaknesses. Objective In this paper, we describe a process evaluation protocol aimed at opening the 'black box' to evaluate the implementation processes of the Redesigned Community Health Fund (CHF) program in the Dodoma region of Tanzania. Design The study employs a cross-sectional mixed methods design and is being carried out 3 years after the launch of the Redesigned CHF program. The study is grounded in a conceptual framework which rests on the Diffusion of Innovation Theory and the Implementation Fidelity Framework. The study utilizes a mixture of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools (questionnaires, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and document review), and aligns the evaluation to the Theory of Intervention developed by our team. Quantitative data will be used to measure program adoption, implementation fidelity, and their moderating factors. Qualitative data will be used to explore the responses of stakeholders to the intervention, contextual factors, and moderators of adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability. Discussion This protocol describes a systematic process evaluation in relation to the implementation of a reformed MHI. We trust that the theoretical approaches and methodologies described in our protocol may be useful to inform the design of future process evaluations focused on the assessment of complex interventions, such as MHI schemes.

  5. Child Physical and Sexual Abuse in a Community Sample of Young Adults: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMillan, Harriet L.; Tanaka, Masako; Duku, Eric; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boyle, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Exposure to child maltreatment is associated with physical, emotional, and social impairment, yet in Canada there is a paucity of community-based information about the extent of this problem and its determinants. We examined the prevalence of child physical and sexual abuse and the associations of child abuse with early contextual,…

  6. Child Physical and Sexual Abuse in a Community Sample of Young Adults: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMillan, Harriet L.; Tanaka, Masako; Duku, Eric; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boyle, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Exposure to child maltreatment is associated with physical, emotional, and social impairment, yet in Canada there is a paucity of community-based information about the extent of this problem and its determinants. We examined the prevalence of child physical and sexual abuse and the associations of child abuse with early contextual,…

  7. A STUDY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE PUBLIC JUNIOR AND COMMUNITY COLLEGES OF THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BLAMER, WILLIAM C.

    PRESENT COMMUNITY COLLEGE PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS ARE COMPARED WITH STANDARDS RECOMMENDED BY PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS, THUS PROVIDING ATHLETIC DIRECTORS WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR POSSIBLE IMPROVEMENTS. JUNIOR COLLEGES WERE GROUPED BY ENROLLMENT AND 450 QUESTIONNAIRES SENT TO THEIR PHYSICAL EDUCATION DIRECTORS, OF WHOM 324 REPLIED. THE DATA WERE…

  8. Does community type moderate the relationship between parent perceptions of the neighborhood and physical activity in children?

    PubMed Central

    Dunton, Genevieve F.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether residing in a community designed to promote physical activity moderates the relationship between parent perceptions of the neighborhood and general physical activity or active commuting to school in their children. Design Cross-sectional Setting San Bernardino County, California. Subjects 365 families (one parent and one child in grades 4th-8th). 85 reside in a smart growth community designed to be more conducive to physical activity. Measures Parent perceptions assessed using the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. General child physical activity measured using accelerometers, and active commuting was self-reported by children. Analysis Two sets of regressions were performed: one for general physical activity, and one for active commuting. Separate models were run in the two sets for each of the 14 NEWS factors, while controlling for demographics. Results For general physical activity, walking infrastructure, lack of cul-de-sacs and social interaction had significant main effect associations (p≤0.05). No factors were moderated by community. The relationships between active commuting to school and perceived crime, traffic hazards, hilliness, physical barriers, cul-de-sac connectivity, aesthetics, and walking infrastructure were significant for those in the smart growth community only (p≤0.05). Conclusions Living in an activity friendly environment is associated with positive relationships between parent perceptions and active commuting behaviors in children. Future interventions should account for both the perceived neighborhood environment and available physical activity infrastructure. PMID:22747320

  9. Does community type moderate the relationship between parent perceptions of the neighborhood and physical activity in children?

    PubMed

    Durand, Casey P; Dunton, Genevieve F; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    To examine whether residing in a community designed to promote physical activity moderates the relationship between parent perceptions of the neighborhood and general physical activity or active commuting to school in their children. Cross-sectional. San Bernardino County, California. Three hundred sixty-five families (one parent and one child in grades four through eight). Eighty-five reside in a smart growth community designed to be more conducive to physical activity. Parent perceptions assessed using the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS). General child physical activity was measured using accelerometers, and active commuting was self-reported by children. Two sets of regressions were performed: one for general physical activity, and one for active commuting. Separate models were run in the two sets for each of the 14 NEWS factors, while controlling for demographics. For general physical activity, walking infrastructure, lack of cul-de-sacs, and social interaction had significant main effect associations (p ≤ .05). No factors were moderated by community. The relationships between active commuting to school and perceived crime, traffic hazards, hilliness, physical barriers, cul-de-sac connectivity, aesthetics, and walking infrastructure were significant for those in the smart growth community only (p ≤ .05). Living in an activity-friendly environment is associated with positive relationships between parent perceptions and active commuting behaviors in children. Future interventions should account for both the perceived neighborhood environment and available physical activity infrastructure.

  10. The Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics (PICUP): A Community-Building Prototype for Positively Affecting the Undergraduate Physics Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Computation in the undergraduate curriculum is gaining significant traction in physics departments across the country, including a burgeoning effort to integrate computation into individual physics courses, both introductory and advanced, in such a way that it plays a role that is as important as non-computational mathematics in two important educational areas: (i) providing a deeper conceptual understanding of physical principles, and (ii) problem-solving. The Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics (PICUP), an informal group of physics faculty from around the country, is committed to building a community of STEM educators dedicated to integrating computation into the undergraduate curriculum. One of the cornerstones of the PICUP community-building efforts is a significant online component. In this presentation, I shall describe the PICUP community-building framework, and the unique educational materials development effort that has already attracted much interest amongst physics faculty at all levels of computational physics education experience. Support for the PICUP project in the form of a grant from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Risk analytics for hedge funds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Ankur

    2005-05-01

    The rapid growth of the hedge fund industry presents significant business opportunity for the institutional investors particularly in the form of portfolio diversification. To facilitate this, there is a need to develop a new set of risk analytics for investments consisting of hedge funds, with the ultimate aim to create transparency in risk measurement without compromising the proprietary investment strategies of hedge funds. As well documented in the literature, use of dynamic options like strategies by most of the hedge funds make their returns highly non-normal with fat tails and high kurtosis, thus rendering Value at Risk (VaR) and other mean-variance analysis methods unsuitable for hedge fund risk quantification. This paper looks at some unique concerns for hedge fund risk management and will particularly concentrate on two approaches from physical world to model the non-linearities and dynamic correlations in hedge fund portfolio returns: Self Organizing Criticality (SOC) and Random Matrix Theory (RMT).Random Matrix Theory analyzes correlation matrix between different hedge fund styles and filters random noise from genuine correlations arising from interactions within the system. As seen in the results of portfolio risk analysis, it leads to a better portfolio risk forecastability and thus to optimum allocation of resources to different hedge fund styles. The results also prove the efficacy of self-organized criticality and implied portfolio correlation as a tool for risk management and style selection for portfolios of hedge funds, being particularly effective during non-linear market crashes.

  12. Examination of community and consumer nutrition, tobacco and physical activity environments at food and tobacco retail stores in three diverse North Carolina communities

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Heather; Evenson, Kelly R.; Rose, Shyanika W.; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Myers, Allison E.; Ribisl, Kurt M.

    2015-01-01

    To advance our understanding of multiple health-related dimensions of the built environment, this study examined associations among nutrition, tobacco, and physical activity community and consumer environments. Community environment measures included supermarket access, tobacco outlet density, and physical activity resource density in store neighborhoods. Cross-sectional observations of the nutrition, tobacco and physical activity environments were conducted in 2011 at and around 303 food stores that sold tobacco products in three North Carolina counties. Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression were used to examine associations between community and consumer environments. Correlations between community nutrition, tobacco, and physical activity environments ranged from slight to fair (− 0.35 to 0.20) and from poor to fair (− 0.01 to − 0.38) between consumer environments. Significant relationships between consumer tobacco and nutrition environments were found after controlling for store and neighborhood characteristics. For example, stores with higher amounts of interior tobacco marketing had higher healthy food availability (p = 0.001), while stores with higher amounts of exterior tobacco marketing had lower healthy food availability (p = 0.02). Community and consumer environments for nutrition, tobacco, and physical activity were interrelated. Measures that assess single aspects of community or consumer environments could miss characteristics that may influence customer purchasing. Even chain supermarkets, typically regarded as healthful food sources compared to smaller food stores, may expose customers to tobacco marketing inside. Future research could explore combining efforts to reduce obesity and tobacco use by addressing tobacco marketing, healthy food availability and physical activity opportunities at retail food outlets. PMID:26516620

  13. Promoting sustainable community change in support of older adult physical activity: evaluation findings from the Southeast Seattle Senior Physical Activity Network (SESPAN).

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Allen; Egger, Ruth; LoGerfo, James P; Schwartz, Sheryl; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have identified as effective and worthy of broader dissemination a variety of intervention strategies to promote physical activity among older adults. This paper reports results of a community-organizing approach to disseminating evidence-based interventions in a sustainable way: The Southeast Seattle Senior Physical Activity Network (SESPAN). SESPAN was implemented in Southeast Seattle, a group of multicultural neighborhoods extending 8 miles southeast of downtown Seattle, with a population of 56,469 in 2000, with 12% (7,041) aged 65 and older. The SESPAN organizing strategy involved networking to: (1) make connections between two or more community organizations to create new senior physical activity programs; and (2) build coalitions of community groups and organizations to assist in making larger scale environmental and policy changes to increase senior physical activity. The SESPAN evaluation used an uncontrolled prospective design focusing on sustainable community changes, including new or modified programs, policies, and practices. Networking among organizations led to the creation of 16 ongoing exercise classes and walking groups, serving approximately 200 older adults in previously underserved Southeast Seattle communities. In addition, the project's health coalition is sustaining current activities and generating new programs and environmental changes. The success of the SESPAN organizing model depended on identifying and involving champions in partner organizations who provided support and resources for implementing programs.

  14. Community based rehabilitation: Does it really improve the level of productivity among persons with physical disabilities?

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman; Saha, Palash Chandra; Habib, Md Monjurul

    2015-01-01

    The Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) is a common approach to work with disable people to improve their quality of life by improving the level of productivity and integrating them into society. But the effectiveness of CBR varies by country to country. The aim of the study was to find out whether CBR programs really improved the level of productivity among persons with physical disabilities. A cross-sectional study was conducted among equal number of respondents (n=51) from each CBR coverage and non-coverage areas from two different upazilla (sub-districts) located 40 km away from the capital city of Bangladesh. Respondents were selected purposively and data were collected by face to face interviews. Willer's (1994) version of the Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) was used to measure the level of productivity among adult with physical disabilities. The mean score of total productivity integration in CBR coverage and non-coverage areas were 4.3 ± 2.4 and 4.5 ± 2.2 respectively. This difference was statistically non-significant (p=0.602).The levels of productivity integration between CBR coverage and non-coverage areas varied only 2-4% (p=0.793). The mean score of productivity integration and levels of productivity were not different significantly in CBR coverage and non-coverage areas.

  15. Toward a stress process model of children's exposure to physical family and community violence.

    PubMed

    Foster, Holly; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2009-06-01

    Theoretically informed models are required to further the comprehensive understanding of children's ETV. We draw on the stress process paradigm to forward an overall conceptual model of ETV (ETV) in childhood and adolescence. Around this conceptual model, we synthesize research in four dominant areas of the literature which are detailed but often disconnected including: (1) exposure to three forms of physical violence (e.g., child physical maltreatment, interparental violence, and community ETV); (2) the multilevel correlates and causes of ETV (e.g., neighborhood characteristics including concentrated disadvantage; family characteristics including socio-economic status and family stressors); (3) a range of consequences of ETV (e.g., internalizing and externalizing mental health problems, role transitions, and academic outcomes); and (4) multilevel and cross domain mediators and moderators of ETV influences (e.g., school and community factors, family social support, and individual coping resources). We highlight the range of interconnected processes through which violence exposures may influence children and suggest opportunities for prevention and intervention. We further identify needed future research on children's ETV including coping resources as well as research on cumulative contributions of violence exposure, violence exposure modifications, curvilinearity, and timing of exposure.

  16. Synthetic biology in the view of European public funding organisations

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Gaisser, Sibylle; Schmidt, Markus

    2012-01-01

    We analysed the decisions of major European public funding organisations to fund or not to fund synthetic biology (SB) and related ethical, legal and social implication (ELSI) studies. We investigated the reaction of public organisations in six countries (Austria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the UK) towards SB that may influence SB’s further development in Europe. We examined R&D and ELSI communities and their particular funding situation. Our results show that the funding situation for SB varies considerably among the analysed countries, with the UK as the only country with an established funding scheme for R&D and ELSI that successfully integrates these research communities. Elsewhere, we determined a general lack of funding (France), difficulties in funding ELSI work (Switzerland), lack of an R&D community (Austria), too small ELSI communities (France, Switzerland, Netherlands), or difficulties in linking existing communities with available funding sources (Germany), partly due to an unclear SB definition. PMID:22586841

  17. Social marketing: approach to cultural and contextual relevance in a community-based physical activity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Colleen; Vega-López, Sonia; Ainsworth, Barbara; Nagle-Williams, Allison; Records, Kathie; Permana, Paska; Coonrod, Dean

    2014-01-01

    We report the social marketing strategies used for the design, recruitment and retention of participants in a community-based physical activity (PA) intervention, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health). The study example used to illustrate the use of social marketing is a 48-week prescribed walking program, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health), which tests a social support intervention to explore the effectiveness of a culturally specific program using ‘bouts’ of PA to effect the changes in body fat, fat tissue inflammation and postpartum depression symptoms in sedentary Hispanic women. Using the guidelines from the National Benchmark Criteria, we developed intervention, recruitment and retention strategies that reflect efforts to draw on community values, traditions and customs in intervention design, through partnership with community members. Most of the women enrolled in Madres para la Salud were born in Mexico, largely never or unemployed and resided among the highest crime neighborhoods with poor access to resources. We developed recruitment and retention strategies that characterized social marketing strategies that employed a culturally relevant, consumer driven and problem-specific design. Cost and benefit of program participation, consumer-derived motivation and segmentation strategies considered the development transition of the young Latinas as well as cultural and neighborhood barriers that impacted retention are described. PMID:23002252

  18. Social marketing: approach to cultural and contextual relevance in a community-based physical activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Keller, Colleen; Vega-López, Sonia; Ainsworth, Barbara; Nagle-Williams, Allison; Records, Kathie; Permana, Paska; Coonrod, Dean

    2014-03-01

    We report the social marketing strategies used for the design, recruitment and retention of participants in a community-based physical activity (PA) intervention, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health). The study example used to illustrate the use of social marketing is a 48-week prescribed walking program, Madres para la Salud (Mothers for Health), which tests a social support intervention to explore the effectiveness of a culturally specific program using 'bouts' of PA to effect the changes in body fat, fat tissue inflammation and postpartum depression symptoms in sedentary Hispanic women. Using the guidelines from the National Benchmark Criteria, we developed intervention, recruitment and retention strategies that reflect efforts to draw on community values, traditions and customs in intervention design, through partnership with community members. Most of the women enrolled in Madres para la Salud were born in Mexico, largely never or unemployed and resided among the highest crime neighborhoods with poor access to resources. We developed recruitment and retention strategies that characterized social marketing strategies that employed a culturally relevant, consumer driven and problem-specific design. Cost and benefit of program participation, consumer-derived motivation and segmentation strategies considered the development transition of the young Latinas as well as cultural and neighborhood barriers that impacted retention are described.

  19. The association between the home environment and physical activity in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Benzinger, P; Iwarsson, S; Kroog, A; Beische, D; Lindemann, U; Klenk, J; Becker, C

    2014-08-01

    Physical activity (PA) decreases with increasing age despite the fact that PA exerts beneficial effects on many age-related diseases and conditions. Consequently, there is an interest in modifiable factors that may influence PA among older persons. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between PA and the home environment in well-functioning older community-dwelling persons. This study used a person-environment (P-E) fit perspective to the home environment, operationalized by means of assessment of functional limitations in 81 community-dwelling persons (median age 79 years) as well as environmental barriers in their home environments and the nearby exterior surroundings. The interaction between functional limitations and environmental barriers generated a score expressing the magnitude of P-E fit problems in their home environment. PA was rated with a questionnaire covering household-related and recreational activities. We found a significant association between PA and the magnitude of P-E fit problems that explained 3.9 % of the variance of PA. The number of environmental barriers per se was not significantly associated with PA, while functional limitations explained 6.8 % of the variance of PA. In well-functioning older persons living in the community environmental aspects of housing demonstrated a weak association with PA.

  20. Changes in diet and physical activity resulting from the Shape Up Somerville community intervention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe the behavioral changes in children resulting from Shape Up Somerville (SUS), a community-based, participatory obesity prevention intervention that used a multi-level, systems-based approach. It was set in Somerville, an urban, culturally diverse community in Massachusetts, USA. Methods This was a non-randomized, controlled 2-year community-based intervention trial with children enrolled in grades 1 to 3 (ages 6-8 years). Overall, the SUS intervention was designed to create environmental and policy change to impact all aspects of a child’s day. Pre-post outcomes were compared between Somerville and two control communities that were chosen based on socio-demographic similarities. Behavioral outcomes were fruit and vegetable and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption; number of organized sports and physical activities per year; walking to and from school; screen and television time; television in bedroom; and dinner in room with television on. These measures were assessed by parent/caregiver report using a 68-item Family Survey Form. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression, accounting for covariates and clustering by community. Results Intervention group children, compared to the control group, significantly reduced sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (-2.0 ounces per day; 95% CI -3.8 to -0.2), increased participation in organized sports and physical activities (0.20 sports or activities per year; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.33), and reduced their screen time (-0.24 hours per day; 95% CI -0.42 to -0.06). Conclusions Results of this study, particularly intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and screen time, are similar to others that used a multi-level approach to realize change in behavior. These results support the efficacy of a multi-level and systems-based approach for promoting the behavioral changes necessary for childhood obesity prevention. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00153322. PMID

  1. Community-based interventions to promote increased physical activity: a primer.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Current recommendations, based on an abundance of empirical data documenting the impact of physical activity (PA) on preventing morbidity and mortality associated with common chronic diseases, indicate that adults should accumulate 30 minutes of moderate-intensity PA > or =5 days per week. However, worldwide rates of PA remain low, indicating a great need for large-scale implementation of evidence-based PA interventions. We briefly present practical aspects of intervention planning, implementation and evaluation within common community settings. The first stage of intervention planning is formative research, which allows for a better understanding of the elements needed for a successful intervention. Partnering with community settings (schools, worksites, faith-based organizations and healthcare organizations) offers many benefits and the opportunity to reach specific populations. Setting-based approaches allow for multilevel strategies, ranging from individual-based programmes and educational initiatives to physical and social environmental changes. Various settings such as healthcare, worksite, and school- and community-based settings are discussed. Intervention delivery methods and strategies can range, depending on the population and setting targeted, from small-group approaches to mediated methods (e.g. print, telephone, electronic). The final phase of intervention planning and implementation is evaluation. Several objective and subjective methods of PA assessment are available to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. We have highlighted the need for process evaluation of intervention implementation to provide valuable information for the dissemination and sustainability of successful interventions. Although there are numerous considerations for the design, implementation, assessment and evaluation of PA interventions, the potential for positive impact on the overall health of the public indicates the necessity for programmes designed to increase PA.

  2. Evidence based prevention of acute injuries during physical exercise in a WHO safe community

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, T; Lindqvist, K

    2001-01-01

    Objective—To evaluate a community based programme for evidence based prevention of injuries during physical exercise. Design—Quasi-experimental evaluation using an intervention population and a non-random control population. Participants—Study municipality (population 41 000) and control municipality (population 26 000) in Sweden. Main outcome measures—Morbidity rate for sports related injuries treated in the health care system; severity classification according to the abbreviated injury scale (AIS). Results—The total morbidity rate for sports related injuries in the study area decreased by 14% from 21 to 18 injuries per 1000 population years (odds ratio 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 0.96). No tendency towards a decrease was observed in people over 40. The rate of moderately severe injury (AIS 2) decreased to almost half (odds ratio 0.58; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.68), whereas the rate of minor injuries (AIS 1) increased (odds ratio 1.22; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.40). The risk of severe injuries (AIS 3–6) remained constant. The rate of total sports injury in the control area did not change (odds ratio 0.93; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.07), and the trends in the study and control areas were not statistically significantly different. Conclusion—An evidence based prevention programme based on local safety rules and educational programmes can reduce the burden of injuries related to physical exercise in a community. Future studies need to look at adjusting the programme to benefit all age groups. Key Words: injuries; prevention; evaluation; community; intervention; safety promotion PMID:11157457

  3. Ability to negotiate stairs predicts free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Matar Abdullah; Dean, Catherine M; Ada, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Which clinical measures of walking performance best predict free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke? Cross-sectional observational study. 42 community-dwelling stroke survivors. Predictors were four clinical measures of walking performance (speed, automaticity, capacity, and stairs ability). The outcome of interest was free-living physical activity, measured as frequency (activity counts) and duration (time on feet), collected using an activity monitor called the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity. Time on feet was predicted by stairs ability alone (B 166, 95% CI 55 to 278) which accounted for 48% of the variance. Activity counts were also predicted by stairs ability alone (B 6486, 95% CI 2922 to 10 050) which accounted for 58% of the variance. The best predictor of free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke was stairs ability.

  4. Independent and combined influence of homeownership, occupation, education, income, and community poverty on physical health in persons with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Leigh F; Martin, Kathryn Remmes; Shreffler, Jack; Kumar, Deepak; Schoster, Britta; Kaufman, Jay S; Schwartz, Todd A

    2011-05-01

    To examine the independent and combined influence of individual- and community-level socioeconomic status (SES) measures on physical health status outcomes in people with self-reported arthritis. From 2004-2005, 968 participants completed a telephone survey assessing health status, chronic conditions, community characteristics, and sociodemographic variables. Individual-level SES measures used included homeownership, occupation (professional or not), educational attainment (less than high school, high school degree, and more than high school), and income (<$15,000, $15,000-$45,000, and >$45,000). Community poverty (2000 US Census block group percentage of individuals living below the poverty line [low, medium, and high]) was used as a community-level SES measure. Outcomes were physical functioning (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12 version 2 physical component summary [PCS]), functional disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ]), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) Healthy Days physical and limited activity days, and were analyzed via multivariable regressions. When entered separately, all individual-level SES variables were significantly (P < 0.01) associated with poorer PCS, HAQ, and CDC HRQOL scores. A higher magnitude of effect was seen for household income, specifically <$15,000 per year in final models with all 4 individual SES measures and community poverty. The magnitude of effect for education is reduced and marginally significant for the PCS and number of physically unhealthy days. No effects were seen for occupation, homeownership, and community poverty. Findings confirm that after adjusting for important covariates, lower individual- and community-level SES measures are associated with poorer physical health outcomes, while household income is the strongest predictor (as measured by both significance and effect) of poorer health status in final models. Studies not having participant

  5. Funding open access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouse, Gene D.; Zimmermann, Frank

    2009-03-01

    We were happy to see the 10-year anniversary of our open-access journal Physical Review Special Topics: Accelerators and Beams (PRST-AB) mentioned in your news article on open-access publishing (December 2008 pp13-14). However, your statement that PRST-AB "is funded by US national labs, whose researchers publish about 150 papers per year in the journal" is not entirely correct.

  6. American particle and nuclear physics planning

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2014-10-01

    In the United States the planning process relevant to future deep inelastic scattering involves both the high energy physics and nuclear physics funding and the two communities. In Canada there is no such split between the communities. Within the past two years there have been several planning initiatives and there may be more to come. We review the current status of both the planning and the plans.

  7. BFS, a Legacy to the International Reactor Physics, Criticality Safety, and Nuclear Data Communities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Anatoly Tsibulya; Yevgeniy Rozhikhin

    2012-03-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. Data provided by these two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades The Russian Federation has been a major contributor to both projects with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) as the major contributor from the Russian Federation. Included in the benchmark specifications from the BFS facilities are 34 critical configurations from BFS-49, 61, 62, 73, 79, 81, 97, 99, and 101; spectral characteristics measurements from BFS-31, 42, 57, 59, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101; reactivity effects measurements from BFS-62-3A; reactivity coefficients and kinetics measurements from BFS-73; and reaction rate measurements from BFS-42, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101.

  8. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-07-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  9. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  10. Companion confidence in the balance of community-dwelling older adults: implications for physical activity promotion.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, James T; Dunfey, Julia C; Wyand, Megan K

    2014-01-01

    Positive social relationships may increase the intention of older adults to be physically active. In the presence of balance impairments, however, the potential influence of a familiar companion on an older adult's physical activity is not well understood. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to explore companion confidence in the balance capability of an older adult as a potential determinant of older adult physical activity. The study employed a cross-sectional design, in which 40 dyads formed by a community-dwelling older adult and his or her close companion (eg, family member, friend, and caregiver) were recruited as a sample of convenience. Older adults completed the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and the Physical Activity Survey for the Elderly (PASE). Companions completed a modified version of the ABC scale, in which they were asked to rate their confidence in the older adult's balance. The agreement between and correspondence of paired ABC scores were analyzed using mean difference (95% confidence interval [CI]), dependent samples t test (α = 0.05), and the intraclass correlation coefficient 1-way random effects model. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was used to characterize the relationship between companion confidence and older adult physical activity. Older adults were more confident in their balance capability (mean ABCOlder Adult = 70.0; 95% CI = 62.8-77.2) than their companions (mean ABCCompanion = 60.2; 95% CI = 50.6-69.8). The difference between group mean scores was significant (mean difference = 9.8; 95% CI = 2.3-17.3, t (39) = 2.38; P = 0.02). Discordance increased as the mean of paired ABC scores diminished. ABC scores were also significantly yet moderately associated (intraclass correlation coefficient (1,1) = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.31-0.74; P < 0.01). The association between ABCCompanion and PASE scores was stronger (r = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.23-0.79; P < 0.01) than the association between ABCOlder

  11. Companion Confidence in the Balance of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Implications for Physical Activity Promotion.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, James T; Dunfey, Julia C; Wyand, Megan K

    2013-12-20

    Positive social relationships may increase the intention of older adults to be physically active. In the presence of balance impairments, however, the potential influence of a familiar companion on an older adult's physical activity is not well understood. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to explore companion confidence in the balance capability of an older adult as a potential determinant of older adult physical activity. The study employed a cross-sectional design, in which 40 dyads formed by a community-dwelling older adult and his or her close companion (eg, family member, friend, and caregiver) were recruited as a sample of convenience. Older adults completed the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and the Physical Activity Survey for the Elderly (PASE). Companions completed a modified version of the ABC scale, in which they were asked to rate their confidence in the older adult's balance. The agreement between and correspondence of paired ABC scores were analyzed using mean difference (95% confidence interval [CI]), dependent samples t test (α= 0.05), and the intraclass correlation coefficient 1-way random effects model. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was used to characterize the relationship between companion confidence and older adult physical activity. Older adults were more confident in their balance capability (mean ABCOlder Adult= 70.0; 95% CI = 62.8-77.2) than their companions (mean ABCCompanion= 60.2; 95% CI = 50.6-69.8). The difference between group mean scores was significant (mean difference = 9.8; 95% CI = 2.3-17.3, t (39) = 2.38; P= 0.02). Discordance increased as the mean of paired ABC scores diminished. ABC scores were also significantly yet moderately associated (intraclass correlation coefficient (1,1) = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.31-0.74; P< 0.01). The association between ABCCompanion and PASE scores was stronger (r= 0.51; 95% CI = 0.23-0.79; P< 0.01) than the association between ABCOlder Adult and

  12. The Role of Family and Community Involvement in the Development and Implementation of School Nutrition and Physical Activity Policy

    PubMed Central

    Kehm, Rebecca; Davey, Cynthia S.; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there are several evidence-based recommendations directed at improving nutrition and physical activity standards in schools, these guidelines have not been uniformly adopted throughout the United States. Consequently, research is needed to identify facilitators promoting schools to implement these recommendations. Therefore, this study analyzed the 2008 School Health Profiles Principal Survey (Profiles) to explore the role of family and community involvement in school nutrition and physical activity standards. METHODS Survey data on nutrition and physical activity policies, as well as family and community involvement, were available for 28 states, representing 6732 secondary schools. One-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), 2-sample t-tests, Pearson’s chi-square tests, and multiple logistic and linear regression models were employed in this analysis. RESULTS Family and community involvement were associated with schools more frequently utilizing healthy eating strategies and offering students healthier food options. Further, involvement was associated with greater support for physical education staff and more intramural sports opportunities for students. CONCLUSIONS Though family and community involvement have the potential to have a positive influence on school nutrition and physical activity policies and practices, involvement remains low in schools. Increased efforts are needed to encourage collaboration among schools, families, and communities to ensure the highest health standards for all students. PMID:25564977

  13. A Walk in the Park: The Influence of Urban Parks and Community Violence on Physical Activity in Chelsea, MA

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Judy Y.; Levy, Jonathan I.; Peters, Junenette L.; Bongiovanni, Roseann; Garcia-Soto, Jovanna; Medina, Rafael; Scammell, Madeleine K.

    2016-01-01

    Proximity to a park does not necessarily imply access or use, and the social environment may positively or negatively influence the positive intentions of the built environment. To investigate parks, park use and physical activity, and their associations with exposure to community violence, we interviewed residents (n = 354) of a densely populated urban community. Our findings indicate that proximity to any park is not associated with physical activity. However, proximity to the preferred park reported by residents to be conducive for physical activity (with walking paths, large fields, playgrounds for children and tennis courts) was associated with physical activity. Conversely, knowledge of sexual assault or rape in the neighborhood is inversely associated with every type of physical activity (park-based, outdoor, and indoor). Our findings suggest that improvements to the built environment (parks, green spaces) may be hindered by adverse social environments and both are necessary for consideration in the design of public health interventions. PMID:26742051

  14. A Walk in the Park: The Influence of Urban Parks and Community Violence on Physical Activity in Chelsea, MA.

    PubMed

    Ou, Judy Y; Levy, Jonathan I; Peters, Junenette L; Bongiovanni, Roseann; Garcia-Soto, Jovanna; Medina, Rafael; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2016-01-04

    Proximity to a park does not necessarily imply access or use, and the social environment may positively or negatively influence the positive intentions of the built environment. To investigate parks, park use and physical activity, and their associations with exposure to community violence, we interviewed residents (n = 354) of a densely populated urban community. Our findings indicate that proximity to any park is not associated with physical activity. However, proximity to the preferred park reported by residents to be conducive for physical activity (with walking paths, large fields, playgrounds for children and tennis courts) was associated with physical activity. Conversely, knowledge of sexual assault or rape in the neighborhood is inversely associated with every type of physical activity (park-based, outdoor, and indoor). Our findings suggest that improvements to the built environment (parks, green spaces) may be hindered by adverse social environments and both are necessary for consideration in the design of public health interventions.

  15. Independent Associations Between Sedentary Behaviors and Mental, Cognitive, Physical, and Functional Health Among Older Adults in Retirement Communities.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Dori E; Bellettiere, John; Gardiner, Paul A; Villarreal, Veronica N; Crist, Katie; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationships between objective and self-reported sedentary time and health indicators among older adults residing in retirement communities. Our cross-sectional analysis used data from 307 participants who completed baseline measurements of a physical activity trial in 11 retirement communities in San Diego County. Sedentary time was objectively measured with devices (accelerometers) and using self-reports. Outcomes assessed included emotional and cognitive health, physical function, and physical health (eg, blood pressure). Linear mixed-effects models examined associations between sedentary behavior and outcomes adjusting for demographics and accelerometer physical activity. Higher device-measured sedentary time was associated with worse objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery, balance task scores, 400-m walk time, chair stand time, gait speed), self-reported physical function, and fear of falling but with less sleep disturbance (all ps < .05). TV viewing was positively related to 400-m walk time (p < .05). Self-reported sedentary behavior was related to better performance on one cognitive task (trails A; p < .05). Sedentary time was mostly related to poorer physical function independently of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and may be a modifiable behavior target in interventions aiming to improve physical function in older adults. Few associations were observed with self-reported sedentary behavior measures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Relationship between Social Support Networks and Physical Functioning in Older Community-Dwelling Mexicans.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; González-Mantilla, Fabiola; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Retana-Ugalde, Raquel

    2017-08-31

    Some studies have demonstrated the relationship between social support networks (SSNs) and health status. In this sense, it has been considered that physical and mental functioning is a key indicator of the health in the age people. The aim of this study was to determine the association between social support networks and physical functioning. A cross-sectional study was carried out including a convenience sample of 150 older community-dwelling Mexicans. We assessed the familial, extra-familial and institutional SSNs; social contacts; the activities of daily living (ADL); the instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs); and physical functioning task (PFT) performance among study participants. Of the 150 older subjects, 53 reported living alone (35%), 113 (75%) reported having few SSNs, and 37 (25%) reported having enough SSNs. Persons with few familial SSNs were at increased odds of demonstrating dependence in at least one of the ADL (OR = 3.25, 95% CI 1.06-9.92, p < 0.05). Likewise, persons with few institutional SSNs and few social contacts were at increased odds of demonstrating dependence in at least one of the IADL (OR = 6.96, 95% CI 1.57-30.7, p < 0.01; OR = 5.02, 95% CI 1.44-17.5, p < 0.01, respectively). We also observed that having few extra-familial SSNs and few social contacts were the main risk factors for PFT dependence, with ORs of 3.70 (95% CI 1.21-11.2, p < 0.05) and 3.85 (95% CI 1.10-13.5, p < 0.05), respectively. Our findings suggest that having few SSNs could be a significant risk factor for reduced physical functioning in older adults.

  17. Trade-wind Clouds in Community Atmosphere Model Hindcasts: Impacts of Resolution and Parameterized Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, B.

    2016-12-01

    Shallow cumulus clouds predominate in the trade-wind regions and the response of this widespread regime has been directly linked to the spread in climate model estimates of cloud feedback and climate sensitivity. Observations and process-model simulations show that trade-wind regions foster multi-layered cloud structures with complicated relationships to their environment that manifest as different cloud variability near the cloud base versus cloud top as well as inhomogeneous horizontal distributions of cloud. Assessments of these clouds in climate models show a disturbing spread among models in the vertical structure, but much less spread in the cloud radiative effect signaling compensating biases. The models also fail to capture the observed correlations between clouds and environmental parameters, often showing the opposite sign compared to observations. Based on such errors, one hypothesis is that climate models lack the proper parameterized physics to represent shallow convection. An alternate hypothesis is that models do not capture observed mesoscale variability, leading to erroneous cloud statistics. Of course, the hypotheses are not mutually exclusive. A series of hindcasts are performed with the Community Atmosphere Model to test these hypotheses. One set of hindcasts uses the standard 1-degree grid spacing, and it is shown that the clouds are similar to long-term, free-running simulations. A parallel set of hindcasts with a refined 0.25-degree mesh over the northern Atlantic trade-wind region allows a detailed comparison of the model's ability to represent trade-wind clouds with and without mesoscale variability explicitly resolved. Two more sets of hindcasts are run with the same grid configurations but using updated parameterized physics that change the representation of clouds, turbulence, and shallow convection. The updated physics are nominally less sensitive to horizontal resolution, which is tested by comparing the coarse and fine resolution, and

  18. Physical activity and body mass index of children in an old order Amish community.

    PubMed

    Bassett, David R; Tremblay, Mark S; Esliger, Dale W; Copeland, Jennifer L; Barnes, Joel D; Huntington, Gertrude E

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is rapidly increasing in many countries throughout the world. Advances in modern technology may have contributed to this problem by reducing children's physical activity levels. Thus, it is interesting to study children belonging to groups that have refrained from adopting modern technology. This study examined the physical activity levels and body mass index (BMI) of Old Order Amish children and adolescents living in a nontechnological farming community. One hundred thirty-nine Amish youth (6-18 yr of age) were recruited for the study. BMI was computed from measured height and weight. The schoolchildren were instructed to wear sealed step counters for 7 d. Each school day, research assistants opened the step counters, recorded their steps, reset and resealed them, and placed them back on the children. Older children recorded their steps on a step-counter log sheet. The number of steps per day (mean +/- SD) was 17,525 +/- 4443 (measured for four weekdays), 10,661 +/- 4208 (measured over Friday, Saturday, and Sunday), and 15,563 +/- 3702 (measured for 7 d). All of the step variables (P < 0.001) showed gender effects, but there were no significant age effects. Only 7.2% of the youth were overweight, and only 1.4% were obese. These Amish youth have high levels of physical activity, and obesity is rare. Comparing our results with those of other studies, it is evident that these Amish youth are more physically active and have a lower rate of obesity than children living in modern, industrialized societies.

  19. The association between sleep duration and physical performance in Chinese community-dwelling elderly.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liyuan; Jia, Liye; Zhang, Wen; Han, Peipei; Kang, Li; Ma, Yixuan; Yu, Hairui; Zhai, Tianqi; Chen, Xiaoyu; Guo, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Physical performance is an important healthy factor in elder people. Good living habits, which include sleep, can maintain physical strength and physical performance. The aim of the present study was to conduct a cross-sectional study to determine the association between total sleep duration and physical performance. Our study population comprised residents of the township central hospital in the suburban of Tianjin, China. We measured muscle strength, walk speed and balance function by grip, 4-m walk test and timed up and go test (TUGT). We divided sleep duration into four groups <7h, 7-8h, >8-9h, >9h. A total 898 participants had completed data (392 men and 506 women, mean age 67.71 years). In man, adjusted sleep duration was associated with lower grip in > 9 h group, the mean value (95% CI) was 0.429 (0.409, 0.448), and longer TUGT time was also associated with long sleep duration, 10.46s (9.97 s, 10.95 s). In women, adjusted slower 4-m walk speed present an inverse U-shaped relation with sleep duration, by 0.93 m/s (0.86 m/s, 0.98 m/s), 0.97 m/s (0.96 m/s, 1.00 m/s), 0.97 m/s (0.95 m/s, 0.99 m/s) and 0.92 m/s (0.89 m/s, 0.96 m/s); longer TUGT time were associated with long sleep duration (> 9 h), by 11.23 s (10.70 s, 11.77 s). In Chinese community-dwelling elderly, lower muscle strength and lower balance function were associated with long sleep duration in men. Slower walk speed and lower balance function were associated with long sleep duration in women.

  20. The association between sleep duration and physical performance in Chinese community-dwelling elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liyuan; Jia, Liye; Zhang, Wen; Han, Peipei; Kang, Li; Ma, Yixuan; Yu, Hairui; Zhai, Tianqi; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical performance is an important healthy factor in elder people. Good living habits, which include sleep, can maintain physical strength and physical performance. The aim of the present study was to conduct a cross-sectional study to determine the association between total sleep duration and physical performance. Methods Our study population comprised residents of the township central hospital in the suburban of Tianjin, China. We measured muscle strength, walk speed and balance function by grip, 4-m walk test and timed up and go test (TUGT). We divided sleep duration into four groups <7h, 7-8h, >8-9h, >9h. Results A total 898 participants had completed data (392 men and 506 women, mean age 67.71 years). In man, adjusted sleep duration was associated with lower grip in > 9 h group, the mean value (95% CI) was 0.429 (0.409, 0.448), and longer TUGT time was also associated with long sleep duration, 10.46s (9.97 s, 10.95 s). In women, adjusted slower 4-m walk speed present an inverse U-shaped relation with sleep duration, by 0.93 m/s (0.86 m/s, 0.98 m/s), 0.97 m/s (0.96 m/s, 1.00 m/s), 0.97 m/s (0.95 m/s, 0.99 m/s) and 0.92 m/s (0.89 m/s, 0.96 m/s); longer TUGT time were associated with long sleep duration (> 9 h), by 11.23 s (10.70 s, 11.77 s). Conclusion In Chinese community-dwelling elderly, lower muscle strength and lower balance function were associated with long sleep duration in men. Slower walk speed and lower balance function were associated with long sleep duration in women. PMID:28358845