Science.gov

Sample records for physics workshop commissioning

  1. Applied antineutrino physics workshop.

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river.

  2. Physics Teachers Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    Huggins, DaNel; Calhoun, John; Palmer, Alyson; Thorpe, Steve; Vanderveen, Anne

    2016-07-12

    INL is looking for the nation's top high school physics teachers to attend our July workshop in Idaho Falls. Participants get to learn from nuclear researchers, tour facilities including a research reactor and interact with peers from across the country. You can learn more about INL projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  3. Physics Teachers Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, DaNel; Calhoun, John; Palmer, Alyson; Thorpe, Steve; Vanderveen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    INL is looking for the nation's top high school physics teachers to attend our July workshop in Idaho Falls. Participants get to learn from nuclear researchers, tour facilities including a research reactor and interact with peers from across the country. You can learn more about INL projects at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  4. Workshop II: Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Renee; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Physics Education Workshop at the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics heard about, among other topics, a study exploring why students have difficulty with concepts related to magnetism (and whether explicitly evoking gender affects the results), work in Europe to develop materials to help teachers implement inquiry-based science education, and the use of peer instruction and online collaboration to help teacher-candidates develop questioning skills.

  5. Report of the LCLS Diagnostics and Commissioning Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H

    2004-04-13

    This is the report on a workshop held at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) on January 19-20, 2004 to establish the baseline values for the commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) FEL. This report consists of an Executive Summary, summaries of the presentations, and a list of recommendations. The workshop program is attached. The workshop focused on requirements for the generation and characterization of x-ray radiation during the commissioning phase including electron beam control, electron and x-ray beam diagnostics, as well as the development of simulation codes to support commissioning. The workshop was presented with a proposal for commissioning diagnostics and with procedures to carry out FEL commissioning towards the end of the LCLS construction phase. The workshop accepted the general plan. The charge to the workshop was summarized in the question: Will the undulator diagnostics serve commissioning and operations needs for the LCLS? There were concerns and recommendations for a number of items that are described in the report.

  6. Proceedings: ACPA Commission II Orientation Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI. Div. of Student Services.

    This workshop provided an opportunity for persons in higher education to participate in the development of an orientation program model for community colleges, small liberal arts college, medium-sized colleges, and large institutions. The workshop focused attention on career counseling, study skills, the minority student, the transfer student, the…

  7. Solar Physics - Plasma Physics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Sturrock, P. A.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings of a conference whose purpose was to explore plasma physics problems which arise in the study of solar physics is provided. Sessions were concerned with specific questions including the following: (1) whether the solar plasma is thermal or non-themal; (2) what spectroscopic data is required; (3) what types of magnetic field structures exist; (4) whether magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (5) whether resistive or non-magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (6) what mechanisms of particle acceleration have been proposed; and (7) what information is available concerning shock waves. Very few questions were answered categorically but, for each question, there was discussion concerning the observational evidence, theoretical analyses, and existing or potential laboratory and numerical experiments.

  8. Academic excellence workshops in chemistry and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Susan Rose

    In the mid-1970's, Uri Treisman, at the University of California, Berkeley, developed an academic excellence workshop program that had important successes in increasing minority student achievement and persistence in calculus. The present dissertation research is an in-depth study of chemistry and physics workshops at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Data for the first, longitudinal component of this study were obtained by tracking to Spring 1998 all workshop minority students, i.e., Latino, African American, and Native American workshop students, a random sample of non-workshop minority students, and a random sample of non-targeted students, i.e., Anglo and Asian students, enrolled in first-quarter General Chemistry or Physics during specific quarters of 1992 or 1993. Data for the second component were obtained by administering questionnaires, conducting interviews, and observing science students during Fall, 1996. Workshop participation was a significant predictor of first-quarter course grade for minority students in both chemistry and physics, while verbal and mathematics Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores were not significant predictors of beginning course grade for minority science students. The lack of predictive ability of the SAT and the importance of workshop participation in minority students' beginning science course performance are results with important implications for educators and students. In comparing pre-college achievement measures for workshop and non-targeted students, non-targeted students' mathematics SAT scores were significantly higher than chemistry and physics workshop students' scores. Nonetheless, workshop participation "leveled the field" as workshop and non-targeted students performed similarly in beginning science courses. Positive impacts of workshop participation on achievement, persistence, efficiency, social integration, and self-confidence support the continued and expanded funding of workshop programs

  9. (Workshop on nuclear physics with large arrays)

    SciTech Connect

    Beene, J.R.

    1989-11-17

    The traveler attended the third and final part of the three-month-long Workshop on Nuclear Structure in the Era of New Spectroscopy, held from September through November at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. The third or C part of this ambitious series of workshops was titled Nuclear Physics with Large Arrays.'' The author presented four talks over a two-week period, at the invitation of the organizers.

  10. Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Workshop Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1997-01-01

    In August, 1997, a NASA workshop was held to assess the prospects emerging from physics that might lead to creating the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, attaining the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis was to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research that could make measurable progress toward these propulsion goals. Experiments and theories were discussed regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and wormholes, and superluminal quantum tunneling. Preliminary results of this workshop are presented, along with the status of the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program that conducted this workshop.

  11. Breakthrough propulsion physics workshop preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Millis, Marc G.

    1998-01-15

    In August, 1997, a NASA workshop was held to assess the prospects emerging from physics that might lead to creating the ultimate breakthroughs in space transportation: propulsion that requires no propellant mass, attaining the maximum transit speeds physically possible, and breakthrough methods of energy production to power such devices. Because these propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis was to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research that could make measurable progress toward these propulsion goals. Experiments and theories were discussed regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and wormholes, and superluminal quantum tunneling. Preliminary results of this workshop are presented, along with the status of the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program that conducted this workshop.

  12. Physics of Dusty Plasmas: Seventh Workshop. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1998-10-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Seventh Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas, held in Boulder, Colorado in April, 1998. Dusty Plasmas are multicomponent plasmas where, in addition to electrons and ions, microscopic charge carriers are present. Dusty plasmas is perhaps the fastest growing area of plasma physics. The papers presented at the Workshop included, among others, the following topics: dust charging, waves and instabilities, laboratory and industrial plasmas, strongly coupled systems, and astrophysical, space and atmospheric plasmas. There were 37 papers presented at the conference,out of which 10 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  13. International Workshop on Top Quark Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofre, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this workshop is to discuss recent and expected results on the physics of the top quark. In particular we hope to foster current and future research in this area from both the experimental and the theoretical point of view.

  14. Commission 16: Physical Study of Planets & Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Melissa A.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Courtin, Regis; Lara, Luisa M.; Kim, Sang Joon; Ksanfomality, Leonid V.; Morrison, David; Tejfel, Viktor G.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2010-05-01

    The Business Meeting of IAU Commission 16 was held at the General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro on August 13, 2009. The meeting was called to order at 9:15am by Commission President, Régis Courtin, with 12 members present. Commission 16 now has 312 members, up from 271 at the last General Assembly. It is now the third largest Commission in Division III, after Commission 15 and Commission 51.

  15. March 2011 Physical Indicators Workshop Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Brent

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Assessment (NCA) convened a workshop on Physical Climate Indicators from 29-30 March 2011, as part of a series on Monitoring Climate Change and its Impacts . The overarching goal of this workshop was to identify a few broad categories of potential physical climate indicators using a set of priorities developed by the NCA, and to provide a clear justification for how they would inform the Nation about climate change. Additional goals included providing input on the overall NCA framework for selecting the indicators and suggesting methodologies to construct indicators. Although one of the workshop goals was to address the status of current observational networks to support indicators, this was not a main focus of any single discussion. However, participants agreed with the NCA indicator vision that high quality data were needed to develop indicators, and generally focused on identifying indicator categories that current observation systems could support. The nearly 60 participants, primarily from Federal agencies, received a white paper in advance of the workshop that detailed the NCA vision for a coordinated suite of climate-related physical, ecological, and societal indicators. The intent of these national indicators of change is to develop a way to evaluate and communicate over time both the rate of change in impacts and the capacity to respond to climate drivers. These indicators will be tracked as a part of ongoing, long-term assessment activities, with adjustments as necessary to adapt to changing conditions and understanding. An initial framework was provided to workshop participants to ensure that everyone understood the audience, scope, and purpose of the indicators. A common lexicon was defined since indicator terminology varies widely. In addition, several potential approaches to grouping or categorizing the indicators were presented. Participants spent most of their time in small breakout groups with facilitators, working to address a

  16. NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G. (Editor); Williamson, Gary Scott (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    In August 1997, NASA sponsored a 3-day workshop to assess the prospects emerging from physics that may eventually lead to creating propulsion breakthroughs -the kind of breakthroughs that could revolutionize space flight and enable human voyages to other star systems. Experiments and theories were discussed regarding the coupling of gravity and electromagnetism, vacuum fluctuation energy, warp drives and wormholes, and superluminal quantum tunneling. Because the propulsion goals are presumably far from fruition, a special emphasis was to identify affordable, near-term, and credible research tasks that could make measurable progress toward these grand ambitions. This workshop was one of the first steps for the new NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics program led by the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  17. A Physical Science Workshop for Elementary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amario, James J.; Rodano, Salvatore J.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a physical science workshop for elementary school teachers. Explains the need for and the benefits gained from such workshops where certain topics, experiments and projects are explored. (GA)

  18. Physical security workshop summary: entry control

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Entry control hardware has been used extensively in the past to assist security forces in separating the authorized from the unauthorized at the plant perimeter. As more attention is being focused on the insider threat, these entry control elements are being used to extend the security inspectors' presence into the plant by compartmentalizing access and monitoring vital components. This paper summarizes the experiences expressed by the participants at the March 16 to 19, 1982 INMM Physical Protection Workshop in utilizing access control and contraband detection hardware for plant wide entry control applications.

  19. Professional development workshops for physics education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Eleanor C.; Franklin, Scott V.; Kustusch, Mary Bridget

    2017-01-01

    Physics education research holds the promise of satisfying expectations of both scholarship, which is increasing at teaching-centric institutions, and teaching effectiveness, a concern at all institutions. Additionally, junior physics education researchers seek more diverse training in research methods and theories. Emerging education researchers need support as they develop their research programs and expand their theoretical and methodological expertise, and they benefit from the guidance of knowledgable peers and near-peers. Our two-part professional development model combines intensive in-person workshops with long-term remote activities. During a two-week in-person workshop, emerging and established education researchers work closely together to develop research questions, learn appropriate analytic techniques, and collect a corpus of data appropriate to their research questions. Afterwards, they meet biweekly in a distributed, mentored research group to share analyses and develop their ideas into publishable papers. In this talk, we discuss this model for professional development and show results from one three-year implementation in the IMPRESS program at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Partially funded by the PERTG of the AAPT.

  20. The Health Physics Society Science Teacher Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert E.

    2001-03-01

    The South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society (STC) maintains a program of education for science teachers, grades 4-12. This program, originally funded by the U.S. Department of Energy but now supported by STC, is intended to teach fundamentals of radiation and radiation safety at a level suitable for comprehension by lay persons. Course topics include Fundamentals of Radiation, Cellular Biology and Radiation Health Effects, Exposure to Radiation in Modern Life, Radioactive Waste, and Radiation Safety. The 8-hour course is usually given on Saturdays at locations in Texas as requested by educational or other groups. Classes of up to 25 teacher-students are ideal. Lesson plans, reference materials, a video tape, software, and a radiation detector are provided to each participant. To schedule a workshop in your area, contact alevans@swbell.net or David Fogle, david.fogle@tdh.state.tx.us.

  1. Life cycle thinking in waste management: summary of European Commission's Malta 2005 workshop and pilot studies.

    PubMed

    Koneczny, Karol; Pennington, David W

    2007-01-01

    Life cycle thinking is essential to consider the implications of different waste management systems beyond their traditional regional boundaries. Building on data provided by representatives of Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia, the European Commission's DG JRC conducted a series of life cycle pilot studies in the context of municipal waste management. The results were presented in a JRC workshop in Malta, where the government representatives also outlined their national strategies focusing on the main related achievements. Proposed follow-up activities include a close interaction with the Commission's project, the European Platform on Life Cycle Assessment, to develop straightforward European life cycle guidelines for the management of various wastes.

  2. SLAC workshop on high energy electroproduction and spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    These Proceedings contain copies of the transparencies presented at the Workshop on High Energy Electroproduction and Spin Physics held at SLAC on February 5--8, 1992. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring people together to discuss the possibilities for new experiments using the SLAC high intensity electron and photon beams and the facilities of End Station A.

  3. SLAC workshop on high energy electroproduction and spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    These Proceedings contain copies of the transparencies presented at the Workshop on High Energy Electroproduction and Spin Physics held at SLAC on February 5--8, 1992. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring people together to discuss the possibilities for new experiments using the SLAC high intensity electron and photon beams and the facilities of End Station A.

  4. Using contests to ``spice up'' workshop physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, M. G.; Warden, J. A.

    1997-03-01

    Once or twice each semester we give the students in our calculus-based Workshop Physics (1) course a problem dressed up as a contest. To "win," a team must correctly predict the outcome of a unique event and test that prediction within a single fifty minute class period. Successful teams win a home-cooked meal or other prize unrelated to course grade. We design a contest to focus cooperative effort, yet it also serves in ways like a problem session, review, or exam, but with no grade pressure. As illustrated by the sample contests exhibited on the poster, you can adjust the difficulty of these exercises to get a variety of different success rates. While this is hardly a novel idea, we provide it as a reminder that it is useful to step out of the normal homework, quiz, exam mode once in a while. Pedagogical goals include: • Fast, intensive review, like an exam but without the pass/fail stress. • Puts a premium on cooperative effort and promotes teamwork. • Serves as a morale booster, an antidote to "midterm blues." Student teams are given a chance to predict the outcome of a unique event and to test that prediction within a single fifty-minute class. The task chosen requires at least two careful measurements and subsequent analysis.

  5. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 4: Electricity and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including:

      Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

    • PREFACE: Workshop on Higher Symmetries in Physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Campoamor-Stursberg, Rutwig; María Ancochea, José; Castrillón, Marco

      2009-07-01

      This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the Proceedings of the Workshop on Higher Symmetries in Physics (WHSP), held at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid (UCM) on 6-8 November 2008. This meeting constituted one of the activities of the research group GEODISIM-920920 of the Universidad Complutense, through the research project CCG07/ESP-2922 of the UCM/CAM for the academic year 2008/2009. The objective of this meeting was to provide a forum to facilitate the opportunity for interaction between specialists working in different fields of physics and mathematics, but who share a common interest in group theoretical, geometrical and symmetry methods applied to physical phenomena. This goal was achieved by means of lectures and technical presentations on different subjects, the only constraint being the current academic interest. The multidisciplinary character of the meeting allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different topics having a symmetry background, like higher order and n-Lie algebras and their cohomology theories, supergravity backgrounds, the geometric approach to the Quantum Hall effect, integrable and superintegrable systems, loop quantum gravity, master symmetries, constants of motion, Gowdy cosmological models, new methods for the Kronecker product decomposition of multiplets, the internal labelling problem or recent developments concerning Grand Unified Theories. The workshop consisted of three microcourses of three hours each and some plenary talks of one hour, as well as a small number of short communications. The Proceedings have been divided into two main sections, according to the structure of the meeting. The first one corresponds to the papers of the courses, which in addition to the material presented in the lectures also contain new and original results. The second part is devoted to the papers of the plenary talks and the remaining contributions. In some cases, the corresponding contributions are completely

    • Physics of the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line commissioning

      SciTech Connect

      Satogata, T.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, M.; Brown, K.; Clifford, T.; Connolly, R.; Dell, F.; Deng, D.P.; Hoff, L.; Kewisch, J.; MacKay, W.W.; Maldonado, G.; Martin, B.; Olsen, R.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Robinson, T.; Sathe, S.; Shea, D.; Shea, T.J.; Tanaka, M.; Thompson, P.; Tepikian, S.; Trahern, C.G.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.; Witkover, R.; Zhou, P.

      1996-07-01

      This paper presents beam physics results from the fall 1995 AGS-to- RHIC (ATR) transfer line commissioning run with fully ionized gold nuclei. We first describe beam position monitors and transverse video profile monitors, instrumentation relevant to measurements performed during this commissioning. Measured and corrected beam trajectories demonstrate agreement with design optics to a few percent, including optical transfer functions and beamline dispersion. Digitized 2- dimensional video profile monitors were used to measure beam emittance, and beamline optics and AGS gold ion beam parameters are shown to be comparable to RHIC design requirements.

    • Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

      SciTech Connect

      Chanowitz, M.S.

      1986-05-01

      A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed.

    • Workshop on electronuclear physics with internal targets: Proceedings

      SciTech Connect

      Arnold, R.G.; Minehart, R.C.

      1987-05-01

      The Workshop on Electronuclear Physics with Internal Targets was held at SLAC on January 5-8, 1987. The idea for this workshop grew out of interest among physicists at SLAC and MIT/Bates who have been exploring the possibilities for internal targets in the PEP ring at SLAC and in a proposed stretcher ring at MIT/Bates. The aim of the workshop was to bring together physicists from these groups and from other laboratories and universities to discuss the new physics that could be made accessible with internal targets, and to share information on recent developments in internal target technology, on the impact of internal targets on ring operation, and on the detector requirements. The workshop was sponsored by NPAS, the program of Nuclear Physics at SLAC, and it was attended by more than 100 physicists from the US, Canada, Europe, and Japan. The workshop sessions began with two days of invited talks followed by two days of shorter presentations organized by the chairmen of four Working Groups. Written versions of all the plenary talks and all but four of the Working Group talks are presented here.

    • 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Soto, Leopoldo

      2014-05-01

      The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010), together agreed to carry out this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, on occasion of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of the official program within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial. The event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project ''Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4'', supported by National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya, in 1980, and followed by the Congresses: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006), and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss the recent progress and future views in plasma science, including fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, and plasma applications, and so forth. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by the Workshops: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005), and Caracas (2007). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is a communication forum of the achievements of the plasma-physics regional community, fostering collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The program of the ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included the topics

    • Workshop on Energy Research for Physics Graduate Students and Postdocs

      SciTech Connect

      Cole, Ken

      2015-03-01

      One-day workshop for a small group of graduate students and post-docs to hear talks and interact with experts in a variety of areas of energy research. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for young physicists to learn about cutting-edge research in which they might find a career utilizing their interest and background in physics.

    • EDITORIAL: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'14)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2015-03-01

      Dear Readers, The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop, LPHYS'14, took place in the City of Sofia, Bulgaria. 361 participants from 35 countries attended the conference. It was hosted by the Institute of Electronics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. This year's Workshop was dedicated to paying tribute to two major events: • 50th anniversary of 1964 Nobel Prize in physics, • 145th anniversary of the establishment of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS'14 has been taken under the High Patronage of Rosen Plevneliev, President of the Republic of Bulgaria. The LPHYS'14 Steering Committee and the Advisory & Program Committee would like to extend their sincere gratitude to Professor Sanka Gateva (Co-Chair) and Professor Ekaterina Borisova (Head of the Local Organizing Committee) and to their team for the outstanding job performed in organizing, arranging, managing and putting in order the conference. Their combined efforts lead to a successful result. In this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series you will find selected proceedings of the Workshop in Sofia. Please make a note that the 24th annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'15) will take place from August 21 to August 25, 2015 in the city of Shanghai, China hosted by Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. With kind regards, Steering and Advisory & Program committees LPHYS'14

    • U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission dose modeling workshop, Nov. 13-14, 1997, resrad model presentation.

      SciTech Connect

      Yu, C.

      1998-01-29

      RESRAD was one of the multimedia models selected by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to include in its workshop on radiation dose modeling and demonstration of compliance with the radiological criteria for license termination. This paper is a summary of the presentation made at the workshop and focuses on the 10 questions the NRC distributed to all participants prior to the workshop. The code selection criteria, which were solicited by the NRC, for demonstrating compliance with the license termination rule are also included. Among the RESRAD family of codes, RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD are designed for evaluating radiological contamination in soils and in buildings. Many documents have been published to support the use of these codes. This paper focuses on these two codes. The pathways considered, the databases and parameters used, quality control and quality assurance, benchmarking, verification and validation of these codes, and capabilities as well as limitations of these codes are discussed in detail.

    • Problem solving workshop for physics teachers at Venezuelan High School

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Andrés, Maria Maite

      1997-03-01

      The Venezuelan Physics Olympiad is aimed at high school students. The syllabus at the high school level includes mechanics, electricity and magnetism, vibrations and waves, optics, fluid statics, and energy and its transformations. The Venezuelan Physics Olympiad consists of three tests. The preliminary test has 20 problems. They are multiple choice questions with a choice of five options. The theory test has 8 or 10 open-ended problems and the experimental final test is a problem whose solution it is made at the laboratory. The results of the five Venezuelan Physics Olympiads, 1991-1995, were analyzed. It was found that students solve physics problems the same way they solve mathematics exercises (1, 2). They emphasized the mathematical processes too much and paid little attention to description and analysis of the physical situation involved. Also, we observed that students did not develop experimental skills at school and their experience with laboratory work is very poor. According to these results, we designed two workshops for in-service physics teachers. One workshop focuses on solving pencil-and-paper-type problems, and the other one provides knowledge and skills about experimental work. Both workshops are designed with a cognitive approach (3-7).

    • A Summary of the 2010 Photocathode Physics for Photoinjectors Workshop

      SciTech Connect

      Bazarov, I; Dowell, D; Hannon, Fay; Harkay, K; Garcia, C H; Padmore, H; Rao, T; Smedley, J

      2010-10-01

      This contribution contains a summary and some highlights from the Photocathode Physics for Photoinjectors (P3) Workshop [1]. This workshop, held at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Ocotber of 2010, was aimed at bringing the photocathode community together to discuss and explore the current state of the art in accelerator photocathodes, from both a theoretical and a materials science perspective. All types of photocathode materials were discussed, including metals, NEA and PEA semiconductors, and "designer" photocathodes with bespoke properties. Topics of the workshop included: Current status of photocathodes for accelerator applications Current fabrication methods Applications of modern materials science to the growth and analysis of cathodes Photoemission spectroscopy as a diagnostic of cathode performance Utilization of modern user facilities Photoemission theory Novel ideas in cathode development Discussion forum on future collaboration for cathode growth, analysis and testing

    • The World in Slow Motion: Using a High-Speed Camera in a Physics Workshop

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Dewanto, Andreas; Lim, Geok Quee; Kuang, Jianhong; Zhang, Jinfeng; Yeo, Ye

      2012-01-01

      We present a physics workshop for college students to investigate various physical phenomena using high-speed cameras. The technical specifications required, the step-by-step instructions, as well as the practical limitations of the workshop, are discussed. This workshop is also intended to be a novel way to promote physics to Generation-Y…

    • VIII International Workshop On Charm Physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2016-09-01

      Charm physics covers the studies of a range of composite particles containing charm quarks which provide unique opportunities for probing the strong and weak interactions in the standard model and beyond. Recently, a large variety of new results have been published, from the observation of new states to mixing and searches for CP violation. The purpose of CHARM 2016 is to review results in the field of charm physics, including the impact on and from theory, as well as projections for results to be expected from upcoming facilities.

    • PREFACE: 22nd International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'13)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Steering, LPHYS'13; Advisory; Committees, Program

      2014-03-01

      Dear Readers, The 22nd annual International Laser Physics Workshop, LPHYS'13, took place in the City of Prague, the Czech Republic. The conference gathered 387 participants from 34 countries. It was hosted by the Institute of Physics at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and the Czech Technical University in Prague. At this occasion, the LPHYS'13 Steering and the Advisory & Program Committees of the conference would like extend its sincere gratitude to Professor Miroslav Jelínek, Co-Chair and Head of the Local Organizing Committee and his team for the outstanding job performed on organizing, arranging, managing and putting in order the conference that lead to its successful resulting conclusion. As a result of scientific seminars at the Workshop, we would like to present to you the following conference proceedings published in this volume of the IOP Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Please be advised that the 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'14) will take place from 14-18 July, 2014 in Sofia, Bulgaria, hosted by Institute of Electronics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS'13 Steering and Advisory & Program Committees

    • Kruger 2010: Workshop on Discovery Physics at the LHC

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Six days of plenary talks and parallel sessions where some of the very latest experimental results from the LHC (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb), as well as topical beyond the Standard Model theories, will be presented. The surroundings of one of the world's largest national parks, and the physics results presented during this workshop, will serve to inspire discussions between theorists and experimentalists on the latest LHC and Tevatron measurements as well as our expectations for the future.

    • Workshop on Energy Research Opportunities for Physics Graduates & Postdocs

      SciTech Connect

      Kate Kirby

      2010-03-14

      Young people these days are very concerned about the environment. There is also a great deal of interest in using technology to improve energy efficiency. Many physics students share these concerns and would like to find ways to use their scientific and quantitative skills to help overcome the environmental challenges that the world faces. This may be particularly true for female students. Showing physics students how they can contribute to environmental and energy solutions while doing scientific research which excites them is expected to attract more physicists to work on these very important problems and to retain more of the best and the brightest in physical science. This is a major thrust of the 'Gathering Storm' report, the 'American Competitiveness Initiative' report, and several other studies. With these concerns in mind, the American Physical Society (APS) and more specifically, the newly formed APS Topical Group on Energy Research and Applications (GERA), organized and conducted a one-day workshop for graduate students and post docs highlighting the contributions that physics-related research can make to meeting the nation's energy needs in environmentally friendly ways. A workshop program committee was formed and met four times by conference call to determine session topics and to suggest appropriate presenters for each topic. Speakers were chosen not only for their prominence in their respective fields of energy research but also for their ability to relate their work to young people. The workshop was held the day before the APS March Meeting on March 14, 2009 in Portland, OR. The workshop was restricted to approximately 80 young physicists to encourage group discussion. Talks were planned and presented at a level of participants with a physics background but no special knowledge of energy research. Speakers were asked to give a broad overview of their area of research before talking more specifically about their own work. The format was designed with

  1. PREFACE: 1st Franco-Algerian Workshop on Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarki, N.; Mimouni, J.; Vanucci, F.; Aissaoui, H.

    2015-04-01

    The first Franco-Algerian workshop on neutrino physics was held on 22-23 October 2013 at the University of Mentouri, Constantine, Algeria. It was jointly organized by the Laboratory of Mathematical and Subatomic Physics (LPMS) and the Direction of Scientific Research (DGRSTD) for the Algerian side, and for the French part by the IN2P3, CNRS and CEA IRFU. It is one of a series of international scientific meetings organized every two years by the LPMS at Constantine on high energy physics (theoretical, nuclear physics, classical and quantum cosmology, astrophysics, mathematical physics and quantum computing etc...) to maintain a high quality in scientific research and education at Algerian universities. This specific meeting brought together experts in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology from France and Algeria. It touched upon several theoretical, phenomenological as well as experimental aspects of the neutrinos. The workshop participants were mostly young researchers from many universities and research institutes in Algeria. The physics of neutrinos is a very active field in particle physics, hence the importance for the High Energy community in Algeria to gain expertise in this ''strategic'' area at the intersection of various topics in theoretical physics and high energy astrophysics (SM physics, CP violation, in general, SNe explosions, baryogenesis...). The neutrino proposed by Pauli back in 1930 as a ''desperate remedy'' to save the law of energy conservation in beta decay had a bright early history. Discovered in 1956 in the Cowan-Reines experiment despite all odds, this elusive particle which enabled us to understand the chiral nature of the weak interactions which later lead to the electro-weak unification finally appears to hold a key role in understanding subatomic physics as well as the structure and structuration of the Universe. It is also, after the discovery of the Higgs particle at the LHC in 2012, the only grey area left today in the

  2. 77 FR 9273 - WORKSHOP Sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... (EPRI), will hold a joint workshop on the Treatment of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Uncertainties... manifest in the PRA, and their potential significance to the PRA model and results. More specifically,...

  3. PREFACE: High Energy Particle Physics Workshop (HEPPW2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Alan S.; Mellado, B.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation for this workshop began with the discovery of the Higgs boson three years ago, and the realisation that many problems remain in particle physics, such as why there is more matter than anti-matter, better determining the still poorly measured parameters of the strong force, explaining possible sources for dark matter, naturalness etc. While the newly discovered Higgs boson seems to be compatible with the Standard Model, current experimental accuracy is far from providing a definitive statement with regards to the nature of this new particle. There is a lot of room for physics beyond the Standard Model to emerge in the exploration of the Higgs boson. Recent measurements in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the LHC have shed light on the complex dynamics that govern high-density quark-gluon interactions. An array of results from the ALICE collaboration have been highlighted in a recent issue of CERN courier. The physics program of high-energy heavy ion collisions promises to further unveil the intricacies of high-density quark-gluon plasma physics. The great topicality of high energy physics research has also seen a rapid increase in the number of researchers in South Africa pursuing such studies, both experimentally through the ATLAS and ALICE colliders at CERN, and theoretically. Young researchers and graduate students largely populate these research groups, with little experience in presenting their work, and few support structures (to their knowledge) to share experiences with. Whilst many schools and workshops have sought to educate these students on the theories and tools they will need to pursue their research, few have provided them with a platform to present their work. As such, this workshop discussed the various projects being pursued by graduate students and young researchers in South Africa, enabling them to develop networks for future collaboration and discussion. The workshop took place at the iThemba Laboratories - North facility, in

  4. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jr., Lloyd

    1997-09-21

    This document contains the final reports from the five panels that comprised a Workshop held to explore future directions, scientific impacts and technological connections of research in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. This workshop was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and was held at the Westfields International Conference Center in Chantilly, Virginia on September 21-24, 1997. The workshop was chaired by Lloyd Armstrong, Jr., University of Southern California and the five panels focused on the following topics: Panel A: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - Low Field Daniel Kleppner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), chair Panel B: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - High Field Phil Bucksbaum (University of Michigan), chair Panel C: Surface Interactions with Photons, Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules J. Wayne Rabalais (University of Houston), chair Panel D: Theory of Structure and Dynamics Chris Greene (University of Colorado), chair Panel E: Nano- and Mesocopic Structures Paul Alivisatos (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), chair The choice of focus areas reflects areas of significant interest to DOE/BES but is clearly not intended to span all fields encompassed by the designation of atomic, molecular and optical physics, nor even all areas that would be considered for review and funding under DOE’s AMOP program. In a similar vein, not all research that might be suggested under these topics in this report would be appropriate for consideration by DOE’s AMOP program. The workshop format included overview presentations from each of the panel chairs, followed by an intensive series of panel discussion sessions held over a two-day period. The panels were comprised of scientists from the U. S. and abroad, many of whom are not supported by DOE’s AMOP Program. This workshop was held in lieu of the customary “Contractors Meeting” held annually for

  5. PREFACE: First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benova, Evgenia; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    The First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'05) organized by The Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia and the Foundation `Theoretical and Computational Physics and Astrophysics' was dedicated to the World Year of Physics 2005 and held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 8--12 June 2005. The aim of the workshop was to bring together scientists from various branches of plasma physics in order to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations. Another important task was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for the further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 31 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion research, kinetics and transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, MHD waves and instabilities in the solar atmosphere, dc and microwave discharge modelling, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are Masters or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will stimulate readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at Sofia University, Dr Ivan Bogorov Publishing house, and Artgraph2 Publishing house. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited lecturers who were willing to pay the participation fee. In this way, in addition to the intellectual support they provided by means of their excellent lectures, they also supported the school

  6. The College Commissions - Agriculture, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fooks, Joyce Lane

    Information concerning the eight science college commissions now in existence is provided. These commissions encompass the fields of agriculture, biology, chemistry, engineering, geography, geology, mathematics and physics. An overview of the primary functions and commitments of the commissions and consulting services offered is presented. Also…

  7. Workshop on the Physics and Modeling of Submicron Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    workshop. 4o *1i SIcmtlTl CAMsazvIxnOiN: Unolanasfled Page 3 H. U. Baranger and J. W. Wilkins John Bardeen J. R. Barker Herbert Bennett Robert Buhrman...University Ithaca, NY 14853 6. John Bardeen Department of Physics University of Illinois 211 Loomis Laboratory 1110 West Green St. Urbana, IL 61801 7...electronics. This was also stressed by Bardeen in his introductory talk and by G. J. Iafrate and Bruce McCombe in their overviews. (iii) The third major

  8. Commission 15: Physical Studies of Comets and Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellino, Alberto; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Huebner, Walter F.; Davidsson, Bjrn J.; Dotto, Elisabetta; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Jenniskens, Petrus M. M.; Lupishko, Dmitrij; Mothé-Diniz, Thais; Tancredi, Gonzalo; Wooden, Diane H.

    2010-05-01

    This report of the business meeting of Commission 15 at the 2009 IAU GA is based on notes provided by Walter Huebner, past president, and on the minutes taken by Daniel Boice, secretary of Commission 15 in the triennium 2006 to 2009, with additional notes from the current secretary, Daniel Hestroffer. The business meeting was split into two sessions, the first held on 5 August and the second held on 11 August. This report presents the minutes of the two Commission 15 business-meeting sessions held during General Assembly XXVII.

  9. Commission 16: Physical Study of Planets and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, Guy J.; Courtin, Regis; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Blanco, Carlo; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Ksanfomality, Leonid V.; McGrath, Melissa A.; Morrison, David; Morrison, David; Noll, Keith S.; Owen, Tobias C.; Roos-Serote, Maarten C.; Spencer, John R.; Tejfel, Victor G.

    2007-12-01

    Commission 16 held its business meeting during the General Assembly in Prague, on Wednesday August 23, 2006, with nine members present. The meeting was called to order at 14:00 hr by president Guy Consolmagno. A moment of silence was observed in memory of those Commission (or Division) members deceased since the last General Assembly. They are Joseph W. Chamberlain, Michel Festou, Thomas Gold, Cornell H. Mayer, Vasilij I. Moroz, William M. Sinton, Willem Wamsteker, James A. Westphal, and Fred L. Whipple.

  10. Report on the solar physics-plasma physics workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes discussions held between solar physicists and plasma physicists on the interface between solar and plasma physics, with emphasis placed on the question of what laboratory experiments, or computer experiments, could be pursued to test proposed mechanisms involved in solar phenomena. Major areas discussed include nonthermal plasma on the sun, spectroscopic data needed in solar plasma diagnostics, types of magnetic field structures in the sun's atmosphere, the possibility of MHD phenomena involved in solar eruptive phenomena, the role of non-MHD instabilities in energy release in solar flares, particle acceleration in solar flares, shock waves in the sun's atmosphere, and mechanisms of radio emission from the sun.

  11. Agenda [to the Workshop Meeting on the Commission on Innovation's Report, "Choosing the Future."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This document provides the agenda for the California Community College Board of Governors (BOG) meeting for December 10, 1993, held to inform, explain, and gain a meaningful understanding of the recommendations of the Commission on Innovation (COI) report titled "Choosing the Future." The COI report was prepared in November 1993 and…

  12. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  13. FOREWORD: International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science. Sponsored by the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.

    2005-01-01

    were more than seventy poster papers in three sessions. The latter provided opportunities for younger physicists to display the results of their recent work and to obtain comments from the other participants. During the period 11 16 July 2004 at the Abdus Salam ICTP, we focused on nonlinear effects that are common in plasmas, fluids, nonlinear optics, and condensed matter physics. In addition, we concentrated on collective processes in space and dusty plasmas, as well as in astrophysics and intense laser-plasma interactions. Also presented were modern topics of nonlinear neutrino-plasma interactions, nonlinear quantum electrodynamics, quark-gluon plasmas, and high-energy astrophysics. This reflects that plasma physics is a truly cross-disciplinary and very fascinating science with many potential applications. The workshop was attended by several distinguished invited speakers. Most of the contributions from the second week of our Trieste workshop appear in this Topical Issue of Physica Scripta, which will be distributed to all the participants. The organizers are grateful to Professor Katepalli Raju Sreenivasan, the director of the Abdus Salam ICTP, for his generous support and warm hospitality in Trieste. The Editors appreciate their colleagues and co-organizers for their constant and wholehearted support in our endeavours of publishing this Topical Issue of Physica Scripta. We highly value the excellent work of Mrs Ave Lusenti and Dr. Brian Stewart at the Abdus Salam ICTP. Thanks are also due to the European Commission for supporting our activity through the Research Training Networks entitled "Complex Plasmas" and "Turbulent Boundary Layers". Finally, we would like to express our gratitude to the Abdus Salam ICTP for providing financial support to our workshop in Trieste. Besides, the workshop directors thank the speakers and the attendees for their contributions which resulted in the success of our Trieste workshop 2004. Specifically, we appreciate the speakers for

  14. Report of the Physics Gender Equity Workshop (May 2007) at APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2008-04-01

    The Committee of the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP) of the American Physical Society (APS) organized and held a national workshop entitled ``Gender Equity: Strengthening the Physics Enterprise in Universities and National Laboratories'' to focus on addressing the gender gap in the field of physics. The major aim of the workshop was to facilitate a doubling of the number of women in physics, in both academia and national laboratories, over the next 15 years. The active participation of physics department chairs, national laboratory managers, and federal agencies allowed exciting collective work that enabled new ideas to emerge, both to make the field of physics more attractive to women and men, and to find effective ways to retain women in physics. The group also generated a set of recommendations that can be applied at any physics department or national laboratory unit [1]. A report from this workshop will be presented. [1] http://www.aps.org/programs/women/workshops/gender-equity/index.cfm

  15. Book of Proceedings of Workshops Held on Physical Education for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Univ. for Women, Columbus.

    Proceedings are presented from three workshops concerning physical education for the mentally retarded held at Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and University of Southern Mississippi in 1967. Topics covered in the workshops include program development of physical education with the mentally handicapped, reports of research…

  16. PREFACE: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benova, Evgeniya; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    The Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'06) organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Bulgarian Nuclear Society, was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 3-9 July 2006. As with the first of these scientific meetings (IWSSPP'05 Journal of Physics: Conference Series 44 (2006)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 33 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma research, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of these papers were presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing procedure and our referees for their patience and considerable effort to improve the manuscripts. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at the University of Sofia and Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania EAD. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited

  17. Joint Commission on International Accreditation workshop: Planning, development and provision of laboratory services.

    PubMed

    Karaarslan, Inci

    2009-03-01

    Throughout the world, the oversight of health care quality is accomplished through professionally based accrediting bodies and state regulatory agencies. These organizations set standards or define regulations that address important organizational functions. The Joint Commission, a private sector United States-based non-profit organization, is the forerunner and best known among healthcare accreditation groups. One of the functions assessed by the standards of the JCI Clinical Laboratory Accreditation Program is the planning, development and provision of laboratory services. The standards related to this issue address the necessary processes that should be in place prior to performing patient testing.

  18. PREFACE: X Workshop of the Gravitation and Mathematical Physics Division, Mexican Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The collection of papers in this volume was presented during the X Workshop of the Gravitation and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society (DGFM-SMF), which was held in Pachuca, Hidalgo, México, December 2-6, 2013. The Workshop is a bi-annual series of conferences sponsored by the DGFM-SMF that started in 1993 with the purposes of discussing and exchanging the research and experience of the gravitational and mathematical physics communities in Mexico. Each Mexican Workshop has been devoted to subjects of broad interest, so that students, in particular, can have access to specialized courses and talks that allow them to raise up their qualifications as professional researchers. Recurrent topics in the Mexican Workshop are supergravity, branes, black holes, the early Universe, observational cosmology, quantum gravity and cosmology and numerical relativity. Following our previous Workshops, distinguished researchers in the field, working in Mexico, were invited to give courses, whereas young researchers were invited for plenary lectures. More specialized talks were also presented in parallel sessions, with ample participation of researchers, and graduate and undergraduate students; most of the presentations have been included in these proceedings. The contributions in this volume have been peer-reviewed, and they represent most of the courses, plenary talks and contributed talks presented during our Workshop. We are indebted to the contributors of these proceedings, as well as to the other participants and organizers, all for making the event a complete success. We acknowledge the professionalism of our reviewers, who helped us to keep high quality standards in all manuscripts. Acknowledgments The organizing committee would like to acknowledge the financial support of the Mexican National Science and Technology Council (CONACyT), the Mexican Physical Society (SMF), as well as several Institutions including: Centro de Investigación y Estudios

  19. Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, Ed., Brian L; Dart, Ed., Eli; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Ernest, Michael; Hitchcock, Daniel; Johnston, William; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Maguire, Charles; Olson, Douglas; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Watson, Chip; Vale, Carla

    2008-11-10

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States of America. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In May 2008, ESnet and the Nuclear Physics (NP) Program Office of the DOE Office of Science organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by the NP Program Office. Most of the key DOE sites for NP related work will require significant increases in network bandwidth in the 5 year time frame. This includes roughly 40 Gbps for BNL, and 20 Gbps for NERSC. Total transatlantic requirements are on the order of 40 Gbps, and transpacific requirements are on the order of 30 Gbps. Other key sites are Vanderbilt University and MIT, which will need on the order of 20 Gbps bandwidth to support data transfers for the CMS Heavy Ion program. In addition to bandwidth requirements, the workshop emphasized several points in regard to science process and collaboration. One key point is the heavy reliance on Grid tools and infrastructure (both PKI and tools such as GridFTP) by the NP community. The reliance on Grid software is expected to increase in the future. Therefore, continued development and support of Grid software is very important to the NP science community. Another key finding is that scientific productivity is greatly enhanced by easy researcher-local access to instrument data. This is driving the creation of distributed repositories for instrument data at collaborating institutions, along with a corresponding increase in demand for network-based data transfers and the tools

  20. Physics at the Frontier HS Teacher Workshop: bringing particle physics and cloud chambers into the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Alyx; Bedard, Jamie; Bellis, Matthew; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    In the summer of 2015, we hosted 10 high school teachers for a three-day ``Physics at the Frontier'' Workshop. The mornings were spent learning about particle physics, CMS and the LHC, and radiation safety while the afternoons were spent building turn-key cloud chambers for use in their classrooms. The basic cloud chamber design uses Peltier thermoelectric coolers, rather than dry ice, and instructions can be found in multiple places online. For a robust build procedure and for easy use in the classroom, we redesigned parts of the construction process to make it easier to put together while holding costs below 200 per chamber. In addition to this new design, we also created a website with instructions for those who are interested in building their own using this design. This workshop was funded in part by a minigrant for Outreach and Education from the USCMS collaboration. Our experience with the workshop and the lessons learned from the cloud chamber design will be discussed. This work was funded in part by NSF Grants PHY-1307562 and a USCMS-administered minigrant for Outreach and Education.

  1. Tau Lepton Physics: Proceedings of the Second Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K. K.

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * International Advisory Committee and Local Organization Committee * Forward * Workshop Agenda * New Measurements of the τ Lepton Mass * Status of the Tau Lepton — View from the PDG * TAUOLA Monte Carlo for τ Decays. A Question of Systematic Errors * A Review of the τ Lifetime * A Recent CLEO II Measurement of the Branching Ratio Be(τ → eνν) * Tau Leptonic Branching Ratios with the L3 Detector * Measurements of BR( {τ \\to ev\\bar v } ) and BR( {τ \\to μ v\\bar v } ) Using the OPAL Detector at LEP * Status of Lepton Universality * QCD Predictions for the Tau Hadronic Width and Determination of α_s(M_τ ^{2}) * τ → π(K)ν and τ → ρν (OPAL Results) * Measurement of the Decay τ- → ρ-ντ * A Measurement of the Branching Fraction B(τ± → h±π0ντ) * One-Prong Tau Decays with Multiple π0's * Analysis of the Hadronic Final State in τ- → π-π-π+ντ * Observation of the Decay τ± → 3h±2π0ντ * Measurement of the Spectral Functions and Determination of the Strong Coupling Constant * 3-Prong τ Decays * CLEO-II Results on τ Decays to η * Strange Decays of the Tau Lepton * Tau Decay Puzzles and Possible Light Gluinos * Beyond the Standard Model in Tau Decays * A Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime * Tau Lifetime Measurement Using the OPAL Detector at LEP * A Precise Measurement of the τ Lepton Lifetime * DELPHI τ Lifetime Measurements * L3 Tau Lifetime Measurement from 1991 Data * The Tau Branching Ratios * Are We Moving Toward a Balanced τ Budget? * Bell's Inequality and τ-Physics at LEP * Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the τ Lepton * Tests for CP Violation in τ Decays * CP Violation and τ Weak Dipole Moment * Search for CP Violation in Z → τ+τ- * Test of Electroweak Interactions at TRISTAN * Test of Electroweak Interactions at LEP * Measurement of τ Polarization at LEP * Tau Physics at p\\bar p Colliders * New Measurements of the Tau and Tau Neutrino Masses from

  2. FOREWORD: Workshop on Large Amplitude Waves and Fields in Plasmas, sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; De Angelis, U.; Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.

    1990-01-01

    During the last decade considerable progress has been made in the area of nonlinear plasma wave phenomena and their applications. In order to exhibit the present state-of-art in this field, a one-week (22-26 May) workshop on Large Amplitude Waves and Fields was organized at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, during the bi-yearly activity of the Spring College on Plasma Physics (15 May-9 June, 1989). Most of the invited lectures are published in this Topical Issue of Physica Scripta so that scientists working, or who want to enter the field of nonlinear plasma wave theory, can find out what has been achieved and what are the current research trends in this area. The material included here consists of general plasma wave theory, results of computer simulations, and experimental verifications. Without going into any detail, we shall just highlight the topics and the general features of the lectures contained in these proceedings. Various aspects of the excitation, propagation and interaction of nonlinear waves in plasmas are reviewed. Their relevance to plasma-based beat wave accelerators, short pulse laser and particle beam wake-field accelerators, plasma lenses, laser fusion and ionospheric modification experiments is discussed. Some introductory lectures present the general physics of nonlinear plasma waves including the saturation mechanisms and wave breaking conditions for both non-relativistic and relativistic nonlinearities. Three wave and four wave processes which include stimulated Raman, Brillouin and Compton scattering, modulational instabilities, self-focusing and collapse of the waves are discussed, emphasizing the important effects due to the relativistic electron mass variation and ponderomotive force. Detailed numerical studies of the interaction of high frequency plasma waves with low frequency density fluctuations described by the Zakharov equations show the localization of the high frequency field in density

  3. Commissioning and operation of the Nuclear Physics Injector at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Miller, R.H.; Leger, G.K.; Iverson, R.

    1985-03-01

    The new Nuclear Physics Injector (NPI) approved for construction in October of 1983 was completed by September of 1984, and delivered short pulse beams for SPEAR ring checkout in mid-October. Long pulse beams of up to 1.6 microsecond length were also demonstrated. The paper describes the startup operation, reviews the performance characteristics, and discusses the beam transport optics used to deliver 1 to 4 GeV beams to nuclear physics experiments in End Station A.

  4. A National Workshop in the United States to Prepare New Faculty in Physics and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Kenneth S.

    2010-07-01

    Starting in 1996, newly hired college and university faculty in physics and astronomy from throughout the U.S. have been invited to attend a workshop to help them improve their teaching skills. More than 1000 faculty have participated, representing more than 25% of the new hires at all U. S. institutions that award a baccalaureate in physics or astronomy, from 4-year colleges through research universities. The workshops seek to improve physics teaching by introducing new faculty to instructional strategies and innovations that have been shown to be effective in a variety of contexts. Such a national mentoring workshop can effectively address a commonality of physics and astronomy teaching challenges that transcend institutional characters and types. Based on surveys of the participants (and their department chairs), we have found that a large fraction of the participants have become adopters of innovative teaching techniques and that they rate the workshops as the most significant cause of the improvements in their teaching.

  5. Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

    1984-11-13

    The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

  6. Physics of Cellular Automata and Quantum Dots Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-02

    Office of Naval Research Workshop The purpose of the workshop was to bring together a select group of physicists and computer ’ scientists to discuss...methods of domesticating quantum ’ dots-’for computational purposes. There are a variety of ways of constructing with modern lithography two- dimensional...case, the arrays to date have been limited to two dimensions, or planar technology. Cellular automata provide a computing paradigm where uniform arrays

  7. Division III / Commission 15 / Working Group Physical Study of Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Walter F.; Cellino, Alberto; Tedesco, Edward F.; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Ma, Yuehua; Jenniskens, Petrus M. M.; Lupishko, Dmitrij F.; Reitsema, Harold J.; Tancredi, Gonzalo; Shulz, Rita M.

    2007-12-01

    The meeting of the Physical Properties of the Minor Planets Working Group of IAU Commission 15 took place on 24 August, and was devoted to purely scientific matters, since other topics (organization of the Minor Planet WG, need of a new web page, election of the new chairman) had been already discussed during the business meeting of Commission 15, on 22 August. A brief summary of the talks given during the meeting is given in what follows.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R.; Wicks, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

  9. Workshop on physics at the first muon collider and front-end of a muon collider: A brief summary

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.

    1998-02-01

    In November 1997 a workshop was held at Fermilab to explore the physics potential of the first muon collider, and the physics potential of the accelerator complex at the `front-end` of the collider. An extensive physics program emerged from the workshop. This paper attempts to summarize this physics program and to identify the main conclusions from the workshop. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Workshop on Physics with Neutral Kaon Beam at JLab (KL2016) Mini-Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Strakovsky, Igor I.; Amaryan, Moskov; Chudakov, Eugene A.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Pennington, Michael R.; Ritman, James L.

    2016-05-01

    The KL2016 Workshop is following the Letter of Intent LoI12-15-001 "Physics Opportunities with Secondary KL beam at JLab" submitted to PAC43 with the main focus on the physics of excited hyperons produced by the Kaon beam on unpolarized and polarized targets with GlueX setup in Hall D. Such studies will broaden a physics program of hadron spectroscopy extending it to the strange sector. The Workshop was organized to get a feedback from the community to strengthen physics motivation of the LoI and prepare a full proposal.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN PHYSICS V, VOLUME 32, FEBRUARY 21, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    BUNCE,G.; SAITO,N.; VIGDOR,S.; ROSER,T.; SPINKA,H.; ENYO,H.; BLAND,L.C.; GURYN,W.

    2001-02-21

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998.

  12. PREFACE: 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Liliana; Britton, David; Glover, Nigel; Heinrich, Gudrun; Lauret, Jérôme; Naumann, Axel; Speer, Thomas; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    ACAT2011 This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 14th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2011) which took place on 5-7 September 2011 at Brunel University, UK. The workshop series, which began in 1990 in Lyon, France, brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields in order to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. It is a forum for the exchange of ideas among the fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing, data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques in fundamental physics research. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 100 participants from all over the world. 14 invited speakers presented key topics on computing ecosystems, cloud computing, multivariate data analysis, symbolic and automatic theoretical calculations as well as computing and data analysis challenges in astrophysics, bioinformatics and musicology. Over 80 other talks and posters presented state-of-the art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. Panel and round table discussions on data management and multivariate data analysis uncovered new ideas and collaboration opportunities in the respective areas. This edition of ACAT was generously sponsored by the Science and Technology Facility Council (STFC), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) at Durham University, Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA and Dell. We would like to thank all the participants of the workshop for the high level of their scientific contributions and for the enthusiastic participation in all its activities which were, ultimately, the key factors in the

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success. We had

  14. Annual Report of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report highlights and presents examples of the Commission on Physical Science, Mathematics, and Resources' (CPSMR) recent activities and future plans. Selected programs and activities from the 224 boards and committees that operate within CPSMR are reviewed. These range from studies of basic science to examinations of applied science and…

  15. Annual Report of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report highlights and presents examples of the Commission on Physical Science, Mathematics, and Resources' (CPSMR) recent activities and future plans. Selected programs and activities from the 224 boards and committees that operate within CPSMR are reviewed. These range from studies of basic science to examinations of applied science and…

  16. Implementation of a Multifaceted Interactive Electrodiagnostic Medicine Workshop in a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jayne; van de Rijn, Marc; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Shih, Shirley; Paganoni, Sabrina

    2017-09-25

    Electrodiagnostic medicine is a required component of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency education, but limited resources exist to guide curriculum development. Our objective was to create a focused workshop to enhance our residency program's electrodiagnostic curriculum. We created two separate 1.5-day workshops, one basic and one advanced, for all residents. Each workshop included didactic sessions, case discussion, question and answer sessions, demonstrations, and hands-on participation with direct supervision and feedback. Presurveys and postsurveys were administered to evaluate the value of the workshops. We also assessed trends in electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination scores. Residents reported clinical electrodiagnostic rotations to be more valuable to their education than previous didactic sessions and independent learning. Self-reported knowledge of electrodiagnostic concepts, resident comfort level in planning, performing, and interpreting studies, and perceived value in independent learning of electrodiagnostic medicine improved after implementation of the workshops. There was a 7% improvement in the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination score compared with the previous year and a 15% improvement in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation self-assessment examination electrodiagnostic subscore compared with the previous 5 yrs. All participants recommended similar educational experience for other residents. This successful workshop may serve as a resource for other training programs.

  17. Proceedings of the 2004 NASA/JPL Workshop on Physics for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Donald M. (Editor); Banerdt, Bruce; Barmatz, M.; Chung, Sang; Chui, Talso; Hamell, R.; Israelsson, Ulf; Jerebets, Sergei; Le, Thanh; Litchen, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The conference was held April 20-22, 2004, the NASA/JPL Workshop on Physics for Planetary Exploration focused on NASA's new concentration on sending crewed missions to the Moon by 2020 and then to Mars and beyond. However, our ground-based physics experiments are continuing to be funded, and it will be possible to compete for $80-90 million in new money from the NASA exploration programs. Papers presented at the workshop related how physics research can help NASA to prepare for and accomplish this grand scheme of exploration. From sensors for water on the Moon and Mars, to fundamental research on those bodies, and to aids for navigating precisely to landing sites on distant planets, diverse topics were addressed by the Workshop speakers.

  18. 2nd Workshop on Design for Social Interaction through Physical Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, Tilde; Sturm, Janienke; Barakova, Emilia

    We aim to stimulate social interaction by designing and creating interactive objects for physical play for diverse user groups, such as children, elderly or people with special needs. With this workshop we aim to bring researchers and practitioners together to share and explore issues and opportunities for technology-enhanced physical play for stimulating face-to-face social interaction (as opposed to virtual interaction through a computer). The focus of this workshop is on sharing theories that are valuable for the design and research of products and applications in this field.

  19. The XXth International Workshop High Energy Physics and Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Workshop continues a series of workshops started by the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University (SINP MSU) in 1985 and conceived with the purpose of presenting topics of current interest and providing a stimulating environment for scientific discussion on new developments in theoretical and experimental high energy physics and physical programs for future colliders. Traditionally the list of workshop attendees includes a great number of active young scientists and students from Russia and other countries. This year Workshop is organized jointly by the SINP MSU and the Southern Federal University (SFedU) and will take place in the holiday hotel "Luchezarniy" (Effulgent) situated on the Black Sea shore in a picturesque natural park in the suburb of the largest Russian resort city Sochi - the host city of the XXII Olympic Winter Games to be held in 2014. The main topics to be covered are: Experimental results from the LHC. Tevatron summary: the status of the Standard Model and the boundaries on BSM physics. Future physics at Linear Colliders and super B-factories. Extensions of the Standard Model and their phenomenological consequences at the LHC and Linear Colliders: SUSY extensions of the Standard Model; particle interactions in space-time with extra dimensions; strings, quantum groups and new ideas from modern algebra and geometry. Higher order corrections and resummations for collider phenomenology. Automatic calculations of Feynman diagrams and Monte Carlo simulations. LHC/LC and astroparticle/cosmology connections. Modern nuclear physics and relativistic nucleous-nucleous collisions.

  20. PREFACE: XV International Workshop on Low Energy Positron and Positronium Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campeanu, R. I.; Darewych, J. W.; Stauffer, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the Proceedings of the XV International Workshop on Low Energy Positron and Positronium Physics, which was held at York University, Toronto, Canada, between 29 July and 1 August 2009. This Workshop was one of the official satellites of the XXVI International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions, held at Kalamazoo, MI, USA between 22 and 28 July 2009. Our Workshop was run in parallel with the XVI International Conference on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, enabling delegates to select talks from either meeting. The proceedings of the XVI International Conference on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms are being published in a separate volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The combined attendance at the two meetings was 110, from 19 countries, with interest being roughly split between the two areas. There were 5 plenary lectures addressed to all participants and on the Positron Workshop side there were 20 invited talks and 40 posters presented in two poster sessions. The subjects covered antihydrogen, positron collisions with atoms and molecules, annihilation, bound and resonant states, positronium and positronium negative ion, plasmas and swarms. The talks and posters highlighted the vigour of the field and underlined the impressive new developments now in progress and which promise to transform the subject. The next Workshop of this biennial series of meetings will be held in July 2011 at Maynooth University in Ireland. R I Campeanu J W Darewych A D Stauffer Guest Editors

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  2. Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E (Editor); Stepinski, T. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars was to bring together workers on accretion disks in the western Gulf region (Texas and Louisiana). Part 2 presents the workshop program, a list of poster presentations, and a list of workshop participants. Accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of these disks form around compact stars, such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes that are members of binary systems and reveal themselves as a power source, especially in the x-ray and gamma regions of the spectrum. On the other hand, protostellar disks are believed to be accretion disks associated with young, pre-main-sequence stars and manifest themselves mostly in infrared and radio observations. These disks are considered to be a natural outcome of the star formation process. The focus of this workshop included theory and observations relevant to accretion disks around compact objects and newly forming stars, with the primary purpose of bringing the two communities together for intellectual cross-fertilization. The nature of the workshop was exploratory, to see how much interaction is possible between distinct communities and to better realize the local potential in this subject. A critical workshop activity was identification and documentation of key issues that are of mutual interest to both communities.

  3. PREFACE: 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxiong

    2014-06-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 15th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2013) which took place on 16-21 May 2013 at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. The workshop series brings together computer science researchers and practitioners, and researchers from particle physics and related fields to explore and confront the boundaries of computing and of automatic data analysis and theoretical calculation techniques. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 120 participants from all over the world. 18 invited speakers presented key topics on the universe in computer, Computing in Earth Sciences, multivariate data analysis, automated computation in Quantum Field Theory as well as computing and data analysis challenges in many fields. Over 70 other talks and posters presented state-of-the-art developments in the areas of the workshop's three tracks: Computing Technologies, Data Analysis Algorithms and Tools, and Computational Techniques in Theoretical Physics. The round table discussions on open-source, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration stimulate us to think over the issue in the respective areas. ACAT 2013 was generously sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NFSC), Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA (BNL), Peking University (PKU), Theoretical Physics Cernter for Science facilities of CAS (TPCSF-CAS) and Sugon. We would like to thank all the participants for their scientific contributions and for the en- thusiastic participation in all its activities of the workshop. Further information on ACAT 2013 can be found at http://acat2013.ihep.ac.cn. Professor Jianxiong Wang Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science Details of committees and sponsors are available in the PDF

  4. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY14

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2014-04-01

    The workshop was held from September 23-25, 2013 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Dragan Huterer, Katherine Freese, and Heidi Wu (University of Michigan). Marilena Lo Verde (University of Chicago) also served as an external organizer. This workshop sought to gather experimentalists and theorists to discuss and define directions in cosmology research after the 1st year release of Planck data. The workshop included 35 invited (non-U-M) cosmologists, most of them relatively junior. The workshop was notable for spirited discussion of various theoretical ideas and experimental developments, and particularly on how one could test theory with ongoing and future experiments. In our follow-up poll, 95% of participants reported that interactions with other participants at the workshop may lead to further collaboration. Most participants (again about 95%) reported that they are very satisfied with the quality of the program, information they received, and the logistical support. Slides are available on line at: http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/CAP13/program.html. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 23 participants came under the program. Slides are available on line for talks when applicable: http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/winter 2014 and http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/fall-2013.

  5. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY16

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron

    2016-09-08

    This award provided partial support for the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics to host the 5-day workshop "Emergent themes in String Theory" this winter, March 15 - 19, 2016. on the University of Michigan campus. In addition, this award provided limited support for the Young High Energy Theorist (YHET) visitor program at the University of Michigan.

  6. The "Earth Physics" Workshops Offered by the Earth Science Education Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Earth science has a part to play in broadening students' learning experience in physics. The Earth Science Education Unit presents a range of (free) workshops to teachers and trainee teachers, suggesting how Earth-based science activities, which show how we understand and use the planet we live on, can easily be slotted into normal science…

  7. Physical and Environmental Hazards in the Prosthetics and Orthotics workshop: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah; Stuckey, Rwth; Poole, Diana; Oakman, Jodi

    2017-02-07

    Background; Prosthetists and Orthotists (P&O) are exposed to physical hazards within the workshop environment. Concern regarding these exposures has been expressed by P&Os; however, little research has been undertaken. Exposures to noise and volatile organic compounds in amounts larger than statutorily allowed can have adverse short and long term consequences on people's health.

  8. Summary of the very large hadron collider physics and detector workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.; Berger, M.; Brandt, A.; Eno, S.

    1997-10-01

    One of the options for an accelerator beyond the LHC is a hadron collider with higher energy. Work is going on to explore accelerator technologies that would make such a machine feasible. This workshop concentrated on the physics and detector issues associated with a hadron collider with an energy in the center of mass of the order of 100 to 200 TeV.

  9. The "Earth Physics" Workshops Offered by the Earth Science Education Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Earth science has a part to play in broadening students' learning experience in physics. The Earth Science Education Unit presents a range of (free) workshops to teachers and trainee teachers, suggesting how Earth-based science activities, which show how we understand and use the planet we live on, can easily be slotted into normal science…

  10. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics was held at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai from 31 October to 4 November 2011. This workshop series, supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy (BRNS, DAE), Govt. of India, began ten years ago with the first one being held at BARC, Mumbai in October 2002. The second one was held at Puri in 2005, organized jointly by Institute of Physics, Bhubneswar and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata. The 3rd and 4th ones took place, respectively, at Shantineketan in 2006, organized by Visva Bharati University, and at Aligarh in 2008, organized by Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. The aim of the present workshop was to bring together the experts and young researchers in the field of hadron physics (both experiment and theory) and to have in-depth discussions on the current research activities in this field. The format of the workshop was: a series of review lectures by various experts from India and abroad, the presentation of advanced research results by researchers in the field, and a review of major experimental programs being planned and pursued in major laboratories in the field of hadron physics, with the aim of providing a platform for the young participants for interaction with their peers. The upcoming international FAIR facility at GSI is a unique future facility for studies of hadron physics in the charm sector and hyper nuclear physics. The Indian hadron physics community is involved in this mega science project and is working with the PANDA collaboration on the development of detectors, simulation and software tools for the hadron physics programme with antiprotons at FAIR. A one-day discussion session was held at this workshop to discuss India-PANDA activities, the current collaboration status and the work plan. This volume presents the workshop proceedings consisting of lectures and seminars which were delivered during the workshop. We are thankful to

  11. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alexandre; Abe, Sumiyoshi; Li, Wei

    2015-04-01

    This volume contains 24 contributed papers presented at the 4th International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS) held during October 12-16, 2014 in Yichang, China. Each paper was peer-reviewed by at least one referee chosen from a distinguished international panel. The previous three workshops of this series were organized in 2008, 2010, and 2012, in Le Mans, France, Wuhan, China, and Kazan, Russia, respectively. The SPMCS international workshop series is destined mainly to communicate and exchange research results and information on the fundamental challenges and questions in the vanguard of statistical physics, thermodynamics and mathematics for complex systems. More specifically, the topics of interest touch, but are not limited to, the following: • Fundamental aspects in the application of statistical physics and thermodynamics to complex systems and their modeling • Finite size and non-extensive system • Fluctuation theorems and equalities, quantum thermodynamics • Variational principle for random dynamics • Fractal geometry, fractional mathematics More than 50 participants from 7 countries participated in SPMCS-2014. 35 oral contributions were presented at the workshop. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the members of the Scientific Program Committee, many of whom acted as reviewers of the papers and responded promptly. We would also like to thank the organizing committee, the session chairs, the technicians and the students for the smooth running of the whole workshop. Thanks also go to China Three Gorges University who provided generous support for the conference venue, as well as exquisite refreshments for the tea breaks. The workshop was also partially supported by Central China Normal University and the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities under grant NO. B08033. Special thanks are due to Ms Juy Zhu who has done excellent editing work with great effort.

  12. Overview of the first workshop on alpha particle physics in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Biglari, H.

    1991-07-01

    The First Workshop on Alpha Physics in TFTR'' was held at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab March 28--29, 1991. The motivation for this meeting was to clarify and strengthen the TFTR alpha physics program, and to increase the involvement of the fusion community outside PPPL in the TFTR D-T experiments. Therefore the meeting was sharply focused on alpha physics relevant to the upcoming TFTR D-T simulation, and was asked to devote half of his talk to specific TFTR issues. The Workshop consisted of 27 talks on: (1) experimental possibilities; (2) theoretical possibilities; (3) diagnostic possibilities; (4) relevance for future machines; and (5) discussion/summary session. This summary contains a brief sampling of the new results and ideas brought out by these talks, followed by two more general overviews of the status of experiment and theory.

  13. Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization: Report of the On-Site Inspection Workshop-5-Planning Examination of Inspection Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Krioutchenkov, V.; Shchukin, V.; Davies, A.; Sweeney, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    On-Site Inspection (OSI) Workshop-5 met 8-12 November, 1999 in Farnborough, UK and was hosted by the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA). The purpose of the workshop was to provide guidance on OSI Operational Manual (OM) development for Working Group B (WGB) of the CTBT Preparatory Commission (PrepCom). The two main topics of the workshop involved logistics/preparatory activities for the pre-inspection phase and in-depth examination of technology application during the initial and continuation phases of an OSI. Reports from the PTS-sponsored Kazakhstan OSI experiment set the tone for the discussions of logistics and preparatory activities. The most important recommendation coming out of the experiment and workshop discussions is a need for Working Group A to develop specific administrative and financial rules regarding OSIs and define the status of inspectors and inspector assistants with respect to the CTBTO. There was also extensive discussion of a need for Working Group B to develop and/or adapt safety standards. With respect to OSI preparations, the group agreed that the time line and quick response required by an OSI necessitate development of special procedures; standing arrangements and/or advanced parties are suggested as one possible approach and a list of relevant issues has been initiated. A chart was developed that outlines the various elements of logistics required for an OSI that can serve as a basis for development of checklists, databases, and other preparation activities. Technology presentations and discussion focused on three major areas: phenomenology, synergy, and specifications.

  14. The Third International Workshop on the Physics and Modern Applications of Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-08-01

    This document contains 31 abstracts and 7 papers on lasers and optical fibers presented at the third international workshop on the physics and modern applications of lasers. The main topics covered include: basics in lasers, geometrical, physical and quantum optics; optical techniques for research, education and development in Africa; application of lasers in optical fibre communication, environmental studies, bio medicine, chemistry, agriculture, engineering and industry. A list of lecturers, participants and programme of activities are also given.

  15. Workshop on Coupled-Cluster Theory at the Interface of Atomic Physics and Quantum Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-05

    potentials, electron affinities, and Auger spectroscopy, Fock space multi-reference methods (as discussed at the workshop by Mukherjee, Kaldor , Rittby...Bishop K. Jankowski Zuwei Liu University of Manchester Nicholas Capernicus University University of Virginia Dept. of Mathematics Institute of Physics...Kingston, NY 12401 Bhanu Pratap Das Uzi Kaldor Peter Mohr Utah State University Tel Aviv University National Institute of Standards & Physics Dept

  16. Report on the 9th European Fusion Physics Workshop* Report on the 9th European Fusion Physics Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; Barabaschi, P.; Bécoulet, M.; Federici, G.; Hellsten, T.; Loarte, A.; Pautasso, G.; Wilson, H.

    2003-04-01

    The 9th EFPW took place in December 2001 at Saariselka in Finland, hosted by the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and the Helsinki University, and sponsored by the European Commission. Within an overall theme of `transient events, their mitigation and their implications for plasma facing components in ITER', four topics of importance to the future development of magnetically confined fusion were discussed in detail. In addition, the key issues for the ITER design which are associated with transient events and a review of the JET scientific and technical programme under EFDA were presented. The main issues discussed and the areas identified as requiring further study are summarized here.

  17. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics & 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38) and the 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics (IWTCP-1). Both the conference and the workshop were held from 29 July to 1 August 2013 in Pullman hotel, Da Nang, Vietnam. The IWTCP-1 was a new activity of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society (VTPS) organized in association with the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38), the most well-known annual scientific forum dedicated to the dissemination of the latest development in the field of theoretical physics within the country. The IWTCP-1 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). The overriding goal of the IWTCP is to provide an international forum for scientists and engineers from academia to share ideas, problems and solution relating to the recent advances in theoretical physics as well as in computational physics. The main IWTCP motivation is to foster scientific exchanges between the Vietnamese theoretical and computational physics community and world-wide scientists as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. About 110 participants coming from 10 countries participated in the conference and the workshop. 4 invited talks, 18 oral contributions and 46 posters were presented at the conference. In the workshop we had one keynote lecture and 9 invited talks presented by international experts in the fields of theoretical and computational physics, together with 14 oral and 33 poster contributions. The proceedings were edited by Nguyen Tri Lan, Trinh Xuan Hoang, and Nguyen Ai Viet. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the conference and the workshop successful. Nguyen Ai Viet Chair of NCTP-38 and IWTCP-1

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: VOLUME 61 RIKEN-TODAI MINI-WORKSHOP ON ''TOPICS IN HADRON PHYSICS AT RHIC''. VOLUME 61

    SciTech Connect

    EN'YO,H.HAMAGAKI,H.HATSUDAT.WATANABA,Y.YAZAKI,K.

    2004-05-26

    The RIKEN-TODAI Mini-Workshop on ''Topics in Hadron Physics at RHIC'' was held on March 23rd and 24th, 2064 at the Nishina Memorial Hall of RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, Japan, sponsored by RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and TODAI (University of Tokyo). The workshop was planned when we learned that two distinguished theorists in hadron physics, Professors L. McLerran and S.H. Lee, would be visiting TODAI and/or RIKEN during the week of March 22-26. We asked them to give key talks at the beginning of the workshop and attend the sessions consisting of talks by young theorists in RIKEN, TODAI and other institutes in Japan and they kindly agreed on both. Considering the JPS meeting scheduled from March 27 through 30, we decided to have a.one-and-half-a-day workshop on March 23 and 24. The purpose of the workshop was to offer young researchers an opportunity to learn the forefront of hadron physics as well as to discuss their own works with the distinguished theorists.

  19. 2016 Final Reports from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Runnels, Scott Robert; Bachrach, Harrison Ian; Carlson, Nils; Collier, Angela; Dumas, William; Fankell, Douglas; Ferris, Natalie; Gonzalez, Francisco; Griffith, Alec; Guston, Brandon; Kenyon, Connor; Li, Benson; Mookerjee, Adaleena; Parkinson, Christian; Peck, Hailee; Peters, Evan; Poondla, Yasvanth; Rogers, Brandon; Shaffer, Nathaniel; Trettel, Andrew; Valaitis, Sonata Mae; Venzke, Joel Aaron; Black, Mason; Demircan, Samet; Holladay, Robert Tyler

    2016-09-22

    The two primary purposes of LANL’s Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop are (1) To educate graduate and exceptional undergraduate students in the challenges and applications of computational physics of interest to LANL, and (2) Entice their interest toward those challenges. Computational physics is emerging as a discipline in its own right, combining expertise in mathematics, physics, and computer science. The mathematical aspects focus on numerical methods for solving equations on the computer as well as developing test problems with analytical solutions. The physics aspects are very broad, ranging from low-temperature material modeling to extremely high temperature plasma physics, radiation transport and neutron transport. The computer science issues are concerned with matching numerical algorithms to emerging architectures and maintaining the quality of extremely large codes built to perform multi-physics calculations. Although graduate programs associated with computational physics are emerging, it is apparent that the pool of U.S. citizens in this multi-disciplinary field is relatively small and is typically not focused on the aspects that are of primary interest to LANL. Furthermore, more structured foundations for LANL interaction with universities in computational physics is needed; historically interactions rely heavily on individuals’ personalities and personal contacts. Thus a tertiary purpose of the Summer Workshop is to build an educational network of LANL researchers, university professors, and emerging students to advance the field and LANL’s involvement in it.

  20. 2015 Final Reports from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Runnels, Scott Robert; Caldwell, Wendy; Brown, Barton Jed; Pederson, Clark; Brown, Justin; Burrill, Daniel; Feinblum, David; Hyde, David; Levick, Nathan; Lyngaas, Isaac; Maeng, Brad; Reed, Richard LeRoy; Sarno-Smith, Lois; Shohet, Gil; Skarda, Jinhie; Stevens, Josey; Zeppetello, Lucas; Grossman-Ponemon, Benjamin; Bottini, Joseph Larkin; Loudon, Tyson Shane; VanGessel, Francis Gilbert; Nagaraj, Sriram; Price, Jacob

    2015-10-15

    The two primary purposes of LANL’s Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop are (1) To educate graduate and exceptional undergraduate students in the challenges and applications of computational physics of interest to LANL, and (2) Entice their interest toward those challenges. Computational physics is emerging as a discipline in its own right, combining expertise in mathematics, physics, and computer science. The mathematical aspects focus on numerical methods for solving equations on the computer as well as developing test problems with analytical solutions. The physics aspects are very broad, ranging from low-temperature material modeling to extremely high temperature plasma physics, radiation transport and neutron transport. The computer science issues are concerned with matching numerical algorithms to emerging architectures and maintaining the quality of extremely large codes built to perform multi-physics calculations. Although graduate programs associated with computational physics are emerging, it is apparent that the pool of U.S. citizens in this multi-disciplinary field is relatively small and is typically not focused on the aspects that are of primary interest to LANL. Furthermore, more structured foundations for LANL interaction with universities in computational physics is needed; historically interactions rely heavily on individuals’ personalities and personal contacts. Thus a tertiary purpose of the Summer Workshop is to build an educational network of LANL researchers, university professors, and emerging students to advance the field and LANL’s involvement in it. This report includes both the background for the program and the reports from the students.

  1. Proceedings of the workshop on B physics at hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, P.; Mishra, C.S.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Measurement of Angle {alpha}; Measurement of Angle {beta}; Measurement of Angle {gamma}; Other B Physics; Theory of Heavy Flavors; Charged Particle Tracking and Vertexing; e and {gamma} Detection; Muon Detection; Hadron ID; Electronics, DAQ, and Computing; and Machine Detector Interface. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion the in Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Workshop on the interface between radiation chemistry and radiation physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    Twenty-four papers are grouped under the session headings: measurements of physical and chemical properties, track structure modeling, spurs and track structure, and the 10/sup -16/ to 10/sup -12/ second region. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the papers; four of the remaining papers had previously been abstracted. (DLC)

  3. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 2: Mechanics II, Momentum, Energy, Rotational and Harmonic Motion, and Chaos (Units 8 - 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including:

      Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

    • PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yamada, Taiichi; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

      2014-12-01

      The 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3) was held at KGU Kannai Media Center, Kanto Gakuin University, Yokohama, Japan, from May 26 to 30, 2014. Yokohama is the second largest city in Japan, about 25 km southeast of Tokyo. The first workshop of the series was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008 and the second one was in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. The purpose of SOTANCP3 was to discuss the present status and future perspectives of the nuclear cluster physics. The following nine topics were selected in order to cover most of the scientific programme and highlight an area where new ideas have emerged over recent years: (1) Cluster structures and many-body correlations in stable and unstable nuclei (2) Clustering aspects of nuclear reactions and resonances (3) Alpha condensates and analogy with condensed matter approaches (4) Role of tensor force in cluster physics and ab initio approaches (5) Clustering in hypernuclei (6) Nuclear fission, superheavy nuclei, and cluster decay (7) Cluster physics and nuclear astrophysics (8) Clustering in nuclear matter and neutron stars (9) Clustering in hadron and atomic physics There were 122 participants, including 53 from 17 foreign countries. In addition to invited talks, we had many talks selected from contributed papers. There were plenary, parallel, and poster sessions. Poster contributions were also presented as four-minute talks in parallel sessions. This proceedings contains the papers presented in invited and selected talks together with those presented in poster sessions. We would like to express our gratitude to the members of the International Advisory Committee and those of the Organizing Committee for their efforts which made this workshop successful. In particular we would like to present our great thanks to Drs. Y. Funaki, W. Horiuchi, N. Itagaki, M. Kimura, T. Myo, and T. Yoshida. We would like also to thank the following organizations for their sponsors: RCNP

    • PREFACE: 16th International workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in physics research (ACAT2014)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Fiala, L.; Lokajicek, M.; Tumova, N.

      2015-05-01

      This volume of the IOP Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 16th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2014), this year the motto was ''bridging disciplines''. The conference took place on September 1-5, 2014, at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. The 16th edition of ACAT explored the boundaries of computing system architectures, data analysis algorithmics, automatic calculations, and theoretical calculation technologies. It provided a forum for confronting and exchanging ideas among these fields, where new approaches in computing technologies for scientific research were explored and promoted. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 140 participants from all over the world. The workshop's 16 invited speakers presented key topics on advanced computing and analysis techniques in physics. During the workshop, 60 talks and 40 posters were presented in three tracks: Computing Technology for Physics Research, Data Analysis - Algorithms and Tools, and Computations in Theoretical Physics: Techniques and Methods. The round table enabled discussions on expanding software, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the respective areas. ACAT 2014 was generously sponsored by Western Digital, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hewlett Packard, DataDirect Networks, M Computers, Bright Computing, Huawei and PDV-Systemhaus. Special appreciations go to the track liaisons Lorenzo Moneta, Axel Naumann and Grigory Rubtsov for their work on the scientific program and the publication preparation. ACAT's IACC would also like to express its gratitude to all referees for their work on making sure the contributions are published in the proceedings. Our thanks extend to the conference liaisons Andrei Kataev and Jerome Lauret who worked with the local contacts and made this conference possible as well as to the program

    • N Physics - Proceedings of the Fourth Cebaf/int Workshop

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lee, T.-S. H.; Roberts, W.

      1997-06-01

      The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Introduction * Preface * Baryons and QCD * Dispersion Relations in Pion Photoproduction * Reaction Theories for N* Excitations in πN and γN Reactions * The N* Physics Program: Where are We and Where are We Going? * Recent Calculations of Electromagnetic and Strong Decays of N* * Test of Constituent Quark Model in η and π Photoproduction * Baryon Current Matrix Elements in a Relativistic Quark Model * Light-Front Calculations of Electromagnetic Form Factors for N-N* Transitions * Open Problems in Hadronic Structure * The Role of Massive States in Chiral Perturbation Theory * Baryons in Chiral Constituent Quark Model * Delta Electroproduction in a Chiral Bag Model Approach * E2/M1 and C2/M1 in the Electroproduction of the Δ and the Chiral Quark Soliton Model * Monopole Excitations of Baryons in the NJL Soliton Model * Δ Photoproduction in Chiral Color Dielectric Model * Glueballs and Hybrids * Pion Photo-Production and the Off-Shell Behavior of the πN Interaction * Kaon Photoproduction on the Nucleon: Status and Future Prospects * Determination of N* Parameters in the Review of Particle Properties * N* Physics at the AGS with the Crystal Ball Multiphoton Spectrometer * Photoexcitation of the S11(1535)-Resonance on the Proton, on the Neutron, and in Nuclei * Measurement of the E2/M1 Ratio in the N → Δ Transition * Theory of Eta Photo- and Electroproduction * Vector Mesons Below 2 GeV * N* Resonances and 2π Production * A Model for Two-Pion Photoproduction Amplitudes * Negative Parity Baryons in the QCD Sum Rule * Meson Photoproductions Off Nucleons in the Chiral Quark Model * Unquenching the Quark Model * Spin Observables in Pseudoscalar Meson Photoproduction * Baryon Resonance Extraction from πN Data using a Multichannel Unitary Model * A Dispersion Theoretical Analysis of the E/M Ratio of the Δ(1232) Resonance * Meson Production Experiments at TJNAL and BNL * Opportunities for Polarization Physics with

    • Workshop on Research for Space Exploration: Physical Sciences and Process Technology

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Singh, Bhim S.

      1998-01-01

      This report summarizes the results of a workshop sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division of NASA to define contributions the microgravity research community can provide to advance the human exploration of space. Invited speakers and attendees participated in an exchange of ideas to identify issues of interest in physical sciences and process technologies. This workshop was part of a continuing effort to broaden the contribution of the microgravity research community toward achieving the goals of the space agency in human exploration, as identified in the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) strategic plan. The Microgravity program is one of NASA'a major links to academic and industrial basic research in the physical and engineering sciences. At present, it supports close to 400 principal investigators, who represent many of the nation's leading researchers in the physical and engineering sciences and biotechnology. The intent of the workshop provided a dialogue between NASA and this large, influential research community, mission planners and industry technical experts with the goal of defining enabling research for the Human Exploration and Development of Space activities to which the microgravity research community can contribute.

    • Workshop on Research for Space Exploration: Physical Sciences and Process Technology

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Singh, Bhim S.

      1998-05-01

      This report summarizes the results of a workshop sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division of NASA to define contributions the microgravity research community can provide to advance the human exploration of space. Invited speakers and attendees participated in an exchange of ideas to identify issues of interest in physical sciences and process technologies. This workshop was part of a continuing effort to broaden the contribution of the microgravity research community toward achieving the goals of the space agency in human exploration, as identified in the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) strategic plan. The Microgravity program is one of NASA'a major links to academic and industrial basic research in the physical and engineering sciences. At present, it supports close to 400 principal investigators, who represent many of the nation's leading researchers in the physical and engineering sciences and biotechnology. The intent of the workshop provided a dialogue between NASA and this large, influential research community, mission planners and industry technical experts with the goal of defining enabling research for the Human Exploration and Development of Space activities to which the microgravity research community can contribute.

    • XVI Workshop on High Energy Spin Physics (D-SPIN2015)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lednicky, Richard

      2016-02-01

      Dear Colleagues, Ladies and Gentlemen, on behalf of the Directorate of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) it is a pleasure for me to welcome you here to Dubna for the 16th International Workshop on High Energy Spin Physics. It provides an opportunity to present and discuss the news accumulated during last year. Another important feature of this series of workshops has always been the participation of a large number of physicists from the former Soviet Union and Eastern European countries, for which long trips have previously been limited by financial (and earlier also by bureaucratic) reasons. It thus represents an important addition to the series of large International Symposia on spin physics held in even-numbered years in different countries, including the Symposium held in Dubna in 2012. JINR has a long-lasting tradition of experimental and theoretical studies of spin phenomena. The workshops on high energy spin physics started in Dubna in 1981 due to the initiative of L. Lapidus, an outstanding theoretical physicist. Since then, these meetings have been held in Dubna in every odd year and have become regular thanks to Anatoly Vasilievich Efremov, the chairman for many years. Recent years have brought a lot of new experimental results, and above all the discovery and determination of quantum characteristics of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider.

    • IN MEMORIUM: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2007-04-01

      Zdravko Neichev, a PhD student at University of Sofia and a member of the Local Organising Committee of the International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics, died September 22, 2006 at the age of 27 in a tragic car accident. He was close to finishing his PhD thesis working thoroughly in the field of Plasma Physics. Being also an excellent programmer he produced a number of perfect programs for numerical modelling of the coaxial discharge properties. He was a smart, friendly person, always ready to help. His colleagues and friends will never forget his radiant smile. Zdravko Neichev

    • EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2006-04-01

      , Russia, the US, China, South Korea and India (as of March 2006). It will take several years to accomplish this important task. There is no doubt that the success depends not only on funding but also on enthusiastic people willing to contribute with their skills and knowledge. Young scientists and engineers must be enrolled to the programme and trained in various disciplines of fusion science and technology. There are various education schemes and work programmes. Organization of summer schools on fusion-related plasma physics is an important part of the training process. Several schools are organized annually or every second year in Europe. Fusion-related science is so vast that it is impossible to cover all topics during an event lasting for one or two weeks. Therefore, each school has its distinctive features and focuses on a selected group of issues to be addressed in depth. This also applies to the Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics in Kudowa Zdrój (Poland) that, has been organised annually since 2001. It was initiated by Dr Marek Scholz with the help of his colleagues from the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM) in Warsaw. The idea was to create a forum for students mainly from Eastern Europe to learn and discuss subjects in general plasma physics and dense magnetized media, predominantly in plasma focus devices. Over the years the school has matured and created a clear profile. A unique feature has always been to accommodate in the programme not only tutorials delivered by invited senior scientists but also presentations prepared by the students. In June 2005 the 5th Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics was held under the heading 'Towards Fusion Energy: Plasma Physics, Diagnostics, Applications'. There were 59 participants, including 44 students, coming from plasma physics and material research laboratories in 17 countries: Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Georgia, Iran, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Russia

    • Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Physics of W and Z Bosons

      SciTech Connect

      Dawson, S.; Okada, K.; Patwa, A.; Qiu, J.; Surrow, B.

      2010-06-24

      A two-day workshop on 'The Physics of Wand Z Bosons' Was held at the RIKEN BNL Research Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory on June 24-25, 2010. With the recent release of the first measurement of W bosons in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and the first observation of W events at the LHC, the workshop was a timely opportunity to bring together experts from both the high energy particle and nuclear physics communities to share their ideas and expertise on the physics of Wand Z bosons, with the aim of fully exploring the potential of the W/Z physics programs at RHIC and the LHC. The focus was on the production and measurement of W/Z bosons in both polarized and unpolarized proton-proton collisions, and the role of W/Z production in probing the parton flavor and helicity structure of the colliding proton and in the search for new physics. There were lively discussions about the potential and future prospects of W/Z programs at RHIC, Tevatron, and the LHC.

    • LPHYS'13: 22nd International Laser Physics Workshop (Prague, 15-19 July 2013)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yevseyev, Alexander V.

      2013-04-01

      The 22nd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'13) will be held from 15-19 July 2013 in the city of Prague, Czech Republic, at the Hotel Krystal and Czech Technical University hosted this year by the Institute of Physics ASCR and Czech Technical University in Prague. LPHYS'13 continues a series of workshops that took place in Dubna, 1992; Dubna/Volga river tour, 1993; New York, 1994; Moscow/Volga river tour (jointly with NATO SILAP Workshop), 1995; Moscow, 1996; Prague, 1997; Berlin, 1998; Budapest, 1999; Bordeaux, 2000; Moscow, 2001; Bratislava, 2002; Hamburg, 2003; Trieste, 2004; Kyoto, 2005; Lausanne, 2006; León, 2007; Trondheim, 2008; Barcelona, 2009; Foz do Iguaçu, 2010; Sarajevo, 2011; and Calgary, 2012. The total number of participants this year is expected to be about 400. In the past, annual participation was typically from over 30 countries. 2013 Chairmen: Miroslav Jelinek (Czech Republic) and Pavel P Pashinin (Russia) LPHYS'13 will offer eight scientific section seminars and one general symposium: Seminar 1 Modern Trends in Laser Physics Seminar 2 Strong Field & Attosecond Physics Seminar 3 Biophotonics Seminar 4 Physics of Lasers Seminar 5 Nonlinear Optics & Spectroscopy Seminar 6 Physics of Cold Trapped Atoms Seminar 7 Quantum Information Science Seminar 8 Fiber Optics Symposium Extreme Light Technologies, Science and Applications Abstract of your presentation A one-page abstract should contain: title; list of all co-authors (the name of the speaker underlined); affiliations; correspondence addresses including phone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail addresses; and the text of the abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the following co-chairs of the scientific seminars and the symposium: Kirill A Prokhorov (Seminar 1) E-mail: cyrpro@gpi.ru Mikhail V Fedorov (Seminar 2) E-mail: fedorov@ran.gpi.ru Sergey A Gonchukov (Seminar 3) E-mail: gonchukov@mephi.ru Ivan A Shcherbakov (Seminar 4) E-mail: gbufetova@lsk.gpi.ru Vladimir A Makarov (Seminar 5) E

    • Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

      SciTech Connect

      Allred, J.C.; Talley, B.

      1980-05-01

      A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I.

    • A Dozen Years and a Thousand Participants: The Workshops for Preparing New Faculty in Physics and Astronomy

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Krane, Kenneth

      2009-03-01

      Beginning in 1996, an annual workshop for newly hired faculty in physics and astronomy has been held under the organizational leadership of AAPT, APS, and AAS. To date more than 1000 faculty have participated in this workshop, representing approximately 25% of the new hires at all U. S. institutions that award a baccalaureate in physics or astronomy, from 4-year colleges through research universities. The original motivation for the workshops was to improve physics teaching by introducing new faculty to instructional strategies and innovations that had been shown to be effective in a variety of contexts. The need for such a program was suggested in part by the belief that a national mentoring workshop could effectively address a commonality of physics and astronomy teaching challenges that transcended institutional characters and types, and also in part by the reaction to a significant decrease in the number of baccalaureate physics degrees awarded in the U. S. in the 1990s, which many believed was due to ineffective and uninspiring teaching at the undergraduate level and especially in introductory courses. Based on surveys of the participants (and their department chairs), we have found that a large fraction of the participants have become adopters of innovative teaching techniques and that they rate the workshops as the most significant cause of the improvements in their teaching. This talk will summarize the development of the workshop program since its inception, the measures of its success in improving teaching, and the plans for its future.

    • LPHYS'14: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (Sofia, Bulgaria, 14-18 July 2014)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yevseyev, Alexander V.

      2014-04-01

      The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS14) will be held from 14 July to 18 July 2014 in the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, at the Ramada Sofia Hotel hosted this year by the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS14 continues a series of workshops that took place in Dubna,1992; Dubna/Volga river tour, 1993; New York, 1994; Moscow/Volga river tour (jointly with NATO SILAP Workshop), 1995; Moscow, 1996; Prague, 1997; Berlin, 1998; Budapest, 1999; Bordeaux, 2000; Moscow, 2001; Bratislava, 2002; Hamburg, 2003; Trieste, 2004; Kyoto, 2005; Lausanne, 2006; Len, 2007; Trondheim, 2008; Barcelona, 2009; Foz do Iguau, 2010; Sarajevo, 2011; Calgary, 2012 and Prague, 2013. The total number of participants this year is expected to be about 400. In the past, annual participation was typically from over 30 countries. 2014 Chairpersons Sanka Gateva (Bulgaria), Pavel Pashinin (Russia) LPHYS14 will offer eight scientific section seminars and one general symposium: Seminar 1 Modern Trends in Laser Physics Seminar 2 Strong Field and Attosecond Physics Seminar 3 Biophotonics Seminar 4 Physics of Lasers Seminar 5 Nonlinear Optics and Spectroscopy Seminar 6 Physics of Cold Trapped Atoms Seminar 7 Quantum Information Science Seminar 8 Fiber Optics Symposium Extreme Light Technologies, Science and Applications Abstract of your presentation A one-page abstract should contain: title; list of all co-authors (the name of the speaker underlined); affiliations; correspondence addresses including phone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail addresses; and the text of the abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the following co-chairs of the scientific seminars and the symposium: Kirill A Prokhorov (Seminar 1) E-mail: cyrpro@gpi.ru Mikhail V Fedorov (Seminar 2) E-mail: fedorov@ran.gpi.ru Sergey A Gonchukov (Seminar 3) E-mail: gonchukov@mephi.ru Ivan A Shcherbakov (Seminar 4) E-mail: gbufetova@lsk.gpi.ru Vladimir A Makarov (Seminar 5) E-mail: makarov@msu.ilc.edu.ru Vyacheslav

    • e-Infrastructures for e-Sciences 2013 A CHAIN-REDS Workshop organised under the aegis of the European Commission

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      The CHAIN-REDS Project is organising a workshop on "e-Infrastructures for e-Sciences" focusing on Cloud Computing and Data Repositories under the aegis of the European Commission and in co-location with the International Conference on e-Science 2013 (IEEE2013) that will be held in Beijing, P.R. of China on October 17-22, 2013. The core objective of the CHAIN-REDS project is to promote, coordinate and support the effort of a critical mass of non-European e-Infrastructures for Research and Education to collaborate with Europe addressing interoperability and interoperation of Grids and other Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). From this perspective, CHAIN-REDS will optimise the interoperation of European infrastructures with those present in 6 other regions of the world, both from a development and use point of view, and catering to different communities. Overall, CHAIN-REDS will provide input for future strategies and decision-making regarding collaboration with other regions on e-Infrastructure deployment and availability of related data; it will raise the visibility of e-Infrastructures towards intercontinental audiences, covering most of the world and will provide support to establish globally connected and interoperable infrastructures, in particular between the EU and the developing regions. Organised by IHEP, INFN and Sigma Orionis with the support of all project partners, this workshop will aim at: - Presenting the state of the art of Cloud computing in Europe and in China and discussing the opportunities offered by having interoperable and federated e-Infrastructures; - Exploring the existing initiatives of Data Infrastructures in Europe and China, and highlighting the Data Repositories of interest for the Virtual Research Communities in several domains such as Health, Agriculture, Climate, etc.

    • PREFACE: XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics (17-21 September 2007, Caracas, Venezuela)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Puerta, Julio

      2008-10-01

      Some years ago a group of Latin American physicists took the initiative to consult about the viability of organizing a meeting on plasma physics for researchers and students of the region. The result was that it was not only a good idea, but a necessity in order to show and share everyone's work, and to keep updated on latest advances and technologies on plasma physics. It was decided that for new researchers as well as students of Physics, it would prove to be the best way to keep them posted on such matters. This was the birth of a series of meetings known as Latin American workshops on plasma physics that take place every two years in a different Latin American country. In Venezuela we have had the opportunity to organize two editions of this interesting and important reunion of physicists. The first of these Latin American workshops on plasma physics was held in Cambuquira (Brazil) in 1982. After organizing the first six editions of the workshop, the VII LAWPP meeting was realized in Caracas in January 1997. It was designed with a structure similar to the first edition. It developed in two stages, a first week devoted to short courses with lecturers in different fields of plasma physics and a second week for contributed and invited presentations. Participants from sixteen different countries were present, half of them from this continent and the other half from overseas, demonstrating the international character of this meeting. There have been four more editions of the workshop and once again, we have had the opportunity to organize this latest edition of the series: the XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics, which took place in Caracas, Venezuela from the 17th to the 21st of September 2007. The structure was modified, because contributed and review papers were together during the first stage, with short courses realized during the second one, called mini-courses, and given by several high level contributors such as José Boedo, Leopoldo Soto, Claude

    • Third International Workshop on Low-Temperature Physics in Microgravity Environment (CWS-2002)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Osip'yan, Yu. A.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

      2003-06-01

      The Third International Workshop on Low-Temperature Physics in Microgravity Environment (CWS-2002) was held at the Chernogolovka Research Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences from the twelfth through the eighteenth of August 2002. CWS-2002 was one of the satellite conferences and seminars devoted to some rapidly developing area of low-temperature physics which are traditionally held in conjunction with the International Conference on Low-Temperature Physics, which meets once every three years (LT-23 was held in Hiroshima, Japan on August 20-27, 2002). CWS-2002 was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ISSP RAS) and the Space Materials Science Section of the Space Council of the RAS, with the support of the RAS, the Ministry of Industry, Science and Technology of the Russian Federation, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, and the Russian Aerospace Agency (Rosaviakosmos). We are also grateful to the Organizing Committee of LT-23 (especially to Prof. Shun-ichi Kobayashi and Dr. Kimitoshi Kono), the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) (Dr. M. C. Lee and Dr. U. E. Israelsson), and to the INTAS foundation (Grant 02-MO-263, principal investigator Prof. L. Esquivias). At the Workshop, roundtable discussions were held with participants from the various projects supported by INTAS in 2001 and 2002.

    • Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions

      SciTech Connect

      Not Available

      1987-01-01

      The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

  1. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayurskii, Dmitrii; Abe, Sumiyoshi; Alexandre Wang, Q.

    2012-11-01

    The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS2012) was held between 25-30 August at Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation. This workshop was jointly organized by Kazan Federal University and Institut Supérieur des Matériaux et Mécaniques Avancées (ISMANS), France. The series of SPMCS workshops was created in 2008 with the aim to be an interdisciplinary incubator for the worldwide exchange of innovative ideas and information about the latest results. The first workshop was held at ISMANS, Le Mans (France) in 2008, and the third at Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan (China) in 2010. At SPMCS2012, we wished to bring together a broad community of researchers from the different branches of the rapidly developing complexity science to discuss the fundamental theoretical challenges (geometry/topology, number theory, statistical physics, dynamical systems, etc) as well as experimental and applied aspects of many practical problems (condensed matter, disordered systems, financial markets, chemistry, biology, geoscience, etc). The program of SPMCS2012 was prepared based on three categories: (i) physical and mathematical studies (quantum mechanics, generalized nonequilibrium thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamics, condensed matter physics, nanoscience); (ii) natural complex systems (physical, geophysical, chemical and biological); (iii) social, economical, political agent systems and man-made complex systems. The conference attracted 64 participants from 10 countries. There were 10 invited lectures, 12 invited talks and 28 regular oral talks in the morning and afternoon sessions. The book of Abstracts is available from the conference website (http://www.ksu.ru/conf/spmcs2012/?id=3). A round table was also held, the topic of which was 'Recent and Anticipated Future Progress in Science of Complexity', discussing a variety of questions and opinions important for the understanding of the concept of

  2. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2015-09-18

    The String theory workshop was held from March 4-7, 2015 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Gordon Kane and Aaron Pierce. Piyush Kumar (Yale), Jim Halverson (KITP), Bobby Acharya (ICTP) and Sven Krippendorf (Oxford) served as external organizers.The meeting focused on the status of work to project 10 or 11 dimensional string/M theories onto our 4 spacetime dimensions (compactification). The workshop had 31 participants, half from outside the U.S. Participants were encouraged to focus on predictions for recent and forthcoming data, particularly for Higgs physics and LHC and dark matter, rather than on the traditional approach of embedding the Standard Model particles and forces. The Higgs boson sympoosium was locally organized by James Wells (chair), Aaron Pierce and Jianming Qian. Additional input in the early stages by Stefan Pokorski (Warsaw) who was unable to attend in the end. The workshop consistent of 22 talks from experts around the world, both theoretical and experimental. Experimentalists summarized the current state of knowledge of the Higgs boson and its varients. The theory talks ranged from technical calculations of Standard Model processes to speculative novel ideas. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 24 participants came under the program, with 17 of them receiving at least partial support for their visits.

  3. Let’s move our health! The experience of 40 physical activity motivational workshops

    PubMed

    Bouté, Catherine; Cailliez, Elisabeth; D Hour, Alain; Goxe, Didier; Gusto, Gaëlle; Copin, Nane; Lantieri, Olivier

    2016-10-19

    Aims: To set up physical activity promotion workshops in health centres to help people with a sedentary lifestyle achieve an adequate level of physical activity. Methods: This health programme, called ‘Bougeons Notre Santé’ (Let’s move our health) has been implemented since 2006 by four health centres in the Pays de la Loire region, in France. This article describes implementation of the programme, its feasibility, how it can be integrated into a global preventive approach and its outcomes on promoting more physical activity. The “Let’s move our health!” programme comprises four group meetings with participants over a period of several months. At these meetings, participants discuss, exchange and monitor their qualitative and quantitative level of physical activity. Realistic and achievable goals are set in consultation with each participant in relation to their personal circumstances and are monitored with a pedometer and a follow-up diary. Support on healthy eating is also provided. This programme is an opportunity to promote health and refer participants to existing local resources. Results: Forty groups, comprising a total of 275 people, have participated in the programme since 2006. After the four meetings, participants had increased their physical activity level by an average of 723 steps per day and 85% reported that they had changed their eating habits. Conclusion: This health promotion programme is feasible and effective: an increase in the physical activity of participants was observed, together with a favourable impact on perceived health, well-being and social links. These workshops are integrated into a network of associations and institutional partners and could be implemented by similar social or health organisations.

  4. Division III: Commission 15: Physical Studies of Comets and Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Gil-Hutton, Ricardo; Cellino, Alberto; Hestroffer, Daniel; Belskaya, Irina N.; Davidsson, Björn J. R.; Dotto, Elisabetta; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Hestroffer, Daniel; Kawakita, Hideyo; Mothe-Diniz, Thais; Licandro, Javier; Wooden, Diane H.; Yano, Hajime

    2015-08-01

    The business meeting of IAU Commission 15 (C15) took place in Beijing on 29 August 2012, from 14:00 to 18:00, in room 405 of the China National Convention Center. This report of the business meeting of Commission 15 at the 2012 IAU GA is based on the report provided by Alberto Cellino, past president, and on the minutes taken by Daniel Hestroffer, secretary of Commission 15 in the triennium 2009 to 2012, and current secretary.

  5. PREFACE: 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fring, Andreas; Jones, Hugh; Znojil, Miloslav

    2008-06-01

    Attempts to understand the quantum mechanics of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems can be traced back to the early days, one example being Heisenberg's endeavour to formulate a consistent model involving an indefinite metric. Over the years non-Hermitian Hamiltonians whose spectra were believed to be real have appeared from time to time in the literature, for instance in the study of strong interactions at high energies via Regge models, in condensed matter physics in the context of the XXZ-spin chain, in interacting boson models in nuclear physics, in integrable quantum field theories as Toda field theories with complex coupling constants, and also very recently in a field theoretical scenario in the quantization procedure of strings on an AdS5 x S5 background. Concrete experimental realizations of these types of systems in the form of optical lattices have been proposed in 2007. In the area of mathematical physics similar non-systematic results appeared sporadically over the years. However, intensive and more systematic investigation of these types of non- Hermitian Hamiltonians with real eigenvalue spectra only began about ten years ago, when the surprising discovery was made that a large class of one-particle systems perturbed by a simple non-Hermitian potential term possesses a real energy spectrum. Since then regular international workshops devoted to this theme have taken place. This special issue is centred around the 6th International Workshop on Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics held in July 2007 at City University London. All the contributions contain significant new results or alternatively provide a survey of the state of the art of the subject or a critical assessment of the present understanding of the topic and a discussion of open problems. Original contributions from non-participants were also invited. Meanwhile many interesting results have been obtained and consensus has been reached on various central conceptual issues in the

  6. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schietinger, T.; Pedrozzi, M.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, B.; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  7. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010) both agreed to hold this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, considering the celebration of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of its official program, within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial activities. This event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project `Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4', supported by the National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya in 1980, and was followed by: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006) and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss recent progress and outlooks in plasma science, covering fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, plasma applications, etc. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005) and Caracas (2007). The purpose of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is to provide a forum in which the achievements of the Latin American plasma physics communities can be displayed, as well as to foster collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The Program of ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included

  8. PREFACE: 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Ky, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2015-06-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39). Both the workshop and the conference were held from 28th - 31st July 2014 in Dakruco Hotel, Buon Ma Thuot, Dak Lak, Vietnam. The NCTP-39 and the IWTCP-2 were organized under the support of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society, with a motivation to foster scientific exchanges between the theoretical and computational physicists in Vietnam and worldwide, as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. The IWTCP-2 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). About 100 participants coming from nine countries participated in the workshop and the conference. At the IWTCP-2 workshop, we had 16 invited talks presented by international experts, together with eight oral and ten poster contributions. At the NCTP-39, three invited talks, 15 oral contributions and 39 posters were presented. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the workshop and the conference successful. Trinh Xuan Hoang, Nguyen Anh Ky, Nguyen Tri Lan and Nguyen Ai Viet

  9. Mini-proceedings of the workshop on heavy ion physics and instrumentation for a 15-Tm booster and storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    The goal of this workshop was to probe in depth a few of the areas of possible physics made possible by the availability of an intermediate energy heavy-ion physics facility. There was a special emphasis on physics that would be possible only with a storage/cooler ring. Topics discussed were nuclei far from stability, quantum electrodynamics, giant resonances and photonuclear reactions, and high energy gamma-ray production. Individual papers in this meeting were abstracted separately.

  10. Fundamental physics at the intensity frontier. Report of the workshop held December 2011 in Rockville, MD.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.; Weerts, H.; Brock, R.; Butler, J.N.; Casey, B.C.K.; Lu, Z.T.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Dietrich, M.R.; Djurcic, Z.; Goodman, M.; Green, J.P.; Holt, R.J.; Mueller, P.; Paley, J.; Reimer, P.; Singh, J.; Upadhye, A.

    2012-06-05

    new sources of CP violation? Is there CP violation in the leptonic sector? Are neutrinos their own antiparticles? Do the forces unify? Is there a weakly coupled hidden sector that is related to dark matter? Do new symmetries exist at very high energy scales? To identify the most compelling science opportunities in this area, the workshop Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier was held in December 2011, sponsored by the Office of High Energy Physics in the US Department of Energy Office of Science. Participants investigated the most promising experiments to exploit these opportunities and described the knowledge that can be gained from such a program. The workshop generated much interest in the community, as witnessed by the large and energetic participation by a broad spectrum of scientists. This document chronicles the activities of the workshop, with contributions by more than 450 authors. The workshop organized the intensity frontier science program along six topics that formed the basis for working groups: experiments that probe (i) heavy quarks, (ii) charged leptons, (iii) neutrinos, (iv) proton decay, (v) light, weakly interacting particles, and (vi) nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. The conveners for each working group included an experimenter and a theorist working in the field and an observer from the community at large. The working groups began their efforts well in advance of the workshop, holding regular meetings and soliciting written contributions. Specific avenues of exploration were identified by each working group. Experiments that study rare strange, charm, and bottom meson decays provide a broad program of measurements that are sensitive to new interactions. Charged leptons, particularly muons and taus, provide a precise probe for new physics because the Standard Model predictions for their properties are very accurate. Research at the intensity frontier can reveal CP violation in the lepton sector, and elucidate whether neutrinos are their own

  11. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  12. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010 The Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'10) is organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from July 5 to July 10, 2010. The scientific programme covers the topics Fusion Plasma and Materials; Plasma Modeling and Fundamentals; Plasma Sources, Diagnostics and Technology. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007), IWSSPP'08, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 207 (2010), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 34 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing

  13. Accelerator beam data commissioning equipment and procedures: Report of the TG-106 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the AAPM

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, C.-W.; Watts, Ronald J.; Ahnesjoe, Anders; Gibbons, John; Li, X. Allen; Lowenstein, Jessica; Mitra, Raj K.; Simon, William E.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2008-09-15

    For commissioning a linear accelerator for clinical use, medical physicists are faced with many challenges including the need for precision, a variety of testing methods, data validation, the lack of standards, and time constraints. Since commissioning beam data are treated as a reference and ultimately used by treatment planning systems, it is vitally important that the collected data are of the highest quality to avoid dosimetric and patient treatment errors that may subsequently lead to a poor radiation outcome. Beam data commissioning should be performed with appropriate knowledge and proper tools and should be independent of the person collecting the data. To achieve this goal, Task Group 106 (TG-106) of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine was formed to review the practical aspects as well as the physics of linear accelerator commissioning. The report provides guidelines and recommendations on the proper selection of phantoms and detectors, setting up of a phantom for data acquisition (both scanning and no-scanning data), procedures for acquiring specific photon and electron beam parameters and methods to reduce measurement errors (<1%), beam data processing and detector size convolution for accurate profiles. The TG-106 also provides a brief discussion on the emerging trend in Monte Carlo simulation techniques in photon and electron beam commissioning. The procedures described in this report should assist a qualified medical physicist in either measuring a complete set of beam data, or in verifying a subset of data before initial use or for periodic quality assurance measurements. By combining practical experience with theoretical discussion, this document sets a new standard for beam data commissioning.

  14. Workshop Physics and Related Curricula: "A 25-Year History of Collaborative Learning Enhanced by Computer Tools for Observation and Analysis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Priscilla W.; Willis, Maxine C.; Sokoloff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the 25-year history of development of the activity-based Workshop Physics (WP) at Dickinson College, its adaptation for use at Gettysburg Area High School, and its synergistic influence on curricular materials developed at the University of Oregon and Tufts University and vice versa. WP and these related curricula: 1) are…

  15. Workshop Physics and Related Curricula: "A 25-Year History of Collaborative Learning Enhanced by Computer Tools for Observation and Analysis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Priscilla W.; Willis, Maxine C.; Sokoloff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the 25-year history of development of the activity-based Workshop Physics (WP) at Dickinson College, its adaptation for use at Gettysburg Area High School, and its synergistic influence on curricular materials developed at the University of Oregon and Tufts University and vice versa. WP and these related curricula: 1) are…

  16. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Request for support of the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Thomas

    2009-05-21

    This grant supported the publication of student papers that were presented at the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas. Papers were published in a Special Issue of the IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 32, Issue 2 in April, 2007.

  17. Proceedings of the 2003 NASA/JPL Workshop on Fundamental Physics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Don (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Fundamental Physics workshop included presentations ranging from forces acting on RNA to properties of clouds of degenerate Fermi atoms, to techniques to probe for a added space-time dimensions, and to flight hardware for low temperature experiments, amongst others. Mark Lee from NASA Headquarters described the new strategic plan that NASA has developed under Administrator Sean O'Keefe's leadership. Mark explained that the Fundamental Physics community now needs to align its research program and the roadmap describing the long-term goals of the program with the NASA plan. Ulf Israelsson of JPL discussed how the rewrite of the roadmap will be implemented under the leadership of the Fundamental Physics Discipline Working Group (DWG). Nick Bigelow, chair of the DWG, outlined how investigators can contribute to the writing of the roadmap. Results of measurements on very cold clouds of Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance were described by three investigators. Also, new measurements relating to tests of Einstein equivalence were discussed. Investigators also described methods to test other aspects of Einstein's relativity theories.

  18. Proceedings of the 2003 NASA/JPL Workshop on Fundamental Physics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Don (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Fundamental Physics workshop included presentations ranging from forces acting on RNA to properties of clouds of degenerate Fermi atoms, to techniques to probe for a added space-time dimensions, and to flight hardware for low temperature experiments, amongst others. Mark Lee from NASA Headquarters described the new strategic plan that NASA has developed under Administrator Sean O'Keefe's leadership. Mark explained that the Fundamental Physics community now needs to align its research program and the roadmap describing the long-term goals of the program with the NASA plan. Ulf Israelsson of JPL discussed how the rewrite of the roadmap will be implemented under the leadership of the Fundamental Physics Discipline Working Group (DWG). Nick Bigelow, chair of the DWG, outlined how investigators can contribute to the writing of the roadmap. Results of measurements on very cold clouds of Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance were described by three investigators. Also, new measurements relating to tests of Einstein equivalence were discussed. Investigators also described methods to test other aspects of Einstein's relativity theories.

  19. EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop on Physical Chemistry of Wet Etching of Semiconductors (PCWES 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Helmut

    2007-04-01

    The biannual Workshop on Physical Chemistry of Wet Etching of Semiconductors (PCWES) was held in Saarbrücken, Germany in June 2006 for the fifth time in its history. The event was initiated in 1998 by Miko Elwenspoek from Twente University. It is a dedicated workshop with a typical attendance of about 30 scientists with multidisciplinary backgrounds from all parts of the world working in the field. Starting off in Holten in The Netherlands in 1998, subsequent workshops have been held at Toulouse, France in 2000, Nara, Japan in 2002, and Montreal, Canada in 2004. The initial focus was upon anisotropic etching of silicon in alkaline solutions, including surface topology, modelling aspects and applications. This process has found a wide range of applications in microsystems technology (MST), i.e. in the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Most prominently, it provides the technological basis for bulk micromachining. More recently, other semiconductors such as germanium, III-V compounds and, particularly, wide-bandgap materials have started to enter the field. Furthermore, electrochemical aspects have gained in importance and the formation of porous silicon has also become a considerable part of the programme. From the very beginning up to the present time there was and is a strong focus on illumination of the underlying mechanism of crystallographic anisotropy, as well as on the understanding of electrochemical and dopant-induced etch stop phenomena. The fifth workshop, presented in Saarbrücken, included a total of twenty four contributions, six of which were as posters. Five of these are included in this partial special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering as full length papers after having undergone the standard review process. The selection of contributions starts with the first invited paper given by M Gosalvez et al, resulting from a collaboration between Nagoya University, Japan and Helsinki University of Technology

  20. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    This volume is a collection of papers associated with a series of invited lectures presented at the First Workshop on Nonequilibrium processes in Plasma Physics and studies of Environment that was held at Mt Kopaonik in August 2006. The workshop originated as a part of the FP6 COE 026328 which had the basic aim of promoting centers of excellence in Western Balkan countries, to facilitate dissemination of their results and to help them establish themselves in the broader arena of European and international science. So the best way to achieve all those goals was to prepare a workshop associated with the local conference SPIG (Symposium on Physics of Ionized Gases) where the participants could attend sessions in which the host Laboratory presented progress reports and papers and thereby gain a full perspective of our results. At the same time this allowed participants in the COE the opportunity to compare their results with the results of external speakers and to gain new perspectives and knowledge. The program of the workshop was augmented by inviting some of our colleagues who visited the COE in recent years or have an active collaboration with a participating member. In that respect this volume is not only a proceedings of the workshop but a collection of papers related to the topic of the workshop: Non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas and in the science of our environment. The idea is to offer review articles either summarizing a broader area of published or about to be published work or to give overviews showing preliminary results of the works in progress. The refereeing of the papers consisted of two parts, first in selection of the invitees and second in checking the submitted manuscripts. The papers were refereed to the standard of the Journal. As the program of the COE covers a wide area of topics from application of plasmas in nano- electronics to monitoring and removal of pollutants in the atmosphere, so the program of the workshop covered an even broader

  1. Final Report for the September 2001 Workshop on Physical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, N D; Durham, W B; Kirby, S; Brewer, P

    2001-10-01

    A 2-day workshop ''Physical and Chemical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community'' was held on 17-18 September 2001. Putting together this workshop was a joint effort by LLNL, MBARI and the USGS, Menlo Park. Twenty-two people from a wide variety of institutions and backgrounds participated. An additional eighteen people were forced to cancel at the last minute due to the events of 11 September 2001. The premise of the workshop was that progress in nearly every aspect of gas hydrate research depends fundamentally on the availability of high-quality property data and the development of laboratory insights into the physics and chemistry that govern gas hydrates in nature. One objective of the workshop was to develop a dialogue between laboratory scientists who make property measurements of gas hydrates and scientists who use these data for quantitative modeling. A second objective was to help facilitate research among experimentalists and the acquisition of reliable gas hydrate properties. The latter focused mainly, but not exclusively, on researchers from institutions in the San Francisco Bay Area to energize a community that has a geographic advantage in collaborative relationships. The workshop was successful at meeting both of these objectives, although the unique perspectives of the invitees who weren't able to attend were missed. After reviewing the current state of gas hydrate R&D with respect to property measurements, there was general agreement that it is time to move forward with new approaches (e.g., seafloor experiments, lab experiments with hydrate-sediment aggregates) and new applications of techniques (e.g., improved seismics, in situ x-ray and neutron diffraction and tomography, and NMR scanning). The workshop consensus is summarized at the end of this document in a table of fundamental questions pertaining to natural gas hydrates and possible experimental lab and seafloor approaches to answering them.

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  3. Three-dimensional multi-physics analysis and commissioning frequency tuning strategy of a radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Lu, Liang; Liu, Ting; Xu, Xianbo; Sun, Liepeng; Li, Chenxing; Shi, Longbo; Wang, Wenbin; He, Yuan; Zhao, Hongwei

    2017-09-01

    The resonant frequency stability of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is an important concern during commissioning. The power dissipated on the RFQ internal surface will heat the cavity and lead to a temperature rise and a structural deformation, especially in the continuous wave (CW) RFQs, which will cause the resonant frequency shifts. It is important to simulate the temperature rise, the deformation and the frequency shift of the RFQ cavity. The cooling water takes away the power to maintain the frequency stability. Meanwhile, the RFQ resonant frequency can be tuned by adjusting the water temperature. In this paper, a detailed three-dimensional multi-physics analysis of the Low Energy Accelerator Facility (LEAF) RFQ will be presented and a commissioning frequency tuning strategy will be studied.

  4. FOREWORD: International Topical Workshop on Plasma Physics: Coherent Processes in Nonlinear Media. Sponsored by the ICTP (Trieste) and the European Union (Brussels)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Bingham, R.; Stenflo, L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    of turbulence and the formation of coherent structures, particle and heat transport, plasma based charged particle acceleration by intense electrostatic waves that are created by powerful short laser beams, etc. Specifically, the review talks presented the general picture of the subject matter at hand and the underlying physics, whereas the remaining topical talks and the posters described the present state-of-the-art in the field. Instead of presenting the technical details, the speakers kept a good balance in injecting both the physics and the mathematical techniques to their audience. It was noted that despite the diversity of the physical problems, the mathematical equations governing particular phenomena and their solutions remain somewhat similar. Most contributions from the Trieste meeting appear in the form of a collection of articles in this Topical Issue of Physica Scripta, which will be distributed to all the delegates. We are grateful to the ICTP director Professor M A Virasoro and the deputy director Professor L Bertocchi for their generous support and warm hospitality at the ICTP. Thanks are also due to Professor G Denardo of the ICTP and Professor M H A Hassan of the Third World Academy of Sciences (TWAS, ICTP) for their constant and wholehearted support in our endeavours. We would like to express our gratitude to the ICTP and the Commission of the European Union (through the HCM networks on Dusty Plasmas and Nonlinear Phenomena in the Microphysics of Collisionless Plasmas) for providing partial financial support to our activities at Trieste. Finally, our cordial thanks are extended to the speakers and the attendees for their contributions which resulted in the success of this workshop. Specifically, we appreciate the speakers for delivering excellent talks, supplying well prepared manuscripts for publication, and enhancing the plasma physics activity at the ICTP. The excellent work of MS Ave Lusenti is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. 78 FR 16675 - First Technology Transitions; Policy Task Force Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... COMMISSION First Technology Transitions; Policy Task Force Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... planned series of workshops to analyze technology transitions from narrowband to broadband; from time... technological capabilities of wireless and wireline (copper, fiber and coax) technologies today and in...

  6. IAU Division III Commission 15: Physical Studies of Comets and Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.; Huebner, Walter F.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Harris, A. W.; Kiselev, N.; McFadden, L.-A.; Michalowsky, T.; Muinonen, K.; Reitsema, H.; Ma, Y.; Schulz, R.; Sykes, M. V.

    2007-03-01

    The report of Commission 15 was prepared primarily by the chairpersons of its two working groups: the Minor Planet Working Group and the Comet Working Group. In particular, the Minor Planet section was created by A. Cellino with a little help from E. Tedesco and the Comet section by T. Yamamoto with the assistance of D. Bockelée-Morvan, W. Huebner, A. Bhardwaj, D. Biesecker, L. Jorda, H. Kawakita, H. U. Keller, H. Kimura, A. Kouchi, and D. Prialnik. E. Tedesco was responsible for the Introduction, final editing, and merging of the two reports.

  7. Physical Activity and Physical Fitness in Pediatric Obesity: What are the First Steps for Clinicians? Expert Conclusion from the 2016 ECOG Workshop

    PubMed Central

    O’MALLEY, GRACE; RING-DIMITRIOU, SUSANNE; NOWICKA, PAULINA; VANIA, ANDREA; FRELUT, MARIE-LAURE; FARPOUR-LAMBERT, NATHALIE; WEGHUBER, DANIEL; THIVEL, DAVID

    2017-01-01

    One of the main aims of the European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) is to assist healthcare workers in delivering evidence-based assessment and treatment of childhood obesity. Every year the ECOG Congress includes working groups whose objective is to highlight concerns faced by clinicians and practitioners who work in the field of pediatric obesity. This year, a working group was devoted to the assessment of physical activity and physical fitness in this population. The present commentary attempts to summarize the main themes identified by practitioners during these workshops in order to provide the basic and essential first steps required to address physical activity and fitness in children with obesity. PMID:28674594

  8. Physical Activity and Physical Fitness in Pediatric Obesity: What are the First Steps for Clinicians? Expert Conclusion from the 2016 ECOG Workshop.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Grace; Ring-Dimitriou, Susanne; Nowicka, Paulina; Vania, Andrea; Frelut, Marie-Laure; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie; Weghuber, Daniel; Thivel, David

    2017-01-01

    One of the main aims of the European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) is to assist healthcare workers in delivering evidence-based assessment and treatment of childhood obesity. Every year the ECOG Congress includes working groups whose objective is to highlight concerns faced by clinicians and practitioners who work in the field of pediatric obesity. This year, a working group was devoted to the assessment of physical activity and physical fitness in this population. The present commentary attempts to summarize the main themes identified by practitioners during these workshops in order to provide the basic and essential first steps required to address physical activity and fitness in children with obesity.

  9. The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011) The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibene, G.

    2012-11-01

    The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers, held in Lady Margaret Hall College in Oxford in October 2011 continues the tradition of bi-annual international meetings dedicated to the study of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. The first meeting of this series took place in S Diego (CA, US) in 1987, and since then scientists in the fusion community studying the formation and effects of transport barriers in plasmas have been meeting at this small workshop to discuss progress, new experimental evidence and related theoretical studies. The first workshops were strongly focussed on the characterization and understanding of the H-mode plasma, discovered in ASDEX in 1982. Tokamaks throughout the entire world were able to reproduce the H-mode transition in the following few years and since then the H-mode has been recognised as a pervasive physics feature of toroidally confined plasmas. Increased physics understanding of the H-mode transition and of the properties of H-mode plasmas, together with extensive development of diagnostic capabilities for the plasma edge, led to the development of edge transport barrier studies and theory. The H-mode Workshop reflected this extension in interest, with more and more contributions discussing the phenomenology of edge transport barriers and instabilities (ELMs), L-H transition and edge transport barrier formation theory. In the last 15 years, in response to the development of fusion plasma studies, the scientific scope of the workshop has been broadened to include experimental and theoretical studies of both edge and internal transport barriers, including formation and sustainment of transport barriers for different transport channels (energy, particle and momentum). The 13th H-mode Workshop was organized around six leading topics, and, as customary for this workshop, a lead speaker was selected for each topic to present to the audience the state-of-the-art, new understanding and open issues, as well

  10. Workshop Physics and Related Curricula: A 25-Year History of Collaborative Learning Enhanced by Computer Tools for Observation and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.; Willis, Maxine C.; Sokoloff, David R.

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the 25-year history of development of the activity-based Workshop Physics (WP) at Dickinson College, its adaptation for use at Gettysburg Area High School, and its synergistic influence on curricular materials developed at the University of Oregon and Tufts University and vice versa. WP and these related curricula: 1) are based on Physics Education Research (PER) findings and are PER-validated; 2) feature active, collaborative learning; and 3) use computer-based tools that enable students to learn by making predictions and then collecting, displaying, and analyzing data from their experiments.

  11. Can a 3-hour educational workshop and the provision of practical tools encourage family physicians to prescribe physical activity as medicine? A pre–post study

    PubMed Central

    Windt, Johann; Windt, Adriaan; Davis, Jennifer; Petrella, Robert; Khan, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To increase, in our sample, the proportion of family physicians who provided their patients with written physical activity prescriptions after the delivery of a 3-hour educational workshop with the provision of practical tools to facilitate behaviour change. Design A pre–post study. Setting Abbotsford and Mission, British Columbia. Participants All 158 physicians registered with the Abbotsford (121) or Mission (37) Divisions of Family Practice were invited to participate. Intervention A 3-hour educational workshop combined with practical tools. Educational content of the workshop included (1) assessing patients’ physical activity levels, (2) using motivational interviewing techniques to encourage physical activity and (3) providing written physical activity prescriptions when appropriate. Practical tools to facilitate physician behaviour changes included a ‘physical activity vital sign’, and copies of the Exercise is Medicine Canada Prescription Pad. Participating physicians completed a bespoke questionnaire before and 4 weeks after their attendance at the workshop. Outcome measures The primary outcome was the change in the proportion of family physicians who reported providing written physical activity prescriptions. Exploratory outcomes included changes in other physical activity prescription behaviours, the perceived importance of various barriers to prescription, and knowledge and confidence in regards to physical activity prescription. McNemar's test evaluated changes in proportions before and after the workshop, while Wilcoxon signed-rank tests evaluated changes in Likert data. Results 25 family physicians completed the baseline questionnaire and attended the workshop, with 100% follow-up response rate. The proportion of family physicians who reported providing written physical activity prescriptions in their clinical practice increased significantly (p<0.05), from 10 (40%) at baseline to 17 (68%) 4 weeks after the intervention

  12. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    The 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP 2012) took place in Winchester, UK, from the 16-21 September. It gathered students as well as people active in the top quark sector and provided a framework to highlight the newest results and matters related to top quark physics. Discovered in 1995, the top quark is the sixth and heaviest of all quarks, and it is the only one with a lifetime short enough to be observed 'naked'. This makes it an important testing ground in the search for new physics. In fact, the fact of its mass being so much larger than the other quarks, hints at its special role in the Higgs mechanism. For the same reason, in many models of New Physics, new heavy resonances are expected to couple mostly with top quarks. Even if no new particles are observed, the direct correlation between its angular momentum and that of its detectable decay products allows us to probe indirectly New Physics in action when top quarks are created. In this edition of the TOP conference series, for the first time, the agenda was equally balanced between 'traditional' measurements and the now vast number of searches for physics BSM in the top quark sector, thanks mostly to the amount of data collected at the LHC in its Run I. New results were presented by both the Tevatron and the LHC collaborations: improved ttbar and single top cross-section measurements, refined techniques to measure the top quark mass and a large number of results on properties such as spin correlation and W boson polarization in top quark decays were shown. More technical discussions on the experimental issues, both from the detector and the simulation side also took place, drawing together experimentalists and theorists. Reviews of the latest results on ttbar asymmetry both from CDF and D0 and from ATLAS and CMS were shown, and theorists active in the field made some interesting points on this hot topic. Additionally, results on the search for fourth generation fermions and new

  13. 10 CFR 150.14 - Commission regulatory authority for physical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... significance in quantities greater than 15 grams of plutonium or uranium-233 or uranium-235 (enriched to 20... equation grams=grams uranium-235+grams plutonium+grams uranium-233 shall meet the physical...

  14. 10 CFR 150.14 - Commission regulatory authority for physical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... significance in quantities greater than 15 grams of plutonium or uranium-233 or uranium-235 (enriched to 20... equation grams=grams uranium-235+grams plutonium+grams uranium-233 shall meet the physical...

  15. 10 CFR 150.14 - Commission regulatory authority for physical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... significance in quantities greater than 15 grams of plutonium or uranium-233 or uranium-235 (enriched to 20... equation grams=grams uranium-235+grams plutonium+grams uranium-233 shall meet the physical...

  16. 10 CFR 150.14 - Commission regulatory authority for physical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... significance in quantities greater than 15 grams of plutonium or uranium-233 or uranium-235 (enriched to 20... equation grams=grams uranium-235+grams plutonium+grams uranium-233 shall meet the physical...

  17. 10 CFR 150.14 - Commission regulatory authority for physical protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... significance in quantities greater than 15 grams of plutonium or uranium-233 or uranium-235 (enriched to 20... equation grams=grams uranium-235+grams plutonium+grams uranium-233 shall meet the physical...

  18. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    SciTech Connect

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  19. The NOνA experiment, the first 12 months of commissioning, operations and physics data

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.

    2015-07-15

    The NOνA experiment is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to make precision measurements of the oscillation probabilities for ν{sub µ} → ν{sub e} and ν{sub µ} → ν{sub µ} for both neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. These measurements will provide new information on the neutrino mass hierarchy, improve our knowledge of whether θ{sub 23} is non-maximal and possibility provide information on the CP violating phase δ{sub CP} of the PMNS neutrino mixing matrix. We present the observations of the first neutrino event in the NOνA far and near detectors along with data obtained during the first year of detector commissioning and operations. We use the data to demonstrate the detector’s ability to identify electron and muon neutrino events and to reject cosmic ray induced backgrounds at a level of 4 × 10{sup 7}:1. New estimates for the signal and background sensitivities of the NOνA experiment during the first year of full detector running are presented.

  20. Workshop report on a future information infrastructure for the physical sciences. The facts of the matter: finding, understanding, and using information about our physical world

    SciTech Connect

    Trivelpiece, Alvin; Berry, R. Stephen; Blume, Martin; Griffiths, Jose-Marie; Holcomb, Lee; McDonald, Kirk; Rajan, Krishna; Smith, Kent; Winstanley, Derek

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to obtain input from the scientific community regarding the merits of the concept of a ''Future Information Infrastructure for the Physical Sciences'' that would offer a comprehensive collection of scientific and technical information in the physical sciences as well as services that would facilitate scientific communication and increase the productivity of the scientific enterprise in the United States. The Infrastructure would impact science methods and science education as well as the scientific record as a public good. The workshop was composed of a panel of experts in science, science policy, information science, and scientific publishing. Other participants included representatives from the community of potential stakeholders in such an enterprise. The overall conclusion of the workshop was an enthusiastic endorsement of a vision of a national infrastructure that benefits not just the scientific community but the national good. It could ultimately impact not only research and development, but also education and applications to everyday life. It would be a step to integrate the whole of science to provide a basis to improve society, the economy, and the environment.

  1. Increasing the health literacy of learning disability and mental health nurses in physical care skills: a pre and post-test evaluation of a workshop on diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Trotter, Fiona; Clifton, Andrew; Holdich, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the pre- and post-test results of the outcomes of a workshop designed to increase learning disability and mental health nurses' knowledge and skill to undertake interventions for service users at risk of, or with a diagnosis of, type 2 diabetes. Health literacy is also discussed as a way of explaining why such nurses may lack expertise in physical health care. Findings from the workshop show that learning disability and mental health nurses have the motivation to increase their health literacy (skills and knowledge) in diabetes care. The potential of such workshops, and how organisations looking forward to the future can build health literacy, is discussed.

  2. MO-FG-210-01: Commissioning An US System for Brachytherapy: An Overview of Physics, Instrumentation, and Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z.

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medical practice. Since US imaging offers real-time imaging capability, it has becomes an excellent option to provide image guidance for brachytherapy (IGBT). (1) The physics and the fundamental principles of US imaging are presented, and the typical steps required to commission an US system for IGBT is provided for illustration. (2) Application of US for prostate HDR brachytherapy, including partial prostate treatments using MR-ultrasound co-registration to enable a focused treatment on the disease within the prostate is also presented. Prostate HDR with US image guidance planning can benefit from real time visualization of the needles, and fusion of the ultrasound images with T2 weighted MR allows the focusing of the treatment to the specific areas of disease within the prostate, so that the entire gland need not be treated. Finally, (3) ultrasound guidance for an eye plaque program is presented. US can be a key component of placement and QA for episcleral plaque brachytherapy for ocular cancer, and the UCLA eye plaque program with US for image guidance is presented to demonstrate the utility of US verification of plaque placement in improving the methods and QA in episcleral plaque brachytherapy. Learning Objectives: To understand the physics of an US system and the necessary aspects of commissioning US for image guided brachytherapy (IGBT). To understand real time planning of prostate HDR using ultrasound, and its application in partial prostate treatments using MR-ultrasound fusion to focus treatment on disease within the prostate. To understand the methods and QA in applying US for localizing the target and the implant during a episcleral plaque brachytherapy procedures.

  3. Proceedings of the Special Demonstration Workshop for Integrating Blind Children with Sighted Children into Ongoing Physical Education and Recreation Programs (Cleveland, Ohio, October 9-10, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boninger, Walter B., Ed.

    A special education workshop (Cleveland, Ohio, October 9-10, 1969) for integrating blind children with sighted children into ongoing physical education and recreation programs is described. Physical education and blind children from the viewpoint of opthalmology, social and psychological aspects of blindness as they relate to participation in…

  4. Teaching English through Action: Total Physical Response (T.P.R.). A Right-Brain/Left-Brain Approach to Language Acquisition. A Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Bertha E.

    Materials from a teacher workshop on the Total Physical Response method for teaching English as a second language are presented. The technique describes the process of first language acquisition, uses physical activities in the classroom to reinforce learning, and allows a long period of receptive language learning before requiring production. The…

  5. Teaching English through Action: Total Physical Response (T.P.R.). A Right-Brain/Left-Brain Approach to Language Acquisition. A Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Bertha E.

    Materials from a teacher workshop on the Total Physical Response method for teaching English as a second language are presented. The technique describes the process of first language acquisition, uses physical activities in the classroom to reinforce learning, and allows a long period of receptive language learning before requiring production. The…

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on neutron-induced gamma-ray physics at LANSCE/WNR

    SciTech Connect

    Strottman, D.D.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to present the unique capabilities of LANSCE coupled with a large scale Compton suppressed Ge detector array and to help define a future experimental research program. This document contains the vuegraphs from the unclassified session. The vuegraphs were kindly provided by the invited speakers who came from both the university and the national laboratory communities. The talks focused on planned as well as potential experiments at LANSCE/WNR and their importance to the field.

  7. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2014: Workshop for young scientists on the physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-05-01

    The 6th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2014) was held in Las Negras, Spain from 21-28 September 2014. Following the traditions of the conference, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the first years of their scientific careers. The present issue contains the proceedings of this workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed as well as the perspectives for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt and the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2014 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), CPAN (Spain), Czech Science Foundation (GACR) under grant 13-20841S (Czech Republic), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council under grant 259612 (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz Association and GSI under grant VH-NG-822, Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), National Science Foundation under grant No.1359622 (USA), Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR (Czech Republic), Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife (Spain) and the Universidad de Granada (Spain). Javier López Albacete, Universidad de Granada (Spain) Jana Bielcikova, Nuclear Physics Inst. and Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic) Rainer J. Fries, Texas A&M University (USA) Raphaël Granier de Cassagnac, CNRS-IN2P3 and École polytechnique (France

  8. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached.

  9. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    (IAVCEI), the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) through the Coordinación de la Investigación Científica, the Institute of Physics Publishing services, the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología de Querétaro (CONCYTEQ). The workshop represented the key activity of the IAVCEI Commission on Collapse Calderas in 2008. We, the workshop organizers, would like to express our gratitude to all workshop participants, the staff of Misión La Muralla, the Centro de Geociencias of UNAM for administrative and logistic support, to Adelina Geyer for web support, to María Inés Rojano for organization of logistics, the Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí for logistics support, the Comisiòn Nacional de Electricidad for authorizing a visit to Los Azufres geothermal field, and to all sponsors that provided financial support. We expect these proceedings to stimulate further fruitful discussions, which we hope will be continued at a future meeting. Jo Gottsmann and Gerardo Aguirre-Diaz October 2008

  10. Ethics teaching in rehabilitation: results of a pan-Canadian workshop with occupational and physical therapy educators.

    PubMed

    Hudon, Anne; Perreault, Kadija; Laliberté, Maude; Desrochers, Pascal; Williams-Jones, Bryn; Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie; Hunt, Matthew; Durocher, Evelyne; Mazer, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    Ethical practice is an essential competency for occupational and physical therapists. However, rehabilitation educators have few points of reference for choosing appropriate pedagogical and evaluation methods related to ethics. The objectives of this study were to: (1) identify priority content to cover in ethics teaching in occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) programmes and (2) explore useful and innovative teaching and evaluation methods. Data for this qualitative descriptive study were collected during a 1-d knowledge exchange workshop focused on ethics teaching in rehabilitation. Twenty-three educators from 11 OT and 11 PT Canadian programmes participated in the workshop. They highlighted the importance of teaching foundational theoretical/philosophical approaches and grounding this teaching in concrete examples drawn from rehabilitation practice. A wide range of teaching methods was identified, such as videos, blogs, game-based simulations and role-play. For evaluation, participants used written assignments, exams, objective structured clinical examinations and reflective journals. The inclusion of opportunities for student self-evaluation was viewed as important. The CREW Day provided ethics educators the opportunity to share knowledge and begin creating a community of practice. This space for dialogue could be expanded to international rehabilitation ethics educators, to facilitate a broader network for sharing of tacit and experiential knowledge. Implications for Rehabilitation According to the study participants, rehabilitation ethics education should include learning about foundational knowledge related to ethical theory; be grounded in examples and cases drawn from clinical rehabilitation practice; and contribute to building professional competencies such as self-knowledge and critical thinking in students. Regardless of the methods used by occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) educators for teaching and evaluation, the

  11. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2013-04-01

    Asymmetric, thermal and non-thermal dark matter and its detection”. The first of these workshops (RG Flows) was held from September 17-21 with local organizers Henriette Elvang and Jim Liu, and external organizer Matt Headrick (Brandeis). There were a total of 40 participants, 27 of which were external. The conference website is http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2012/rgflows/, with slides available at http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/ 2012/rgflows/sciprog.html. The second workshop (Light DM), was held April 15th-17th. It was especially timely as it coincided with the announcment of events seen by the CDMS collaboration consistent with a possible hint of a Light Dark Matter signal. The conference website is available at: http://www.umich. edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/dm2013/ with slides available on-line at http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/dm2013/program. html.

  12. Effect of the science teaching advancement through modeling physical science professional development workshop on teachers' attitudes, beliefs and content knowledge and students' content knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Laura

    The Science Teaching Advancement through Modeling Physical Science (STAMPS) professional development workshop was evaluated for effectiveness in improving teachers' and students' content knowledge. Previous research has shown modeling to be an effective method of instruction for improving student and teacher content knowledge, evidenced by assessment scores. Data includes teacher scores on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI; Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhamer, 1992) and the Chemistry Concept Inventory (CCI; Jenkins, Birk, Bauer, Krause, & Pavelich, 2004), as well as student scores on a physics and chemistry assessment. Quantitative data is supported by teacher responses to a post workshop survey and classroom observations. Evaluation of the data shows that the STAMPS professional development workshop was successful in improving both student and teacher content knowledge. Conclusions and suggestions for future study are also included.

  13. Proceedings of the XXI International Workshop High Energy Physics and Quantum Field Theory (QFTHEP 2013). 23 30 June, 2013. Saint Petersburg Area, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Workshop continues a series of workshops started by the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University (SINP MSU) in 1985 and conceived with the purpose of presenting topics of current interest and providing a stimulating environment for scientific discussion on new developments in theoretical and experimental high energy physics and physical programs for future colliders. Traditionally the list of workshop attendees includes a great number of active young scientists and students from Russia and other countries. This year the Workshop is organized jointly by the SINP MSU and the SPbSU and it will take place in the holiday hotel "Baltiets" situated in a picturesque place of the Karelian Isthmus on the shore of the Gulf of Finland in the suburb of the second largest Russian city Saint Petersburg. Scientific program, the main topics to be covered are: * Higgs searches and other experimental results from the LHC and the Tevatron; impact of the Higgs-like boson observed * Physics prospects at Linear Colliders and super B-factories * Extensions of the Standard Model and their phenomenological consequences at the LHC and Linear Colliders * Higher order corrections and resummations for collider phenomenology * Automatic calculations and Monte Carlo simulations in high energy physics * LHC/LC and astroparticle/cosmology connections * Modern nuclear physics and relativistic nucleous-nucleous collisions * Detectors for future experiments in high energy physics The Workshop will include plenary and two parallel afternoon sessions. The plenary sessions will consist of invited lectures. The afternoon sessions will include original talks. Further details are given at http://qfthep.sinp.msu.ru

  14. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2012: Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Markus; Caines, Helen; Calderón de la Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Fries, Rainer; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphaël; Hippolyte, Boris; Mischke, André; Mócsy, Ágnes; Petersen, Hannah; Ruan, Lijuan; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The 5th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2012) was held in Copamarina, Puerto Rico from 14-20 October 2012. As in previous years, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the early years of their scientific careers. This issue contains the proceedings of the workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Measurements from the proton-led run at the CERN-LHC were shown for the first time at this meeting. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed, as well as the proposals for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven, and the LHeC. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2012 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), IN2P3/CNRS (France) and the European Research Council via grant #259612, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (USA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA), National Science Foundation (USA), and Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (Netherlands). Marcus BleicherAndré Mischke Goethe-University Frankfurt and HIC4FAIRUtrecht University and Nikhef Amsterdam GermanyThe Netherlands Helen CainesÁgnes Mócsy Yale UniversityPratt Institute and Brookhaven National

  15. CONFERENCE REPORT: Report on the 11th European Fusion Physics Workshop (Heraklion, Crete, 8 10 December 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; Bécoulet, A.; Counsell, G.; Federici, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Kirschner, A.; Krieger, K.; Ortolani, S.; Pitts, R.; Philipps, V.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2005-08-01

    The 11th EFPW took place in December 2003 at Heraklion in Crete, hosted by the Association EURATOM-Greece and the FORTH Institute, Heraklion and sponsored by the European Commission. Within the overall theme of 'plasma-wall interactions (PWI) and their implications for impurity generation and transport', four topics of importance to the future development of magnetically confined fusion were discussed in detail. Key PWI issues for ITER were also reviewed, the programmes of the two European physics task forces, on PWI and on integrated tokamak modelling, were discussed, and several topical reviews on key physics R&D issues for ITER were presented. The main issues discussed and the areas identified as requiring further study are summarized here.

  16. From Syllabus To Diagnostic Exam: Learnings from the New Faculty Workshop Applied In the Intro Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoff, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Kalamazoo College offers a ``one-size-fits-all'' concept-based introductory physics sequence. The widely varying demographic composition of the class --- including majors in biology, chemistry, pre-med, physics, and math, along with occasional humanities majors --- adds obvious challenges to the successful learning experience. As such, educational techniques that apply across the demographic are required. Several ideas presented at the Fall 2005 New Faculty Workshop apply to the needs of this broad range of students at Kalamazoo College, including an ``organic'' course syllabus that has been allowed to grow to whatever extent necessary to address recurring student concerns and misunderstandings about course expectations, policies, and guidelines, and to provide advice on recurring themes; peer instruction for maximizing classroom value; and hiring teaching assistants with first hand experience in the course and the labs. Details on implementing these techniques, including developing a syllabus with unusual section headings such as ``Attendance and Homework Dramas'' and ``Introductory Physics Survival Requirements,'' will be presented. Success of the techniques, as evidenced by performance on diagnostic exams, class attendance, and comments from course evaluations, will be discussed.

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND.

    SciTech Connect

    BLAND, L.; BOER, D.; SAITO, N.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2001-05-14

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, {Delta}g); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry A{sub N}{sup {pi}} for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible {Delta}g distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q{sup 2} with the future lower-p{sub T} measurements at RHIC.

  18. Do breast cancer survivors increase their physical activity and enhance their health-related quality of life after attending community-based wellness workshops?

    PubMed

    Spector, D; Battaglini, C; Alsobrooks, A; Owen, J; Groff, D

    2012-06-01

    Many breast cancer survivors may be at increased risk for physical and psychological complications from cancer treatments. Research has shown that regular exercise can help ameliorate some of the lingering side effects of breast cancer treatments and improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Additionally, certain stress management techniques have helped increase HRQOL in breast cancer survivors. Few educational programs exist which address both the promotion of physical activity and use of mindfulness-based strategies to improve the health of breast cancer survivors. Community-based wellness workshops were designed to promote regular exercise and use of mindfulness-based techniques. There was an increase in physical activity and improvements on several HRQOL domains 1 month following the exercise workshops; although the results were not significant, they are encouraging.

  19. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.

    2010-06-01

    The 12th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers was held at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA between September 30 and October 2, 2009. This meeting was the continuation of a series of previous meetings which was initiated in 1987 and has been held bi-annually since then. Following the recent tradition at the last few meetings, the program was sub- divided into six sessions. At each session, an overview talk was presented, followed by two or three shorter oral presentations which supplemented the coverage of important issues. These talks were followed by discussion periods and poster sessions of contributed papers. The sessions were: Physics of Transition to/from Enhanced Confinement Regimes, Pedestal and Edge Localized Mode Dynamics, Plasma Rotation and Momentum Transport, Role of 3D Physics in Transport Barriers, Transport Barriers: Theory and Simulations and High Priority ITER Issues on Transport Barriers. The diversity of the 90 registered participants was remarkable, with 22 different nationalities. US participants were in the majority (36), followed by Japan (14), South Korea (7), and China (6). This special issue of Nuclear Fusion consists of a cluster of 18 accepted papers from submitted manuscripts based on overview talks and poster presentations. The paper selection procedure followed the guidelines of Nuclear Fusion which are essentially the same as for regular articles with an additional requirement on timeliness of submission, review and revision. One overview paper and five contributed papers report on the H-mode pedestal related results which reflect the importance of this issue concerning the successful operation of ITER. Four papers address the rotation and momentum transport which play a crucial role in transport barrier physics. The transport barrier transition condition is the main focus of other four papers. Finally, four additional papers are devoted to the behaviour and control of

  20. Beyond Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2004-08-31

    The emerging practice of building commissioning generally provides energy savings of 10% to, in some cases, more than 60% of a building's energy consumption. Moreover, commissioning ensures that equipment and systems are installed and operate properly, providing occupants with the conditions expected. Without commissioning, new buildings can have incorrect equipment installed, devices like fans installed backwards, and unimplemented control algorithms to mention a few deficiencies sometimes found. Existing buildings can have faulty and failed equipment such as clogged filters and coils, stuck dampers, leaky valves, and imbalanced air distribution, as well as overridden controls, improper set points, and incorrect schedules. Commissioning of new and existing buildings helps prevent and alleviate such problems. Yet only a small fraction of commercial buildings has ever been commissioned, and many buildings that have been commissioned have only a fraction of the recommended actions implemented. Time may change this situation or maybe other changes can accelerate the progress of commissioning. Will commissioning continue in the future as it is performed today or must it change? The authors share a vision for how the functions provided by commissioning could change in the future. The paper delves into the roles of automation technology for functional testing, diagnostics, prognostics, data management, asset tracking, and project management in building commissioning. Methods of delivery explored for these capabilities include laptop-, desktop-, and pda-based tools, web-based services, and ubiquitous embedded networked processing. The authors present a vision for how these technologies could change the practice of commissioning and the impacts this could bring for commercial buildings in the U.S. and throughout the world. Potential impacts on building performance, energy consumption, peak power, and occupant satisfaction are examined.

  1. New Worlds in Astroparticle Physics: Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão, Ana M.; Pimenta, Mário; Potting, Robertus; Sá, Paulo M.

    Preface -- Group photo -- pt. 1. Overviews in astroparticle physics. An overview of the status of work on ultra high energy cosmic rays / A. A. Watson. Gravitational waves from compact sources / K. D. Kokkotas and N. Stergioulas. Neutrino physics and astrophysics / E. Fernandez. Black holes and fundamental physics / J. P. S. Lemos -- pt. 2. Contributions. Cosmic ray physics. Phenomenology of cosmic ray air showers / M. T. Dova. First results from the MAGIC experiment / A. de Angelis. How to select UHECR in EUSO - the trigger system / P. Assis. Pressure and temperature dependence of the primary scintillation in air / M. Fraga ... [et al.]. Overview of the GLAST physics / N. Giglietto ... [et al.]. Velocity and charge reconstruction with the AMS/RICH detector / L. Arruda ... [et al.]. Isotope separation with the RICH detector of the AMS experiment / L. Arruda ... [et al.]. Gravitational waves and compact sources. Gravitational radiation from 3D collapse to rotating black holes / L. Baiotti ... [et al.]. The role of differential rotation in the evolution of the r-mode instability / P. M. Sá and B. Tomé. Analytical r-mode solution with gravitational radiation reaction force / Ó. J. C. Dias and P. M. Sá. Space radiation: effects and monitoring. Particles from the sun / D. Maia. Simulations of space radiation monitors / B. Tomé. GEANT4 detector simulations: radiation interaction simulations for the high-energy astrophysics experiments EUSO and AMS / P. Goncalves. Software for radiological risk assessment in space missions / A. Trindade, P. Rodrigues. Neutrino physics. Results from K2K / S. Andringa. SNO: salt phase results and NCD phase status / J. Maneira. The ICARUS experiment / S. Navas-Concha. Cosmological parameters measurements. High redshift supernova surveys / S. Fabbro. SNFactory: nearby supernova factory / P. Antilogus. A polarized galactic emission mapping experiment at 5-10 GHz / D. Barbosa ... [et al.]. Galaxy clusters as probes of dark energy / P. T. P

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the second one following the

  3. Commissioning MMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Stone, John; Smith, Patrick; Reiter, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASAs Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  4. Workshop on data acquisition and trigger system simulations for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: DAQSIM: A data acquisition system simulation tool; Front end and DCC Simulations for the SDC Straw Tube System; Simulation of Non-Blocklng Data Acquisition Architectures; Simulation Studies of the SDC Data Collection Chip; Correlation Studies of the Data Collection Circuit & The Design of a Queue for this Circuit; Fast Data Compression & Transmission from a Silicon Strip Wafer; Simulation of SCI Protocols in Modsim; Visual Design with vVHDL; Stochastic Simulation of Asynchronous Buffers; SDC Trigger Simulations; Trigger Rates, DAQ & Online Processing at the SSC; Planned Enhancements to MODSEM II & SIMOBJECT -- an Overview -- R.; DAGAR -- A synthesis system; Proposed Silicon Compiler for Physics Applications; Timed -- LOTOS in a PROLOG Environment: an Algebraic language for Simulation; Modeling and Simulation of an Event Builder for High Energy Physics Data Acquisition Systems; A Verilog Simulation for the CDF DAQ; Simulation to Design with Verilog; The DZero Data Acquisition System: Model and Measurements; DZero Trigger Level 1.5 Modeling; Strategies Optimizing Data Load in the DZero Triggers; Simulation of the DZero Level 2 Data Acquisition System; A Fast Method for Calculating DZero Level 1 Jet Trigger Properties and Physics Input to DAQ Studies.

  5. 13th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, T.; Boudjema, F.; Lauret, J.; Naumann, A.; Teodorescu, L.; Uwer, P.

    "Beyond the Cutting edge in Computing" Fundamental research is dealing, by definition, with the two extremes: the extremely small and the extremely large. The LHC and Astroparticle physics experiments will soon offer new glimpses beyond the current frontiers. And the computing infrastructure to support such physics research needs to look beyond the cutting edge. Once more it seems that we are on the edge of a computing revolution. But perhaps what we are seeing now is a even more epochal change where not only the pace of the revolution is changing, but also its very nature. Change is not any more an "event" meant to open new possibilities that have to be understood first and exploited then to prepare the ground for a new leap. Change is becoming the very essence of the computing reality, sustained by a continuous flow of technical and paradigmatic innovation. The hardware is definitely moving toward more massive parallelism, in a breathtaking synthesis of all the past techniques of concurrent computation. New many-core machines offer opportunities for all sorts of Single/Multiple Instructions, Single/Multiple Data and Vector computations that in the past required specialised hardware. At the same time, all levels of virtualisation imagined till now seem to be possible via Clouds, and possibly many more. Information Technology has been the working backbone of the Global Village, and now, in more than one sense, it is becoming itself the Global Village. Between these two, the gap between the need for adapting applications to exploit the new hardware possibilities and the push toward virtualisation of resources is widening, creating more challenges as technical and intellectual progress continues. ACAT 2010 proposes to explore and confront the different boundaries of the evolution of computing, and its possible consequences on our scientific activity. What do these new technologies entail for physics research? How will physics research benefit from this revolution in

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on nuclear and particle physics at energies up to 31 GeV: new and future aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D.; Kisslinger, L.S.; Silbar, R.R.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Workshop on Nuclear and Particle Physics at Energies up to 31 GeV, New and Future Aspects, held in Los Alamos, January 5 to 8, 1981. Included are invited talks and contributed papers covering recent developments in (a) weak and unified interactions (including discussions of neutrino oscillations), (b) the hadronic description of strong interactions, (c) the quark description of strong interactions, (d) hypernuclei, and (e) new facilities and proposed experiments. One of the motivations for the Workshop was to explore physics justifications for a future high-intensity proton accelerator in this energy regime. Separate abstracts were prepared for papers from this meeting. Six papers were previously included in the data base.

  7. Earth materials research: Report of a Workshop on Physics and Chemistry of Earth Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The report concludes that an enhanced effort of earth materials research is necessary to advance the understanding of the processes that shape the planet. In support of such an effort, there are new classes of experiments, new levels of analytical sensitivity and precision, and new levels of theory that are now applicable in understanding the physical and chemical properties of geological materials. The application of these capabilities involves the need to upgrade and make greater use of existing facilities as well as the development of new techniques. A concomitant need is for a sample program involving their collection, synthesis, distribution, and analysis.

  8. PREFACE: International Workshop on Discovery Physics at the LHC (Kruger2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleymans, Jean

    2013-08-01

    The second conference on 'Discovery Physics at the LHC' was held on 3-7 December 2012 at the Kruger Gate Hotel in South Africa. In total there were 110 participants from Armenia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Norway, Poland, USA, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, Switzerland and South Africa. The latest results from the Large Hadron Collider, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Jefferson Laboratory and BABAR experiments, as well as the latest theoretical insights were presented. Set against the backdrop of the majestic Kruger National Park a very stimulating conference with many exchanges took place. The proceedings reflect the high standard of the conference. The financial contributions from the National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITHeP), the SA-CERN programme, the UCT-CERN Research Centre, the University of Johannesburg, the University of the Witwatersrand and iThemba Labs—Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science are gratefully acknowledged. Jean Cleymans Chair of the Local Organizing Committee Local Organizing Committee Oana Boeriu Jean Cleymans Simon H Connell Alan S Cornell William A Horowitz Andre Peshier Trevor Vickey Zeblon Z Vilakazi Group picture

  9. 78 FR 23192 - Wireline Competition Bureau Adds New Discussion Topic to Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Wireline Competition Bureau adds a new virtual workshop discussion topic, entitled... for submitting comments. Virtual Workshop: In addition to the usual methods for filing...

  10. Proceedings of the Ringberg Workshop New Trends in HERA Physics 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindhammer, G.; Ochs, W.; Kniehl, B. A.; Kramer, G.

    2006-04-01

    1. Proton structure. Proton structure measurements at high Q2 and large x / Katarzyna Wichmann. Electroweak physics at HERA / Joachim Meyer. Inclusive low Q2 measurements at HERA / Victor Lendermann. Resummed perturbative evolution at high energy / Richard Ball. Colour dipole phenomenology / Graham Shaw -- 2. Spin physics. Exclusive reactions at HERMES / Frank Ellinghaus. Transverse spin effects in single and double hadron electroproduction at HERMES / Benedikt Zihlmann. Present understanding of the nucleon spin structure in view of recent experiments / Andreas Metz -- 3. Production of Hadrons and Jets. Measurements of [symbol] and parton distribution functions using HERA jet data / Amanda Cooper-Sarkar. A new parton shower algorithm: shower evolution, matching at leading and next-to-leading order level / Zóltan Nagy. Jet production at HERA / Dan Traynor. Multi-jet production in lepton-proton scattering with next-to-leading order accuracy / Zóltan Trócsányi. Dijet rates with symmetric [symbol] cuts / Andrea Banfi. QCD dynamics from forward hadron and jet measurements / Lidia Goerlich. Light-hadron electroproduction at next-to-leading order and implications / Bernd Kniehl. Particle production and fragmentation / David Saxon. Soft gluon logarithmic resummation and hadron mass effects in single hadron inclusive production / Simon Albino -- 4. Heavy-flavour production. Heavy-flavour photo- and electroproduction at NLO / Ingo Schienbein. Physics with charm quarks at HERA / John Loizides. Beauty production at HERA / Olaf Behnke. J/[symbol] photoproduction at next-to-leading order / Luminita Mihaila. J/[symbol] photoproduction at large z in soft collinear effective theory / Sean Fleming -- 5. Diffractive ep Scattering. Exclusive and inclusive diffraction at HERA / Henri Kowalski. Diffractive production of vector mesons and the gluon at small x / Thomas Teubner. Inclusive diffraction / Laurent Favart. From factorization to its breaking in diffractive dijet production

  11. Minnowbrook VI: 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E.; Povinelli, Louis A.; Gostelow, J. Paul; Glauser, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Topics covered include: Flow Physics and control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (not in TOC...starts on pg13); Breaking CFD Bottlenecks in Gas-Turbine Flow-Path Design; Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading; DNS and Embedded DNS as Tools for Investigating Unsteady Heat Transfer Phenomena in Turbines; Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade; Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows; Active Flow Control of Lifting Surface With Flap-Current Activities and Future Directions; Closed-Loop Control of Vortex Formation in Separated Flows; Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited; Very Large-Scale Motions in Smooth and Rough Wall Boundary Layers; Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer With Localized Roughness; Active Control of Open Cavities; Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control; U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Need for Flow Physics and Control With Applications Involving Aero-Optics and Weapon Bay Cavities; Some Issues Related to Integrating Active Flow Control With Flight Control; Active Flow Control Strategies Using Surface Pressure Measurements; Reduction of Unsteady Forcing in a Vaned, Contra-Rotating Transonic Turbine Configuration; Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface; Controlling Separation in Turbomachines; Flow Control on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils Using Vortex Generator Jets; Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows; Study and Control of Flow Past Disk, and Circular and Rectangular Cylinders Aligned in the Flow; Periodic Forcing of a Turbulent Axisymmetric Wake; Control of Vortex Breakdown in Critical Swirl Regime Using Azimuthal Forcing; External and Turbomachinery Flow Control Working Group; Boundary Layers, Transitions and Separation; Efficiency Considerations in Low Pressure Turbines; Summary of Conference; and Final Plenary Session

  12. Minnowbrook VI: 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E.; Povinelli, Louis A.; Gostelow, J. Paul; Glauser, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Topics covered include: Flow Physics and control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (not in TOC...starts on pg13); Breaking CFD Bottlenecks in Gas-Turbine Flow-Path Design; Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading; DNS and Embedded DNS as Tools for Investigating Unsteady Heat Transfer Phenomena in Turbines; Cavitation, Flow Structure and Turbulence in the Tip Region of a Rotor Blade; Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows; Active Flow Control of Lifting Surface With Flap-Current Activities and Future Directions; Closed-Loop Control of Vortex Formation in Separated Flows; Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited; Very Large-Scale Motions in Smooth and Rough Wall Boundary Layers; Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer With Localized Roughness; Active Control of Open Cavities; Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control; U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Need for Flow Physics and Control With Applications Involving Aero-Optics and Weapon Bay Cavities; Some Issues Related to Integrating Active Flow Control With Flight Control; Active Flow Control Strategies Using Surface Pressure Measurements; Reduction of Unsteady Forcing in a Vaned, Contra-Rotating Transonic Turbine Configuration; Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface; Controlling Separation in Turbomachines; Flow Control on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils Using Vortex Generator Jets; Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows; Study and Control of Flow Past Disk, and Circular and Rectangular Cylinders Aligned in the Flow; Periodic Forcing of a Turbulent Axisymmetric Wake; Control of Vortex Breakdown in Critical Swirl Regime Using Azimuthal Forcing; External and Turbomachinery Flow Control Working Group; Boundary Layers, Transitions and Separation; Efficiency Considerations in Low Pressure Turbines; Summary of Conference; and Final Plenary Session

  13. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content The Joint Commission Log In | Request Guest Access Forgot password? | Log In Help Contact Us | Careers | JCR Web Store | Press Room Search Home Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health ...

  14. "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory", 12th DESY Workshop on Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The bi-annual international conference "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory" has been held at Weimar, Germany, from April 27 to May 02, 2014. It has been the 12th conference of this series, started in 1992. The main focus of the conference are precision calculations of multi- loop and multi-leg processes in elementary particle physics for processes at present and future high-energy facilities within and beyond the Standard Model. At present many physics questions studied deal with processes at the LHC and future facilities like the ILC. A growing number of contributions deals with important developments in the field of computational technologies and algorithmic methods, including large-scale computer algebra, efficient methods to compute large numbers of Feynman diagrams, analytic summation and integration methods of various kinds, new related function spaces, precise numerical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The present conference has been attended by more than 110 participants from all over the world, presenting more than 75 contributions, most of which have been written up for these pro- ceedings. The present volume demonstrates in an impressive way the enormous development of the field during the last few years, reaching the level of 5-loop calculations in QCD and a like- wise impressive development in massive next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order processes. Computer algebraic and numerical calculations require terabyte storage and many CPU years, even after intense parallelization, to obtain state-of-the-art theoretical predictions. The city of Weimar gave a suitable frame to the conference, with its rich history, especially in literature, music, arts, and architecture. Goethe, Schiller, Wieland, Herder, Bach and Liszt lived there and created many of their masterpieces. The many young participants signal that our field is prosperous and faces an exciting future. The conference hotel "Kaiserin Augusta" offered a warm hospitality and

  15. Physics NSF-REU Site Director Workshop: What Did We Learn and What Questions Remain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affatigato, Mario

    2009-03-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduates program, traditionally funded by the National Science Foundation and by other agencies (including the Department of Defense), has been a great success. Every year, hundreds of students have the chance to participate in research activities at Universities and research entities other than their own. These extended experiences have helped the students develop confidence in their abilities as practicing physicists, train on state of the art instrumentation, work on communication skills through presentations, and frequently reach a publication milestone. The REU program's impact is manifold and complementary to the strong work done at the home institutions by faculty advisors and instructors. In this presentation we will discuss the current state of the program as determined by the recent (and first) meeting of the Physics REU site directors. In particular we will focus on the strengths of the program, shared good practices, data gathering, and some changes the new Steering Committee might implement. The intended audience should be current REU directors and faculty research supervisors; students who might be interested in the program; faculty at institutions who might be thinking of applying to become a site; and anyone attentive to undergraduate research in general.

  16. PREFACE: International Workshop on Discovery Physics at the LHC (Kruger2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleymans, Jean

    2015-06-01

    The third biannual conference on 'Discovery Physics at the LHC' was held on December 1-6 2014 at the Kruger Gate Hotel in South Africa. Over 100 participants attended from Austria, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, South Africa, Switzerland, the UK and the USA. The latest results from the Large Hadron Collider as well the latest theoretical insights were presented. With the majestic Kruger National Park in the background this led to a very stimulating conference with many exchanges taking place. The proceedings reflect the high level of the conference. The financial contributions from the SA-CERN programme, the UCT-CERN Research Centre, the University of Johannesburg, the University of the Witwatersrand and iThemba L.A.B.S. are gratefully acknowledged. Local Organizing Committee: Z. Buthelezi J. Cleymans (chair) S. H. Connell A. S. Cornell T. Dietel S. Förtsch N. Haasbroek A. Hamilton W. A. Horowitz B. Mellado Z. Z. Vilakazi S. Yacoob

  17. 75 FR 45167 - Notice of Public Workshop on a Potential Rulemaking for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Public Workshop on a Potential Rulemaking for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Notice of Public Workshop. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) plans to conduct two public workshops to solicit public input on major issues...

  18. Mathematical Modeling: An Integrated Algebra, Physics and Chemistry Workshop for Teachers as a Tool for Recruiting Science, Technology and Mathematics Students.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obot, V.; Reiff, P.; Morris, P. A.; Humphrey, M.

    2004-12-01

    Based on the philosophy that there exists an artificial boundary between mathematics and the sciences, we have developed a series of workshops and modules on mathematical modeling suitable as teaching examples in secondary schools. The workshops is a 60-hour workshop held on the campus of Texas Southern University during the summer months, followed by a series of follow-up workshops on Saturdays during the academic year. Texas Southern University is a Historically Black University devoted to urban programming. The workshops use experimental and observational data from various fields with particular emphasis on chemistry, physics, earth and space sciences. The data is used to construct mathematical models. In the process of constructing the model, the student learns the appropriate mathematical and scientific concepts. We have studied linear, exponential and logarithmic functions, and using planetary data, derived and discussed Kepler's laws. We have learned how to balance chemical equations as a solution to a system of equations. We have studied and modeled electromagnetic waves using ham radio as our launching pad. Judging from participant evaluations, follow up workshops and classroom visits; teachers who participated in this workshop have been re-invigorated in their teaching. They have incorporated our examples in their teaching. They have reported increased attentiveness and excitement regarding science and mathematics from their students. It appears that this approach have caused some students to think seriously about pursuing science and engineering careers. An added benefit of this program is that the teachers have invited us and affiliated scientist into their classrooms for demonstrations. This gives the students an opportunity to interact with actual scientist and engineers. These interactions have resulted in several of the students being invited to serve as summer interns in our laboratories. For the past three years, almost all of the interns have

  19. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  20. Role of physical activity and sport in oncology: scientific commission of the National Federation Sport and Cancer CAMI.

    PubMed

    Bouillet, T; Bigard, X; Brami, C; Chouahnia, K; Copel, L; Dauchy, S; Delcambre, C; Descotes, J M; Joly, F; Lepeu, G; Marre, A; Scotte, F; Spano, J P; Vanlemmens, L; Zelek, L

    2015-04-01

    This overview reports published data about the interaction between physical activity and sport during and after cancer on one hand and improvement in psychological parameters, survival and biological mechanisms underlying this effect on the other hand. Practising physical activity and sport during cancer modifies parameters assessing fatigue and quality of life and reduces symptoms of depression. An association also exists between the practise of physical activity and sport and overall and cancer-specific survivals, especially after breast cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer. These benefits seem to be mediated by a modification of circulating levels of estrogens, insulin, IGF-1 and by a decrease in insulin-resistance, by alterations in the secretion of adipokines, and by a reduction in chronic inflammation through decreased levels of cytokines. There exist some obstacles to the practise of physical activity. These obstacles are mainly related to a fear of pain induced by physical activity and to overweight. These programmes of physical activity and sport cannot be offered to all patients since there are several contra-indications, with some being present since the initial visit and others appearing during cancer management either due to disease progression or related to iatrogenic effects. Whereas benefits from physical activity and sport among cancer patients seem obvious, there are still several pending clinical and biological issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. News Quantum physics: German Physical Society spring meeting Journal access: American Physical Society's online journals will be available for free in all US high schools Award: High-school physics teacher receives American award for excellence Teacher training: Fobinet offers coordination of teacher-training activities Astronomy: Astronomy fans see stars at Astrofest Conference: Delegates enjoy the workshops and activities at CPD conference Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Quantum physics: German Physical Society spring meeting Journal access: American Physical Society's online journals will be available for free in all US high schools Award: High-school physics teacher receives American award for excellence Teacher training: Fobinet offers coordination of teacher-training activities Astronomy: Astronomy fans see stars at Astrofest Conference: Delegates enjoy the workshops and activities at CPD conference Forthcoming events

  2. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 5.a.: Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations - Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Das, Indra J; Feygelman, Vladimir; Fraass, Benedick A; Kry, Stephen F; Marshall, Ingrid R; Mihailidis, Dimitris N; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ritter, Timothy; Snyder, Michael G; Fairobent, Lynne

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States. The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner. Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized. The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:• Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.• Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  3. 78 FR 48851 - Wireline Competition Bureau Announces Closing of the Bureau's Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Wireline Competition Bureau Announces Closing of the Bureau's Cost Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed Rule; closing of virtual workshop... America Cost Model (CAM) virtual workshop. Parties should submit any additional input regarding the...

  4. Educator workshop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-22

    Middle school teachers from across Louisiana participate in a hands-on activity during a professional development workshop at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge on Jan. 22, 2011. Fifty-five teachers participated in the workshop, which was hosted by the Stennis Education Office. During the workshop, Stennis specialists presented hands-on, problem-based learning and technology-based activities teachers can use in their classrooms to promote interest in areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

  5. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  6. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD.

  7. Neutrino Oscillation Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NOW 2016 is the 9th workshop of a series started in 1998 in Amsterdam. Since the year 2000, this international workshop takes place in Otranto (Lecce, Italy). NOW is locally organized by the INFN sections and Depts. of Physics of Bari and Lecce, and is one of the few "Major Conference Series" recognized by INSPIRES in the field of neutrino physics, https://inspirehep.net/info/Conferences/series The aim of the workshop is: to discuss Neutrino Oscillation Physics, in particular current experimental data and their theoretical interpretation; to outline future investigations of neutrino masses and mixings; and to explore the links with various research fields in Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology. The structure of the Workshop includes five sessions, with plenary and parallel talks on several topics of current interest. The sessions for the NOW 2016 edition are: Session I - Oscillation parameters: present Session II - Oscillation parameters: future Session III - Multimessenger astrophysics Session IV - Neutrino masses, states and interactions Session V - Particle physics in the Cosmos The NOW 2016 Proceedings have been edited by Antonio Marrone (U. of Bari and INFN, Bari), Alessandro Mirizzi (U. of Bari and INFN, Bari), and Daniele Montanino (U. of Salento and INFN, Lecce). For further information see the NOW website, http://www.ba.infn.it/now

  8. Linking physical monitoring to coho and Chinook salmon populations in the Redwood Creek Watershed, California—Summary of May 3–4, 2012 Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann; Torregrosa, Alicia; Woodward, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    On Thursday, May 3, 2012, a science workshop was held at the Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP) office in Arcata, California, with researchers and resource managers working in RNSP to share data and expert opinions concerning salmon populations and habitat in the Redwood Creek watershed. The focus of the workshop was to discuss how best to synthesize physical and biological data related to the freshwater and estuarine phases of salmon life cycles in order to increase the understanding of constraints on salmon populations. The workshop was hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Status and Trends (S&T) Program National Park Monitoring Project (http://www.fort.usgs.gov/brdscience/ParkMonitoring.htm), which supports USGS research on priority topics (themes) identified by the National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring Program (I&M) and S&T. The NPS has organized more than 270 parks with significant natural resources into 32 Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Networks (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/networks.cfm) that share funding and core professional staff to monitor the status and long-term trends of selected natural resources (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor). All 32 networks have completed vital signs monitoring plans (available at http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor/MonitoringPlans.cfm), containing background information on the important resources of each park, conceptual models behind the selection of vital signs for monitoring the condition of natural resources, and the selection of high priority vital signs for monitoring. Vital signs are particular physical, chemical, and biological elements and processes of park ecosystems that represent the overall health or condition of the park, known or hypothesized effects of stressors, or elements that have important human values (Fancy and others, 2009). Beginning in 2009, the I&M program funded projects to analyze and synthesize the biotic and abiotic data generated by vital signs

  9. Teacher workshop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-20

    The John C. Stennis Space Center Educator Resource Center hosted an Oct. 20 workshop to equip teachers of grades 3 through 12 in using the LEGO Bricks in Space curriculum issued by NASA. Participants in the professional development workshop built their own LEGO simple machine prototypes and explored the engineering principles that make them work (on Earth and in space).

  10. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  11. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  12. Teacher workshop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-20

    John C. Stennis Space Center educators and area teachers partnered together during a professional development workshop Oct. 20 to learn about the LEGO Bricks in Space curriculum issued by NASA. The curriculum is designed to encourage students in areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The Stennis Space Center Educator Resource Center hosted the workshop to equip teachers of grades 3-12.

  13. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    Written contributions from participants of the Joint 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) - 21st IAEA Technical Meeting on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (21st IAEA TM RUSFD). The International Advisory Committees of the 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and the 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD), agreed to carry out together this Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st RUSFD in San José, Costa Rica, on 27-31 January 2014. The Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st RUSFD meeting, organized by the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, and Ad Astra Rocket Company in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP) is a series of events which has been held periodically since 1982, with the purpose of providing a forum in which the research of the Latin American plasma physics community can be displayed, as well as fostering collaborations among plasma scientists within the region and with researchers from the rest of the world. Recognized plasma scientists from developed countries are specially invited to the meeting to present the state of the art on several "hot" topics related to plasma physics. It is an open meeting, with an International Advisory Committee, in which the working language is English. It was firstly held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by workshops in Medellín, Colombia (1985), Santiago de Chile, Chile (1988), Buenos Aires, Argentina (1990), Mexico City, Mexico (1992), Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil (1994, combined with the International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP)), Caracas, Venezuela (1997), Tandil, Argentina (1998), La Serena, Chile (2000), Sao Pedro, Brazil (2003), Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Caracas, Venezuela (2007), Santiago de Chile, Chile (2010, combined with the ICPP) and Mar de Plata, Argentina (2011). The 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices is an ideal forum for

  14. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  15. Commissioning the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenqin; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator deploys high purity germanium (HPGe) detector modules to search for neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay in 76Ge. The experiment is aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility and low backgrounds for a next generation Ge-based BBz experiment. The program of testing and commissioning the Demonstrator modules is a critical step to debug and improve the experimental apparatus, to establish and refine operational procedures, and to develop data analysis tools. In this talk, we will discuss our experience commissioning the Demonstrator modules and show how this program leads to successful data-taking. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  16. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  17. Minnowbrook II 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The volume contains materials presented at the Minnowbrook II - 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines, held at Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, on September 7-10, 1997. The workshop followed the informal format at the 1993 Minnowbrook I workshop, focusing on improving the understanding of late stage (final breakdown) boundary layer transition, with the engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery in mind. Among the physical mechanisms discussed were hydrodynamic instabilities, laminar to turbulent transition, bypass transition, turbulent spots, wake interaction with boundary layers, calmed regions, and separation, all in the context of flow in turbomachinery, particularly in compressors and high and low pressure turbines. Results from experiments, DNS, computation, modeling and theoretical analysis were presented. Abstracts and copies of viewgraphs, a specifically commissioned summation paper prepared after the workshop, and a transcript of the extensive working group reports and discussions are included in this volume. They provide recommendations for future research and clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of transition in turbomachines.

  18. MECA Workshop on Atmospheric H2O Observations of Earth and Mars. Physical Processes, Measurements and Interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M. (Editor); Haberle, Robert M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The workshop was held to discuss a variety of questions related to the detection and cycling of atmospheric water. Among the questions addressed were: what factors govern the storage and exchange of water between planetary surfaces and atmospheres; what instruments are best suited for the measurement and mapping of atmospheric water; do regolith sources and sinks of water have uniquely identifiable column abundance signatures; what degree of time and spatial resolution in column abundance data is necessary to determine dynamic behavior. Of special importance is the question, does the understanding of how atmospheric water is cycled on Earth provide any insights for the interpretation of Mars atmospheric data.

  19. Physics and astrophysics from a lunar base; Proceedings of the 1st NASA Workshop, Stanford, CA, May 19, 20, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E. (Editor); Wilson, T. L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on physics and astrophysics from a lunar base encompasses space physics, cosmic ray physics, neutrino physics, experiments in gravitation and general relativity, gravitational radiation physics, cosmic background radiation, particle astrophysics, surface physics, and the physics of gamma rays and X-rays. Specific issues addressed include space-plasma physics research at a lunar base, prospects for neutral particle imaging, the atmosphere as particle detector, medium- and high-energy neutrino physics from a lunar base, muons on the moon, a search for relic supernovae antineutrinos, and the use of clocks in satellites orbiting the moon to test general relativity. Also addressed are large X-ray-detector arrays for physics experiments on the moon, and the measurement of proton decay, arcsec-source locations, halo dark matter and elemental abundances above 10 exp 15 eV at a lunar base.

  20. Physics and astrophysics from a lunar base; Proceedings of the 1st NASA Workshop, Stanford, CA, May 19, 20, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, A.E.; Wilson, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on physics and astrophysics from a lunar base encompasses space physics, cosmic ray physics, neutrino physics, experiments in gravitation and general relativity, gravitational radiation physics, cosmic background radiation, particle astrophysics, surface physics, and the physics of gamma rays and X-rays. Specific issues addressed include space-plasma physics research at a lunar base, prospects for neutral particle imaging, the atmosphere as particle detector, medium- and high-energy neutrino physics from a lunar base, muons on the moon, a search for relic supernovae antineutrinos, and the use of clocks in satellites orbiting the moon to test general relativity. Also addressed are large X-ray-detector arrays for physics experiments on the moon, and the measurement of proton decay, arcsec-source locations, halo dark matter and elemental abundances above 10 exp 15 eV at a lunar base.

  1. 78 FR 17624 - Wireline Competition Bureau Adds New Discussion Topic To Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this document, the Wireline Competition Bureau adds a new virtual workshop discussion topic, entitled ``Rate of.... Virtual Workshop: In addition to the usual methods for filing electronic comments, the Commission...

  2. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. . Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. )

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  3. Workshop introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  4. Workshop Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-04-01

    19 Workshops were held during IAU S285. 15 submitted reports of the discussions that took place, while for the remaining 4 we have reproduced the summaries that were available on our wiki prior to the Symposium.

  5. Workshop Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandes, Herbert

    1970-01-01

    Workshop titles are: (1) "Authenticity in Communication ; (2) "Inter Cultural Communication ; (3) "Enticements to Eupsychia ; (4) "Psychoneurosensory Problems in Education ; (5) "Why Education for Family Life and Human Sexuality ; and (6) "Communication in the Hazards of Drug Abuse . (EK)

  6. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  7. An Algebra-Integrated Physics and Chemistry Workshop for Teachers as a Model for Increasing the Number of Minority Students in Science and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obot, V.; Brown, B.; Wu, T.; Wunsch, G.; Miles, A.; Morris, P.; Lindstrom, M.; Allen, J.

    The need to increase minority representation in science and engineering disciplines is well documented. Many strategies for achieving this goal have evolved over the years; yet, minority representation is still minimal. It appears that while students are naturally curious about the universe, once mention is made of mathematics as a pre-requisite to the study of science and engineering, interest seems to wane. Perhaps a possible way to get around this phobia is to incorporate the mathematics into the science courses and the science into the mathematics courses at the secondary level. This will require mathematics and science teachers to work together, re-enforcing each other so that lessons can be truly interdisciplinary. For the past two summers, we have conducted workshops for secondary school mathematics and science teachers in a large urban school district. The workshops are called "Algebra-Integrated Physics and Chemistry". These workshops are designed to introduce the teachers to mathematical modeling of physical and chemical phenomenon. T chnology (graphic calculators) is used to dis covere functions that model a particular process. We have modeled linear functions by looking at the Celsius and Fahrenheit scales. A simple experiment is heating water, measuring the temperature in both Celsius and Fahrenheit scales, plotting Celsius versus Fahrenheit temperatures, and determining their mathematical relationship. At this point, the science teacher can also go into a discussion of the meaning of temperature. In some cases readily available data can be analyzed. The ellipse and Kepler's third law is ideal when studying conic sections. In this case, available data can be used, and by plotting appropriately, cubic functions can be studied and motions of planets in their orbits near and far from the sun can be discussed. This new approach to mathematics and science will take the student to a certain comfort level so that statements such as either " I like science

  8. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, Bill

    1999-03-15

    On March 15, 1999, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory hosted a workshop focused on energy efficiency in Cleanroom facilities. The workshop was held as part of a multiyear effort sponsored by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency, and the California Energy Commission. It is part of a project that concentrates on improving energy efficiency in Laboratory type facilities including cleanrooms. The project targets the broad market of laboratory and cleanroom facilities, and thus cross-cuts many different industries and institutions. This workshop was intended to raise awareness by sharing case study success stories, providing a forum for industry networking on energy issues, contributing LBNL expertise in research to date, determining barriers to implementation and possible solutions, and soliciting input for further research.

  9. Experiments on Physics in the Arts: Papers from a Workshop (University of South Carolina, Columbia, June 10-21, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Univ., Columbia. Dept. of Physics.

    This book contains 65 physics experiments. The experiments are for a college-level physics course for music and art majors. The initial experiments are devoted to the general concept of vibration and cover vibrating strings, air columns, reflection, and interference. Later experiments explore light, color perception, cameras, mirrors and symmetry,…

  10. Earth-Space Science In-Service Training Syllabus, Astronomy-Physics-Florida Geology & NASA Space Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Jack; And Others

    This syllabus gives a day by day descriptive account of the activities and subjects covered during a two-week in-service program on astronomy, physics, and Florida geology for teachers of grades one through nine. The program for the astronomy and physics was designed to accommodate four levels of instruction: Grades 1 and 2; Grades 3 and 4; Grades…

  11. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.; Proctor, A.

    2001-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed, and maintained at the University of Maryland, for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 91 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of the explosion, crater size, magnitude of the planetquake generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Planetary and Satellite Data Calculators: These tools allow the user to easily calculate physical data for all of the planets or satellites simultaneously, making comparison very easy. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  12. A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop.

    PubMed

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Wolfenden, Luke; Finch, Meghan; Williams, Amanda; Dodds, Pennie; Gillham, Karen; Wyse, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, χ2=34.3; P<0.001). An active, telephone-based recruitment strategy significantly increased the proportion of childcare services with staff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. SO WHAT?: Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services.

  13. News CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

  14. Proceedings of Minnowbrook Workshops I to VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    This DVD collection includes the complete proceedings of Minnowbrook Workshops I through VI. Titles include Minnowbrook I - 1993 Workshop on End-Stage Boundary Layer Transition (NASA/CP-2007-214667, CASI ID 20070038942), Minnowbrook II - 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines (NASA/CP-1998-206958, CASI ID 19980206205), Minnowbrook III - 2000 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flow (NASA/CP-2001-210888, CASI ID 20020067662), Minnowbrook IV - 2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows (NASA TM-2004-212913, CASI ID 20040121174), Minnowbrook V - 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery (NASA/CP-2006-214484, CASI ID 20070024781), and Minnowbrook VI - 2009 Workshop on Flow Physics and Control for Internal and External Aerodynamics (NACA/CP-2010-216112, CASI ID 20100018557).

  15. Division E Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Asai, Ayumi; Cally, Paul S.; Charbonneau, Paul; Gibson, Sarah E.; Gomez, Daniel; Hasan, Siraj S.; Veronig, Astrid M.; Yan, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    After more than half a century of community support related to the science of ``solar activity'', IAU's Commission 10 was formally discontinued in 2015, to be succeeded by C.E2 with the same area of responsibility. On this occasion, we look back at the growth of the scientific disciplines involved around the world over almost a full century. Solar activity and fields of research looking into the related physics of the heliosphere continue to be vibrant and growing, with currently over 2,000 refereed publications appearing per year from over 4,000 unique authors, publishing in dozens of distinct journals and meeting in dozens of workshops and conferences each year. The size of the rapidly growing community and of the observational and computational data volumes, along with the multitude of connections into other branches of astrophysics, pose significant challenges; aspects of these challenges are beginning to be addressed through, among others, the development of new systems of literature reviews, machine-searchable archives for data and publications, and virtual observatories. As customary in these reports, we highlight some of the research topics that have seen particular interest over the most recent triennium, specifically active-region magnetic fields, coronal thermal structure, coronal seismology, flares and eruptions, and the variability of solar activity on long time scales. We close with a collection of developments, discoveries, and surprises that illustrate the range and dynamics of the discipline.

  16. Imaging sciences workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Heavy Ion Physics at Low, Intermediate and Relativistic Energies Using 4PI Detectors - Proceedings of the International Research Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovici, M.; Sandulescu, A.; Pelte, D.; Stöcker, H.; Randrup, J.

    1997-10-01

    Energies * Production and Propagation of Neutral Mesons at Relativistic Energies * Bose-Einstein Correlations of Pion Wavepackets * Freeze-Out Conditions in Heavy Ion Collisions from 1 to 2 AGeV * Kaon and Pion Production in Nuclear Collisions * Strangeness Production and Propagation in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions * Studies of Meson Production at SIS Energies * Particle Production from SIS to SPS Energies * Correlations in the Vacuum * Strangeness Enhancement in Proton-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Interactions at SPS Energies * The ALICE Detector at the CERN LHC * Charge Ratio of Cosmic Rays Muons Measured by Their Decay with a Compact Detector Device * Current Interests in Cosmic Ray Research * Workshop Poster * Workshop Program * Participants * Sponsors

  18. 78 FR 14532 - Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures; Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures; Workshop Take...: https://www.ferc.gov/whats-new/registration/small-generator-03-27-13-form.asp . The purpose of this workshop is to discuss certain topics related to the proposals in the Small Generator Interconnection...

  19. Women's Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karelius, Karen

    The Women's Workshop Notebook is the tool used in the nine-week course designed for the mature woman returning to school at Antelope Valley College. The notebook exercises along with the group interaction and instruction stress the importance of personal assessment of strengths, weaknesses, dreams, deliberations and life history in…

  20. Winter Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Outdoor Educators of Quebec, Montreal.

    Materials on 11 topics presented at a winter workshop for Quebec outdoor educators have been compiled into this booklet. Action story, instant replay, shoe factory, sound and action, and find an object to fit the description are described and recommended as group dynamic activities. Directions for five games (Superlative Selection; Data…

  1. Teacher workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

  2. Wordland Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlish, Harvey Neil

    Can and should the preschool child learn to read? To answer this and related questions, a study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a television program and parental home assistance in teaching reading skills to three-year-old children. For five days a week over a 39-week period, an experimental group watched "Wordland Workshop," a…

  3. Poetry Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janeczko, Paul B.

    2000-01-01

    This workshop offers activities to teach students about poetry. After describing haiku as a brief snapshot rather than a story, it explains how to teach poetry using an attached reproducible and poster. The tear-out reproducible sheet teaches students how to write their own haiku, offering a sample one as a model. The poster presents three sample…

  4. Writers' Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherris, Arieh

    1998-01-01

    Israeli 12th graders studying English as a Second Language benefit from writers' workshops where they compose written portfolios and learn to express themselves fluently in writing. Students write with paper and pen or work via the Internet. They write on selected issues and send letters and articles to various online and print journals and…

  5. Teacher workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

  6. Wordland Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlish, Harvey Neil

    Can and should the preschool child learn to read? To answer this and related questions, a study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a television program and parental home assistance in teaching reading skills to three-year-old children. For five days a week over a 39-week period, an experimental group watched "Wordland Workshop," a…

  7. 76 FR 70721 - Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids; Notice of Staff Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids; Notice of Staff Workshop Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Workshop on Voltage Coordination on High... improve coordination and optimization of transfer capability across the Bulk-Power System from a...

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    SciTech Connect

    KUMANO,S.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.

    2000-06-28

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields.

  9. PROCEEDINGS OF THE RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON LARGE SCALE COMPUTATIONS IN NUCLEAR PHYSICS USING THE QCDOC, SEPTEMBER 26 - 28, 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    AOKI,Y.; BALTZ,A.; CREUTZ,M.; GYULASSY,M.; OHTA,S.

    2002-09-26

    The massively parallel computer QCDOC (QCD On a Chip) of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RI3RC) will provide ten-teraflop peak performance for lattice gauge calculations. Lattice groups from both Columbia University and RBRC, along with assistance from IBM, jointly handled the design of the QCDOC. RIKEN has provided $5 million in funding to complete the machine in 2003. Some fraction of this computer (perhaps as much as 10%) might be made available for large-scale computations in areas of theoretical nuclear physics other than lattice gauge theory. The purpose of this workshop was to investigate the feasibility and possibility of using a supercomputer such as the QCDOC for lattice, general nuclear theory, and other calculations. The lattice applications to nuclear physics that can be investigated with the QCDOC are varied: for example, the light hadron spectrum, finite temperature QCD, and kaon ({Delta}I = 1/2 and CP violation), and nucleon (the structure of the proton) matrix elements, to name a few. There are also other topics in theoretical nuclear physics that are currently limited by computer resources. Among these are ab initio calculations of nuclear structure for light nuclei (e.g. up to {approx}A = 8 nuclei), nuclear shell model calculations, nuclear hydrodynamics, heavy ion cascade and other transport calculations for RHIC, and nuclear astrophysics topics such as exploding supernovae. The physics topics were quite varied, ranging from simulations of stellar collapse by Douglas Swesty to detailed shell model calculations by David Dean, Takaharu Otsuka, and Noritaka Shimizu. Going outside traditional nuclear physics, James Davenport discussed molecular dynamics simulations and Shailesh Chandrasekharan presented a class of algorithms for simulating a wide variety of femionic problems. Four speakers addressed various aspects of theory and computational modeling for relativistic heavy ion reactions at RHIC. Scott Pratt and Steffen Bass gave general overviews of

  10. 75 FR 52046 - Development of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Culture Policy Statement: Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Development of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Culture Policy Statement: Public Meeting... solicit comments on the revision of its draft safety culture policy statement, including the revised...; ML093030375), the results of the NRC's February 2010 workshop (February workshop) on safety culture, and...

  11. The Second Chernogolovka Workshop on Low Temperature Physics in Microgravity Environment (CWS-99), July 28-August 2, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2000-03-01

    The International Seminar CWS-99, devoted to a discussion of the current status and prospects for development of fundamental research in the field of low-temperature physics in a microgravity environment, was held in at the Research Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RCC RAN) in Chernogolovka, Moscow District on July 28-August 2, 1999. This seminar was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics and the Space Materials Science section of the Space Council of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the financial support of the Russian Fund for Fundamental Research, the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Russian Federation, The Russian Aviation & Space Agency, and the Council on Low Temperature Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The CWS-99 Seminar preceded the International Conference on Low Temperature Physics LT-22, and, as one of the satellite activities of LT-22 conducted in the framework of international scientific cooperation, it received substantial support from the Organizing Committee of LT-22 and from the OLMSA Division of the National Aeronoutics and Space Administration (NASA), USA.

  12. Workshop materials from the 2nd international training course on physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials, Module 13

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F. P.

    1980-04-01

    This course is intended for representatives of countries where nuclear power is being developed and whose responsibilities include the preparation of regulation and the design and evaluation of physical protection systems. This is the second of two volumes; the first volume is SAND-79-1090. (DLC)

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on new solid state devices for high energy physics. [LBL, October 28-30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This paper contains articles on semiconductor devices used in the detection of high energy particles. Some articles reported: Position sensitive semiconductor devices; Scintillation techniques and optical devices; Radiation damage to detectors; VLSI for physics; and experience with Si detectors in NA32. (LSP)

  14. The USRA workshop report: Electrostatic fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The Workshop was held at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, on February 1-2, 1983. The Workshop was attended by seventeen experts in the scientific fields of fog and cloud physics, charged-particle electrodynamics, atmospheric turbulence, atmospheric electricity, and electro-gasdynamics. The major objective of the Workshop was to assess the scientific merits and scientific basis of the proposed system and to assess its potential for operational application.

  15. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-25

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  16. TH-D-16A-01: Medical Physics Workshop: Editorial Vision and Guidance On Writing and Reviewing Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J; Das, S; Goodsitt, M

    2014-06-15

    On January 1, 2014, editorial leadership of Medical Physics passed from esteemed long-time Editor Bill Hendee to a collective editorial group composed of the three presenters listed above. In this presentation, we would like to outline our vision for the future of Medical Physics and review recent work-in-progress initiatives to implement this vision. Finally, we will close with guidance to authors on how to write a good Medical Physics paper. Vision for Medical Physics and current initiatives: Jeff Williamson, Editor-in-Chief We cannot improve on Dr. Hendee's succinct vision statement “to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the very best science that propels our discipline forward and improves our contribution to patient care.” More concretely, the Journal should be s the preeminent forum for electronic exchange of cutting edge medical physics science. We seek to identify the best contributions in (a) high impact clinical physics innovations; (b) clinical translation and validation of basic science innovations; or (c) cutting edge basic science developments with potential for patient care improvements. Among the challenges and opportunities we face are: are electronic-only and open access publishing; trends towards more interactive, social-media based scientific communities; and diversification of the medical physics research, authorship, and readership domains, including clinical applications quite foreign to core ABR clinical competencies. To address these issues over the next 3 years, we have reduced the size of our Editorial Board and focused its efforts on improving the Journal's impact through 4 working groups (WGs): WG-1: Review process quality and selectivity Creation of 120 member Board of Associate Editors to improve review uniformity by placing Ms. management in fewer hands New reviewer guidelines and templates Answer: “what is the scope of medical physics research?” Recursive taxonomy for tagging review expertise and article contents

  17. Basic Workshops for Medical Record Clerical Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intermountain Regional Medical Program, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This curriculum guide is an outline of the content for basic workshop training sessions of hospital medical record personnel. Following a two-page topical outline of five content areas, there is a detailed presentation of this content as follows: (1) the medical record and its contribution to patient care (Joint Commission for Accreditation of…

  18. Basic Workshops for Medical Record Clerical Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intermountain Regional Medical Program, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This curriculum guide is an outline of the content for basic workshop training sessions of hospital medical record personnel. Following a two-page topical outline of five content areas, there is a detailed presentation of this content as follows: (1) the medical record and its contribution to patient care (Joint Commission for Accreditation of…

  19. WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    2002-11-06

    Based on this workshop, a plan for upgrading polarized proton acceleration in the AGS was developed. The construction of a strong partial Siberian snake was initiated. Although in principle this single device would avoid all sources of depolarization in the AGS its construction, installation and commissioning will take several years. Also mismatch of the polarization direction at injection into the AGS will cause some depolarization. Plan 1 outlined above will be pursued in the meantime. A warm helical partial Siberian snake will replace the present solenoid snake. It will avoid the coupling resonances and can also be used in the future to avoid injection mismatch with the strong partial snake. Existing quadrupoles will be moved to locations where they can be used to suppress the weak intrinsic resonances as discussed at this workshop by Andreas Lehrach. This approach should give maximum polarization from the AGS as soon as possible and also provide a long term solution that is operationally simple and offers additional polarization improvements if the rf dipole method shows residual depolarization.

  20. Evaluating the Effectiveness of POGIL-PCL Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegall, Stacy L.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert; Hunnicutt, Sally S.

    2016-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL (Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory) project has developed a series of workshops to introduce faculty to POGIL-PCL and to facilitate the development of new experiments. More than 60 faculty members from various institutions have attended these workshops. Workshop participants were surveyed…

  1. Evaluating the Effectiveness of POGIL-PCL Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegall, Stacy L.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert; Hunnicutt, Sally S.

    2016-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL (Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory) project has developed a series of workshops to introduce faculty to POGIL-PCL and to facilitate the development of new experiments. More than 60 faculty members from various institutions have attended these workshops. Workshop participants were surveyed…

  2. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermann, Laura B.; Clark, Blythe G.; Colbert, Rachel S.; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Gupta, Vipin P.; Hibbs, Michael R.; Perkins, David Nikolaus; West, Roger Derek

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  3. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  4. NAOMI Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R.

    2003-12-01

    Adaptive Optics has been the centre piece of ING's development programme for some years now. First results of the NAOMI AO system at the WHT have been presented in earlier issues of this newsletter. As ING is climbing the steep learning curve of adaptive optics, the time was considered ripe to compare our experience at the WHT with that of other telescopes with many more years of experience. In order to keep the workshop well focussed and encourage the best opportunities for debating results only a small number of participants were invited to attend.

  5. SNS BEAM COMMISSIONING TOOLS AND EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Galambos, John D

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) successfully met the primary construction project completion milestones in April 2006. An important ingredient of this successful commissioning was the development and use of software tools. With the increasing digitalization of beam diagnostics and increasing complexity of Integrated Control Systems of large accelerators, the need for high level software tools is critical for smooth commissioning. At SNS a special Java based infrastructure called XAL was prepared for beam commissioning. XAL provides a hierarchal view of the accelerator, is data base configured, and includes a physics model of the beam. This infrastructure and individual applications development along with a historical time line of the SNS commissioning will be discussed.

  6. PREFACE: INERA Workshop: Transition Metal Oxide Thin Films-functional Layers in "Smart windows" and Water Splitting Devices. Parallel session of the 18th International School on Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The Special issue presents the papers for the INERA Workshop entitled "Transition Metal Oxides as Functional Layers in Smart windows and Water Splitting Devices", which was held in Varna, St. Konstantin and Elena, Bulgaria, from the 4th-6th September 2014. The Workshop is organized within the context of the INERA "Research and Innovation Capacity Strengthening of ISSP-BAS in Multifunctional Nanostructures", FP7 Project REGPOT 316309 program, European project of the Institute of Solid State Physics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. There were 42 participants at the workshop, 16 from Sweden, Germany, Romania and Hungary, 11 invited lecturers, and 28 young participants. There were researchers present from prestigious European laboratories which are leaders in the field of transition metal oxide thin film technologies. The event contributed to training young researchers in innovative thin film technologies, as well as thin films characterization techniques. The topics of the Workshop cover the field of technology and investigation of thin oxide films as functional layers in "Smart windows" and "Water splitting" devices. The topics are related to the application of novel technologies for the preparation of transition metal oxide films and the modification of chromogenic properties towards the improvement of electrochromic and termochromic device parameters for possible industrial deployment. The Workshop addressed the following topics: Metal oxide films-functional layers in energy efficient devices; Photocatalysts and chemical sensing; Novel thin film technologies and applications; Methods of thin films characterizations; From the 37 abstracts sent, 21 manuscripts were written and later refereed. We appreciate the comments from all the referees, and we are grateful for their valuable contributions. Guest Editors: Assoc. Prof. Dr.Tatyana Ivanova Prof. DSc Kostadinka Gesheva Prof. DSc Hassan Chamatti Assoc. Prof. Dr. Georgi Popkirov Workshop Organizing Committee Prof

  7. Proceedings of the Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics. Keynote address: New directions in elementary particle physics - pantip from very low to very high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, M.

    1980-05-01

    The recent development of cooling techniques offers the possibility to obtain intense sources of antiprotons, stacking them as they are produced at a multi-GeV accelerator. The wide array of applications presently considered, ranging from reactions at extremely low energy in the case of p anti p atoms to reactions at hundreds of GeV in the case of head-on collisions between protons and antiprotons accelerated at the same time in a super synchrotron, is reviewed. Special emphasis is put on the present CERN program, which will reach the data-taking stage in 1981. The study of p anti p interactions is meant as an illustration of how new possibilities open new directions in elementary particle physics, whether reaching energies hitherto much beyond accelerator possibilities or developing new lower-energy beams improved tremendously over those presently available. 14 figures, 1 table.

  8. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  9. Workshop IV: Professional Development and Leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Man-Ling; Yoon, Jin-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The Professional Development and Leadership workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics was aimed at identifying and overcoming the personal and professional roadblocks that female physicists experience while pursuing their careers and obtaining leadership positions. Participants shared their thoughts and experiences related to the workshop's three sessions—Leadership, Education, and Inspiration—and concluded by formulating resolutions and recommendations to present to the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP).

  10. Commission 28: Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Elaine M.; Combes, Françoise; Okamura, Sadanori; Binney, James J.; Fairall, Anthony P.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lilly, Simon J.; Karachentseva, Valentina; Kraan-Korteweg, Renée C.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Leibundgut, Bruno; Narlikar, Jayant V.

    2007-12-01

    The members of Commission 28 on Galaxies were very busy during this General Assembly, with the Commission involved in two Symposia (IAU Symposium No. 235 Galaxy Evolution across the Hubble Time, IAU Symposium No. 238 Black Holes: from Stars to Galaxies), and two Joint Discussions (JD07 The Universe at z > 6, JD15 New Cosmology Results from the Spitzer Space Telescope). Therefore, the Business Meeting was combined with the Division VIII Business Meeting, which included a short information session on the new Commission 28 Organizing Committee. The triennial report of the Commission for 2003-2005 was also distributed, and is available on the Commission 28 web site.

  11. Commissioning HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiess, K.

    1995-12-01

    In recent years, commissioning has been viewed as a separate process that had to be specified and implemented by a specialized entity. This article discusses commissioning in the HVAC field and looks at it from an international perspective. The author has worked in Europe, South Africa (British system) and the USA. The differences between the British and the American methods of commissioning are discussed, with examples given where the American way was unsuccessful. It is the design engineer`s job to test and accept (commission) an installation after the contractor has demonstrated the performance to the satisfaction of the design engineer. Once the plant is commissioned, it is put into service.

  12. Commissioning the SNO+ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, Freija; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the successor to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), in which SNO's heavy water is replaced by approximately 780T of liquid scintillator (LAB). The combination of the 2km underground location, the use of ultra-clean materials and the high light-yield of the liquid scintillator means that a low background level and a low energy threshold can be achieved. This creates a new multipurpose neutrino detector with the potential to address a diverse set of physics goals, including the detection of reactor, solar, geo- and supernova neutrinos. A main physics goal of SNO+ is the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. By loading the liquid scintillator with 0.5% of natural Tellurium, resulting in about 1300kg of 130Te (isotopic abundance is slightly over 34%), a competitive sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass can be reached. This talk will present the status of the SNO+ detector, specifically the results and status of the detector commissioning with water.

  13. Commissioning the SNO+ Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caden, E.; Coulter, I.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    SNO+ is a multipurpose liquid scintillator neutrino experiment based at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The experiment’s main physics goal is a search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Tellurium-130, but SNO+ will also study low energy solar neutrinos, geo- and reactor-antineutrinos, among other topics. We are reusing much of the hardware from the original SNO experiment, but significant work has taken place to transform the heavy water detector into a liquid scintillator detector. We present upgrades and improvements to the read-out electronics and trigger system to handle the higher data rates expected by a scintillator experiment. We show the successful installation and testing of a hold-down rope net for the acrylic vessel to counter-act the buoyancy of organic liquid scintillator. We also describe the new scintillator process plant and cover gas systems that have been constructed to achieve the purification necessary to meet our physics goals. We are currently commissioning the experiment with ultra-pure water in preparation for filling with scintillator in early 2017 and present the current status of this work.

  14. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (Editor); Gehrels, Neil (Editor); Dennis, Brian (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  15. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  16. EDITORIAL: The 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics The 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita; Arsenovic, Dusan

    2009-07-01

    The development of quantum optics was part and parcel of the formation of modern physics following the fundamental work of Max Planck and Albert Einstein, which gave rise to quantum mechanics. The possibility of working with pure quantum objects, like single atoms and single photons, has turned quantum optics into the main tool for testing the fundamentals of quantum physics. Thus, despite a long history, quantum optics nowadays remains an extremely important branch of physics. It represents a natural base for the development of advanced technologies, like quantum information processing and quantum computing. Previous Central European Workshops on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) took place in Palermo (2007), Vienna (2006), Ankara (2005), Trieste (2004), Rostock (2003), Szeged (2002), Prague (2001), Balatonfüred (2000), Olomouc (1999), Prague (1997), Budmerice (1995, 1996), Budapest (1994) and Bratislava (1993). Those meetings offered excellent opportunities for the exchange of knowledge and ideas between leading scientists and young researchers in quantum optics, foundations of quantum mechanics, cavity quantum electrodynamics, photonics, atom optics, condensed matter optics, and quantum informatics, etc. The collaborative spirit and tradition of CEWQO were a great inspiration and help to the Institute of Physics, Belgrade, and the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, as the organizers of CEWQO 2008. The 16th CEWQO will take place in 2009 in Turku, Finland, and the 17th CEWQO will be organized in 2010 in St Andrews, United Kingdom. The 15th CEWQO was organized under the auspices and support of the Ministry of Science of the Republic of Serbia, the Serbian Physical Society, the European Physical Society with sponsorship from the University of Belgrade, the Central European Initiative, the FP6 Program of the European Commission under INCO project QUPOM No 026322, the FP7 Program of the European Commission under project NANOCHARM, Europhysics Letters (EPL), The European

  17. Dreissenid mussel research priorities workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sytsma, Mark; Phillips, Stephen; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, dreissenid mussels have yet to be detected in the northwestern part of the United States and western Canada. Infestation of one of the jurisdictions within the mussel-free Pacific Northwest would likely have significant economic, soci­etal and environmental implications for the entire region. Understanding the biology and environmental tolerances of dreissenid mussels, and effectiveness of various man­agement strategies, is key to prevention.On November 4-5, 2015, the Aquatic Bioinvasion Research and Policy Institute and the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs at Portland State University, the US Geological Survey, and the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, convened a Dreissenid Mussel Research Priorities Workshop funded by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative. The purpose of the workshop was to review dreissenid research priorities in the 2010 Quagga-Zebra Mussel Action Plan for Western U.S. Waters, reassess those priorities, incorporate new information and emerging trends, and develop priorities to strategically focus research efforts on zebra and quagga mussels in the Pacific Northwest and ensure that future research is focused on the highest priorities. It is important to note that there is some repetition among dreissenid research priority categories (e.g., prevention, detection, control, monitoring, and biology).Workshop participants with research experience in dreissenid mussel biology and management were identified by a literature review. State and federal agency managers were also invited to the workshop to ensure relevancy and practicality of the work­shop outcomes. A total of 28 experts (see sidebar) in mussel biology, ecology, and management attended the workshop.

  18. Multiphase Flow in Power and Propulsion Workshop Fluid Stability and Dynamics Workshop: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2003-01-01

    The short term purpose of the workshop described by this viewgraph presentation is to present a research plan and a 'roadmap' developed for strategic research for the Office of Biological and Physical Research. The long term purpose of the workshop is to conduct necessary ground-based and space-flight low gravity experiments, complemented by analyses, resulting in a documented framework for parameter prediction of needed by designers. The presentation reviews several previous workshops which were similar, and describes the differences in this workshop. The presentation also includes a prioritizing scheme for microgravity issues, which includes four priority ratings.

  19. 1991 LANL Mantle Convection Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gable, Carl W.; Kincaid, Chris

    1992-04-01

    Since 1985, Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) has hosted a mantle convection workshop. Each year, senior scientists and graduate students meet for 2 weeks of formal and informal presentations and hands-on working groups. The workshop format has been to define focus topics and activities which are discussed in small subgroups. Focus group reports are then made to summarize previous work and define avenues of future research on specific topics. From July 8 to 19, 1991, the primary focus of discussion was mantle plumes. Mantle discontinuities and the effect of tectonic plates upon mantle convection were focus topics in previous workshops. Additional focus topics for this workshop included the differences between 2D and 3D convection and a discussion of benchmark problems for the European convection workshop, held in August 1991 in Weilburg, Germany. In addition to presentations, focus group reports, and the exchange of ideas by geodynamics researchers, a number of guest speakers from related fields helped provide background on relevant model constraints, motivate discussion, and promote communication between fields.

  20. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    modelling, improving our understanding of the physics underlying magnetic activity phenomena. Commission 10 reports on a vigorously evolving field of research produced by a large community. The number of refereed publications containing `Sun', `heliosphere', or a synonym in their abstracts continued the steady growth seen over the preceding decades, reaching about 2000 in the years 2008-2010, with a total of close to 4000 unique authors. This report, however, has its limitations and it is inherently incomplete, as it was prepared jointly by the members of the Organising Committee of Commission 10 (see the names of the primary contributors to the sections indicated in parentheses) reflecting their fields of expertise and interest. Nevertheless, we believe that it is a representative sample of significant new results obtained during the last triennium in the field of solar activity.

  1. SU-E-I-65: The Joint Commission's Requirements for Annual Diagnostic Physics Testing of Nuclear Medicine Equipment, and a Clinically Relevant Methodology for Testing Low-Contrast Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    West, W. Geoffrey; Gray, David Clinton

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To introduce the Joint Commission's requirements for annual diagnostic physics testing of all nuclear medicine equipment, effective 7/1/2014, and to highlight an acceptable methodology for testing lowcontrast resolution of the nuclear medicine imaging system. Methods: The Joint Commission's required diagnostic physics evaluations are to be conducted for all of the image types produced clinically by each scanner. Other accrediting bodies, such as the ACR and the IAC, have similar imaging metrics, but do not emphasize testing low-contrast resolution as it relates clinically. The proposed method for testing low contrast resolution introduces quantitative metrics that are clinically relevant. The acquisition protocol and calculation of contrast levels will utilize a modified version of the protocol defined in AAPM Report #52. Results: Using the Rose criterion for lesion detection with a SNRpixel = 4.335 and a CNRlesion = 4, the minimum contrast levels for 25.4 mm and 31.8 mm cold spheres were calculated to be 0.317 and 0.283, respectively. These contrast levels are the minimum threshold that must be attained to guard against false positive lesion detection. Conclusion: Low contrast resolution, or detectability, can be properly tested in a manner that is clinically relevant by measuring the contrast level of cold spheres within a Jaszczak phantom using pixel values within ROI's placed in the background and cold sphere regions. The measured contrast levels are then compared to a minimum threshold calculated using the Rose criterion and a CNRlesion = 4. The measured contrast levels must either meet or exceed this minimum threshold to prove acceptable lesion detectability. This research and development activity was performed by the authors while employed at West Physics Consulting, LLC. It is presented with the consent of West Physics, which has authorized the dissemination of the information and/or techniques described in the work.

  2. Commission 12: Solar Radiation & Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Thomas. J.; Martínez Pillet, Valentin; Asplund, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cauzzi, G.; Cram, L. E.; Dravins, D.; Gan, W.; Henzl, P.; Kosovichev, A.; Mariska, J. T.; Rovira, M. G.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2007-03-01

    Commission 12 covers research on the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, the "quiet" solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. There is considerable productive overlap with the other Commissions of Division II as investigations move progressively toward the fertile intellectual boundaries between traditional research disciplines. In large part, the solar magnetic field provides the linkage that connects these diverse themes. The same magnetic field that produces the more subtle variations of solar structure and radiative output over the 11 yr activity cycle is also implicated in rapid and often violent phenomena such as flares, coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and episodes of sporadic magnetic reconnection.The last three years have again brought significant progress in nearly all the research endeavors touched upon by the interests of Commission 12. The underlying causes for this success remain the same: sustained advances in computing capabilities coupled with diverse observations with increasing levels of spatial, temporal and spectral resolution. It is all but impossible to deal with these many advances here in anything except a cursory and selective fashion. Thankfully, the Living Reviews in Solar Physics; has published several extensive reviews over the last two years that deal explicitly with issues relevant to the purview of Commission 12. The reader who is eager for a deeper and more complete understanding of some of these advances is directed to http://www.livingreviews.org for access to these articles.

  3. 10 CFR 62.25 - Criteria for a Commission determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Statement (45 FR 10950, February 24, 1977) for determining whether an event at a facility or activity... Commission shall consider the characteristics of the wastes (including: physical properties,...

  4. IOC/WMO Workshop on Marine Pollution Monitoring (3rd, New Delhi, India, February 11-15, 1980). Summary Report. Workshop Report No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Provided is a summary report of the third IOC/WMO (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission/World Meteorological Organization) workshop of marine pollution monitoring. Summaries are presented in nine sections, including: (1) workshop opening; (2) welcoming addresses; (3) reports on the Marine Pollution (Petroleum) Monitoring Pilot Project…

  5. IOC/WMO Workshop on Marine Pollution Monitoring (3rd, New Delhi, India, February 11-15, 1980). Summary Report. Workshop Report No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Provided is a summary report of the third IOC/WMO (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission/World Meteorological Organization) workshop of marine pollution monitoring. Summaries are presented in nine sections, including: (1) workshop opening; (2) welcoming addresses; (3) reports on the Marine Pollution (Petroleum) Monitoring Pilot Project…

  6. PREFACE: Peyresq Physics Workshops 11 and 12—'Micro and Macro Structure of Spacetime', Peyresq, Alpes de Haute Provence, France (17 23 June 2006 and 16 22 June 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, D.; Verdaguer, E.

    2008-08-01

    This special issue is devoted to the proceedings of the workshops Peyresq Physics 11 and Peyresq Physics 12 on 'Micro and Macro Structure of Spacetime', which were held on the 17 23 June 2006 and 16 22 June 2007, respectively, in Peyresq, Alpes de Haute Provence, France, and organized by E Gunzig, B-L Hu and one of us (EV). These workshops are part of a series of annual meetings which bring together around 20 physicists active in different areas of theoretical physics. Uncovering the microscopic structures of spacetime is the goal of quantum gravity and string theory. It is often considered as the 'holy grail' of theoretical physics because it is believed that all fundamental forces are unified at that level of description. Macroscopic spacetime refers to astrophysical and cosmological structures and processes in the observable physical world, from black holes to the cosmos, from the second law to the arrow of time. The challenge theoretical physicists now face is to infer the micro structure of spacetime from the observed macro phenomena, and to deduce the multifarious manifestations of our world from any such candidate theory. To do so demands a careful re-examination of the foundational issues of quantum physics and general relativity (such as intrinsic and quantum gravity decoherence), the origin and nature of symmetries in spacetime (such as Lorentz symmetry) and the conditions where they may be violated, as well as their intersections (such as the physics of the early universe and the end states of black hole evolution). One asks how and why these two pillars of modern physics appear to be so incongruous with each other. Is it because their basic tenets and assumptions are at odds to each other? For these quests one needs to draw upon concepts and techniques from close disciplines such as those found in topology and geometry, or other subdisciplines of physics such as particle physics, strings and loops, statistical mechanics and mesoscopic phenomena, atomic

  7. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-31

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Residential commissioning is a solution to this problem. This guide is the culmination of a 30-month project that began in September 1999. The ultimate objective of the project is to increase the number of houses that undergo commissioning, which will improve the quality, comfort, and safety of homes for California citizens. The project goal is to lay the groundwork for a residential commissioning industry in California focused on end-use energy and non-energy issues. As such, we intend this guide to be a beginning and not an end. Our intent is that the guide will lead to the programmatic integration of commissioning with other building industry processes, which in turn will provide more value to a single site visit for people such as home energy auditors and raters, home inspectors, and building performance contractors. Project work to support the development of this guide includes: a literature review and annotated bibliography, which facilitates access to 469 documents related to residential commissioning published over the past 20 years (Wray et al. 2000), an analysis of the potential benefits one can realistically expect from commissioning new and existing California houses (Matson et al. 2002), and an assessment of 107 diagnostic tools for evaluating residential commissioning metrics (Wray et al. 2002). In this guide, we describe the issues that non-experts should consider in developing a commissioning program to achieve the benefits we have identified. We do this by providing specific recommendations about: how to structure the commissioning process, which diagnostics to use, and how to use them to commission new and existing houses. Using examples, we also demonstrate the potential benefits of applying the recommended whole-house commissioning approach to

  8. Minnowbrook IV: 2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    On August 17 to 20, 2003, over 40 attendees participated in a workshop entitled "Minnowbrook IV.2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows. Earlier themes focused on improving the understanding of late stage (final breakdown) of boundary layer transition. The specific engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery was encouraged by the attendance of representatives from gas turbine manufacturers. Written papers were not requested. Abstracts and copies of figures were the only written record of the workshop aside from specifically commissioned transcriptions of a workshop summary and the extensive working group reports, discussions, and summary that followed on the final morning of the workshop.

  9. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  10. THE COLLEGE COMMISSIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOOKS, JOYCE LANE

    THE HISTORIES, ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES, MODES OF OPERATION, GOALS, AND SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES OF EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS ARE PRESENTED. THE GOAL OF THE EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS IS TO BRING UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE INSTRUCTION CLOSER TO THE RESEARCH FRONTIER, UPDATE COURSES, AND FOSTER THE SPIRIT OF INQUIRY. INTERCOMMISSION…

  11. The Building Commissioning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, John A.; Casault, Rick

    This book discusses building commissioning, which is the process of certifying that a new facility meets the required specifications. As buildings have become more complex, the traditional methods for building start-up and final acceptance have been proven inadequate, and building commissioning has been developed, which often necessitates the use…

  12. Get into Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limback, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may be apprehensive about commissioning, and frequently directors do not see it as realistic for their programs. It took the author a while to commission a piece, even though he is often on the composer side. The author asserts that there's already plenty of high-quality literature out there to keep teachers busy, but a bigger factor is…

  13. Commissioning of HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiess, K.

    1995-06-01

    In recent years various presentation and discussions have taken place which looked at commissioning as a separate process that had to be specified and implemented by a specialized entity in a project. This presentation discusses commissioning in the HVAC field and looks at it from an international perspective. The author has worked in Europe, South Africa (British system) and in the USA. The differences are discussed between the British and the American methods with some examples where the American way of commissioning was unsuccessful. The conclusion is that it is the design engineer`s job to test and accept (commission) an installation after the contractor has demonstrated the performance to the satisfaction of the design engineer. Once the plant is commissioned, it is put into service.

  14. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  15. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  16. Advanced Accelerator Concepts: Seventh Workshop. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; McCullough, J.; Dahl, P.

    1997-09-01

    These proceedings are based on the Seventh Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts held in October, 1996 at Lake Tahoe, California. This workshop was sponsored by the US Department of Energy(High Energy Physics Division, Advanced Technology Branch) and by the center for Beam Physics at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. A wide range of applications was covered at the workshop, from high energy colliders to synchrotron radiation sources. This scope included topics such as new methods of particle acceleration, production of ultrahigh gradient electromagnetic fields, diagnostics and control of particle/photon beams in ultrashort dimensions and ultrafast time scales, and various energy and beam sources. There were 87 papers presented at the workshop and out of these, 65 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  17. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    {\\bf The Astronomy Workshop} (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe a few of the available tools. {\\bf Solar Systems Visualizer}: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. {\\bf Solar System Calculators}: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed. {\\bf Stellar Evolution}: The "Life of the Sun" tool animates the history of the Sun as a movie, showing students how the size and color of our star has evolved and will evolve over billions of years. In "Star Race," the user selects two stars of different masses and watches their evolution in a split-screeen format that emphasizes the great differences in stellar lifetimes and fates.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON UNCERTAINTY, SENSITIVITY, AND PARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING. EPA/600/R-04/117, NUREG/CP-0187, ERDC SR-04-2.

    EPA Science Inventory

    An International Workshop on Uncertainty, Sensitivity, and Parameter Estimation for Multimedia Environmental Modeling was held August 1921, 2003, at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland, USA. The workshop was organized and convened by the Fe...

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON UNCERTAINTY, SENSITIVITY, AND PARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING. EPA/600/R-04/117, NUREG/CP-0187, ERDC SR-04-2.

    EPA Science Inventory

    An International Workshop on Uncertainty, Sensitivity, and Parameter Estimation for Multimedia Environmental Modeling was held August 1921, 2003, at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland, USA. The workshop was organized and convened by the Fe...

  20. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on…

  1. Formaldehyde Workshop Agenda

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is the agenda for the Formaldehyde Workshop hosted by the Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessments in cooperation with the IRIS Program. The workshop was held in April 2014

  2. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  3. Summary of Technical Meeting To Compare US/French Approaches for Physical Protection Test Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Thomas Kimball; Martinez, Ruben; Thomas, Gerald; Palut, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, representatives of the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration, including test bed professionals from Sandia National Laboratories, and representatives of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission participated in a one-week workshop to share best practices in design, organization, operations, utilization, improvement, and performance testing of physical protection test beds. The intended workshop outcomes were to (1) share methods of improving respective test bed methodologies and programs and (2) prepare recommendations for standards regarding creating and operating testing facilities for nations new to nuclear operations. At the workshop, the French and American subject matter experts compared best practices as developed at their respective test bed sites; discussed access delay test bed considerations; and presented the limitations/ constraints of physical protection test beds.

  4. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Race Margaret S. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Rummel, John D. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for missions to Mars that will involve the return of samples to Earth, it will be necessary to prepare for the receiving, handling, testing, distributing, and archiving of martian materials here on Earth. Previous groups and committees have studied selected aspects of sample return activities, but specific detailed protocols for the handling and testing of returned samples must still be developed. To further refine the requirements for sample hazard testing and to develop the criteria for subsequent release of sample materials from quarantine, the NASA Planetary Protection Officer convened a series of workshops in 2000-2001. The overall objective of the Workshop Series was to produce a Draft Protocol by which returned martian sample materials can be assessed for biological hazards and examined for evidence of life (extant or extinct) while safeguarding the purity of the samples from possible terrestrial contamination. This report also provides a record of the proceedings of Workshop 4, the final Workshop of the Series, which was held in Arlington, Virginia, June 5-7, 2001. During Workshop 4, the sub-groups were provided with a draft of the protocol compiled in May 2001 from the work done at prior Workshops in the Series. Then eight sub-groups were formed to discuss the following assigned topics: Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Physical/Chemical Testing Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Life Detection Testing Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Biohazard Testing Environmental and Health/Monitoring and Safety Issues Requirements of the Draft Protocol for Facilities and Equipment Contingency Planning for Different Outcomes of the Draft Protocol Personnel Management Considerations in Implementation of the Draft Protocol Draft Protocol Implementation Process and Update Concepts This report provides the first complete presentation of the Draft Protocol for Mars Sample Handling to meet planetary protection needs. This Draft Protocol

  5. 78 FR 77670 - Zero Rate Reactive Power Rate Schedules; Notice Allowing Post-Workshop Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Comments On December 11, 2013, a Commission staff-led workshop explored the mechanics of filing reactive... written comments focused on the mechanics of filing reactive power rate schedules for which there is no...

  6. Undergraduate Breakfast, Career Workshop, and Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students can enjoy a hearty breakfast and learn about how to prepare for a wide variety of careers in physics outside of academia. Topics of this interactive workshop will include planning and self-assessment, inventorying transferable skills, finding out more about career opportunities, and successfully applying for jobs. Immediately following the workshop, top presenters from the Undergraduate Research/SPS sessions will be recognized. All presenters in the undergraduate sessions will receive certificates acknowledging their scientific accomplishments.

  7. Insider Threat Mitigation Workshop Instructional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Larsen, Robert; O'Brien, Mike; Rodriquez, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Insiders represent a formidable threat to nuclear facilities. This set of workshop materials covers methodologies to analyze and approaches to mitigate the threat of an insider attempting abrupt theft of nuclear materials. This report is a compilation of workshop materials consisting of lectures on technical and administrative measures used in Physical Protection (PP) and Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) and methods for analyzing their effectiveness against a postulated insider threat.

  8. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  9. Climate risks workshop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-16

    Participants in an Oct. 16-18 workshop at John C. Stennis Space Center focused on identifying current and future climate risks and developing strategies to address them. NASA Headquarters sponsored the Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop to understand climate change risks and adaptation strategies. The workshop was part of an effort that joins the science and operations arms of the agency in a coordinated response to climate change. NASA Headquarters is holding workshops on the subject at all NASA centers.

  10. ICP-MS Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  11. Reading Workshop Survival Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschla, Gary Robert

    Intended for reading and classroom teachers, this book, organized in two parts, is a complete, step-by-step guide to setting up and running a reading workshop for grades 5-12 where reading is "the" priority. Part 1, "Management of the Reading Workshop," shows how to create a reading workshop, offers specific tools and…

  12. Thematic Issue: Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The articles in this publication trace the historical development of the theatre workshop, explain the relationship between the workshop and experimental theatre, and analyze the ways in which current drama workshops teach and develop the dramatic skills of the participants. The topics discussed include the special skills, production-oriented, and…

  13. FOREWORD: International Workshop on the Avogadro Constant and the Representation of the Silicon Mole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Giuseppe; Garfagnini, Raffaello; Mana, Giovanni; Peuto, Anna; Zosi, Gianfranco

    1994-01-01

    This special issue of Metrologia brings together contributions to the International Workshop on the Avogadro Constant and the Representation of the Silicon Mole, held in Turin, Italy, from 9 to 10 March 1994. It was organized by the Istituto di Metrologia "G Colonnetti" (IMGC) del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) and the Istituto di Fisica Generale "A Avogadro" (IFG) dell'Università di Tonno. It was sponsored by the CNR, the University of Turin, the Regione Piemonte, and the Commission of the European Communities DG XII. The workshop was a follow-up to previous international meetings held in Turin to commemorate Amedeo Avogadro, one in 1911 (the centenary of the publication of his hypothesis) and another in 1957 (the centenary of his death). On this occasion the workshop was motivated by the requirements of researchers engaged in the international project on the determination of the Avogadro constant by the x-ray crystal density method. Sixty-four participants representing eight countries attended the workshop. Doctoral students in metrology from Turin University and researchers working in adjacent fields were also present. The lectures were chosen so as to review the different aspects of this project, to illustrate progress in research, and to indicate future developments to scientists working in different fields of physics, metrology and technology. Complementary approaches to the NA determination based on electrical measurements were also reported and analysed. During the workshop, a number of specialist meetings allowed experts to discuss specific topics, to exchange information on results and techniques, and to improve the coordination of their activities. In their opening addresses, Prof. C Castagnoli (Director of the IFG) and Prof. L Crovini (Director of the IMGC) welcomed the participants and introduced the work in progress with a view to making a more precise determination of the Avogadro constant. They mentioned the expected influence of this

  14. 1994 Building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    During the spring of 1994, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards, conducted five two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the United States. Workshops were held in Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, and Denver. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing state building codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requirements for residential and commercial building energy codes, the Climate Change Action Plan, the role of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Building Energy Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, the commercial and residential codes and standards, the Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants were also encouraged to inform DOE of their needs, particularly with regard to implementing building energy codes, enhancing current implementation efforts, and building on training efforts already in place. This paper documents the workshop findings and workshop planning and follow-up processes.

  15. Agroterrorism workshop: engaging community preparedness.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jeffrey; Gilmore, Karen; Nalbone, Torey; Shepherd, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Agroterrorism is the deliberate tampering with and/or contamination of the food supply with the intent of adversely affecting the social, economic, physical, and psychological well-being of society. Testimony before the Government Affairs Committee of the U.S. Senate has suggested that agriculture is an area that has received comparatively little attention with regard to terrorism. In February of 2004, the NIOSH Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention, and Education developed a workshop on agroterrorism designed to engage local community leaders in a process to prepare for and respond to a terrorist event involving the food supply. The workshop was an effective collaboration between NIOSH Ag Centers, the state department of health (Texas), a school of public health, and the Texas Agricultural Research and Extension Centers in five urban and rural locations with substantial agricultural production. In order to reach a diverse and geographically widespread audience, the workshop was conducted by synchronous two-way interactive televideo (9 geographic sites). The audience of 155 participants was comprised of numerous stakeholders. The workshop format involved separate modules addressing food and fiber, livestock and poultry, food distribution, and emergency preparedness, with participants developing priorities for future consideration within their communities to address all phases of an event from preparedness to follow-up debriefing. There were 13 additional individuals (for a total of 168) who participated in the workshop subsequently through use of a video. Workshop evaluation components included pre- and post-workshop objective assessment of factual information presented (tests), and follow-up for implementation of priorities developed by conference participants. Statistically significant improvement was noted in knowledge acquisition. The six-month follow-up demonstrated implementation of preparedness planning priorities. This is an effective

  16. 78 FR 12271 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Additional Comment In Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this... Site: http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs2/ . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Virtual...://www.fcc.gov/blog/wcb-cost-model-virtual-workshop-2012 . People with Disabilities: Contact the FCC...

  17. Technology and Assessment: Thinking Ahead. Proceedings from a Workshop (Washington, DC, November 14, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Testing and Assessment.

    Papers in this collection were commissioned for a workshop designed to share advances in the cognitive sciences and methods of measurement and their implications for improving educational assessment. A second goal of the workshop was to delve into the role that technology could play in bringing these advances together. The papers are: (1)…

  18. Technology and Assessment: Thinking Ahead. Proceedings from a Workshop (Washington, DC, November 14, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Testing and Assessment.

    Papers in this collection were commissioned for a workshop designed to share advances in the cognitive sciences and methods of measurement and their implications for improving educational assessment. A second goal of the workshop was to delve into the role that technology could play in bringing these advances together. The papers are: (1)…

  19. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 2: Supporting documents

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains presentation material and a transcript of the workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report.

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  2. State Emergency Response Commissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Governor of each state has designated a State Emergency Response Commission (SERC) that is responsible for implementing the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) provisions within its state.

  3. Commissioning the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section, from drive laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch clearly demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photo-cathode drive laser, RF gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  4. SPEAR3 Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Boland, M.J.; Tan, Y.E.; Krinsky, S.; Podobedov, B.; Decking, W.; Ropert, A.; Byrd, J.M.; Robin, D.; Scarvie, T.; Steier, C.; Fedurin, M.G.; Jines, P.; Chang, H.-P.; Kuo, C.-C.; Tsai, H.-J.; Yoon, M.H.; Boge, M.; Allison, S.; Bellomo, P.; /SLAC, SSRL /SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin

    2005-05-09

    The successful commissioning of the new SPEAR3 light source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) will be reviewed. Orbit control, beam-based alignment, and an orbit interlock were commissioned. Orbit motion was characterized as a function of frequency. The linear optics was corrected for ID focusing and coupling errors. The nonlinear optics were investigated with dynamic aperture measurements as a function of energy and tune.

  5. Commission 51: Bioastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Boss, Alan; Cosmovici, Cristiano; Kwok, Sun; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Morrison, David; Udry, Stephane

    2010-05-01

    Commission 51 met on August 12, 2009. Outgoing President Alan Boss chaired the meeting, and there were several dozen members present, including incoming President William Irvine, incoming Vice President Pascale Ehrenfreund, and outgoing Past President Karen Meech. Commission 51 (C51) was re-authorized for a term of six more years at the 2006 Prague General Assembly of the IAU, and hence comes up for renewal at the 2012 IAU General Assembly in Beijing, China.

  6. 75 FR 29775 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration... ``Food Labeling Workshop.'' This public workshop is intended to provide information about FDA food...

  7. Chemical and physical characterization of fertile soil-derived ice residuals from the Fifth International Ice Nucleation workshop in November 2014 (FIN-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Laskin, Alexander; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2017-04-01

    The climate impact of ice-nucleating particles (INPs) derived from fertile soils on global scale has been recently accented by their diversity and efficient freezing ability. However, their representation in atmospheric models is limited in part due to our incomplete knowledge of fertile soil composition, abundance and associated sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation. To fill given knowledge gap, we have investigated a unique/rich set of ice crystal residual samples derived from a variety of fertile soil samples obtained through our participation in the Fifth International Ice Nucleation workshop (FIN-1). FIN-1 was held at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), which is the world's foremost facility for studying ice clouds in a controlled setting, in November 2014 to comprehensively study the heterogeneous ice formation in the atmosphere with collaboration among 10 international groups that were funded through European consortium, NSF and USDOE agencies. Here, we will present the nanoscale surface morphology and elemental/molecular composition of ice crystal residuals as well as that of total aerosol samples from the FIN-1 activity to identify and classify any specific mineral and organic inclusions that may have promoted nucleation of ice. Comparing total aerosols to residuals will shed light on the composition and abundance of certain particle types in INPs. Acknowledgements: The valuable contributions of the INUIT (Ice Nuclei Research Unit) collaborators, the FIN organizers, their institutions and the FIN-1 Workshop science team are gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Lunar Regolith Biomining: Workshop Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, Bonnie P.; Roberto, Frank F.

    2008-01-01

    On May 5th and 6th, 2007, NASA Ames Research Center hosted a workshop entitled 'Lunar Regolith Biomining'. The workshop addressed the feasibility of biologically-based mining of the lunar regolith along with identification of views and concepts for moving this topic forward to NASA. Workshop presentations provided background in topics of interest that served as the foundation for discussion in the subsequent breakout sessions. The first topical area included the history, status, and issues with biomining on Earth to familiarize all attendees with current activities. These presentations related the primary considerations in existing biomining, e.g., microbes of choice, pH of reactions, time and temperature, specific mining applications and locations, and benefits and/or limitations of biomining. The second area reviewed existing research efforts addressing biomining of planetary surfaces (Mars, Moon), including microbial considerations, and chemical necessities in biomining and biofuel production. The last element pertained to other non-biological considerations and influences in biomining efforts on the lunar surface such as radiation fluxes and effects, and the application of small satellite experiments to learn more about the lunar and Martian surfaces. Following the presentations, the workshop attendees divided into three breakout sessions to discuss areas of interest in greater detail and to define next steps in determining the feasibility of lunar regolith biomining. Topics for each of the three breakout sessions included: 1) bio-communities of choice, target product(s), and suggested ground studies; 2) physical/environmental issues and ground studies; and 3) the development of reference experiments for the Astrobiology Small payloads Workshop. The results of the breakout sessions are summarized and a list of participants is included.

  9. Commissioning Experience of SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H{sup -} front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs in January-February and April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS linac will be presented.

  10. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  11. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  12. Commissioning of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hutton

    1994-06-01

    Construction of the CEBAF accelerator, a 4 GeV CW recirculating linac, is virtually complete. The 338 power sources and superconducting RF cavities, which have all run above nominal operating gradient in vertical tests (average 10.7 MeV/m), are installed. All the major components of the nine recirculation arcs are installed and aligned. Pre-commissioning was performed in parallel with construction. Ninety-nine superconducting cavities were operated simultaneously at the nominal gradient of 5 MeV/m. A maximum beam current of 110 PA CW (ZOO PA design) was reached. A cryomodule with eight cavities has operated at 8 MeV/m. Commissioning of the entire machine began in May 94. Results obtained during commissioning of the two linacs and the first arc are presented. 600 MeV beam is ready to be brought to the first experimental hall meeting a DOE milestone established in 1988.

  13. 1995 building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    During the spring of 1995, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted four two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the US. Workshops were held in Chicago, Denver, Rhode Island, and Atlanta. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing building energy codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about residential and commercial building energy codes and standards, the role of the US Department of Energy and the Building Standards and Guidelines Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. Participants heard success stories, got tips on enforcement training, and received technical support materials. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants had an opportunity to provide input on code adoption issues, building industry training issues, building design issues, and exemplary programs across the US. This paper documents the workshop planning, findings, and follow-up processes.

  14. ATF2 Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A.; Christian, G.; Parker, B.; Schulte, D.; Delahaye, J.-P.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.; Wolski, A.; Elsen, E.; Sanuki, T.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Ross, M.; Wendt, M.; Takahashi, T.; Bai, S.; Gao, J.; Bolzon, B.; Geffroy, N.; Jeremie, A.; Apsimon, R.; Burrows, P.; /Oxford U., JAI /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Orsay, LAL /Phang Accelerator Lab /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /University Coll. London /Manchester U. /Univ. of Tokyo U.

    2009-10-30

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line that aims to focus the low-emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a beam size of about 37 nm, and at the same time to demonstrate nm beam stability, using numerous advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools. The construction has been finished at the end of 2008 and the beam commissioning of ATF2 has started in December of 2008. ATF2 is constructed and commissioned by ATF international collaborations with strong US, Asian and European participation.

  15. Transitsearch Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, T.

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of more than 100 planets around nearby solar-like stars that surpass Jupiter in size yet orbit their stars more quickly than Mercury has heralded a new era in astronomy. These enigmatic 'Hot-Jupiters' are large enough and close enough to their parent stars that their 'transits' can be captured by astronomers equipped with a small computer controlled telescope and a quality electronic CCD camera. The planet reveals its presence through the periodic decrease in brightness as it passes (or transits) in front of the star as seen from Earth. The first known transiting extrasolar planet HD 209458b, in the constellation Pegasus, has been the subject of hundreds of scientific papers since its discovery in 1999. The transit of 8th magnitude HD 209458 has been observed by at least a dozen non-professional astronomers using telescopes as small as 4 inches in aperture. Using equipment already in hand, and armed with target lists, transit time predictions, observing techniques and software procedures developed by astronomers at NASA's Ames Research Center and the University of California at Santa Cruz, non-professional astronomers can contribute significantly to the study of extrasolar planets by carefully measuring the brightness of stars with known Hot-Jupiters. In this way, we may resume (after a two century interruption!) the tradition of planetary discoveries by amateur astronomers begun with William Herschel's 1787 discovery of the 'solar' planet Uranus. In the few years transitsearch has been in existence, investigators Tim Castellano (NASA Ames) and Greg Laughlin (UCSC) have written articles for Sky and Telescope and Astronomy magazines, have been featured in stories by the Reuters News Service, Nature magazine, Science magazine, Space.com, the American Institute of Physics and others and received several hundred thousand total hits on their website www.transitsearch,org.

  16. Transitsearch Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, T.

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of more than 100 planets around nearby solar-like stars that surpass Jupiter in size yet orbit their stars more quickly than Mercury has heralded a new era in astronomy. These enigmatic 'Hot-Jupiters' are large enough and close enough to their parent stars that their 'transits' can be captured by astronomers equipped with a small computer controlled telescope and a quality electronic CCD camera. The planet reveals its presence through the periodic decrease in brightness as it passes (or transits) in front of the star as seen from Earth. The first known transiting extrasolar planet HD 209458b, in the constellation Pegasus, has been the subject of hundreds of scientific papers since its discovery in 1999. The transit of 8th magnitude HD 209458 has been observed by at least a dozen non-professional astronomers using telescopes as small as 4 inches in aperture. Using equipment already in hand, and armed with target lists, transit time predictions, observing techniques and software procedures developed by astronomers at NASA's Ames Research Center and the University of California at Santa Cruz, non-professional astronomers can contribute significantly to the study of extrasolar planets by carefully measuring the brightness of stars with known Hot-Jupiters. In this way, we may resume (after a two century interruption!) the tradition of planetary discoveries by amateur astronomers begun with William Herschel's 1787 discovery of the 'solar' planet Uranus. In the few years transitsearch has been in existence, investigators Tim Castellano (NASA Ames) and Greg Laughlin (UCSC) have written articles for Sky and Telescope and Astronomy magazines, have been featured in stories by the Reuters News Service, Nature magazine, Science magazine, Space.com, the American Institute of Physics and others and received several hundred thousand total hits on their website www.transitsearch,org.

  17. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

  18. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop.

  19. Solar education project workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.

    1980-10-31

    A summary of proceedings of the Solar Education Project Workshop is presented. The workshop had as its focus the dissemination of curriculum materials developed by the Solar Energy Project of the New York State Department of Education under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. It includes, in addition to presentations by speakers and workshop leaders, specific comments from participants regarding materials available and energy-related activities underway in their respective states and suggested strategies from them for ongoing dissemination efforts.

  20. "Boden macht Schule" - a soil awareness workshop for Austrian pupils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foldal, Cecile B.; Aust, Günter; Baumgarten, Andreas; Berthold, Helene; Birli, Barbara; Englisch, Michael; Ferstl, Elsa; Leregger, Florian; Schwarz, Sigrid; Tulipan, Monika

    2014-05-01

    In order to raise awareness and understanding for the importance of soil, we developed a workshop for schoolchildren between the age of nine and thirteen. The workshop focuses on soil formation, soil functions and soil organisms. Guided by young soil scientist the children can actively explore different soil properties. Key elements are studies and identification of soil animals, small physical experiments and several games followed up with creative tasks. Our aim is to make the workshop an attractive tool for environmental education in public schools and by this to increase the interest in soil and soil protection. This poster gives a short overview of the contents of the workshop "Boden macht Schule"

  1. The Second International Workshop on Squeezed States and Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S.; Manko, V. I.

    1993-01-01

    This conference publication contains the proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Squeezed States and Uncertainty Relations held in Moscow, Russia, on 25-29 May 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to study possible applications of squeezed states of light. The Workshop brought together many active researchers in squeezed states of light and those who may find the concept of squeezed states useful in their research, particularly in understanding the uncertainty relations. It was found at this workshop that the squeezed state has a much broader implication than the two-photon coherent states in quantum optics, since the squeeze transformation is one of the most fundamental transformations in physics.

  2. 78 FR 12412 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on March 21, 2013, in Harrisburg...

  3. 77 FR 28420 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on June 7, 2012, in Binghamton, New...

  4. 77 FR 70204 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on December 14, 2012, in Annapolis...

  5. 78 FR 52601 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on September 19, 2013, in Binghamton, New York. Details concerning the matters to be addressed at the business meeting are contained in the...

  6. CARE 3 User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A user's workshop for CARE 3, a reliability assessment tool designed and developed especially for the evaluation of high reliability fault tolerant digital systems, was held at NASA Langley Research Center on October 6 to 7, 1987. The main purpose of the workshop was to assess the evolutionary status of CARE 3. The activities of the workshop are documented and papers are included by user's of CARE 3 and NASA. Features and limitations of CARE 3 and comparisons to other tools are presented. The conclusions to a workshop questionaire are also discussed.

  7. Fermilab Cryogenic Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W. V.

    1980-06-18

    A workshop to discuss recent pressing problems experienced in the operation of helium refrigerators at the national laboratories was proposed by DOE. Early in 1980 it was decided that the workshop should be held at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The reasoning behind the selection of Fermilab included the proposed initial tests of the Central Liquefier, the recently experienced problems with refrigeration systems at Fermilab, and the fact that a previous workshop had been held at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, which, at present, would be the other logical choice for the workshop.

  8. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  9. Summary of the Tau 2016 Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    The main topics discussed at the Tau 2016 Workshop are briefly summarized. A large number of reports were given on low-energy QCD studies, on the hadronic g - 2 contribution, and on neutrino Physics. Other reports were given on the τ lepton properties and related topics, on Lepton Flavour Violation and New Physics searches involving tau-lepton production or light New Physics particles.

  10. WESTPAC Workshop on Coastal Transport of Pollutants (Tokyo, Japan, March 27-31, 1980). Summary Report. Workshop Report No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Provided is a 4-page summary of the WESTPAC (Western Pacific) Workshop On Coastal Transport of Pollutants and five appendices. Workshop objectives were to review present knowledge of the physical dispersion, accumulation, and transportation of pollutants, and analytical methods and data processing in the Western Pacific Region; identify major…

  11. WESTPAC Workshop on Coastal Transport of Pollutants (Tokyo, Japan, March 27-31, 1980). Summary Report. Workshop Report No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Provided is a 4-page summary of the WESTPAC (Western Pacific) Workshop On Coastal Transport of Pollutants and five appendices. Workshop objectives were to review present knowledge of the physical dispersion, accumulation, and transportation of pollutants, and analytical methods and data processing in the Western Pacific Region; identify major…

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  13. Conservation Commissions in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffey, Andrew J. W.

    The Conservation Foundation reported on the experience of a resource development specialist in the state of Massachusetts on the public's growing concern for environmental quality. After tracing the origins of the Massachusetts movement, the report draws upon a variety of specific state experiences to illustrate the commission's growing pains and…

  14. Legal Commission Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Legal Commission of the International Non-Governmental Organizations Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations adopted the following agenda: legal status of indigenous populations; the land question; indigenous laws and courts; discrimination against indigenous peoples in existing laws and their application; and creation of…

  15. Ethics Commission Member's Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sue Spayth

    1988-01-01

    Presents a National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Ethics Commission member's comments and suggestions about how early childhood educators can best make sound decisions about the ethical dilemma of the welfare of the child and the confidentiality of its divorced parents. (BB)

  16. Expedition 29 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Expedition 29 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Russian Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Expedition 29 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    NASA Expedition 29 backup crew member Joseph Acaba speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 28 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum stands during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 28 to the International Space Station, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 29 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Michael Suffredini, Manager, International Space Station (ISS) Program speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Expedition 28 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 Russian backup Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko is seen seated during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 28 to the International Space Station, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Expedition 33 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-22

    Members of the State Commission meet at the Cosmosnaut hotel to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 33/34 Flight Engineer Kevin Ford of NASA, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin of ROSCOSMOS on Monday, Oct. 22, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Expedition 28 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Michael Suffredini, Manager, International Space Station (ISS) Program, center, speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 28 to the International Space Station, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 29 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Vladimir Popovkin, Head of the Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS) speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 41 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Michael Suffredini, NASA International Space Station Program Manager, speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 41 to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. Expedition 29 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 backup crew member Sergei Revin speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 29 to the International Space Station, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Expedition 28 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Vladimir Popovkin, Head of the Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS) speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 28 to the International Space Station, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  9. Commission on Liberal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzard, George W.

    1976-01-01

    Study emphasis within the Commission on Liberal Learning during the year was on the role of liberal education in the society of the future. The relationship of undergraduate liberal education to the world macro-problem--population growth, industrial production, food, materials and energy scarcities, pollution and environmental degradation--was…

  10. Federal Election Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Lee Ann

    1996-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of the responsibilities, membership, structure, and requirements of the Federal Election Commission (FEC). Created in 1974, the FEC oversees the financial activities of candidates and political parties. Discusses corporate and union political action committees (PACs) as well as contribution limits and prohibitions. (MJP)

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  12. The 2008 ICOH Workshop on Skin Notation.

    PubMed

    Sartorelli, P; Ahlers, H W; Cherrie, J W; Kezic, Sanja; Johanson, G; Filon, Francesca Larese; Nielsen, J B; Shepherd, A; Stull, J; Williams, Faith

    2010-01-01

    On 29 March 2008 the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) Scientific Committee on Occupational and Environmental Dermatoses organized a Skin Notation Workshop hosted by the 11th International Percutaneous Penetration Perspectives Conference (La Grande Motte, France). Skin notation (S) was chosen as a topic for discussion because this is the only example of existing regulation in the field of dermal risk assessment. The issue was discussed in a previous workshop held in Siena, Italy in 2006 with the objective of focussing on the problems related to S, the different assignment criteria and the attempts to improve the S system made by various international and governmental agencies. A position paper was subsequently published. The workshop in France was a continuation of this activity with the aim of evaluating how the different strategies can improve S. The Workshop was divided into two sessions. The first was dedicated to lectures focused on different aspects of S. In the second session participants discussed key issues with the aim of exploring the actions needed to improve international S. systems.

  13. A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains a summary of that workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report. An appendix contains the 8 papers presented at the conference: NRC proposed policy statement on the use of probabilistic risk assessment methods in nuclear regulatory activities; NRC proposed agency-wide implementation plan for probabilistic risk assessment; Risk evaluation of high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy at a large research/teaching institution; The pros and cons of using human reliability analysis techniques to analyze misadministration events; Review of medical misadministration event summaries and comparison of human error modeling; Preliminary examples of the development of error influences and effects diagrams to analyze medical misadministration events; Brachytherapy risk assessment program plan; and Principles of brachytherapy quality assurance.

  14. Workshop on CEBAF at higher energies

    SciTech Connect

    Isgur, N.; Stoler, P.

    1994-04-01

    Since the current parameters of CEBAF were defined almost a decade ago, there has been a remarkably fruitful evolution of our picture of the behavior of strongly interacting matter that apparently could be addressed by CEBAF at higher energies. Favorable technical developments coupled with foresight in initial laboratory planning have now made it feasible to consider approximately doubling CEBAF`s current design energy of 4 GeV to approach 10 GeV at rather modest cost. The purpose of the workshop, sponsored by the CEBAF User Group, was to begin to develop the next phase of CEBAF`s program by giving the entire community the opportunity to participate in defining the future of our field, and in particular the physics accessible with an upgraded CEBAF energy. It is intended that this report mark the first step toward an ultimate goal of defining a physics program that will form the basis for an upgrade of CEBAF. The report begins with a brief overview of the workshop`s conclusions. Its body consists of sections corresponding to the workshop`s Working Groups on Hadron Spectroscopy and Production, High Q{sup 2} Form Factors and Exclusive Reactions, Inclusive and Semi-Inclusive Processes, and Hadrons in the Nuclear Medium. Each section begins with the working group summaries and is followed by associated plenary talks summarizing the outstanding physics issues addressable by an upgrade, which are in turn followed by individual contributions presenting specific physics programs. An appendix describes capabilities of CEBAF`s current experimental equipment at higher energies; another appendix lists workshop participants. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Sensors Workshop summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A review of the efforts of three workshops is presented. The presentation describes those technological developments that would contribute most to sensor subsystem optimization and improvement of NASA's data acquisition capabilities, and summarizes the recommendations of the sensor technology panels from the most recent workshops.

  16. Productivity Workshop Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewes, Donald W.

    This document presents a plan for conducting productivity workshops sponsored by state vocational education agencies for state agency staff, field vocational educators, and representatives of businesses and industry. The rationale is discussed, and workshop goals and objectives are stated. Suggested procedures are described for the attainment of…

  17. The "Holding Power" Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupaka, Betty M., Ed.

    In August 1971, a large number of Indian leaders, youth, and lay citizens participated in a workshop designed to develop skills and knowledge which public school personnel could use to improve Indian attendance and retention patterns in New Mexico. The workshop yielded much information relevant to Indian students in public schools. Speakers…

  18. Term Paper Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellsbury, Susan; And Others

    The purpose of this term paper clinic workshop was to provide information on options that can be used when students need information for research papers. The workshop is designed for librarians in any type of library who deal with students working on term papers. Three types of term paper clinics are discussed: individual conferences; group…

  19. Workshop in Translating Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Michael; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A workshop dealing with literature in translation took place in 1974 at the German Department of the University of Cincinnati. This is a report on its procedures and methods. The workshop dealt with discussion of texts, translation of texts, critique of existing translations and interpretation of content. (TL)

  20. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  1. Inspection Workshop-6: OSI Technologies: Methodologies and Techniques for Application

    SciTech Connect

    Krioutchenkov, V.; Shchukin, V.; Sweeney, J.J.

    2000-09-14

    On-Site Inspection (OSI) Workshop-6 met 26-30 June 2000 in Vienna, hosted by the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the CTBT Organization. The purpose of the workshop was to provide guidance on OSI Operational Manual (OM) development for Working Group B (WGB) of the CTBT preparatory Commission (PrepCom) in the general areas of equipment and logistics. The two main sessions of this workshop, titled ''OSI Equipment: Development of Functional and Operational Requirements, Specifications and Application Procedures'' and ''OSI Logistics: Continued Work on Standing Arrangements, Status of Inspectors and Support Equipment Issues'' reflected this focus. For this workshop, the schedule of work was divided into two parts: The first half of the week were sessions with formal paper presentations and discussion; the latter half of the week used two smaller subgroups to focus on and discuss separately equipment and logistics issues. Drawing heavily on the results of the five previous workshops, these subgroups produced material to be considered by Working Group B. This provisional material is intended to advance the process of equipment definition and procurement and establish procedures for logistics that can be incorporated into the OSI Operational Manual. The participants agreed that using subgroups in this workshop was an especially effective mechanism for discussion of different expert opinion on technical issues, and that having access to material presented at the previous five OSI workshops was particularly valuable.

  2. SSC workshop on environmental radiation

    SciTech Connect

    1986-01-09

    The Superconducting Super Collider is a 20 TeV-on-20 TeV proton beam collider where two 20-TeV proton accelerators whose beams, rotating in opposite senses, are brought into collision to provide 40 TeV in the center of mass. The scale of the project is set by the 6.6 tesla magnet guide field for the protons which results in a roughly circular machine with a circumference of 83 km (51.5 mi.). The energy scale of the proton beams and the physical scale of the machine are an order of magnitude greater than for any presently operating or contemplated proton accelerator yet the facility must be operated within the same strict radiological guidelines as existing accelerators in the US and Europe. To ensure that the facility conforms to existing and projected guidelines both in design and operation, the Workshop was charged to review the experience and practices of existing accelerator laboratories, to determine the relevant present and projected regulatory requirements, to review particle production and shielding data from accelerators and cosmic rays, to study the design and operational specifications of the Collider, to examine the parameters set forth in the Siting Parameters Document, and to evaluate the computational tools available to model the radiation patterns arising under various operational and failure scenarios. This report summarizes the extensive and intensive presentations and discussions of the Workshop. A great deal of material, much of it in the form of internal reports from the various laboratories and drafts of works in preparation, was provided by the participants for the various topics. This material, including the viewgraphs used by the presenters, forms the background and basis for the conclusions of the Workshop and, as such, is an important part of the Workshop. An introduction to the material and a catalog by topic are presented as section 6 of this report.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 70)

    SciTech Connect

    JACAK, B.; SHURYAK, E.; HALLMAN, T.; BASS, S.; DAVIDSON, R.

    2005-01-14

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned for heavy ion collisions and for polarized pp collisions in 2001. All principal components of the accelerator chain were operational by the 2003 RHIC run. Approximately 50 papers on RHIC experimental results have been published in refereed journals to date. This is a testament to the vast amount of exciting new information and the unprecedented analysis and publication rate from RHIC. A number of signals of creation of matter at extreme energy density, and of new physics in that matter, have been observed. The RHIC community has been heavily engaged in discussion about these signals, and about the appropriate level of proof for Quark Gluon Plasma discovery at the RHIC. In fact, such discussions were the subject of an earlier RBRC Workshop. One of the striking results from heavy ion collisions at RHIC is that the quark gluon plasma accessible appears to be strongly coupled. The properties of strongly coupled plasmas are of intense interest in the traditional Plasma Physics community, who have been developing tools to study such matter theoretically and experimentally. Despite the fact that one plasma interacts electromagnetically and the other through the strong interaction, there is tremendous commonality in the intellectual approach and even the theoretical and experimental tools. It is important to broaden the discussion of Quark Gluon Plasma discovery beyond possible signals of deconfinement to also encompass signals of plasma phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Thus it is imperative establish more direct contact among Nuclear, Plasma and Atomic physicists to share techniques and ideas. RHIC physicists will benefit from familiarity with typical plasma diagnostics and theoretical methods to study strongly coupled plasmas. Plasma and Atomic physicists may fmd new techniques parallel to the multi-particle correlations used in RHIC data analysis, and theoretical tools to study high energy density matter

  4. Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Ribas, Ignasi; Giménez, Alvaro; Harmanec, Petr; Hilditch, Ronald W.; Kaluzny, Janusz; Niarchos, Panayiotis; Nordström, Birgitta; Oláh, Katalin; Richards, Mercedes T.; Scarfe, Colin D.; Sion, Edward M.; Torres, Guillermo; Vrielmann, Sonja

    2010-05-01

    During the commission business session, the past President presented the new Organizing Committee which was selected by the OC through a e-mail vote conducted during the months before the Rio de Janeiro General Assembly. The new OC will consist of Ignasi Ribas (President), Mercedes Richards (Vice President), and Slavek Rucinski (Past President) with the members: David Bradstreet, Petr Harmanec, Janusz Kaluzny, Joanna Mikolajewska, Ulisse Munari, Panos Niarchos, Katalin Olah, Theo Pribulla, Colin Scarfe and Guillermo Torres.

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the April 1996 reporting period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are issuances pertaining to: (1) Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (2) Georgia Tech Research Reactor, (3) River Bend Station, (4) Millstone Unit 1, (5) Thermo-Lag fire barrier material, and (6) Louisiana Energy Services.

  6. Expedition 39 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-24

    General Director of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Oleg Ostapenko, as seen during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz rocket launch of Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Flight Engineer Steve Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos on a six month mission aboard the International Space Station, Monday, March 24, 2014 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Expedition 38 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Members of the State Commission meet to approve the Soyuz rocket launch of Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA for a six month mission aboard the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Expedition 38 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    President of RSC Energia, Designer General V.A. Lopota, talks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz rocket launch of Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA for a six month mission aboard the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 38 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) President Naoki Okumura talks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz rocket launch of Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA for a six month mission aboard the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Enzymes: A Workshop for Secondary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, C. Larry

    1994-01-01

    Describes the weekend science workshop on enzymes and includes several projects that involve students directly, parts of which can be incorporated into a traditional chemistry, biology, or physical science course at the secondary level. Subjects include catalysts and catalytic converters in cars, enzymes as consumer products and in industrial…

  11. Enzymes: A Workshop for Secondary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, C. Larry

    1994-01-01

    Describes the weekend science workshop on enzymes and includes several projects that involve students directly, parts of which can be incorporated into a traditional chemistry, biology, or physical science course at the secondary level. Subjects include catalysts and catalytic converters in cars, enzymes as consumer products and in industrial…

  12. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  13. Workshop on Feedback Stabilization of MHD Stabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Mauel, M.; Nevins, W.; Prager, S.

    1996-12-31

    The feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities is an area of research that is critical for improving the performance and economic attractiveness of magnetic confinement devices. A Workshop dedicated to feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities was held from December 11-13, 1996 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton NJ, USA. The resulting presentations, conclusions, and recommendations are summarized.

  14. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains presentations given at Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling held 15-16 Sep. 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Papers cover the following topics: turbulence modeling activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT); heat transfer and turbomachinery flow physics; aerothermochemistry and computational methods for space systems; computational fluid dynamics and the k-epsilon turbulence model; propulsion systems; and inlet, duct, and nozzle flow.

  15. 75 FR 74736 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration..., in collaboration with Iowa State University, is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Food Labeling...

  16. 76 FR 60505 - Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of... M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Food...

  17. 77 FR 12313 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public workshop...

  18. 29 CFR 2203.3 - Public attendance at Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public attendance at Commission meetings. 2203.3 Section 2203.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION... procedures, or (vi) Endanger the life or physical safety of law enforcement personnel; (8) Disclose...

  19. Commissioning and operation of the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. D'Auria

    2002-01-18

    The CDF-II silicon detector has been partially commissioned and used for taking preliminary physics data. This paper is a report on commissioning and initial operations of the 5.8m{sup 2} silicon detector. This experience can be useful to the large silicon systems that are presently under construction.

  20. International workshop of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Div. of Neurology); Carrano, A.J. )

    1991-09-16

    This document summarizes the workshop on physical and genetic mapping of chromosome 19. The first session discussed the major disease loci found on the chromosome. The second session concentrated on reference families, markers and linkage maps. The third session concentrated on radiation hybrid mapping, somatic cell hybrid panels, macro restriction maps and YACs, followed by cDNA and long range physical maps. The fourth session concentrated on compiling consensus genetic and physical maps as well as discussing regions of conflict. The final session dealt with the LLNL cosmid contig database and comparative mapping of homologous regions of the human and mouse genomes, and ended with a discussion of resource sharing. 18 refs., 2 figs. (MHB)

  1. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Connolly, R.; Garnett, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohson, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Saadatmand, K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 key H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments will be presented along with comparisons to simulations.

  2. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Connolly, R.; Garnett, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohson, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Saadatmand, K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 key H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments will be presented along with comparisons to simulations.

  3. Bringing Technology into Physics Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettlili, Nouredine

    2009-05-01

    Through our outreach initiative at Jacksonville State University, we have been supporting a number of school districts in Northeast Alabama to improve the teaching of physics at the high school level. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. The main aim of project IMPACTSEED is to help teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama Course of Study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of program. In this presentation, we want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to physics classrooms. We have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms, most notably through a series of make-and-take technology workshops that were developed over several years of research. In turn, when the teachers assign these make-an-take projects to their students, the students will be able to see first-hand---by doing, rather than being told---that physics is not a dry, abstract subject. We found this approach to be particularly effective in heightening the students' interest in math and science.

  4. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara E. (Editor); Kovacs, Gregory T. A. (Editor); Race, Margaret S. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous NASA reports and studies have identified Planetary Protection (PP) as an important part of any Mars sample return mission. The mission architecture, hardware, on-board experiments, and related activities must be designed in ways that prevent both forward- and back-contamination and also ensure maximal return of scientific information. A key element of any PP effort for sample return missions is the development of guidelines for containment and analysis of returned sample(s). As part of that effort, NASA and the Space Studies Board (SSB) of the National Research Council (NRC) have each assembled experts from a wide range of scientific fields to identify and discuss issues pertinent to sample return. In 1997, the SSB released its report on recommendations for handling and testing of returned Mars samples. In particular, the NRC recommended that: a) samples returned from Mars by spacecraft should be contained and treated as potentially hazardous until proven otherwise, and b) rigorous physical, chemical, and biological analyses [should] confirm that there is no indication of the presence of any exogenous biological entity. Also in 1997, a Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol workshop was convened at NASA Ames Research Center to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent 'uncontrolled release' of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. In 1999, a study by NASA's Mars Sample Handling and Requirements Panel (MSHARP) addressed three other specific areas in anticipation of returning samples from Mars: 1) sample collection and transport back to Earth; 2) certification of the samples as non-hazardous; and 3) sample receiving, curation, and distribution. To further refine the requirements for sample

  5. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara E. (Editor); Kovacs, Gregory T. A. (Editor); Race, Margaret S. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous NASA reports and studies have identified Planetary Protection (PP) as an important part of any Mars sample return mission. The mission architecture, hardware, on-board experiments, and related activities must be designed in ways that prevent both forward- and back-contamination and also ensure maximal return of scientific information. A key element of any PP effort for sample return missions is the development of guidelines for containment and analysis of returned sample(s). As part of that effort, NASA and the Space Studies Board (SSB) of the National Research Council (NRC) have each assembled experts from a wide range of scientific fields to identify and discuss issues pertinent to sample return. In 1997, the SSB released its report on recommendations for handling and testing of returned Mars samples. In particular, the NRC recommended that: a) samples returned from Mars by spacecraft should be contained and treated as potentially hazardous until proven otherwise, and b) rigorous physical, chemical, and biological analyses [should] confirm that there is no indication of the presence of any exogenous biological entity. Also in 1997, a Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol workshop was convened at NASA Ames Research Center to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent 'uncontrolled release' of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. In 1999, a study by NASA's Mars Sample Handling and Requirements Panel (MSHARP) addressed three other specific areas in anticipation of returning samples from Mars: 1) sample collection and transport back to Earth; 2) certification of the samples as non-hazardous; and 3) sample receiving, curation, and distribution. To further refine the requirements for sample

  6. The 1998 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Jeffrey C. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 31st annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on October 27-29, 1998. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers, as well as international participation in like kind from a number of countries around the world. The subjects covered included nickel-hydrogen, silver-hydrogen, nickel-metal hydride, and lithium-based technologies, as well as results from destructive physical analyses on various cell chemistries.

  7. Communication & Negotiation Skills Workshop for Women II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-03-01

    This workshop is designed to provide women physics students and postdocs with the professional skills they need to effectively perform research, including: negotiating a position in academia, industry or at a national lab, interacting positively on teams and with a mentor or advisor, thinking tactically, articulating goals, enhancing their personal presence, and developing alliances. We will discuss negotiation strategies and tactics that are useful for achieving professional goals. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants are invited to bring examples of difficult professional situations to discuss.

  8. Communication & Negotiation Skills Workshop for Women I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-03-01

    This workshop is designed to provide women physics students and postdocs with the professional skills they need to effectively perform research, including: negotiating a position in academia, industry or at a national lab, interacting positively on teams and with a mentor or advisor, thinking tactically, articulating goals, enhancing their personal presence, and developing alliances. We will discuss negotiation strategies and tactics that are useful for achieving professional goals. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants are invited to bring examples of difficult professional situations to discuss.

  9. XV International Workshop on Neutrino Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The "Neutrino Telescopes" is one of the most prestigious international events in the field of Physics. It takes place every two years and dates back to 1988 when Prof. Milla Baldo Ceolin conceived it and launched the first edition. It soon became a crucial event and it is now considered a consolidated appointment where to discuss the latest discoveries and the fascinating future scenarios in topics that range from Neutrinos to Astrophysics and Cosmology. The workshop is structured in plenary sessions with invited talks followed by discussions and a poster session, aiming at involving particularly, but not limited to, young researchers with new brilliant ideas on the workshop's topics of interest.

  10. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  11. A Guide to Building Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  13. Minnowbrook V: 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E.; Ashpis, David E.; Oldfield, Martin L. G.; Gostelow, J. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This CD-ROM contain materials presented at the Minnowbrook V 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery, held at the Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, on August 20-23, 2006. The workshop organizers were John E. LaGraff (Syracuse University), Martin L.G. Oldfield (Oxford University), and J. Paul Gostelow (University of Leicester). The workshop followed the theme, venue, and informal format of four earlier workshops: Minnowbrook I (1993), Minnowbrook II (1997), Minnowbrook III (2000), and Minnowbrook IV (2003). The workshop was focused on physical understanding of unsteady flows in turbomachinery, with the specific goal of contributing to engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery. The workshop participants included academic researchers from the United States and abroad and representatives from the gas-turbine industry and U.S. Government laboratories. The physical mechanisms discussed were related to unsteady wakes, active flow control, turbulence, bypass and natural transition, separation bubbles and turbulent spots, modeling of turbulence and transition, heat transfer and cooling, surface roughness, unsteady CFD, and DNS. This CD-ROM contains copies of the viewgraphs presented, organized according to the workshop sessions. Full-color viewgraphs and animations are included. The workshop summary and the plenary discussion transcripts clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of unsteady flows in turbomachines.

  14. PV radiometrics workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents presentations and discussions held at the Photovoltaics Radiometeric Measurements Workshop conducted at Vail, Colorado, on July 24 and 25, 1995. The workshop was sponsored and financed by the Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project managed by Richard DeBlasio, Principal Investigator. That project is a component of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic Research and Development Program, conducted by NREL for the US Department of Energy, through the NREL Photovoltaic Engineering and Applications Branch, managed by Roland Hulstrom. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this workshop.

  15. Soil Moisture Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L. (Editor); Moore, D. G. (Editor); Schmugge, T. J. (Editor); Friedman, D. B. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Workshop was held at the United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, Maryland on January 17-19, 1978. The objectives of the Workshop were to evaluate the state of the art of remote sensing of soil moisture; examine the needs of potential users; and make recommendations concerning the future of soil moisture research and development. To accomplish these objectives, small working groups were organized in advance of the Workshop to prepare position papers. These papers served as the basis for this report.

  16. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, John Howard; Allen, Todd Randall; Hildebrandt, Philip Clay; Baker, Suzanne Hobbs

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  17. Ocean margins workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  18. Martian Surface and Atmosphere Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuraytz, Benjamin C.

    The NASA-sponsored Martian Surface and Atmosphere Through Time Study Project convened its first major meeting at the University of Colorado in Boulder, September 23-25, 1991. The workshop, co-sponsored by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) and the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, brought together an international group of 125 scientists to discuss a variety of issues relevant to the goals of the MSATT Program. The workshop program committee included co-convenors Robert Haberle, MSATT Steering Committee Chairman NASA Ames Research Center) and Bruce Jakosky (University of Colorado), and committee members Amos Banin (NASA Ames Research Center and Hebrew University), Benjamin Schuraytz (LPI), and Kenneth Tanaka (U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz.).The purpose of the workshop was to begin exploring and defining the relationships between different aspects of Mars science—the evolution of the surface, the atmosphere, upper atmosphere, volatiles, and climate. Specific topics addressed in the 88 contributed abstracts included the current nature of the surface with respect to physical properties and photometric observations and interpretations; the history of geological processes, comprising water and ice-related geomorphology, impact cratering, and volcanism; and the geochemistry and mineralogy of the surface with emphasis on compositional and spectroscopic studies and weathering processes. Also addressed were the present atmosphere, focusing on structure and dynamics, volatile and dust distribution, and the upper atmosphere; long-term volatile evolution based on volatiles in SNC meteorites (certain meteorites thought to have come from Mars) and atmospheric evolution processes; climate history and volatile cycles in relation to early climate and the polar caps, ground ice, and regolith; and future mission concepts.

  19. Expedition 18 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    The State Commission gives the approval for launch of the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft carrying Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott to the International Space Station, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to launch Oct. 12 for a docking with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Expedition 18 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, left, and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke listen to the State Commission give the approval for launch of the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Lonchakov, Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott are scheduled to launch Oct. 12 and then to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 18 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    A Russian flight surgeon, right, along with the quarantined prime and backup crews listen to the State Commission give the final approval for the launch of the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott are scheduled to launch Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. The SNS RFQ Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ratti, A.; Ayers, J.; Doolittle, L.; DiGennaro, R.; Gough, R.A.; Hoff, M.; Keller, R.; MacGill, J.; Staples, J.; Thomae, R.; Virostek, S.; Yourd, R.; Aleksandrov, A.

    2002-08-16

    LBNL has built for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project a 402.5 MHz RFQ that is designed to accelerate up to 60 mA H{sup -} from 65 keV to 2.5 MeV [1]. A one millisecond pulse length at 60 Hz provides a 6% duty factor. The RFQ has now been built, conditioned at full duty factor and tested with beam. This paper will present results from the final installation, tuning and beam commissioning. Beam measurements include acceleration and transport efficiencies and transverse emittances. The LEBT optics were tuned for best results. Performance testing of the RF power distribution is also discussed here.

  3. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  4. Commission 31: Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defraigne, Pascale; Manchester, Richard; Matsakis, Demetrios; Petit, Gerard; Hosokawa, Mizuhiko; Leschiutta, Sigfrid; Zhai, Zao-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Dr R. N. Manchester and Dr M. Hosokawa have been elected as, respectively, the new President and Vice-President of the Commission for the next term, 2009-2012. Concerning the Organizing Committee (OC) Members, we welcome as new members: Felicitas Aris (BIPM, France), Philip Tuckey (LNE-SYRTE, France), Vladimir Zharov (MSU, Russia), and Shougang Zhang (NTSC, China) and we acknowledge the outgoing members: Demetrios Matsakis, Gerard Petit, Mizuhiko Hosokawa, Sigfrid Leschiutta and Zao-Cheng Zhai. P. Defraigne remains on the OC as immediate Past-President.

  5. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  6. International Workshop on Computational Condensed Matter Physics (5th) Held in Trieste, Italy on 16-18 January 1991. Programme and Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-18

    and physical ions G. B. Bachelet, A. Bosin. P. Focher and A. Lastri Dipartimento di Fisica and Laboratorio di Fisica Computazionale Universita degh...implementation of the Augmented-Plane-WVave method Jos6 M. Soler’ and Arthur R. WiUiams 2 IDep. de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Univ. Aut6noma. E...International Centre for Theoretical Phy/sics (ICTP). P.O. Boz 586, J-340i4’ Trieste, Italy c) Laboratorio Tecnologie Avanzate Superfici e Catalisi(TASC), del

  7. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    SciTech Connect

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Van Dam, Wim; Farhi, Edward; Gaitan, Frank; Humble, Travis; Jordan, Stephen; Landahl, Andrew J; Love, Peter; Lucas, Robert; Preskill, John; Muller, Richard P.; Svore, Krysta; Wiebe, Nathan; Williams, Carl

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  8. TH-C-204-00: Medical Physics Workshop: An Update On the Journal's Improvement Activities and Guidance On Writing and Reviewing Papers.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    In this presentation, the Editors will outline our vision for the future of Medical Physics and review recent work-in-progress initiatives to implement this vision. Finally, we will close with guidance to authors on how to write a good Medical Physics paper. A major focus will be the transition to a new publisher in 2017 following a more than 40-year association with American Institute of Physics Publishing (AIPP). Vision for Medical Physics and status of current initiatives: Jeff Williamson, Editor-in-Chief The broad vision of Medical Physics is "to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the very best science that propels our discipline forward and improves our contribution to patient care." More concretely, the Journal should be the preeminent forum for exchange of cutting edge medical physics science. We seek to identify the best contributions in (a) high impact clinical physics innovations; (b) clinical translation and validation of basic science innovations; and (c) cutting edge basic science developments with potential for patient care improvements. Among the challenges and opportunities, we face are: electronic-only and open access publishing; competition from new radiological science journals; trends towards more interactive, social-media based scientific communities; and diversification of the medical physics research, authorship, and readership domains, including clinical applications quite foreign to core ABR clinical competencies. Recently implemented and ongoing initiatives include: 1) Revised Table of Contents (TOC) and more contemporary topical submission categories 2) Structured review template in HTML format 3) Comprehensive hierarchical taxonomy for identifying reviewer expertise 4) Formal process for soliciting high quality and impact Review and Vision 20/20 Articles We have recruited four Review Article Co-editors: John Rowlands and Ingrid Reiser (imaging physics) and Joao Seco and Tim Zhu (therapy physics). The Co-Editors will identify

  9. 7TH International Workshop on Laser Physics (LPHYS󈨦) Berlin, Germany July 6-10, 1998 Program and Book of Abstracts: Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    Phone: +1 401 863-1444, E-Mail: Theodore Morse@brown.edu ’Physical Sciences Inc., Andover, MA 01810. Abstract: A wavelength modulated Er3’ -Yb3’ doped...explants [Mester and Snow, 1990], Schwann cell proliferation [Van Breugel et al., 1991], astrocyte division [Yew et al., 1990], changes in striatal

  10. The Effects of a Content Knowledge Workshop on Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Student Learning in a Soccer Unit in Middle School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yun Soo

    2011-01-01

    There is an assumption that pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) is observable and measurable. Yet, in many studies referencing PCK, the construct of PCK remains both undefined operationally and poorly described. In physical education, although one study has measured teachers' PCK using teachers' weak and strong units of instruction (Ayvazo, 2007),…

  11. ONR/LANL Workshop on the Fundamental Physics and Chemistry of Combustion, Initiation, and Detonation of Energetic Materials Held in Los Almos, New Mexico on 3-6 March 1992,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This document contains the abstracts, papers, and selected posters presented at the Office of Naval Research/ Los Alamos National Laboratory (ONR/LANL...workshop that was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory , Los Alamos, New Mexico, March 3-6, 1992. The workshop focused on the fundamental

  12. Urban Waters Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page will house information leading up to the 2017 Urban Waters National Training Workshop. The agenda, hotel and other quarterly updates will be posted to this page including information about how to register.

  13. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  14. Cybernetics and Workshop Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckstein, Daniel G.

    1979-01-01

    Cybernetic sessions allow for the investigation of several variables concurrently, resulting in a large volume of input compacted into a concise time frame. Three session questions are reproduced to illustrate the variety of ideas generated relative to workshop design. (Author)

  15. Special parallel processing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report contains viewgraphs from the Special Parallel Processing Workshop. These viewgraphs deal with topics such as parallel processing performance, message passing, queue structure, and other basic concept detailing with parallel processing.

  16. SUMMARY OF WORKSHOP SESSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Important aspects of the effect of contaminants on wetland ecological structure and function, in both natural and constructed systems, were reviewed and evaluated in a Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Workshop, Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment for Wetlan...

  17. Successful Workshop Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Barbara A.

    1980-01-01

    Offers suggestions concerning important elements in planning workshops: organization of committees, program planning, definition of topic and purpose, statement of objectives, the audience, format, timing, site selection, registration, publicity, speaker selection, contracts, budgets, and evaluation questionnaires. (FM)

  18. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  19. An Aerospace Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bill

    1972-01-01

    Describes the 16-day, 10,000 mile national tour of the nation's major aerospace research and development centers by 65 students enrolled in Central Washington State College's Summer Aerospace Workshop. (Author/MB)

  20. The Career Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    This article describes a career planning workshop for managers and its purpose is to support and accelerate the process of individual development without organizational coercion or manipulation. (Author/RK)

  1. Workshop: Teaching Primitive Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordison, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the concrete and spiritual aspects of teaching workshops on survival skills or primitive arts. Gives details on lostproofing, or ways to teach a child not to get lost in the outdoors; building a survival shelter; and wilderness cooking. (CDS)

  2. Colorado Model Rocketry Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindez, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Describes a summer workshop course in rocketry offered to educators and sponsored by industry. The participants built various model rockets and equipment and worked on challenging practical problems and activities. (GA)

  3. An Aerospace Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bill

    1972-01-01

    Describes the 16-day, 10,000 mile national tour of the nation's major aerospace research and development centers by 65 students enrolled in Central Washington State College's Summer Aerospace Workshop. (Author/MB)

  4. ISIS Workshops Using Virtualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Becker, T. L.

    2015-06-01

    ISIS workshops are now using virtualization technology to improve the user experience and create a stable, consistent and useful ISIS installation for educational purposes as well as future processing needs.

  5. Appalachian Stream Mitigation Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A 5 day workshop in 2011 developed for state and federal regulatory and resource agencies, who review, comment on and/or approve compensatory mitigation plans for surface coal mining projects in Appalachia

  6. Report of the Interagency biological methods workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurtz, Martin E.; Muir, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey hosted the Interagency Biological Methods Workshop in Reston, Virginia, during June 22-23, 1993. The purposes of the workshop were to (1) promote better communication among Federal agencies that are using or developing biological methods in water-quality assessment programs for streams and rivers, and (2) facilitate the sharing of data and interagency collaboration. The workshop was attended by 45 biologists representing numerous Federal agencies and programs, and a few regional and State programs that were selected to provide additional perspectives. The focus of the workshop was community assessment methods for fish, invertebrates, and algae; physical habitat characterization; and chemical analyses of biological tissues. Charts comparing program objectives, design features, and sampling methods were compiled from materials that were provided by participating agencies prior to the workshop and formed the basis for small workgroup discussions. Participants noted that differences in methods among programs were often necessitated by differences in program objectives. However, participants agreed that where programs have identified similar data needs, the use of common methods is beneficial. Opportunities discussed for improving data compatibility and information sharing included (1) modifying existing methods, (2) adding parameters, (3) improving access to data through shared databases (potentially with common database structures), and (4) future collaborative efforts that range from research on selected protocol questions to followup meetings and continued discussions.

  7. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  8. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop on Tuesday, May 14, 2002, to discuss space mechanisms technology. The theme for this workshop was 'Working in the Cold,' a focus on space mechanisms that must operate at low temperatures. We define 'cold' as below -60C (210 K), such as would be found near the equator of Mars. However, we are also concerned with much colder temperatures such as in permanently dark craters of the Moon (about 40 K).

  9. OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. Bernard; Wright, Robert L.; Badi, Deborah; Findlay, John T.

    1988-01-01

    This publication summarizes the software needs and available analysis tools presented at the OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop held at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia on June 21 to 22, 1988. The objective of the workshop was to identify available spacecraft system (and subsystem) analysis and engineering design tools, and mission planning and analysis software that could be used for various NASA Office of Exploration (code Z) studies, specifically lunar and Mars missions.

  10. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop to discuss the state of drive systems technology needed for space exploration. The Workshop was held Thursday, November 2, 2000. About 70 space mechanisms experts shared their experiences from working in this field and considered technology development that will be needed to support future space exploration in the next 10 to 30 years.

  11. Orion: a commissioned user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadwell, P. A.; Allan, P.; Cann, N.; Danson, C.; Duffield, S.; Elsmere, S.; Edwards, R.; Egan, D.; Girling, M.; Gumbrell, E.; Harvey, E.; Hill, M.; Hillier, D.; Hoarty, D.; Hobbs, L.; Hopps, N.; Hussey, D.; Oades, K.; James, S.; Norman, M.; Palmer, J.; Parker, S.; Winter, D.; Bett, T.

    2013-05-01

    The Orion Laser Facility at AWE in the UK consists of ten nanosecond beamlines and two sub-picosecond beamlines. The nanosecond beamlines each nominally deliver 500 J at 351 nm in a 1 ns square temporal profile, but can also deliver a user-definable temporal profile with durations between 0.1 ns and 5 ns. The sub-picosecond beamlines each nominally deliver 500 J at 1053 nm in a 500 fs pulse, with a peak irradiance of greater than 1021 W/cm2. One of the sub-picosecond beamlines can also be frequency-converted to deliver 100 J at 527 nm in a 500 fs pulse, although this is at half the aperture of the 1053 nm beam. Commissioning of all twelve beamlines has been completed, including the 527 nm sub-picosecond option. An overview of the design of the Orion beamlines will be presented, along with a summary of the commissioning and subsequent performance data. The design of Orion was underwritten by running various computer simulations of the beamlines. Work is now underway to validate these simulations against real system data, with the aim of creating predictive models of beamline performance. These predictive models will enable the user's experimental requirements to be critically assessed ahead of time, and will ultimately be used to determine key system settings and parameters. The facility is now conducting high energy density physics experiments. A capability experiment has already been conducted that demonstrates that Orion can generate plasmas at several million Kelvin and several times solid density. From March 2013 15% of the facility operating time will be given over to external academic users in addition to collaborative experiments with AWE scientists.

  12. Proceedings of the NASA First Wake Vortex Dynamic Spacing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creduer, Leonard (Editor); Perry, R. Brad (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A Government and Industry workshop on wake vortex dynamic spacing systems was conducted on May 13-15, 1997, at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of the workshop was to disclose the status of ongoing NASA wake vortex R&D to the international community and to seek feedback on the direction of future work to assure an optimized research approach. Workshop sessions examined wake vortex characterization and physics, wake sensor technologies, aircraft/wake encounters, terminal area weather characterization and prediction, and wake vortex systems integration and implementation. A final workshop session surveyed the Government and Industry perspectives on the NASA research underway and related international wake vortex activities. This document contains the proceedings of the workshop including the presenters' slides, the discussion following each presentation, the wrap-up panel discussion, and the attendees' evaluation feedback.

  13. DOE Advanced Controls R&D Planning Workshop, June 11, 2003, Washington DC: Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13

    On June 11, 2003, representatives from universities, federal and state government agencies, Department of Energy national laboratories, and the private sector attended a one-day workshop in Washington, DC. The objective of the workshop was to review and provide input into DOE's assessment of the market for advanced sensors and controls technology and potential R&D pathways to enhance their success in the buildings market place. The workshop consisted of two sessions. During the morning session, participants were given an overview on the following topics: market assessment, current applications and strategies for new applications, sensors and controls, networking, security, and protocols and standards, and automated diagnostics, performance measurement, commissioning and optimal control and tools. In the sessions, workshop participants were asked to review the potential R&D pathways, identify high priority activities, and outline a five year path for each of these activities. Priorities were as follows: largest and quickest impact; best use of finite resources; greatest likelihood for market penetration; and ability to replicate results. The participants identified several promising R&D opportunities.

  14. Report of the task force on SSC commissioning and operations

    SciTech Connect

    1985-07-01

    In 1985 January a Taskforce was organized to study the impact of magnet design on the commissioning and operation of the SSC. The results of the study, in the form of this report, are intended as one of several sources of input for the Magnet Type Selection Committee. Other major input will come from the Magnet Taskforce, the Test String Taskforce, the Cost Estimating Taskforce, and other study groups. All of these efforts will culminate in a magnet type selection, after which concentrated R&D on the selected magnet can commence. The study began with a one-week workshop, held on the UC Berkeley campus in 1985 January 14--18. An interim report of the Taskforce, based on the results of the Workshop, was published on 1985 January 28 (SSC-05). With very few exceptions, the work of the Taskforce was carried out by the participants in the Workshop, both during the workshop and in the subsequent weeks. This report is the collective effort of that group, whose very substantial contribution of time, effort, and thought is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  16. Expedition 38 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, left, Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, right, are seen behind glass, while in quarantine, during the State Commission meeting held to approve the Soyuz launch of the crew for a six month mission aboard the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. An Olympic torch that will be launched with the crew for a four-day visit to the station is seen on the left. The torch will return to Earth with another trio of station residents on Nov. 11 and will be part of the torch relay that ends with the lighting of the flame at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia Feb. 7 to mark the opening of the 2014 Winter Olympics. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, M.; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M.

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

  18. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The field of neutrino physics has expanded greatly in recent years with the discovery that neutrinos change flavor and therefore have mass. Although there are many neutrino physics results since the last DIS workshop, these proceedings concentrate on recent neutrino physics results that either add to or depend on the understanding of Deep Inelastic Scattering. They also describe the short and longer term future of neutrino DIS experiments.

  19. Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications are to ensure that the design team applies commissioning concepts to the design and prepares commissioning specifications and a commission plan for inclusion in the bid construction documents.

  20. The Effects of a One Day In-Service Workshop on the Self-Efficacy of Physical Educators to Include Students with Autism into the General Physical Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    General physical education (GPE) teachers often express concerns when asked about including students with autism into an inclusive physical education environment, which typically result in feelings of frustration (Blinde & McCallister, 1998; Goodwin & Watkinson, 2000; Hutzler, Zach, & Gafni, 2005; Place & Hodge, 2001). Similarly,…

  1. The Effects of a One Day In-Service Workshop on the Self-Efficacy of Physical Educators to Include Students with Autism into the General Physical Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    General physical education (GPE) teachers often express concerns when asked about including students with autism into an inclusive physical education environment, which typically result in feelings of frustration (Blinde & McCallister, 1998; Goodwin & Watkinson, 2000; Hutzler, Zach, & Gafni, 2005; Place & Hodge, 2001). Similarly,…

  2. The QED Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  3. t4 Workshop Report*

    PubMed Central

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J.; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma’ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W.; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T.; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E.; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. A workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation – the development of Pathways of Toxicity (PoT) as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a PoT as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as “A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants”. It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities. PMID:24127042

  4. Commissioning of NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Willeke, F.

    2015-05-03

    NSLS-II, the new 3rd generation light source at BNL was designed for a brightness of 1022 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 (0.1%BW)-1. It was constructed between 2009 and 2014. The storage ring was commissioned in April 2014 which was followed by insertion device and beamline commissioning in the fall of 2014. All ambitious design parameters of the facility have already been achieved except for commissioning the full beam intensity of 500mA which requires more RF installation. This paper reports on the results of commissioning.

  5. Special Issue on the 20th Workshop on MHD Stability Control

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Jong -Kyu

    2016-11-08

    The 20th workshop on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability control took place November 22–24, 2015, in Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), following the American Physical Society—Division of Plasma Physics annual meeting on November 16–20 in Savannah, GA. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate in depth discussion and motivate future research in the areas of MHD stability physics and control of magnetically confined plasmas. Furthermore, the workshop was organized jointly by Auburn University, Columbia University, General Atomics, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and under the auspices of the US/Japan Collaboration.

  6. 75 FR 25281 - Food Protection Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Protection Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ] ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... with the University of Arkansas (UA) Institute of Food Science and Engineering, is announcing a public...

  7. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy compliance life cycle. A learning lunch... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice Announcing Public Workshop. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security Privacy...

  8. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  9. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  10. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  11. Thin film solar cell workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Joe; Jeffrey, Frank

    1993-01-01

    A summation of responses to questions posed to the thin-film solar cell workshop and the ensuing discussion is provided. Participants in the workshop included photovoltaic manufacturers (both thin film and crystalline), cell performance investigators, and consumers.

  12. Conducting Effective Staff Development Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kay; Janczak, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Staff development workshops conducted by library media specialists can assist teachers to integrate information literacy skills and technology into their curricula. Guidelines are presented on the planning and implementation of such workshops.

  13. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  14. Commissioning a Hodoscope Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulis, Andrew; Merhi, Abdul; Frank, Nathan; Bazin, Daniel; Smith, Jenna; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Experiments on neutron-rich nuclei are interesting since they test the limits of current nuclear theory. One method to populate neutron-rich nuclei is to utilize the (d,p) reaction in which the beam nucleus picks up a neutron from the target. This heavier nucleus immediately emits a neutron resulting in the same nucleus as the beam but with lower energy. One challenge is to discriminate decay products from unreacted beam particles by their difference in energy. A hodoscope was recently installed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) as part of the MoNA-LISA-Sweeper setup to make experiments using a (d,p) reaction possible. The hodoscope is a 5 × 5 scintillator array consisting of CsI(Na) crystals with a resolution of better than 1%. This presentation will describe the recently commissioned detector and the results of the first data analysis using this device. Work supported by Augustana College and the National Science Foundation grant #0969173.

  15. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  16. National Knowledge Commission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitroda, Sam

    2007-04-01

    India's National Knowledge Commission (NKC) established by the prime minister is focused on building institutions and infrastructure in Education, Science and Technology, Innovation etc. to meet the challenges of the knowledge economy in the 21st century and increase India's competitive advantage in the global market. India today stands poised to reap the benefits of a rapidly growing economy and a major demographic advantage, with 550 million young people below the age of 25 years, the largest in the world. The NKC is focused on five critical areas of knowledge related to access, concepts, creation, applications and services. This includes a variety of subject areas such as language, translations, libraries, networks, portals, affirmative action, distance learning, intellectual property, Entrepreneurship, application in Agriculture, health, small and medium scale industries, e-governance etc. One of the keys to this effort is to build a national broadband gigabit of networks of 500 nodes to connect universities, Libraries, Laboratories, Hospitals, Agriculture institutions etc. to share resources and collaborate on multidisciplinary activities. This presentation will introduce the NKC, discuss methodology, subject areas, specific recommendation and outline a plan to build knowledge networks and specifics on network architecture, applications, and utilities.

  17. LIGO Detector Commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Frederick

    2003-04-01

    The initial LIGO interferometer design was based on more than 20 years of experience with test interferometers, but the increase in scale, new operating environments and extreme technical requirements presented challenges for commissioning. Detector installation began in 1998 with injection optics at Hanford, WA. By 1999, light was resonating in a single 2-km Fabry-Perot arm cavity. Subsequent engineering runs tested stability and analyzed environmental influences, particularly the earth tides and the microseism. By October 2000, the first lock of a kilometer-scale, power recycled Fabry-Perot-Michelson interferometer was obtained, using an automated system to analyze optical signals and reconfigure control loops as the mirrors are drawn into position. The many control loops that minimize length and angle fluctuations of the mirrors relative to the laser light were tuned and noise sources were identified and reduced iteratively as sensitivity improved by several orders of magnitude. Following installation of the last LIGO mirror in 2001, engineering run 7 provided the first triple-coincidence operation of LIGO's interferometers at Hanford and Livingston, LA in early 2002. Clear signals of mirrors recoiling from the Brownian motion of the suspension-wire violin modes first emerged from the noise during science run 1 in September 2002, at approximately the expected amplitude. Detector robustness has steadily improved and uninterrupted locking on a dark fringe for more than a day has been achieved. The support of the US National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement No. PHY-0107417 is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  19. Skylab Orbiter Workshop Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This cutaway illustration shows the characteristics and basic elements of the Skylab Orbiter Workshop (OWS). The OWS was divided into two major compartments. The lower level provided crew accommodations for sleeping, food preparation and consumption, hygiene, waste processing and disposal, and performance of certain experiments. The upper level consisted of a large work area and housed water storage tanks, a food freezer, storage vaults for film, scientific airlocks, mobility and stability experiment equipment, and other experimental equipment. The compartment below the crew quarters was a container for liquid and solid waste and trash accumulated throughout the mission. A solar array, consisting of two wings covered on one side with solar cells, was mounted outside the workshop to generate electrical power to augment the power generated by another solar array mounted on the solar observatory. Thrusters were provided at one end of the workshop for short-term control of the attitude of the space station.

  20. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  1. Workshop on molecular animation.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2010-10-13

    From February 25 to 26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for producing high-quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories.

  2. Workshop on Molecular Animation

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Sarina; Chiu, Wah; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary February 25–26, 2010, in San Francisco, the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization and Informatics (RBVI) and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) hosted a molecular animation workshop for 21 structural biologists, molecular animators, and creators of molecular visualization software. Molecular animation aims to visualize scientific understanding of biomolecular processes and structures. The primary goal of the workshop was to identify the necessary tools for: producing high quality molecular animations, understanding complex molecular and cellular structures, creating publication supplementary materials and conference presentations, and teaching science to students and the public. Another use of molecular animation emerged in the workshop: helping to focus scientific inquiry about the motions of molecules and enhancing informal communication within and between laboratories. PMID:20947014

  3. European Stroke Science Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, Heinrich P.; Brainin, Michael; Chamorro, Angel; Diener, Hans Christoph; Hacke, Werner; Leys, Didier; Norrving, Bo; Ward, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The European Stroke Organisation (ESO) held its first European Stroke Science Workshop in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (15-17 December 2011). Stroke experts based in Europe were invited to present and discuss their current research. The scope of the workshop was to review the most recent findings of selected topics in stroke, to exchange ideas, to stimulate new research and to enhance collaboration between European stroke research groups. Seven scientific sessions were held, each starting with a keynote lecture to review the state of the art of the given topic, followed by 4 or 5 short presentations by experts. They were asked to limit their presentations to 10 slides containing only recent information. The meeting was organized by the executive committee of the ESO (Heinrich Mattle, chairman, Michael Brainin, Angel Chamorro, Werner Hacke, Didier Leys) and supported by the European Stroke Conference (Michael Hennerici). In this article we summarize the main contents of this successful workshop. PMID:22836350

  4. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-09

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  5. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  6. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  7. Third International Workshop on Squeezed States and Uncertainty Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Rubin, Morton H. (Editor); Shih, Yan-Hua (Editor); Zachary, Woodford W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of these workshops is to bring together an international selection of scientists to discuss the latest developments in Squeezed States in various branches of physics, and in the understanding of the foundations of quantum mechanics. At the third workshop, special attention was given to the influence that quantum optics is having on our understanding of quantum measurement theory. The fourth meeting in this series will be held in the People's Republic of China.

  8. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: ANIMATED ORBITS OF PLANETS AND MOONS: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. SOLAR SYSTEM COLLISIONS: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. SCIENTIFIC NOTATION: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. ORBITAL SIMULATIONS: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. ASTRONOMY WORKSHOP BULLETIN BOARD: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  9. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  10. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-09-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  11. In-House EVM Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Government Accounting • Management Information System • Workshop Recommendations EVM In- House Workshop Findings • EVM implementation within DoD...Management Command Mr. William “Bill” Gibson Mr. Dominic A. “Chip” Thomas IN- HOUSE ( GOVERNMENT ) EVMS WORKSHOP VALIDATION & SURVEILLANCE D:\\PPT...2Defense Contract Management Command IN- HOUSE ( GOVERNMENT ) EVMS WORKSHOP VALIDATION • WHY VALIDATE/CERTIFY • WHO PAYS THE COST • FACILITY

  12. Workshop on the role of natural analogs in geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.; Kovach, L.A.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) was held in San Antonio, Texas, on July 22-25, 1991. It was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). Invitations to the workshop were extended to a large number of individuals with a variety of technical and professional interests related to geologic disposal of nuclear waste and natural analog studies. The objective of the workshop was to examine the role of natural analog studies in performance assessment, site characterization, and prioritization of research related to geologic disposal of HLW.

  13. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, Claude R. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided.

  14. Innovative Long Wavelength Infrared Detector Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on innovative long wavelength (lambda less than 17 microns) infrared (LWIR) detectors with the potential of meeting future NASA and DoD long-duration space application needs. Requirements are for focal plane arrays which operate near 65K using active refrigeration with mission lifetimes of five to ten years. The workshop addressed innovative concepts, new material systems, novel device physics, and current progress in relation to benchmark technology. It also provided a forum for discussion of performance characterization, producibility, reliability, and fundamental limitations of device physics. It covered the status of the incumbent HgCdTe technology, which shows encouraging progress towards LWIR arrays, and provided a snapshot of research and development in several new contender technologies.

  15. Second International Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo (Editor); Wolf, Kurt Bernardo (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Second International Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc from March 23 to 25, 1994. The Workshop gathered 67 participants; there were 10 invited lecturers, 30 plenary oral presentations, 15 posters, and plenty of discussion divided into the five sessions of this volume. The Organizing Committee was asked by the chairman of several Mexican funding agencies what exactly was meant by harmonic oscillators, and for what purpose the new research could be useful. Harmonic oscillators - as we explained - is a code name for a family of mathematical models based on the theory of Lie algebras and groups, with applications in a growing range of physical theories and technologies: molecular, atomic, nuclear and particle physics; quantum optics and communication theory.

  16. Bringing Technology into High School Physics Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2005-04-01

    In an effort to help high school physics teachers bring technology into their classrooms, we at JSU have been offering professional development to secondary education teachers. This effort is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind (NCLB) grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, serving high school physics teachers in Northeast Alabama. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. To achieve IMPACTSEED's goals, we have forged a functional collaboration with school districts from about ten counties. This collaboration is aimed at achieving a double aim: (a) to make physics and chemistry understandable and fun to learn within a hands-on, inquiry-based setting; (b) to overcome the fear- factor for physics and chemistry among students. Through a two-week long summer institute, a series of weekend technology workshops, and onsite support, we have been providing year-round support to the physics/chemistry teachers in this area. This outreach initiative has helped provide our students with a physics/chemistry education that enjoys a great deal of continuity and consistency from high school to college.

  17. The Dacum Workshop. Dacum 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Barbara J.

    This booklet, the second in a series of four volumes on the Designing a Curriculum (Dacum) process, is intended to familiarize prospective Dacum workshop participants with the goals and procedures of the workshop. The first section of the booklet comprises a description of a Dacum workshop as a means of bringing together educators and employers to…

  18. Proceedings of the Workshop on Change of Representation and Problem Reformulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the third Workshop on Change of representation and Problem Reformulation is presented. In contrast to the first two workshops, this workshop was focused on analytic or knowledge-based approaches, as opposed to statistical or empirical approaches called 'constructive induction'. The organizing committee believes that there is a potential for combining analytic and inductive approaches at a future date. However, it became apparent at the previous two workshops that the communities pursuing these different approaches are currently interested in largely non-overlapping issues. The constructive induction community has been holding its own workshops, principally in conjunction with the machine learning conference. While this workshop is more focused on analytic approaches, the organizing committee has made an effort to include more application domains. We have greatly expanded from the origins in the machine learning community. Participants in this workshop come from the full spectrum of AI application domains including planning, qualitative physics, software engineering, knowledge representation, and machine learning.

  19. Reflections on the Gordon Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haertel, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Background:This brief reflection on the work of the Gordon Commission calls out significant themes and implications found in the various papers authored by the commissioners and other scholars, especially those included in this special issue of Teachers College Record. Purpose: The forward-looking vision of the Gordon Commission is contrasted with…

  20. Vermont Technical Education Commission Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont State Technical Education Commission, Montpelier.

    A 1968 New England Regional Commission grant to the Vermont Department of Administration financed a feasibility study for a technical college at the postsecondary level. The commission undertook two specific studies: an examination of ultimate career destinations of Vermont secondary students and a survey of Vermont industry to determine immediate…