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Sample records for physiologic oxygen tension

  1. Oxygen tension in embryo culture: does a shift to 2% O2 in extended culture represent the most physiologic system?

    PubMed

    Morin, Scott J

    2017-03-01

    There has been much debate regarding the optimal oxygen tension in clinical embryo culture. The majority of the literature to date has compared 5% oxygen to atmospheric levels (20-21%). While the majority of modern IVF labs have accepted the superiority of 5% oxygen tension, a new debate has emerged regarding whether a further reduction after day 3 of development represents the most physiologic system. This new avenue of research is based on the premise that oxygen tension is in fact lower in the uterus than in the oviduct and that the embryo crosses the uterotubal junction sometime on day 3. While data are currently limited, recent experience with ultra-low oxygen (2%) after day 3 of development suggests that the optimal oxygen tension in embryo culture may depend on the stage of development. This review article will consider the current state of the literature and discuss ongoing efforts at studying ultra-low oxygen tension in extended culture.

  2. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O'Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-08-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes.

  3. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-01-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes. PMID:27478033

  4. Ion release from magnesium materials in physiological solutions under different oxygen tensions.

    PubMed

    Feyerabend, Frank; Drücker, Heiko; Laipple, Daniel; Vogt, Carla; Stekker, Michael; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit, Regine

    2012-01-01

    Although magnesium as degradable biomaterial already showed clinical proof of concepts, the design of new alloys requires predictive in vitro methods, which are still lacking. Incubation under cell culture conditions to obtain "physiological" corrosion may be a solution. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of different solutions, addition of proteins and of oxygen availability on the corrosion of different magnesium materials (pure Mg, WE43, and E11) with different surface finishing. Oxygen content in solution, pH, osmolality and ion release were determined. Corrosion led to a reduction of oxygen in solution. The influence of oxygen on pH was enhanced by proteins, while osmolality was not influenced. Magnesium ion release was solution-dependent and enhanced in the initial phase by proteins with delayed release of alloying elements. The main corrosion product formed was magnesium carbonate. Therefore, cell culture conditions are proposed as first step toward physiological corrosion.

  5. Sex differences in the mitochondrial bioenergetics of astrocytes but not microglia at a physiologically relevant brain oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Sausan M; Bordt, Evan A; Bhatt, Niraj M; Lewis, Daniel M; Gerecht, Sharon; Fiskum, Gary; Polster, Brian M

    2017-09-06

    Biological sex is thought to influence mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Previous respiration measurements examining brain mitochondrial sex differences were made at atmospheric oxygen using isolated brain mitochondria. Oxygen is 160 mm Hg (21%) in the atmosphere, while the oxygen tension in the brain generally ranges from ∼5 to 45 mm Hg (∼1-6% O2). This study tested the hypothesis that sex and/or brain physiological oxygen tension influence the mitochondrial bioenergetic properties of primary rat cortical astrocytes and microglia. Oxygen consumption was measured with a Seahorse XF24 cell respirometer in an oxygen-controlled environmental chamber. Strikingly, male astrocytes had a higher maximal respiration than female astrocytes when cultured and assayed at 3% O2. Three percent O2 yielded a low physiological dissolved O2 level of ∼1.2% (9.1 mm Hg) at the cell monolayer during culture and 1.2-3.0% O2 during assays. No differences in bioenergetic parameters were observed between male and female astrocytes at 21% O2 (dissolved O2 of ∼19.7%, 150 mm Hg during culture) or between either of these cell populations and female astrocytes at 3% O2. In contrast to astrocytes, microglia showed no sex differences in mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters at either oxygen level, regardless of whether they were non-stimulated or activated to a proinflammatory state. There were also no O2- or sex-dependent differences in proinflammatory TNF-α or IL-1β cytokine secretion measured at 18 h activation. Overall, results reveal an intriguing sex variance in astrocytic maximal respiration that requires additional investigation. Findings also demonstrate that sex differences can be masked by conducting experiments at non-physiological O2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain tissue oxygen tension and its response to physiological manipulations: influence of distance from injury site in a swine model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Phan, Nicolas; Ferguson, Adam R; Morabito, Diane; Derugin, Nikita; Stewart, Campbell L; Knudson, M Margaret; Manley, Geoffrey; Rosenthal, Guy

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The optimal site for placement of tissue oxygen probes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unresolved. The authors used a previously described swine model of focal TBI and studied brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) at the sites of contusion, proximal and distal to contusion, and in the contralateral hemisphere to determine the effect of probe location on PbtO2 and to assess the effects of physiological interventions on PbtO2 at these different sites. METHODS A controlled cortical impact device was used to generate a focal lesion in the right frontal lobe in 12 anesthetized swine. PbtO2 was measured using Licox brain tissue oxygen probes placed at the site of contusion, in pericontusional tissue (proximal probe), in the right parietal region (distal probe), and in the contralateral hemisphere. PbtO2 was measured during normoxia, hyperoxia, hypoventilation, and hyperventilation. RESULTS Physiological interventions led to expected changes, including a large increase in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood with hyperoxia, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) with hypoventilation, and decreased ICP with hyperventilation. Importantly, PbtO2 decreased substantially with proximity to the focal injury (contusion and proximal probes), and this difference was maintained at different levels of fraction of inspired oxygen and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. In the distal and contralateral probes, hypoventilation and hyperventilation were associated with expected increased and decreased PbtO2 values, respectively. However, in the contusion and proximal probes, these effects were diminished, consistent with loss of cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity at and near the injury site. Similarly, hyperoxia led to the expected rise in PbtO2 only in the distal and contralateral probes, with little or no effect in the proximal and contusion probes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS PbtO2 measurements are strongly influenced by the distance from the

  7. Changes in arterial oxygen tension and physiological status in resting, unrestrained Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus (L.) exposed to mild hypoxia and hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, A; Rosseland, B O; Thorarensen, H; Kiessling, A

    2011-03-01

    In arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus, arterial blood partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide increased with increasing water oxygen tension (PwO2), while the water to arterial PO2 difference (PwO2-PaO2) did not change in relation to PwO2.

  8. In vitro expansion of human glioblastoma cells at non-physiological oxygen tension irreversibly alters subsequent in vivo aggressiveness and AC133 expression

    PubMed Central

    BOURSEAU-GUILMAIN, ERIKA; LEMAIRE, LAURENT; GRIVEAU, AUDREY; HERVOUET, ERIC; VALLETTE, FRANÇOIS; BERGER, FRANÇOIS; MENEI, PHILIPPE; BENOIT, JEAN-PIERRE; WION, DIDIER; GARCION, EMMANUEL

    2012-01-01

    Among markers of glioblastoma initiating cells, AC133 has been shown to be associated with glioblastoma resistance and malignancy. Recently, it was demonstrated that increasing oxygen tension (pO2) down-regulated AC133 expression in glioblastoma cells in vitro. In order to better understand extrinsic factor regulation of AC133, this work aimed to investigate the relationship between cell culture pO2, AC133 expression, and tumor development and phenotype. Using treatments with CoCl2 and HIF-1α shRNA knockdowns on non-sorted human primary glioblastoma cells cultured at low (3%) versus high (21%) oxygen tension, we established a responsibility for low pO2 in the maintenance of high levels of AC133 expression, with a major but non-exclusive role for HIF-1α. We also demonstrated that human glioblastoma cells previously cultured under high oxygen tension can lose part of their aggressiveness when orthotopically engrafted in SCID mice or lead to tumors with distinct phenotypes and no re-expression of AC133. These observations showed that the specific pO2 microenvironment irreversibly impacts glioblastoma cell phenotypes, highlighting the pertinence of culture conditions when extrapolating data from xenogenic models to human cells in their source environment. They also raised AC133 as a marker of non-exposure to oxygenated areas rather than a marker of aggressiveness or low pO2 niches. PMID:22134773

  9. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections.

    PubMed

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition.

  10. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    SciTech Connect

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  11. Transcutaneous Determination of Arterial Oxygen Tension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Evaluated were two techniques (the conventional method and the new transcutaneous method) of measuring arterial oxygen tension in 20 severely ill preterm and term infants and in 70 healthy infants. (Author/CL)

  12. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  13. A microfluidic cell culture array with various oxygen tensions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Chen, Ying-Hua; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-08-21

    Oxygen tension plays an important role in regulating various cellular functions in both normal physiology and disease states. Therefore, drug testing using conventional in vitro cell models under normoxia often possesses limited prediction capability. A traditional method of setting an oxygen tension in a liquid medium is by saturating it with a gas mixture at the desired level of oxygen, which requires bulky gas cylinders, sophisticated control, and tedious interconnections. Moreover, only a single oxygen tension can be tested at the same time. In this paper, we develop a microfluidic cell culture array platform capable of performing cell culture and drug testing under various oxygen tensions simultaneously. The device is fabricated using an elastomeric material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and the well-developed multi-layer soft lithography (MSL) technique. The prototype device has 4 × 4 wells, arranged in the same dimensions as a conventional 96-well plate, for cell culture. The oxygen tensions are controlled by spatially confined oxygen scavenging chemical reactions underneath the wells using microfluidics. The platform takes advantage of microfluidic phenomena while exhibiting the combinatorial diversities achieved by microarrays. Importantly, the platform is compatible with existing cell incubators and high-throughput instruments (liquid handling systems and plate readers) for cost-effective setup and straightforward operation. Utilizing the developed platform, we successfully perform drug testing using an anti-cancer drug, triapazamine (TPZ), on adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549) under three oxygen tensions ranging from 1.4% to normoxia. The developed platform is promising to provide a more meaningful in vitro cell model for various biomedical applications while maintaining desired high throughput capabilities.

  14. Measurement of arterial and capillary blood oxygen tension

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    An oxygen electrode system, supplied as an attachment to the Radiometer Astrup micro equipment for blood pH determination (AME I), has been investigated. Determination of blood oxygen tension using this electrode system has been compared with tension measurements using an established Bishop type oxygen electrode and satisfactory agreement was found. The storage of blood for routine estimation of oxygen tension has been investigated. Capillary blood oxygen tension has been measured and compared with that of simultaneously taken arterial blood samples. PMID:5929338

  15. Cerebral Microcirculation and Oxygen Tension in the Human Secondary Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Linninger, A. A.; Gould, I. G.; Marinnan, T.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Chojecki, M.; Alaraj, A.

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional spatial arrangement of the cortical microcirculatory system is critical for understanding oxygen exchange between blood vessels and brain cells. A three-dimensional computer model of a 3 × 3 × 3 mm3 subsection of the human secondary cortex was constructed to quantify oxygen advection in the microcirculation, tissue oxygen perfusion, and consumption in the human cortex. This computer model accounts for all arterial, capillary and venous blood vessels of the cerebral microvascular bed as well as brain tissue occupying the extravascular space. Microvessels were assembled with optimization algorithms emulating angiogenic growth; a realistic capillary bed was built with space filling procedures. The extravascular tissue was modeled as a porous medium supplied with oxygen by advection–diffusion to match normal metabolic oxygen demand. The resulting synthetic computer generated network matches prior measured morphometrics and fractal patterns of the cortical microvasculature. This morphologically accurate, physiologically consistent, multi-scale computer network of the cerebral microcirculation predicts the oxygen exchange of cortical blood vessels with the surrounding gray matter. Oxygen tension subject to blood pressure and flow conditions were computed and validated for the blood as well as brain tissue. Oxygen gradients along arterioles, capillaries and veins agreed with in vivo trends observed recently in imaging studies within experimental tolerances and uncertainty. PMID:23842693

  16. Oxygen Tension Modulates Differentiation and Primary Macrophage Functions in the Human Monocytic THP-1 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Grodzki, Ana Cristina G.; Giulivi, Cecilia; Lein, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    The human THP-1 cell line is widely used as an in vitro model system for studying macrophage differentiation and function. Conventional culture conditions for these cells consist of ambient oxygen pressure (∼20% v/v) and medium supplemented with the thiol 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) and serum. In consideration of the redox activities of O2 and 2-ME, and the extensive experimental evidence supporting a role for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the differentiation and function of macrophages, we addressed the question of whether culturing THP-1 cells under a more physiologically relevant oxygen tension (5% O2) in the absence of 2-ME and serum would alter THP-1 cell physiology. Comparisons of cultures maintained in 18% O2 versus 5% O2 indicated that reducing oxygen tension had no effect on the proliferation of undifferentiated THP-1 cells. However, decreasing the oxygen tension to 5% O2 significantly increased the rate of phorbol ester-induced differentiation of THP-1 cells into macrophage-like cells as well as the metabolic activity of both undifferentiated and PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Removal of both 2-ME and serum from the medium decreased the proliferation of undifferentiated THP-1 cells but increased metabolic activity and the rate of differentiation under either oxygen tension. In differentiated THP-1 cells, lowering the oxygen tension to 5% O2 decreased phagocytic activity, the constitutive release of β-hexosaminidase and LPS-induced NF-κB activation but enhanced LPS-stimulated release of cytokines. Collectively, these data demonstrate that oxygen tension influences THP-1 cell differentiation and primary macrophage functions, and suggest that culturing these cells under tightly regulated oxygen tension in the absence of exogenous reducing agent and serum is likely to provide a physiologically relevant baseline from which to study the role of the local redox environment in regulating THP-1 cell physiology. PMID:23355903

  17. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    chemotherapy and radiotherapy (37). In summary, changes in breast tumor temperature and vascular oxygenation have been simultaneously measured using a multi...Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mengna Xia...W81XWH-04-1-0411 Breast Tumors under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  18. Deoxygenation Reduces Sickle Cell Blood Flow at Arterial Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinran; Wood, David K; Higgins, John M

    2016-06-21

    The majority of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease is caused by vaso-occlusion: circulatory obstruction leading to tissue ischemia and infarction. The consequences of vaso-occlusion are seen clinically throughout the vascular tree, from the relatively high-oxygen and high-velocity cerebral arteries to the relatively low-oxygen and low-velocity postcapillary venules. Prevailing models of vaso-occlusion propose mechanisms that are relevant only to regions of low oxygen and low velocity, leaving a wide gap in our understanding of the most important pathologic process in sickle cell disease. Progress toward understanding vaso-occlusion is further challenged by the complexity of the multiple processes thought to be involved, including, but not limited to 1) deoxygenation-dependent hemoglobin polymerization leading to impaired rheology, 2) endothelial and leukocyte activation, and 3) altered cellular adhesion. Here, we chose to focus exclusively on deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes in an effort to quantify their contribution independent of the other processes that are likely involved in vivo. We take advantage of an experimental system that, to our knowledge, uniquely enables the study of pressure-driven blood flow in physiologic-sized tubes at physiologic hematocrit under controlled oxygenation conditions, while excluding the effects of endothelium, leukocyte activation, adhesion, inflammation, and coagulation. We find that deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes are sufficient to increase apparent viscosity significantly, slowing blood flow velocity at arterial oxygen tension even without additional contributions from inflammation, adhesion, and endothelial and leukocyte activation. We quantify the changes in apparent viscosity and define a set of functional regimes of sickle cell blood flow personalized for each patient that may be important in further dissecting mechanisms of in vivo vaso-occlusion as well as in assessing risk of patient

  19. Quantitating intracellular oxygen tension in vivo by phosphorescence lifetime measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Kamiya, Mako; Mimura, Imari; Fujikura, Daichi; Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Takahashi, Ippei; Urano, Yasuteru; Tobita, Seiji; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia appears to have an important role in pathological conditions in many organs such as kidney; however, a method to quantify intracellular oxygen tension in vivo has not been well established. In this study, we established an optical method to quantify oxygen tension in mice kidneys using a cationic lipophilic phosphorescence probe, BTPDM1, which has an intracellular oxygen concentration-sensitive phosphorescence lifetime. Since this probe is distributed inside the tubular cells of the mice kidney, we succeeded in detecting acute renal hypoxic conditions and chronic kidney disease. This technique enabled us to estimate intracellular partial pressures of oxygen in vivo by extrapolating the calibration curve generated from cultured tubular cells. Since intracellular oxygen tension is directly related to cellular hypoxic reactions, such as the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, our method will shed new light on hypoxia research in vivo. PMID:26644023

  20. Soil gas oxygen tension and pentachlorophenol biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, C.J.; Sims, R.C.; Sims, J.L.; Sorensen, D.L.; McLean, J.E.; Huling, S.

    1997-04-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion International Superfund Site in Libby, Mont. This soil was contaminated with wood preserving wastes including creosote and PCP. Degradation rates of {sup 14}C-PCP and nonlabeled PCP were found to be enhanced under soil gas oxygen concentrations between 2 and 21% in the contaminated soil. Between 48 and 64% of {sup 14}C-PCP spiked onto the soil was mineralized after 70 days at soil gas oxygen levels between 2 and 21%. No statistically significant mineralization of PCP was found to occur at 0% oxygen concentrations. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-PCP in contaminated soil poisoned with mercuric chloride was determined to be less than 0.2%. Degradation of indigenous nonradiolabeled PCP in the nonpoisoned soil was statistically significantly greater than in poisoned soil. These results indicated that degradation of PCP was biological and would occur under low oxygen concentrations. Soil gas oxygen concentrations necessary for PCP biodegradation (2--5%) could be maintained, for example, using bioventing technology in order to achieve continued treatment of buried lifts of soil while new lifts are added, thus decreasing the total time for soil remediation of the prepared bed.

  1. SOIL GAS OXYGEN TENSION AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion Inte...

  2. SOIL GAS OXYGEN TENSION AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion Inte...

  3. The roles of cerebral blood flow, capillary transit time heterogeneity, and oxygen tension in brain oxygenation and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Sune N; Østergaard, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Normal brain function depends critically on moment-to-moment regulation of oxygen supply by the bloodstream to meet changing metabolic needs. Neurovascular coupling, a range of mechanisms that converge on arterioles to adjust local cerebral blood flow (CBF), represents our current framework for understanding this regulation. We modeled the combined effects of CBF and capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTTH) on the maximum oxygen extraction fraction (OEFmax) and metabolic rate of oxygen that can biophysically be supported, for a given tissue oxygen tension. Red blood cell velocity recordings in rat brain support close hemodynamic–metabolic coupling by means of CBF and CTTH across a range of physiological conditions. The CTTH reduction improves tissue oxygenation by counteracting inherent reductions in OEFmax as CBF increases, and seemingly secures sufficient oxygenation during episodes of hyperemia resulting from cortical activation or hypoxemia. In hypoperfusion and states of blocked CBF, both lower oxygen tension and CTTH may secure tissue oxygenation. Our model predicts that disturbed capillary flows may cause a condition of malignant CTTH, in which states of higher CBF display lower oxygen availability. We propose that conditions with altered capillary morphology, such as amyloid, diabetic or hypertensive microangiopathy, and ischemia–reperfusion, may disturb CTTH and thereby flow-metabolism coupling and cerebral oxygen metabolism. PMID:22044867

  4. Oxygen tension modulates the effects of TNFα in compressed chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tilwani, R K; Vessillier, S; Pingguan-Murphy, B; Lee, D A; Bader, D L; Chowdhury, T T

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen tension and biomechanical signals are factors that regulate inflammatory mechanisms in chondrocytes. We examined whether low oxygen tension influenced the cells response to TNFα and dynamic compression. Chondrocyte/agarose constructs were treated with varying concentrations of TNFα (0.1-100 ng/ml) and cultured at 5 and 21 % oxygen tension for 48 h. In separate experiments, constructs were subjected to dynamic compression (15 %) and treated with TNFα (10 ng/ml) and/or L-NIO (1 mM) at 5 and 21 % oxygen tension using an ex vivo bioreactor for 48 h. Markers for catabolic activity (NO, PGE2) and tissue remodelling (GAG, MMPs) were quantified by biochemical assay. ADAMTS-5 and MMP-13 expression were examined by real-time qPCR. 2-way ANOVA and a post hoc Bonferroni-corrected t test were used to analyse data. TNFα dose-dependently increased NO, PGE2 and MMP activity (all p < 0.001) and induced MMP-13 (p < 0.05) and ADAMTS-5 gene expression (pp < 0.01) with values greater at 5 % oxygen tension than 21 %. The induction of catabolic mediators by TNFα was reduced by dynamic compression and/or L-NIO (all p < 0.001), with a greater inhibition observed at 5% than 21 %. The stimulation of GAG synthesis by dynamic compression was greater at 21 % than 5 % oxygen tension and this response was reduced with TNFα or reversed with L-NIO. The present findings revealed that TNFα increased production of NO, PGE2 and MMP activity at 5 % oxygen tension. The effects induced by TNFα were reduced by dynamic compression and/or the NOS inhibitor, linking both types of stimuli to reparative activities. Future therapeutics should develop oxygen-sensitive antagonists which are directed to interfering with the TNFα-induced pathways.

  5. Corneal Equilibrium Flux as a Function of Corneal Surface Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    Compañ, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel; Weissman, Barry A

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen is essential for aerobic mammalian cell physiology. Oxygen tension (PO2) should reach a minimum at some position within the corneal stroma, and oxygen flux should be zero, by definition, at this point as well. We found the locations and magnitudes of this "corneal equilibrium flux" (xmin) and explored its physiological implications. We used an application of the Monod kinetic model to calculate xmin for normal human cornea as anterior surface PO2 changes from 155 to 20 mmHg. We find that xmin deepens, broadens, and advances from 1.25 μm above the endothelial-aqueous humor surface toward the epithelium (reaching a position 320 μm above the endothelial-aqueous humor surface) as anterior corneal surface PO2 decreases from 155 to 20 mmHg. Our model supports an anterior corneal oxygen flux of 9 μL O2 · cm · h and an epithelial oxygen consumption of approximately 4 μL O2 · cm · h. Only at the highest anterior corneal PO2 does our model predict that oxygen diffuses all the way through the cornea to perhaps reach the anterior chamber. Of most interest, corneal oxygen consumption should be supported down to a corneal surface PO2 of 60 to 80 mmHg but declines below this range. We conclude that the critical oxygen tension for hypoxia induced corneal swelling is more likely this range rather than a fixed value.

  6. Oxygen modulates growth of human cells at physiologic partial pressures

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the growth of human diploid fibroblasts (WI-38 and IMR90) as a function of initial seeding density and oxygen tension. Cells at young and mid-passage levels were subcultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 10% fetal bovine serum at 0.005, 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 2 X 10(4) cells/cm2. Flasks were equilibrated before and after seeding with 1 of 10 gas mixtures containing the desired oxygen tension (9-591 mm Hg) and placed in incubators that measure and maintain a preset oxygen tension. The partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in media of all flasks was determined at harvest. Cells were shielded from light of wavelength less than 500 nm. Cell growth varied inversely with oxygen tension and seeding density. At 50 cells/cm2, growth was maximal at PO2 9 and 16 mm Hg. Growth was progressively inhibited as the oxygen tension was increased. The population doubling increase at 14 d was 8.6 for PO2 9 and 16 mm Hg, 5.8 for PO2 42 mm Hg, 3.8 for PO2 78 mm Hg, 3.8 for PO2 104 mm Hg, and 3 for PO2 138 mm Hg. As the seeding density was increased, the differences in growth at PO2 less than 140 mm Hg were progressively minimized, such that at seeding densities of 10(4) cells/cm2 there was little difference in the rate of exponential growth or the final saturation density of cells cultivated between PO2 9 and 96 mm Hg. At all seeding densities tested, growth was progressively inhibited when the PO2 was increased greater than 140 mm Hg. The seeding density dependence of oxygen's influence on cellular growth is not explained by oxygen consumption of higher density cultures. Oxygen acts directly on the cells and not by destroying some essential medium component. We have found that oxygen regulates the growth of human cells under pressures of oxygen physiologic to humans, and that oxygen toxicity contributes to the seeding density dependence of cellular growth commonly seen in cell culture. PMID:6736869

  7. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kalliampakou, K. I.; Kotta-Loizou, I.; Befani, C.; Liakos, P.; Simos, G.; Mentis, A. F.; Kalliaropoulos, A.; Doumba, P. P.; Smirlis, D.; Foka, P.; Bauhofer, O.; Poenisch, M.; Windisch, M. P.; Lee, M. E.; Koskinas, J.; Bartenschlager, R.

    2013-01-01

    Low oxygen tension exerts a significant effect on the replication of several DNA and RNA viruses in cultured cells. In vitro propagation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has thus far been studied under atmospheric oxygen levels despite the fact that the liver tissue microenvironment is hypoxic. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of HCV production in actively dividing or differentiating human hepatoma cells cultured under low or atmospheric oxygen tensions. By using both HCV replicons and infection-based assays, low oxygen was found to enhance HCV RNA replication whereas virus entry and RNA translation were not affected. Hypoxia signaling pathway-focused DNA microarray and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed an upregulation of genes related to hypoxic stress, glycolytic metabolism, cell growth, and proliferation when cells were kept under low (3% [vol/vol]) oxygen tension, likely reflecting cell adaptation to anaerobic conditions. Interestingly, hypoxia-mediated enhancement of HCV replication correlated directly with the increase in anaerobic glycolysis and creatine kinase B (CKB) activity that leads to elevated ATP production. Surprisingly, activation of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-α) was not involved in the elevation of HCV replication. Instead, a number of oncogenes known to be associated with glycolysis were upregulated and evidence that these oncogenes contribute to hypoxia-mediated enhancement of HCV replication was obtained. Finally, in liver biopsy specimens of HCV-infected patients, the levels of hypoxia and anaerobic metabolism markers correlated with HCV RNA levels. These results provide new insights into the impact of oxygen tension on the intricate HCV-host cell interaction. PMID:23269812

  8. The impact of arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation in circulatory failure.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kwok Ming; Harding, Richard; Chamberlain, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Central and mixed venous oxygen saturations have been used to guide resuscitation in circulatory failure, but the impact of arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation has not been thoroughly evaluated. This observational study investigated the impact of arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation in circulatory failure. Twenty critically ill patients with circulatory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and a pulmonary artery catheter in an intensive care unit in a tertiary hospital in Western Australia were recruited. Samples of arterial blood, central venous blood, and mixed venous blood were simultaneously and slowly drawn from the arterial, central venous, and pulmonary artery catheter, respectively, at baseline and after the patient was ventilated with 100% inspired oxygen for 5 min. The blood samples were redrawn after a significant change in cardiac index (>or =10%) from the baseline, occurring within 24 h of study enrollment while the patient was ventilated with the same baseline inspired oxygen concentration, was detected. An increase in inspired oxygen concentration significantly increased the arterial oxygen tension from 12.5 to 38.4 kPa (93.8-288 mmHg) (mean difference, 25.9 kPa; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-31.9 kPa; P < 0.001) and the venous oxygen saturation from 69.9% to 76.5% (mean difference, 6.6%; 95% CI, 5.3% - 7.9%; P < 0.001). The effect of arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation was more significant than the effect associated with changes in cardiac index (mean difference, 2.8%; 95% CI, -0.2% to 5.8%; P = 0.063). In conclusion, arterial oxygen tension has a significant effect on venous oxygen saturation, and this effect is more significant and consistent than the effect associated with changes in cardiac index.

  9. Multiple Oxygen Tension Environments Reveal Diverse Patterns of Transcriptional Regulation in Primary Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Liyun; Park, Sung-Soo; Martin, Bronwen; Wang, Rui; Becker, Kevin G.; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Peers, Chris; Maudsley, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system normally functions at O2 levels which would be regarded as hypoxic by most other tissues. However, most in vitro studies of neurons and astrocytes are conducted under hyperoxic conditions without consideration of O2-dependent cellular adaptation. We analyzed the reactivity of astrocytes to 1, 4 and 9% O2 tensions compared to the cell culture standard of 20% O2, to investigate their ability to sense and translate this O2 information to transcriptional activity. Variance of ambient O2 tension for rat astrocytes resulted in profound changes in ribosomal activity, cytoskeletal and energy-regulatory mechanisms and cytokine-related signaling. Clustering of transcriptional regulation patterns revealed four distinct response pattern groups that directionally pivoted around the 4% O2 tension, or demonstrated coherent ascending/decreasing gene expression patterns in response to diverse oxygen tensions. Immune response and cell cycle/cancer-related signaling pathway transcriptomic subsets were significantly activated with increasing hypoxia, whilst hemostatic and cardiovascular signaling mechanisms were attenuated with increasing hypoxia. Our data indicate that variant O2 tensions induce specific and physiologically-focused transcript regulation patterns that may underpin important physiological mechanisms that connect higher neurological activity to astrocytic function and ambient oxygen environments. These strongly defined patterns demonstrate a strong bias for physiological transcript programs to pivot around the 4% O2 tension, while uni-modal programs that do not, appear more related to pathological actions. The functional interaction of these transcriptional ‘programs’ may serve to regulate the dynamic vascular responsivity of the central nervous system during periods of stress or heightened activity. PMID:21738745

  10. Oxygen-induced tension in the sheep ductus arteriosus: effects of gestation on potassium and calcium channel regulation

    PubMed Central

    Waleh, Nahid; Reese, Jeff; Kajino, Hiroki; Roman, Christine; Seidner, Steven; McCurnin, Donald; Clyman, Ronald I.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with the full term ductus arteriosus, the premature ductus is less likely to constrict when exposed to postnatal oxygen concentrations. We used isolated fetal sheep ductus arteriosus (pretreated with inhibitors of prostaglandin and nitric oxide production) to determine if changes in K+- and CaL-channel activity could account for the developmental differences in oxygen-induced tension. In the mature ductus, KV-channels appear to be the only K+-channels that oppose ductus tension. Oxygen concentrations between (2 and 15%) inhibit KV-channel activity, which increases the CaL-channel-mediated increase in tension. Low oxygen concentrations have a direct inhibitory effect on CaL-channel activity in the immature ductus; this is not the case in the mature ductus. In the immature ductus, 3 different K+-channel activities (KV, KCa, and KATP) oppose ductus tension and contribute to its decreased tone. Oxygen inhibits the activities of all 3 K+-channels. The inhibitory effects of the 3 K+-channel activities decline with advancing gestation. The decline in K+-channel activity is not due to decreased K+-channel expression. Super-physiologic oxygen concentrations (≥30% O2) constrict the ductus by utilizing calcium dependent pathways that are independent of K+- and CaL-channel activities. Super-physiologic oxygen concentrations eliminate the difference in tensions between the 2 age groups. PMID:19092721

  11. Hemodynamic parameters change earlier than tissue oxygen tension in hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Gunther J; Fukui, Kimiko; Kimberger, Oliver; Hager, Helmut; Kurz, Andrea; Hiltebrand, Luzius B

    2010-05-15

    Untreated hypovolemia results in impaired outcome. This study tests our hypothesis whether general hemodynamic parameters detect acute blood loss earlier than monitoring parameters of regional tissue beds. Eight pigs (23-25 kg) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. A pulmonary artery catheter and an arterial catheter were inserted. Tissue oxygen tension was measured with Clark-type electrodes in the jejunal and colonic wall, in the liver, and subcutaneously. Jejunal microcirculation was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Intravascular volume was optimized using difference in pulse pressure (dPP) to keep dPP below 13%. Sixty minutes after preparation, baseline measurements were taken. At first, 5% of total blood volume was withdrawn, followed by another 5% increment, and then in 10% increments until death. After withdrawal of 5% of estimated blood volume, dPP increased from 6.1% +/- 3.0% to 20.8% +/- 2.7% (P < 0.01). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) decreased with a blood loss of 10% (P < 0.01). Cardiac output (CO) changed after a blood loss of 20% (P < 0.05). Tissue oxygen tension in central organs, and blood flow in the jejunal muscularis decreased (P < 0.05) after a blood loss of 20%. Tissue oxygen tension in the skin, and jejunal mucosa blood flow decreased (P < 0.05) after a blood loss of 40% and 50%, respectively. In this hemorrhagic pig model systemic hemodynamic parameters were more sensitive to detect acute hypovolemia than tissue oxygen tension measurements or jejunal LDF measurements. Acute blood loss was detected first by dPP. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tissue oxygen tension measurement for monitoring musculocutaneous and cutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Hjortdal, V E; Awwad, A M; Gottrup, F; Kirkegaard, L; Gellett, S

    1990-01-01

    In pigs, latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous island flaps and buttock skin island flaps were raised. Subcutaneous (PscO2) and intramuscular oxygen tension (PimO2) were measured using a non-heated needle electrode before, during and after repeated occlusion of the supplying artery or the draining vein. During arterial and venous occlusion, the tissue oxygen tension in the musculocutaneous flap dropped rapidly. A plateau was reached after 15 min. After arterial occlusion the mean value was 20 mmHg (SEM = +/- 5 mmHg, N = 6) in the subcutis and 16 mmHg in the muscle (SEM = +/- 4 mmHg, N = 10). After venous occlusion the mean value was 11 mmHg (SEM = +/- 3 mmHg, N = 6) in the subcutis. In the skin flap the drop of PscO2 was slower, and after 30 min of arterial occlusion the mean value was 29 mmHg (SEM = +/- 9 mmHg, N = 6). This study has shown that tissue oxygen tension measurement can be used as a sensitive indicator of acute impairment of the supplying vessels in island flaps. The method seems to have potential for monitoring free tissue transfers. A comparable decrease in PscO2 was found for arterial and venous impairment.

  13. Disparate Response of Articular- and Auricular-derived Chondrocytes to Oxygen Tension

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Mera, Hisashi; Whitney, G. Adam; MacKay, Danielle L.; Awadallah, Amad; Fernandes, Russell J.; Dennis, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Aim To determine the effect of reduced (5%) oxygen tension on chondrogenesis of auricular-derived chondrocytes. Currently, many cell and tissue culture experiments are performed at 20% oxygen with 5% carbon dioxide. Few cells in the body are subjected to this supra-physiological oxygen tension. Chondrocytes and their mesenchymal progenitors are widely reported to have greater chondrogenic expression when cultured at low, more physiological, oxygen tension (1–7%). Although generally accepted, there is still some controversy, and different culture methods, species, and outcome metrics cloud the field. These results are, however, articular chondrocyte biased and have not been reported for auricular-derived chondrocytes. Materials and Methods Auricular and articular chondrocytes were isolated from skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits, expanded in culture and differentiated in high density cultures with serum free chondrogenic media. Cartilage tissue derived from aggregate cultures or from the tissue engineered sheets were assessed for biomechanical, glycosaminoglycan, collagen, collagen cross-links, and lysyl oxidase activity and expression. Results Our studies show increased proliferation rates for both auricular and articular chondrocytes at low (5%) O2 versus standard (20%) O2. In our scaffold free chondrogenic cultures, low O2 was found to increase articular chondrocyte accumulation of glycosaminoglycan, but not cross-linked type II collagen, or total collagen. Conversely, auricular chondrocytes accumulated less glycosaminoglycan, cross-linked type II collagen and total collagen under low oxygen tension. Conclusions This study highlights the dramatic difference in response to low O2 of chondrocytes isolated from different anatomical sites. Low O2 is beneficial for articular-derived chondrogenesis but detrimental for auricular-derived chondrogenesis. PMID:27128439

  14. Disparate response of articular- and auricular-derived chondrocytes to oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Kean, Thomas J; Mera, Hisashi; Whitney, G Adam; MacKay, Danielle L; Awadallah, Amad; Fernandes, Russell J; Dennis, James E

    2016-07-01

    To determine the effect of reduced (5%) oxygen tension on chondrogenesis of auricular-derived chondrocytes. Currently, many cell and tissue culture experiments are performed at 20% oxygen with 5% carbon dioxide. Few cells in the body are subjected to this supra-physiological oxygen tension. Chondrocytes and their mesenchymal progenitors are widely reported to have greater chondrogenic expression when cultured at low, more physiological, oxygen tension (1-7%). Although generally accepted, there is still some controversy, and different culture methods, species, and outcome metrics cloud the field. These results are, however, articular chondrocyte biased and have not been reported for auricular-derived chondrocytes. Auricular and articular chondrocytes were isolated from skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits, expanded in culture and differentiated in high density cultures with serum-free chondrogenic media. Cartilage tissue derived from aggregate cultures or from the tissue engineered sheets were assessed for biomechanical, glycosaminoglycan, collagen, collagen cross-links, and lysyl oxidase activity and expression. Our studies show increased proliferation rates for both auricular and articular chondrocytes at low (5%) O2 versus standard (20%) O2. In our scaffold-free chondrogenic cultures, low O2 was found to increase articular chondrocyte accumulation of glycosaminoglycan, but not cross-linked type II collagen, or total collagen. Conversely, auricular chondrocytes accumulated less glycosaminoglycan, cross-linked type II collagen and total collagen under low oxygen tension. This study highlights the dramatic difference in response to low O2 of chondrocytes isolated from different anatomical sites. Low O2 is beneficial for articular-derived chondrogenesis but detrimental for auricular-derived chondrogenesis.

  15. Low oxygen tension favored expansion and hematopoietic reconstitution of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells expanded from human cord blood-derived CD34(+) Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyan; Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Fan, Jinli; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor that regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in both in vivo hematopoietic microenvironment and ex vivo culture system. Although the effect of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion of HSCs was extensively studied, there were no clear descriptions on physiological function and gene expression analysis of HSCs under different oxygen tensions. In this study, the effects of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion characteristics of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34(+) cells are evaluated. Moreover, the physiological function of expanded CD34(+) cells was assessed by secondary expansion ability ex vivo and hematopoietic reconstitution ability in vivo. Also, genetic profiling was applied to analyze the expression of genes related to cell function. It was found that low oxygen tension favored expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells. Additionally, CD34(+) cells expanded under low oxygen tension showed better secondary expansion ability and reconstitution ability than those under atmospheric oxygen concentration. Finally, the genetic profiling of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells cultured under low oxygen tension was more akin to freshly isolated cells. These results collectively demonstrate that low oxygen tension was able to better maintain both self-renewal and hematopoietic reconstitution potential and may lay an experimental basis for clinical transplantation of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A New Approach for On-Demand Generation of Various Oxygen Tensions for In Vitro Hypoxia Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Chaung, Wayne; Mozayan, Cameron; Chabra, Ranjeev; Wang, Ping; Narayan, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    The development of in vitro disease models closely mimicking the functions of human disease has captured increasing attention in recent years. Oxygen tensions and gradients play essential roles in modulating biological systems in both physiologic and pathologic events. Thus, controlling oxygen tension is critical for mimicking physiologically relevant in vivo environments for cell, tissue and organ research. We present a new approach for on-demand generation of various oxygen tensions for in vitro hypoxia models. Proof-of-concept prototypes have been developed for conventional cell culture microplate by immobilizing a novel oxygen-consuming biomaterial on the 3D-printed insert. For the first time, rapid (~3.8 minutes to reach 0.5% O2 from 20.9% O2) and precisely controlled oxygen tensions/gradients (2.68 mmHg per 50 μm distance) were generated by exposing the biocompatible biomaterial to the different depth of cell culture media. In addition, changing the position of 3D-printed inserts with immobilized biomaterials relative to the cultured cells resulted in controllable and rapid changes in oxygen tensions (<130 seconds). Compared to the current technologies, our approach allows enhanced spatiotemporal resolution and accuracy of the oxygen tensions. Additionally, it does not interfere with the testing environment while maintaining ease of use. The elegance of oxygen tension manipulation introduced by our new approach will drastically improve control and lower the technological barrier of entry for hypoxia studies. Since the biomaterials can be immobilized in any devices, including microfluidic devices and 3D-printed tissues or organs, it will serve as the basis for a new generation of experimental models previously impossible or very difficult to implement.

  17. A New Approach for On-Demand Generation of Various Oxygen Tensions for In Vitro Hypoxia Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Chaung, Wayne; Mozayan, Cameron; Chabra, Ranjeev; Wang, Ping; Narayan, Raj K.

    2016-01-01

    The development of in vitro disease models closely mimicking the functions of human disease has captured increasing attention in recent years. Oxygen tensions and gradients play essential roles in modulating biological systems in both physiologic and pathologic events. Thus, controlling oxygen tension is critical for mimicking physiologically relevant in vivo environments for cell, tissue and organ research. We present a new approach for on-demand generation of various oxygen tensions for in vitro hypoxia models. Proof-of-concept prototypes have been developed for conventional cell culture microplate by immobilizing a novel oxygen-consuming biomaterial on the 3D-printed insert. For the first time, rapid (~3.8 minutes to reach 0.5% O2 from 20.9% O2) and precisely controlled oxygen tensions/gradients (2.68 mmHg per 50 μm distance) were generated by exposing the biocompatible biomaterial to the different depth of cell culture media. In addition, changing the position of 3D-printed inserts with immobilized biomaterials relative to the cultured cells resulted in controllable and rapid changes in oxygen tensions (<130 seconds). Compared to the current technologies, our approach allows enhanced spatiotemporal resolution and accuracy of the oxygen tensions. Additionally, it does not interfere with the testing environment while maintaining ease of use. The elegance of oxygen tension manipulation introduced by our new approach will drastically improve control and lower the technological barrier of entry for hypoxia studies. Since the biomaterials can be immobilized in any devices, including microfluidic devices and 3D-printed tissues or organs, it will serve as the basis for a new generation of experimental models previously impossible or very difficult to implement. PMID:27219067

  18. Inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen by oxygen tension and blood flow imaging in rat.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-Yu; Albers, John; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic function of inner retinal cells relies on the availability of nutrients and oxygen that are supplied by the retinal circulation. Assessment of retinal tissue vitality and function requires knowledge of both the rate of oxygen delivery and consumption. The purpose of the current study is to report a novel technique for assessment of the inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen (MO(2)) by combined measurements of retinal blood flow and vascular oxygen tension (PO(2)) in rat. The application of this technology has the potential to broaden knowledge of retinal oxygen dynamics and advance understanding of disease pathophysiology.

  19. Supplemental oxygen, but not supplemental crystalloid fluid, increases tissue oxygen tension in healthy and anastomotic colon in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kimberger, Oliver; Fleischmann, Edith; Brandt, Sebastian; Kugener, André; Kabon, Barbara; Hiltebrand, Luzius; Krejci, Vladimir; Kurz, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    Low tissue oxygen tension is an important factor leading to the development of wound dehiscence and anastomotic leakage after colon surgery. We tested whether supplemental fluid and supplemental oxygen can increase tissue oxygen tension in healthy and injured, perianastomotic, and anastomotic colon in an acutely instrumented pig model of anastomosis surgery. Sixteen Swiss Landrace pigs were anesthetized (isoflurane 0.8%-1%) and their lungs ventilated. The animals were randomly assigned to low fluid treatment ("low" group, 3 mL x kg(-1) x h(-1) lactated Ringer's solution) or high fluid treatment ("high" group, 10 mL/kg bolus, 18 mL x kg(-1) x h(-1) lactated Ringer's solution) during colon anastomosis surgery and a subsequent measurement period (4 h). Two-and-half hours after surgery, tissue oxygen tension was recorded for 30 min during ventilation with 30% oxygen. Three hours after surgery, the animals' lungs were ventilated with 100% oxygen for 60 min. Tissue oxygen tension was recorded in the last 30 min. Tissue oxygen tension was measured with polarographic Clark-type electrodes, positioned in healthy colonic wall, close (2 cm) to the anastomosis, and in the anastomosis. In every group, tissue oxygen tension during ventilation with 100% oxygen was approximately twice as high as during ventilation with 30% oxygen, a statistically significant result. High or low volume crystalloid fluid treatment had no effect on colon tissue oxygen tension. Supplemental oxygen, but not supplemental crystalloid fluid, increased tissue oxygen tension in healthy, perianastomotic, and anastomotic colon tissue.

  20. Low oxygen tension enhances the generation of lung progenitor cells from mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Garreta, Elena; Melo, Esther; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Whole‐organ decellularization technology has emerged as a new alternative for the fabrication of bioartificial lungs. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are potentially useful for recellularization since they can be directed to express phenotypic marker genes of lung epithelial cells. Normal pulmonary development takes place in a low oxygen environment ranging from 1 to 5%. By contrast, in vitro ESC and iPSC differentiation protocols are usually carried out at room‐air oxygen tension. Here, we sought to determine the role played by oxygen tension on the derivation of Nkx2.1+ lung/thyroid progenitor cells from mouse ESC and iPSC. A step‐wise differentiation protocol was used to generate Nkx2.1+ lung/thyroid progenitors under 20% and 5% oxygen tension. On day 12, gene expression analysis revealed that Nkx2.1 and Foxa2 (endodermal and early lung epithelial cell marker) were significantly upregulated at 5% oxygen tension in ESC and iPSC differentiated cultures compared to 20% oxygen conditions. In addition, quantification of Foxa2+Nkx2.1+Pax8‐ cells corresponding to the lung field, with exclusion of the potential thyroid fate identified by Pax8 expression, confirmed that the low physiologic oxygen tension exerted a significant positive effect on early pulmonary differentiation of ESC and iPSC. In conclusion, we found that 5% oxygen tension enhanced the derivation of lung progenitors from mouse ESC and iPSC compared to 20% room‐air oxygen tension. PMID:25347858

  1. Continuous measurement of scalp tissue oxygen tension and carotid arterial oxygen tension in the fetal lamb.

    PubMed

    Aarnoudse, J G; Oeseburg, B; Kwant, G; Huisjes, H J; Zijlstra, W G

    1980-01-01

    Scalp tissue PO2, carotid arterial PO2 fetal heart rate were continuously measured in the anaesthetized fetal lamb in utero while variations in oxygen supply were brought about. In some experiments the transcutaneously measured fetal scalp PO2 was recorded in addition. Scalp tissue PO2 was measured using specially designed miniature needle-type oxygen electrode, incorporated in an easily applicable spiral scalp electrode as commonly used for fetal heart rate monitoring. The measurements showed that fetal carotid arterial hypoxaemia is always nearly immediately followed by fetal scalp tissue hypoxia, and that the recovery of scalp tissue PO2 after a hypoxic period has a remarkably varying time course. Fetal heart rate usually decreased during hypoxia, but in some instances it did not change or even increased, demonstrating that heart rate is not always a reliable indicator of fetal hypoxia. PO2 values obtained with the transcutaneous method were higher than those with the needle electrode, because of the effect of the heating system of the transcutaneous electrode on tissue blood flow and haemoglobin oxygen affinity. It would seem that during hypoxaemia the decrease in scalp tissue PO2 is poossibly the combined result of the fall in arterial PO2 and a concomitant decrease in blood flow through the skin.

  2. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Expression of Myogenic Genes When Human Myoblasts Are Activated from G0 Arrest.

    PubMed

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Nielsen, Joachim; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Most cell culture studies have been performed at atmospheric oxygen tension of 21%, however the physiological oxygen tension is much lower and is a factor that may affect skeletal muscle myoblasts. In this study we have compared activation of G0 arrested myoblasts in 21% O2 and in 1% O2 in order to see how oxygen tension affects activation and proliferation of human myoblasts. Human myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle tissue and G0 arrested in vitro followed by reactivation at 21% O2 and 1% O2. The effect was assesses by Real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot. We found an increase in proliferation rate of myoblasts when activated at a low oxygen tension (1% O2) compared to 21% O2. In addition, the gene expression studies showed up regulation of the myogenesis related genes PAX3, PAX7, MYOD, MYOG (myogenin), MET, NCAM, DES (desmin), MEF2A, MEF2C and CDH15 (M-cadherin), however, the fraction of DES and MYOD positive cells was not increased by low oxygen tension, indicating that 1% O2 may not have a functional effect on the myogenic response. Furthermore, the expression of genes involved in the TGFβ, Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were also up regulated in low oxygen tension. The differences in gene expression were most pronounced at day one after activation from G0-arrest, thus the initial activation of myoblasts seemed most sensitive to changes in oxygen tension. Protein expression of HES1 and β-catenin indicated that notch signaling may be induced in 21% O2, while the canonical Wnt signaling may be induced in 1% O2 during activation and proliferation of myoblasts.

  3. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Expression of Myogenic Genes When Human Myoblasts Are Activated from G0 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Nielsen, Joachim; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Most cell culture studies have been performed at atmospheric oxygen tension of 21%, however the physiological oxygen tension is much lower and is a factor that may affect skeletal muscle myoblasts. In this study we have compared activation of G0 arrested myoblasts in 21% O2 and in 1% O2 in order to see how oxygen tension affects activation and proliferation of human myoblasts. Materials and Methods Human myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle tissue and G0 arrested in vitro followed by reactivation at 21% O2 and 1% O2. The effect was assesses by Real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results and Conclusions We found an increase in proliferation rate of myoblasts when activated at a low oxygen tension (1% O2) compared to 21% O2. In addition, the gene expression studies showed up regulation of the myogenesis related genes PAX3, PAX7, MYOD, MYOG (myogenin), MET, NCAM, DES (desmin), MEF2A, MEF2C and CDH15 (M-cadherin), however, the fraction of DES and MYOD positive cells was not increased by low oxygen tension, indicating that 1% O2 may not have a functional effect on the myogenic response. Furthermore, the expression of genes involved in the TGFβ, Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were also up regulated in low oxygen tension. The differences in gene expression were most pronounced at day one after activation from G0-arrest, thus the initial activation of myoblasts seemed most sensitive to changes in oxygen tension. Protein expression of HES1 and β-catenin indicated that notch signaling may be induced in 21% O2, while the canonical Wnt signaling may be induced in 1% O2 during activation and proliferation of myoblasts. PMID:27442119

  4. Direct Regularized Estimation of Retinal Vascular Oxygen Tension Based on an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Isa; Ansari, Rashid; Yetik, I. Samil; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorescence lifetime imaging is commonly used to generate oxygen tension maps of retinal blood vessels by classical least squares (LS) estimation method. A spatial regularization method was later proposed and provided improved results. However, both methods obtain oxygen tension values from the estimates of intermediate variables, and do not yield an optimum estimate of oxygen tension values, due to their nonlinear dependence on the ratio of intermediate variables. In this paper, we provide an improved solution by devising a regularized direct least squares (RDLS) method that exploits available knowledge in studies that provide models of oxygen tension in retinal arteries and veins, unlike the earlier regularized LS approach where knowledge about intermediate variables is limited. The performance of the proposed RDLS method is evaluated by investigating and comparing the bias, variance, oxygen tension maps, 1-D profiles of arterial oxygen tension, and mean absolute error with those of earlier methods, and its superior performance both quantitatively and qualitatively is demonstrated. PMID:23732915

  5. Application of a modified regularization procedure for estimating oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Isa; Ansari, Rashid; Samil Yetik, I.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2010-03-01

    Phosphorescence lifetime measurement based on a frequency domain approach is used to estimate oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels. The classical least squares (LS) estimation was initially used to determine oxygen tension indirectly from intermediate variables. A spatial regularized least squares (RLS) method was later proposed to reduce the high variance of oxygen tension estimated by LS method. In this paper, we provide a solution using a modified RLS (MRLS) approach that utilizes prior knowledge about retinal vessels oxygenation based on expected oxygen tension values in retinal arteries and veins. The performance of MRLS method was evaluated in simulated and experimental data by determining the bias, variance, and mean absolute error (MAE) of oxygen tension measurements and comparing these parameters with those derived with the use of LS and RLS methods.

  6. High brain tissue oxygen tension during ventilation with 100% oxygen after fetal asphyxia in newborn sheep.

    PubMed

    Perez-de-Sa, Valeria; Cunha-Goncalves, Doris; Nordh, Anders; Hansson, Stefan; Larsson, Anders; Ley, David; Fellman, Vineta; Werner, Olof

    2009-01-01

    The optimal inhaled oxygen fraction for newborn resuscitation is still not settled. We hypothesized that short-lasting oxygen ventilation after intrauterine asphyxia would not cause arterial or cerebral hyperoxia, and therefore be innocuous. The umbilical cord of fetal sheep was clamped and 10 min later, after delivery, ventilation with air (n = 7) or with 100% oxygen for 3 (n = 6) or 30 min (n = 5), followed by air, was started. Among the 11 lambs given 100% oxygen, oxygen tension (PO2) was 10.7 (1.8-56) kPa [median (range)] in arterial samples taken after 2.5 min of ventilation. In those ventilated with 100% oxygen for 30 min, brain tissue PO2 (PbtO2) increased from less than 0.1 kPa in each lamb to individual maxima of 56 (30-61) kPa, whereas in those given oxygen for just 3 min, PbtO2 peaked at 4.2 (2.9-46) kPa. The maximal PbtO2 in air-ventilated lambs was 2.9 (0.8-5.4) kPa. Heart rate and blood pressure increased equally fast in the three groups. Thus, prolonged ventilation with 100% oxygen caused an increase in PbtO2 of a magnitude previously only reported under hyperbaric conditions. Reducing the time of 100% oxygen ventilation to 3 min did not consistently avert systemic hyperoxia.

  7. Evolution and physiology of neural oxygen sensing

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Kauê M.; Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Moraes, Davi J. A.; Machado, Benedito H.

    2014-01-01

    Major evolutionary trends in animal physiology have been heavily influenced by atmospheric O2 levels. Amongst other important factors, the increase in atmospheric O2 which occurred in the Pre-Cambrian and the development of aerobic respiration beckoned the evolution of animal organ systems that were dedicated to the absorption and transportation of O2, e.g., the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of vertebrates. Global variations of O2 levels in post-Cambrian periods have also been correlated with evolutionary changes in animal physiology, especially cardiorespiratory function. Oxygen transportation systems are, in our view, ultimately controlled by the brain related mechanisms, which senses changes in O2 availability and regulates autonomic and respiratory responses that ensure the survival of the organism in the face of hypoxic challenges. In vertebrates, the major sensorial system for oxygen sensing and responding to hypoxia is the peripheral chemoreflex neuronal pathways, which includes the oxygen chemosensitive glomus cells and several brainstem regions involved in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system and respiratory control. In this review we discuss the concept that regulating O2 homeostasis was one of the primordial roles of the nervous system. We also review the physiology of the peripheral chemoreflex, focusing on the integrative repercussions of chemoreflex activation and the evolutionary importance of this system, which is essential for the survival of complex organisms such as vertebrates. The contribution of hypoxia and peripheral chemoreflex for the development of diseases associated to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems is also discussed in an evolutionary context. PMID:25161625

  8. Effects of Environmental Oxygen Content and Dissolved Oxygen on the Surface Tension and Viscosity of Liquid Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SanSoucie, M. P.; Rogers, J. R.; Kumar, V.; Rodriguez, J.; Xiao, X.; Matson, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has recently added an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled in the range from approximately 10^{-28} {to} 10^{-9} bar, while in a vacuum atmosphere. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, has a PID-based current loop and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects on surface tension and viscosity by oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding environment and the melt dissolved oxygen content will be evaluated, and the results will be presented. The surface tension and viscosity will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension and viscosity will be measured using the oscillating droplet method.

  9. Concerted regulation of skeletal muscle contractility by oxygen tension and endogenous nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Eu, Jerry P.; Hare, Joshua M.; Hess, Douglas T.; Skaf, Michel; Sun, Junhui; Cardenas-Navina, Isabella; Sun, Qi-An; Dewhirst, Mark; Meissner, Gerhard; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    It is generally accepted that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) facilitates, and thus nitric oxide (NO) inhibits, contractility of skeletal muscle. However, standard assessments of contractility are carried out at a nonphysiological oxygen tension [partial pressure of oxygen (pO2)] that can interfere with NO signaling (95% O2). We therefore examined, in normal and neuronal NOS (nNOS)-deficient mice, the influence of pO2 on whole-muscle contractility and on myocyte calcium flux and sarcomere shortening. Here, we demonstrate a significant enhancement of these measures of muscle performance at low physiological pO2 and an inhibitory influence at higher physiological pO2, which depend on endogenous nNOS. At 95% O2 (which produces oxidative stress; muscle core pO2 ≈400 mmHg), force production is enhanced but control of contractility by NO/nitrosylation is greatly attenuated. In addition, responsivity to pO2 is altered significantly in nNOS mutant muscle. These results reveal a fundamental role for the concerted action of NO and O2 in physiological regulation of skeletal muscle contractility, and suggest novel molecular aspects of myopathic disease. They suggest further that the role of NO in some cellular systems may require reexamination. PMID:14645704

  10. Adipogenesis of adipose-derived stem cells may be regulated via the cytoskeleton at physiological oxygen levels in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity, which is excessive expansion of white adipose tissue, is a major risk factor for several serious health issues, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Efforts to combat obesity and related diseases require understanding the basic biology of adipogenesis. However, in vitro studies do not result in lipid composition and morphology that are typically seen in vivo, likely because the in vitro conditions are not truly representative of in vivo adipose tissue formation. In vitro, low oxygen tension and cytoskeletal tension have been shown to independently regulate adipogenesis, but in vivo, these two factors simultaneously influence differentiation. Methods The purpose of our study was to examine the influence of physiological oxygen tension on cytoskeletal tension-mediated adipogenesis. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were differentiated under both ambient (20%) and physiological (5%) oxygen conditions and treated with cytoskeletal inhibitors, cytochalasin D or blebbistatin. Adipogenesis was assessed on the basis of gene expression and adipocyte metabolic function. Results Adipose tissue metabolic markers (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) and triglycerides) were significantly down-regulated by physiological oxygen levels. Reducing cytoskeletal tension through the use of chemical inhibitors, either cytochalasin D or blebbistatin, resulted in an up-regulation of adipogenic gene expression (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4)) and metabolic markers, regardless of oxygen levels. Cytochalasin D and blebbistatin treatment altered cytoskeletal organization and associated tension via different mechanisms; however, both conditions had similar effects on adipogenesis, suggesting that physiological oxygen-mediated regulation of adipogenesis in ASCs is modulated, in part, by cytoskeletal tension. Conclusions These results demonstrated that

  11. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    FOXY system, on various rat breast tumor size (months 14- 30). Instead of single-channel NIRS, steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SSDRS...combination of normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen interventions) simultaneously monitored by steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SSDRS) and...simultaneously by steady-state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SSDRS) and FOXY oxygen sensor in response to normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen

  12. Physiological roles of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2012-10-26

    Historically, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) were thought to exclusively cause cellular damage and lack a physiological function. Accumulation of ROS and oxidative damage have been linked to multiple pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, and premature aging. Thus, mROS were originally envisioned as a necessary evil of oxidative metabolism, a product of an imperfect system. Yet few biological systems possess such flagrant imperfections, thanks to the persistent optimization of evolution, and it appears that oxidative metabolism is no different. More and more evidence suggests that mROS are critical for healthy cell function. In this Review, we discuss this evidence following some background on the generation and regulation of mROS.

  13. Influence of extradural blockade and ephedrine on transcutaneous oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J A; Sih, I L; Bovill, J G; van der Broek, B; Oosting, J

    1986-10-01

    The influence of lumbar extradural blockade with 0.5% pain bupivacaine on transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO2) and skin temperature was studied in 20 patients, 10 scheduled for vascular surgery and 10 for urological surgery. At the time of maximum extent of blockade, mean arterial pressure (MAP) had decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from 96.6 +/- 18.8 mm Hg to 69.5 +/- 10.1 (mean +/- SD) in the vascular group and from 88.0 +/- 14.7 mm Hg to 71.1 +/- 12 mm Hg in the urological group. In the vascular group PtcO2 decreased significantly in the ischaemic (P less than 0.01) and non-ischaemic (P less than 0.001) limbs. In the urological group, there was a significant (P less than 0.001) decrease in PtcO2 in both limbs. There was no change in cutaneous temperature in the ischaemic limbs (vascular group), but the temperature in the non-ischaemic limbs increased significantly (P less than 0.01). In the urological group, the cutaneous temperature increased significantly (P less than 0.001) in both limbs. When ephedrine 10 mg was administered i.v., MAP increased significantly (P less than 0.001) in both groups to pre-blockade values. This was accompanied in both groups by significant increases in PtcO2' but not by a change in skin temperature. There was a significant correlation between change in MAP and change in PtcO2 in both groups after ephedrine.

  14. Oxygen tension and gradient measurements in the retinal microvasculature of rats.

    PubMed

    Teng, Pang-Yu; Blair, Norman P; Wanek, Justin; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2012-03-01

    Oxygen delivery from the retinal vasculature plays a crucial role in maintaining normal retinal metabolic function. Therefore, measurements of retinal vascular oxygen tension (PO(2)) and PO(2) longitudinal gradients (gPO(2)) along retinal blood vessels may help gain fundamental knowledge of retinal physiology and pathological processes. Three-dimensional retinal vascular PO(2) maps were generated in rats by optical section phosphorescence lifetime imaging. A major retinal artery and vein pair, and a smaller blood vessel (microvessel) between them were segmented, and PO(2) along each blood vessel was measured. In each blood vessel, an average PO(2) (mPO(2)) was calculated, and gPO(2) was determined by linear regression analysis. Reproducibility of measurements was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of repeated measurements. The correlations of mPO(2) and gPO(2) measurements with systemic arterial oxygen tension (P(a)O(2)) and carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) was determined. Measurements of mPO(2) and gPO(2) in retinal arteries, microvessels and veins were reproducible (ICC > 0.86; p < 0.01; N = 8), except for retinal arterial gPO(2). Retinal arterial, microvessel and venous mPO(2) were 41 ± 8, 32 ± 8 and 25 ± 7 mmHg, respectively (mean ± SD; N = 27). Retinal arterial mPO(2) was correlated with P(a)O(2) and P(a)CO(2) (R > 0.44; p < 0.03), while retinal microvessel and venous mPO(2) were only correlated with P(a)CO(2) (R > 0.68; p < 0.01). Retinal microvessel gPO(2) (-3.8 ± 1.5 mmHg/100 μm) was significantly steeper (more negative) than venous gPO(2) (0.02 ± 0.43 mmHg/100 μm) (p < 0.01; N = 27), and neither were significantly correlated with P(a)O(2) or P(a)CO(2). Quantitative measurement of mPO(2) and gPO(2) in the retinal microvasculature was demonstrated. A significant decrease in PO(2) was observed along most retinal microvessels, indicative of substantial

  15. Oxygen Tension Within the Neurogenic Niche Regulates Dopaminergic Neurogenesis in the Developing Midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne Karen; Marrone, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor controlling stem cell proliferation and maintenance in various stem cell populations with a particular relevance in midbrain dopaminergic progenitors. Further studies have shown that the oxygen-dependent transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is involved in these processes. However, all available studies on oxygen effects in dopaminergic neuroprogenitors were performed in vitro and thus it remains unclear whether tissue oxygen tension in the embryonic midbrain is also relevant for the regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis in vivo. We thus dissect here the effects of oxygen tension in combination with HIF-1α conditional knockout on dopaminergic neurogenesis by using a novel experimental design allowing for the control of oxygen tension within the microenvironment of the neurogenic niche of the murine fetal midbrain in vivo. The microenvironment of the midbrain dopaminergic neurogenic niche was detected as hypoxic with oxygen tensions below 1.1%. Maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21%, and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal midbrain oxygenation. Fetal midbrain hypoxia hampered the generation of dopaminergic neurons and is accompanied with restricted fetal midbrain development. In contrast, induced hyperoxia stimulated proliferation and differentiation of dopaminergic progenitors during early and late embryogenesis. Oxygen effects were not directly mediated through HIF-1α signaling. These data—in agreement with in vitro data—indicate that oxygen is a crucial regulator of developmental dopaminergic neurogenesis. Our study provides the initial framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms mediating oxygen regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis within the fetal midbrain as its natural environment. PMID:26577812

  16. Oxygen Tension Within the Neurogenic Niche Regulates Dopaminergic Neurogenesis in the Developing Midbrain.

    PubMed

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne Karen; Marrone, Lara; Storch, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor controlling stem cell proliferation and maintenance in various stem cell populations with a particular relevance in midbrain dopaminergic progenitors. Further studies have shown that the oxygen-dependent transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is involved in these processes. However, all available studies on oxygen effects in dopaminergic neuroprogenitors were performed in vitro and thus it remains unclear whether tissue oxygen tension in the embryonic midbrain is also relevant for the regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis in vivo. We thus dissect here the effects of oxygen tension in combination with HIF-1α conditional knockout on dopaminergic neurogenesis by using a novel experimental design allowing for the control of oxygen tension within the microenvironment of the neurogenic niche of the murine fetal midbrain in vivo. The microenvironment of the midbrain dopaminergic neurogenic niche was detected as hypoxic with oxygen tensions below 1.1%. Maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21%, and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal midbrain oxygenation. Fetal midbrain hypoxia hampered the generation of dopaminergic neurons and is accompanied with restricted fetal midbrain development. In contrast, induced hyperoxia stimulated proliferation and differentiation of dopaminergic progenitors during early and late embryogenesis. Oxygen effects were not directly mediated through HIF-1α signaling. These data--in agreement with in vitro data-indicate that oxygen is a crucial regulator of developmental dopaminergic neurogenesis. Our study provides the initial framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms mediating oxygen regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis within the fetal midbrain as its natural environment.

  17. Effects of Oxygen Partial Pressure on the Surface Tension of Liquid Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Gowda, Vijaya Kumar Malahalli Shankare; Rodriguez, Justin; Matson, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has been recently upgraded with an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, theoretically in the range from 10-36 to 100 bar. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte, which is yttria-stabilized zirconia. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, PID-based current loop, and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects of oxygen partial pressure on the surface tension of undercooled liquid nickel will be analyzed, and the results will be presented. The surface tension will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension will be measured using the oscillating drop method. While undercooled, each sample will be oscillated several times consecutively to investigate how the surface tension behaves with time while at a particular oxygen partial pressure.

  18. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Following the same strategy, here, oxygen/carbogen induced tumor blood flow changes were estimated by fitting the Windkessel model ( Mandeville et al 1999...determined by the vasomotor control of arterioles, and that the capillaries and veins passively respond to arterial pressure changes ( Mandeville et al 1999...than normobaric oxygen. Reference: Boas D, Strangman G, Culver J, Hoge R, Jasdzewski G, Poldrack R, Rosen B and Mandeville J 2003 Can the cerebral

  19. Increased metallothionein content in rat liver induced by x irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, N.; Aono, K.; Utsumi, K.

    1983-08-01

    X irradiation and exposure to high oxygen tension are known to induce lipid peroxidation. The effects of these stresses on hepatic content of metallothionein, which may be involved in the regulation of zinc and copper metabolism, have been studied. The amount of metallothionein in rat liver was increased 11-fold by a high dose of X irradiation (1000 R). Increased metallothionein content (about 15 times) was also observed in liver of rats exposed to high oxygen tension for 3 days.

  20. The influence of 2 surgical bandage systems on wound tissue oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Plattner, O; Akca, O; Herbst, F; Arkilic, C F; Függer, R; Barlan, M; Kurz, A; Hopf, H; Werba, A; Sessler, D I

    2000-07-01

    Local wound heating improves tissue oxygen tension in postoperative patients. University hospital. Forty normothermic and well-hydrated patients recovering from elective open abdominal surgery. A comparison between an experimental bandage system (Warm-Up; Augustine Medical Inc, Eden Prairie, Minn) and conventional gauze covered with elastic adhesive (Medipore Dress-it; 3M, St Paul, Minn). The experimental system is heated to 38 degrees C and does not touch the wound. Subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was measured postoperatively and on the first postoperative day. In a subgroup, we also evaluated the effects of bandage pressure per se on tissue oxygen. Initial postoperative tissue oxygen tensions were approximately 30 mm Hg greater with the experimental bandage, even before warming. Subcutaneous oxygen tension during heating remained significantly greater in patients with the warmed bandage than the conventional elastic bandage (116 +/- 40 vs 85 +/- 34 mm Hg, respectively) while the patients were breathing approximately 50% oxygen. The difference was smaller on the first postoperative day, but still statistically significant (82 +/- 30 vs 65 +/- 22 mm Hg, respectively). In the subgroup analysis, tissue oxygen tension increased significantly by 12 +/- 4 mm Hg when the heating bandage was substituted for a conventional bandage (P<.001). In normothermic and well-hydrated surgical patients, much benefit from the heating bandage system appears to result from pressure relief. These data suggest that relieving wound pressure markedly improves tissue perfusion and oxygenation.

  1. Continuous measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tension of neonates under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Welle, P; Hayden, W; Miller, T

    1980-06-01

    Neonates present unique challenges to the anesthesiologist because of their susceptibility to oxygen toxicity and because clinical assessment of the degree of an infant's hypoxia is more difficult than in the adult. Equipment is now available for the continuous noninvasive measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tension. We used this equipment to monitor nine different neonates undergoing ten surgical procedures requiring general anesthesia. We found that certain of the infants were above and below what we considered to be a safe range for the transcutaneous oxygen tension for a significant portion of the surgery. Additionally, the manipulations of the surgeon and anesthesiologists were seen to cause sudden and large fluctuations in the transcutaneous oxygen tension. By providing the anesthesiologist with continuous and immediate data on the cardiorespiratory status of the infant, transcutaneous oxygen monitoring makes itself a valuable addition to the equipment used in the intraoperative monitoring of the neonate.

  2. Low oxygen tension enhances endothelial fate of human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Sravanti; Peijnenburg, Elizabeth; Patel, Parth; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Objective A critical regulator of the developing or regenerating vasculature is low oxygen tension. Precise elucidation of the role of low oxygen environments on endothelial commitment from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) necessitates controlled in vitro differentiation environments. Approach and Results We employed a feeder-free, two-dimensional differentiation system in which we could accurately monitor dissolved oxygen levels during hPSC differentiation toward early vascular cells (EVCs). We found that oxygen uptake rate of differentiating hPSCs is lower in 5% O2 compared to atmospheric conditions. EVCs differentiated in 5% O2 had an increased VEcad expression with clusters of VEcad+ cells surrounded by PDGFRβ+ cells. When we assessed the temporal effects of low oxygen differentiation environments, we determined that low oxygen environments during the early stages of EVC differentiation enhance endothelial lineage commitment. EVCs differentiated in 5% O2 exhibited an increased expression of VEcad and CD31 along with their localization to the membrane, enhanced lectin binding and acLDL uptake, rapid cord-like structure formation, and increased expression of arterial EC markers. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation during the early stages of differentiation abrogated the endothelial inductive effects of the low oxygen environments. Conclusions Low oxygen tension during early stages of EVC derivation induces endothelial commitment and maturation through the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, highlighting the importance of regulating oxygen tensions during hPSC-vascular differentiation. PMID:24526696

  3. Observations on intrauterine oxygen tension measured by fibre-optic microsensors.

    PubMed

    Ottosen, Lars D M; Hindkaer, Johnny; Husth, Merete; Petersen, Dorrit Elschner; Kirk, John; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2006-09-01

    Understanding the biology of reproductive organs is essential for the development of assisted reproductive techniques. There is at present no direct evidence for either the concentration and dynamics of intrauterine oxygen tension at the endometrial surface, nor its importance for the receptiveness of the endometrium. In this study a new method measured mid-cycle (ranging from day 12-18) endometrial surface oxygen tension in 21 patients referred to intrauterine insemination (IUI). Time series was measured online for a period of 5-10 min. The (mean) individual oxygen tension among patients varied from 4 to 27% air saturation. Overall mean oxygen tension among all patients was 11.8% air saturation. Within the same patient, considerable time-related variations were observed. Some patients exhibited rhythmic oscillations with a frequency in the order of 1 min, whereas others did not show any regular patterns. A good description of endometrial surface oxygen concentration and dynamics was thus obtained, but given the relatively small number of participants, an association with pregnancy following insemination could not be established. Further studies using this new method could elucidate the association between individual intrauterine activity, embryo implantation and endometrial surface oxygen tension.

  4. Near-simultaneous hemoglobin saturation and oxygen tension maps in mouse brain using an AOTF microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Shonat, R D; Wachman, E S; Niu, W; Koretsky, A P; Farkas, D L

    1997-01-01

    A newly developed microscope using acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) was used to generate in vivo hemoglobin saturation (SO2) and oxygen tension (PO2) maps in the cerebral cortex of mice. SO2 maps were generated from the spectral analysis of reflected absorbance images collected at different wavelengths, and PO2 maps were generated from the phosphorescence lifetimes of an injected palladium-porphyrin compound using a frequency-domain measurement. As the inspiratory O2 was stepped from hypoxia (10% O2), through normoxia (21% O2), to hyperoxia (60% O2), measured SO2 and PO2 levels rose accordingly and predictably throughout. A plot of SO2 versus PO2 in different arterial and venous regions of the pial vessels conformed to the sigmoidal shape of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve, providing further validation of the two mapping procedures. The study demonstrates the versatility of the AOTF microscope for in vivo physiologic investigation, allowing for the generation of nearly simultaneous SO2 and PO2 maps in the cerebral cortex, and the frequency-domain detection of phosphorescence lifetimes. This class of study opens up exciting new possibilities for investigating the dynamics of hemoglobin and O2 binding during functional activation of neuronal tissues. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9284290

  5. Method measuring oxygen tension and transport within subcutaneous devices

    PubMed Central

    Weidling, John; Sameni, Sara; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Botvinick, Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cellular therapies hold promise to replace the implantation of whole organs in the treatment of disease. For most cell types, in vivo viability depends on oxygen delivery to avoid the toxic effects of hypoxia. A promising approach is the in situ vascularization of implantable devices which can mediate hypoxia and improve both the lifetime and utility of implanted cells and tissues. Although mathematical models and bulk measurements of oxygenation in surrounding tissue have been used to estimate oxygenation within devices, such estimates are insufficient in determining if supplied oxygen is sufficient for the entire thickness of the implanted cells and tissues. We have developed a technique in which oxygen-sensitive microparticles (OSMs) are incorporated into the volume of subcutaneously implantable devices. Oxygen partial pressure within these devices can be measured directly in vivo by an optical probe placed on the skin surface. As validation, OSMs have been incorporated into alginate beads, commonly used as immunoisolation devices to encapsulate pancreatic islet cells. Alginate beads were implanted into the subcutaneous space of Sprague–Dawley rats. Oxygen transport through beads was characterized from dynamic OSM signals in response to changes in inhaled oxygen. Changes in oxygen dynamics over days demonstrate the utility of our technology. PMID:25162910

  6. Effect of mechanical stimulation by tooth brushing on oxygen tension in dog gingiva.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Hanioka, T; Ojima, M; Hori, T; Shizukuishi, S

    1994-11-01

    To determine oxygen tension (pO2) in gingival tissue, an oxygen micro-electrode with a membrane-coated Pt needle was inserted into the gingiva of 12 dogs. Teeth were brushed using a modified Bass technique for 10 s under 200 g pressure. pO2 increased and reached a maximum 15 min after brushing, then gradually returned to the baseline. A significant increase in pO2 persisted for approx. 1 h. These findings suggest that short-term stimulation by tooth brushing increases oxygen tension in the gingiva.

  7. Low oxygen tension increased fibronectin fragment induced catabolic activities - response prevented with biomechanical signals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The inherent low oxygen tension in normal cartilage has implications on inflammatory conditions associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Biomechanical signals will additionally contribute to changes in tissue remodelling and influence the inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of oxygen tension and fibronectin fragment (FN-f) on the inflammatory response of chondrocytes subjected to biomechanical signals. Methods Chondrocytes were cultured under free-swelling conditions at 1%, 5% and 21% oxygen tension or subjected to dynamic compression in an ex vivo 3D/bioreactor model with 29 kDa FN-f, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and/or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor for 6 and 48 hours. Markers for catabolic activity (NO, PGE2), tissue remodelling (GAG, MMPs) and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα) were quantified by biochemical assay. Aggrecan, collagen type II, iNOS and COX-2 gene expression were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Bonferroni-corrected t-test were used to analyse data. Results Both FN-fs and IL-1β increased NO, PGE2 and MMP production (all P < 0.001). FN-f was more active than IL-1β with greater levels of NO observed at 5% than 1% or 21% oxygen tension (P < 0.001). Whilst FN-f reduced GAG synthesis at all oxygen tension, the effect of IL-1β was significant at 1% oxygen tension. In unstrained constructs, treatment with FN-f or IL-1β increased iNOS and COX-2 expression and reduced aggrecan and collagen type II (all P < 0.001). In unstrained constructs, FN-f was more effective than IL-1β at 5% oxygen tension and increased production of NO, PGE2, MMP, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα. At 5% and 21% oxygen tension, co-stimulation with compression and the NOS inhibitor abolished fragment or cytokine-induced catabolic activities and restored anabolic response. Conclusions The present findings revealed that FN-fs are more potent than IL-1β in exerting catabolic effects

  8. Near-infrared uncaging or photosensitizing dictated by oxygen tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Erin D.; Gorka, Alexander P.; Schnermann, Martin J.

    2016-11-01

    Existing strategies that use tissue-penetrant near-infrared light for the targeted treatment of cancer typically rely on the local generation of reactive oxygen species. This approach can be impeded by hypoxia, which frequently occurs in tumour microenvironments. Here we demonstrate that axially unsymmetrical silicon phthalocyanines uncage small molecules preferentially in a low-oxygen environment, while efficiently generating reactive oxygen species in normoxic conditions. Mechanistic studies of the uncaging reaction implicate a photoredox pathway involving photoinduced electron transfer to generate a key radical anion intermediate. Cellular studies demonstrate that the biological mechanism of action is O2-dependent, with reactive oxygen species-mediated phototoxicity in normoxic conditions and small molecule uncaging in hypoxia. These studies provide a near-infrared light-targeted treatment strategy with the potential to address the complex tumour landscape through two distinct mechanisms that vary in response to the local O2 environment.

  9. Respiratory Development in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grown at Controlled Oxygen Tension

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, P. J.; Stewart, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in batch culture over a wide range of oxygen concentrations, varying from the anaerobic condition to a maximal dissolved oxygen concentration of 3.5 μM. The development of cells was assayed by measuring amounts of the aerobic cytochromes aa3, b, c, and c1, the cellular content of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol, and the activity of respiratory enzyme complexes. The half-maximal levels of membrane-bound cytochromes aa3, b, and c1, were reached in cells grown in O2 concentrations around 0.1 μM; this was similar to the oxygen concentration required for half-maximal levels of unsaturated fatty acid and sterol. However, the synthesis of ubiquinone and cytochrome c and the increase in fumarase activity were essentially linear functions of the dissolved oxygen concentration up to 3.5 μM oxygen. The synthesis of the succinate dehydrogenase, succinate cytochrome c reductase, and cytochrome c oxidase complexes showed different responses to changes in O2 concentration in the growth medium. Cyanide-insensitive respiration and P450 cytochrome content were maximal at 0.25 μM oxygen and declined in both more anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Cytochrome c peroxidase and catalase activities in cell-free homogenates were high in all but the most strictly anaerobic cells. PMID:4352179

  10. Measurements of oxygen tension in native and transplanted rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, P O; Liss, P; Andersson, A; Jansson, L

    1998-07-01

    This study was performed to measure the oxygen tension before and after revascularization of pancreatic islets transplanted beneath the renal capsule and to investigate to what extent this was affected by acute and chronic hyperglycemia. In addition, the oxygen tension in islets within the pancreas was determined. PO2 was measured with a modified Clark electrode (tip 2-6 microm o.d.). Within native pancreatic islets, the mean PO2 was higher (31-37 mmHg) than within the exocrine pancreas (20-23 mmHg). The mean oxygen tension in the transplanted islets the day after implantation was half of that recorded in native islets (14-19 mmHg) and did not differ between normoglycemic and diabetic recipients. At 1 month after transplantation, when revascularization had occurred, the mean PO2 in the islet grafts was 9-15 mmHgf in normoglycemic animals but was lower (6-8 mmHg) in diabetic animals, whereas the blood perfusion of the transplants, as measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry (probe diameter 0.45 mm), was similar in both groups. The mean oxygen tension in the superficial renal cortex surrounding the implanted islets was similar in all groups and remained stable at 13-21 mmHg. Intravenous administration of D-glucose (1 g/kg) did not affect the oxygen tension in any of the investigated tissues. We conclude that the mean PO2 in islets implanted under the renal capsule is markedly lower than in native islets, not only in the immediate posttransplantation period but also 1 month after implantation, i.e., when revascularization has occurred. Furthermore, persistent hyperglycemia in the recipient leads to a further decrease in graft oxygen tension. To what extent this may contribute to islet graft failure is at present unknown.

  11. A Method for Combined Retinal Vascular and Tissue Oxygen Tension Imaging.

    PubMed

    Felder, Anthony E; Wanek, Justin; Tan, Michael R; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2017-09-06

    The retina requires adequate oxygenation to maintain cellular metabolism and visual function. Inner retinal oxygen metabolism is directly related to retinal vascular oxygen tension (PO2) and inner retinal oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), whereas outer retinal oxygen consumption (QO2) relies on oxygen availability by the choroid and is contingent upon retinal tissue oxygen tension (tPO2) gradients across the retinal depth. Thus far, these oxygenation and metabolic parameters have been measured independently by different techniques in separate animals, precluding a comprehensive and correlative assessment of retinal oxygenation and metabolism dynamics. The purpose of the current study is to report an innovative optical system for dual oxyphor phosphorescence lifetime imaging to near-simultaneously measure retinal vascular PO2 and tPO2 in rats. The use of a new oxyphor with different spectral characteristics allowed differentiation of phosphorescence signals from the retinal vasculature and tissue. Concurrent measurements of retinal arterial and venous PO 2 , tPO2 through the retinal depth, inner retinal OEF, and outer retinal QO 2 were demonstrated, permitting a correlative assessment of retinal oxygenation and metabolism. Future application of this method can be used to investigate the relations among retinal oxygen content, extraction and metabolism under pathologic conditions and thus advance knowledge of retinal hypoxia pathophysiology.

  12. Regulation of ion transport across lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte membrane by oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Virkki, L V; Salama, A; Nikinmaa, M

    1998-06-01

    We have measured the effects of oxygen tension on the transport of Na+, K+ and Cl- across the erythrocyte membrane of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. The transport of each ion was affected by the oxygen tension of the medium. Hypoxic conditions (PO2 2 kPa) caused an increase in the acidification-induced influx of Na+ via Na+/H+ exchange. The influx of K+ was only slightly affected by the oxygenation of the medium. In contrast, the basal K+ efflux, measured using the radioactive isotope 43K, was markedly reduced by decreasing the oxygen tension of the medium, whereas the K+ flux in hypotonic medium was not affected. Only minor effects of hypoxic conditions on the influx of Cl- were observed in either isotonic or hypotonic conditions (there was a tendency for the isotonic influx to increase) or on the efflux in isotonic conditions. However, deoxygenation caused a marked reduction in the Cl- efflux in hypotonic conditions. The results show that oxygen tension has a marked effect on the pH and volume regulatory transport pathways of lamprey erythrocytes. For K+ and Cl-, the regulation appears to be asymmetric, i.e. influx and efflux are affected differently.

  13. Regulation of ion transport across lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) erythrocyte membrane by oxygen tension

    PubMed

    Virkki; Salama; Nikinmaa

    1998-05-21

    We have measured the effects of oxygen tension on the transport of Na+, K+ and Cl- across the erythrocyte membrane of the lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis. The transport of each ion was affected by the oxygen tension of the medium. Hypoxic conditions (PO2 2 kPa) caused an increase in the acidification-induced influx of Na+ via Na+/H+ exchange. The influx of K+ was only slightly affected by the oxygenation of the medium. In contrast, the basal K+ efflux, measured using the radioactive isotope 43K, was markedly reduced by decreasing the oxygen tension of the medium, whereas the K+ flux in hypotonic medium was not affected. Only minor effects of hypoxic conditions on the influx of Cl- were observed in either isotonic or hypotonic conditions (there was a tendency for the isotonic influx to increase) or on the efflux in isotonic conditions. However, deoxygenation caused a marked reduction in the Cl- efflux in hypotonic conditions. The results show that oxygen tension has a marked effect on the pH and volume regulatory transport pathways of lamprey erythrocytes. For K+ and Cl-, the regulation appears to be asymmetric, i.e. influx and efflux are affected differently.

  14. Oxygen at physiological concentrations. A potential, paradoxical mediator of reperfusion injury to mitochondria induced by phosphate.

    PubMed

    Lange, L G; Hartman, M; Sobel, B E

    1984-04-01

    Cellular injury induced by reperfusion after myocardial ischemia is manifested by striking mitochondrial damage as well as other hallmarks such as contraction band necrosis. Calcium has been implicated as a mediator of irreversible cellular injury in several systems. To identify other potential mediators of the mitochondrial injury associated with reperfusion, interactions between inorganic phosphate, oxygen, and mitochondria harvested from rabbit hearts were evaluated in vitro. Mitochondria exhibited rapid inactivation of oxidative phosphorylation after preincubation at 25 degrees C when phosphate and oxygen were present. Inactivation was partially but not completely precluded by EDTA, EGTA, magnesium, diltiazem, or ruthenium red, results in concert with findings of others suggesting involvement of a deleterious influx of calcium into mitochondria; exogenous calcium enhanced inactivation. However, the present data indicate that inactivation is prevented by incubation of mitochondria in the absence of oxygen, and demonstrate for the first time that injury elicited by phosphate is dependent on oxygen at physiological concentrations either because calcium and/or phosphate influx is linked to aerobic metabolism or because oxygen exerts deleterious effects on mitochondria, which may render them particularly susceptible to calcium influx. Since intracellular inorganic phosphate concentration increases markedly with ischemia, reperfusion with oxygenated medium may paradoxically augment mitochondrial injury in this setting. Thus, in the presence of increased intracellular concentrations of calcium and phosphate induced by ischemia, subsequent reestablishment of physiological levels of intracellular oxygen tension may promote mitochondrial damage, which is known to increase with reperfusion.

  15. Rabbit Erythrocytes Release ATP and Dilate Skeletal Muscle Arterioles in the Presence of Reduced Oxygen Tension

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Randy S.; Hanson, Madelyn S.; Achilleus, David; Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Stephenson, Alan H.; Sridharan, Meera; Adderley, Shaquria; Ellsworth, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, oxygen (O2) delivery to appropriately meet metabolic need requires mechanisms for detection of the magnitude of O2 demand and the regulation of O2 delivery. Erythrocytes, when exposed to decreases in O2 tension, release both O2 and the vasodilator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The aims of this study were to establish that erythrocytes release ATP in response to reduced O2 tension and determine if erythrocytes are necessary for dilation of isolated skeletal muscle arterioles exposed to reduced extra-luminal O2 tension. Rabbit erythrocytes exposed to reduced O2 tension in a tonometer (n = 5, PO2 = 27 ± 3, p<0.01) released ATP in response to reduced O2 tension. ATP release increased proportional to the decrease in O2 tension. The contribution of erythrocytes to the response of skeletal muscle arterioles to reduced extra-luminal O2 tension was determined using isolated hamster cheek pouch retractor muscle arterioles perfused with buffer (n = 11, mean diameter 52 ± 3 μm) in the absence and presence of rabbit erythrocytes. Without erythrocytes, arterioles did not dilate when exposed to reduced extra-luminal O2 tension (PO2 = 32 ± 4 mm Hg). In contrast, when rabbit erythrocytes were present in the perfusate (hematocrit 15%) the same decrease in O2 tension resulted in a 20 ± 4% dilation (p<0.01). These results provide support for the hypothesis that erythrocytes, via their ability to release O2 along with ATP in response to exposure to reduced O2 tension, can participate in the matching of O2 delivery with metabolic need in skeletal muscle. PMID:19307706

  16. Influence of Oxygen Tension on Dopaminergic Differentiation of Human Fetal Stem Cells of Midbrain and Forebrain Origin

    PubMed Central

    Krabbe, Christina; Bak, Sara Thornby; Jensen, Pia; von Linstow, Christian; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Hansen, Claus; Meyer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD), but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3%) versus high, atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1±0.5 and 17.1±0.4 (P<0.001); forebrain: 1.9±0.4 and 3.9±0.6 (P<0.01) percent of total cells). Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect differences in

  17. Influence of oxygen tension on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal stem cells of midbrain and forebrain origin.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Christina; Bak, Sara Thornby; Jensen, Pia; von Linstow, Christian; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Hansen, Claus; Meyer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD), but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3%) versus high, atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1 ± 0.5 and 17.1 ± 0.4 (P<0.001); forebrain: 1.9 ± 0.4 and 3.9 ± 0.6 (P<0.01) percent of total cells). Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect differences

  18. Three-dimensional mapping of oxygen tension in cortical arterioles before and after occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Salvaggio, Anthony J.; Estrada, Arnold D.; Hemati, Michael A.; Shaydyuk, Nazariy K.; Roussakis, Emannuel; Jones, Theresa A.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Occlusions in single cortical microvessels lead to a reduction in oxygen supply, but this decrement has not been able to be quantified in three dimensions at the level of individual vessels using a single instrument. We demonstrate a combined optical system using two-photon phosphorescence lifetime and fluorescence microscopy (2PLM) to characterize the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in single descending cortical arterioles in the mouse brain before and after generating a targeted photothrombotic occlusion. Integrated real-time Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) provides wide-field perfusion maps that are used to monitor and guide the occlusion process while 2PLM maps changes in intravascular oxygen tension. We present the technique’s utility in highlighting the effects of vascular networking on the residual intravascular oxygen tensions measured after occlusion in three dimensions. PMID:23847732

  19. Determination of oxygen tension in the subcutaneous tissue of cosmonauts during the Salyut-6 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranski, S.; Bloszczynski, R.; Hermaszewski, M.; Kubiczkowa, J.; Piorko, A.; Saganiak, R.; Sarol, Z.; Skibniewsky, F.; Stendera, J.; Walichnowski, W.

    1982-01-01

    A polarographic technique was used to measure the oxygen tension in subcutaneous tissue of the forearm of a cosmonaut prior to, after, and on the fourth day of a space mission performed by Salut-6. A drop in the oxygen exchange rate in the peripheral tissues during weightlessness was observed. The mechanisms of this change are studied, taking into consideration the blood distribution in the organism and microcirculation disorders reflected by a decreased blood flow rate in arterial-venous junctions.

  20. Culture of human mesenchymal stem cells at low oxygen tension improves growth and genetic stability by activating glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, J C; Albo, C; Benguría, A; Dopazo, A; López-Romero, P; Carrera-Quintanar, L; Roche, E; Clemente, E P; Enríquez, J A; Bernad, A; Samper, E

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of human stem cells before cell therapy is typically performed at 20% O2. Growth in these pro-oxidative conditions can lead to oxidative stress and genetic instability. Here, we demonstrate that culture of human mesenchymal stem cells at lower, physiological O2 concentrations significantly increases lifespan, limiting oxidative stress, DNA damage, telomere shortening and chromosomal aberrations. Our gene expression and bioenergetic data strongly suggest that growth at reduced oxygen tensions favors a natural metabolic state of increased glycolysis and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. We propose that this balance is disturbed at 20% O2, resulting in abnormally increased levels of oxidative stress. These observations indicate that bioenergetic pathways are intertwined with the control of lifespan and decisively influence the genetic stability of human primary stem cells. We conclude that stem cells for human therapy should be grown under low oxygen conditions to increase biosafety. PMID:22139129

  1. Evaluation of multi-exponential curve fitting analysis of oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces for recovering microvascular oxygen tension histograms.

    PubMed

    Bezemer, Rick; Faber, Dirk J; Almac, Emre; Kalkman, Jeroen; Legrand, Matthieu; Heger, Michal; Ince, Can

    2010-12-01

    Although it is generally accepted that oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces can be analyzed using the exponential series method (ESM), its application until now has been limited to a few (patho)physiological studies, probably because the reliability of the recovered oxygen tension (pO(2)) histograms has never been extensively evaluated and lacks documentation. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the use of the ESM to adequately determine pO(2) histograms from phosphorescence decay traces. For this purpose we simulated decay traces corresponding to uni- and bimodal pO(2) distributions and recovered the pO(2) histograms at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Ultimately, we recovered microvascular pO(2) histograms measured in the rat kidney in a model of endotoxemic shock and fluid resuscitation and showed that the mean microvascular oxygen tension, [Symbol: see text]pO(2)[Symbol: see text], decreased after induction of endotoxemia and that after 2 h of fluid resuscitation, [Symbol: see text]pO(2)[Symbol: see text] remained low, but the hypoxic peak that had arisen during endotoxemia was reduced. This finding illustrates the importance of recovering pO(2) histograms under (patho)physiological conditions. In conclusion, this study has characterized how noise affects the recovery of pO(2) histograms using the ESM and documented the reliability of the ESM for recovering both low- and high-pO(2) distributions for SNRs typically found in experiments. This study might therefore serve as a frame of reference for investigations focused on oxygen (re)distribution during health and disease and encourage researchers to (re-)analyze data obtained in (earlier) studies possibly revealing new insights into complex disease states and treatment strategies.

  2. Evaluation of multi-exponential curve fitting analysis of oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces for recovering microvascular oxygen tension histograms

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Dirk J.; Almac, Emre; Kalkman, Jeroen; Legrand, Matthieu; Heger, Michal; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that oxygen-quenched phosphorescence decay traces can be analyzed using the exponential series method (ESM), its application until now has been limited to a few (patho)physiological studies, probably because the reliability of the recovered oxygen tension (pO2) histograms has never been extensively evaluated and lacks documentation. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the use of the ESM to adequately determine pO2 histograms from phosphorescence decay traces. For this purpose we simulated decay traces corresponding to uni- and bimodal pO2 distributions and recovered the pO2 histograms at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Ultimately, we recovered microvascular pO2 histograms measured in the rat kidney in a model of endotoxemic shock and fluid resuscitation and showed that the mean microvascular oxygen tension, 〈pO2〉, decreased after induction of endotoxemia and that after 2 h of fluid resuscitation, 〈pO2〉 remained low, but the hypoxic peak that had arisen during endotoxemia was reduced. This finding illustrates the importance of recovering pO2 histograms under (patho)physiological conditions. In conclusion, this study has characterized how noise affects the recovery of pO2 histograms using the ESM and documented the reliability of the ESM for recovering both low- and high-pO2 distributions for SNRs typically found in experiments. This study might therefore serve as a frame of reference for investigations focused on oxygen (re)distribution during health and disease and encourage researchers to (re-)analyze data obtained in (earlier) studies possibly revealing new insights into complex disease states and treatment strategies. PMID:21046272

  3. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: Integration of experimental and computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Oreffo, ROC; Sengers, BG; Tare, RS

    2014-01-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 1876–1885. PMID:24668194

  4. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jianhua Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-10-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific.

  5. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  6. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  7. The effect of differing ambient oxygen tensions on wound infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, T K; Linsey, M; Grislis, H; Sonne, M; Jawetz, E

    1975-01-01

    Wound infections were studied in rabbits using two standard inocula (approximately equal to 10-4 and approximately equal to 10-6) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa injected into subcutaneous wound dead space made by implantation of standard wire mesh cylinders. The inoculation was done on the fourth day after implantation of the cylinders in animals kept from the day of implantation in atmospheres of 12%, 21%, or 45% oxygen content. Samples of wound fluid (0.2 ml) were removed for quantitative culture just before inoculation and 3, 7, 14, and 21 days later. No positive cultures resulted from samples taken before inoculation. One uninoculated wound served as a control in each animal. None of these control wounds became infected. Culture counts were significantly highest in the anoxic group and lowest in the hyperoxic group. Established infections were significantly lowest in the hyperoxics and highest in the hypoxics. The percent of wounds showing a significant culture count showed a similar trend. The mechanisms of this effect is not known, but a possible mechanism lies in the relative inability of leucocytes to kill this bacterium under hypoxic conditions. PMID:804296

  8. The effect of differing ambient oxygen tensions on wound infection.

    PubMed

    Hunt, T K; Linsey, M; Grislis, H; Sonne, M; Jawetz, E

    1975-01-01

    Wound infections were studied in rabbits using two standard inocula (approximately equal to 10-4 and approximately equal to 10-6) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa injected into subcutaneous wound dead space made by implantation of standard wire mesh cylinders. The inoculation was done on the fourth day after implantation of the cylinders in animals kept from the day of implantation in atmospheres of 12%, 21%, or 45% oxygen content. Samples of wound fluid (0.2 ml) were removed for quantitative culture just before inoculation and 3, 7, 14, and 21 days later. No positive cultures resulted from samples taken before inoculation. One uninoculated wound served as a control in each animal. None of these control wounds became infected. Culture counts were significantly highest in the anoxic group and lowest in the hyperoxic group. Established infections were significantly lowest in the hyperoxics and highest in the hypoxics. The percent of wounds showing a significant culture count showed a similar trend. The mechanisms of this effect is not known, but a possible mechanism lies in the relative inability of leucocytes to kill this bacterium under hypoxic conditions.

  9. Transcutaneous oxygen tension in patients with post-thrombotic leg ulcers: treatment with intermittent pneumatic compression.

    PubMed

    Kolari, P J; Pekanmäki, K; Pohjola, R T

    1988-02-01

    Transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2) and the effect of intermittent pneumatic compression on tissue oxygenation were studied in 10 patients with post-thrombotic leg ulcers. Oxygen tension was measured near the edge of the leg ulcer before and after 60 min of intermittent compression at 50 mmHg. The control group consisted of nine subjects with no evidence of peripheral vascular disease. The mean TcPO2 for the controls was 59.7 (SEM2.9) mmHg and for the study group 26.2 (SEM7.0) mmHg before treatment and 42.7 (SEM6.4) mmHg after treatment (p less than 0.005). Oxygen tension increased in nine patients in the study group. The change in TcPO2 correlated highly significantly (r = 0.912, p less than 0.002) with the reduction of oedema and the inverse change of skin temperature. The results suggest that intermittent pneumatic compression decreases interstitial fluid volume and venous stasis, both of which may lead to increased tissue oxygenation.

  10. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Xiao, Huajun; Shi, Weiru; Wen, Dongqing; Yu, Lihua; Chen, Jianzhang

    2015-01-01

    Positive pressure breathing (PPB) can cause circulatory dysfunction due to peripheral pooling of blood. This study explored a better way at ground level to simulate pure oxygen PPB at 59,055 ft (18,000 m) by comparing the physiological changes during PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen at ground level. Six subjects were exposed to 3 min of 69-mmHg PPB and 3 min of 59-mmHg PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen while wearing the thoracic counterpressure jerkin inflated to 1× breathing pressure and G-suit inflated to 3 and 4× breathing pressure. Stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), and peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) were measured. Subjects completed a simulating flying task (SFT) during 3-min PPB and scores were recorded. HR and SV responses differed significantly between breathing pure oxygen and low oxygen. CO response was not significantly different for pure oxygen and low oxygen, the two levels of PPB, and the two levels of G-suit pressure. Spo2 declined as a linear function of time during low-oxygen PPB and there was a significant difference in Spo2 response for the two levels of PPB. The average score of SFT during pure oxygen PPB was 3970.5 ± 1050.4, which was significantly higher than 2708.0 ± 702.7 with low oxygen PPB. Hypoxia and PPB have a synergistic negative effect on both the cardiovascular system and SFT performance. PPB with low oxygen was more appropriate at ground level to investigate physiological responses during PPB and evaluate the protective performance of garments. Liu X, Xiao H, Shi W, Wen D, Yu L, Chen J. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

  11. Clinical, Biomechanical, and Physiological Translational Interpretations of Human Resting Myofascial Tone or Tension

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Nair, Kalyani; Evans, Tyler; Ghandour, Yousef

    2010-01-01

    Background Myofascial tissues generate integrated webs and networks of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and that control movement in the body. Passive [central nervous system (CNS)–independent] resting myofascial tension is present in the body and provides a low-level stabilizing component to help maintain balanced postures. This property was recently called “human resting myofascial tone” (HRMT). The HRMT model evolved from electromyography (EMG) research in the 1950s that showed lumbar muscles usually to be EMG-silent in relaxed gravity-neutral upright postures. Methods Biomechanical, clinical, and physiological studies were reviewed to interpret the passive stiffness properties of HRMT that help to stabilize various relaxed functions such as quiet balanced standing. Biomechanical analyses and experimental studies of the lumbar multifidus were reviewed to interpret its passive stiffness properties. The lumbar multifidus was illustrated as the major core stabilizing muscle of the spine, serving an important passive biomechanical role in the body. Results Research into muscle physiology suggests that passive resting tension (CNS-independent) is generated in sarcomeres by the molecular elasticity of low-level cycling cross-bridges between the actomyosin filaments. In turn, tension is complexly transmitted to intimately enveloping fascial matrix fibrils and other molecular elements in connective tissue, which, collectively, constitute the myofascial unit. Postural myofascial tonus varies with age and sex. Also, individuals in the population are proposed to vary in a polymorphism of postural HRMT. A few people are expected to have outlier degrees of innate postural hypotonicity or hypertonicity. Such biomechanical variations likely predispose to greater risk of related musculoskeletal disorders, a situation that deserves greater attention in clinical practice and research. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized to

  12. Effects of oxygen tension and dextran-shelled/2H,3H-decafluoropentane-cored oxygen-loaded nanodroplets on secretion of gelatinases and their inhibitors in term human placenta.

    PubMed

    Prato, Mauro; Khadjavi, Amina; Magnetto, Chiara; Gulino, Giulia Rossana; Rolfo, Alessandro; Todros, Tullia; Cavalli, Roberta; Guiot, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs) need to be finely modulated in physiological processes. However, oxygen tension influences MMP/TIMP balances, potentially leading to pathology. Intriguingly, new 2H,3H-decafluoropentane-based oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNDs) have proven effective in abrogating hypoxia-dependent dysregulation of MMP and TIMP secretion by single cell populations. This work explored the effects of different oxygen tensions and dextran-shelled OLNDs on MMP/TIMP production in an organized and multicellular tissue (term human placenta). Chorionic villous explants from normal third-trimester pregnancies were incubated with/without OLNDs in 3 or 20% O2. Explants cultured at higher oxygen tension released constitutive proMMP-2, proMMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2. Hypoxia significantly altered MMP-2/TIMP-2 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios enhancing TIMP-2 and reducing proMMP-2, proMMP-9, and TIMP-1 levels. Intriguingly, OLNDs effectively counteracted the effects of low oxygen tension. Collectively, these data support OLND potential as innovative, nonconventional, and cost-effective tools to counteract hypoxia-dependent dysregulation of MMP/TIMP balances in human tissues.

  13. Effect of oxygen tension on bacteria-stimulated cytokine production by fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Klimova, Natalia G; Hanna, Nazeeh; Peltier, Morgan R

    2013-09-01

    Tissue culture studies indicate that bacterial products stimulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines by reproductive tissues. However, most of these studies have been performed under room air conditions, supplemented with 5% CO₂. In this study, we tested whether O₂ tension affects bacteria-stimulated cytokine production by extra-placental fetal membranes. Cultures of full-thickness membranes, isolated choriodecidua, and isolated amnion were exposed to bacteria and incubated under 21% (room air) or 5% O₂ for 18 h. Cytokine concentrations in conditioned medium was quantified by immunoassay. Culture under 5% O₂ increased production of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but reduced IL-10 and IL-6 production by full membranes. Isolated choriodecidua responded to 5% O₂ with increased IL-1β production and reduced IL-6 production, but had no effect on TNF-α and IL-10 production was not detected. No effect of O₂ tension on IL-1β or IL-6 production by isolated amnion was detected, however, Escherichia coli-stimulated IL-10, TNF-α and IL-8 production was enhanced by culture under 5% O₂. Increased oxygen tension reduces the pro-inflammatory responsiveness of cell cultures to E. coli and promotes an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile. Differential effects of O₂ tension on choriodecidua and amnion suggests a network of paracrine factors that regulate cytokine levels in response to changes in O₂ tension.

  14. Microscopic Local Measurement of Blood Flow and Oxygen Tension in Brain Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamitani, Haruyuki; Takahashi, Ryota; Tsukada, Kousuke

    A multi-photonic imaging system was proposed for measuring blood flow velocity, vessel diameter and blood oxygen tension pO2 simultaneously with high spatio-temporal resolution in the parenchymatous organ microcirculation, such as pial tissue, by using a closed cranial window and two light sources. FITC-stained erythrocytes was used to visualize the microcirculation, and the fluorescent image was recorded by a high-speed video camera for measuring blood flow velocity. Oxygen tension pO2 was measured by oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescent molecules, Pd-TCPP, in the microvessels after irradiation of second harmonic light of Nd:YAG pulse laser (532nm). Animal experiments were performed for investigation of blood flow dynamics and oxygen diffusion phenomenon during acute cerebral ischemia using photochemical thrombus formation in the closed cranial window of male Wistar rats. Experimental results showed specific and significant blood flow and oxygen diffusion phenomena related to the abnormal organ tissues, from those the proposed technique would contribute to the trasnlational research for the clinical medicine, concerned in the ischemic dysfunction, angiogenisis, tumorgenisis and so on.

  15. The Association Between Arterial Oxygen Tension and Neurological Outcome After Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas J; Dodampahala, Kalani; Rosselot, Babette; Perman, Sarah M; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Goyal, Munish; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V

    2017-03-01

    A number of observational studies have evaluated the association between arterial oxygen tensions and outcome after cardiac arrest with variable results. The objective of this study is to determine the association between arterial oxygen tension and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using the Penn Alliance for Therapeutic Hypothermia registry. Adult patients who experienced return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and had a partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) recorded within 48 hours were included. Our primary exposure of interest was PaO2. Hyperoxemia was defined as PaO2 > 300 mmHg, hypoxemia as PaO2 < 60 mmHg, and optimal oxygenation as PaO2 60-300 mmHg. The primary outcome was neurological function at hospital discharge among survivors, as described by the cerebral performance category (CPC) score, dichotomized into "favorable" (CPCs 1-2) and "unfavorable" (CPCs 3-5). Secondary outcomes included in-hospital mortality. A total of 544 patients from 13 institutions were included. Average age was 61 years, 56% were male, and 51% were white. A total of 64% experienced OHCA, 81% of arrests were witnessed, and pulseless electrical activity was the most common initial rhythm (40%). More than 72% of the patients had cardiac etiology for their arrests, and 55% underwent targeted temperature management. A total of 38% of patients survived to hospital discharge. There was no significant association between PaO2 at any time interval and neurological outcome at hospital discharge. Hyperoxemia at 12 hours after cardiac arrest was associated with decreased odds of survival (OR 0.17 [0.03-0.89], p = 0.032). There was no significant association between arterial oxygen tension measured within the first 48 hours after cardiac arrest and neurological outcome.

  16. Modulating the oxygen tension in tumours by hypothermia and hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Nias, A H; Perry, P M; Photiou, A R

    1988-01-01

    Hypothermia is associated with reduced metabolism of tissues and especially reduced oxygen consumption by tumours. If the blood supply to a hypothermic tumour can be maintained then the hypoxic fraction of cells should be reduced and the radiation response increased. This hypothesis has been tested with radiation under hyperbaric oxygen and increased tumour response has been demonstrated. PMID:3210193

  17. Oxygen tension regulates the osteogenic, chondrogenic and endochondral phenotype of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, Eamon J.; Buckley, Conor T.; Kelly, Daniel J.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expansion in low oxygen enhances MSC proliferation and osteogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation in low oxygen enhances chondrogenesis and suppresses hypertrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen can regulate the MSC phenotype for use in tissue engineering applications. -- Abstract: The local oxygen tension is a key regulator of the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a low oxygen tension during expansion and differentiation on the proliferation kinetics as well as the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs. We first hypothesised that expansion in a low oxygen tension (5% pO{sub 2}) would improve both the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs compared to expansion in a normoxic environment (20% pO{sub 2}). Furthermore, we hypothesised that chondrogenic differentiation in a low oxygen environment would suppress hypertrophy of MSCs cultured in both pellets and hydrogels used in tissue engineering strategies. MSCs expanded at 5% pO{sub 2} proliferated faster forming larger colonies, resulting in higher cell yields. Expansion at 5% pO{sub 2} also enhanced subsequent osteogenesis of MSCs, whereas differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} was found to be a more potent promoter of chondrogenesis than expansion at 5% pO{sub 2}. Greater collagen accumulation, and more intense staining for collagen types I and X, was observed in pellets maintained at 20% pO{sub 2} compared to 5% pO{sub 2}. Both pellets and hydrogels stained more intensely for type II collagen when undergoing chondrogenesis in a low oxygen environment. Differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} also appeared to inhibit hypertrophy in both pellets and hydrogels, as demonstrated by reduced collagen type X and Alizarin Red staining and alkaline phosphatase activity. This study demonstrates that the local oxygen environment can be manipulated in vitro to either stabilise a

  18. A Review of Oxygen Physiology and Appropriate Management of Oxygen Levels in Premature Neonates.

    PubMed

    Kayton, Allyson; Timoney, Paula; Vargo, Lyn; Perez, Jose A

    2017-09-25

    Although oxygen is the most widely used therapeutic agent in neonatal care, optimal oxygen management remains uncertain. We reviewed oxygen physiology and balance, key studies evaluating oxygen saturation targets, and strategies for oxygen use in the neonatal intensive care unit. Oxygen is a potent vasodilator involved in the transition at birth to breathing. Supplemental oxygen is administered to reverse/prevent hypoxia; however, excessive oxygen can be toxic owing to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Current neonatal resuscitation guidelines recommend using room air for term infants in need of support, with titration to achieve oxygen saturation levels similar to uncompromised term infants. In premature infants, targeting a higher oxygen saturation range (eg, 91%-95%) may be safer than targeting a lower range (eg, 85%-89%), but more evidence is needed. In combined analyses, lower oxygen saturation levels increased mortality, suggesting that the higher target may be safer, but higher targets are associated with an increased risk of developing disorders of oxidative stress. Need for supplemental oxygen should be assessed according to the American Heart Association guidelines. If appropriate, oxygen should be administered using room air, with the goal of preventing hypoxia and avoiding hyperoxia. Use of oximeter alarms may help achieve this goal. Pulmonary vasodilators may improve oxygenation and reduce supplemental oxygen requirements. Implementation of wider target ranges for oxygen saturation may be more practical and lead to improved outcomes; however, controlled trials are necessary to determine the impact on mortality and disability.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the

  19. Aerobic induction of respiro-fermentative growth by decreasing oxygen tensions in the respiratory yeast Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Klinner, U; Fluthgraf, S; Freese, S; Passoth, V

    2005-04-01

    The fermentative and respiratory metabolism of Pichia stipitis wild-type strain CBS 5774 and the derived auxotrophic transformation recipient PJH53 trp5-10 his3-1 were examined in differentially oxygenated glucose cultures in the hermetically sealed Sensomat system. There was a good agreement of the kinetics of gas metabolism, growth, ethanol formation and glucose utilisation, proving the suitability of the Sensomat system for rapid and inexpensive investigation of strains and mutants for their respiratory and fermentative metabolism. Our study revealed respiro-fermentative growth by the wild-type strain, although the cultures were not oxygen-limited. The induction of respiro-fermentative behaviour was obviously due to the decrease in oxygen tension but not falling below a threshold of oxygen tension. The responses differed depending on the velocity of the decrease in oxygen tension. At high oxygenation (slow decrease in oxygen tension), ethanol production was induced but glucose uptake was not influenced. At low oxygenation, glucose uptake and ethanol formation increased during the first hours of cultivation. The transformation recipient PJH53 most probably carries a mutation that influences the response to a slow decrease in oxygen tension, since almost no ethanol formation was found under these conditions.

  20. Impact of low oxygen tension on stemness, proliferation and differentiation potential of human adipose-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jane Ru; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Chua, Kien Hui; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Hypoxia maintains the stemness of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). • ASCs show an increased proliferation rate under low oxygen tension. • Oxygen level as low as 2% enhances the chondrogenic differentiation potential of ASCs. • HIF-1α may regulate the proliferation and differentiation activities of ASCs under hypoxia. - Abstract: Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been found adapted to a specific niche with low oxygen tension (hypoxia) in the body. As an important component of this niche, oxygen tension has been known to play a critical role in the maintenance of stem cell characteristics. However, the effect of O{sub 2} tension on their functional properties has not been well determined. In this study, we investigated the effects of O{sub 2} tension on ASCs stemness, differentiation and proliferation ability. Human ASCs were cultured under normoxia (21% O{sub 2}) and hypoxia (2% O{sub 2}). We found that hypoxia increased ASC stemness marker expression and proliferation rate without altering their morphology and surface markers. Low oxygen tension further enhances the chondrogenic differentiation ability, but reduces both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. These results might be correlated with the increased expression of HIF-1α under hypoxia. Taken together, we suggest that growing ASCs under 2% O{sub 2} tension may be important in expanding ASCs effectively while maintaining their functional properties for clinical therapy, particularly for the treatment of cartilage defects.

  1. Effects of Low and High Oxygen Tensions and Related Respiratory Conditions on Visual Performance: A Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    light sensitivity and the electrical ex- citability of the eye, although no details of oxygen tensions or testing procedures were provided in the...secondary source. Wischne- wsky and Zirlin concluded that since electrical stimulation does not involve the photochemical system, hypoxia had its primary...pressure produced a decrease in both the light sensitivity and the electrical excitability of the eye, although no details of oxygen tensions or testing

  2. Enhanced proliferation and dopaminergic differentiation of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells by synergistic effect of FGF2 and reduced oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Pia; Gramsbergen, Jan-Bert; Zimmer, Jens; Widmer, Hans R.; Meyer, Morten

    2011-07-15

    Effective numerical expansion of dopaminergic precursors might overcome the limited availability of transplantable cells in replacement strategies for Parkinson's disease. Here we investigated the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and FGF8 on expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic neuroblasts cultured at high (20%) and low (3%) oxygen tension. More cells incorporated bromodeoxyuridine in cultures expanded at low as compared to high oxygen tension, and after 6 days of differentiation there were significantly more neuronal cells in low than in high oxygen cultures. Low oxygen during FGF2-mediated expansion resulted also in a significant increase in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons as compared to high oxygen tension, but no corresponding effect was observed for dopamine release into the culture medium. However, switching FGF2-expanded cultures from low to high oxygen tension during the last two days of differentiation significantly enhanced dopamine release and intracellular dopamine levels as compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the short-term exposure to high oxygen enhanced in situ assessed TH enzyme activity, which may explain the elevated dopamine levels. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of oxygen tension is a recognizable factor for in vitro expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic midbrain precursor cells.

  3. Modeling Variable Phanerozoic Oxygen Effects on Physiology and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jeffrey B; Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical approximation of Earth's atmospheric O2 level over geologic time prompts hypotheses linking hyper- and hypoxic atmospheres to transformative events in the evolutionary history of the biosphere. Such correlations, however, remain problematic due to the relative imprecision of the timing and scope of oxygen change and the looseness of its overlay on the chronology of key biotic events such as radiations, evolutionary innovation, and extinctions. There are nevertheless general attributions of atmospheric oxygen concentration to key evolutionary changes among groups having a primary dependence upon oxygen diffusion for respiration. These include the occurrence of Devonian hypoxia and the accentuation of air-breathing dependence leading to the origin of vertebrate terrestriality, the occurrence of Carboniferous-Permian hyperoxia and the major radiation of early tetrapods and the origins of insect flight and gigantism, and the Mid-Late Permian oxygen decline accompanying the Permian extinction. However, because of variability between and error within different atmospheric models, there is little basis for postulating correlations outside the Late Paleozoic. Other problems arising in the correlation of paleo-oxygen with significant biological events include tendencies to ignore the role of blood pigment affinity modulation in maintaining homeostasis, the slow rates of O2 change that would have allowed for adaptation, and significant respiratory and circulatory modifications that can and do occur without changes in atmospheric oxygen. The purpose of this paper is thus to refocus thinking about basic questions central to the biological and physiological implications of O2 change over geological time.

  4. Mitochondrial physiology and reactive oxygen species production are altered by hypoxia acclimation in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Du, Sherry N N; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Borowiec, Brittney G; Scott, Graham R

    2016-04-15

    Many fish encounter hypoxia in their native environment, but the role of mitochondrial physiology in hypoxia acclimation and hypoxia tolerance is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of hypoxia acclimation on mitochondrial respiration, O2kinetics, emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant capacity in the estuarine killifish ( ITALIC! Fundulus heteroclitus). Killifish were acclimated to normoxia, constant hypoxia (5 kPa O2) or intermittent diel cycles of nocturnal hypoxia (12 h:12 h normoxia:hypoxia) for 28-33 days and mitochondria were isolated from liver. Neither pattern of hypoxia acclimation affected the respiratory capacities for oxidative phosphorylation or electron transport, leak respiration, coupling control or phosphorylation efficiency. Hypoxia acclimation also had no effect on mitochondrial O2kinetics, but ITALIC! P50(the O2tension at which hypoxia inhibits respiration by 50%) was lower in the leak state than during maximal respiration, and killifish mitochondria endured anoxia-reoxygenation without any impact on mitochondrial respiration. However, both patterns of hypoxia acclimation reduced the rate of ROS emission from mitochondria when compared at a common O2tension. Hypoxia acclimation also increased the levels of protein carbonyls and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver tissue (the latter only occurred in constant hypoxia). Our results suggest that hypoxia acclimation is associated with changes in mitochondrial physiology that decrease ROS production and may help improve hypoxia tolerance. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. [Stoichiometry of cytochromes and oxygen tension in skeletal muscles of marine fish].

    PubMed

    Soldatov, A A; Parfenova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The character of oxygen tension distribution and peculiarities of cytochromes stoichiometry in skeletal muscles of bottom and pelagic species of marine fish were compared. It is shown, that the limitation of muscle activity increases the number of hypoxic zones in the muscle tissue. The mitochondrial electron-transporting chain then obtain the uncompensated type of organization, expressed in the increase of the share of the terminal complex aa3 on the background of general reduction of cytochromes content in the muscles. The reaction is of an adaptive character and can be implemented by pelagic fish species in conditions of experimental hypokinesia.

  6. Low Oxygen Tension During Incubation Periods of Chondrocyte Expansion Is Sufficient to Enhance Postexpansion Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ginley, Nell M.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Niyibizi, Christopher; Dennis, James E.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether low oxygen (O2) tension during expansion affects the matrix density, as well as quantity, of cartilage formed, and to determine whether application of low O2 tension during incubation periods alone is sufficient to modulate chondrogenic expression, rabbit chondrocytes expanded at either 21% O2 or 5% O2 were analyzed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content, total collagen, and gene expression during expansion and postexpansion aggregate cultures. When cultured as aggregates at 21% O2, chondrocytes expanded at 5% O2 produced cartilage aggregates that contained more total GAG, GAG per wet weight, GAG per DNA, and total collagen than chondrocytes expanded at 21% O2. Less of an effect on GAG and collagen content was observed when aggregate culture was performed at 5% O2. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of COL2A1 expression showed upregulated levels of type IIA (an early marker) and IIB (a late marker) during expansion and elevated levels of type IIB during aggregate culture in chondrocytes expanded in low O2. The application of low O2 tension during incubation periods of chondrocyte expansion enhances the ultimate cartilage matrix density and quantity, and this enhancement can be achieved through the use of an O2 control incubator. PMID:19958052

  7. Special article: measuring mitochondrial oxygen tension: from basic principles to application in humans.

    PubMed

    Mik, Egbert G

    2013-10-01

    The protoporphyrin IX-triplet state lifetime technique (PpIX-TSLT) has been recently introduced as the first method to measure mitochondrial oxygen tension (mitoPO2) in living cells and tissues. The current implementation of the technique is based on oxygen-dependent quenching of the delayed fluorescence lifetime of 5-aminolevulinic-acid-enhanced mitochondrial PpIX. It represents a significant step forward in our ability to comprehensively measure tissue oxygenation. PpIX-TSLT is feasible for application in humans and recently we have been able to measure for the first time mitoPO2 in humans. MitoPO2 in intact tissues reflects the balance between oxygen supply and demand at the cellular level. Administration of aminolevulinic acid induces measurable mitochondrial levels of PpIX. PpIX acts as a mitochondrially located oxygen-sensitive dye by emitting a red delayed fluorescence after excitation with a pulse of green light. The lifetime of the delayed fluorescence is inversely related to PO2 by the Stern-Volmer equation. In vivo measurements of mitoPO2 in liver, heart, and skin of rats have revealed surprisingly high values of typically several tens of mm Hg. Clinical measurements of mitoPO2 are possible as demonstrated by cutaneous measurements in healthy volunteers. Applications of PpIX-TSLT in anesthesiology and intensive care medicine might, e.g., be monitoring mitoPO2 as a resuscitation end point, targeting oxygen homeostasis in the critically ill, and assessing mitochondrial function at the bedside. PpIX-TSLT likely also has applications in other fields also, e.g., providing an oxygen-related feedback signal in photodynamic therapy of malignant tumors.

  8. Effect of supplemental oxygen versus dobutamine administration on liver oxygen tension in dPP-guided normovolemic pigs.

    PubMed

    Pestel, G; Fukui, K; Hager, H; Kurz, A; Hiltebrand, L

    2009-01-01

    Difference in pulse pressure (dPP) confirms adequate intravascular filling as a prerequisite for tissue perfusion. We hypothesized that both oxygen and dobutamine increase liver tissue oxygen tension (ptO(2)). Eight anesthetized pigs received dPP-guided fluid management. Hepatic pO(2) was measured with Clark-type electrodes placed subcapsularly, and on the liver surface. Pigs received: (1) supplemental oxygen (F(i)O(2) 1.0); (2) dobutamine 2.5 microg/kg/min, and (3) dobutamine 5 microg/kg/min. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA followed by a Tukey post-test for multiple comparisons. ptO(2 )measured subcapsularly and at the liver surface were compared using the Bland-Altman plot. Variation in F(i)O(2) changed local hepatic tissue ptO(2) [subcapsular measurement: 39 +/- 12 (F(i)O(2) 0.3), 89 +/- 35 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 1.0, p = 0.01 vs. F(i)O(2) 0.3), 44 +/- 10 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 0.3, p = 0.05 vs. F(i)O(2) 1.0); surface measurement: 52 +/- 35 (F(i)O(2) 0.3), 112 +/- 24 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 1.0, p = 0.001 vs. F(i)O(2) 0.3), 54 +/- 24 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 0.3, p = 0.001 vs. F(i)O(2) 1.0)]. Surface measurements were widely scattered compared to subcapsular measurements (bias: -15 mm Hg, precision: 76.3 mm Hg). Dobutamine did not affect hepatic oxygenation. Supplemental oxygen increased hepatic tissue pO(2) while dobutamine did not. Although less invasive, the use of surface measurements is discouraged. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Low oxygen tension is critical for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells with strong osteogenic potential from haemarthrosis fluid.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Callie A; Clark, Marcia E; Meeson, Annette P; Khan, Sameer K; Dowen, Daniel J; Deehan, David J; Oldershaw, Rachel A

    2013-10-01

    Satisfactory osseous tissue integration of the soft tissue graft with bone is the mainstay of healing following surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). However, tissue remodelling is slow and significantly impacts on quality of life by delaying return to work and sport and accelerating the onset of degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis. Delivery of multipotent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) at surgery could enhance osseous tissue integration. We aim to use hMSCs derived from haemarthrosis fluid (HF) (the intra-articular bleed accrued post-trauma) which is aspirated and discarded as clinical waste. With the aim of improving our bioprocessing methodologies for clinical translation we have investigated the effect of low oxygen tension on the derivation and osteogenic potential of this novel HF-hMSC population. Mononuclear cells were isolated from HF aspirated samples and divided for derivation and culture under normal or low oxygen tension. HF-hMSCs were derived from 100 % of cultures under low oxygen tension compared to 71 % for normal oxygen tension; this was coupled with increased CFU-Fs. We investigated the osteogenic potential and cellular health of HF-hMSC populations following ex vivo expansion. HF-hMSC populations showed enhanced matrix mineralisation and cellular health when differentiated under low oxygen tension. This positive effect of low oxygen on osteogenesis and cellular health was reduced with prolonged culture. These data demonstrate that derivation and culture of HF-hMSC populations under low oxygen tension will enable the translation of a cellular therapy for the treatment of broad patient numbers with optimal osteogenic potency and cellular vitality.

  10. Expression of the bop gene cluster of Halobacterium halobium is induced by low oxygen tension and by light.

    PubMed Central

    Shand, R F; Betlach, M C

    1991-01-01

    The bop gene cluster consists of at least three genes: bop (bacterio-opsin), brp (bacterio-opsin-related protein), and bat (bacterio-opsin activator). We have quantitated transcript levels from these genes in a wild-type and bacterioruberin-deficient mutant of Halobacterium halobium under conditions which affect purple membrane synthesis. In wild-type cultures grown under high oxygen tension in the dark, bop and bat transcript levels were low during steady-state growth and then increased approximately 29- and approximately 45-fold, respectively, upon entry into stationary phase. brp gene transcription remained very low and essentially unchanged under these conditions. In addition, exposure of wild-type cultures growing under high oxygen tension to 30,000 lx of light stimulated expression of all three genes, especially brp. In contrast to the wild-type, transcription from all three genes in the bacterioruberin mutant was very high during steady-state growth under high oxygen tension in the dark. Cultures of the bacterioruberin mutant were shifted at early stationary phase to low oxygen tension to determine whether oxygen concentrations lower than those present in stationary phase would induce transcription of the bop gene cluster in this strain. Indeed, transcription was induced, suggesting that the bop gene cluster is not completely uncoupled from regulation by oxygen tension in the bacterioruberin mutant. From these data, we propose a regulatory model involving two different mechanisms: (i) bat gene expression is induced under conditions of low oxygen tension and the bat gene product activates bop gene expression and (ii) light induces brp transcription, which stimulates or modulates bat transcription. PMID:1856168

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits succinate dehydrogenase-driven oxygen consumption in potato tuber mitochondria in an oxygen tension-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Vagner; Galina, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    NO (nitric oxide) is described as an inhibitor of plant and mammalian respiratory chains owing to its high affinity for COX (cytochrome c oxidase), which hinders the reduction of oxygen to water. In the present study we show that in plant mitochondria NO may interfere with other respiratory complexes as well. We analysed oxygen consumption supported by complex I and/or complex II and/or external NADH dehydrogenase in Percoll-isolated potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria. When mitochondrial respiration was stimulated by succinate, adding the NO donors SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine) or DETA-NONOate caused a 70% reduction in oxygen consumption rate in state 3 (stimulated with 1 mM of ADP). This inhibition was followed by a significant increase in the Km value of SDH (succinate dehydrogenase) for succinate (Km of 0.77±0.19 to 34.3±5.9 mM, in the presence of NO). When mitochondrial respiration was stimulated by external NADH dehydrogenase or complex I, NO had no effect on respiration. NO itself and DETA-NONOate had similar effects to SNAP. No significant inhibition of respiration was observed in the absence of ADP. More importantly, SNAP inhibited PTM (potato tuber mitochondria) respiration independently of oxygen tensions, indicating a different kinetic mechanism from that observed in mammalian mitochondria. We also observed, in an FAD reduction assay, that SNAP blocked the intrinsic SDH electron flow in much the same way as TTFA (thenoyltrifluoroacetone), a non-competitive SDH inhibitor. We suggest that NO inhibits SDH in its ubiquinone site or its Fe-S centres. These data indicate that SDH has an alternative site of NO action in plant mitochondria.

  12. Association of muscle hardness with muscle tension dynamics: a physiological property.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Mitsuyoshi; Watanabe, Kotaro; Kato, Ryoko; Uchiyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Tsugutake

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between muscle hardness and muscle tension in terms of length-tension relationship. A frog gastrocnemius muscle sample was horizontally mounted on the base plate inside a chamber and was stretched from 100 to 150% of the pre-length, in 5% increments. After each step of muscle lengthening, electrical field stimulation for induction of tetanus was applied using platinum-plate electrodes positioned on either side of the muscle submerged in Ringer's solution. The measurement of muscle hardness, i.e., applying perpendicular distortion, was performed whilst maintaining the plateau of passive and tetanic tension. The relationship between normalised tension and normalised muscle hardness was evaluated. The length-hardness diagram could be created from the modification with the length-tension diagram. It is noteworthy that muscle hardness was proportional to passive and total tension. Regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between muscle hardness and passive and total tension, with a significant positive slope (passive tension: r = 0.986, P < 0.001; total tension: r = 0.856, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results suggest that muscle hardness depends on muscle tension in most ranges of muscle length in the length-tension diagram.

  13. Physiologically Low Oxygen Enhances Biomolecule Production and Stemness of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shearier, Emily; Xing, Qi; Qian, Zichen; Zhao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spheroids have been demonstrated to be valuable in a variety of applications, including cartilage regeneration, wound healing, and neoangiogenesis. Physiological relevant low oxygen culture can significantly improve in vitro hMSC expansion by preventing cell differentiation. We hypothesize that hypoxia-cultured hMSC spheroids can better maintain the regenerative properties of hMSCs. In this study, hMSC spheroids were fabricated using hanging drop method and cultured under 2% O2 and 20% O2 for up to 96 h. Spheroid diameter and viability were examined, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) components and growth factor levels between the two oxygen tensions at different time points. Stemness was measured among the spheroid culture conditions and compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Spheroid viability and structural integrity were studied using different needle gauges to ensure no damage would occur when implemented in vivo. Spheroid attachment and integration within a tissue substitute were also demonstrated. The results showed that a three-dimensional hMSC spheroid cultured at low oxygen conditions can enhance the production of ECM proteins and growth factors, while maintaining the spheroids' stemness and ability to be injected, attached, and potentially be integrated within a tissue.

  14. Bordetella bronchiseptica responses to physiological reactive nitrogen and oxygen stresses

    PubMed Central

    Omsland, Anders; Miranda, Katrina M.; Friedman, Richard L.; Boitano, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can establish prolonged airway infection consistent with a highly developed ability to evade mammalian host immune responses. Upon initial interaction with the host upper respiratory tract mucosa, B. bronchiseptica are subjected to antimicrobial reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), effector molecules of the innate immune system. However, the responses of B. bronchiseptica to redox species at physiologically relevant concentrations (nM-µM) have not been investigated. Using predicted physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O2.−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on low numbers of colony forming units (CFU) of B. bronchiseptica, all redox active species displayed dose-dependent antimicrobial activity. Susceptibility to individual redox active species was significantly increased upon introduction of a second species at sub-antimicrobial concentrations. An increased bacteriostatic activity of NO was observed relative to H2O2. The understanding of Bordetella responses to physiologically relevant levels of exogenous RNS and ROS will aid in defining the role of endogenous production of these molecules in host innate immunity against Bordetella and other respiratory pathogens. PMID:18462394

  15. Oxygen Tension Is a Determinant of the Matrix-Forming Phenotype of Cultured Human Meniscal Fibrochondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Adesida, Adetola B.; Mulet-Sierra, Aillette; Laouar, Leila; Jomha, Nadr M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscal cartilage displays a poor repair capacity, especially when injury is located in the avascular region of the tissue. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies to generate functional meniscus substitutes is a promising approach to treat meniscus injuries. Meniscus fibrochondrocytes (MFC) can be used in this approach. However, MFC are unable to retain their phenotype when expanded in culture. In this study, we explored the effect of oxygen tension on MFC expansion and on their matrix-forming phenotype. Methodology/Principal Findings MFC were isolated from human menisci followed by basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) mediated cell expansion in monolayer culture under normoxia (21%O2) or hypoxia (3%O2). Normoxia and hypoxia expanded MFC were seeded on to a collagen scaffold. The MFC seeded scaffolds (constructs) were cultured in a serum free chondrogenic medium for 3 weeks under normoxia and hypoxia. Constructs containing normoxia-expanded MFC were subsequently cultured under normoxia while those formed from hypoxia-expanded MFC were subsequently cultured under hypoxia. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, the constructs were assessed biochemically, histologically and for gene expression via real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays. The results showed that constructs under normoxia produced a matrix with enhanced mRNA ratio (3.5-fold higher; p<0.001) of collagen type II to I. This was confirmed by enhanced deposition of collagen II using immuno-histochemistry. Furthermore, the constructs under hypoxia produced a matrix with higher mRNA ratio of aggrecan to versican (3.5-fold, p<0.05). However, both constructs had the same capacity to produce a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) –specific extracellular matrix. Conclusions Our data provide evidence that oxygen tension is a key player in determining the matrix phenotype of cultured MFC. These findings suggest that the use of normal and low oxygen tension during MFC expansion and subsequent neo-tissue formation

  16. Oxygen tension changes the rate of migration of human skin keratinocytes in an age-related manner.

    PubMed

    Ross, Caitlin; Alston, Myrissa; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2011-01-01

    Migration of keratinocytes to re-epithelialize wounds is a key step in dermal wound healing. In aged human skin, wound healing rates decrease and cellular damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulates. The relationship between age, ROS and human skin keratinocyte migration is not clearly understood. In this study, 4% and 21% oxygen tensions were used to modify levels of ROS produced by metabolism to model low and high oxidative stress conditions. When migration of keratinocytes from young and old primary skin was compared using an in vitro scratch assay, old keratinocytes migrated faster in high oxygen tension than did young keratinocytes, whereas young keratinocytes migrated faster in low oxygen tension. Although all young and old cells at the scratch margins showed intense increases in dihydroethidium oxidation immediately after scratching, the old keratinocytes grown at 21% oxygen demonstrated a greater decrease in the DHE oxidation following scratching and migrated the fastest. These results show that old and young keratinocytes respond to oxygen tension differently and support the hypothesis that keratinocyte migration is affected by the capacity to remove ROS.

  17. Influence of Low Oxygen Tensions and Sorption to Sediment Black Carbon on Biodegradation of Pyrene ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Gschwend, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Sorption to sediment black carbon (BC) may limit the aerobic biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in resuspension events and intact sediment beds. We examined this hypothesis experimentally under conditions that were realistic in terms of oxygen concentrations and BC content. A new method, based on synchronous fluorescence observations of 14C-pyrene, was developed for continuously measuring the uptake of dissolved pyrene by Mycobacterium gilvum VM552, a representative degrader of PAHs. The effect of oxygen and pyrene concentrations on pyrene uptake followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, resulting in a dissolved oxygen half-saturation constant (Kom) of 14.1 μM and a dissolved pyrene half-saturation constant (Kpm) of 6 nM. The fluorescence of 14C-pyrene in air-saturated suspensions of sediments and induced cells followed time courses that reflected simultaneous desorption and biodegradation of pyrene, ultimately causing a quasi-steady-state concentration of dissolved pyrene balancing desorptive inputs and biodegradation removals. The increasing concentrations of 14CO2 in these suspensions, as determined with liquid scintillation, evidenced the strong impact of sorption to BC-rich sediments on the biodegradation rate. Using the best-fit parameter values, we integrated oxygen and sorption effects and showed that oxygen tensions far below saturation levels in water are sufficient to enable significant decreases in the steady-state concentrations of aqueous-phase pyrene. These findings may be relevant for bioaccumulation scenarios that consider the effect of sediment resuspension events on exposure to water column and sediment pore water, as well as the direct uptake of PAHs from sediments. PMID:20472733

  18. Effect of Oxygen Tension and Medium Components on Monomer Distribution of Alginate.

    PubMed

    Kıvılcımdan Moral, Çiğdem; Doğan, Özdemir; Sanin, Faika Dilek

    2015-06-01

    Alginate is a natural biopolymer composed of mannuronic and guluronic acid monomers. It is produced by algae and some species of Azotobacter and Pseudomonas. This study aims to investigate the effect of dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) and growth medium substrate and calcium concentrations on the monomeric composition of alginate produced by Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC® 9046 in a fermenter. Results showed that alginate production increased with increasing DOT from 1 to 5 %. The highest alginate production was obtained as 4.51 g/L under 20 g/L of sucrose and 50 mg/L of calcium at 5 % DOT. At these conditions, alginate was rich in mannuronic acid (up to 61 %) and it was particularly high at low calcium concentration. On the other hand, at extreme conditions such as high DOT level (10 % DOT) and low sucrose concentration (10 g/L), guluronic acid was dominant (ranging between 65 and 100 %).

  19. Online monitoring of dissolved oxygen tension in microtiter plates based on infrared fluorescent oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Tobias; Flitsch, David; Schlepütz, Tino; Büchs, Jochen

    2015-10-09

    During the past years, new high-throughput screening systems with capabilities of online monitoring turned out to be powerful tools for the characterization of microbial cell cultures. These systems are often easy to use, offer economic advantages compared to larger systems and allow to determine many important process parameters within short time. Fluorescent protein tags tremendously simplified the tracking and observation of cellular activity in vivo. Unfortunately, interferences between established fluorescence based dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) measurement techniques and fluorescence-based protein tags appeared. Therefore, the applicability of new oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles operated within the more suitable infrared wavelength region are introduced and validated for DOT measurement. The biocompatibility of the used dispersed oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles was proven via RAMOS cultivations for Hansenula polymorpha, Gluconobacter oxydans, and Escherichia coli. The applicability of the introduced DOT measurement technique for online monitoring of cultivations was demonstrated and successfully validated. The nanoparticles showed no disturbing effect on the online measurement of the fluorescence intensities of the proteins GFP, mCherry and YFP measured by a BioLector prototype. Additionally, the DOT measurement was not influenced by changing concentrations of these proteins. The kLa values for the applied cultivation conditions were successfully determined based on the measured DOT. The introduced technique appeared to be practically as well as economically advantageous for DOT online measuring in microtiter plates. The disadvantage of limited availability of microtiter plates with immobilized sensor spots (optodes) does not apply for this introduced technique. Due to the infrared wavelength range, used for the DOT measurement, no interferences with biogenic fluorescence or with expressed fluorescent proteins (e.g. YFP, GFP or mCherry) occur.

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated. PMID:27625575

  1. Effect of increased oxygen tension on flicker-induced vasodilatation in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    In the retina, blood flow and neural activity are tightly coupled. Stimulation of the retina with flickering light is accompanied by an increase in blood flow. The current study seeks to investigate whether an increase in oxygen tension modulates flicker (FL)-induced vasodilatation in the human retina. A total of 52 healthy volunteers were included. Via a breathing mask, 100% oxygen (O(2)) was administered in one, a mixture of 8% carbon dioxide and 92% oxygen (C/O) in a second cohort. Retinal vessel diameters were measured with a Vessel Analyzer and FL responses were assessed before and during the breathing periods. At baseline, FL stimulation increased retinal vessel diameters by +3.7±2.3% in arteries and by +5.1±3.7% in veins. Breathing of C/O led to a decrease in arterial (-9.0±6.9%) and venous (-11.3±5.9%) vessel calibers. Flicker response was increased to 5.7±2.5% in arteries and to 8.6±4.1% in veins. Breathing of pure O2 induced a vasoconstriction of vessel diameters by -14.0±5.3% in arteries and -18.4±7.0% in veins and increased FL responses in arteries (+6.2±2.8%) and veins (+7.2±3.1%). Systemic hyperoxia increases FL-induced retinal vasodilatation in the retina. The mechanism by which oxygen modulates the hyperemic response to FL stimulation remains to be elucidated.

  2. Oxygen cost and physiological responses of recreational badminton match play.

    PubMed

    Deka, Pallav; Berg, Kris; Harder, Jeanette; Batelaan, Herman; McGRATH, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    Badminton, as an Olympic sport, is popular worldwide. However, the benefits of recreational badminton match play are not well known. The purpose of the study was to determine the oxygen cost of recreational badminton match play. Heart rate (HR), blood lactate (BL), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), step count and energy expenditure were also assessed. Fourteen male recreational badminton players aged 35.9±6.62 years participated in test sessions to assess oxygen uptake (VO2) and the related physiological responses of match play. During the match play sessions, participants played singles badminton matches for 30 min while wearing a portable metabolic system. VO2 and HR were continuously recorded while blood lactate and RPE were determined following warm-up, at 15 minutes and 30 minutes of match play. Step count was recorded at 15 minutes and 30 minutes of play. VO2 over 30 minutes was 34.4±5.8 mL/kg/min which was 76.1% of maximal oxygen uptake. Across three 10-minute periods of play, VO2 was not significantly different while HR was higher in the third 10-minute period than the first and second 10-minute periods (P=0.001). Mean HR over 30 minutes was 167.9±9.4 bpm. BL was significantly higher at 15 and 30 minutes than following warm-up while RPE of 17.57±1.91 after 30 minutes was significantly higher (P=0.009) than RPE of 15.79±1.63 at 15 minutes. Step count did not vary between the two 15-minute periods of play with a total of 2404±360 steps while energy expenditure over 30 minutes of play was 391.7±66 kcal. Recreational badminton match play can be categorized as vigorous intensity suggesting that it can be a viable means of achieving recommended physical activity and improving aerobic fitness.

  3. Importance of culturing primary lymphocytes at physiological oxygen levels

    PubMed Central

    Atkuri, Kondala R.; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Cowan, Tina; Herzenberg, Leonore A.

    2007-01-01

    Although studies with primary lymphocytes are almost always conducted in CO2 incubators maintained at atmospheric oxygen levels (atmosO2; 20%), the physiological oxygen levels (physO2; 5%) that cells encounter in vivo are 2–4 times lower. We show here that culturing primary T cells at atmosO2 significantly alters the intracellular redox state (decreases intracellular glutathione, increases oxidized intracellular glutathione), whereas culturing at physO2 maintains the intracellular redox environment (intracellular glutathione/oxidized intracellular glutathione) close to its in vivo status. Furthermore, we show that CD3/CD28-induced T cell proliferation (based on proliferation index and cell yield) is higher at atmosO2 than at physO2. This apparently paradoxical finding, we suggest, may be explained by two additional findings with CD3/CD28-stimulated T cells: (i) the intracellular NO (iNO) levels are higher at physO2 than at atmosO2; and (ii) the peak expression of CD69 is significantly delayed and more sustained at physO2 that at atmosO2. Because high levels of intracellular NO and sustained CD69 tend to down-regulate T cell responses in vivo, the lower proliferative T cell responses at physO2 likely reflect the in vitro operation of the natural in vivo regulatory mechanisms. Thus, we suggest caution in culturing primary lymphocytes at atmosO2 because the requisite adaptation to nonphysiological oxygen levels may seriously skew T cell responses, particularly after several days in culture. PMID:17360561

  4. Regulation of Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransport in turkey red cells: the role of oxygen tension and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Muzyamba, M C; Cossins, A R; Gibson, J S

    1999-01-01

    Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransport (NKCC) was studied in turkey red cells using Na+ dependence or bumetanide sensitivity of 86Rb+ influx to monitor activity of the transporter. Deoxygenation was the major physiological stimulus for NKCC activity: oxygen tensions (PO2) over the physiological range modulated the transporter, with a PO2 for half-maximal activation of about 41 mmHg (n = 3). In air, activity of NKCC was also stimulated by shrinkage and isoproteronol (isoprenaline, 5 μm). By contrast, in deoxygenated cells, although the transporter activity was markedly elevated, it was no longer sensitive to volume or β-adrenergic stimulation. Calyculin A, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, stimulated cotransport with a lag of about 5 min. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) inhibited cotransport and also blocked the stimulatory effect of calyculin A if administered before calyculin A. Stimulation by calyculin A and deoxygenation were not additive. Staurosporine (2 μm) inhibited deoxygenated-stimulated K+ influxes, but not those stimulated by calyculin A. NEM added during calyculin A stimulation, i.e. during the 5 min lag, caused transport activity to be clamped at levels intermediate between maximal (calyculin A alone) and control. Cells treated with calyculin A alone or with calyculin A followed by NEM were no longer sensitive to volume, isoproteronol or PO2. The results have characterized the interaction between deoxygenation and other stimuli of NKCC activity. They have also shown that it is possible to manipulate the transporter in a reciprocal way to that shown previously for K+-Cl− cotransport. PMID:10332092

  5. Contrasted Reactivity to Oxygen Tensions in Frankia sp. Strain CcI3 throughout Nitrogen Fixation and Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Hezbri, Karima; Ktari, Amir; Sbissi, Imed; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Gtari, Maher; Tisa, Louis S.

    2014-01-01

    Reconciling the irreconcilable is a primary struggle in aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Although nitrogenase is oxygen and reactive oxygen species-labile, oxygen tension is required to sustain respiration. In the nitrogen-fixing Frankia, various strategies have been developed through evolution to control the respiration and nitrogen-fixation balance. Here, we assessed the effect of different oxygen tensions on Frankia sp. strain CcI3 growth, vesicle production, and gene expression under different oxygen tensions. Both biomass and vesicle production were correlated with elevated oxygen levels under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-deficient conditions. The mRNA levels for the nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK) were high under hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions compared to oxic conditions. The mRNA level for the hopanoid biosynthesis genes (sqhC and hpnC) was also elevated under hyperoxic conditions suggesting an increase in the vesicle envelope. Under nitrogen-deficient conditions, the hup2 mRNA levels increased with hyperoxic environment, while hup1 mRNA levels remained relatively constant. Taken together, these results indicate that Frankia protects nitrogenase by the use of multiple mechanisms including the vesicle-hopanoid barrier and increased respiratory protection. PMID:24987692

  6. Cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebral tissue oxygen tension in a patient during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Roberto; Bellinzona, Guido; Riccardi, Francesca; Pagani, Michele; Langer, Martin

    2003-06-01

    To report on the effects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instituted immediately after a cardiac arrest on cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and cerebral tissue oxygen tension (PbrO(2)). Case report. ICU of a university hospital. A head-injured 17-year-old man submitted to multimodal neurological monitoring underwent sudden cardiac arrest and successful CPR. External chest compression, 100% oxygen ventilation, volume expansion and standard ACLS protocols. Heart rate, ECG, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), ETCO(2), PaO(2), intracranial pressure (ICP), CPP and PbrO(2) were continuously monitored during CPR and data recorded at 15-s intervals by a dedicated personal computer. At the onset of the cardiac arrest, PbrO(2) decreased to zero. The institution of CPR resulted in a progressive increase of MABP, CPP and PbrO(2). Assuming, on the basis of previous experimental and clinical reports, 8 mmHg PbrO(2) as a possible ischaemic/hypoxic threshold value, during the first 6.5 min of CPR, PbrO(2) values were below this threshold (range 0-7 mmHg) and CPP values were <25 mmHg for 81.5% of the time. In the following 5.5 min, more efficient CPR generated CPP values >25 mmHg for 77.3% of the time. These values were associated with a PbrO(2) >8 mmHg (range 8-28 mmHg) at all times. In the clinical setting of a witnessed cardiac arrest, immediate institution of CPR can be effective in generating PbrO(2) values above a supposed ischaemic/hypoxic threshold when CPP is >25 mmHg. PbrO(2) monitoring by the Licox system is sensitive and reliable, even at low values, and can be suitable for evaluating cerebral oxygenation during experimental CPR.

  7. Oxygen uptake efficiency plateau: physiology and reference values.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-Guo; Hansen, James E; Stringer, William W

    2012-03-01

    The relationship of oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] to ventilation [Formula: see text], i.e., oxygen uptake efficiency (OUE) is known to differ between normal subjects and patients with congestive heart failure. However, only the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES, i.e., slope of [Formula: see text] has previously been reported. To understand the physiology and to improve the usefulness of OUE in assessing cardiovascular function, we analyzed the complete response pattern of OUE during entire incremental exercise tests and ascertained effect of age, body size, gender, fitness, and ergometer type on exercise OUE to generate reference values in normal healthy subjects. We investigated the effect of age, gender, and fitness on OUE using incremental cardiopulmonary exercise in 474 healthy subjects, age 17-78 years, of which 57 were highly fit. The final methods of OUE analysis were: (1) OUE plateau at the highest values (OUEP), (2) OUE at anaerobic threshold (OUE@AT), and (3) OUES using the entire exercise period. The OUEP and OUE@AT were similar, highly reproducible, less variable than the OUES (p < 0.0001), and unaffected by the study sites or types of ergometry. The resultant prediction equations from 417 normal subjects for men were OUEP (mL/L) = 42.18 - 0.189 × years + 0.036 × cm and OUES [L/min/log(L/min)] = -0.610 - 0.032 × years + 0.023 × cm + 0.008 × kg. For women, OUEP (mL/L) = 39.16 - 0.189 × years + 0.036 × cm and OUES [L/min/log(L/min)] = -1.178 - 0.032 × years + 0.023 × cm + 0.008 × kg. OUE@AT was similar to OUEP. Extreme fitness has a minimal effect on OUEP. OUEP is advantageous, since it measures maximal oxygen extraction from ventilated air but does not require high intensity exercise. The OUEP is a non-invasive parameter dependent only on age, gender, height, and cardiovascular health.

  8. BIOELECTRIC POTENTIALS IN HALICYSTIS : VII. THE EFFECTS OF LOW OXYGEN TENSION.

    PubMed

    Blinks, L R; Darsie, M L; Skow, R K

    1938-11-20

    The potential difference across the protoplasm of impaled cells of Halicystis is not affected by increase of oxygen tension in equilibrium with the sea water, nor with decrease down to about 1/10 its tension in the air (2 per cent O(2) in N(2)). When bubbling of 2 per cent O(2) is stopped, the P.D. drifts downward, to be restored on stirring the sea water, or rebubbling the gas. Bubbling 0.2 per cent O(2) causes the P.D. to drop to 20 mv. or less; 1.1 per cent O(2) to about 50 mv. Restoration of 2 per cent or higher O(2) causes recovery to 70 or 80 mv. often with a preliminary cusp which decreases the P.D. before it rises. Perfusion of aerated sea water through the vacuole is just as effective in restoring the P.D. as external aeration, indicating that the direction of the oxygen gradient is not significant. Low O(2) tension also inhibits the reversed, negative P.D. produced by adding NH(4)Cl to sea water, 0.2 per cent O(2) bringing this P.D. back to the same low positive values found without ammonia. Restoration of 2 per cent O(2) or air, restores this latent negativity. At slightly below the threshold for ammonia reversal, low O(2) may induce a temporary negativity when first bubbled, and a negative cusp may occur on aeration before positive P.D. is regained. This may be due to a decreased consumption of ammonia, or to intermediate pH changes. The locus of the P.D. alteration was tested by applying increased KCl concentrations to the cell exterior; the large cusps produced in aerated solutions become greatly decreased when the P.D. has fallen in 0.2 per cent O(2). This indicates that the originally high relative mobility or concentration of K(+) ion has approached that of Na(+) in the external protoplasmic surface under reduced O(2) tension. Results obtained with sulfate sea water indicate that Na(+) mobility approaches that of SO(4) (-) in 0.2 per cent O(2). P.D. measurements alone cannot tell whether this is due to an increase of the slower ion or a decrease of

  9. Postoperative wound oxygen tension with epidural or intravenous analgesia: a prospective, randomized, single-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Buggy, Donal J; Doherty, Warren L; Hart, Elaine M; Pallett, Edward J

    2002-10-01

    Adequate tissue oxygen tension is an essential requirement for surgical-wound healing. The authors tested the hypothesis that epidural anesthesia and analgesia increases wound tissue oxygen tension compared with intravenous morphine analgesia. In a prospective, randomized, blind clinical study, the authors allocated patients having major abdominal surgery (n = 32) to receive combined general and epidural anesthesia with postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia (epidural group, n = 16), or general anesthesia alone with postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (intravenous group, n = 16). An oxygen sensor and a temperature sensor were placed subcutaneously in the wound before closure. Wound oxygen tension (P(w)O(2)) and temperature were measured continuously for 24 h. Other variables affecting wound tissue oxygenation and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores were also documented. Despite epidural patients having lower body temperatures at the end of surgery (35.7 +/- 0.3) versus 36.3 +/- 0.5 degrees C, = 0.004), they had significantly higher mean P(w)O(2) over the 24 h period, compared with the intravenous group (64.4 +/- 14 vs. 50.7 +/- 15) mmHg, mean (SD), 95% CI difference, -22 to -5, = 0.002). Area under the P(w)O(2) -24 h time curve was also significantly higher in the epidural group (930 +/- 278 vs. 749 +/- 257) mmHg x h, 95% CI difference -344 to -18, = 0.03). VAS pain scores at rest and moving were significantly lower in the epidural group at all times. Epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for major abdominal surgery increases wound tissue oxygen tension compared with general anesthesia and intravenous morphine analgesia.

  10. Herbivore tooth oxygen isotope compositions: Effects of diet and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Matthew J.; Schoeninger, Margaret J.; Valley, John W.

    1996-10-01

    The applicability of rapid and precise laser probe analysis of tooth enamel for δ18O has been verified, and the method has been applied to different modern herbivores in East Africa. Sampling and pretreatment procedures involve initial bleaching and grinding of enamel to <75 μm, and elimination of adsorbed water and organic compounds with BrF 5. Typical analytical reproducibilities for 0.5-2 mg samples are ±0.08‰ (± 1σ). Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of pretreated but unanalyzed samples show no alteration compared to fresh enamel. Solid reaction products are nearly pure CaF 2 with little evidence for residual O 2. Because laser probe fluorination extracts oxygen from all sites in the apatite structure (phosphate, structural carbonate, and hydroxyl), only unaltered tooth enamel (>95% apatite) can be analyzed reliably. Different East African herbivores exhibit previously unsuspected compositional differences. Average enamel δ18O values (V-SMOW) are approximately: 25‰ (goat), 27‰ (oryx), 28‰ (dikdik and zebra), 29‰ (topi), 30‰ (gerenuk), and 32‰ (gazelle). These compositions differ from generalized theoretical models, but are broadly consistent with expected isotope effects associated with differences in how much each animal (a) drinks, (b) eats C3 vs. C4 plants, and (c) pants vs. sweats. Consideration of diet, water turnover, and animal physiology will allow the most accurate interpretation of ancient teeth and targeting of environmentally-sensitive animals in paleoclimate studies.

  11. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  12. Measuring oxygen tension modulation, induced by a new pre-radiotherapy therapeutic, in a mammary window chamber mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-03-01

    Tumor regions under hypoxic or low oxygen conditions respond less effectively to many treatment strategies, including radiation therapy. A novel investigational therapeutic, NVX-108 (NuvOx Pharma), has been developed to increase delivery of oxygen through the use of a nano-emulsion of dodecofluoropentane. By raising pO2 levels prior to delivering radiation, treatment efficacy may be improved. To aid in evaluating the novel drug, oxygen tension was quantitatively measured, spatially and temporally, to record the effect of administrating NVX-108 in an orthotopic mammary window chamber mouse model of breast cancer. The oxygen tension was measured through the use of an oxygen-sensitive coating, comprised of phosphorescent platinum porphyrin dye embedded in a polystyrene matrix. The coating, applied to the surface of the coverslip of the window chamber through spin coating, is placed in contact with the mammary fat pad to record the oxygenation status of the surface tissue layer. Prior to implantation of the window chamber, a tumor is grown in the SCID mouse model by injection of MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat pad. Two-dimensional spatial distributions of the pO2 levels were obtained through conversion of measured maps of phosphorescent lifetime. The resulting information on the spatial and temporal variation of the induced oxygen modulation could provide valuable insight into the optimal timing between administration of NVX-108 and radiation treatment to provide the most effective treatment outcome.

  13. Measurement of surface tension in an atmosphere with controlled oxygen partial pressure under microgravity using a parabolic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibiya, Taketoshi; Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Adachi, Masayoshi; Takenaga, Noriaki; Aoyagai, Tomowo; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Higuchi, Kensuke

    Use of a levitation technique is an elegant way to determine thermophysical properties of high temperature melts, because this containerless technique can avoid contamination from a container and assures measurement in a wide temperature range including superheated and undercooled conditions. In particular, electromagnetic levitation is suitable for electrically conductive materials, such as molten metals, alloys and semiconductors. For surface tension measurement, the Rayleigh equation can be applicable only under microgravity condition [1]. However, when this technique is applied on earth, the l = 2 mode frequency is split into five frequencies, because a droplet is deformed from a spherical shape into an egg shape due to gravitational force and the Lorentz force. Surface tension must be calculated taking account of correction term [2]. Therefore, measurement under microgravity is required to minimize uncertainty. Furthermore, surface tension is sensitive to oxygen partial pressure of an ambient atmosphere. However, there has been less report on surface tension measurement under microgravity in an atmosphere with controlled oxygen partial pressure. We are going to measure surface tension of high temperature metallic melts under microgravity using a parabolic flight of a jet aircraft, the Gulf Stream II, operated by Diamond Air Service in Japan. In September of 2007, through parabolic flight experiments we confirmed that droplets of Cu and Ag were successfully levitated using a newly designed coil under the 1G and 10-2G conditions. Droplets were also assured to be levitated in the pull-up period (1.5G); we can melt samples before entering microgravity condition, so that we can use 20 second microgravity only for measurement. On earth, surface tension of molten silicon was successfully measured using electromagnetic levitation in an ambient atmosphere with various oxygen partial pressures; surface tension of molten silicon showed a marked dependence of oxygen

  14. Prevalence of apoptosis and inner cell allocation in bovine embryos cultured under different oxygen tensions with or without cysteine addition.

    PubMed

    Van Soom, A; Yuan, Y Q; Peelman, L J; de Matos, D G; Dewulf, J; Laevens, H; de Kruif, A

    2002-03-15

    Supraphysiological oxygen tension during embryo culture can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can induce apoptosis. Antioxidants such as thiol compounds (cysteine, cysteamine) can be used to prevent ROS damage to the embryo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of apoptosis during bovine embryo development and to evaluate the effect of the presence or absence of cysteine 0.6 mM in modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) on in vitro produced cattle embryos cultured under two different oxygen tensions (5% O2 versus 20% O2). Effects were assessed by checking embryo development at Days 7, 8 and 9 and by evaluating Day 9 hatched blastocysts for differentiation by means of differential staining and for apoptosis by means of TUNEL-assay. Apoptotic cells were present in 94% of Day 7 blastocysts and in 100% of Days 8 and 9 blastocysts. Cysteine addition affected Day 8 blastocyst rates in a negative way (P < 0.05) regardless of the oxygen tension. In fact, cysteine addition to the mSOF culture medium had a negative effect upon embryo development in terms of blastocyst rates, hatching rates and apoptotic cell ratio. Embryos cultured under 5% O2 in the presence of cysteine, however, possessed significantly higher numbers of ICM cells. This finding corroborates the theoretical assumption that antioxidants are beneficial for ICM development.

  15. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  16. Differential expression of survival proteins during decreased intracellular oxygen tension in brain endothelial cells of grey mullets.

    PubMed

    Ekambaram, Padmini; Narayanan, Meenakshi; Parasuraman, Parimala

    2017-02-15

    The brain requires constant oxygen supply to perform its biological functions essential for survival. Because of low oxygen capacity and poor oxygen diffusibility of water, many fish species have evolved various adaptive mechanisms to cope with depleted oxygen. Endothelial cells (EC) are the primary components responsible for controlled environment of brain. Brain homeostasis largely depends on integrity of the EC. To elucidate their adaptive strategy, EC were isolated from the fish brain of Kovalam-control site and Ennore estuary-test/field hypoxic site and were subjected to low oxygen tension in laboratory. Cell viability, 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed to ascertain stress. Hypoxic insult, cytoprotective role of HSPs and apoptotic effect were analyzed by assessing hypoxia-inducible-factor-α (HIF1α), heat-shock-protein-70 (HSP70), heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and apoptosis signal regulating kinase-1 (ASK1). This study evidenced that HSP70 and HO-1 are the key stress proteins, confer high tolerance to decreased oxygen tension mediated stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Herbivore tooth oxygen isotope compositions: Effects of diet and physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, M.J.; Valley, J.W.; Schoeninger, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    The applicability of rapid and precise laser probe analysis of tooth enamel for {delta}{sup 18}O has been verified, and the method has been applied to different modern herbivores in East Africa. Sampling and pretreatment procedures involve initial bleaching and grinding of enamel to <75 {mu}m, and elimination of adsorbed water and organic compounds with BrF{sub 5}. Typical analytical reproducibilities for 0.5-2 mg samples are {+-}0.08{per_thousand} ({+-} 1{sigma}). Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of pretreated but unanalyzed samples show no alteration compared to fresh enamel. Solid reaction products are nearly pure CaF{sub 2} with little evidence for residual O{sub 2}. Because laser probe fluorination extracts oxygen from all sites in the apatite structure (phosphate, structural carbonate, and hydroxyl), only unaltered tooth enamel ( >95% apatite) can be analyzed reliably. Different East African herbivores exhibit previously unsuspected compositional differences. Average enamel {delta}{sup 18}O values (V-SMOW) are approximately: 25{per_thousand} (goat). 27{per_thousand} (oryx), 28{per_thousand} (dikdik and zebra), 29{per_thousand} (topi), 30{per_thousand} (gerenuk), and 32{per_thousand} (gazelle). These compositions differ from generalized theoretical models, but are broadly consistent with expected isotope effects associated with differences in how much each animal (a) drinks, (b) eats C3 vs. C4 plants, and (c) pants vs. sweats. Consideration of diet, water turnover. and animal physiology will allow the most accurate interpretation of ancient teeth and targeting of environmentally-sensitive animals in paleoclimate studies. 66 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Surface tension and its temperature coefficient of molten tin determined with the sessile drop method at different oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhang Fu; Mukai, Kusuhiro; Takagi, Katsuhiko; Ohtaka, Masahiko; Huang, Wen Lai; Liu, Qiu Sheng

    2002-10-15

    The surface tension of molten tin has been determined by the sessile drop method at temperatures ranging from 523 to 1033 K and in the oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) range from 2.85 x 10(-19) to 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa, and its dependence on temperature and oxygen partial pressure has been analyzed. At P(O(2))=2.85 x 10(-19) and 1.06 x 10(-15) MPa, the surface tension decreases linearly with the increase of temperature and its temperature coefficients are -0.151 and -0.094 mN m(-1) K(-1), respectively. However, at high P(O(2)) (3.17 x 10(-10), 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa), the surface tension increases with the temperature near the melting point (505 K) and decreases above 723 K. The surface tension decrease with increasing P(O(2)) is much larger near the melting point than at temperatures above 823 K. The contact angle between the molten tin and the alumina substrate is 158-173 degrees, and the wettability is poor.

  19. Microvascular and interstitial oxygen tension in the renal cortex and medulla studied in a 4-h rat model of LPS-induced endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Alex; Bezemer, Rick; Legrand, Matthieu; Balestra, Gianmarco; Singer, Mervyn; Ince, Can

    2011-07-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury remains poorly understood. As changes in renal perfusion and oxygenation have been shown, we aimed to study the short-term effects of endotoxemia on microvascular and interstitial oxygenation in the cortex and medulla, in conjunction with global and renal hemodynamics. In a 4-h rat model of endotoxemia, we simultaneously assessed renal artery blood flow and microvascular and interstitial oxygen tensions in the renal cortex and medulla using ultrasonic flowmetry, dual wavelength phosphorimetry, and tissue oxygen tension monitoring, respectively. Whereas medullary microvascular and interstitial oxygen tensions decreased promptly in line with macrovascular blood flow, changes in cortical oxygenation were only seen later on. During the entire experimental protocol, the gradient between microvascular PO₂ and tissue oxygen tension remained unchanged in both cortex and outer medulla. At study end, urine output was significantly decreased despite a maintained oxygen consumption rate. In this 4-h rat model of endotoxemia, total renal oxygen consumption and the gradient between microvascular PO₂ and tissue oxygen tension remained unaltered, despite falls in renal perfusion and oxygen delivery and urine output. Taken in conjunction with the decrease in urine output, our results could represent either a functional renal impairment or an adaptive response.

  20. Development of bovine embryos cultured in CR1aa and IVD101 media using different oxygen tensions and culture systems.

    PubMed

    Somfai, Tamás; Inaba, Yasushi; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Kobayashi, Shuji; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Takashi; Imai, Kei

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimise the culture conditions for the in vitro production of bovine embryos. The development of in vitro fertilised bovine oocytes in CR1aa supplemented with 5% calf serum and IVD101 culture media were compared using traditional microdrops and Well of the Well (WOW) culture systems either under 5% or 20% oxygen tension. After 7 days of culture, a significantly higher blastocyst formation rate was obtained for embryos cultured in CR1aa medium compared to those cultured in IVD101, irrespective of O2 tensions and culture systems. The blastocyst formation in IVD101 was suppressed under 20% O2 compared to 5% O2 . Despite their similar total cell numbers, higher rates of inner cell mass (ICM) cells were observed in blastocysts developed in IVD101 medium than in those developed in CR1aa, irrespective of O2 tensions. There was no significant difference in blastocyst formation, total, ICM and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers between embryos obtained by microdrop and WOW culture systems irrespective of the culture media and O2 tensions used. In conclusion, CR1aa resulted in higher blastocyst formation rates irrespective of O2 tension, whereas IVD101 supported blastocyst formation only under low O2 levels but enhanced the proliferation of ICM cells.

  1. Correlation of brain tissue oxygen tension with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy and mixed venous oxygen saturation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Tyree, Kreangkai; Tyree, Melissa; DiGeronimo, Robert

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this prospective, animal study was to compare brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) with cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SVO(2)) during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) in a porcine model. This was accomplished using twelve immature piglets with surgically implanted catheters placed in the superficial cerebral cortex to measure brain PbtO(2) and microdialysis metabolites. The NIRS sensor was placed overlying the forehead to measure cerebral regional saturation index (rSO(2)i) while SVO(2) was measured directly from the ECMO circuit. Animals were placed on VA ECMO followed by an initial period of stabilization, after which they were subjected to graded hypoxia and recovery. Our results revealed that rSO(2)i and SVO(2) correlated only marginally with PbtO(2) (R(2)=0.32 and R(2)=0.26, respectively) while the correlation between rSO(2)i and SVO( 2) was significantly stronger (R(2)=0.59). Cerebral metabolites and rSO(2)i were significantly altered during attenuation of PbtO( 2), p<0.05). A subset of animals, following exposure to hypoxia, experienced markedly delayed recovery of both rSO(2)i and PbtO( 2) despite rapid normalization of SVO(2). Upon further analysis, these animals had significantly lower blood pressure (p=0.001), lower serum pH (p=0.01), and higher serum lactate (p=0.02). Additionally, in this subgroup, rSO(2)i correlated better with PbtO(2) (R(2)=0.76). These findings suggest that, in our ECMO model, rSO(2)i and SVO( 2) correlate reasonably well with each other, but not necessarily with brain PbtO(2) and that NIRS-derived rSO(2)i may more accurately reflect cerebral tissue hypoxia in sicker animals.

  2. Low oxygen tension and relative defined culture medium with 3, 4-dihydroxyflavone are beneficial for yak-bovine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryo.

    PubMed

    Xiong, X; Li, J; Wang, L; Zhong, J; Zi, X; Wang, Y

    2014-02-01

    With an aim to improve the efficiency of yak-bovine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT), this study investigated the effect of different culture systems on the development, quality and gene expression profile of yak-bovine iSCNT embryo. Reconstructed embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF) or relative defined culture medium (RDCM) with 5% or 20% oxygen tension. Relative mRNA abundance of Oct-4, IFNT, IGF-2, Bax, GPX-1, SOD-1, CAT and GSS was analysed in blastocysts with qRT-PCR. The blastocyst formation rate in RDCM under 5% oxygen tension was significantly higher than that under 20% oxygen tension (P < 0.05). The total cell number of blastocyst derived from RDCM with 20% oxygen tension was lower than that of other groups, whereas the group of RDCM with 5% oxygen tension showed a beneficial effect on apoptosis index and tolerance to cryopreservation (P < 0.05). However, under the same oxygen tension, the mRNA abundance of IFNT of RDCM groups was higher than that of the mSOF groups. In addition, high oxygen tension during in vitro culture (IVC) with RDCM significantly increases the mRNA expression of oxidative stress-related genes (GPX-1, SOD-1, CAT and GSS) (P < 0.05). 3, 4-Dihydroxyflavone (DHF) during high oxygen tension was able to improve the cloned blastocyst formation rate in RDCM (P < 0.05). These results for the first time showed that low oxygen tension and RDCM could improve the developmental competence and quality and alleviate the oxidative stress for yak-bovine iSCNT embryo during IVC. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Endothelial cell respiration is affected by the oxygen tension during shear exposure: role of mitochondrial peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles I; Han, Zhaosheng; Presley, Tennille; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Ilangovan, Govindasamy; Alevriadou, B Rita

    2008-07-01

    Cultured vascular endothelial cell (EC) exposure to steady laminar shear stress results in peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation intramitochondrially and inactivation of the electron transport chain. We examined whether the "hyperoxic state" of 21% O(2), compared with more physiological O(2) tensions (Po(2)), increases the shear-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and mitochondrial superoxide (O(2)(*-)) generation leading to ONOO(-) formation and suppression of respiration. Electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was used to measure O(2) consumption rates of bovine aortic ECs sheared (10 dyn/cm(2), 30 min) at 5%, 10%, or 21% O(2) or left static at 5% or 21% O(2). Respiration was inhibited to a greater extent when ECs were sheared at 21% O(2) than at lower Po(2) or left static at different Po(2). Flow in the presence of an endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor or a ONOO(-) scavenger abolished the inhibitory effect. EC transfection with an adenovirus that expresses manganese superoxide dismutase in mitochondria, and not a control virus, blocked the inhibitory effect. Intracellular and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production was higher in ECs sheared at 21% than at 5% O(2), as determined by dihydroethidium and MitoSOX red fluorescence, respectively, and the latter was, at least in part, NO-dependent. Accumulation of NO metabolites in media of ECs sheared at 21% O(2) was modestly increased compared with ECs sheared at lower Po(2), suggesting that eNOS activity may be higher at 21% O(2). Hence, the hyperoxia of in vitro EC flow studies, via increased NO and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production, leads to enhanced ONOO(-) formation intramitochondrially and suppression of respiration.

  4. Early Changes in Brain Oxygen Tension May Predict Outcome Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J K; Chandrasekaran, S; Andrews, P J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the change in brain oxygen tension (PbtO2) over the first 24 h of monitoring in a series of 25 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and relate this to outcome. The trend in PbtO2 for the whole group was to increase with time (mean PbtO2 17.4 [1.75] vs 24.7 [1.60] mmHg, first- vs last-hour data, respectively; p = 0.002). However, a significant increase in PbtO2 occurred in only 17 patients (68 %), all surviving to intensive care unit discharge (p = 0.006). Similarly, a consistent increase in PbtO2 with time occurred in only 13 patients, the correlation coefficient for PbtO2 versus time being ≥0.5 for all survivors. There were eight survivors and four non-survivors, with low correlation coefficients (<0.5). Significantly more patients with a correlation coefficient ≥0.5 for PbtO2 versus time survived in intensive care (p = 0.039). The cumulative length of time that PbtO2 was <20 mmHg was not significantly different among these three groups. In conclusion, although for the cohort as a whole PbtO2 increased over the first 24 h, the individual trends of PbtO2 were related to outcome. There was a significant association between improving PbtO2 and survival, despite these patients having cumulative durations of hypoxia similar to those of non-survivors.

  5. Cigarette smoke and decreased oxygen tension inhibit pulmonary claudin-6 expression.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Felix R; Lewis, Josh B; Belgique, Samuel T; Milner, Dallin C; Lewis, Adam L; Dunaway, Todd M; Egbert, Kaleb M; Winden, Duane R; Arroyo, Juan A; Reynolds, Paul R

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a condition involving perturbed barrier integrity coincident with both emphysema and inflammation of the airways, and smoking is considered a major risk factor. Claudins (Cldns) stabilize barriers and contribute to tight junctions by preventing paracellular transport of extracellular fluid constituents. To determine Cldn6 was differentially influenced by tobacco smoke, Cldn6 was evaluated in cells and tissues by q-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry following exposure. Cldn6 transcriptional regulation was also assessed using luciferase reporter constructs. Q-PCR and immunoblotting revealed that Cldn6 was decreased in alveolar type II-like epithelial cells (A549) and primary small airway epithelial cells when exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Cldn6 was also markedly decreased in the lungs of mice exposed to acute tobacco smoke delivered by a nose-only automated smoke machine compared to controls. Luciferase reporter assays incorporating 0.5-kb, 1.0-kb, or 2.0-kb of the Cldn6 promoter revealed decreased transcription of Cldn6 following exposure to CSE. Cldn6 transcriptional regulation was also assessed in hypoxic conditions due to low oxygen tension observed during smoking. Hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha caused decreased transcription of the Cldn6 gene via interactions with putative response elements in the proximal promoter sequence. These data reveal that tight junctional proteins such as Cldn6 are differentially regulated by tobacco-smoke exposure and that Cldns are potentially targeted when epithelial cells respond to tobacco smoke. Further research may show that Cldns expressed in tight junctions between parenchymal cells contribute to impaired structural integrity of the lung coincident with smoking.

  6. The effect of high oxygen tensions on the mechanical properties of rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, R. M.; Rosenberg, Edith

    1970-01-01

    1. The average mechanical properties of groups of lungs or lung—thorax systems from pathogen-free rats weighing approximately 200 g were determined. Static pressure—volume curves and resistances to air-flow were obtained. 2. Six series, each of sixteen rats, were studied. Eight experimental rats in each series were exposed to 4 atm O2 (OHP) in a transparent pressure chamber; the other eight rats, which served as controls, were obtained from the breeder at the same time and studied at the same time. 3. In four series, the experimental animals were killed 10 min after gasping due to OHP had been definitely established. One series was a control in which experimental animals were exposed to 4 atm of pressure in an atmosphere containing oxygen at a tension of 150 mm Hg for 190 min. The experimental animals in the sixth series were exposed to 4 atm O2 for 2 hr and none of them gasped. 4. Gross and histological examination of sixteen rats, eight of which were killed after 10 min of gasping at 4 atm O2, showed that at this stage of intoxication there was no evidence of pulmonary pathology. 5. In none of the series studied were the static pressure—volume curves for deflation shifted, i.e. OHP did not affect the elastic properties of the lungs or the alveolar surfactant. 6. In two series studied 10 min after gasping behaviour had been established there was a significant decrease of resistance to air-flow and a shift to the left of the static pressure—volume curve for inflation with air. The rats in both these series were sedated with pentobarbitone and then killed with pentobarbitone injected into the jugular vein. 7. The decrease in resistance to air-flow was interpreted as broncho-dilatation and a possible mechanism whereby OHP produces broncho-dilatation is discussed. PMID:5503886

  7. Prediction of arterial oxygen tension during one-lung ventilation: analysis of preoperative and intraoperative variables.

    PubMed

    Guenoun, Thierry; Journois, Didier; Silleran-Chassany, Jacqueline; Frappier, Jerôme; D'attellis, Nicola; Salem, Antoinette; Safran, Denis

    2002-04-01

    To determine whether currently available preoperative and intraoperative variables related to arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) can be used as predictors for low PaO(2) during one-lung ventilation (OLV). A prospective cohort study. Primary university hospital. Adult patients (n = 92) undergoing thoracic surgery requiring OLV. Preoperative and intraoperative data, including past medical history, physical examination, and usual preoperative and intraoperative tests, were collected and used as explanatory variables for PaO(2) during OLV by univariate and multivariate analysis. A stepwise logistic regression including the same independent variables was used to identify patients who should be expected to develop arterial hypoxemia (PaO(2) <70 mmHg). Arterial blood gas samples were analyzed 15 minutes after the onset of OLV and after thoracotomy to determine the lowest PaO(2) value during OLV. Preoperative (age, hematocrit, relative perfusion of the nondependent lung) and intraoperative (PaO(2) during 2-lung ventilation and mean arterial pressure at the lowest PaO(2)) variables were identified as independent factors affecting PaO(2) in OLV. PaO(2) during 2-lung ventilation was the only independent variable accounting for arterial hypoxemia when multivariate logistic regression was performed. The PaO(2) during OLV can be predicted using routinely available preoperative and intraoperative data. From a clinical point of view, this study failed to identify patients at risk of arterial hypoxemia when OLV is instituted because mainly intraoperative independent variables are involved in the decrease of PaO(2) in this situation. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  8. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  9. Effects of evening primrose oil treatment on sciatic nerve blood flow and endoneurial oxygen tension in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1994-12-01

    Evening primrose oil (EPO) is rich in the omega-6 essential fatty acid component, gamma-linolenic acid. The aim of the investigation was to determine whether EPO treatment prevented a reduction in sciatic nerve perfusion and oxygenation in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Rats were treated from diabetes induction with 10 g EPO kg-1 day-1. Sciatic blood flow was measured by microelectrode polarography and hydrogen clearance. Diabetes caused 47.7% +/- 3.4% (P < 0.001) and 58.8% +/- 4.8% (P < 0.001) reduction in the nutritive (capillary) and the non-nutritive (large vessel) components of endoneurial blood flow, respectively, which were prevented by EPO. Treatment had no significant effect on nutritive flow in non-diabetic rats; however, the rate of non-nutritive flow increased by 97.7% +/- 38.9% (P < 0.01). Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tension was measured by microelectrode polarography. Diabetes resulted in a 44.7% +/- 3.4% reduction in mean oxygen tension (P < 0.001), which was largely (82.3% +/- 10.2%) prevented by EPO treatment (P < 0.001). Thus, EPO prevents impairment of blood flow and endoneurial oxygenation in experimental diabetes. It is likely that this neurovascular action accounts for the beneficial effects of treatment on nerve function in diabetic rats and patients.

  10. Postocclusive Hyperemia Measured with Laser Doppler Flowmetry and Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension in the Diagnosis of Primary Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Prospective, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Maga, Paweł; Henry, Brandon Michael; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K.; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Kaczmarczyk, Paweł; Niżankowski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the sensitivity and specificity of transcutaneous oxygen tension and postocclusive hyperemia testing using laser Doppler flowmetry in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. One hundred patients and one hundred controls were included in the study. Baseline microvascular blood flow and then time to peak flow following occlusion were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. Afterwards, the transcutaneous oxygen tension was recorded. The sensitivities of baseline microvascular blood flow, postocclusive time to peak flow, and transcutaneous oxygen tension were 79%, 79%, and 77%, respectively. The postocclusive time peak flow had a superior specificity of 90% and area under the curve of 0.92 as compared to 66% and 0.80 for baseline microvascular flow and 64% and 0.76 for transcutaneous oxygen tension. Time to postocclusive peak blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry is a highly accurate test for differentiating patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon from healthy controls. PMID:28101516

  11. Postocclusive Hyperemia Measured with Laser Doppler Flowmetry and Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension in the Diagnosis of Primary Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Prospective, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Maga, Paweł; Henry, Brandon Michael; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Kaczmarczyk, Paweł; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Niżankowski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the sensitivity and specificity of transcutaneous oxygen tension and postocclusive hyperemia testing using laser Doppler flowmetry in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. One hundred patients and one hundred controls were included in the study. Baseline microvascular blood flow and then time to peak flow following occlusion were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. Afterwards, the transcutaneous oxygen tension was recorded. The sensitivities of baseline microvascular blood flow, postocclusive time to peak flow, and transcutaneous oxygen tension were 79%, 79%, and 77%, respectively. The postocclusive time peak flow had a superior specificity of 90% and area under the curve of 0.92 as compared to 66% and 0.80 for baseline microvascular flow and 64% and 0.76 for transcutaneous oxygen tension. Time to postocclusive peak blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry is a highly accurate test for differentiating patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon from healthy controls.

  12. The Metabolomic Profile of Spent Culture Media from Day-3 Human Embryos Cultured under Low Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos, Maria José; Gámiz, Pilar; de Los Santos, José María; Romero, Josep Lluís; Prados, Nicolás; Alonso, Cristina; Remohí, José; Dominguez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts made to improve the in vitro embryo culture conditions used during assisted reproduction procedures, human embryos must adapt to different in vitro oxygen concentrations and the new metabolic milieu provided by the diverse culture media used for such protocols. It has been shown that the embryo culture environment can affect not only cellular metabolism, but also gene expression in different species of mammalian embryos. Therefore we wanted to compare the metabolic footprint left by human cleavage-stage embryos under two types of oxygen atmospheric culture conditions (6% and 20% O2). The spent culture media from 39 transferred and implanted embryos from a total of 22 patients undergoing egg donation treatment was analyzed; 23 embryos came from 13 patients in the 6% oxygen concentration group, and 16 embryos from 9 patients were used in the 20% oxygen concentration group. The multivariate statistics we used in our analysis showed that human cleavage-stage embryos grown under both types of oxygen concentration left a similar metabolic fingerprint. We failed to observe any change in the net depletion or release of relevant analytes, such as glucose and especially fatty acids, by human cleavage-stage embryos under either type of culture condition. Therefore it seems that low oxygen tension during embryo culture does not alter the global metabolism of human cleavage-stage embryos.

  13. Culture of bovine embryos in polyester mesh sections: the effect of pore size and oxygen tension on in vitro development.

    PubMed

    Somfai, T; Inaba, Y; Aikawa, Y; Ohtake, M; Kobayashi, S; Akai, T; Hattori, H; Konishi, K; Imai, K

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of polyester mesh culture for the in vitro production of bovine embryos, as polyester mesh is an alternative way for tracking individual embryos throughout culture using time-lapse cinematography (TLC). Bovine embryos were isolated during in vitro culture using sections of three different polyethylene terephthalate (PET) mesh products. In vitro matured and fertilized bovine oocytes were cultured in the 217 × 217, 230 × 230 or 238 × 238-μm openings of PET mesh sections or in simple micro-drops (control) for 7 days under either 20% or 5% O(2) tensions. No difference in embryo developmental rates was found between the culture groups in terms of cleavage, blastocyst formation and blastocyst expansion irrespective of O(2) tension. In contrast, under 20% O(2) tension, blastocysts that developed in PET mesh with 217 × 217-μm opening had significantly higher numbers of total and trophectoderm (TE) cells than control embryos; however, the numbers and proportions of inner cell mass (ICM) cells did not differ. Under 5% O(2) tension, no difference was found among the culture groups in the numbers of total, ICM and TE cells in embryos. All three PET mesh products investigated in this study were proven to be effective to prevent embryo movement. The results demonstrate that bovine embryos can be cultured in PET mesh sections without negative side-effects and suggest that embryo distance determined by the mesh affects embryo quality at atmospheric oxygen tension. Polyethylene terephthalate mesh with 217 × 217-μm openings was found to be the most suitable for further application in TLC.

  14. The biosynthetic pathway of pyrimidine (deoxy)nucleotides: A sensor of oxygen tension necessary for maintaining cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, M. )

    1989-06-01

    Culture experiments on Ehrlich ascites tumor cells revealed that a low oxygen tension (about 20% in normoxic atmosphere) induced an increase in the length of the growth cycle. The relative growth of aerobic control cells after transfer to the second in vitro passage was 145% within 24 h, and reduced to 50% at 1% O{sub 2} and about 30% at 0.1% O{sub 2}. The increase in protein and DNA content of these hypoxic cultures was equally impaired. Also, the cell cycle traverse as analyzed by flow cytometry was affected predominantly at the G{sub 1}/early S stage. Uptake of labeled thymidine into acid-insoluble material of hypoxic cells was below that of controls whereas incorporation of uridine exceeded that of normoxic controls. The results are interpreted as supporting the concept that the biosynthetic pathway of pyrimidine (deoxy)nucleotides - because of two oxygen-dependent enzymes, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and ribonucleotide reductase - is a potential transducer of environmental limitations in oxygen tension to the proliferative capacity of cells.

  15. The role of reduced oxygen in the developmental physiology of growth and metamorphosis initiation in Drosophila

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rearing oxygen level is known to affect final body size in a variety of insects, but the physiological mechanisms by which oxygen affects size are incompletely understood. In Manduca and Drosophila, the larval size at which metamorphosis is initiated largely determines adult size, and metamorphosis ...

  16. Butler-Sugimoto monomolecular bilayer interface model: the effect of oxygen on the surface tension of a liquid metal and its wetting of a ceramic.

    PubMed

    Yen, Pei-Shan; Datta, Ravindra

    2014-07-15

    The influence of oxygen on liquid-gas surface tension of molten metals has been well-investigated experimentally and modeled theoretically via the Szyszkowski equation, derivable from the Butler molecular monolayer interface model. However, there is no corresponding model describing the experimentally observed profound effect of oxygen partial pressure on solid-liquid surface tension as well as on contact angle of molten metals on ceramic substrates. Here, we utilize the Butler-Sugimoto thermodynamic approach based on a monomolecular bilayer interface model to investigate the effect of oxygen partial pressure on liquid-gas as well as solid-liquid surface tension of molten Cu/Al2O3 and molten Ag/Al2O3 systems. It is shown that both liquid-gas and solid-liquid surface tension are a strong function of oxygen activity in the melt, which, in turn, depends on gas-phase oxygen partial pressure, in conformity with experiments. The change in solid-liquid surface tension and wetting is also greatly affected by the change in liquid-gas surface tension. This improved understanding is of practical significance in many applications.

  17. The acute effects of hemorrhagic shock on cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygen tension, and spreading depolarization following penetrating ballistic-like brain injury.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Shear, Deborah A; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often occurs in conjunction with additional trauma, resulting in secondary complications, such as hypotension as a result of blood loss. This study investigated the combined effects of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) on physiological parameters, including acute changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), brain tissue oxygen tension (P(bt)O₂), and cortical spreading depolarizations (CSDs). All recordings were initiated before injury (PBBI/HS/both) and maintained for 2.5 h. Results showed that PBBI alone and combined PBBI and HS produced a sustained impairment of ipsilateral rCBF that decreased by 70% from baseline (p<0.05). Significant and sustained reductions in P(bt)O₂ (50% baseline; p<0.05) were also observed in the injured hemisphere of the animals subjected to both PBBI and HS (PBBI+HS). In contrast, PBBI alone produced smaller, more transient reductions in P(bt)O₂ levels. The lower limit of cerebral autoregulation was significantly higher in the PBBI+HS group (p<0.05, compared to HS alone). Critically, combined injury resulted in twice the number of spontaneous CSDs as in PBBI alone (p<0.05). It also lowered the propagation speed of CSD and the threshold of CSD occurrence [induced CSD at higher mean arterial pressure (MAP)]. However, rCBF and P(bt)O₂ were not responsive to the depolarizations. Our data suggest that PBBI together with HS causes persistent impairment of CBF and brain tissue oxygen tension, increasing the probability of CSDs that likely contribute to secondary neuropathology and compromise neurological recovery.

  18. Influence of variations in pH and PCO2 on scalp tissue oxygen tension and carotid arterial oxygen tension in the fetal lamb.

    PubMed

    Aarnoudse, J G; Oeseburg, B; Kwant, G; Zwart, A; Zijlstra, W G; Huisjes, H J

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of the effect of hypercapnic acidaemia and hypocapnic alkalaemia on scalp tissue PO2 as measured with a subcutaneous needle-electrode and a transcutaneous electrode in 6 fetal lambs. The experiments were carried out under general anaesthesia with the fetus kept in utero. Hypocapnia was induced by hyperventilating the ewe and hypercapnia was achieved by administering extra CO2 to the ewe. Fetal carotid arterial, subcutaneous and transcutaneous PO2 were continuously recorded, and fetal and maternal arterial pH and arterial PCO2 were determined from blood samples taken at short intervals. In each experiment the H+ Bohr factor of fetal and maternal blood was measured. During hypocapnic alkalaemia, there was a fall in all fetal PO2 levels, whereas a marked rise was observed during hypercapnic acidaemia. The variations in fetal PO2 observed in vivo even exceeded the variations due to the H+ Bohr effect (measured in vitro). This was due to small variations in fetal carotid arterial oxygen saturation, which tended to fall during hypocapnic alkalaemia and to rise during hypercapnic acidaemia. The results of these findings strongly suggest that tissue PO2, as measured with the subcutaneous and transcutaneous electrodes, is dependent on the H+ Bohr effect. This adds to the uncertainty as to the value of subcutaneous and transcutaneous PO2 monitoring during labour as an early warning system for impending fetal asphyxia.

  19. Anatomy of the biceps tendon: implications for restoring physiological length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J; Dai, Xuesong; Hanypsiak, Brian T; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the normal length and diameter of the long head of the biceps tendon (BT) to provide guidelines for interference screw tenodesis. Twenty-one cadaveric shoulders were dissected. The BT length was measured from its origin to the humeral head articular margin (AM), lower subscapularis, upper pectoralis major, musculotendinous junction of the biceps (MTJ), and lower pectoralis major (LPM). Tendon diameter was measured at levels corresponding to tenodesis: (1) at the AM, (2) suprapectorally, and (3) subpectorally. The mean tendon length was 24.9 mm from the origin to the AM, 56.1 mm to the lower subscapularis, 73.8 mm to the upper pectoralis major, 98.5 mm to the MTJ, and 118.4 mm to the LPM. The mean tendon diameter was 6.6 mm for tenodesis at the AM, 5.1 mm for suprapectoral tenodesis, and 5.3 mm for subpectoral tenodesis. During biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation, restoring the normal length-tension relation of the BT depends on the site of tenodesis and the depth of the bone socket. At the AM, a 25-mm bone socket on average will maintain the length-tension relation. For tenodesis more distally, the length of tendon resection varies with bone socket length. Because the MTJ is above the LPM, subpectoral tenodesis should be performed proximal to the LPM. This study provides guidelines for restoring the normal length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation. The simplest way to restore this relation is with tenodesis adjacent to the humeral head AM and a bone socket of 25 mm in depth. For tenodesis at more distal locations, both the length of the BT and the depth of the bone socket must be considered. Information about the normal BT may be useful in preserving the physiological length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. History of developments in sport and exercise physiology: A. V. Hill, maximal oxygen uptake, and oxygen debt.

    PubMed

    Hale, Tudor

    2008-02-15

    This paper provides a thumb-nail sketch of some of the key issues that have been instrumental in the development of the scientific study of exercise, and more particularly sports, physiology. Those who have had the pleasure of reading the American Physiological Society's publication Exercise Physiology in its "People and Ideas" series, will know the breadth and depth of the extant material in this field. In an attempt at some form of coherence, the present paper focuses on the concepts of maximal oxygen uptake and oxygen debt introduced by the British physiologist Archibald Vivian Hill in 1922. The Introduction provides a contextual framework for the paper, and is followed by a description of the work undertaken by Hill and his colleagues in the development of these concepts over a three-year period. Credit is given to scientists from the eighteenth century onwards who provided the scientific foundations that led to the measurement of oxygen uptake, and those who went on to elaborate the physiological mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. The problems in what constitutes a plateau and how to get it are discussed, along with attempts to predict maximal oxygen uptake from sub-maximal--or even no--exercise. The debate surrounding the limiting factor in the oxygen uptake chain started by Hill is brought up to date rather than resolved. The ecological validity of applied sports physiology is explored in terms of sport-specific ergometry and test protocols. Finally, Hill's interest in the production and removal of lactic acid re-emerges in the recent attempts to establish the threshold at which accumulation of lactic acid in the blood leads to cessation of exercise, and also the means of validly measuring an individual's anaerobic power and capacity. Wherever possible and appropriate, counter-arguments are introduced to demonstrate the transient and uncertain nature of what is often regarded as true knowledge.

  1. Inhaled nitric oxide and arterial oxygen tension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Y.; Higenbottam, T. W.; d Diaz; Cremona, G.; Akamine, S.; Barbera, J. A.; Rodriguez-Roisin, R.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) is a selective pulmonary vasodilator which can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury. However, it is uncertain that this effect on arterial oxygenation can be generalised to all lung diseases. METHODS: The effects of inhaled NO on gas exchange were studied in nine patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 11 patients with severe pulmonary hypertension, and 14 healthy volunteers. A randomized sequence of 40 ppm of NO or air was inhaled for 20 minutes through an orofacial mask. RESULTS: Inhaled NO reduced mean (SE) transcutaneous arterial oxygen tension (TcPO2) from 9.6 (0.3) to 8.9 (0.4) kPa in healthy volunteers and from 7.4 (0.6) to 7.0 (0.5) kPa in patients with COPD. There was no change in TcPO2 in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. During inhalation of NO and air no change occurred in transcutaneous arterial carbon dioxide tension (TcPCO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) measured by pulse oximeter, or cardiac output determined by the transthoracic impedance method. CONCLUSIONS: Inhaled NO does not improve TcPO2 nor increase cardiac output in normal subjects and patients with COPD, suggesting that inhaled NO worsens gas exchange. This could represent inhaled NO overriding hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in COPD. The finding that TcPO2 also fell when normal subjects inhaled NO suggests that a similar mechanism normally contributes to optimal gas exchange. Whilst inhaled NO can improve oxygenation, this effect should not be considered to be a general response but is dependent on the type of lung disease. 


 PMID:9059470

  2. Effectiveness of Spiritist "passe" (Spiritual healing) for anxiety levels, depression, pain, muscle tension, well-being, and physiological parameters in cardiovascular inpatients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Élida Mara; Barbosa, Luana Pereira; Marson, Jorge Marcelo; Terra, Juverson Alves; Martins, Claudio Jacinto Pereira; Modesto, Danielle; Resende, Luiz Antônio Pertili Rodrigues de; Borges, Maria de Fátima

    2017-02-01

    Biofield therapies, such as laying on of hands, are used in association with Conventional Medicine as Spiritist "passe", among others. The aim of this study was to evaluate anxiety, depression, pain, muscle tension and well-being, as well as physiological parameters in cardiovascular inpatients submitted to the Spiritist "passe", sham, and no intervention. In the total, 41 cardiovascular inpatients submitted to the Spiritist "passe", sham, and no intervention during a 10-min period on 3 consecutive days. They were evaluated through anxiety and depression level, pain, the perceptions of muscle tension and well-being and physiological parameters, before and after interventions. A significant reduction (p=0.001) in anxiety scores and muscle tension (p=0.011), improvement of well-being (p=0.003) and a significant increase in peripheral oxyhemoglobin saturation scores (p=0.028) were observed in Spiritist "passe" patients, and a significant reduction (p=0.028) of muscle tension and improvement of well-being (p=0.045) in sham patients. However, muscle tension reduction (p=0.003) and improvement of well-being (p=0.003) were more accentuated in the Spiritist "passe" compared to sham and no intervention. Results suggest that the Spiritist "passe" appeared to be effective, reducing anxiety level and the perception of muscle tension, consequently improving peripheral oxyhemoglobin saturation and the sensation of well-being compared to sham and no intervention in cardiovascular inpatients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Defining the role of oxygen tension in human neural progenitor fate.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuan; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Ying; Gaeta, Xavier; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wisidagama, Dona R R; Cinkornpumin, Jessica; Koehler, Carla M; Malone, Cindy S; Teitell, Michael A; Lowry, William E

    2014-11-11

    Hypoxia augments human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-renewal via hypoxia-inducible factor 2α-activated OCT4 transcription. Hypoxia also increases the efficiency of reprogramming differentiated cells to a pluripotent-like state. Combined, these findings suggest that low O2 tension would impair the purposeful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Here, we show that low O2 tension and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activity instead promote appropriate hESC differentiation. Through gain- and loss-of-function studies, we implicate O2 tension as a modifier of a key cell fate decision, namely whether neural progenitors differentiate toward neurons or glia. Furthermore, our data show that even transient changes in O2 concentration can affect cell fate through HIF by regulating the activity of MYC, a regulator of LIN28/let-7 that is critical for fate decisions in the neural lineage. We also identify key small molecules that can take advantage of this pathway to quickly and efficiently promote the development of mature cell types.

  4. Oxygen tension and normalisation pressure modulate nifedipine-sensitive relaxation of human placental chorionic plate arteries.

    PubMed

    Cooper, E J; Wareing, M; Greenwood, S L; Baker, P N

    2006-01-01

    Fetoplacental blood vessel constriction in response to reduced oxygenation has been demonstrated in placenta perfused in vitro. In pulmonary vessels, hypoxic vasoconstriction involves Ca2+ influx into smooth muscle through membrane ion channels including voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs). We hypothesised that VGCCs are involved in agonist-induced constriction of fetoplacental resistance vessels and that their contribution is modulated by oxygen. Chorionic plate small arteries were studied using wire myography. Arteries were normalised at high (0.9 of L(13.3 kPa)) or low (0.9 of L(5.1 kPa)) stretch and experiments performed at 156, 38 or 15 mmHg oxygen. At low stretch, U46619 (thromboxane-mimetic) or KCl (smooth muscle depolarisation) constriction was greater at 38 than 156 or 15 mmHg oxygen. An L-type VGCC blocker nifedipine, inhibited KCl constriction by >85% but was less effective in U46619 constrictions (43-67%). At high stretch, nifedipine inhibition of KCl- and U46619-induced constriction was less at 15 than 38 or 156 mmHg oxygen. Oxygen did not affect constriction to U46619 or nifedipine-induced relaxation when vessels were normalised at high stretch. In conclusion, oxygen modulates chorionic plate arterial constriction at low stretch but regulation is lost at high stretch. U46619 constriction is underlain by VGCCs and nifedipine-insensitive processes; their relative contribution is influenced by oxygen.

  5. Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.

    2013-01-01

    The air that we breathe contains nearly 21% oxygen, most of which is utilized by mitochondria during respiration. While we cannot live without it, it was perceived as a bane to aerobic organisms due to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites by mitochondria and other cellular compartments. However, this dogma was challenged when these species were demonstrated to modulate cellular responses through altering signaling pathways. In fact, since this discovery of a dichotomous role of reactive species in immune function and signal transduction, research in this field grew at an exponential pace and the pursuit for mechanisms involved began. Due to a significant number of review articles present on the reactive species mediated cell death, we have focused on emerging novel pathways such as autophagy, signaling and maintenance of the mitochondrial network. Despite its role in several processes, increased reactive species generation has been associated with the origin and pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases. While it is tempting to speculate that anti-oxidant therapy would protect against these disorders, growing evidence suggests that this may not be true. This further supports our belief that these reactive species play a fundamental role in maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. PMID:23528859

  6. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary.We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats.This method provides stable and continuous measurements of cortical tissue oxygen tension (PO2) for more than 2 weeks and can reproducibly detect acute changes in cortical oxygenation.Exogenous angiotensin‐II reduced renal cortical tissue PO2 more than equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine, probably because it reduced renal oxygen delivery more than did phenylephrine.Activation of the endogenous renin–angiotensin system in transgenic Cyp1a1Ren2 rats reduced cortical tissue PO2; in this model renal hypoxia precedes the development of structural pathology and can be reversed acutely by an angiotensin‐II receptor type 1 antagonist.Angiotensin‐II promotes renal hypoxia, which may in turn contribute to its pathological effects during development of chronic kidney disease. Abstract We hypothesised that both exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II (AngII) can decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in the renal cortex of unrestrained rats, which might in turn contribute to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rats were instrumented with telemeters equipped with a carbon paste electrode for continuous measurement of renal cortical tissue PO2. The method reproducibly detected acute changes in cortical oxygenation induced by systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia. In conscious rats, renal cortical PO2 was dose‐dependently reduced by intravenous AngII. Reductions in PO2 were significantly greater than those induced by equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine. In anaesthetised rats, renal oxygen consumption was not affected, and filtration fraction was increased only in the AngII infused animals. Oxygen delivery decreased by 50% after infusion of AngII and renal blood flow (RBF) fell by 3.3 ml min−1

  7. Concise review: the role of oxygen in hematopoietic stem cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Jež, Mojca; Rožman, Primož; Ivanović, Zoran; Bas, Tuba

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dioxygen, O(2), is an important element in cellular microenvironment in vivo, and often overlooked in standard in vitro and ex vivo cell culture systems. Molecular oxygen is the ultimate electron acceptor in oxidative cellular respiration, and also a signal that regulates cell fate through concentration gradients. Recent advances in physiology of oxygen and adult stem cell research have shown that apart from being important for oxidative phosphorylation, thus energy metabolism, oxygen is also important as a signaling molecule and an integral part of the stem cell niche. This review article covers the influence of physiologically relevant oxygen levels on adult stem cells through highlighting the research on the effect of oxygen concentration on hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. This is important particularly to understand the embryonic and adult stem cell biology and physiology. The new discoveries in this field will help to further improve current tissue engineering and clinical applications. In addition, understanding the relationship between oxygen and stemness is invaluable for the advanced treatments of neoplastic diseases. Authors believe that in the future, active and programmed dynamic of oxygen levels will be routinely used for the programmed in vitro and ex vivo expansion of different adult stem cell types and tissue regeneration purposes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effects of oxygen tension and pH on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Bearman, S I; Babior, B M

    1979-06-01

    The respiratory burst of human neutrophils was measured under conditions of hypoxia and low pH. O2 -- production by neutrophils activated with opsonized zymosan fell slowly as the oxygen concentration declined to 1%, then dropped more sharply, reaching negligible levels at oxygen concentrations less than 0.25%. Production was half maximal at an oxygen concentration of 0.35% (equivalent to approximately 10-microM dissolved oxygen). O2- production by the cell-free O2- -forming system prepared from zymosan-activated neutrophils showed a similar dependence on oxygen concentration. A drop in pH caused decreases in both oxygen consumption and O2-- production by zymosan-treated neutrophils, values at PH 6.0 being 10%--20% of those observed at pH 7.5. Experiments with the cell-free O2-- -forming system suggested that this decline in respiratory burst activity at low pH was due to inefficient activation of the O2-- -forming enzyme under acidic conditions.

  9. Microvascular oxygen tension and flow measurements in rodent cerebral cortex during baseline conditions and functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Sakadžić, Sava; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Gorczynska, Iwona; Wu, Weicheng; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Measuring cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism microscopically is important for interpreting macroscopic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and identifying pathological changes associated with stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injury. Here, we present simultaneous, microscopic measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cortical microvessels of anesthetized rats under baseline conditions and during somatosensory stimulation. Using a custom-built imaging system, we measured CBF with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), and vascular pO2 with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy. Cerebral blood flow and pO2 measurements displayed heterogeneity over distances irresolvable with fMRI and positron emission tomography. Baseline measurements indicate O2 extraction from pial arterioles and homogeneity of ascending venule pO2 despite large variation in microvessel flows. Oxygen extraction is linearly related to flow in ascending venules, suggesting that flow in ascending venules closely matches oxygen demand of the drained territory. Oxygen partial pressure and relative CBF transients during somatosensory stimulation further indicate arteriolar O2 extraction and suggest that arterioles contribute to the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent response. Understanding O2 supply on a microscopic level will yield better insight into brain function and the underlying mechanisms of various neuropathologies. PMID:21179069

  10. Effects of ambient oxygen tension on flight performance, metabolism, and water loss of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Joos, B; Lighton, J R; Harrison, J F; Suarez, R K; Roberts, S P

    1997-01-01

    Although the metabolic rate of resting insects is relatively insensitive to atmospheric O2 tensions, metabolic rates during flight increase by 20- to 100-fold above resting levels. In this study we test whether O2 delivery limits metabolic rate during unladen hovering flight of the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Below 10 kPa PO2, wing-stroke frequency decreased, and at 5 kPa, bees could not fly. However, for PO2's ranging from 39 to 10 kPa, metabolic rate and wing-stroke frequency were unaffected by PO2. Evaporative water loss rates increased by 40% at the lowest O2 tensions, which suggests that flying honeybees compensated for decreasing ambient PO2 by modulating convective ventilatory flow. Under normal sea-level conditions, O2 delivery does not limit flight metabolic rate in unladen, hovering honeybees and does not limit maximal metabolic rate. At altitudes above 3,000 m, the convective component of O2 delivery may, however, limit flight metabolic rate and flight capacity in honeybees.

  11. Impact of Hyperglycemia and Low Oxygen Tension on Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Compared with Dermal Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes: Importance for Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lafosse, Aurore; Dufeys, Cécile; Beauloye, Christophe; Horman, Sandrine; Dufrane, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Aim Adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) are currently proposed for wound healing in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, this study investigated the impact of diabetes on adipose tissue in relation to ASC isolation, proliferation, and growth factor release and the impact of hyperglycemia and low oxygen tension (found in diabetic wounds) on dermal fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and ASC in vitro. Methods Different sequences of hypoxia and hyperglycemia were applied in vitro to ASC from nondiabetic (n = 8) or T2DM patients (n = 4) to study cell survival, proliferation, and growth factor release. Comparisons of dermal fibroblasts (n = 8) and keratinocytes (primary lineage) were made. Results No significant difference of isolation and proliferation capacities was found in ASC from nondiabetic and diabetic humans. Hypoxia and hyperglycemia did not impact cell viability and proliferation. Keratinocyte Growth Factor release was significantly lower in diabetic ASC than in nondiabetic ASC group in each condition, while Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor release was not affected by the diabetic origin. Nondiabetic ASC exposition to hypoxia (0.1% oxygen) combined with hyperglycemia (25mM glucose), resulted in a significant increase in VEGF secretion (+64%, p<0.05) with no deleterious impact on KGF release in comparison to physiological conditions (5% oxygen and 5 mM glucose). Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1α (-93%, p<0.001) and KGF (-20%, p<0.05) secretion by DF decreased in these conditions. Conclusions A better profile of growth factor secretion (regarding wound healing) was found in vitro for ASC in hyperglycemia coupled with hypoxia in comparison to dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Interestingly, ASC from T2DM donors demonstrated cellular growth rates and survival (in hypoxia and hyperglycemic conditions) similar to those of healthy ASC (from normoglycemic donors); however, KGF secretion was significantly depleted in ASC obtained from T2DM patients. This

  12. Diffusion capacity and CT measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness – relation to arterial oxygen tension in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Saure, Eirunn Waatevik; Bakke, Per Sigvald; Eagan, Tomas Mikal Lind; Aanerud, Marianne; Jensen, Robert Leroy; Grydeland, Thomas Blix; Johannessen, Ane; Nilsen, Roy Miodini; Thorsen, Einar; Hardie, Jon Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Decreased diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is associated with emphysema. DLCO is also related to decreased arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), but there are limited data on associations between PaO2 and computed tomography (CT) derived measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness. Objective To examine whether CT measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness are associated with level of arterial oxygen tension beyond that provided by measurements of diffusion capacity and spirometry. Methods The study sample consisted of 271 smoking or ex-smoking COPD patients from the Bergen COPD Cohort Study examined in 2007–2008. Emphysema was assessed as percent of low-attenuation areas<−950 Hounsfield units (%LAA), and airway wall thickness as standardised measure at an internal perimeter of 10 mm (AWT-Pi10). Multiple linear regression models were fitted with PaO2 as the outcome variable, and %LAA, AWT-Pi10, DLCO and carbon monoxide transfer coefficient (KCO) as main explanatory variables. The models were adjusted for sex, age, smoking status, and haemoglobin concentration, as well as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Results Sixty two per cent of the subjects were men, mean (SD) age was 64 (7) years, mean (SD) FEV1 in percent predicted was 50 (15)%, and mean PaO2 (SD) was 9.3 (1.1) kPa. The adjusted regression coefficient (CI) for PaO2 was –0.32 (−0.04–(−0.019)) per 10% increase in %LAA (p<0.01). When diffusion capacity and FEV1 were added to the model, respectively, the association lost its statistical significance. No relationship between airway wall thickness and PaO2 was found. Conclusion CT assessment of airway wall thickness is not associated with arterial oxygen tension in COPD patients. Emphysema score measured by chest CT, is related to decreased PaO2, but cannot replace measurements of diffusion capacity in the clinical evaluation of hypoxaemia. PMID:27178139

  13. Mitochondrial Bioenergetics of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells in Response to Dynamic Changes in Oxygen Tension: Effects of HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Claudia R.; Griguer, Corinne E.; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Hurst, Douglas R.; Welch, Danny R.; Landar, Aimee

    2013-01-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by regions of low oxygen tension (OT), which play a central role in tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Low OT affects mitochondrial function and for the cells to survive, mitochondria must functionally adapt to low OT to maintain the cellular bioenergetics. In this study, a novel experimental approach was developed to examine the real-time bioenergetic changes in breast cancer cells (BCCs) during adaptation to OT (from 20% to <1% oxygen) using sensitive extracellular flux technology. Oxygen was gradually removed from the medium, and the bioenergetics of metastatic BCCs (MDA-MB-231 and MCF10CA clones) was compared with non-tumorigenic (MCF10A) cells. BCCs, but not MCF10A, rapidly responded to low OT by stabilizing HIF-1α and increasing HIF-1α responsive gene expression and glucose uptake. BCCs also increased extracellular acidification rate (ECAR), which was markedly lower in MCF10A. Interestingly, BCCs exhibited a biphasic response in basal respiration as the OT was reduced from 20% to <1%. The initial stimulation of oxygen consumption is found to be due to increased mitochondrial respiration. This effect was HIF-1α-dependent, as silencing HIF-1α abolished the biphasic response. During hypoxia and reoxygenation, BCCs also maintained oxygen consumption rates at specific OT; however, HIF-1α silenced BCC were less responsive to changes in OT. Our results suggest that HIF-1α provides a high degree of bioenergetic flexibility under different OT which may confer an adaptive advantage for BCC survival in the tumor microenvironment and during invasion and metastasis. This study thus provides direct evidence for the cross-talk between HIF-1α and mitochondria during adaptation to low OT by BCCs and may be useful in identifying novel therapeutic agents that target the bioenergetics of BCCs in response to low OT. PMID:23840849

  14. Physiological intestinal oxygen modulates the Caco-2 cell model and increases sensitivity to the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Tara; Armstrong, Jane A; Criddle, David N; Wright, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    The Caco-2 cell model is widely used as a model of colon cancer and small intestinal epithelium but, like most cell models, is cultured in atmospheric oxygen conditions (∼21%). This does not reflect the physiological oxygen range found in the colon. In this study, we investigated the effect of adapting the Caco-2 cell line to routine culturing in a physiological oxygen (5%) environment. Under these conditions, cells maintain a number of key characteristics of the Caco-2 model, such as increased formation of tight junctions and alkaline phosphatase expression over the differentiation period and maintenance of barrier function. However, these cells exhibit differential oxidative metabolism, proliferate less and become larger during differentiation. In addition, these cells were more sensitive to cannabidiol-induced antiproliferative actions through changes in cellular energetics: from a drop of oxygen consumption rate and loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity in cells treated under atmospheric conditions to an increase in reactive oxygen species in intact mitochondria in cells treated under low-oxygen conditions. Inclusion of an additional physiological parameter, sodium butyrate, into the medium revealed a cannabidiol-induced proliferative response at low doses. These effects could impact on its development as an anticancer therapeutic, but overall, the data supports the principle that culturing cells in microenvironments that more closely mimic the in vivo conditions is important for drug screening and mechanism of action studies.

  15. Arousal-related reticular neurons during reduced oxygen tension: resilience and recovery of electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Kow, L-M; Vannucci, S J; Pfaff, D; Martin, E M

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of the electrical activity of large medullary reticular formation neurons, in nucleus gigantocellularis, were performed under control conditions and under conditions of hypoxia or anoxia. Neurons were discovered whose activity was remarkably resilient during and after the reduction or loss of oxygen. Such cells may relate to the ability of the newborn brain to survive hypoxia/anoxia, and also may demonstrate the preservation of neurons involved in generalized CNS arousal, as would be appropriate for activating behavioral responses to the reduction or loss of oxygen.

  16. Low oxygen tension induces positive inotropy and decreases a(i)Na in isolated guinea-pig cardiac ventricular papillary muscles.

    PubMed

    Jao, M J; Yang, J M

    1998-06-30

    Effects of low oxygen on contractile force, intracellular Na+ activity (aiNa), and action potential were simultaneously measured in isolated guinea-pig ventricular papillary muscles. Reduction of oxygen from control 488 to 150 mmHg biphasically increased and decreased the twitch tension, and decreased aiNa in muscles driven at 60 beats/min. The action potential duration (APD) was decreased but the maximum rate of upstroke (Vmax) was increased. In control, 1 microM epinephrine significantly increased the the action potential amplitude and twitch tension with decreases in the time to twitch peak (TTP), time for 50% relaxation (RT50), and aiNa. After exposure to low oxygen for 10 min, with twitch tension elevated and TTP and RT90 increased, 1 microM epinephrine significantly increased the twitch tension and Vmax, and decreased the APD and aiNa. Pretreatment with reserpine inhibited the twitch tension, both at control and in the presence of epinephrine. But changes of action potential and aiNa in response to low oxygen and epinephrine were similar to those in control. Our results indicate that the isolated guinea-pig ventricular muscle needs a high oxygen tension to maintain a normal contractile function. Reduction of oxygen deteriorates the electrical and mechanical activities, most likely, by a coaxial graded hypoxia. The decreased aiNa, not associated with endogenous catecholamines, suggests that the activity of the Na(+)-K+ pump can be maintained in the superficial muscle cells despite of core-central hypoxia.

  17. Response of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation to steady-state oxygen tension: implications for hypoxic cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David L; Salter, Jason D; Brookes, Paul S

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are proposed to play an important role in hypoxic cell signaling. One currently accepted signaling paradigm is that the mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases in hypoxia. This is paradoxical, because oxygen is a substrate for ROS generation. Although the response of isolated mitochondrial ROS generation to [O(2)] has been examined previously, such investigations did not apply rigorous control over [O(2)] within the hypoxic signaling range. With the use of open-flow respirometry and fluorimetry, the current study determined the response of isolated rat liver mitochondrial ROS generation to defined steady-state [O(2)] as low as 0.1 microM. In mitochondria respiring under state 4 (quiescent) or state 3 (ATP turnover) conditions, decreased ROS generation was always observed at low [O(2)]. It is concluded that the biochemical mechanism to facilitate increased ROS generation in response to hypoxia in cells is not intrinsic to the mitochondrial respiratory chain alone but may involve other factors. The implications for hypoxic cell signaling are discussed.

  18. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

  19. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

  20. Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Renal Oxygen Tension: Effects of an Altered Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Fredrik; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Liss, Per

    During conditions with experimental diabetes mellitus, it is evident that several alterations in renal oxygen metabolism occur, including increased mitochondrial respiration and increased lactate accumulation in the renal tissue. Consequently, these alterations will contribute to decrease the interstitial pO2, preferentially in the renal medulla of animals with sustained long-term hyperglycemia.

  1. Effects of sample storage time, temperature and syringe type on blood gas tensions in samples with high oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, J. J.; Rochford, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although plastic arterial sampling syringes are now commonly used, the effects of sample storage time and temperature on blood gas tensions are poorly described for samples with a high oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) taken with these high density polypropylene syringes. METHODS--Two ml samples of tonometered whole blood (PaO2 86.7 kPa, PaCO2 4.27 kPa) were placed in glass syringes and in three brands of plastic blood gas syringes. The syringes were placed either at room temperature or in iced water and blood gas analysis was performed at baseline and after 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. RESULTS--In the first 10 minutes measured PaO2 in plastic syringes at room temperature fell by an average of 1.21 kPa/min; placing the sample on ice reduced the rate of PaO2 decline to 0.19 kPa/min. The rate of fall of PaO2 in glass at room temperature was 0.49 kPa/min. The changes in PaCO2 were less dramatic and at room temperature averaged increases of 0.47 kPa for plastic syringes and 0.71 kPa for glass syringes over the entire two hour period. These changes in gas tension for plastic syringes would lead to an overestimation of pulmonary shunt measured by the 100% oxygen technique of 0.6% for each minute left at room temperature before analysis. CONCLUSIONS--Glass syringes are superior to plastic syringes in preserving samples with a high PaO2, and prompt and adequate cooling of such samples is essential for accurate blood gas analysis. PMID:8016801

  2. Use of transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions for assessing indices of gas exchange during exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Carter, R; Banham, S W

    2000-04-01

    The slow response characteristics of the combined transcutaneous electrode have been viewed as a major disadvantage when compared with other types of non-invasive assessment of gas exchange during exercise testing. We have previously shown that by using the highest recommended temperature of 45 degrees C to reduce response times, and combining this with an exercise protocol of gradual work load increments, that this allows changes in arterial blood gases to be closely followed by transcutaneous values. In the present study we have validated the use of a transcutaneous electrode for estimation of alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaO2) and dead space to tidal volume ratio (V(D)/V(T)) during exercise, against values calculated from direct arterial blood gas analysis. One hundred measurements were made in 20 patients with various cardiopulmonary disorders who underwent exercise testing. Exercise testing was performed by bicycle ergometry with a specific protocol involving gradual work load increments at 2 min intervals. Transcutaneous gas tensions were measured by a heated combined O2 and CO2 electrode. Arterial blood was sampled at the midpoint of each stage of exercise and transcutaneous tensions noted at the end of each stage. The mean difference of the AaO2 gradient calculated from blood gas tensions obtained by the two methods was 0.14 kPa. The limits of agreement were -0.26 and 0.63 kPa. The same values for V(D)/V(T) calculated from gas tensions measured by the two methods were: mean difference 0001; limits of agreement -0.0242 and 0.0252. For both these parameters there was an even scatter around the mean value on Bland and Altman analysis. The findings of this study suggest that estimation of parameters of gas exchange using transcutaneous values during exercise testing is reliable, provided the electrode is heated to a slightly higher temperature than usual and the work load increments are gradual, allowing for the latency in the response time of the system

  3. Community-level physiological profiling performed with an oxygen-sensitive fluorophore in a microtiter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Jay L.; Roberts, Michael S.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Mills, Aaron L.

    2003-01-01

    Community-level physiological profiling based upon fluorometric detection of oxygen consumption was performed on hydroponic rhizosphere and salt marsh litter samples by using substrate levels as low as 50 ppm with incubation times between 5 and 24 h. The rate and extent of response were increased in samples acclimated to specific substrates and were reduced by limiting nitrogen availability in the wells.

  4. Community-level physiological profiling performed with an oxygen-sensitive fluorophore in a microtiter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Jay L.; Roberts, Michael S.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Mills, Aaron L.

    2003-01-01

    Community-level physiological profiling based upon fluorometric detection of oxygen consumption was performed on hydroponic rhizosphere and salt marsh litter samples by using substrate levels as low as 50 ppm with incubation times between 5 and 24 h. The rate and extent of response were increased in samples acclimated to specific substrates and were reduced by limiting nitrogen availability in the wells.

  5. Community-level physiological profiling performed with an oxygen-sensitive fluorophore in a microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Garland, Jay L; Roberts, Michael S; Levine, Lanfang H; Mills, Aaron L

    2003-05-01

    Community-level physiological profiling based upon fluorometric detection of oxygen consumption was performed on hydroponic rhizosphere and salt marsh litter samples by using substrate levels as low as 50 ppm with incubation times between 5 and 24 h. The rate and extent of response were increased in samples acclimated to specific substrates and were reduced by limiting nitrogen availability in the wells.

  6. Renal medullary and urinary oxygen tension during cardiopulmonary bypass in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sgouralis, Ioannis; Evans, Roger G; Layton, Anita T

    2017-09-01

    Renal hypoxia could result from a mismatch in renal oxygen supply and demand, particularly in the renal medulla. Medullary hypoxic damage is believed to give rise to acute kidney injury, which is a prevalent complication of cardiac surgery performed on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). To determine the mechanisms that could lead to medullary hypoxia during CPB in the rat kidney, we developed a mathematical model which incorporates (i) autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate, (ii) detailed oxygen transport and utilization in the renal medulla and (iii) oxygen transport along the ureter. Within the outer medulla, the lowest interstitial tissue P$_{\\rm O2}$, which is an indicator of renal hypoxia, is predicted near the thick ascending limbs. Interstitial tissue P$_{\\rm O2}$ exhibits a general decrease along the inner medullary axis, but urine P$_{\\rm O2}$ increases significantly along the ureter. Thus, bladder urinary P$_{\\rm O2}$ is predicted to be substantially higher than medullary P$_{\\rm O2}$. The model is used to identify the phase of cardiac surgery performed on CPB that is associated with the highest risk for hypoxic kidney injury. Simulation results indicate that the outer medulla's vulnerability to hypoxic injury depends, in part, on the extent to which medullary blood flow is autoregulated. With imperfect medullary blood flow autoregulation, the model predicts that the rewarming phase of CPB, in which medullary blood flow is low but medullary oxygen consumption remains high, is the phase in which the kidney is most likely to suffer hypoxic injury. © The authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  7. Contemporary evidence on the physiological role of reactive oxygen species in human sperm function.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, Stefan S; Agarwal, Ashok; Halabi, Jacques; Tvrda, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in male fertility. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with a variety of male fertility complications, including leukocytospermia, varicocele and idiopathic infertility. The subsequent oxidative insult to spermatozoa can manifest as insufficient energy metabolism, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, leading to loss of motility and viability. However, various studies have demonstrated that physiological amounts of ROS play important roles in the processes of spermatozoa maturation, capacitation, hyperactivation and acrosome reaction. It is therefore crucial to define and understand the delicate oxidative balance in male reproductive cells and tissues for a better understanding of both positive as well as negative impact of ROS production on the fertilizing ability. This review will discuss the specific physiological roles, mechanisms of action and effects that ROS have on the acquisition of structural integrity and physiological activity of spermatozoa.

  8. Easy to use and reliable technique for online dissolved oxygen tension measurement in shake flasks using infrared fluorescent oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Flitsch, David; Ladner, Tobias; Lukacs, Mihaly; Büchs, Jochen

    2016-02-24

    Despite the progressive miniaturization of bioreactors for screening purposes, shake flasks are still widespread in biotechnological laboratories and industry as cultivation vessels. Shake flasks are often applied as the first or second step in applications such as strain screening or media optimization. Thus, there are ongoing efforts to develop online measurement techniques for shake flasks, to gain as much information as possible about the cultured microbial system. Since dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) is a key experimental parameter, its accurate determination during the course of experiment is critical. Some of the available DOT measurement techniques can lead to erroneous measurements or are very difficult to handle. A reliable and easy to use DOT measurement system, based on suspended oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles, is presented in this work. In a cultivation of Kluyveromyces lactis, a new DOT measurement technique via suspended oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles was compared with the conventional DOT measurement via fixed sensor spots. These experiments revealed the main disadvantage of applying sensor spots. With further cultivations of Escherichia coli and Hansenula polymorpha, the new measurement technique was successfully validated. In combination with a RAMOS device, kLa values were determined during the presented cultivations. The determined kLa values are in good agreement with a correlation recently found in the literature. The presented DOT measurement technique via suspended oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles in shake flasks turned out to be easy to use, robust and reliable under all applied combinations of shaking frequencies and filling volumes. Its applicability as an online monitoring system for cultivations was shown by means of four examples. Additionally, in combination with a RAMOS device, the possibility of experimental kLa determination was successfully demonstrated.

  9. Effect of oocyte maturation time, sperm selection method and oxygen tension on in vitro embryo development in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jaime; Paulo Santayana, R; José Mendoza, M; Leandra Landeo, J; Huamán, Elizabeth; Ticllacuri, Flamel; Fidel Mujica, L; Silva, Mauricio; Ratto, Marcelo H

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of in vitro maturation time, sperm selection and oxygen tension on alpaca embryo development. In Experiment I, Cumulus Oocyte- Complexes (COCs) were obtained from abattoir ovaries and in vitro matured in TCM-199 for 24 (n = 217), 28 (215), or 32 h (223) at 38.5 °C, high humidity and 5% CO2 in air. Oocytes from 24 (n = 392), 28 (n = 456) or 32 (n = 368) h groups were in vitro fertilized with epididymal sperm and cultured in SOFaa at 38.5 °C, high humidity and 5% CO2, 5% O2 and 90% N2 for 7 days. Embryo development was evaluated on Day 2, 5 and Day 7 of in vitro culture (Day 0 = in vitro fertilization). In Experiment II, a 2 by 2-factorial design was used to determine the effect of sperm selection (Swim-up vs Percoll) and oxygen tension (20% vs 5%) during embryo culture and their interaction on embryo development. COCs were in vitro matured for 32 h at 38.5 °C and 5% CO2 in air and then in vitro inseminated with epididymal sperm processed by swim-up or Percoll. Zygotes were cultured in SOFaa + cumulus cells at 38.5 °C under 20 or 5% of O2 tension and high humidity for 7 days. A total of 235, 235, 253 and 240 oocytes were assigned to: swim-up+20 O2, swim-up+5 O2 or Percoll+20 O2, Percoll+5 O2, groups respectively. The proportion of oocytes reaching MII stage was highest after 32 h of in vitro maturation (P < 0.05). Blastocyst rate (29.1 ± 2.7%) was also highest for COCs matured for 32 h (Exp I). In Experiment II, Blastocysts rate (26.03 ± 4.7; 27.7 ± 4.3; 29.7 ± 3.8 and 27.6 ± 4.2% for swim-up+20 O2, swim-up+5 O2 or Percoll+20 O2, Percoll+5 O2, respectively) was not affected by sperm selection method (P = 0.8), oxygen tension (P = 0.9) or their interaction (P = 0.5). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  11. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Dennis, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current tissue engineering methods are insufficient for total joint resurfacing, and chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation when expanded on tissue culture plastic. De-differentiated chondrocytes show poor re-differentiation in culture, giving reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen matrix accumulation. To address this, porcine synoviocyte-derived extracellular matrix and low (5%) oxygen tension were assessed for their ability to enhance human articular chondrocyte expansion and maintain re-differentiation potential. Methods Porcine synoviocyte matrices were devitalized using 3 non-detergent methods. These devitalized synoviocyte matrices were compared against tissue culture plastic for their ability to support human chondrocyte expansion. Expansion was further compared at both low (5%), and atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension on all surfaces. Expanded cells then underwent chondrogenic re-differentiation in aggregate culture at both low and atmospheric oxygen tension. Aggregates were assessed for their GAG and collagen content both biochemically and histologically. Results Human chondrocytes expanded twice as fast on devitalized synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic, and cells retained their re-differentiation capacity for twice the number of population doublings. There was no significant difference in growth rate between low and atmospheric oxygen tension. There was significantly less collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan and more MMP13 expression in cells expanded on synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic. There were also significant effects due to oxygen tension on gene expression, wherein there was greater collagen type I, collagen type II, SOX9 and less MMP13 expression on tissue culture plastic compared to synoviocyte matrix. There was a significant increase in GAG, but not collagen, accumulation in chondrocyte aggregates re-differentiated at low oxygen tension over that achieved in atmospheric oxygen conditions. Conclusions

  12. Cell physiology regulation by hypoxia inducible factor-1: Targeting oxygen-related nanomachineries of hypoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Eskandani, Morteza; Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Barar, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Any dysfunctionality in maintaining the oxygen homeostasis by mammalian cells may elicit hypoxia/anoxia, which results in inescapable oxidative stress and possible subsequent detrimental impacts on certain cells/tissues with high demands to oxygen molecules. The ischemic damage in turn can trigger initiation of a number of diseases including organs ischemia, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, different types of malignancies, and alteration in wound healing process. Thus, full comprehension of molecular mechanism(s) and cellular physiology of the oxygen homeostasis is the cornerstone of the mammalian cells metabolism, energetic pathways and health and disease conditions. An imbalance in oxygen content within the cellular microenvironment activates a cascade of molecular events that are often compensated, otherwise pathologic condition occurs through a complexed network of biomolecules. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays a key transcriptional role in the adaptation of cell physiology in relation with the oxygen content within a cell. In this current study, we provide a comprehensive review on the molecular mechanisms of oxygen sensing and homeostasis and the impacts of HIF-1 in hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Moreover, different molecular and biochemical responses of the cells to the surrounding environment are discussed in details. Finally, modern technological approaches for targeting the hypoxia related proteins are articulated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Development of sensors for monitoring oxygen and free radicals in plant physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Prachee

    Oxygen plays a critical role in the physiology of photosynthetic organisms, including bioenergetics, metabolism, development, and stress response. Oxygen levels affect photosynthesis, respiration, and alternative oxidase pathways. Likewise, the metabolic rate of spatially distinct plant cells (and therefore oxygen flux) is known to be affected by biotic stress (e.g., herbivory) and environmental stress (e.g., salt/nutrient stress). During aerobic metabolism, cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by product. Plants also produce ROS during adaptation to stress (e.g., abscisic acid (ABA) mediated stress responses). If stress conditions are prolonged, ROS levels surpass the capacity of detoxifying mechanisms within the cell, resulting in oxidative damage. While stress response pathways such as ABA-mediated mechanisms have been well characterized (e.g., water stress, inhibited shoot growth, synthesis of storage proteins in seeds), the connection between ROS production, oxygen metabolism and stress response remains unknown. In part, this is because details of oxygen transport at the interface of cell(s) and the surrounding microenvironment remains nebulous. The overall goal of this research was to develop oxygen and Free radical sensors for studying stress signaling in plants. Recent developments in nanomaterials and data acquisition systems were integrated to develop real-time, non-invasive oxygen and Free radical sensors. The availability of these sensors for plant physiologists is an exciting opportunity to probe the functional realm of cells and tissues in ways that were not previously possible.

  14. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of VEGF normalizes skeletal muscle oxygen tension and induces arteriogenesis in ischemic rat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Chang, David S; Su, Hua; Tang, Gale L; Brevetti, Lucy S; Sarkar, Rajabrata; Wang, Rong; Kan, Yuet W; Messina, Louis M

    2003-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia is an important clinical problem that often leads to disability and limb loss. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), delivered either as recombinant protein or as gene therapy, has been shown to promote both collateral artery formation (arteriogenesis) and capillary angiogenesis in animal models of hindlimb ischemia. However, none of the previous studies has demonstrated an improvement in tissue hypoxia, the condition that drives the molecular response to ischemia. Furthermore, the optimal vector and route of gene delivery have not been determined. Recently, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, which efficiently transduce skeletal muscle and produce sustained transgene expression, have been used as gene therapy vectors. We asked whether an intra-arterial injection of AAV-VEGF(165) normalizes muscle oxygen tension by increasing skeletal muscle oxygen tension, and promotes arteriogenesis and angiogenesis in a rat model of severe hindlimb ischemia. We found that AAV-VEGF treatment normalized muscle oxygen tension in the ischemic limb. In contrast, vehicle and AAV-lacZ-treated limbs remained ischemic. Collateral arteries were more numerous in AAV-VEGF-treated rats, but, surprisingly, capillaries were not. We conclude that intra-arterial AAV-mediated gene transfer of AAV-VEGF(165) normalizes muscle oxygen tension and leads to arteriogenesis in rats with severe hindlimb ischemia.

  15. Oxygen tension-independent protection against hypoxic cell killing in rat liver by low sodium.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Di Pasqua, Laura G; Berardo, Clarissa; Siciliano, Veronica; Richelmi, Plinio; Vairetti, Mariapia

    2017-05-30

    The role of Na+ in hypoxic injury was evaluated by a time-course analysis of damage in isolated livers perfused with N2-saturated buffer containing standard (143 mM) or low (25 mM) Na+ levels. Trypan blue uptake was used to detect non-viable cells. Under hypoxia with standard-Na+, trypan blue uptake began at the border between pericentral areas and periportal regions and increased in the latter zone; using a low-Na+ buffer, no trypan blue zonation occurred but a homogenous distribution of dye was found associated with sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) staining. A decrease in hyaluronic acid (HA) uptake, index of SEC damage, was observed using a low-Na+ buffer. A time dependent injury was confirmed by an increase in LDH and TBARS levels with standard-Na+ buffer. Using low-Na+ buffer, SEC susceptibility appears elevated under hypoxia and hepatocytes was protected, in an oxygen independent manner.

  16. [Dynamic oxygen tension in the brain of rats under acute hypobaric hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Kisliakov, Iu Ia; Popova, N I

    1990-10-01

    In unanesthetized rats at the "altitudes" of 4000 m (1st group) and 8000 m (2nd group), within 1.5 hrs the 1st group developed a 17-30% drop in the PO2 in 43% of cases, no changes occurred in 14% of cases, and in 43% the PO2 increased by 145-205%. In the 2nd group, the PO2 was decreased by 44-87%, on the average. The PO2 changes in the brain cortex under hypoxic conditions seems to have a phasic character as expressed by alternation of increased and decreased levels of the PO2 depending on the degree of hypoxia and induced, apparently, by systemic and local responses compensating for the lack of oxygen in the air.

  17. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn Physiology: coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio

    PubMed Central

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H.; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2015-01-01

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data. PMID:25913242

  18. Oxygen sensing and hypoxia signalling pathways in animals: the implications of physiology for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Studies of regulation of the haematopoietic growth factor erythropoietin led to the unexpected discovery of a widespread system of direct oxygen sensing that regulates gene expression in animals. The oxygen-sensitive signal is generated by a series of non-haem Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that catalyse the post-translational hydroxylation of specific residues in the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). These hydroxylations promote both oxygen-dependent degradation and oxygen-dependent inactivation of HIF, but are suppressed in hypoxia, leading to the accumulation of HIF and assembly of an active transcriptional complex in hypoxic cells. Hypoxia-inducible factor activates an extensive transcriptional cascade that interfaces with other cell signalling pathways, microRNA networks and RNA–protein translational control systems. The relationship of these cellular signalling pathways to the integrated physiology of oxygen homeostasis and the implication of dysregulating these massive physiological pathways in diseases such as cancer are discussed. PMID:23401619

  19. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn physiology: Coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio.

    PubMed

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-07-16

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data.

  20. Physiologic and pathologic levels of reactive oxygen species in neat semen of infertile men.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nisarg; Sharma, Rakesh; Makker, Kartikeya; Sabanegh, Edmund; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-11-01

    To define physiologic levels of reactive oxygen species in infertile men and establish a cutoff value of reactive oxygen species level in neat semen with a high sensitivity and specificity to differentiate infertile men from fertile donors (controls). Reactive oxygen species levels were measured in the neat semen samples (n = 51) from fertile donors and infertile patients (n = 54). Reproductive research laboratory at a tertiary care hospital. Infertile patients from male infertility clinic. Reactive oxygen species measurement in neat semen sample using luminol-based chemiluminescence method, receiver operating characteristic curves. Seminal reactive oxygen species levels, cutoff value, sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values. The best cutoff value to distinguish between healthy fertile donors and infertile men was 0.0185 x 10(6) counted photons per minute/20 x 10(6) sperm. At this threshold, the specificity was 82% and the sensitivity was 78%. This value can be defined as basal reactive oxygen species level in infertile men. Reactive oxygen species levels in neat semen samples as measured by luminol-based chemiluminescence are a highly specific and sensitive test in the diagnosis of infertility. This test also may help clinicians treat patients with seminal oxidative stress.

  1. Effect of oxygen tension on regulation of arteriolar diameter in skeletal muscle in situ.

    PubMed

    Pries, A R; Heide, J; Ley, K; Klotz, K F; Gaehtgens, P

    1995-05-01

    Skeletal muscle arterioles are known to constrict upon elevation of ambient PO2. While several studies have shown that the endothelium plays an important role in this response, it is not clear how this response is mediated. We examined the oxygen-induced constriction of arterioles in the rat spinotrapezius muscle. Elevation of superfusion solution PO2 from about 15 to 150 mm Hg caused arteriolar constriction by 25% (+/- 3%, n = 18). Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by superfusion of indomethacin (30 microM) produced vasoconstriction by 28% (+/- 9.5%, n = 5), but left the PO2 response unaffected. Blockade of the synthesis of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) by NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 35 mg/kg i.v.) caused arteriolar constriction by 31% (+/- 8%, n = 8). During application of L-NNA, the constrictor response to PO2 elevation was reduced to 3 +/- 2%. Administration of superoxide dismutase (SOD, 80,000 U/kg i.v.) did not affect the PO2 response. It is concluded that in small arterioles of skeletal muscle both EDRF and prostanoids sustain a significant basal dilatation. The dilatory effects of EDRF but not of prostaglandins are strongly dependent on PO2. The vasoconstriction in response to high ambient PO2 is not due to EDRF breakdown during its diffusion from endothelial to smooth muscle cells.

  2. Stereological re-examination of the effects of varying oxygen tensions on human placental villi maintained in organ culture for up to 12 h.

    PubMed

    Burton, G J; Mayhew, T M; Robertson, L A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of exposure to various oxygen tensions on villi in organ culture are re-examined. Villi from ten normal mature placentae were cultured under hypoxic (6 per cent oxygen) and hyperoxic (40 per cent oxygen) conditions for 6 or 12 h. Control tissue (zero time in culture) was also taken. Pieces of tissue were fixed by immersion and embedded in resin for semithin sectioning. Systematically sampled microscopical fields were analysed stereologically to estimate harmonic and arithmetic mean thicknesses for the trophoblast and for the villous membrane and to assess the volumetric composition and mean diameter of villi. Trophoblast thicknesses were influenced significantly by oxygen tension, being smaller in hypoxic and greater in hyperoxic media. No significant interaction terms or effects of time in culture were detected. Villous membrane thicknesses altered in a similar fashion to trophoblast thicknesses. No significant differences in the composition of villi were detected but villi tended to be greater in diameter during hyperoxia. Findings are discussed in the context of previously reported adaptations in vivo, in different regions of the placental lobule and during chronic maternal hypoxic stress at high altitude. We conclude that there is insufficient evidence to support the claim that villi can adapt in vitro to varying ambient oxygen tensions.

  3. Monitoring the conjunctiva for carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions and pH during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Irwin K; Isenberg, Sherwin J; McArthur, David L; Del Signore, Madeline; McDonald, John S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure, for the first time, multiple physiologic parameters of perfusion (pH, PCO2, PO2, and temperature) from the conjunctiva of adult patients during cardiopulmonary bypass while undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. Ten patients who underwent either intracardiac valve repair, atrial septal defect repair, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery had placement of a sensor which directly measured pH, PCO2, PO2, and temperature from the conjunctiva. Data were stratified into seven phases (0-5 minutes prior to bypass; 0-5, 6-10, and 11-15 minutes after initiation of bypass; 0-5 minutes prior to conclusion of bypass; and 0-5 and 6-10 minutes after bypass) and analyzed using a mixed model analysis.The change in conjunctival pH over the course of measurement was not statistically significant (p = .56). The PCO2 level followed a quadratic pattern, decreasing from a mean pre-bypass level of 37.7 mmHg at baseline prior to the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass to a nadir of 33.2 mmHg, then increasing to a high of 39.4 mmHg at 6-10 minutes post bypass (p < .01). The PO2 declined from a mean pre-bypass level of 79.5 mmHg to 31.3 mmHg by 6-10 minutes post bypass and even post-bypass, it never returned to baseline values (p < .01). Temperature followed a pattern similar to PCO2 by returning to baseline levels as the patient was re-warmed following bypass (p < .01). There was no evidence of any eye injury or inflammation following the removal of the sensor. In the subjects studied, the conjunctival sensor yielded reproducible measurements during the various phases of cardiopulmonary bypass without ocular injury. Further study is necessary to determine the role of conjunctival measurements in critical settings.

  4. Effects of air bubbles and tube transportation on blood oxygen tension in arterial blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Ying; Kao, Jau Tsuen; Chien, Tzu I; Lee, Tai Fen; Tsai, Keh Sung

    2003-04-01

    Pneumatic tube transport has been reported to aggravate the error in partial pressure of oxygen (PO(2)) measurements caused by air bubbles. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of manual and pneumatic tube methods of sample transportation and different amounts of air bubbles on arterial blood gas analysis. Blood gas samples from 15 patients and a pooled wasted blood mixture with 3 different levels of PO(2) were analyzed to determine the effects of air bubbles and manual versus pneumatic tube transportation on PO(2) levels. PO(2) increased significantly in samples containing 10% air bubbles and was exaggerated by pneumatic tube transport (from 115.63 +/- 9.31 mm Hg to 180.51 +/- 11.29 mm Hg, p < 0.001). In samples with low PO(2) ( approximately 30 mm Hg), the measurement was not aberrant regardless of the method of transportation or the amount of air bubbles contained in the specimen. However, in samples with medium and high PO(2) (> 70 mm Hg), aberrances in measurements were noted even with only 0.5% air bubbles and regardless of whether the sample was transported by manual methods or pressurized tube. The increments of PO(2) correlated positively with the amount of air introduced into the specimens. Thus, the measured PO(2) increased 8.13 and 31.77 mm Hg when 0.5% and 10% air bubbles were introduced, respectively, to samples with medium PO(2) (p < 0.05). The interaction between the amount of air bubbles and the method of transportation was significant (p < 0.001). Trapped air in the syringe should be expelled as thoroughly as possible, since the presence of only 1% air bubbles can result in aberrance in PO(2) measurement. Samples for blood gas analysis should be carried in ambient pressure to the laboratory because pneumatic tube delivery systems significantly aggravate the air bubble-related aberrance in PO(2) measurement.

  5. The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension in the anaesthetized cat

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    1 The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke, and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension (MPo2) were estimated amperometrically in 33 anaesthetized open-chest cats with a glass-insulated 25 μm platinum cathode within a 22-gauge needle implanted in the left ventricular wall. 2 MPo2 was 1.6-60 mmHg (mean 23.5 mmHg) when arterial Po2 was >80 mmHg. Sequential intravenous infusions of nicotine (2-3 μg/kg every 45 s) or intracheal puffs (3-5 ml) of tobacco smoke commonly produced transitory increases (25-35 mmHg) of arterial pressure and 4-6 mmHg increments of MPo2. Intratracheal puffs (5 ml) of 5% carbon monoxide sufficient to increase carboxyhaemoglobin from 0.8 to 1.5% to 4-7% had no effect on arterial Po2 or blood pressure but typically decreased MPo2 by approximately 1-4 mmHg. Augmentation of MPo2 often succeeded carbon monoxide administration. 3 Arterial hypoxia (arterial Po2 < 60 mmHg) reduced mean MPo2 to 14.4 mmHg but anoxic levels were not observed. Pressor responses to nicotine and tobacco smoke were accompanied by small increases (usually 1-3 mmHg) of MPo2. Puffs of 5% carbon monoxide had less effect than during normoxia. Locations of low MPo2 (<10 mmHg) were unaffected as carboxyhaemoglobin was raised to 7-11% during hypoxaemia. 4 It is concluded that nicotine and tobacco smoke cause augmentation of myocardial oxygen supply, even during moderate hypoxaemia. By contrast, smoking dosages of carbon monoxide have the potential of producing a small reduction of MPo2 during normoxia, but the effect is negligible during moderate hypoxaemia. PMID:656704

  6. Effects of intracellular pH, blood, and tissue oxygen tension on T1rho relaxation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kettunen, Mikko I; Gröhn, Olli H J; Silvennoinen, M Johanna; Penttonen, Markku; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2002-09-01

    The effects of intracellular pH (pH(i)), paramagnetic macroscopic, and microscopic susceptibility on T(1) in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) were studied in rat brain. Intracellular acidosis was induced by hypercapnia and pH(i), T(1rho), T(2), diffusion, and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were quantified. Taking into account the CBV contribution, a prolongation of parenchymal T(1rho) by 4.5% was ascribed to a change in tissue water relaxation caused by a one unit drop in pH(i). Blood T(1rho) was found to prolong linearly with blood oxygenation saturation (Y). The macroscopic susceptibility contribution to parenchymal T(1rho) was assessed both through BOLD and an iron oxide contrast agent, AMI-227. The T(1rho) data from these experiments could be described by intravascular effects with insignificant effects of susceptibility gradients on tissue water. Tissue oxygen tension (PtO(2)) was manipulated and monitored with microelectrodes to assess its plausible contribution to microscopic susceptibility and relaxation. Parenchymal T(1rho) was virtually unaffected by variations in the PtO(2), but T(1) was shortened in hyperoxia and T(2) showed a negative BOLD effect in hypoxia. It is demonstrated that pH(i) directly modulates tissue T(1rho), possibly through its effect on proton exchange; however, neither BOLD nor PtO(2) directly influence tissue T(1rho). The observations are discussed in the light of physicochemical mechanisms contributing to the ischemic T(1rho) changes. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Physiological levels of reactive oxygen species are required to maintain genomic stability in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao-Sheng; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-07-01

    Stem cell cytogenetic abnormalities constitute a roadblock to regenerative therapies. We investigated the possibility that reactive oxygen species (ROSs) influence genomic stability in cardiac and embryonic stem cells. Karyotypic abnormalities in primary human cardiac stem cells were suppressed by culture in physiological (5%) oxygen, but addition of antioxidants to the medium unexpectedly increased aneuploidy. Intracellular ROS levels were moderately decreased in physiological oxygen, but dramatically decreased by the addition of high-dose antioxidants. Quantification of DNA damage in cardiac stem cells and in human embryonic stem cells revealed a biphasic dose-dependence: antioxidants suppressed DNA damage at low concentrations, but potentiated such damage at higher concentrations. High-dose antioxidants decreased cellular levels of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and other DNA repair enzymes, providing a potential mechanistic basis for the observed effects. These results indicate that physiological levels of intracellular ROS are required to activate the DNA repair pathway for maintaining genomic stability in stem cells. The concept of an "oxidative optimum" for genomic stability has broad implications for stem cell biology and carcinogenesis.

  8. Comparison of bacterial inoculation and transcutaneous oxygen tension in the rabbit S1 perforator and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Aldo Benjamin; Gill, Paul Singh; Trahan, Chris G; Ruiz, Bernardo; Lund, Kerstin M; Delaune, Christie L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Metzinger, Stephen Eric

    2005-02-01

    Muscle and musculocutaneous flaps have been used reliably in reconstruction of soft-tissue defects for many years. Previous experimental studies have shown musculocutaneous flaps to be superior to the random pattern and fasciocutaneous flaps in the management of infected wounds. Over the past decade, perforator flaps have gained acceptance as alternative methods of reconstruction in the clinical setting that can decrease donor-site morbidity and hospital stay, and increase patient satisfaction. The authors theorized that perforator flaps may be able to handle infected wounds better than random pattern and fasciocutaneous flaps because their blood supply is essentially the same as many of their musculocutaneous counterparts. The goal of this study was to compare the S1 perforator-based skin flap and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap in the dorsal flank of the rabbit with the introduction of bacteria to simulate both superficial and deep wound infection. Measurements of oxygen tension and regional perfusion index were performed on both types of flaps to ascertain their viability and capacity to heal. The authors found no statistical significance between latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous and S1 perforator flaps in the rabbit with respect to superficial and deep wound infections. The regional perfusion index was calculated for postoperative days 1, 2, and 4. No statistically significant difference between the two flaps using the regional perfusion index could be identified. Additionally, regional perfusion for both types of flaps was greater than 0.6, indicating that their capacity to heal wounds is similar.

  9. Physiological adaptations of microorganisms to high oxygen in two oligotrophic lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Mikell, A.T. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen at four times normal saturation inhibited growth and metabolism of summer planktobacteria in surface waters of alpine oligotrophic Mountain Lake (Giles County, Virginia). Data included viable colony counts, D-(U-/sup 14/C)glucose incorporation into extractable lipid of colonies, and respiration-assimilation of D-(U-/sup 14/C)glucose by lake water samples. Significant differences were not detected in either colony counts or /sup 14/C-lipid when superoxide dismutase or catalase were added to the medium. The upper waters of Lake Hoare, Antarctica, contain dissolved oxygen at greater than or equal to42 mg liter/sup -1/ (=HDO). HDO did inhibit D-(U-/sup 14/C)glucoses assimilation-respiration compared with normal atmospheric dissolved oxygen (=ADO) in Lake Hoare water. D-(U-/sup 14/C)glucose was assimilated and respired optimally at 12/sup 0/C in Lake Hoare. Colony formation was inhibited in both lakes. Five microbial isolated were selected from Lake Hoare by growth under very high oxygen. Isolates were examined for physiological characteristics which might enhance their survival in the HDO environment. Bacterial isolates were motile Gram negative rods, catalase and oxidase positive, differing in their growth response to temperature and nutrient concentration. Four of five bacterial isolates demonstrated HDO inducible superoxide dismutase (SOD). Microorganisms in the high oxygen Lake Hoare waters may be protected from oxygen toxicity by the lake's oligotrophic nature as well as a combination of cellular defenses.

  10. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. I - Physiological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Suri, K.; Mctigue, M.; Smith, J.; Cooper, W.; Miquel, J.; Ashley, W. W.; Behnke, A. R., Jr.; Saunders, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were carried out on pocket mice to ascertain their tolerance to elevated oxygen pressures alone and to a combination of hyperoxia and heat in excess of that expected during the flight of the mice on Apollo XVII. The mice withstood oxygen partial pressures up to 12 psi at normal room temperature (24 C, 75 F) over a period of 7 days. A few mice previously exposed to increased PO2 died in the course of exposure to an oxygen pressure of 10 psi or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) for 13 d in ambient heat of 32 C (90 F). Supplemental vitamin E and physiological saline loading given prior to exposure had no apparent protective effect. The overall conclusion was that the pocket mice which were to go on Apollo XVII could readily survive the ambient atmosphere to which they would be exposed.

  11. Bach1 differentially regulates distinct Nrf2-dependent genes in human venous and coronary artery endothelial cells adapted to physiological oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Sarah J; Keeley, Thomas P; Mastronicola, Daniela; Arno, Matthew; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Fleck, Roland; Siow, Richard C M; Mann, Giovanni E

    2016-03-01

    The effects of physiological oxygen tension on Nuclear Factor-E2-Related Factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated redox signaling remain poorly understood. We report the first study of Nrf2-regulated signaling in human primary endothelial cells (EC) adapted long-term to physiological O2 (5%). Adaptation of EC to 5% O2 had minimal effects on cell ultrastructure, viability, basal redox status or HIF1-α expression. Affymetrix array profiling and subsequent qPCR/protein validation revealed that induction of select Nrf2 target genes, HO-1 and NQO1, was significantly attenuated in cells adapted to 5% O2, despite nuclear accumulation and DNA binding of Nrf2. Diminished HO-1 induction under 5% O2 was stimulus independent and reversible upon re-adaptation to air or silencing of the Nrf2 repressor Bach1, notably elevated under 5% O2. Induction of GSH-related genes xCT and GCLM were oxygen and Bach1-insensitive during long-term culture under 5% O2, providing the first evidence that genes related to GSH synthesis mediate protection afforded by Nrf2-Keap1 defense pathway in cells adapted to physiological O2 levels encountered in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Physiological Studies of Oxygen Protection Mechanisms in the Heterocysts of Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Murry, M A; Horne, A J; Benemann, J R

    1984-03-01

    The mechanism of O(2) protection of nitrogenase in the heterocysts of Anabaena cylindrica was studied in vivo. Resistance to O(2) inhibition of nitrogenase activity correlated with the O(2) tension of the medium in which heterocyst formation was induced. O(2) resistance also correlated with the apparent K(m) for acetylene, indicating that O(2) tension may influence the development of a gas diffusion barrier in the heterocysts. The role of respiratory activity in protecting nitrogenase from O(2) that diffuses into the heterocyst was studied using inhibitors of carbon metabolism. Reductant limitation induced by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea increased the O(2) sensitivity of in vivo acetylene reduction. Azide, at concentrations (30 mM) sufficient to completely inhibit dark nitrogenase activity (a process dependent on oxidative phosphorylation for its ATP supply), severely inhibited short-term light-dependent acetylene reduction in the presence of O(2) but not in its absence. After 3 h of aerobic incubation in the presence of 20 mM azide, 75% of cross-reactive component I (Fe-Mo protein) in nitrogenase was lost; less than 35% was lost under microaerophilic conditions. Sodium malonate and monofluoroacetate, inhibitors of Krebs cycle activity, had only small inhibitory effects on nitrogenase activity in the light and on cross-reactive material. The results suggest that oxygen protection is dependent on both an O(2) diffusion barrier and active respiration by the heterocyst.

  13. Physiological closed-loop control in intelligent oxygen therapy: A review.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Morillo, Daniel; Olaby, Osama; Fernandez-Granero, Miguel Angel; Leon-Jimenez, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    Oxygen therapy has become a standard care for the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other hypoxemic chronic lung diseases. In current systems, manually continuous adjustment of O2 flow rate is a time-consuming task, often unsuccessful, that requires experienced staff. The primary aim of this systematic review is to collate and report on the principles, algorithms and accuracy of autonomous physiological close-loop controlled oxygen devices as well to present recommendations for future research and studies in this area. A literature search was performed on medical database MEDLINE, engineering database IEEE-Xplore and wide-raging scientific databases Scopus and Web of Science. A narrative synthesis of the results was carried out. A summary of the findings of this review suggests that when compared to the conventional manual practice, the closed-loop controllers maintain higher saturation levels, spend less time below the target saturation, and save oxygen resources. Nonetheless, despite of their potential, autonomous oxygen therapy devices are scarce in real clinical applications. Robustness of control algorithms, fail-safe mechanisms, limited reliability of sensors, usability issues and the need for standardized evaluating methods of assessing risks can be among the reasons for this lack of matureness and need to be addressed before the wide spreading of a new generation of automatic oxygen devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Emerging technologies for non-invasive quantification of physiological oxygen transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, P; Taguchi, M; Burrs, S L; Hauser, B A; Salim, W W A W; Claussen, J C; McLamore, E S

    2013-09-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in plant metabolism, stress response/signaling, and adaptation to environmental changes (Lambers and Colmer, Plant Soil 274:7-15, 2005; Pitzschke et al., Antioxid Redox Signal 8:1757-1764, 2006; Van Breusegem et al., Plant Sci 161:405-414, 2001). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of various metabolic pathways in which oxygen is a key molecule, are produced during adaptation responses to environmental stress. While much is known about plant adaptation to stress (e.g., detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant production), the link between ROS metabolism, O2 transport, and stress response mechanisms is unknown. Thus, non-invasive technologies for measuring O2 are critical for understanding the link between physiological O2 transport and ROS signaling. New non-invasive technologies allow real-time measurement of O2 at the single cell and even organelle levels. This review briefly summarizes currently available (i.e., mainstream) technologies for measuring O2 and then introduces emerging technologies for measuring O2. Advanced techniques that provide the ability to non-invasively (i.e., non-destructively) measure O2 are highlighted. In the near future, these non-invasive sensors will facilitate novel experimentation that will allow plant physiologists to ask new hypothesis-driven research questions aimed at improving our understanding of physiological O2 transport.

  15. Impact of physiological noise correction on detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast in the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Tess E.; Manavaki, Roido; Graves, Martin J.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological fluctuations are expected to be a dominant source of noise in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments to assess tumour oxygenation and angiogenesis. This work investigates the impact of various physiological noise regressors: retrospective image correction (RETROICOR), heart rate (HR) and respiratory volume per unit time (RVT), on signal variance and the detection of BOLD contrast in the breast in response to a modulated respiratory stimulus. BOLD MRI was performed at 3 T in ten volunteers at rest and during cycles of oxygen and carbogen gas breathing. RETROICOR was optimized using F-tests to determine which cardiac and respiratory phase terms accounted for a significant amount of signal variance. A nested regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of RETROICOR, HR and RVT on the model fit residuals, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, and BOLD activation parameters. The optimized RETROICOR model accounted for the largest amount of signal variance ( Δ R\\text{adj}2   =  3.3  ±  2.1%) and improved the detection of BOLD activation (P  =  0.002). Inclusion of HR and RVT regressors explained additional signal variance, but had a negative impact on activation parameter estimation (P  <  0.001). Fluctuations in HR and RVT appeared to be correlated with the stimulus and may contribute to apparent BOLD signal reactivity.

  16. Rapid quantification of oxygen tension in blood flow with a fluorine nanoparticle reporter and a novel blood flow-enhanced-saturation-recovery sequence.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingzhi; Chen, Junjie; Yang, Xiaoxia; Caruthers, Shelton D; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2013-07-01

    We present a novel blood flow-enhanced-saturation-recovery (BESR) sequence, which allows rapid in vivo T1 measurement of blood for both (1)H and (19)F nuclei. BESR sequence is achieved by combining homogeneous spin preparation and time-of-flight image acquisition and therefore preserves high time efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio for (19)F imaging of circulating perfluorocarbon nanoparticles comprising a perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether core and a lipid monolayer (nominal size = 250 nm). The consistency and accuracy of the BESR sequence for measuring T1 of blood was validated experimentally. With a confirmed linear response feature of (19)F R1 with oxygen tension in both salt solution and blood sample, we demonstrated the feasibility of the BESR sequence to quantitatively determine the oxygen tension within mouse left and right ventricles under both normoxia and hyperoxia conditions. Thus, (19)F BESR MRI of circulating perfluorocarbon nanoparticles represents a new approach to noninvasively evaluate intravascular oxygen tension. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rapid quantification of oxygen tension in blood flow with a fluorine nanoparticle reporter and a novel Blood flow-Enhanced-Saturation-Recovery (BESR) sequence

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lingzhi; Chen, Junjie; Yang, Xiaoxia; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel Blood flow-Enhanced-Saturation-Recovery (BESR) sequence, which allows rapid in vivo T1 measurement of blood for both 1H and 19F nuclei. BESR sequence is achieved by combining homogeneous spin preparation and time-of-flight image acquisition and therefore preserves high time efficiency and SNR for 19F imaging of circulating Perfluorocarbon (PFC) Nanoparticles (NPs) comprising a perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether core and a lipid monolayer (nominal size = 250 nm). The consistency and accuracy of the BESR sequence for measuring T1 of blood was validated experimentally. With a confirmed linear response feature of 19F R1 with oxygen tension in both salt solution and blood sample, we demonstrated the feasibility of the BESR sequence to quantitatively determine the oxygen tension within mouse left and right ventricles under both normoxia and hyperoxia conditions. Thus, 19F BESR MRI of circulating PFC NPs represents a new approach to non-invasively evaluate intravascular oxygen tension. PMID:22915328

  18. Prediction of inspired oxygen fraction for targeted arterial oxygen tension following open heart surgery in non-smoking and smoking patients.

    PubMed

    Bou-Khalil, Pierre; Zeineldine, Salah; Chatburn, Robert; Ayyoub, Chakib; Elkhatib, Farouk; Bou-Akl, Imad; El-Khatib, Mohamad

    2016-10-24

    Simple and accurate expressions describing the PaO2-FiO2 relationship in mechanically ventilated patients are lacking. The current study aims to validate a novel mathematical expression for accurate prediction of the fraction of inspired oxygen that will result in a targeted arterial oxygen tension in non-smoking and smoking patients receiving mechanical ventilation following open heart surgeries. One hundred PaO2-FiO2 data pairs were obtained from 25 non-smoking patients mechanically ventilated following open heart surgeries. One data pair was collected at each of FiO2 of 40, 60, 80, and 100% while maintaining same mechanical ventilation support settings. Similarly, another 100 hundred PaO2-FiO2 data pairs were obtained from 25 smoking patients mechanically ventilated following open heart surgeries. The utility of the new mathematical expression in accurately describing the PaO2-FiO2 relationship in these patients was assessed by the regression and Bland-Altman analyses. Significant correlations were seen between the true and estimated FiO2 values in non-smoking (r(2) = 0.9424; p < 0.05) and smoking (r(2) = 0.9466; p < 0.05) patients. Tight biases between the true and estimated FiO2 values for non-smoking (3.1%) and smoking (4.1%) patients were observed. Also, significant correlations were seen between the true and estimated PaO2/FiO2 ratios in non-smoking (r(2) = 0.9530; p < 0.05) and smoking (r(2) = 0.9675; p < 0.05) patients. Tight biases between the true and estimated PaO2/FiO2 ratios for non-smoking (-18 mmHg) and smoking (-16 mmHg) patients were also observed. The new mathematical expression for the description of the PaO2-FiO2 relationship is valid and accurate in non-smoking and smoking patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation for post cardiac surgery.

  19. Physiological (antioxidant) responses of estuarine fishes to variability in dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ross, S W; Dalton, D A; Kramer, S; Christensen, B L

    2001-11-01

    Cycles of dissolved oxygen (DO) in estuaries can range from anoxia to various levels of supersaturation (200-300%) over short time periods. Aerobic metabolism causes formation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), a process exacerbated by high or low DO. Fish can generate physiological defenses (e.g. antioxidant enzymes) against ROS, however, there are little data tying this to environmental conditions. We investigated physiological defenses generated by estuarine fishes in response to high DO and various DO cycles. We hypothesized that chemical defenses and/or oxidative damage are related to patterns of DO supersaturation. Specific activities of antioxidants in fish tissues should be positively correlated with increasing levels of DO, if high DO levels are physiologically stressful. We caged common benthic fishes (longjaw mudsucker, Gillichthys mirabilis, and staghorn sculpin, Leptocottus armatus, in CA and spot, Leiostomus xanthurus and pinfish, Lagodon rhomboides, in NC) during summer 1998 in two estuarine sites in southern North Carolina and two in central California. At each site a water quality meter measured bottom DO, salinity, temperature, depth, pH and turbidity at 30 min intervals throughout the study. These sites exhibited a wide variety of dissolved oxygen patterns. After 2 weeks in the cages, fish gills and livers were analyzed for antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase) and the metabolite glutathione. All fish exhibited antioxidant enzyme activity. There was a significant site-dependent effect on all enzyme activities at the NC sites, with the most activity at the site with the highest DO cycling and the most DO supersaturation. There was a trend towards higher enzyme activities under high DO levels at the CA sites.

  20. [Development of physiological monitors based on the Zigbee technology for hyperbaric oxygen chambers].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin-Nuan; Wu, Bao-Ming; Lin, Jin-Zhao; Wang, Qiang

    2008-05-01

    This paper introduces a monitor that can monitor five physiological parameters (ECG, blood pressure, spo2, respiration and temperature) based on Wireless Sensor Networks. The monitor will be applied to hyperbaric oxygen chambers. After acquisition, the signal will be displayed on the LCD screen of the monitor terminal in the cabin. At the same time, the Zigbee RF module will send the signal to the extravehicular guardianship PC terminals. This monitor equipment can realize synchronous real-time monitoring both inside and outside. What's more? A host can also display monitoring data the three monitor terminals collected. Preliminary clinical tests show that the monitors are safe and the monitoring results are satisfactory.

  1. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Sheard, Michael A.; Ghent, Matthew V.; Cabral, Daniel J.; Lee, Joanne C.; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q.; Kang, Min H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  2. Effects of Glucose, pH, and Dissolved-Oxygen Tension on Bacillus cereus Growth and Permeability Factor Production in Batch Culture

    PubMed Central

    Spira, W. M.; Silverman, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The production of a Bacillus cereus enterotoxin, measured as rabbit skin permeability factor (PF), in response to differences in glucose availability, pH, and dissolved oxygen tension was studied in a 1-liter batch fermentor system. Glucose had to be present for toxigenesis to occur. In uncontrolled fermentation an increasing inhibition of PF production and growth occurred as pH dropped occurred below 6.5. Optimum pH for toxigenesis was 7.0 to 7.5, and fermentations maintained at this level yielded 10- to 20-fold more PF than comparable uncontrolled fermentations. PF production was appreciably diminished at or below pH 6.0 and at or above pH 8.5. Peak PF titer was associated with a drop in acid output, and the titrant utilization profile could be used as an indication of this point. Productivity was greatest in the early exponential phase of growth and decreased to zero at the transition phase. Differences in dissolved oxygen tension affected both the maximum productivity early in the fermentation and the rate of its decrease as growth progressed. The optimum dissolved oxygen tension for toxigenesis was 0.002 atm, and the most rapid growth occurred at 0.10 atm. Productivity and growth were reduced under anerobic conditions, whereas a hyperoxic environment severely reduced productivity, but not growth. Postexponential-phase loss of toxic activity coincided with a rapid increase in cellular oxygen demand. Neither was inhibited by the presence of glucose. However, PF loss was completely prevented by stringent oxygen limitation. Extracellular proteolytic activity did not appear to be responsible for the loss of toxic activity. PMID:32838

  3. Assessing the effects of a short-term green tea intervention in skin microvascular function and oxygen tension in older and younger adults.

    PubMed

    Wasilewski, Rebecca; Ubara, Emmanuel O; Klonizakis, Markos

    2016-09-01

    Green tea consumption has been associated with a reduction in cardiovascular disease risk factors. However, there is little evidence examining its potential differing effect between younger and older populations, whilst little is known on its effect on the circulatory system when oxygen demand is higher. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of green tea consumption on microvascular functioning in both an older and younger population. Fifteen young [24 (4.0)] and fifteen older [61 (4.0)] participants, consumed two cups of green tea daily for 14days. We used Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to assess cutaneous microvascular function and Transcutaneous Oxygen monitoring (TcPO2) to assess skin oxygen tension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were also assessed on both visits. We observed significant improvements in axon-mediated microvascular vasodilation for the younger group [1.6 (0.59) vs 2.05 (0.72), p<0.05] and the older group [1.25 (0.58) vs 1.65 (0.5) p<0.05]. Improvements in skin oxygen tension were also noted for both groups in both noted TcPO2 measures (i.e. 1.25 (0.58) vs 1.65 (0.5) (p<0.05), for ΔTcPO2max for the older group, between visits) respectively. Improvements were also observed for systolic blood pressure in both the younger [120 (10) vs 112 (10), p<0.05] and older group [129 (12) v 124 (11), p<0.001]. In conclusion, we observed statistically-significant improvements in microvascular function and skin oxygen tension. Our results suggest that green tea may prove beneficial as a dietary element in lifestyle interventions aiming to lower cardiovascular disease risk, in both older and younger populations.

  4. Comparative In Vivo Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers (HBOC) with Varying Prooxidant and Physiological Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Ioana; Sevastre, Bogdan; Hathazi, Denisa; Scurtu, Florina; Damian, Grigore; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    A series of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier candidates (HBOC), previously noted for their differences in prooxidative and physiological reactivity, were compared in terms of the negative effects displayed upon injection in Wistar rats. At the concentrations tested, antioxidant strategies based on albumin as well as based on rubrerythrin appear to offer observable physiological advantages. PMID:27097326

  5. Comparative In Vivo Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers (HBOC) with Varying Prooxidant and Physiological Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Toma, Vlad Al; Farcaș, Anca D; Roman, Ioana; Sevastre, Bogdan; Hathazi, Denisa; Scurtu, Florina; Damian, Grigore; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    A series of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier candidates (HBOC), previously noted for their differences in prooxidative and physiological reactivity, were compared in terms of the negative effects displayed upon injection in Wistar rats. At the concentrations tested, antioxidant strategies based on albumin as well as based on rubrerythrin appear to offer observable physiological advantages.

  6. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells – Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W.; Rice, Gregory E.; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications. PMID:28350871

  7. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells - Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications.

  8. Brain natriuretic peptide predicts forced vital capacity of the lungs, oxygen pulse and peak oxygen consumption in physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Popovic, Bojana; Petrovic, Milan; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Kocijancic, Aleksandar; Banovic, Marko; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Markovic, Vidan; Damjanovic, Svetozar S

    2013-05-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) is used as marker of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. However, the predictive value of circulating NT-pro-BNP for cardiac and pulmonary performance is unclear in physiological conditions. Standard echocardiography, tissue Doppler and forced spirometry at rest were used to assess cardiac parameters and forced vital capacity (FVC) in two groups of athletes (16 elite male wrestlers (W), 21 water polo player (WP)), as different stress adaptation models, and 20 sedentary subjects (C) matched for age. Cardiopulmonary test on treadmill (CPET), as acute stress model, was used to measure peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2), maximal heart rate (HRmax) and peak oxygen pulse (peak VO2/HR). NT-pro-BNP was measured by immunoassey sandwich technique 10min before the test - at rest, at the beginning of the test, at maximal effort, at third minute of recovery. FVC was higher in athletes and the highest in W (WP 5.60±0.29 l; W 6.57±1.00 l; C 5.41±0.29 l; p<0.01). Peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR were higher in athletes and the highest in WP. HRmax was not different among groups. In all groups, NT-pro-BNP decreased from rest to the beginning phase, increased in maximal effort and stayed unchanged in recovery. NT-pro-BNP was higher in C than W in all phases; WP had similar values as W and C. On multiple regression analysis, in all three groups together, ΔNT-pro-BNP from rest to the beginning phase independently predicted both peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR (r=0.38, 0.35; B=37.40, 0.19; p=0.007, 0.000, respectively). NT-pro-BNP at rest predicted HRmax (r=-0.32, B=-0.22, p=0.02). Maximal NT-pro-BNP predicted FVC (r=-0.22, B=-0.07, p=0.02). These results show noticeable predictive value of NT-pro-BNP for both cardiac and pulmonary performance in physiological conditions suggesting that NT-pro-BNP could be a common regulatory factor coordinating adaptation of heart and lungs to stress condition.

  9. Low Oxygen Tension and Synthetic Nanogratings Improve the Uniformity and Stemness of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Veldhuis, Jan J; Duan, Yajun; Yang, Yong; Christoforou, Nicolas; Ma, Teng; Leong, Kam W

    2010-01-01

    A free-standing, robust cell sheet comprising aligned human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) offers many interesting opportunities for tissue reconstruction. As a first step toward this goal, a confluent, uniform hMSC layer with a high degree of alignment and stemness maintenance needs to be created. Hypothesizing that topographical cue and a physiologically relevant low-oxygen condition could promote the formation of such an hMSC layer, we studied the culture of hMSCs on synthetic nanogratings (350 nm width and 700 nm pitch) and either under 2 or 20% O2. Culturing hMSCs on the nanogratings highly aligned the cells, but it tended to create patchy layers and accentuate the hMSC differentiation. The 2% O2 improved the alignment and uniformity of hMSCs, and reduced their differentiation. Over a 14-day culture period, hMSCs in 2% O2 showed uniform connexon distribution, secreted abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, and displayed a high progenicity. After 21-day culture on nanogratings, hMSCs exposed to 2% O2 maintained a higher viability and differentiation capacity. This study established that a 2% O2 culture condition could restrict the differentiation of hMSCs cultured on nanopatterns, thereby setting the foundation to fabricate a uniformly aligned hMSC sheet for different regenerative medicine applications. PMID:20179678

  10. Calculating alveolar capillary conductance and pulmonary capillary blood volume: comparing the multiple- and single-inspired oxygen tension methods

    PubMed Central

    Ceridon, Maile L.; Beck, Kenneth C.; Olson, Thomas P.; Bilezikian, Jordan A.

    2010-01-01

    Key elements for determining alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) from the lung diffusing capacity (Dl) for carbon monoxide (DlCO) or for nitric oxide (DlNO) are the reaction rate of carbon monoxide with hemoglobin (θCO) and the DmCO/DlNO relationship (α-ratio). Although a range of values have been reported, currently there is no consensus regarding these parameters. The study purpose was to define optimal parameters (θCO, α-ratio) that would experimentally substantiate calculations of Dm and Vc from the single-inspired O2 tension [inspired fraction of O2 (FiO2)] method relative to the multiple-FiO2 method. Eight healthy men were studied at rest and during moderate exercise (80-W cycle). Dm and Vc were determined by the multiple-FiO2 and single-FiO2 methods (rebreathe technique) and were tabulated by applying previously reported θCO equations (both methods) and by varying the α-ratio (single-FiO2 method) from 1.90 to 2.50. Values were then compared between methods throughout the examined α-ratios. Dm and Vc were critically dependent on the applied θCO equation. For the multiple-FiO2 method, Dm was highly variable between θCO equations (rest and exercise); the range of Vc was less widespread. For the single-FiO2 method, the θCO equation by Reeves and Park (1992) combined with an α-ratio between 2.08 and 2.26 gave values for Dm and Vc that most closely matched those from the multiple-FiO2 method and were also physiologically plausible compared with predicted values. We conclude that the parameters used to calculate Dm and Vc values from the single-FiO2 method (using DlCO and DlNO) can significantly influence results and should be evaluated within individual laboratories to obtain optimal values. PMID:20538842

  11. Parenteral diclofenac infusion significantly decreases brain-tissue oxygen tension in patients with poor-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diclofenac, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, is commonly used as antipyretic therapy in intensive care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of parenteral diclofenac infusion on brain homeostasis, including brain-tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) and brain metabolism after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study with retrospective analysis of 21 consecutive aSAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), intracranial pressure (ICP), body temperature, and PbtO2 were analyzed after parenteral diclofenac infusion administered over a 34-minute period (20 to 45 IQR). Data are given as mean ± standard error of mean and median with interquartile range (IQR), as appropriate. Time-series data were analyzed by using a general linear model extended by generalized estimation equations (GEEs). Results One-hundred twenty-three interventions were analyzed. Body temperature decreased from 38.3°C ± 0.05°C by 0.8°C ± 0.06°C (P < 0.001). A 10% decrease in MAP and CPP (P < 0.001) necessitated an increase of vasopressors in 26% (n = 32), colloids in 33% (n = 41), and crystalloids in 5% (n = 7) of interventions. PbtO2 decreased by 13% from a baseline value of 28.1 ± 2.2 mm Hg, resulting in brain-tissue hypoxia (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg) in 38% (n = 8) of patients and 35% (n = 43) of interventions. PbtO2 <30 mm Hg before intervention was associated with brain-tissue hypoxia after parenteral diclofenac infusion (likelihood ratio, 40; AUC, 93%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 87% to 99%; P < 0.001). Cerebral metabolism showed no significant changes after parenteral diclofenac infusion. Conclusions Parenteral diclofenac infusion after aSAH effectively reduces body temperature, but may lead to CPP decrease and brain-tissue hypoxia, which were both associated with poor outcome after aSAH. PMID:23663770

  12. Smooth muscle physiology and effect of bladder and urethra muscle length/tension on response to stimulation. Part I. Review.

    PubMed

    Bissada, N K; Finkbeiner, A E

    1980-09-01

    With particular reference to the lower urinary tract, a review of basic anatomy and physiology of smooth muscle is presented. The relationship as altered by electrica and pharmacologic stimulation is discussed.

  13. Case Studies in Physiology: Maximal oxygen consumption and performance in a centenarian cyclist.

    PubMed

    Billat, Véronique; Dhonneur, Gilles; Mille-Hamard, Laurence; Le Moyec, Laurence; Momken, Iman; Launay, Thierry; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Besse, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the physiological characteristics of an elite centenarian cyclist who, at 101 yr old, established the 1-h cycling record for individuals ≥100 yr old (24.25 km) and to determine the physiological factors associated with his performance improvement 2 yr later at 103 yr old (26.92 km; +11%). Before each record, he performed an incremental test on a cycling ergometer. For 2 yr, he trained 5,000 km/yr with a polarized training that involved cycling 80% of mileage at "light" rate of perceived exertion (RPE) ≤12 and 20% at "hard" RPE ≥15 at a cadence between 50 and 70 rpm. His body weight and lean body mass did not change, while his maximal oxygen consumption (V̇o2max) increased (31-35 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); +13%). Peak power output increased from 90 to 125 W (+39%), mainly because of increasing the maximal pedaling frequency (69-90 rpm; +30%). Maximal heart rate did not change (134-137 beats/min) in contrast to the maximal ventilation (57-70 l/min, +23%), increasing with both the respiratory frequency (38-41 cycles/min; +8%) and the tidal volume (1.5-1.7 liters; +13%). Respiratory exchange ratio increased (1.03-1.14) to the same extent as tolerance to V̇co2 In conclusion, it is possible to increase performance and V̇o2max with polarized training focusing on a high pedaling cadence even after turning 100 yr old.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study shows, for the first time, that maximal oxygen consumption (+13%) and performance (+11%) can still be increased between 101 and 103 yr old with 2 yr of training and that a centenarian is able, at 103 yr old, to cover 26.9 km/h in 1 h. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Respiratory physiology of high-altitude anurans: 55 years of research on altitude and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Navas, Carlos A; Chauí-Berlinck, José Guilherme

    2007-09-30

    In a 1951 paper, perhaps the first one addressing adjustments of respiratory physiology in high-elevation anurans, L.C. Stuart tested the hypothesis that hemoglobin values were higher in the high-elevation Bufo bocourti than in the low-elevation species Bufo marinus. We use Stuart's paper as a starting point for a historical review of the field that encompasses the past 55 years. We start with the early search for evidence of physiological adjustments that took place in the 1960s, move to the studies with Telmatobius that dominated the 1970s and the 1980s, continue with the contributions of experimental physiology that characterized the 1990s, and finish with the discovery of mechanisms enhancing hemoglobin oxygen affinity in high-elevation anurans (2000s). When analyzing the last mentioned topic, we highlight the contributions by the late Professor Carlos Monge, to whom we dedicate this paper. Finally, we discuss the current state of the field, and propose directions for further studies.

  15. The influence of nitrate on the physiology of the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis grown under oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    de Barros Pita, Will; Tiukova, Ievgeniia; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; Passoth, Volkmar; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2013-03-01

    A previous study showed that the use of nitrate by Dekkera bruxellensis might be an advantageous trait when ammonium is limited in sugarcane substrate for ethanol fermentation. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of nitrate on the yeast physiology during cell growth in different carbon sources under oxygen limitation. If nitrate was the sole source of nitrogen, D. bruxellensis cells presented slower growth, diminished sugar consumption and growth-associated ethanol production, when compared to ammonium. These results were corroborated by the increased expression of genes involved in the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and ATP synthesis. The presence of ammonium in the mixed medium restored most parameters to the standard conditions. This work may open up a line of investigation to establish the connection between nitrate assimilation and energetic metabolism in D. bruxellensis and their influence on its fermentative capacity in oxygen-limited or oxygen-depleted conditions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Monitoring preantral follicle survival and growth in bovine ovarian biopsies by repeated use of neutral red and cultured in vitro under low and high oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Jorssen, Ellen P A; Langbeen, An; Fransen, Erik; Martinez, Emilia L; Leroy, Jo L M R; Bols, Peter E J

    2014-08-01

    The development and optimization of preantral follicle culture methods are crucial in fertility preservation strategies. As preantral follicle dynamics are usually assessed by various invasive techniques, the need for alternative noninvasive evaluation tools exists. Recently, neutral red (NR) was put forward to visualize preantral follicles in situ within ovarian cortical fragments. However, intense light exposure of NR-stained tissues can lead to cell death because of increased reactive oxygen species production, which is also associated with elevated oxygen tension. Therefore, we hypothesize that after repeated NR staining, follicle viability and dynamics can be altered by changes in oxygen tension. In the present study, we aim (1) to determine whether NR can be used to repeatedly assess follicular growth, activation, and viability and (2) to assess the effect of a low (5% O2) or high (20% O2) oxygen tension on the viability, growth, and stage transition of preantral follicles cultured in vitro by means of repeated NR staining. Cortical slices (n = 132; six replicates) from bovine ovaries were incubated for 3 hours at 37 °C in a Leibovitz medium with 50 μg/mL NR. NR-stained follicles were evaluated in situ for follicle diameter and morphology. Next, cortical fragments were individually cultured in McCoy's 5A medium for 6 days at 37 °C, 5% CO2, and 5% or 20% O2. On Days 4 and 6, the fragments were restained by adding NR to the McCoy's medium and follicles were reassessed. In both low and high oxygen tension treatment groups, approximately 70% of the initial follicles survived a 6-day in vitro culture, but no significant difference in follicle survival on Day 4 or 6 could be observed compared with Day 0 (P > 0.05). A significant decrease in the number of primordial and increase in primary and secondary follicles was observed within 4 days of culture (P < 0.001). In addition, a significant increase of the mean follicle diameter in NR-stained follicles was

  17. Box-modeling of bone and tooth phosphate oxygen isotope compositions as a function of environmental and physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Langlois, C; Simon, L; Lécuyer, Ch

    2003-12-01

    A time-dependent box model is developed to calculate oxygen isotope compositions of bone phosphate as a function of environmental and physiological parameters. Input and output oxygen fluxes related to body water and bone reservoirs are scaled to the body mass. The oxygen fluxes are evaluated by stoichiometric scaling to the calcium accretion and resorption rates, assuming a pure hydroxylapatite composition for the bone and tooth mineral. The model shows how the diet composition, body mass, ambient relative humidity and temperature may control the oxygen isotope composition of bone phosphate. The model also computes how bones and teeth record short-term variations in relative humidity, air temperature and delta18O of drinking water, depending on body mass. The documented diversity of oxygen isotope fractionation equations for vertebrates is accounted for by our model when for each specimen the physiological and diet parameters are adjusted in the living range of environmental conditions.

  18. The Effects of Postoperative Activity on Subcuranious Tissue Oxygen Tension and Blood Flow in Orthopedic Surgical Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    killing common surgical infection organisms as Staphylococcus aureus, E coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris , and...healing of wounded tissue is the maintenance of adequate tissue oxygenation. Abundant molecular oxygen must be present for cellular processes of oxidative

  19. The effects of graded changes in oxygen and carbon dioxide tension on coronary blood velocity independent of myocardial energy demand.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Lindsey M; Stembridge, Mike; Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Foster, Glen E

    2016-08-01

    In humans, coronary blood flow is tightly regulated by microvessels within the myocardium to match myocardial energy demand. However, evidence regarding inherent sensitivity of the microvessels to changes in arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen is conflicting because of the accompanied changes in myocardial energy requirements. This study aimed to investigate the changes in coronary blood velocity while manipulating partial pressures of end-tidal CO2 (Petco2) and O2 (Peto2). It was hypothesized that an increase in Petco2 (hypercapnia) or decrease in Peto2 (hypoxia) would result in a significant increase in mean blood velocity in the left anterior descending artery (LADVmean) due to an increase in both blood gases and energy demand associated with the concomitant cardiovascular response. Cardiac energy demand was assessed through noninvasive measurement of the total left ventricular mechanical energy. Healthy subjects (n = 13) underwent a euoxic CO2 test (Petco2 = -8, -4, 0, +4, and +8 mmHg from baseline) and an isocapnic hypoxia test (Peto2 = 64, 52, and 45 mmHg). LADVmean was assessed using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Hypercapnia evoked a 34.6 ± 8.5% (mean ± SE; P < 0.01) increase in mean LADVmean, whereas hypoxia increased LADVmean by 51.4 ± 8.8% (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regressions revealed that both mechanical energy and changes in arterial blood gases are important contributors to the observed changes in LADVmean (P < 0.01). In summary, regulation of the coronary vasculature in humans is mediated by metabolic changes within the heart and an inherent sensitivity to arterial blood gases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Evolution of oxygen secretion in fishes and the emergence of a complex physiological system.

    PubMed

    Berenbrink, Michael; Koldkjaer, Pia; Kepp, Oliver; Cossins, Andrew R

    2005-03-18

    We have reconstructed the events that led to the evolution of a key physiological innovation underpinning the large adaptive radiation of fishes, namely their unique ability to secrete molecular oxygen (O2). We show that O2 secretion into the swimbladder evolved some 100 million years after another O2-secreting system in the eye. We unravel the likely sequence in which the functional components of both systems evolved. These components include ocular and swimbladder countercurrent exchangers, the Bohr and Root effects, the buffering power and surface histidine content of hemoglobins, and red blood cell Na+/H+ exchange activity. Our synthesis reveals the dynamics of gains and losses of these multiple traits over time, accounting for part of the huge diversity of form and function in living fishes.

  1. Biological and physiological role of reactive oxygen species--the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Zuo, L; Zhou, T; Pannell, B K; Ziegler, A C; Best, T M

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are chemically reactive molecules that are naturally produced within biological systems. Research has focused extensively on revealing the multi-faceted and complex roles that ROS play in living tissues. In regard to the good side of ROS, this article explores the effects of ROS on signalling, immune response and other physiological responses. To review the potentially bad side of ROS, we explain the consequences of high concentrations of molecules that lead to the disruption of redox homeostasis, which induces oxidative stress damaging intracellular components. The ugly effects of ROS can be observed in devastating cardiac, pulmonary, neurodegenerative and other disorders. Furthermore, this article covers the regulatory enzymes that mitigate the effects of ROS. Glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase are discussed in particular detail. The current understanding of ROS is incomplete, and it is imperative that future research be performed to understand the implications of ROS in various therapeutic interventions.

  2. Reduced oxygen tension improves embryo quality but not clinical pregnancy rates: a randomized clinical study into ovum donation cycles.

    PubMed

    de los Santos, Maria J; Gámiz, Pilar; Albert, Carmela; Galán, Arancha; Viloria, Thamara; Pérez, Sonia; Romero, Josep Ll; Remohï, José

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effect of low O2 tension during in vitro culture in terms of ongoing pregnancy rates in ovum donation cycles. Randomized trial. Private university-affiliated IVF center, university-based hospital. A total of 1,125 cycles of ovum donation. Embryo culture in an atmosphere of 5.5% CO2, 6% O2, and 88.5% N2 versus a dual-gas system of 5.5% CO2 in air. Ongoing clinical pregnancy rates per intention-to-treat (ITT) patients. The use of low O2 tension achieved a 41.3% ongoing pregnancy rate per ITT compared with a 40.8% rate obtained for 5% CO2 in air. The mean number of blastomeres and the percentage of top-quality embryos were significantly higher after lower O2 concentration during in vitro culture (7.1 ± 3.6 and 28.6% vs. 7.3 ± 8.4 and 32.1%, respectively). In the ovum donation cycles undergoing day-3 embryo transfers, the use of low O2 tension did not improve ongoing pregnancy rates per cycle and per transfer. However, it benefited embryo quality, demonstrating the potential negative impact of high O2 tension on the in vitro embryo development. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Biophysical and physiological origins of blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI signals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Ogawa, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    After its discovery in 1990, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to map brain activation in humans and animals. Since fMRI relies on signal changes induced by neural activity, its signal source can be complex and is also dependent on imaging parameters and techniques. In this review, we identify and describe the origins of BOLD fMRI signals, including the topics of (1) effects of spin density, volume fraction, inflow, perfusion, and susceptibility as potential contributors to BOLD fMRI, (2) intravascular and extravascular contributions to conventional gradient-echo and spin-echo BOLD fMRI, (3) spatial specificity of hemodynamic-based fMRI related to vascular architecture and intrinsic hemodynamic responses, (4) BOLD signal contributions from functional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and cerebral metabolic rate of O2 utilization (CMRO2), (5) dynamic responses of BOLD, CBF, CMRO2, and arterial and venous CBV, (6) potential sources of initial BOLD dips, poststimulus BOLD undershoots, and prolonged negative BOLD fMRI signals, (7) dependence of stimulus-evoked BOLD signals on baseline physiology, and (8) basis of resting-state BOLD fluctuations. These discussions are highly relevant to interpreting BOLD fMRI signals as physiological means. PMID:22395207

  4. Oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibria in Galapagos corals: isotopic thermometry and calcification physiology

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Biological carbonate skeletons are built largely from carbon dioxide, which reacts to form carbonate ion within thin extracellular solutions. The light isotopes of carbon and oxygen react faster than the heavy isotopes, depleting the resulting carbonate ions in /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurs sufficiently fast that the skeleton remains out of isotopic equilibrium with surrounding fluids. This explanation for isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates was partially simulated in vitro, producing results similar to those seen in non-photosynthetic corals. Photosynthetic corals have higher /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios due to the preferential removal of /sup 12/C (as organic carbon) from the reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon. The oxygen isotopic variations in corals can be used to reconstruct past sea surface temperatures to an accuracy of about 0.5/sup 0/C. The carbon isotopic content of photosynthetic corals provides an indication of cloudiness. Using isotopic data from Galapagos corals, it was possible to construct proxy histories of the El Nino phenomenon. The physiology of skeletogenesis appears to be surprisingly similar in calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and silica precipitating systems.

  5. Oxygen Tension and Riboflavin Gradients Cooperatively Regulate the Migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Revealed by a Hydrogel-Based Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beum Jun; Chu, Injun; Jusuf, Sebastian; Kuo, Tiffany; TerAvest, Michaela A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: (1) shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and (2) direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in BESs such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+), using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production. PMID:27703448

  6. Influence of oxygen tension, sulfhydryl compounds, and serum on the motility and virulence of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, S J; Miller, J N; Sykes, J A; Fitzgerald, T J

    1978-01-01

    The motility and virulence of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) were monitored during incubation in a modified tissue culture medium to study the effects of oxygen tension and medium composition on survival of the organism. A basal medium of Eagle minimal essential medium with 50% fresh, heat-inactivated normal rabbit serum was used inasmuch as better survival occurred with 50% normal rabbit serum than with lower concentrations. Addition of 0.5 to 2.0 mM dithiothreitol or 2.0 mM dithioerythritol to the basal medium led to significantly longer retention of T. pallidum viability in the presence of 3% oxygen than under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The results of this investigation lend support to the classification of T. pallidum as a microaerophilic organism and provide direction for the design of potentially successful culture systems, with or without tissue culture cells. PMID:365765

  7. Evaluation of different culture systems with low oxygen tension on the development, quality and oxidative stress-related genes of bovine embryos produced in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arias, Maria Elena; Sanchez, Raul; Felmer, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the development, quality and gene expression profile of oxidative stress-related genes of bovine embryos cultured in different culture systems with low oxygen tension (5% CO2, 5% O2 and 90% N2). The systems assessed included: (1) an incubator chamber; (2) a plastic bag; and (3) a foil bag. The choice of culture system had no effect on cleavage rate at 72 h. However, significant differences (P < 0.01) were observed in the rate of blastocysts registered at day 7 (29.8, 20.2 and 12.7% for incubator chamber, plastic bag and foil bag, respectively). Total number of cells did not differ between systems, although the proportion of ICM:total cells was affected particularly in the plastic bag (19.5%), compared with the incubator chamber (31.4%). In addition, significant differences were found in the apoptotic:total cell ratio (3.3, 6.5 and 8.8% for the incubator chamber, plastic bag and foil bag, respectively), with apoptotic nuclei localised mainly in the ICM compartment of the embryo. The amount of reactive oxygen species was also different between culture systems and this effect was correlated with a higher expression of SOD2, GSS and GPX1 genes in embryos cultured in the gassed bags as compared with embryos cultured in the incubator chamber. In conclusion, these results give evidence that, under low oxygen tension, the incubator chamber is more efficient and generates higher number of, and better quality, embryos than gassed bag systems evaluated here and this effect was probably due to an increased level of reactive oxygen species in the gassed bags, which upregulates the expression of some antioxidant enzymes to compensate for hyperoxia conditions.

  8. Exposure of decidualized HIESC to low oxygen tension and leucine deprivation results in increased IGFBP-1 phosphorylation and reduced IGF-I bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Shehab, Majida Abu; Biggar, Kyle; Singal, Sahil Sagar; Nygard, Karen; Shun-Cheng Li, Shawn; Jansson, Thomas; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2017-09-05

    Phosphorylation of decidual IGFBP-1 enhances binding of IGF-I, limiting the bioavailability of this growth factor which may contribute to reduced placental and fetal growth. The mechanisms regulating decidual IGFBP-1 phosphorylation are incompletely understood. Using decidualized human immortalized endometrial stromal cells we tested the hypothesis that low oxygen tension or reduced leucine availability, believed to be common in placental insufficiency, increase the phosphorylation of decidual IGFBP-1. Multiple reaction monitoring-MS (MRM-MS) was used to quantify IGFBP-1 phosphorylation. MRM-MS validated the novel phosphorylation of IGFBP-1 at Ser58, however this site was unaffected by low oxygen tension/leucine deprivation. In contrast, significantly elevated phosphorylation was detected for pSer119, pSer98/pSer101 and pSer169/pSer174 sites. Immunoblotting and dual-immunofluorescence using phosphosite-specific IGFBP-1 antibodies further demonstrated increased IGFBP-1 phosphorylation in HIESC under both treatments which concomitantly reduced IGF-I bioactivity. These data support the hypothesis that down regulation of IGF-I signaling links decidual IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation to restricted fetal growth in placental insufficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  10. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  11. Assessment of Renal Hemodynamics and Oxygenation by Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Quantitative Invasive Physiological Measurements.

    PubMed

    Cantow, Kathleen; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In vivo assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation under (patho)physiological conditions by means of noninvasive diagnostic imaging is conceptually appealing. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative parametric mapping of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times T 2* and T 2 are thought to provide surrogates of renal tissue oxygenation. The validity and efficacy of this technique for quantitative characterization of local tissue oxygenation and its changes under different functional conditions have not been systematically examined yet and remain to be established. For this purpose, the development of an integrative multimodality approaches is essential. Here we describe an integrated hybrid approach (MR-PHYSIOL) that combines established quantitative physiological measurements with T 2* (T 2) mapping and MR-based kidney size measurements. Standardized reversible (patho)physiologically relevant interventions, such as brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia, are used for detailing the relation between the MR-PHYSIOL parameters, in particular between renal T 2* and tissue oxygenation.

  12. Physiological response in the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to variable salinity and oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Lundgreen, Kim; Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian K; Madsen, Steffen S; Jensen, Frank B

    2008-09-01

    Physiological mechanisms involved in acclimation to variable salinity and oxygen levels and their interaction were studied in European flounder. The fish were acclimated for 2 weeks to freshwater (1 per thousand salinity), brackish water (11 per thousand) or full strength seawater (35 per thousand) under normoxic conditions (water Po(2) = 158 mmHg) and then subjected to 48 h of continued normoxia or hypoxia at a level (Po(2) = 54 mmHg) close to but above the critical Po(2). Plasma osmolality, [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] increased with increasing salinity, but the rises were limited, reflecting an effective extracellular osmoregulation. Muscle water content was the same at all three salinities, indicating complete cell volume regulation. Gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity did not change with salinity, but hypoxia caused a 25% decrease in branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at all three salinities. Furthermore, hypoxia induced a significant decrease in mRNA levels of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha1-subunit, signifying a reduced expression of the transporter gene. The reduced ATPase activity did not influence extracellular ionic concentrations. Blood [Hb] was stable with salinity, and it was not increased by hypoxia. Instead, hypoxia decreased the erythrocytic nucleoside triphosphate content, a common mechanism for increasing blood O(2) affinity. It is concluded that moderate hypoxia induced an energy saving decrease in branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, which did not compromise extracellular osmoregulation.

  13. Physiologic hypoxia and oxygen homeostasis in the healthy intestine. A Review in the Theme: Cellular Responses to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Leon; Kelly, Caleb J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the intestinal mucosa has proven to be an intriguing organ to study tissue oxygenation. The highly vascularized lamina propria juxtaposed to an anaerobic lumen containing trillions of metabolically active microbes results in one of the most austere tissue microenvironments in the body. Studies to date have determined that a healthy mucosa contains a steep oxygen gradient along the length of the intestine and from the lumen to the serosa. Advances in technology have allowed multiple independent measures and indicate that, in the healthy mucosa of the small and large intestine, the lumen-apposed epithelia experience Po2 conditions of <10 mmHg, so-called physiologic hypoxia. This unique physiology results from a combination of factors, including countercurrent exchange blood flow, fluctuating oxygen demands, epithelial metabolism, and oxygen diffusion into the lumen. Such conditions result in the activation of a number of hypoxia-related signaling processes, including stabilization of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor. Here, we review the principles of mucosal oxygen delivery, metabolism, and end-point functional responses that result from this unique oxygenation profile. PMID:26179603

  14. Quantifying the magnitude of the oxygen artefact inherent in culturing airway cells under atmospheric oxygen versus physiological levels.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinav; Dailey, Lea Ann; Swedrowska, Magda; Siow, Richard; Mann, Giovanni E; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Arno, Matthew; Mudway, Ian S; Forbes, Ben

    2016-01-01

    To date, in vitro studies assessing the pulmonary toxicity of inhaled particles have provided poor correlation with in vivo results. We explored whether this discrepancy reflected cellular adaptations in pulmonary cells cultured under atmospheric oxygen concentrations (21%) compared with in vivo alveolar concentrations (100 mm Hg, ~ 13%) and whether this blunted cellular responses to nanoparticle challenge. At 21% oxygen, A549 cells had augmented intracellular glutathione concentrations, with evidence of increased tolerance to CuO nanoparticles, with reduced reactive oxygen species production, blunted transcriptional responses and delayed cell death, compared to cells cultured at 13% oxygen. These data support the contention that standard cell culture conditions pre-adapt cells to oxidative insults and emphasize the necessity of ensuring normoxic conditions in model systems to improve their predictive value.

  15. Effect of Oxygen Tension, Mn(II) Concentration, and Temperature on the Microbially Catalyzed Mn(II) Oxidation Rate in a Marine Fjord †

    PubMed Central

    Tebo, Bradley M.; Emerson, Steven

    1985-01-01

    We present evidence that the oxidation of Mn(II) in a zone above the O2/H2S interface in the water column of Saanich Inlet, British Columbia, Canada, is microbially catalyzed. We measured the uptake of 54Mn(II) in water samples under in situ conditions of pH and temperature and in the presence and absence of oxygen. Experiments in the absence of oxygen provided a measure of the exchange of the tracer between the dissolved and solid pools of Mn(II); we interpret the difference between experiments in the presence and absence of oxygen to be a measure of Mn(II) oxidation. Using this method we examined the effect of oxygen tension, Mn(II) concentration, and temperature on the initial in situ Mn(II) oxidation rate (V0). Mn(II) oxidation was almost twice as fast under conditions of 67% air saturation (V0=5.5 nM h−1) as with the in situ concentration of 15 μM (5% air saturation; V0=3.1 nM h−1). Additions of ca. 18 μM Mn(II) completely inhibited all Mn(II) oxidation at three different depths in the oxidizing zone, and there was a temperature optimum for Mn(II) oxidation of around 20°C. These results are consistent with biologically mediated Mn(II) oxidation and indicate that the rate is limited by both oxygen and the concentration of microbial binding sites in this environment. PMID:16346931

  16. Artefactual effects of oxygen on cell culture models of cellular senescence and stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Olivier; Weemaels, Geoffroy; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Wlaschek, Meinhard

    2011-02-01

    In life sciences, modelling of the in vivo conditions using in vitro models is an important tool to generate knowledge. Although aerobic organisms including mammals depend on accurate oxygen tension, mimicking physiological conditions in cell culture experiments is not very common. Due to the need for simple technical and experimental design, the requirement for simulating the in vivo oxygen tension parameters has been neglected over long time. Fortunately, due to increasing knowledge in recent years the attention has shifted towards this scientific demand. In this short review, we summarize data substantiating the necessity to adequately mimic physiological oxygen tension using cell culture models in life science research. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Quasi-continuous parallel online scattered light, fluorescence and dissolved oxygen tension measurement combined with monitoring of the oxygen transfer rate in each well of a shaken microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Tobias; Held, Markus; Flitsch, David; Beckers, Mario; Büchs, Jochen

    2016-12-03

    Microtiter plates (MTP) are often applied as culture vessels in high-throughput screening programs. If online measuring techniques are available, MTPs can also be applied in the first steps of process development. For such small-scale bioreactors dipping probes are usually too large; therefore, optical measurements are often used. For example, the BioLector technology allows for the online monitoring of scattered light and fluorescence in each well of a continuously orbitally shaken MTP. Although this system provides valuable data, these measurements are mainly of a semi-quantitative nature. Therefore, signal calibration is required to obtain absolute values. With the µRAMOS technology it became possible for the first time to quantify the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) separately in each well of an MTP. In this work, a device is presented that combines both techniques, to provide a hitherto unparalleled high amount of information from each single well. Because both systems (BioLector and µRAMOS) are based on optical measurements, the measurements need to be synchronized to avoid interferences with the optical signals. The new experimental setup was applied for online monitoring in cultures of Escherichia coli and Hansenula polymorpha. It has been demonstrated that the well-to-well reproducibility is very high, and that the monitored signals provide reliable and valuable information about the process. With varying filling volumes, different maximum oxygen transfer capacities (OTRmax) were adjusted in oxygen-limited cultures. The different degrees of stress during the culture due to oxygen limitation affected microbial growth and also impacted reproducibility from culture to culture. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that this new device significantly simplifies the experimental efforts: instead of parallel cultures in a shake flask and MTP, just one single experiment in MTP needs to be conducted to measure the OTR, dissolved oxygen tension (DOT), scattered light and

  18. Direct measurement of myocardial oxygen tension and high energy phosphate content under varying ventilatory conditions in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Sebastian; Troitzsch, Dirk; Spath, Silvia; Portig, Irene; Moosdorf, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Effective myocardial oxygen supply should not be compromised during cardiac surgery as it is essential to avoid circulatory and cardiac dysfunction. Local measurement of myocardial oxygen partial pressure (pO2) was therefore introduced into the operative monitoring of myocardial ischemia. The aim of the present study was to assess whether myocardial oxygen partial pressure correlates with the content of high energy phosphates (HEPs). Seven male rabbits were examined in parallel with measurement of myocardial pO2 by an implanted Clark electrode and 31phosphorus-NMR spectroscopy. The ventilatory management established hyperoxygenation followed by systemic hypoxia with hypercapnia for 20 min. Additionally, analysis of end-expiratory gas composition in combination with blood gas analysis was performed simultaneously, and hemodynamic parameter was recorded. Under hypoxic conditions the cardiovascular system was severely compromised, whereas the myocardial pO2 was only moderately impaired (pO2M 45.0+/-16.0 mm Hg). Immediately before cardiac arrest, low values of arterial and venous pO2 were found (17.6+/-6.0 and 12.9+/-6.1 mm Hg). In contrast to near normal myocardial pO2, HEP content in the myocardium was considerably reduced and inorganic phosphorus was increased. Artificial ventilation leading to systemic hypoxia and eventually circulatory arrest resulted in almost normal myocardial pO2 but severely compromised HEP content. This somewhat unexpected finding requires further clarification, but is in accordance with findings reported previously where regulatory mechanisms have been shown to play a role in the pathophysiology of severe hypoxic conditions such as those for cellular oxygen delivery and demand, P/O coupling and finally control of HEP production facilitating the interaction between respiratory chain and myoglobin oxygen transport.

  19. Effect of low oxygen tension atmosphere and maturation media supplementation on nuclear maturation, cortical granules migration and sperm penetration in swine in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Marques, M G; de Barros, F R O; Goissis, M D; Cavalcanti, P V; Viana, C H C; Assumpção, M E O D; Visintin, J A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of low oxygen tension (5% CO(2) , 5% O(2) and 90% N(2) ) on in vitro oocyte maturation using defined media (0.1% polyvinyl alcohol - PVA) or 10% porcine follicular fluid (PFF)-supplemented media. To achieve this goal, oocytes were evaluated regarding cortical granules (GCs) migration, nuclear maturation and sperm penetration. Oocytes were in vitro matured under different conditions: 5% or 20% O(2) atmosphere and 0.1% PVA- or 10% PFF-supplemented media and evaluated at 0 and 44 h of maturation. To evaluate the migration of CGs and nuclear maturation, by confocal microscopy, oocytes were incubated with 100 μg of FITC-PNA/ml and 10 μg/ml of propidium iodide. To address sperm penetration, after maturation, in vitro fertilization for 6 h and in vitro culture for 18 h, zygotes were incubated with 10 mg/ml Hoechst 33342. Pronuclei and polar bodies were quantified using an epifluorescence microscope. Atmosphere conditions did not affect the CGs migration, but media supplementation did. Oocytes matured in 10% PFF media had a higher percentage of CGs in the oocyte periphery than oocytes matured in PVA-supplemented media. However, this fact did not have effect on in vitro sperm penetration levels. No effect of atmosphere conditions and media supplementation was observed on the rates of metaphase II oocytes. Therefore, the use of low oxygen tension in association with PVA maturation media does not improve the in vitro maturation system of porcine oocytes, because its use did not improve nuclear maturation, CGs migration and zygotes monospermic rates. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Oxygen flux as an indicator of physiological stress in aquatic organisms: a real-time biomonitoring system of water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Brian C.; Yale, Gowri; Chatni, Rameez; Ochoa-Acuña, Hugo G.; Porterfield, D. Marshall; Mclamore, Eric S.; Sepúlveda, María S.

    2009-05-01

    The detection of harmful chemicals and biological agents in real time is a critical need for protecting water quality. We studied the real-time effects of five environmental contaminants with differing modes of action (atrazine, pentachlorophenol, cadmium chloride, malathion, and potassium cyanide) on respiratory oxygen consumption in 2-day post-fertilization fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) eggs. Our objective was to assess the sensitivity of fathead minnow eggs using the self-referencing micro-optrode technique to detect instantaneous changes in oxygen consumption after brief exposures to low concentrations of contaminants. Oxygen consumption data indicated that the technique is indeed sensitive enough to reliably detect physiological alterations induced by all contaminants. After 2 h of exposure, we identified significant increases in oxygen consumption upon exposure to pentachlorophenol (100 and 1000 μg/L), cadmium chloride (0.0002 and 0.002 μg/L), and atrazine (150 μg/L). In contrast, we observed a significant decrease in oxygen flux after exposures to potassium cyanide (5.2, 22, and 44 μg/L) and atrazine (1500 μg/L). No effects were detected after exposures to malathion (200 and 340 μg/L). We have also tested the sensitivity of Daphnia magna embryos as another animal model for real-time environmental biomonitoring. Our results are so far encouraging and support further development of this technology as a physiologically coupled biomonitoring tool for the detection of environmental toxicants.

  1. NOTE: A haemodynamic model for the physiological interpretation of in vivo measurements of the concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Sergio

    2002-09-01

    We present a model that describes the effect of physiological parameters such as the speed of blood flow, local oxygen consumption, capillary recruitment, and vascular dilation/constriction on the concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin in tissue. This model can be used to guide the physiological interpretation of haemodynamic and oximetric data collected in vivo with techniques such as optical imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy and functional magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to providing a formal description of well-established results (exercise-induced hyperemia, reperfusion hyperoxia, decrease in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin induced by brain activity, measurement of arterial saturation by pulse oximetry, etc.), this model suggests that the superposition of asynchronous contributions from the arterial, capillary and venous haemoglobin compartments may be at the origin of observed out-of-phase oscillations of the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations in tissue.

  2. [A simple and controllable method for reproduction of a model of high oxygen tension induced acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoyue; Mou, Shengxu; Chen, Miao; Hui, Yue; Mei, Hong; Qin, Song; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    To explore a simpler, more economic and reproducible method to reproduce a model of high oxygen induced acute lung injury (HALI) in rats. An animal feeding box equipped with a controllable high oxygen was designed. 100 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into normal control group and HALI group by random number table method, with 50 rats in each group. Each group was randomly subdivided into five subgroups according to the duration of exposure to high oxygen, namely 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96-hour subgroups, with 10 rats in each subgroup. The rats in normal control group were kept in cages with ambient air, and the rats in HALI group were kept in an oxygen tank in which the oxygen concentration was higher than 90% volume ratio, with the temperature maintained at 25-27?centigrade, humidity of 50%-70%, and CO2 concentration < 0.5% for 23.5 hours every day. The arterial blood of rats was collected for analysis of blood gas at all time points, and the oxygenation index (OI) and respiratory index (RI) were calculated. Then the rats were sacrificed and the right lung was harvested, which was sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE). The changes in histopathology were observed with light microscopy, and pathological score was recorded. The left lung was harvested for the measurement of the wet/dry weight ratio (W/D). With the prolongation of high oxygen exposure time, the degree of lung injury in HALI group was gradually increased, and the degree of derangement of alveolar structure appeared in an increasing degree, with destruction of the alveolar wall, widening of alveolar space, and appearance of edema, and inflammatory cell infiltration. A small quantity of red blood cells exudation could be found in some rats. The pathologic changes were most obvious at 48-72 hours after exposure. With the prolongation of high oxygen exposure time (0, 24, 48, 72, 96 hours), the OI (mmHg, 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) in HALI group was gradually decreased (446.67±29.93, 306.19±37

  3. Effect of epidural tramadol and lignocaine on physiological and behavioural changes in goats subjected to castration with a high tension band.

    PubMed

    Ajadi, R A; Owanikin, A O; Martins, M M; Gazal, O S

    2012-11-01

    To compare the effect of a single epidural injection of either lignocaine or tramadol on behavioural changes, anaesthetic indices, leucocyte parameters, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and concentration of cortisol in plasma in goats subjected to castration by high tension band. Ten male goats weighing 14.4 (SD 0.7) kg were randomly allocated to anaesthesia with epidural injections of tramadol (3 mg/kg), or lignocaine (4 mg/kg). Following anaesthesia, a rubber ring was applied and tensioned to the scrotal neck of each goat. Behavioural changes were noted as they occurred, and the onset of drug action (time between epidural injection and loss of pedal reflex) and duration of antinociception (time interval between disappearance and reappearance of pedal withdrawal reflex) were determined. Hearts rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures were determined every 15 minutes for a 90-minute period, while blood was obtained for determination of white cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and concentrations of cortisol. Anaesthetic indices were compared using Student's t-test, while physiological parameters were compared using an ANOVA for repeated measurements. Goats treated with epidural tramadol were not recumbent and continued rumination while goats treated with epidural lignocaine were recumbent and did not continue rumination. The onset of analgesia was longer (p=0.01) in goats treated with epidural tramadol (5.0 minutes; SD 1.2) than goats treated with epidural lignocaine (3.0 minutes; SD 1.1), while duration of analgesia was shorter (p=0.003) in goats treated with epidural tramadol (47.2 minutes; SD 13.1) than goats treated with epidural lignocaine (89.8 minutes; SD 23.1). There was no significant difference in heart rates, respiratory rates and erythrocyte sedimentation rates, while the concentration of cortisol in plasma differed (p<0.05) between goats treated with epidural tramadol and lignocaine. Epidural lignocaine injection produced longer

  4. Ventilation Onset Prior to Umbilical Cord Clamping (Physiological-Based Cord Clamping) Improves Systemic and Cerebral Oxygenation in Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Polglase, Graeme R.; Dawson, Jennifer A.; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W.; Davis, Peter G.; te Pas, Arjan B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; McDougall, Annie; Wallace, Euan M.; Hooper, Stuart B.

    2015-01-01

    Background As measurement of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) is common in the delivery room, target SpO2 ranges allow clinicians to titrate oxygen therapy for preterm infants in order to achieve saturation levels similar to those seen in normal term infants in the first minutes of life. However, the influence of the onset of ventilation and the timing of cord clamping on systemic and cerebral oxygenation is not known. Aim We investigated whether the initiation of ventilation, prior to, or after umbilical cord clamping, altered systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs. Methods Systemic and cerebral blood-flows, pressures and peripheral SpO2 and regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2) were measured continuously in apnoeic preterm lambs (126±1 day gestation). Positive pressure ventilation was initiated either 1) prior to umbilical cord clamping, or 2) after umbilical cord clamping. Lambs were monitored intensively prior to intervention, and for 10 minutes following umbilical cord clamping. Results Clamping the umbilical cord prior to ventilation resulted in a rapid decrease in SpO2 and SctO2, and an increase in arterial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction. Ventilation restored oxygenation and haemodynamics by 5–6 minutes. No such disturbances in peripheral or cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics were observed when ventilation was initiated prior to cord clamping. Conclusion The establishment of ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping facilitated a smooth transition to systemic and cerebral oxygenation following birth. SpO2 nomograms may need to be re-evaluated to reflect physiological management of preterm infants in the delivery room. PMID:25689406

  5. Ventilation onset prior to umbilical cord clamping (physiological-based cord clamping) improves systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Polglase, Graeme R; Dawson, Jennifer A; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Davis, Peter G; Te Pas, Arjan B; Crossley, Kelly J; McDougall, Annie; Wallace, Euan M; Hooper, Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    As measurement of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) is common in the delivery room, target SpO2 ranges allow clinicians to titrate oxygen therapy for preterm infants in order to achieve saturation levels similar to those seen in normal term infants in the first minutes of life. However, the influence of the onset of ventilation and the timing of cord clamping on systemic and cerebral oxygenation is not known. We investigated whether the initiation of ventilation, prior to, or after umbilical cord clamping, altered systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs. Systemic and cerebral blood-flows, pressures and peripheral SpO2 and regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2) were measured continuously in apnoeic preterm lambs (126±1 day gestation). Positive pressure ventilation was initiated either 1) prior to umbilical cord clamping, or 2) after umbilical cord clamping. Lambs were monitored intensively prior to intervention, and for 10 minutes following umbilical cord clamping. Clamping the umbilical cord prior to ventilation resulted in a rapid decrease in SpO2 and SctO2, and an increase in arterial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction. Ventilation restored oxygenation and haemodynamics by 5-6 minutes. No such disturbances in peripheral or cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics were observed when ventilation was initiated prior to cord clamping. The establishment of ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping facilitated a smooth transition to systemic and cerebral oxygenation following birth. SpO2 nomograms may need to be re-evaluated to reflect physiological management of preterm infants in the delivery room.

  6. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of myelopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. Many references about spinal cord tissue ischemic damage can be found in the literature, but not detailed studies about spinal cord microvasculature damage related to congestion or blood permeability. This study investigates the effect of ischemia and congestion on the spinal cord using an in vivo model. The aorta was clamped as an ischemia model of the spinal cord and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the 6th costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and conduction velocity in the spinal cord were repeated over a period of 1 h after release of clamping. Finally, we examined the status of blood-spinal cord barrier under fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. Immediately after clamping of the inferior vena cava, the central venous pressure increased by about four times. Blood flow, oxygen tension and action potential were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; but this ischemic model did not show any changes of blood permeability in the spinal cord. The intramedullar edema was more easily produced by venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. In conclusions, venous congestion may be a preceding and essential factor of circulatory disturbance in the compressed spinal cord inducing myelopathy.

  7. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  8. The impact of physiological oxygen during culture, and vitrification for cryopreservation, on the outcome of extended culture in human IVF.

    PubMed

    Gardner, David K

    2016-02-01

    Extended culture has facilitated the move to single blastocyst transfer, resulting in significant increases in implantation and live birth rate, while concomitantly reducing fetal loss during pregnancy. However, concerns have been raised regarding subsequent neo-natal outcomes following extended culture. Analysis of the literature reveals differences in outcomes according to geographical region and between individual clinics. A common factor amongst reports of potentially adverse outcomes following blastocyst transfer appears to be that atmospheric (~20%) oxygen was typically employed for embryo culture. Clinics and countries utilizing physiological concentrations of oxygen (~5%) have not reported adverse perinatal outcomes with blastocyst transfer. Atmospheric oxygen imposes significant negative effects upon the embryo's molecular and cellular physiology, and further it increases the sensitivity of the preimplantation embryo to other stressors in the laboratory. With the recent adoption of vitrification for blastocyst cryopreservation, cumulative pregnancy rates per cycle with extended culture will increase significantly. Consequently, rather than perceiving extended culture as a potentially negative procedure, it is concluded that neo-natal data need to be interpreted in light of the conditions used to culture and cryopreserve blastocysts, and that furthermore a policy of embryo culture using 20% oxygen can no longer be justified.

  9. Physiologic effects of nasopharyngeal administration of supplemental oxygen at various flow rates in healthy neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Wong, David M; Alcott, Cody J; Wang, Chong; Hay-Kraus, Bonnie L; Buchanan, Benjamin R; Brockus, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of various flow rates of oxygen administered via 1 or 2 nasal cannulae on the fraction of inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2) and other arterial blood gas variables in healthy neonatal foals. 9 healthy neonatal (3- to 4-day-old) foals. In each foal, a nasal cannula was introduced into each naris and passed into the nasopharynx to the level of the medial canthus of each eye; oxygen was administered at 4 flow rates through either 1 or both cannulae (8 treatments/foal). Intratracheal FIO2, intratracheal end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and arterial blood gas variables were measured before (baseline) and during unilateral and bilateral nasopharyngeal delivery of 50, 100, 150, and 200 mL of oxygen/kg/min. No adverse reactions were associated with administration of supplemental oxygen except at the highest flow rate, at which the foals became agitated. At individual flow rates, significant and dose-dependent increases in FIO2, PaO2, and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (SaO2) were detected, compared with baseline values. Comparison of unilateral and bilateral delivery of oxygen at similar cumulative flow rates revealed no differences in evaluated variables. Results indicated that administration of supplemental oxygen via nasal cannulae appeared to be a highly effective means of increasing FIO2, PaO2, and SaO2 in neonatal foals. These findings may provide guidance for implementation of oxygen treatment in hypoxemic neonatal foals.

  10. Gene Expression and Physiological Changes of Different Populations of the Long-Lived Bivalve Arctica islandica under Low Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Eva E. R.; Wessels, Wiebke; Gruber, Heike; Strahl, Julia; Wagner, Anika E.; Ernst, Insa M. A.; Rimbach, Gerald; Kraemer, Lars; Schreiber, Stefan; Abele, Doris; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The bivalve Arctica islandica is extremely long lived (>400 years) and can tolerate long periods of hypoxia and anoxia. European populations differ in maximum life spans (MLSP) from 40 years in the Baltic to >400 years around Iceland. Characteristic behavior of A. islandica involves phases of metabolic rate depression (MRD) during which the animals burry into the sediment for several days. During these phases the shell water oxygen concentrations reaches hypoxic to anoxic levels, which possibly support the long life span of some populations. We investigated gene regulation in A. islandica from a long-lived (MLSP 150 years) German Bight population and the short-lived Baltic Sea population, experimentally exposed to different oxygen levels. A new A. islandica transcriptome enabled the identification of genes important during hypoxia/anoxia events and, more generally, gene mining for putative stress response and (anti-) aging genes. Expression changes of a) antioxidant defense: Catalase, Glutathione peroxidase, manganese and copper-zinc Superoxide dismutase; b) oxygen sensing and general stress response: Hypoxia inducible factor alpha, Prolyl hydroxylase and Heat-shock protein 70; and c) anaerobic capacity: Malate dehydrogenase and Octopine dehydrogenase, related transcripts were investigated. Exposed to low oxygen, German Bight individuals suppressed transcription of all investigated genes, whereas Baltic Sea bivalves enhanced gene transcription under anoxic incubation (0 kPa) and, further, decreased these transcription levels again during 6 h of re-oxygenation. Hypoxic and anoxic exposure and subsequent re-oxygenation in Baltic Sea animals did not lead to increased protein oxidation or induction of apoptosis, emphasizing considerable hypoxia/re-oxygenation tolerance in this species. The data suggest that the energy saving effect of MRD may not be an attribute of Baltic Sea A. islandica chronically exposed to high environmental variability (oxygenation, temperature

  11. Gene expression and physiological changes of different populations of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica under low oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Eva E R; Wessels, Wiebke; Gruber, Heike; Strahl, Julia; Wagner, Anika E; Ernst, Insa M A; Rimbach, Gerald; Kraemer, Lars; Schreiber, Stefan; Abele, Doris; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The bivalve Arctica islandica is extremely long lived (>400 years) and can tolerate long periods of hypoxia and anoxia. European populations differ in maximum life spans (MLSP) from 40 years in the Baltic to >400 years around Iceland. Characteristic behavior of A. islandica involves phases of metabolic rate depression (MRD) during which the animals burry into the sediment for several days. During these phases the shell water oxygen concentrations reaches hypoxic to anoxic levels, which possibly support the long life span of some populations. We investigated gene regulation in A. islandica from a long-lived (MLSP 150 years) German Bight population and the short-lived Baltic Sea population, experimentally exposed to different oxygen levels. A new A. islandica transcriptome enabled the identification of genes important during hypoxia/anoxia events and, more generally, gene mining for putative stress response and (anti-) aging genes. Expression changes of a) antioxidant defense: Catalase, Glutathione peroxidase, manganese and copper-zinc Superoxide dismutase; b) oxygen sensing and general stress response: Hypoxia inducible factor alpha, Prolyl hydroxylase and Heat-shock protein 70; and c) anaerobic capacity: Malate dehydrogenase and Octopine dehydrogenase, related transcripts were investigated. Exposed to low oxygen, German Bight individuals suppressed transcription of all investigated genes, whereas Baltic Sea bivalves enhanced gene transcription under anoxic incubation (0 kPa) and, further, decreased these transcription levels again during 6 h of re-oxygenation. Hypoxic and anoxic exposure and subsequent re-oxygenation in Baltic Sea animals did not lead to increased protein oxidation or induction of apoptosis, emphasizing considerable hypoxia/re-oxygenation tolerance in this species. The data suggest that the energy saving effect of MRD may not be an attribute of Baltic Sea A. islandica chronically exposed to high environmental variability (oxygenation, temperature

  12. Non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein using SWI: quantitative evaluation under conditions of physiological and caffeine load.

    PubMed

    Fujima, Noriyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Terae, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Kinya; Yazu, Rie; Zaitsu, Yuri; Tha, Khin Khin; Yoshida, Daisuke; Tsukahara, Akiko; Haacke, Mark E; Sasaki, Makoto; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has been used for quantitative and non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen saturation in the brain. In this study, we used SWI for quantitative measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein to look for physiological- or caffeine-induced changes in venous oxygenation. SWI measurements were obtained for 5 healthy volunteers using 1.5-T MR units, under 1) 3 kinds of physiological load (breath holding, Bh; hyperventilation, Hv; and inspiration of highly concentrated oxygen, Ox) and 2) caffeine load. Oxygen saturation in the anterior spinal vein (ASV) was calculated. We evaluated changes in oxygen saturation induced by physiological load. We also evaluated the time-course of oxygen saturation after caffeine intake. For the physiological load measurements, the average oxygen saturation for the 5 subjects was significantly lower in Hv (0.75) and significantly higher in Bh (0.84) when compared with control (0.80). There was no significant difference between Ox (0.81) and control. Oxygen saturation gradually decreased after caffeine intake. The average values of oxygen saturation were 0.79 (0 min), 0.76 (20 min), 0.74 (40 min), and 0.73 (60 min), respectively. We demonstrated a significant difference in oxygen saturation at 40 and 60 min after caffeine intake when compared with 0 min. In conclusion, we demonstrated the feasibility of using SWI for non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein. We showed changes in oxygen saturation under physiological as well as caffeine load and suggest that this method is a useful tool for the clinical evaluation of spinal cord oxygenation.

  13. Signal transduction pathway mediated by the novel regulator LoiA for low oxygen tension induced Salmonella Typhimurium invasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Feng, Lu; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Wenwen; Wang, Peisheng; Jiang, Xiaohan; Wang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a major intestinal pathogen of both humans and animals. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded virulence genes are required for S. Typhimurium invasion. While oxygen (O2) limitation is an important signal for SPI-1 induction under host conditions, how the signal is received and integrated to the central SPI-1 regulatory system in S. Typhimurium is not clear. Here, we report a signal transduction pathway that activates SPI-1 expression in response to low O2. A novel regulator encoded within SPI-14 (STM14_1008), named LoiA (low oxygen induced factor A), directly binds to the promoter and activates transcription of hilD, leading to the activation of hilA (the master activator of SPI-1). Deletion of loiA significantly decreased the transcription of hilA, hilD and other representative SPI-1 genes (sipB, spaO, invH, prgH and invF) under low O2 conditions. The response of LoiA to the low O2 signal is mediated by the ArcB/ArcA two-component system. Deletion of either arcA or arcB significantly decreased transcription of loiA under low O2 conditions. We also confirmed that SPI-14 contributes to S. Typhimurium virulence by affecting invasion, and that loiA is the virulence determinant of SPI-14. Mice infection assays showed that S. Typhimurium virulence was severely attenuated by deletion of either the entire SPI-14 region or the single loiA gene after oral infection, while the virulence was not affected by either deletion after intraperitoneal infection. The signal transduction pathway described represents an important mechanism for S. Typhimurium to sense and respond to low O2 conditions of the host intestinal tract for invasion. SPI-14-encoded loiA is an essential element of this pathway that integrates the low O2 signal into the SPI-1 regulatory system. Acquisition of SPI-14 is therefore crucial for the evolution of S. Typhimurium as an intestinal pathogen.

  14. Dynamic and selective HERV RNA expression in neuroblastoma cells subjected to variation in oxygen tension and demethylation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lijuan; Uzhameckis, Dmitrijs; Hedborg, Fredrik; Blomberg, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    We studied HERV expression in cell lines after hypoxia, mitogenic stimulation, and demethylation, to better understand if hypoxia may play a role in ERV activation also within the nervous system, as represented by neuroblastoma cell lines. The level of RNA of four human ERV groups (HERVs) (HERVE, I/T, H, and W), and three housekeeping genes, of different cell lines including A549, COS-1, Namalwa, RD-L and Vero-E6, as well as human neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y, SK-N-DZ, and SK-N-AS were studied using reverse transcription and real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR). During the course of recovery from hypoxia a pronounced and selective activation of RNA expression of HERVW-like sequences, but not of HERVE, I/T, H, and three housekeeping genes, was found in the neuroblastoma cell lines, most pronounced in SK-N-DZ. In the SK-N-DZ cell line, we also tested the expression of HERVs after chemical treatments. HERVW-like sequences were selectively upregulated by 5-azacytidine, a demethylating agent. Some HERVW loci seem especially responsive to hypoxia and demethylation. HERV expression in neuroblastoma cells is selectively and profoundly influenced by some physiological and chemical stimuli. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A potential early physiological marker for CNS oxygen toxicity: hyperoxic hyperpnea precedes seizure in unanesthetized rats breathing hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Raffaele; Landon, Carol S; Dean, Jay B

    2013-04-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)) stimulates presumptive central CO2-chemoreceptor neurons, increases minute ventilation (V(min)), decreases heart rate (HR) and, if breathed sufficiently long, produces central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT; i.e., seizures). The risk of seizures when breathing HBO(2) is variable between individuals and its onset is difficult to predict. We have tested the hypothesis that a predictable pattern of cardiorespiration precedes an impending seizure when breathing HBO2. To test this hypothesis, 27 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with radiotelemetry transmitters to assess diaphragmatic/abdominal electromyogram, electrocardiogram, and electroencephalogram. Seven days after surgery, each rat was placed in a sealed, continuously ventilated animal chamber inside a hyperbaric chamber. Both chambers were pressurized in parallel using poikilocapnic 100% O(2) (animal chamber) and air (hyperbaric chamber) to 4, 5, or 6 atmospheres absolute (ATA). Breathing 1 ATA O(2) initially decreased V(min) and HR (Phase 1 of the compound hyperoxic ventilatory response). With continued exposure to normobaric hyperoxia, however, V(min) began increasing toward the end of exposure in one-third of the animals tested. Breathing HBO2 induced an early transient increase in V(min) (Phase 2) and HR during the chamber pressurization, followed by a second significant increase of V(min) ≤8 min prior to seizure (Phase 3). HR, which subsequently decreased during sustained hyperoxia, showed no additional changes prior to seizure. We conclude that hyperoxic hyperpnea (Phase 3 of the compound hyperoxic ventilatory response) is a predictor of an impending seizure while breathing poikilocapnic HBO(2) at rest in unanesthetized rats.

  16. Physiological and hypoxic oxygen concentration differentially regulates human c-Kit+ cardiac stem cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Bellio, Michael A; Rodrigues, Claudia O; Landin, Ana Marie; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E; Kuznetsov, Jeffim; Florea, Victoria; Valasaki, Krystalenia; Khan, Aisha; Hare, Joshua M; Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) are being evaluated for their efficacy in the treatment of heart failure. However, numerous factors impair the exogenously delivered cells' regenerative capabilities. Hypoxia is one stress that contributes to inadequate tissue repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia impairs cell proliferation, survival, and migration of human CSCs relative to physiological and room air oxygen concentrations. Human endomyocardial biopsy-derived CSCs were isolated, selected for c-Kit expression, and expanded in vitro at room air (21% O2). To assess the effect on proliferation, survival, and migration, CSCs were transferred to physiological (5%) or hypoxic (0.5%) O2 concentrations. Physiological O2 levels increased proliferation (P < 0.05) but did not affect survival of CSCs. Although similar growth rates were observed in room air and hypoxia, a significant reduction of β-galactosidase activity (-4,203 fluorescent units, P < 0.05), p16 protein expression (0.58-fold, P < 0.001), and mitochondrial content (0.18-fold, P < 0.001) in hypoxia suggests that transition from high (21%) to low (0.5%) O2 reduces senescence and promotes quiescence. Furthermore, physiological O2 levels increased migration (P < 0.05) compared with room air and hypoxia, and treatment with mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media rescued CSC migration under hypoxia to levels comparable to physiological O2 migration (2-fold, P < 0.05 relative to CSC media control). Our finding that physiological O2 concentration is optimal for in vitro parameters of CSC biology suggests that standard room air may diminish cell regenerative potential. This study provides novel insights into the modulatory effects of O2 concentration on CSC biology and has important implications for refining stem cell therapies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Video-Based Physiologic Monitoring During an Acute Hypoxic Challenge: Heart Rate, Respiratory Rate, and Oxygen Saturation.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S; Jacquel, Dominique; Foo, David M H; Antunes, André; Borg, Ulf R

    2017-09-01

    The physiologic information contained in the video photoplethysmogram is well documented. However, extracting this information during challenging conditions requires new analysis techniques to capture and process the video image streams to extract clinically useful physiologic parameters. We hypothesized that heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation trending can be evaluated accurately from video information during acute hypoxia. Video footage was acquired from multiple desaturation episodes during a porcine model of acute hypoxia using a standard visible light camera. A novel in-house algorithm was used to extract photoplethysmographic cardiac pulse and respiratory information from the video image streams and process it to extract a continuously reported video-based heart rate (HRvid), respiratory rate (RRvid), and oxygen saturation (SvidO2). This information was then compared with HR and oxygen saturation references from commercial pulse oximetry and the known rate of respiration from the ventilator. Eighty-eight minutes of data were acquired during 16 hypoxic episodes in 8 animals. A linear mixed-effects regression showed excellent responses relative to a nonhypoxic reference signal with slopes of 0.976 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.973-0.979) for HRvid; 1.135 (95% CI, 1.101-1.168) for RRvid, and 0.913 (95% CI, 0.905-0.920) for video-based oxygen saturation. These results were obtained while maintaining continuous uninterrupted vital sign monitoring for the entire study period. Video-based monitoring of HR, RR, and oxygen saturation may be performed with reasonable accuracy during acute hypoxic conditions in an anesthetized porcine hypoxia model using standard visible light camera equipment. However, the study was conducted during relatively low motion. A better understanding of the effect of motion and the effect of ambient light on the video photoplethysmogram may help refine this monitoring technology for use in the clinical environment.

  18. Precambrian oxygen levels estimated from the biochemistry and physiology of early eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnegar, Bruce

    1991-12-01

    Recent work on the biochemistry of living organisms has shown that the organelles which eukaryotic cells use for photosynthesis and aerobic respiration are of bacterial origin, and that they were imported by eubacterial endosymbionts some time after the existence of the last common ancestor of all modern eukaryotes. However, all living eukaryotes need a certain amount of molecular oxygen for the biosynthesis of vital compounds such as the sterols that are used to stiffen cell membranes. It follows that some dissolved oxygen must have been available to the ancestral "anaerobic" eukaryotes before they acquired their organelles. A minimum age for the first occurrence of such organisms is given by the discovery of modified sterols (steranes) in organic-rich sedimentary rocks about 1.7 Ga old from the McArthur Basin of northern Australia. Fully organelled eukaryotes need even more oxygen if they are to use their mitochondria for aerobic respiration. Some of the oldest fossils that are likely to be the remains of photosynthetic eukaryotes are also from the McArthur Basin. If these sizeable, unicellular algae had functional mitochondria as well as chloroplasts, the oxygen concentration of surface waters some 1.6-1.8 Ga ago is unlikely to have been less than that required for aerobic respiration (> - 0.01 PAL). The oldest convincing megascopic eukaryote, Grypania spiralis, is found ˜1.4 Ga-old strata in China, India, and the U.S.A. Grypania was a corkscrew-shaped "alga" up to 2 mm in diameter and 0.6 m in length which seems to have lived attached to the sea floor. Unless Grypania used oxygen produced by its own chloroplasts, it should have needed between a hundredth and tenth of the present atmospheric level of oxygen (0.01-0.1 PAL O 2) to survive. A similar atmospheric oxygen concentration may have been more than enough to sustain the sheet-like animals of the Ediacara fauna. However, it is possible that their extraordinary geometry was an adaptation to low oxygen levels

  19. New data on the process of circulation and blood oxygenation in the lungs under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2013-02-01

    Blood flow through the human lungs weighing 600 g is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Blood capacity of human lung is about 500 ml. Therefore, 500 ml blood is oxygenated for 5 sec. Questions arise how such a large volume of blood passes through such a small mass of the lungs and what causes very rapid blood oxygenation. Since the structure of the lungs in mammals is almost the same, the work was carried out on rats (in rats 20-22 ml of blood per minute passes through the lungs weighing 1.5-2.0 g). Intensive blood circulation was proved to be linked with a large diameter pulmonary arterioles and high blood flow velocity in them. The oxygenation rate is explained by special structure of the alveoli and special blood flow conditions, which creates ideal conditions for oxygen diffusion.

  20. Analysis of Cap-binding Proteins in Human Cells Exposed to Physiological Oxygen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Timpano, Sara; Melanson, Gaelan; Evagelou, Sonia L; Guild, Brianna D; Specker, Erin J; Uniacke, James

    2016-12-28

    Translational control is a focal point of gene regulation, especially during periods of cellular stress. Cap-dependent translation via the eIF4F complex is by far the most common pathway to initiate protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, but stress-specific variations of this complex are now emerging. Purifying cap-binding proteins with an affinity resin composed of Agarose-linked m(7)GTP (a 5' mRNA cap analog) is a useful tool to identify factors involved in the regulation of translation initiation. Hypoxia (low oxygen) is a cellular stress encountered during fetal development and tumor progression, and is highly dependent on translation regulation. Furthermore, it was recently reported that human adult organs have a lower oxygen content (physioxia 1-9% oxygen) that is closer to hypoxia than the ambient air where cells are routinely cultured. With the ongoing characterization of a hypoxic eIF4F complex (eIF4F(H)), there is increasing interest in understanding oxygen-dependent translation initiation through the 5' mRNA cap. We have recently developed a human cell culture method to analyze cap-binding proteins that are regulated by oxygen availability. This protocol emphasizes that cell culture and lysis be performed in a hypoxia workstation to eliminate exposure to oxygen. Cells must be incubated for at least 24 hr for the liquid media to equilibrate with the atmosphere within the workstation. To avoid this limitation, pre-conditioned media (de-oxygenated) can be added to cells if shorter time points are required. Certain cap-binding proteins require interactions with a second base or can hydrolyze the m(7)GTP, therefore some cap interactors may be missed in the purification process. Agarose-linked to enzymatically resistant cap analogs may be substituted in this protocol. This method allows the user to identify novel oxygen-regulated translation factors involved in cap-dependent translation.

  1. Effects of In Vitro Low Oxygen Tension Preconditioning of Adipose Stromal Cells on Their In Vivo Chondrogenic Potential: Application in Cartilage Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Olivier; Lesoeur, Julie; Sourice, Sophie; Masson, Martial; Fellah, Borhane Hakim; Geffroy, Olivier; Lallemand, Elodie; Weiss, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multipotent stromal cell (MSC)-based regenerative strategy has shown promise for the repair of cartilage, an avascular tissue in which cells experience hypoxia. Hypoxia is known to promote the early chondrogenic differentiation of MSC. The aim of our study was therefore to determine whether low oxygen tension could be used to enhance the regenerative potential of MSC for cartilage repair. Methods MSC from rabbit or human adipose stromal cells (ASC) were preconditioned in vitro in control or chondrogenic (ITS and TGF-β) medium and in 21 or 5% O2. Chondrogenic commitment was monitored by measuring COL2A1 and ACAN expression (real-time PCR). Preconditioned rabbit and human ASC were then incorporated into an Si-HPMC hydrogel and injected (i) into rabbit articular cartilage defects for 18 weeks or (ii) subcutaneously into nude mice for five weeks. The newly formed tissue was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by cartilage-specific immunohistological staining and scoring. The phenotype of ASC cultured in a monolayer or within Si-HPMC in control or chondrogenic medium and in 21 or 5% O2 was finally evaluated using real-time PCR. Results/Conclusions 5% O2 increased the in vitro expression of chondrogenic markers in ASC cultured in induction medium. Cells implanted within Si-HPMC hydrogel and preconditioned in chondrogenic medium formed a cartilaginous tissue, regardless of the level of oxygen. In addition, the 3D in vitro culture of ASC within Si-HPMC hydrogel was found to reinforce the pro-chondrogenic effects of the induction medium and 5% O2. These data together indicate that although 5% O2 enhances the in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of ASC, it does not enhance their in vivo chondrogenesis. These results also highlight the in vivo chondrogenic potential of ASC and their potential value in cartilage repair. PMID:23638053

  2. The Tension Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    This is a bibliography of literature on the subject of tension. Books, films, and periodicals with a bearing on stress, relaxation, anxiety, and/or methods of controlling stress are listed from the fields of physiology, psychology, and philosophy. New methods such as transcendental meditation and biofeedback are analyzed briefly and criteria are…

  3. The effect of short-term and long-term femoral artery ligation on rat calf muscle oxygen tension, blood flow, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Angersbach, D; Jukna, J J; Nicholson, C D; Ochlich, P; Wilke, R

    1988-01-01

    The effect of short-term (1 day-1 week) and long-term (6-12 weeks) femoral artery ligation on the oxygen tension (pO2), blood flow, metabolism and function of rat gastrocnemius muscle has been examined. Femoral artery ligation reduced resting blood flow, pO2 and pH. Concomitantly, the concentration of high energy phosphates was reduced and the muscle lactate concentration increased. The fatigue developed by the gastrocnemius/plantaris muscle, during a 10 min period of isometric exercise, was increased and the associated hyperaemia was attenuated. The surgery, performed to ligate the artery, induced an increase in the plasma fibrinogen concentration and whole blood viscosity. As the time interval increased after the femoral artery ligation there was a progressive reduction of the magnitude of the effects. Ten weeks after ligation resting muscle concentrations of high energy phosphates and lactate, whole blood viscosity and muscle pH had normalized. However, resting muscle blood flow, pO2, ability to sustained isometric exercise and the exercise induced hyperaemia were still reduced compared to intact animals. Comparison with literature data reveals that the changes produced by chronic femoral artery ligation in rat calf muscle mimic those seen in man with intermittent claudication.

  4. [Study of the surface tear tension and evaluation of its importance for the retinal physiology and pathology in contact correction and in adaptation to soft contact lenses].

    PubMed

    Cherepnin, A I; Smoliakova, G P; Sorokin, E L

    2003-01-01

    The surface lachrymal-fluid (LF) tension was investigated by teardrop dissection in 115 patients with myopia before they were prescribed soft contact lenses (SCL). Such tension was found to be of clinical importance for the development of SCL adaptation disorders. A longer adaptation period in patients with myopia was associated with a low surface LF tension. A high surface LF tension concurrent with the teardrop dissection mode of the destruction type was typical of the pathological nature of SCL adaptation (12.1% of patients). The obtained data are needed to detect timely the risk of dysadaptation disorders and corneal complications before SCL prescription for the purpose of undertaking the pathogenetically substantiated medication to prevent such complications.

  5. Effects of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations on physiology and fluorescence of hermatypic corals and benthic algae

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer E.; Thompson, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    While shifts from coral to seaweed dominance have become increasingly common on coral reefs and factors triggering these shifts successively identified, the primary mechanisms involved in coral-algae interactions remain unclear. Amongst various potential mechanisms, algal exudates can mediate increases in microbial activity, leading to localized hypoxic conditions which may cause coral mortality in the direct vicinity. Most of the processes likely causing such algal exudate induced coral mortality have been quantified (e.g., labile organic matter release, increased microbial metabolism, decreased dissolved oxygen availability), yet little is known about how reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations affect competitive dynamics between seaweeds and corals. The goals of this study were to investigate the effects of different levels of oxygen including hypoxic conditions on a common hermatypic coral Acropora yongei and the common green alga Bryopsis pennata. Specifically, we examined how photosynthetic oxygen production, dark and daylight adapted quantum yield, intensity and anatomical distribution of the coral innate fluorescence, and visual estimates of health varied with differing background oxygen conditions. Our results showed that the algae were significantly more tolerant to extremely low oxygen concentrations (2–4 mg L−1) than corals. Furthermore corals could tolerate reduced oxygen concentrations, but only until a given threshold determined by a combination of exposure time and concentration. Exceeding this threshold led to rapid loss of coral tissue and mortality. This study concludes that hypoxia may indeed play a significant role, or in some cases may even be the main cause, for coral tissue loss during coral-algae interaction processes. PMID:24482757

  6. Effects of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations on physiology and fluorescence of hermatypic corals and benthic algae.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Smith, Jennifer E; Thompson, Melissa; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2014-01-01

    While shifts from coral to seaweed dominance have become increasingly common on coral reefs and factors triggering these shifts successively identified, the primary mechanisms involved in coral-algae interactions remain unclear. Amongst various potential mechanisms, algal exudates can mediate increases in microbial activity, leading to localized hypoxic conditions which may cause coral mortality in the direct vicinity. Most of the processes likely causing such algal exudate induced coral mortality have been quantified (e.g., labile organic matter release, increased microbial metabolism, decreased dissolved oxygen availability), yet little is known about how reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations affect competitive dynamics between seaweeds and corals. The goals of this study were to investigate the effects of different levels of oxygen including hypoxic conditions on a common hermatypic coral Acropora yongei and the common green alga Bryopsis pennata. Specifically, we examined how photosynthetic oxygen production, dark and daylight adapted quantum yield, intensity and anatomical distribution of the coral innate fluorescence, and visual estimates of health varied with differing background oxygen conditions. Our results showed that the algae were significantly more tolerant to extremely low oxygen concentrations (2-4 mg L(-1)) than corals. Furthermore corals could tolerate reduced oxygen concentrations, but only until a given threshold determined by a combination of exposure time and concentration. Exceeding this threshold led to rapid loss of coral tissue and mortality. This study concludes that hypoxia may indeed play a significant role, or in some cases may even be the main cause, for coral tissue loss during coral-algae interaction processes.

  7. A Human-Like Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype Is Conserved in Mouse Cells Dependent on Physiological Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Beauséjour, Christian M.; Parrinello, Simona; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Chin, Koei; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Cellular senescence irreversibly arrests cell proliferation in response to oncogenic stimuli. Human cells develop a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which increases the secretion of cytokines and other factors that alter the behavior of neighboring cells. We show here that “senescent” mouse fibroblasts, which arrested growth after repeated passage under standard culture conditions (20% oxygen), do not express a human-like SASP, and differ from similarly cultured human cells in other respects. However, when cultured in physiological (3%) oxygen and induced to senesce by radiation, mouse cells more closely resemble human cells, including expression of a robust SASP. We describe two new aspects of the human and mouse SASPs. First, cells from both species upregulated the expression and secretion of several matrix metalloproteinases, which comprise a conserved genomic cluster. Second, for both species, the ability to promote the growth of premalignant epithelial cells was due primarily to the conserved SASP factor CXCL-1/KC/GRO-α. Further, mouse fibroblasts made senescent in 3%, but not 20%, oxygen promoted epithelial tumorigenesis in mouse xenographs. Our findings underscore critical mouse-human differences in oxygen sensitivity, identify conditions to use mouse cells to model human cellular senescence, and reveal novel conserved features of the SASP. PMID:20169192

  8. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in Adults: Physiological Benefits, Indication, Clinical Benefits, and Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masaji

    2016-04-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is carried out using an air/oxygen blender, active humidifier, single heated tube, and nasal cannula. Able to deliver adequately heated and humidified medical gas at flows up to 60 L/min, it is considered to have a number of physiological advantages compared with other standard oxygen therapies, including reduced anatomical dead space, PEEP, constant F(IO2), and good humidification. Although few large randomized clinical trials have been performed, HFNC has been gaining attention as an alternative respiratory support for critically ill patients. Published data are mostly available for neonates. For critically ill adults, however, evidence is uneven because the reports cover various subjects with diverse underlying conditions, such as hypoxemic respiratory failure, exacerbation of COPD, postextubation, preintubation oxygenation, sleep apnea, acute heart failure, and conditions entailing do-not-intubate orders. Even so, across the diversity, many published reports suggest that HFNC decreases breathing frequency and work of breathing and reduces the need for respiratory support escalation. Some important issues remain to be resolved, such as definitive indications for HFNC and criteria for timing the starting and stopping of HFNC and for escalating treatment. Despite these issues, HFNC has emerged as an innovative and effective modality for early treatment of adults with respiratory failure with diverse underlying diseases.

  9. Update on hypoxia-inducible factors and hydroxylases in oxygen regulatory pathways: from physiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Peter; Koivunen, Peppi; Myllyharju, Johanna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Bovée, Judith VMG; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Vinatier, Claire; Trichet, Valérie; Robriquet, Florence; Oliver, Lisa; Gardie, Betty

    2017-01-01

    The “Hypoxia Nantes 2016” organized its second conference dedicated to the field of hypoxia research. This conference focused on “the role of hypoxia under physiological conditions as well as in cancer” and took place in Nantes, France, in October 6–7, 2016. The main objective of this conference was to bring together a large group of scientists from different spheres of hypoxia. Recent advances were presented and discussed around different topics: genomics, physiology, musculoskeletal, stem cells, microenvironment and cancer, and oxidative stress. This review summarizes the major highlights of the meeting. PMID:28352643

  10. Co-regulation of Primary Mouse Hepatocyte Viability and Function by Oxygen and Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Lorenna D.; Inman, S. Walker; Rusyn, Ivan; Griffith, Linda G.

    2014-01-01

    Although oxygen and extracellular matrix cues both influence differentiation state and metabolic function of primary rat and human hepatocytes, relatively little is known about how these factors together regulate behaviors of primary mouse hepatocytes in culture. To determine the effects of pericellular oxygen tension on hepatocellular function, we employed 2 methods of altering oxygen concentration in the local cellular microenvironment of cells cultured in the presence or absence of an extracellular matrix (Matrigel) supplement. By systematically altering medium depth and gas phase oxygen tension, we created multiple oxygen regimes (hypoxic, normoxic, and hyperoxic) and measured the local oxygen concentrations in the pericellular environment using custom-designed oxygen microprobes. From these measurements of oxygen concentrations, we derived values of oxygen consumption rates under a spectrum of environmental contexts, thus providing the first reported estimates of these values for primary mouse hepatocytes. Oxygen tension and matrix microenvironment were found to synergistically regulate hepatocellular survival and function as assessed using quantitative image analysis for cells stained with vital dyes, and assessment of secretion of albumin. Hepatocellular viability was affected only at strongly hypoxic conditions. Surprisingly, albumin secretion rates were greatest at a moderately supra-physiological oxygen concentration, and this effect was mitigated at still greater supra-physiological concentrations. Matrigel enhanced the effects of oxygen on retention of function. This study underscores the importance of carefully controlling cell density, medium depth and gas phase oxygen, as the effects of these parameters on local pericellular oxygen tension and subsequent hepatocellular function are profound. PMID:24222008

  11. Laser-induced generation of singlet oxygen and its role in the cerebrovascular physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Sokolovski, S. G.; Goltsov, A.; Gekaluyk, A. S.; Saranceva, E. I.; Bragina, O. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2017-09-01

    For over 55 years, laser technology has expanded from laboratory research to widespread fields, for example telecommunication and data storage amongst others. Recently application of lasers in biology and medicine presents itself as one of the emerging areas. In this review, we will outline the recent advances in using lasers for the generation of singlet oxygen, traditionally used to kill tumour cells or induce thrombotic stroke model due to damage vascular effects. Over the last two decade, completely new results on cerebrovascular effects of singlet oxygen generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been shown alongside promising applications for delivery of drugs and nanoparticles into the brain for therapy of brain cancer. Furthermore, a ;gold key; has been found to overcome the limitations of PDT, such as low light penetration and high toxicity of photosensitizers, by direct generation of singlet oxygen using quantum-dot laser diodes emitting in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. It is our motivation to highlight these pioneering results in this review, to improve understanding of the biological role of singlet oxygen and to provide new perspectives for improving clinical application of laser based therapy in further research.

  12. Physiological requirements for growth and competitiveness of Dekkera bruxellensis under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, Johanna; Nogué, Violeta Sànchez; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie; Passoth, Volkmar

    2012-07-01

    The effect of glucose and oxygen limitation on the growth and fermentation performances of Dekkera bruxellensis was investigated in order to understand which factors favour its propagation in ethanol or wine plants. Although D. bruxellensis has been described as a facultative anaerobe, no growth was observed in mineral medium under complete anaerobiosis while growth was retarded under severe oxygen limitation. In a continuous culture with no gas inflow, glucose was not completely consumed, most probably due to oxygen limitation. When an air/nitrogen mixture (O(2)-content ca. 5%) was sparged to the culture, growth became glucose-limited. In co-cultivations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol yields/g consumed sugar were not affected by the co-cultures as compared to the pure cultures. However, different population responses were observed in both systems. In oxygen-limited cultivation, glucose was depleted within 24 h after challenging with S. cerevisiae and both yeast populations were maintained at a stable level. In contrast, the S. cerevisiae population constantly decreased to about 1% of its initial cell number in the sparged glucose-limited fermentation, whereas the D. bruxellensis population remained constant. To identify the requirements of D. bruxellensis for anaerobic growth, the yeast was cultivated in several nitrogen sources and with the addition of amino acids. Yeast extract and most of the supplied amino acids supported anaerobic growth, which points towards a higher nutrient demand for D. bruxellensis compared to S. cerevisiae in anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Perioperative cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Cheng, Henry H.; Buckley, Erin M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Ferradal, Silvina; Williams, Kathryn; Vyas, Rutvi; Hagan, Katherine; Wigmore, Daniel; McDavitt, Erica; Soul, Janet S.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Newburger, Jane W.; Ellen Grant, P.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients are at risk for neurodevelopmental delay. The etiology of these delays is unclear, but abnormal prenatal cerebral maturation and postoperative hemodynamic instability likely play a role. A better understanding of these factors is needed to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. In this study, we used bedside frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to assess cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle (SV) CHD undergoing surgery and compared them to controls. Our goals were 1) to compare cerebral hemodynamics between unanesthetized SV and healthy neonates, and 2) to determine if FDNIRS-DCS could detect alterations in cerebral hemodynamics beyond cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2). Eleven SV neonates were recruited and compared to 13 controls. Preoperatively, SV patients showed decreased cerebral blood flow (CBFi), cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and SO2; and increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) compared to controls. Compared to preoperative values, unstable postoperative SV patients had decreased CMRO2i and CBFi, which returned to baseline when stable. However, SO2 showed no difference between unstable and stable states. Preoperative SV neonates are flow-limited and show signs of impaired cerebral development compared to controls. FDNIRS-DCS shows potential to improve assessment of cerebral development and postoperative hemodynamics compared to SO2 alone. PMID:26713191

  14. Effect of controlled oxygen limitation on Candida shehatae physiology for ethanol production from xylose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Fromanger, Romain; Guillouet, S E; Uribelarrea, J L; Molina-Jouve, C; Cameleyre, X

    2010-05-01

    Carbon distribution and kinetics of Candida shehatae were studied in fed-batch fermentation with xylose or glucose (separately) as the carbon source in mineral medium. The fermentations were carried out in two phases, an aerobic phase dedicated to growth followed by an oxygen limitation phase dedicated to ethanol production. Oxygen limitation was quantified with an average specific oxygen uptake rate (OUR) varying between 0.30 and 2.48 mmolO(2) g dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1), the maximum value before the aerobic shift. The relations among respiration, growth, ethanol production and polyol production were investigated. It appeared that ethanol was produced to provide energy, and polyols (arabitol, ribitol, glycerol and xylitol) were produced to reoxidize NADH from assimilatory reactions and from the co-factor imbalance of the two-first enzymatic steps of xylose uptake. Hence, to manage carbon flux to ethanol production, oxygen limitation was a major controlled parameter; an oxygen limitation corresponding to an average specific OUR of 1.19 mmolO(2) g DCW(-1) h(-1) allowed maximization of the ethanol yield over xylose (0.327 g g(-1)), the average productivity (2.2 g l(-1) h(-1)) and the ethanol final titer (48.81 g l(-1)). For glucose fermentation, the ethanol yield over glucose was the highest (0.411 g g(-1)) when the specific OUR was low, corresponding to an average specific OUR of 0.30 mmolO(2) g DCW(-1) h(-1), whereas the average ethanol productivity and ethanol final titer reached the maximum values of 1.81 g l(-1) h(-1) and 54.19 g l(-1) when the specific OUR was the highest.

  15. Oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance: bridging ecology and physiology.

    PubMed

    Pörtner, Hans-O; Bock, Christian; Mark, Felix C

    2017-08-01

    Observations of climate impacts on ecosystems highlight the need for an understanding of organismal thermal ranges and their implications at the ecosystem level. Where changes in aquatic animal populations have been observed, the integrative concept of oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) has successfully characterised the onset of thermal limits to performance and field abundance. The OCLTT concept addresses the molecular to whole-animal mechanisms that define thermal constraints on the capacity for oxygen supply to the organism in relation to oxygen demand. The resulting 'total excess aerobic power budget' supports an animal's performance (e.g. comprising motor activity, reproduction and growth) within an individual's thermal range. The aerobic power budget is often approximated through measurements of aerobic scope for activity (i.e. the maximum difference between resting and the highest exercise-induced rate of oxygen consumption), whereas most animals in the field rely on lower (i.e. routine) modes of activity. At thermal limits, OCLTT also integrates protective mechanisms that extend time-limited tolerance to temperature extremes - mechanisms such as chaperones, anaerobic metabolism and antioxidative defence. Here, we briefly summarise the OCLTT concept and update it by addressing the role of routine metabolism. We highlight potential pitfalls in applying the concept and discuss the variables measured that led to the development of OCLTT. We propose that OCLTT explains why thermal vulnerability is highest at the whole-animal level and lowest at the molecular level. We also discuss how OCLTT captures the thermal constraints on the evolution of aquatic animal life and supports an understanding of the benefits of transitioning from water to land. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. A Physiological and Human Factors Evaluation of a Novel Personal Helicopter Oxygen Delivery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    color vision performance using the Farnsworth- Munsell 15 Hue desaturation test at the 4 moderate altitude of 12,000’. Pulse oximetry is also a widely...below provided capability for oxygen production, charging of the portable system, as well as in-flight use by aircrew. The system was tested for its...compatibility with current Aircrew Assemblies, Night Vision Goggles, aircrew duties, and emergency egress. The system was also tested on pilot

  17. Genome and physiology of a model Epsilonproteobacterium responsible for sulfide detoxification in marine oxygen depletion zones.

    PubMed

    Grote, Jana; Schott, Thomas; Bruckner, Christian G; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jost, Günter; Teeling, Hanno; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus

    2012-01-10

    Eutrophication and global climate change lead to expansion of hypoxia in the ocean, often accompanied by the production of hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic to higher organisms. Chemoautotrophic bacteria are thought to buffer against increased sulfide concentrations by oxidizing hydrogen sulfide before its diffusion to oxygenated surface waters. Model organisms from such environments have not been readily available, which has contributed to a poor understanding of these microbes. We present here a detailed study of "Sulfurimonas gotlandica" str. GD1, an Epsilonproteobacterium isolated from the Baltic Sea oxic-anoxic interface, where it plays a key role in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Whole-genome analysis and laboratory experiments revealed a high metabolic flexibility, suggesting a considerable capacity for adaptation to variable redox conditions. S. gotlandica str. GD1 was shown to grow chemolithoautotrophically by coupling denitrification with oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and dark CO(2) fixation. Metabolic versatility was further suggested by the use of a range of different electron donors and acceptors and organic carbon sources. The number of genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways exceeds those of other Epsilonproteobacteria. Oxygen tolerance and environmental-sensing systems combined with chemotactic responses enable this organism to thrive successfully in marine oxygen-depletion zones. We propose that S. gotlandica str. GD1 will serve as a model organism in investigations that will lead to a better understanding how members of the Epsilonproteobacteria are able to cope with water column anoxia and the role these microorganisms play in the detoxification of sulfidic waters.

  18. Physiological and antioxidant response by Beauveria bassiana Bals (Vuill.) to different oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Garza-López, Paul Misael; Konigsberg, Mina; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Loera, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    The effect of three levels of oxygen (normal atmosphere (21% O(2)), low oxygen (16% O(2)) and enriched oxygen (26% O(2))) on the production and germination of conidia by Beauveria bassiana was evaluated using rice as a substrate. The maximum yield of conidia was achieved under hypoxia (16% O(2)) after 8 days of culture (1.51 × 10(9) conidia per gram of initial dry substrate), representing an increase of 32% compared to the normal atmosphere. However, germination was reduced by at least 27% due to atmospheric modifications. Comparison of antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutases and catalases) with the oxidation profiles of biomolecules (proteins and lipids) showed that a decrease in catalase activity in the final days of culture coincided with an increase in the amount of oxidized lipids, showing that oxidative stress was a consequence of pulses of different concentrations of O(2). This is the first study describing oxidative stress induction by atmospheric modification, with practical implications for conidia production.

  19. Continuous coloured light altered human brain haemodynamics and oxygenation assessed by systemic physiology augmented functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Metz, A J; Klein, S D; Scholkmann, F; Wolf, U

    2017-08-30

    Exposure to artificial coloured light is unavoidable in our modern life, but we are only just beginning to understand the impact of coloured light on human physiology. The aim of the present study was to determine effects of coloured light exposure on human systemic and brain physiology using systemic physiology augmented functional near-infrared spectroscopy (SPA-fNIRS). We measured changes in haemoglobin concentrations and tissue oxygen saturation in the left and right prefrontal cortices (L-PFC, R-PFC) by fNIRS, and also recorded skin conductance (SC), partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2), and heart-rate variability variables. 17 healthy adults (median age: 29 years, range: 25-65 years, 6 women) were exposed to blue, red, green, or yellow light for 10 minutes. Pre-light and post-light conditions were in darkness. In the L-PFC the yellow evoked a brain activation. SC and PETCO2 did not change during any of the coloured light exposures, but SC increased and PETCO2 decreased for all colours (except green) in the post-light period. Changes in L-PFC haemoglobin concentration were also observed during the post-light period but have to be interpreted with care, because heart rate and SC increased while PETCO2 decreased. The detected effects are potentially of high relevance for choosing room lighting and may possibly be applied therapeutically.

  20. A comparison of constant acceleration swimming speeds when acceleration rates are different with critical swimming speeds in Chinese bream under two oxygen tensions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Wei; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the effect of acceleration rates on the constant acceleration test speed (U cat) and to compare U cat with the critical swimming speed (U crit) in Chinese bream (Parabramis pekinensis), the U cat test at acceleration rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 cm s(-2) and the U crit test in juvenile fish at 20 °C in either normoxia (>90 % saturation oxygen tension) or hypoxia (30 % saturation) were compared. The lactate concentration ([lactate]) of white muscle, liver and plasma and the glycogen concentration ([glycogen]) of white muscle and liver were also measured to identify whether tissue substrate depletion or tissue lactate accumulation correlated with exhaustion. The U cat decreased with the acceleration rate, and there was no significant difference between U crit and U cat at lower acceleration rates. Hypoxia resulted in lower U cat and U crit, and the difference increased with decreased acceleration rates of the U cat test, possibly due to the increased contribution of aerobic components in U crit or U cat at low acceleration rates. Hypoxia elicited a significant decrease in muscle [glycogen] and an increase in muscle and liver [lactate] in resting fish. All post-exercise fish had similar muscle [lactate], suggesting that tissue lactate accumulation may correlate with exercise exhaustion. Unlike hypoxia, exercise induced an increase in muscle [lactate] and a significant increase in plasma [lactate], which were worthy of further investigation. The similar swimming speed and biochemical indicators after exercise in the U crit and U cat groups at low acceleration rates suggested that U cat can be an alternative for the more frequently adopted protocols in U crit in Chinese bream and possibly in other cyprinid fish species.

  1. Microcirculatory Assessment of Arterial Below-Knee Stumps: Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Versus Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension-A Preliminary Study in Prosthesis Users.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Davy; Barnay, José-Luis; Tourlonias, Bastien; Orta, Cyril; Obert, Christine; Casillas, Jean-Marie

    2017-06-01

    To examine metrologic properties of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) versus transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2) for microcirculatory assessment of vascular transtibial stumps at the stabilized period of prosthesis fitting, as a preliminary step before exploring its ability to predict stump healing, considering the previously identified limits of TcPO2 (borderline area between 15 and 35mmHg). Prospective single-center observational study. University-based rehabilitation center. Individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation for peripheral artery disease, at the definitive stage of prosthesis fitting, able to perform a 2-minute walk test (N=30). Not applicable. Test-retest, with the stump being evaluated in supine and inclined positions, first by NIRS (tissue saturation index [TSI], oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin) and second by TcPO2. Subjects carried out a 2-minute walk test and visual analog scales (wound healing and pain). Feasibility and tolerance of NIRS were satisfactory. The reliability of NIRS and TcPO2 values was good (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.7; P<.05). No significant relation was found between NIRS and TcPO2. No responsiveness (inclined vs supine) was reported (P>.05). A significant relation between TSI and the 2-minute walk test (r>.49, P<.05) was found. NIRS is painless, complication-free, and feasible, with good reliability. NIRS evaluates others domain than TcPO2 that are more linked to metabolic adaptation. Its capacity to predict stump healing and tolerance to early prosthesis fitting is therefore interesting to estimate in future studies. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Superiority of Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension Measurements in Predicting Limb Salvage After Below-the-Knee Angioplasty: A Prospective Trial in Diabetic Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Redlich, Ulf; Xiong, Yan Y.; Pech, Maciej; Tautenhahn, Joerg; Halloul, Zuhir; Lobmann, Ralf; Adolf, Daniela; Ricke, Jens; Dudeck, Oliver

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To assess postprocedural angiograms, the ankle-brachial index (ABI), and transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO{sub 2}) to predict outcome after infrageniculate angioplasty (PTA) in diabetic patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) scheduled for amputation. Materials and Methods: PTA was performed in 28 diabetic patients with CLI confined to infrapopliteal vessels. We recorded patency of crural vessels, including the vascular supply of the foot as well as the ABI and TcPO{sub 2} of the foot. Results: Technical success rate was 92.9% (n = 26), and limb-salvage rate at 12 months was 60.7% (n = 17). The number of patent straight vessels above and below the level of the malleoli increased significantly in patients avoiding amputation. Amputation was unnecessary in 88.2% (n = 15) patients when patency of at least one tibial artery was achieved. In 72.7% (n = 8) of patients, patency of the peroneal artery alone was not sufficient for limb salvage. ABI was of no predictive value for limb salvage. TcPO{sub 2} values increased significantly only in patients not requiring amputation (P = 0.015). In patients with only one tibial artery supplying the foot or only a patent peroneal artery in postprocedural angiograms, TcPO{sub 2} was capable of reliably predicting the outcome. Conclusion: Below-the-knee PTA as an isolated part of therapy was effective to prevent major amputation in more than a half of diabetic patients with CLI. TcPO{sub 2} was a valid predictor for limb salvage, even when angiographic outcome criteria failed.

  3. Human Cells Cultured under Physiological Oxygen Utilize Two Cap-binding Proteins to recruit Distinct mRNAs for Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Timpano, Sara; Uniacke, James

    2016-01-01

    Translation initiation is a focal point of translational control and requires the binding of eIF4E to the 5′ cap of mRNA. Under conditions of extreme oxygen depletion (hypoxia), human cells repress eIF4E and switch to an alternative cap-dependent translation mediated by a homolog of eIF4E, eIF4E2. This homolog forms a complex with the oxygen-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α and can escape translation repression. This complex mediates cap-dependent translation under cell culture conditions of 1% oxygen (to mimic tumor microenvironments), whereas eIF4E mediates cap-dependent translation at 21% oxygen (ambient air). However, emerging evidence suggests that culturing cells in ambient air, or “normoxia,” is far from physiological or “normal.” In fact, oxygen in human tissues ranges from 1–11% or “physioxia.” Here we show that two distinct modes of cap-dependent translation initiation are active during physioxia and act on separate pools of mRNAs. The oxygen-dependent activities of eIF4E and eIF4E2 are elucidated by observing their polysome association and the status of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (eIF4E-dependent) or hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression (eIF4E2-dependent). We have identified oxygen conditions where eIF4E is the dominant cap-binding protein (21% normoxia or standard cell culture conditions), where eIF4E2 is the dominant cap-binding protein (1% hypoxia or ischemic diseases and cancerous tumors), and where both cap-binding proteins act simultaneously to initiate the translation of distinct mRNAs (1–11% physioxia or during development and stem cell differentiation). These data suggest that the physioxic proteome is generated by initiating translation of mRNAs via two distinct but complementary cap-binding proteins. PMID:27002144

  4. Human Cells Cultured under Physiological Oxygen Utilize Two Cap-binding Proteins to recruit Distinct mRNAs for Translation.

    PubMed

    Timpano, Sara; Uniacke, James

    2016-05-13

    Translation initiation is a focal point of translational control and requires the binding of eIF4E to the 5' cap of mRNA. Under conditions of extreme oxygen depletion (hypoxia), human cells repress eIF4E and switch to an alternative cap-dependent translation mediated by a homolog of eIF4E, eIF4E2. This homolog forms a complex with the oxygen-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α and can escape translation repression. This complex mediates cap-dependent translation under cell culture conditions of 1% oxygen (to mimic tumor microenvironments), whereas eIF4E mediates cap-dependent translation at 21% oxygen (ambient air). However, emerging evidence suggests that culturing cells in ambient air, or "normoxia," is far from physiological or "normal." In fact, oxygen in human tissues ranges from 1-11% or "physioxia." Here we show that two distinct modes of cap-dependent translation initiation are active during physioxia and act on separate pools of mRNAs. The oxygen-dependent activities of eIF4E and eIF4E2 are elucidated by observing their polysome association and the status of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (eIF4E-dependent) or hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression (eIF4E2-dependent). We have identified oxygen conditions where eIF4E is the dominant cap-binding protein (21% normoxia or standard cell culture conditions), where eIF4E2 is the dominant cap-binding protein (1% hypoxia or ischemic diseases and cancerous tumors), and where both cap-binding proteins act simultaneously to initiate the translation of distinct mRNAs (1-11% physioxia or during development and stem cell differentiation). These data suggest that the physioxic proteome is generated by initiating translation of mRNAs via two distinct but complementary cap-binding proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Animal response to drastic changes in oxygen availability and physiological oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2002-12-01

    Oxygen is essential for most life forms, but it is also inherently toxic due to its biotransformation into reactive oxygen species (ROS). In fact, the development of many animal and plant pathological conditions, as well as natural aging, is associated with excessive ROS production and/or decreased antioxidant capacity. However, a number of animal species are able to tolerate, under natural conditions, situations posing a large potential for oxidative stress. Situations range from anoxia in fish, frogs and turtles, to severe hypoxia in organs of freeze-tolerant snakes, frogs and insect larvae, or diving seals and turtles, and mild hypoxia in organs of dehydrated frogs and toads or estivating snails. All situations are reminiscent of ischemia/reperfusion events that are highly damaging to most mammals and birds. This article reviews the responses of anoxia/hypoxia-tolerant animals when subjected to environmental and metabolic stresses leading to oxygen limitation. Abrupt changes in metabolic rate in ground squirrels arousing from hibernation, as well as snails arousing from estivation, may also set up a condition of increased ROS formation. Comparing the responses from these diverse animals, certain patterns emerge. The most commonly observed response is an enhancement of the antioxidant defense. The increase in the baseline activity of key antioxidant enzymes, as well as 'secondary' enzymatic defenses, and/or glutathione levels in preparation for a putative oxidative stressful situation arising from tissue reoxygenation seem to be the preferred evolutionary adaptation. Increasing the overall antioxidant capacity during anoxia/hypoxia is of relevance for species such as garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) and wood fogs (Rana sylvatica), while diving freshwater turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) appear to rely mainly upon high constitutive activities of antioxidant enzymes to deal with oxidative stress arising during tissue reoxygenation. The possibility

  6. Genome and physiology of a model Epsilonproteobacterium responsible for sulfide detoxification in marine oxygen depletion zones

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Jana; Schott, Thomas; Bruckner, Christian G.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jost, Günter; Teeling, Hanno; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Eutrophication and global climate change lead to expansion of hypoxia in the ocean, often accompanied by the production of hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic to higher organisms. Chemoautotrophic bacteria are thought to buffer against increased sulfide concentrations by oxidizing hydrogen sulfide before its diffusion to oxygenated surface waters. Model organisms from such environments have not been readily available, which has contributed to a poor understanding of these microbes. We present here a detailed study of “Sulfurimonas gotlandica” str. GD1, an Epsilonproteobacterium isolated from the Baltic Sea oxic-anoxic interface, where it plays a key role in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Whole-genome analysis and laboratory experiments revealed a high metabolic flexibility, suggesting a considerable capacity for adaptation to variable redox conditions. S. gotlandica str. GD1 was shown to grow chemolithoautotrophically by coupling denitrification with oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and dark CO2 fixation. Metabolic versatility was further suggested by the use of a range of different electron donors and acceptors and organic carbon sources. The number of genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways exceeds those of other Epsilonproteobacteria. Oxygen tolerance and environmental-sensing systems combined with chemotactic responses enable this organism to thrive successfully in marine oxygen-depletion zones. We propose that S. gotlandica str. GD1 will serve as a model organism in investigations that will lead to a better understanding how members of the Epsilonproteobacteria are able to cope with water column anoxia and the role these microorganisms play in the detoxification of sulfidic waters. PMID:22203982

  7. Bilirubin activates transcription of HIF-1α in human proximal tubular cells cultured in the physiologic oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Gyun; Ahn, Shin-Young; Lee, Eun Seong; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is influenced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Effect of bilirubin on HIF-1 expression in proximal tubular cells was investigated under physiological oxygen concentration, which is relative hypoxic condition mimicking oxygen content in the medulla of renal tissue. The human kidney (HK2) cells were cultured in 5% oxygen with or without bilirubin. HIF-1α protein expression was increased by bilirubin treatment at 0.01-0.2 mg/dL concentration. The messenger RNA expression of HIF-1α was increased by 1.69±0.05 folds in the cells cultured with 0.1 mg/dL bilirubin, compared to the control cells. The inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR, PI3K/AKT, and ERK 1/2 pathways did not attenuate increased HIF-1α expression by bilirubin. HIF-1α expression decreased by 10 µM exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); scavenger of ROS with or without bilirubin in the HK2 cells increased HIF-1α concentration more than that in the cells without bilirubin. Exogenous H2O2 decreased the phosphorylation of P70S6 kinase, which was completely reversed by bilirubin treatment. Knockdown of NOX4 gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased HIF-1α mRNA expression. In coonclusion, bilirubin enhances HIF-1α transcription as well as the up-regulation of HIF-1α protein translation through the attenuation of ROS and subunits of NADPH oxidase.

  8. Recapitulating physiological and pathological shear stress and oxygen to model vasculature in health and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shen, Yu-I.; Tan, Scott; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    Studying human vascular disease in conventional cell cultures and in animal models does not effectively mimic the complex vascular microenvironment and may not accurately predict vascular responses in humans. We utilized a microfluidic device to recapitulate both shear stress and O2 levels in health and disease, establishing a microfluidic vascular model (μVM). Maintaining human endothelial cells (ECs) in healthy-mimicking conditions resulted in conversion to a physiological phenotype namely cell elongation, reduced proliferation, lowered angiogenic gene expression and formation of actin cortical rim and continuous barrier. We next examined the responses of the healthy μVM to a vasotoxic cancer drug, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), in comparison with an in vivo mouse model. We found that 5-FU does not induce apoptosis rather vascular hyperpermeability, which can be alleviated by Resveratrol treatment. This effect was confirmed by in vivo findings identifying a vasoprotecting strategy by the adjunct therapy of 5-FU with Resveratrol. The μVM of ischemic disease demonstrated the transition of ECs from a quiescent to an activated state, with higher proliferation rate, upregulation of angiogenic genes, and impaired barrier integrity. The μVM offers opportunities to study and predict human ECs with physiologically relevant phenotypes in healthy, pathological and drug-treated environments.

  9. Myocardial oxygen consumption and substrate uptake in man during physiological and pathological volume load.

    PubMed

    Heiss, H W; Wink, K; Barmeyer, J; Keul, J; Reindell, H

    1977-01-01

    It is shown in trained and untrained healthy individuals that the energy requirement of the physiologically hypertrophied heart is lower at rest and even more pronounced during submaximal heavy exercise compared to the non-hypertrophied state. This difference exceeds the changes which could have been anticipated by deviations in hemodynamics and total heart weight. In patients with mild or moderate aortic insufficiency the energy expenditure of the pathologically hypertrophied heart per unit tissue mass is comparable to the non-hypertrophied state at rest or during exercise. It is increased in severe aortic regurgitation or additional myocarditis. The transition from compensation to failure may be associated with a steep decreased of the metabolic and flow reserve of the whole heart.

  10. A hybrid multibreath wash-in wash-out lung function quantification scheme in human subjects using hyperpolarized (3) He MRI for simultaneous assessment of specific ventilation, alveolar oxygen tension, oxygen uptake, and air trapping.

    PubMed

    Hamedani, Hooman; Kadlecek, Stephen; Xin, Yi; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Gatens, Heather; Naji, Joseph; Ishii, Masaru; Cereda, Maurizio; Rossman, Milton; Rizi, Rahim

    2017-08-01

    To present a method for simultaneous acquisition of alveolar oxygen tension (PA O2 ), specific ventilation (SV), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of hyperpolarized (HP) gas in the human lung, allowing reinterpretation of the PA O2 and SV maps to produce a map of oxygen uptake (R). An imaging scheme was designed with a series of identical normoxic HP gas wash-in breaths to measure ADC, SV, PA O2 , and R in less than 2 min. Signal dynamics were fit to an iterative recursive model that regionally solved for these parameters. This measurement was successfully performed in 12 subjects classified in three healthy, smoker, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cohorts. The overall whole lung ADC, SV, PA O2 , and R in healthy, smoker, and COPD subjects was 0.20 ± 0.03 cm(2) /s, 0.39 ± 0.06,113 ± 2 Torr, and 1.55 ± 0.35 Torr/s, respectively, in healthy subjects; 0.21 ± 0.03 cm(2) /s, 0.33 ± 0.06, 115.9 ± 4 Torr, and 0.97 ± 0.2 Torr/s, respectively, in smokers; and 0.25 ± 0.06 cm(2) /s, 0.23 ± 0.08, 114.8 ± 6.0Torr, and 0.94 ± 0.12 Torr/s, respectively, in subjects with COPD. Hetrogeneity of SV, PA O2 , and R were indicators of both smoking-related changes and disease, and the severity of the disease correlated with the degree of this heterogeneity. Subjects with symptoms showed reduced oxygen uptake and specific ventilation. High-resolution, nearly coregistered and quantitative measures of lung function and structure were obtained with less than 1 L of HP gas. This hybrid multibreath technique produced measures of lung function that revealed clear differences among the cohorts and subjects and were confirmed by correlations with global lung measurements. Magn Reson Med 78:611-624, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Differentiation of human adipocytes at physiological oxygen levels results in increased adiponectin secretion and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Famulla, Susanne; Schlich, Raphaela; Sell, Henrike; Eckel, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) hypoxia occurs in obese humans and mice. Acute hypoxia in adipocytes causes dysregulation of adipokine secretion with an increase in inflammatory factors and diminished adiponectin release. O2 levels in humans range between 3 and 11% revealing that conventional in vitro culturing at ambient air and acute hypoxia treatment (1% O2) are performed under non-physiological conditions. In this study, we mimicked physiological conditions by differentiating human primary adipocytes under 10% or 5% O2 in comparison to 21% O2. Induction of differentiation markers was comparable between all three conditions. Adipokine release by adipocytes differentiated at lower oxygen levels was altered, with a marked upregulation of adiponectin, IL-6 and DPP4 secretion, and reduced leptin levels compared with adipocytes differentiated at 21% O2. Isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly elevated in adipocytes differentiated at 10% and 5% compared with 21% O2. This effect was accompanied by increased protein expression of β-1 and -2 adrenergic receptor, HSL and perilipin. Conditioned medium (CM) of adipocytes differentiated at the three different conditions was generated for stimulation of human skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) or smooth muscle cells (SMC). CM-induced insulin resistance in SkMC was comparable for the different CMs. However, the SMC proliferative effect of CM from adipocytes differentiated at 10% O2 was significantly reduced compared with 21% O2. This study demonstrates that oxygen levels during adipogenesis are important factors altering adipocyte functionality such as adipokine release, in particular adiponectin secretion, as well as the hormone-induced lipolytic pathway.

  12. Differentiation of human adipocytes at physiological oxygen levels results in increased adiponectin secretion and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Famulla, Susanne; Schlich, Raphaela; Sell, Henrike; Eckel, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) hypoxia occurs in obese humans and mice. Acute hypoxia in adipocytes causes dysregulation of adipokine secretion with an increase in inflammatory factors and diminished adiponectin release. O2 levels in humans range between 3 and 11% revealing that conventional in vitro culturing at ambient air and acute hypoxia treatment (1% O2) are performed under non-physiological conditions. In this study, we mimicked physiological conditions by differentiating human primary adipocytes under 10% or 5% O2 in comparison to 21% O2. Induction of differentiation markers was comparable between all three conditions. Adipokine release by adipocytes differentiated at lower oxygen levels was altered, with a marked upregulation of adiponectin, IL-6 and DPP4 secretion, and reduced leptin levels compared with adipocytes differentiated at 21% O2. Isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly elevated in adipocytes differentiated at 10% and 5% compared with 21% O2. This effect was accompanied by increased protein expression of β-1 and -2 adrenergic receptor, HSL and perilipin. Conditioned medium (CM) of adipocytes differentiated at the three different conditions was generated for stimulation of human skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) or smooth muscle cells (SMC). CM-induced insulin resistance in SkMC was comparable for the different CMs. However, the SMC proliferative effect of CM from adipocytes differentiated at 10% O2 was significantly reduced compared with 21% O2. This study demonstrates that oxygen levels during adipogenesis are important factors altering adipocyte functionality such as adipokine release, in particular adiponectin secretion, as well as the hormone-induced lipolytic pathway. PMID:23700522

  13. Clinical relevance of decreased oxygen saturation during 6-min walk test in preoperative physiologic assessment for lung cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tatsuo; Chiba, Naohisa; Saito, Masao; Sakaguchi, Yasuto; Ishikawa, Shinya

    2014-10-01

    The Japanese Association for Chest Surgery (JACS) has released guidelines on preoperative physiologic assessment for lung cancer surgery. However, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), which is recommended for patients with poor pulmonary function, is available only in limited institutions. We investigated the possibility of 6-min walk test (6MWT) as a substitute of maximum oxygen consumption test (VO(2)max) on preoperative physiologic assessment for lung cancer surgery. The relationship between VO(2)max and 6MWT was retrospectively analyzed in 51 subjects other than lung cancer patients. Following the preliminary analysis, we modified the risk assessment in the JACS guidelines by substituting 6MWT for VO(2)max, and patients who underwent lung cancer surgery were retrospectively assessed using the modified assessment. Analysis of the correlation between VO(2)max and 6MWT revealed VO(2)max to be significantly correlated to minimum SpO(2) (SpO(2)min) and maximum decrease in SpO(2) (ΔSpO(2)) during 6MWT. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that SpO(2)min and ΔSpO(2) were predictable for a VO(2)max of 15 mL/kg/min, which is the borderline between the average- and increased-risk groups in the JACS guidelines. A total of 1,066 patients were assigned to the average- or increased-risk group according to the modified JACS guidelines using the criteria of SpO(2)min < 91 % and ΔSpO(2) > 4 %. The increased-risk group was significantly inferior to the average-risk group in Home Oxygen Therapy induction rate, cardiopulmonary-related 30- and 90-day mortality (p < 0.001). In clinical practice, decreased saturation during 6MWT may be simple and substitutive for CPET in risk assessment for lung cancer surgery using the JACS guidelines.

  14. Physiological and pathophysiological reactive oxygen species as probed by EPR spectroscopy: the underutilized research window on muscle ageing

    PubMed Central

    A. Abdel‐Rahman, Engy; Mahmoud, Ali M.; Khalifa, Abdulrahman M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) play crucial roles in triggering, mediating and regulating physiological and pathophysiological signal transduction pathways within the cell. Within the cell, ROS efflux is firmly controlled both spatially and temporally, making the study of ROS dynamics a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed for ROS assessment; however, many of these assays are not capable of direct identification or determination of subcellular localization of different ROS. Here we highlight electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a powerful technique that is uniquely capable of addressing questions on ROS dynamics in different biological specimens and cellular compartments. Due to their critical importance in muscle functions and dysfunction, we discuss in some detail spin trapping of various ROS and focus on EPR detection of nitric oxide before highlighting how EPR can be utilized to probe biophysical characteristics of the environment surrounding a given stable radical. Despite the demonstrated ability of EPR spectroscopy to provide unique information on the identity, quantity, dynamics and environment of radical species, its applications in the field of muscle physiology, fatiguing and ageing are disproportionately infrequent. While reviewing the limited examples of successful EPR applications in muscle biology we conclude that the field would greatly benefit from more studies exploring ROS sources and kinetics by spin trapping, protein dynamics by site‐directed spin labelling, and membrane dynamics and global redox changes by spin probing EPR approaches. PMID:26801204

  15. Perfusion pressure-dependent recovery of cortical spreading depression is independent of tissue oxygenation over a wide physiologic range.

    PubMed

    Sukhotinsky, Inna; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sakadzić, Sava; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Sims, John R; Boas, David A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Ayata, Cenk

    2010-06-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a slowly propagating wave of transient neuronal and glial depolarization that develops after stroke, trauma and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In compromised tissue, repetitive SD-like injury depolarizations reduce tissue viability by worsening the mismatch between blood flow and metabolism. Although the mechanism remains unknown, SDs show delayed electrophysiological recovery within the ischemic penumbra. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the recovery rate of SD can be varied by modulating tissue perfusion pressure and oxygenation. Systemic blood pressure and arterial pO(2) were simultaneously manipulated in anesthetized rats under full physiologic monitoring. We found that arterial hypotension doubled the SD duration, whereas hypertension reduced it by a third compared with normoxic normotensive rats. Hyperoxia failed to shorten the prolonged SD durations in hypotensive rats, despite restoring tissue pO(2). Indeed, varying arterial pO(2) (40 to 400 mm Hg) alone did not significantly influence SD duration, whereas blood pressure (40 to 160 mm Hg) was inversely related to SD duration in compromised tissue. These data suggest that cerebral perfusion pressure is a critical determinant of SD duration independent of tissue oxygenation over a wide range of arterial pO(2) levels, and that hypotension may be detrimental in stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, where SD-like injury depolarizations have been observed.

  16. Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces Intracranial Pressure and Partial Brain Oxygen Tension in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Preliminary Data from the Eurotherm3235 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Jonathan; Andrews, Peter J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of disability and death and a huge economic burden throughout the world. Much of the morbidity associated with TBI is attributed to secondary brain injuries resulting in hypoxia and ischemia after the initial trauma. Intracranial hypertension and decreased partial brain oxygen tension (PbtO2) are targeted as potentially avoidable causes of morbidity. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) may be an effective intervention to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP), but could also affect cerebral blood flow (CBF). This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 17 patients admitted to the Western General Hospital, Edinburgh. Patients with an ICP >20 mmHg refractory to initial therapy were randomized to standard care or standard care and TH (intervention group) titrated between 32°C and 35°C to reduce ICP. ICP and PbtO2 were measured using the Licox system and core temperature was recorded through rectal thermometer. Data were analyzed at the hour before cooling, the first hour at target temperature, 2 consecutive hours at target temperature, and after 6 hours of hypothermia. There was a mean decrease in ICP of 4.3±1.6 mmHg (p<0.04) from 15.7 to 11.4 mmHg, from precooling to the first epoch of hypothermia in the intervention group (n=9) that was not seen in the control group (n=8). A decrease in ICP was maintained throughout all time periods. There was a mean decrease in PbtO2 of 7.8±3.1 mmHg (p<0.05) from 30.2 to 22.4 mmHg, from precooling to stable hypothermia, which was not seen in the control group. This research supports others in demonstrating a decrease in ICP with temperature, which could facilitate a reduction in the use of hyperosmolar agents or other stage II interventions. The decrease in PbtO2 is not below the suggested treatment threshold of 20 mmHg, but might indicate a decrease in CBF. PMID:26060880

  17. Physiological considerations acting on triplet oxygen for explicit dosimetry in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Víctor; Romero, María Paulina; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Costa, César

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the spatial and temporal theoretical distribution of the concentrations of Protoporphyrin IX, (3)O2 and doses of (1)O2. The type II mechanism and explicit dosimetry in photodynamic therapy were used. Furthermore, the mechanism of respiration and cellular metabolism acting on (3)O2 were taken into account. The dermis was considered as an absorbing and a scattering medium. An analytical solution was used for light diffusion in the skin. The photophysical, photochemical and biological effects caused by PDT with the initial irradiances of 20, 60 and 150mW/cm(2) were studied for a time of exposure of 20min and a maximum depth of 0.5cm. We found that the initial irradiance triples its value in 0.02cm and that almost 100% of PpIX is part of the dynamics of reactions in photodynamic therapy. Additionally, with about 40μMof (3)O2 there is a balance between the consumed and supplied oxygen. Finally, we determined that with 60mW/cm(2), the highest dose of (1)O2 is obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic physiology of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: Implications for vertical migration in a pronounced oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Rui; Seibel, Brad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Humboldt (or jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is an active predator endemic to the Eastern Pacific that undergoes diel vertical migrations into a pronounced oxygen minimum layer (OML). Here, we investigate the physiological mechanisms that facilitate these migrations and assess the associated costs and benefits. Exposure to hypoxic conditions equivalent to those found in the OML (∼10 μM O 2 at 10 °C) led to a significant reduction in the squid’s routine metabolic rate (RMR), from 8.9 to 1.6 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 ( p < 0.05), and a concomitant increase in mantle muscle octopine levels (from 0.50 to 5.24 μmol g -1 tissue, p < 0.05). Enhanced glycolitic ATP production accounted for only 7.0% and 2.8% at 10 °C and 20 °C, respectively, of the energy deficit that resulted from the decline in aerobic respiration. The observed metabolic suppression presumably extends survival time in the OML by conserving the finite stores of fermentable substrate and avoiding the accumulation of the deleterious anaerobic end products in the tissues. RMR increased significantly with temperature ( p < 0.05), from 8.9 (at 10 °C) to 49.85 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 (at 25 °C) which yielded a Q10 of 2.0 between 10 and 20 °C and 7.9 between 20 and 25 °C ( p < 0.05). These results suggest that 25 °C, although within the normal surface temperature range in the Gulf of California, is outside this species’ normal temperature range. By following the scattering layer into oxygen-enriched shallow water at night, D. gigas may repay any oxygen debt accumulated during the daytime. The dive to deeper water may minimize exposure to stressful surface temperatures when most prey have migrated to depth during the daytime. The physiological and ecological strategies demonstrated here may have facilitated the recent range expansion of this species into northern waters where expanding hypoxic zones prohibit competing top predators.

  19. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Plamena R.; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Ackland, Gareth L.; Funk, Gregory D.; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2. Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca2+]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to detect

  20. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  1. Physiological energetics of the fourth instar of Chinese horseshoe crabs (Tachypleus tridentatus) in response to hypoxic stress and re-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Paul K S; Chan, Cathy S K; Cheung, S G

    2014-08-30

    Hypoxia associated with eutrophication is a potential threat to the Chinese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus which inhabits intertidal sand flats in Asia. This study investigated the effect of dissolved oxygen level (DO) (6, 4 and 2 mg O2 l(-1)) on the physiological energetics in the juvenile T. tridentatus. They were exposed to various oxygen levels for three days and then transferred to normoxia for three days to examine the recovery from low oxygen stress. Feeding rate, respiration rate and scope for growth were reduced at lower DO levels while absorption efficiency and excretion rate were independent of DO levels. Although full recovery of the physiological responses and scope for growth from hypoxis stress was observed when normoxia resumed, their long term survival in suboptimal habitats with frequent occurrence of hypoxia deserves a close monitoring as hypoxia may be even more common in future in a warming world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  3. The Reactivity of Polymersome Encapsulated Hemoglobin with Physiologically Important Gaseous Ligands: Oxygen, Carbon Monoxide and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rameez, Shahid; Banerjee, Uddyalok; Fontes, Jorge; Roth, Alexander; Palmer, Andre F.

    2012-01-01

    Two distinct preparations of amphiphilic diblock copolymer vesicles (i.e. polymersomes), composed of (poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(butadiene)) (PEO-PBD), with molecular weights of 1.8 kDa and 10.4 kDa, offering different hydrophobic membrane thicknesses, were used to encapsulate the oxygen (O2) storage and transport protein hemoglobin (Hb) for possible application as a red blood cell (RBC) substitute. Key biophysical properties as well as the kinetics of polymersome encapsulated Hb (PEH) interaction with physiologically important gaseous ligands (O2, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide) were measured as a function of the hydrophobic membrane thickness of the PEH particle. Taken together, the results of this work show that PEHs exhibit biophysical properties and retarded ligand binding/release kinetics (compared to cell-free Hb), which are similar to the behavior of RBCs. Therefore, PEHs have the potential to serve as safe and efficacious RBC substitutes for use in transfusion medicine. PMID:22865934

  4. From intracellular signaling networks to cell death: the dual role of reactive oxygen species in seed physiology.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Christophe; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Corbineau, Françoise

    2008-10-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are continuously produced during seed development, from embryogenesis to germination, but also during seed storage. ROS play a dual role in seed physiology behaving, on the one hand, as actors of cellular signaling pathways and, on the other hand, as toxic products that accumulate under stress conditions. ROS, provided that their amount is tightly regulated by the balance between production and scavenging, appear now as being beneficial for germination, and in particular to act as a positive signal for seed dormancy release. Such an effect might result from the interplay between ROS and hormone signaling pathways thus leading to changes in gene expression or in cellular redox status. We also propose that changes in ROS homeostasis would play a role in perception of environmental factors by seeds during their germination, and thus act as a signal controlling the completion of germination. However, uncontrolled accumulation of ROS is likely to occur during seed aging or seed desiccation thus leading to oxidative damage toward a wide range of biomolecules and ultimately to necroses and cell death. We present here the concept of the "oxidative window for germination", which restricts the occurrence of the cellular events associated with germination to a critical range of ROS level, enclosed by lower and higher limits. Above or below the "oxidative window for germination", weak or high amounts of ROS, respectively, would not permit progress toward germination.

  5. Effect of dissolved oxygen on swimming ability and physiological response to swimming fatigue of whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yan; Zhang, Xiumei; Liu, Xuxu; Thakur, Dhanrajsingh N.

    2013-11-01

    The swimming endurance of whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei, 87.66 mm ± 0.25 mm, 7.73 g ± 0.06 g) was examined at various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO, 1.9, 3.8, 6.8 and 13.6 mg L-1) in a swimming channel against one of the five flow velocities (v 1, v 2, v 3, v 4 and v 5). Metabolite contents in the plasma, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle of the shrimp were quantified before and after swimming fatigue. The results revealed that the swimming speed and DO concentration were significant factors that affected the swimming endurance of L. vannamei. The relationship between swimming endurance and swimming speed at various DO concentrations can be described by the power model (ν·t b = a). The relationship between DO concentration (mg L-1) and the swimming ability index (SAI), defined as SAI = Σ{0/9000} vdt(cm), can be described as SAI = 27.947 DO0.137 (R 2 = 0.9312). The level of DO concentration directly affected the physiology of shrimp, and exposure to low concentrations of DO led to the increases in lactate and energetic substrate content in the shrimp. In responding to the low DO concentration at 1.9 mg L-1 and the swimming stress, L. vannamei exhibited a mix of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to satisfy the energetic demand, mainly characterized by the utilization of total protein and glycogen and the production of lactate and glucose. Fatigue from swimming led to severe loss of plasma triglyceride at v 1, v 2, and v 3 with 1.9 mg L-1 DO, and at v 1 with 3.8, 6.8 and 13.6 mg L-1 DO, whereas the plasma glucose content increased significantly at v 3, v 4 and v 5 with 3.8 and 6.8 mg L-1 DO, and at v 5 with 13.6 mg L-1 DO. The plasma total protein and hepatopancreas glycogen were highly depleted in shrimp by swimming fatigue at various DO concentrations, whereas the plasma lactate accumulated at high levels after swimming fatigue at different velocities. These results were of particular value to understanding the locomotory ability of whiteleg

  6. Impact of microbial physiology and microbial community structure on pharmaceutical fate driven by dissolved oxygen concentration in nitrifying bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Lauren B; Love, Nancy G

    2016-11-01

    Operation at low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations (<1 mg/L) in wastewater treatment could save utilities significantly by reducing aeration energy costs. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of low DO on pharmaceutical biotransformations during treatment. DO concentration can impact pharmaceutical biotransformation rates during wastewater treatment both directly and indirectly: directly by acting as a limiting substrate that slows the activity of the microorganisms involved in biotransformation; and indirectly by shaping the microbial community and selecting for a community that performs pharmaceutical biotransformation faster (or slower). In this study, nitrifying bioreactors were operated at low (∼0.3 mg/L) and high (>4 mg/L) DO concentrations to understand how DO growth conditions impacted microbial community structure. Short-term batch experiments using the biomass from the parent reactors were performed under low and high DO conditions to understand how DO concentration impacts microbial physiology. Although the low DO parent biomass had a lower specific activity with respect to ammonia oxidation than the high DO parent reactor biomass, it had faster biotransformation rates of ibuprofen, sulfamethoxazole, 17α-ethinylestradiol, acetaminophen, and atenolol in high DO batch conditions. This was likely because the low DO reactor had a 2x higher biomass concentration, was enriched for ammonia oxidizers (4x higher concentration), and harbored a more diverse microbial community (3x more unique taxa) as compared to the high DO parent reactor. Overall, the results show that there can be indirect benefits from low DO operation over high DO operation that support pharmaceutical biotransformation during wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging by overproduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase delays postharvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R; Zhang, Peng

    2013-03-01

    Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava (Manihot esculenta) storage roots is the result of a rapid oxidative burst, which leads to discoloration of the vascular tissues due to the oxidation of phenolic compounds. In this study, coexpression of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) in transgenic cassava was used to explore the intrinsic relationship between ROS scavenging and PPD occurrence. Transgenic cassava plants integrated with the expression cassette p54::MeCu/ZnSOD-35S::MeCAT1 were confirmed by Southern-blot analysis. The expression of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeCAT1 was verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic activity analysis both in the leaves and storage roots. Under exposure to the ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen or to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the transgenic plants showed higher enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT than the wild-type plants. Levels of malondialdehyde, chlorophyll degradation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 accumulation were dramatically reduced in the transgenic lines compared with the wild type. After harvest, the storage roots of transgenic cassava lines show a delay in their PPD response of at least 10 d, accompanied by less mitochondrial oxidation and H2O2 accumulation, compared with those of the wild type. We hypothesize that this is due to the combined ectopic expression of Cu/ZnSOD and CAT leading to an improved synergistic ROS-scavenging capacity of the roots. Our study not only sheds light on the mechanism of the PPD process but also develops an effective approach for delaying the occurrence of PPD in cassava.

  8. Tension Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The fabric structure pictured is the Campus Center of La Verne College, La Verne, California. Unlike the facilities shown on the preceding pages, it is not air-supported. It is a "tension structure," its multi-coned fabric membrane supported by a network of cables attached to steel columns which function like circus tent poles. The spider-web in the accompanying photo is a computer graph of the tension pattern. The designers, Geiger-Berger Associates PC, of New York City, conducted lengthy computer analysis to determine the the best placement of columns and cables. The firm also served as structural engineering consultant on the Pontiac Silverdome and a number of other large fabric structures. Built by Birdair Structures, Inc., Buffalo, New York, the La Verne Campus Center was the first permanent facility in the United States enclosed by the space-spinoff fabric made of Owens-Corning Beta fiber glass coated with Du Pont Teflon TFE. The flexible design permits rearrangement of the interior to accommodate athletic events, student activities, theatrical productions and other recreational programs. Use of fabric covering reduced building cost 30 percent below conventional construction.

  9. HIF1A and EPAS1 mRNA and protein expression during in vitro culture of human primary term cytotrophoblasts and effect of oxygen tension on their expression.

    PubMed

    Depoix, Christophe Louis; Flabat, Olivier; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2016-09-01

    During the first trimester of pregnancy, placenta formation probably occurs in a low-oxygen environment necessary to protect cytotrophoblasts from oxidative stress and to allow proper gene regulation. Transcription factors involved in gene regulation under low oxygen tension are the hypoxia-inducible factors, mainly HIF1A, EPAS1 and their dimerization partner HIF1B. Little is known about their expression during in vitro culture of cytotrophoblasts under chronic hypoxia. We assessed HIF1A and EPAS1 expression in a 4-day in vitro culture of primary term cytotrophoblasts under 21% O2 and 2.5% O2. Copy numbers and relative mRNA expression were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Protein levels were quantified by immunoblot and densitometric analysis. In undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts, EPAS1 transcripts were four times more abundant than HIF1A transcripts (2.14e(7) and 5e(6)copies/μg total RNA, respectively). During cell culture, HIF1A mRNA expression increased after 24h and then decreased to stay stable. The expression was even lower when cells were grown under 2.5% O2. EPAS1 mRNA expression increased during cytotrophoblast differentiation. The expression was higher when cells were under 21% O2 than when they were under 2.5% O2. Interestingly, HIF1A, but not EPAS1, was detected in the nuclei of undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts, and in the nuclei of cytotrophoblasts that grew under 21% O2. During cytotrophoblast differentiation, no variation in HIF1A protein levels was detected. To the contrary, EPAS1 protein level increased during differentiation, and oxygen tension had no effect on EPAS1 protein level. In conclusion, HIF1A and EPAS1 expression was not inhibited by chronic hypoxia during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation.

  10. Tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S

    1999-01-01

    Tension-type headaches, the most prevalent form of headache, are differentiated as being either episodic or chronic. The episodic form is a physiologic response to stress, anxiety, depression, emotional conflicts, fatigue, or repressed hostility. Treatment focuses on the use of over-the-counter or prescribed simple analgesics for pain relief. Successful treatment of the chronic form depends on recognition of depression or persistent anxiety states. Primary care physicians can effectively manage most of these patients with nonhabituating anxiolytic or antidepressant medications; however, referrals for psychotherapy may be required in some cases. When tension-type headaches occur in children and adolescents, the physician must explore the patient's family and social relationships as well as school performance. In addition to nonhabituating drug therapies, family counseling and biofeedback may be helpful. In coexisting migraine and tension-type headaches, nonhabituating analgesics may be used for the relief of acute pain; the use of ergotamine and triptans should be restricted to relief of the hard or sick headache. Tricyclic antidepressants or monoamine oxidase inhibitors are the gold standards for prophylaxis, although the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be indicated in less severe cases. Several forms of biofeedback have also proved effective. Nonetheless, some patients with this form of headache may require psychiatric treatment for severe depression.

  11. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    PubMed

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues.

  12. Continuous measurement of oxygen tensions in the air-breathing organ of Pacific tarpon (Megalops cyprinoides) in relation to aquatic hypoxia and exercise.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S; Farrell, Anthony P; Christian, Keith; Clark, Timothy D; Bennett, Michael B; Wells, Rufus M G; Baldwin, John

    2007-07-01

    The Pacific tarpon is an elopomorph teleost fish with an air-breathing organ (ABO) derived from a physostomous gas bladder. Oxygen partial pressure (PO(2)) in the ABO was measured on juveniles (238 g) with fiber-optic sensors during exposure to selected aquatic PO(2) and swimming speeds. At slow speed (0.65 BL s(-1)), progressive aquatic hypoxia triggered the first breath at a mean PO(2) of 8.3 kPa. Below this, opercular movements declined sharply and visibly ceased in most fish below 6 kPa. At aquatic PO(2) of 6.1 kPa and swimming slowly, mean air-breathing frequency was 0.73 min(-1), ABO PO(2) was 10.9 kPa, breath volume was 23.8 ml kg(-1), rate of oxygen uptake from the ABO was 1.19 ml kg(-1) min(-1), and oxygen uptake per breath was 2.32 ml kg(-1). At the fastest experimental speed (2.4 BL s(-1)) at 6.1 kPa, ABO oxygen uptake increased to about 1.90 ml kg(-1) min(-1), through a variable combination of breathing frequency and oxygen uptake per breath. In normoxic water, tarpon rarely breathed air and apparently closed down ABO perfusion, indicated by a drop in ABO oxygen uptake rate to about 1% of that in hypoxic water. This occurred at a wide range of ABO PO(2) (1.7-26.4 kPa), suggesting that oxygen level in the ABO was not regulated by intrinsic receptors.

  13. The effects of cosmic Particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: V. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. Part I. physiological studies.

    PubMed

    Leon, H A; Suri, K; McTigue, M; Smith, J; Cooper, W; Miquel, J; Ashley, W W; Behnke, A R; Saunders, J F

    1975-04-01

    Tests were carried out on pocket mice to ascertain their tolerance to elevated oxygen pressures alone and to a combination of hyperoxta and heat in excess of that expected during the flight of the mice on Apollo XVII. the mice withstood oxygen partial pressures up to 12 pst at normal room temperature (24 degrees C, 75 degrees F) over a period of 7 days. A few mice previously exposed to increased PO2 died in the course of exposure to an oxygen pressure of 10 pst or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) for 13 d in ambient heat of 32 degrees C (90 degrees F). Supplemental vitamin E and physiological saline loading given prior to exposure had no apparent protective effect. The overall conclusion was that the pocket mice which were to go on Apollo XVII could readily survive the ambient atmosphere to which they would be exposed.

  14. Non-Invasive Determination of Breast Cancer Oxygen Tension by F-19 NMR and Breast Cancer Physiology in Response to Radiotherapy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    an outer diameter of 24.00 cm. The outer structure of the resonator is made of a 5 mm thick plexiglass cylinder, which provides mechanical support and...resonator and the resonator was positioned in the isocenter of the magnet, with its axis being aligned with the direction of the magnet’s static magnetic...end, respectively. The two boards, along with the outer structure, provide very stable mechanical support for the resonator. Three capacitors of 20.0

  15. Oxygen consumption, oxygen cost and physiological cost index in polio survivors: a comparison of walking without orthosis, with an ordinary or a carbon-fibre reinforced plastic knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, Kenji; Makino, Kenichiro; Wada, Futoshi; Saeki, Satoru; Yoshimoto, Nami

    2007-10-01

    To examine, for polio survivors, whether walking with a carbon-fibre reinforced plastic knee-ankle-foot orthosis (carbon KAFO) is more efficient than walking with an ordinary KAFO or without an orthosis. Consecutive sample. Post-polio clinic, University Hospital of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan. Eleven polio survivors who had a carbon KAFO prescribed at the post-polio clinic. A carbon KAFO was prescribed, fabricated and inspected. Oxygen consumption, oxygen cost and physiological cost index. An ordinary KAFO weighed 1403 g (standard deviation(SD) 157 g), whereas a carbon KAFO weighed 992 g (SD 168 g). Subjects walking with a carbon KAFO showed a tendency to increase step length, and to increase speed significantly compared with walking without an orthosis and with an ordinary KAFO (paired t-test, p < 0.05). Oxygen consumption per body weight, oxygen cost (O2 consumption for 1-m walk divided by body weight) and physiological cost index ((heart rate at 3-min walk - heart rate at rest) /speed) were significantly lower than those walking without an orthosis (-16%, -35%, -33%; paired t-test, p < 0.05) and were lower than those walking with an ordinary KAFO (-9%, -14%, -15%; paired t-test, p < 0.05). The gait efficiency of polio survivors with a carbon KAFO was objectively better than those without an orthosis or with an ordinary KAFO.

  16. Low-oxygen tensions found in Salmonella-infected gut tissue boost Salmonella replication in macrophages by impairing antimicrobial activity and augmenting Salmonella virulence.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, Jonas; Matuszak, Jasmin; Walter, Steffi; Felmy, Boas; Gendera, Kathrin; Schatz, Valentin; Nowottny, Monika; Liebsch, Gregor; Hensel, Michael; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Gerlach, Roman G; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    In Salmonella infection, the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2)-encoded type three secretion system (T3SS2) is of key importance for systemic disease and survival in host cells. For instance, in the streptomycin-pretreated mouse model SPI-2-dependent Salmonella replication in lamina propria CD11c(-)CXCR1(-) monocytic phagocytes/macrophages (MΦ) is required for the development of colitis. In addition, containment of intracellular Salmonella in the gut critically depends on the antimicrobial effects of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX), and possibly type 2 nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). For both antimicrobial enzyme complexes, oxygen is an essential substrate. However, the amount of available oxygen upon enteroinvasive Salmonella infection in the gut tissue and its impact on Salmonella-MΦ interactions was unknown. Therefore, we measured the gut tissue oxygen levels in a model of Salmonella enterocolitis using luminescence two-dimensional in vivo oxygen imaging. We found that gut tissue oxygen levels dropped from ∼78 Torr (∼11% O2) to values of ∼16 Torr (∼2% O2) during infection. Because in vivo virulence of Salmonella depends on the Salmonella survival in MΦ, Salmonella-MΦ interaction was analysed under such low oxygen values. These experiments revealed an increased intracellular replication and survival of wild-type and t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella. These findings were paralleled by blunted nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced Salmonella ROS perception. In addition, hypoxia enhanced SPI-2 transcription and translocation of SPI-2-encoded virulence protein. Neither pharmacological blockade of PHOX and NOS2 nor impairment of T3SS2 virulence function alone mimicked the effect of hypoxia on Salmonella replication under normoxic conditions. However, if t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella were used, hypoxia did not further enhance Salmonella recovery in a PHOX and NOS2-deficient situation. Hence, these data suggest that

  17. Age-dependent changes in oxygen tension, radiation dose and sensitivity within normal and diseased coronary arteries-Part C: oxygen effect and its implications on high- and low-LET dose.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Richard B

    2008-10-01

    The aim is to study the implications of the decrease in oxygen concentration in the coronary artery walls with age and atherosclerosis, particularly with regard to an associated reduction in the radiosensitivity to high-and low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) irradiation. In accompanying papers, the age-dependent morphology and composition for the wall layers of normal and diseased coronary arteries were developed in Part A from published data. In Part B, the oxygen concentration in the coronary artery walls was evaluated taking account the diffusion of oxygen from blood and the solubility of oxygen in tissues. In this part the oxygen effect was evaluated using published experimental data. Based on simulation results from the one-dimensional diffusion model, the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) is lower in the hypoxic vessel walls of aged and atherosclerotic arteries. Consequently the high-LET radiation damage arising from both the radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) decay chains to the intimal layer of highly diseased arteries was estimated to be reduced by approximately 37% due to hypoxia. A greater reduction in radiosensitivity (51%) due to hypoxia was determined for low-LET irradiation. These results imply that the oxygen effect, and other radiation biological factors, have a significant influence on radiation biological effects and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and patients receiving radiotherapy of the mediastinum.

  18. Physiologic effects of nasal oxygen or medical air administered prior to and during carfentanil-xylazine anesthesia in North American elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis).

    PubMed

    Paterson, Jessica M; Caulkett, Nigel A; Woodbury, Murray R

    2009-03-01

    This study compared the physiologic effects of carfentanil-xylazine anesthesia in elk administered nasal oxygen or medical air. Eight female 5 +/- 2-yr-old (mean +/- SD) captive elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) weighing 245 +/- 20 kg and habituated to chute restraint were studied in a randomized crossover. Nasal insufflation of oxygen or medical air (10 L/min) was provided prior to and throughout anesthesia. Baseline data were collected before i.m. injection of carfentanil (10 microg/kg) and xylazine (0.2 mg/kg). Arterial blood gases (PaO2 and PaCO2), arterial blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate, and observations of muscle rigidity and movement were collected every 3 min for 30 min. Drugs were antagonized at 30 min with i.m. naltrexone (1 mg/kg) and tolazoline (2 mg/kg). Induction and recovery were significantly faster (mean +/- SD) in elk receiving oxygen (208 +/- 39 and 333 +/- 63 sec, respectively), vs. medical air (306 +/- 84 and 532 +/- 201 sec). Elk receiving oxygen had a significantly higher PaO2 and PaCO2, and significantly lower pH and heart rate. Minimum PaO2 was 75 +/- 30 mm Hg (oxygen), and 28 +/- 6 mm Hg (air). Maximum PaCO2 was 89 +/- 5 mm Hg (oxygen), and 64 +/- 4 mm Hg (air). Frequency of rigidity and movement decreased when PaO2 > or = 70 mm Hg. Animals breathing air demonstrated slower inductions and recoveries, severe hypoxemia, and increased rigidity and movement. Oxygen administration reduced hypoxemia and improved anesthesia quality, but caused prolonged periods of apnea, and moderate to severe hypercarbia and respiratory acidosis.

  19. The effect of physical training on rat calf muscle, oxygen tension, blood flow, metabolism and function in an animal model of chronic occlusive peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, C D; Angersbach, D; Wilke, R

    1992-01-01

    The effect of treadmill physical training (PT) on rat gastrocnemius/plantaris muscle after bilateral femoral artery ligation was investigated. To enable a comparison to be made between the susceptibility of muscles with restricted blood flow and normally perfused skeletal muscle to PT, animals without ligated femoral arteries also underwent PT. PT increased the oxidative capacity of the gastrocnemius/plantaris muscle, as judged by the activity of citrate synthase, and reduced muscle fatigue in both groups of animals. Exercise also tended to lower the activity of a marker enzyme for glycolysis, glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase in all animals, although this only reached the level of statistical significance in the animals with ligated femoral arteries. In the animals with restricted muscle blood flow, PT increased gastrocnemius skeletal muscle blood flow and pO2 and prolonged the time taken to attain maximum muscle twitch tension. The results indicate a great susceptibility of hindlimb skeletal muscles of rats with ligated femoral arteries to PT. They also suggest that the beneficial effect of PT observed in man with chronic occlusive arterial disease (COAD) may result both from an increase in muscle blood flow and from an enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity in the afflicted muscle.

  20. On developing a thesis for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility fellowship: a case study of ultra-low (2%) oxygen tension for extended culture of human embryos.

    PubMed

    Kaser, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    Fellows in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility training are expected to complete 18 months of clinical, basic, or epidemiological research. The goal of this research is not only to provide the basis for the thesis section of the oral board exam but also to spark interest in reproductive medicine research and to provide the next generation of physician-scientists with a foundational experience in research design and implementation. Incoming fellows often have varying degrees of training in research methodology and, likewise, different career goals. Ideally, selection of a thesis topic and mentor should be geared toward defining an "answerable" question and building a practical skill set for future investigation. This contribution to the JARG Young Investigator's Forum revisits the steps of the scientific method through the lens of one recently graduated fellow and his project aimed to test the hypothesis that "sequential oxygen exposure (5% from days 1 to 3, then 2% from days 3 to 5) improves blastocyst yield and quality compared to continuous exposure to 5% oxygen among human preimplantation embryos."

  1. Micro-scale morphology and texture of biogenic iron oxide mats provide a physical record of microbial physiology and oxygen conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krepski, S. T.; Hredzak-showalter, T.; Luther, G. W.; Chan, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    The ability of certain bacteria to deposit Fe oxide minerals has long been recognized. However, we are only beginning to gain greater insights into the physiology and mechanisms of microbial Fe(II) oxidation and biomineralization, due to a small but growing number of isolates and studies on Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). We recently isolated a novel microaerophilic FeOB, Betaproteobacterium Gallionellales strain R-1 (Genbank accession number JN377592) from a freshwater Fe seep in Newark, Delaware, USA. Much like Gallionella ferruginea (93.6% 16S gene sequence similarity), this organism is a bean-shaped cell that forms mineralized extracellular Fe twisted stalks. Strain R-1 shows remarkable physiologic and morphological similarity to the marine Zetaproteobacterium FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, despite being distantly related. We use M. ferrooxydans and strain R-1 as model organisms to study microbial Fe biomineralization and link the formation of microbial Fe oxide mats to environmental conditions and FeOB physiology. To accomplish this, we construct flat glass microslide growth chambers, used in conjunction with solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure the chemistry of FeOB microenvironments in situ while studying undisturbed microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. The development of microbial Fe oxide bands (analogs of mats) begins when cells attach to a surface and deposit minerals. In low-oxygen zones of redox gradients, formed in part by microbial respiration, the bacteria converge into a narrow, mineralized growth band. Filaments orient directionally, as quantified with ArcGIS, towards increasing oxygen, and display uniquely biological characteristics such as branching and a narrow range of widths. Thus, the mineralized structures provide a physical record of FeOB physiology. Observations of putative filamentous Fe microfossils in thin section show that these characteristics can be preserved in the geologic record, even if some

  2. Changes in blood flow, oxygen tension, action potentials, and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the lumbar dorsal root ganglia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Mwaka, Erisa S; Meir, Adam; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Takeno, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Hideaki; Kubota, Masafumi; Shimada, Seiichiro; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2009-07-01

    It is generally believed that radiculopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. However, the basic pathophysiology of circulatory disturbance induced by ischemia and congestion is not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of ischemia and congestion on the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using an in vivo model. The sixth and seventh lumbar laminae were removed and the seventh lumbar DRG was exposed using adult dogs. The aorta was clamped as an ischemic model in the DRG, and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the sixth costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and action potentials in the DRG were recorded over a period of 1 h after clamp release. Finally, we examined the status of intraganglionic blood permeability under a fluorescence microscope following injection of Evans blue albumin into the cephalic vein to determine the type of circulatory disturbance occurring in the DRG. Immediately after inferior vena cava clamping, the central venous pressure increased approximately four times and marked extravasation of protein tracers was induced in the lumbar DRG. Blood flow, partial oxygen pressures, and action potentials within the DRG were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; however, this ischemic model did not reveal any permeability changes in the DRG. The permeability change in the DRG was more easily increased via venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. The intraganglionic venous flow was stopped with compression at much lower pressures than that needed to impact arterial flow. From a clinical perspective, intraganglionic edema formation, rather than arterial ischemia, may be an earlier phenomenon inducing DRG dysfunction.

  3. Oxygen sensitive microwells.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David T

    2010-12-07

    Oxygen tension is critical in a number of cell pathways but is often overlooked in cell culture. One reason for this is the difficulty in modulating and assessing oxygen tensions without disturbing the culture conditions. Toward this end, a simple method to generate oxygen-sensitive microwells was developed through embossing polystyrene (PS) and platinum(ii) octaethylporphyrin ketone (PtOEPK) thin films. In addition to monitoring the oxygen tension, microwells were employed in order to isolate uniform clusters of cells in microwells. The depth and width of the microwells can be adapted to different experimental parameters easily by altering the thin film processing or embossing stamp geometries. The thin oxygen sensitive microwell substrate is also compatible with high magnification modalities such as confocal imaging. The incorporation of the oxygen sensor into the microwells produces measurements of the oxygen tension near the cell surface. The oxygen sensitive microwells were calibrated and used to monitor oxygen tensions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells (MDCKs) cultured at high and low densities as a proof of concept. Wells 500 µm in diameter seeded with an average of 330 cells exhibited an oxygen level of 12.6% whereas wells seeded with an average of 20 cells per well exhibited an oxygen level of 19.5%, a 35.7% difference. This platform represents a new tool for culturing cells in microwells in a format amenable to high magnification imaging while monitoring the oxygen state of the culture media.

  4. Cerebral oxygenation during changes in vascular resistance and flow in patients on cardiopulmonary bypass - a physiological proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Sperna Weiland, N H; Brevoord, D; Jöbsis, D A; de Beaumont, E M F H; Evers, V; Preckel, B; Hollmann, M W; van Dieren, S; de Mol, B A J M; Immink, R V

    2017-01-01

    Despite a rise in blood pressure, cerebral oxygenation decreases following phenylephrine administration, and we hypothesised that phenylephrine reduces cerebral oxygenation by activating cerebral α1 receptors. We studied patients on cardiopulmonary bypass during constant flow. Phenylephrine raised mean arterial pressure (α1 -mediated) from mean (SD) 69 (8) mmHg to 79 (8) mmHg; p = 0.001, and vasopressin raised mean arterial pressure (V1 mediated) from 69 (8) mmHg to 83 (6) mmHg; p = 0.001. Both drugs elicited a comparable decrease in cerebral oxygenation from 61 (7)% to 60 (7)%; p = 0.023 and 61 (8)% to 59 (8)%; p = 0.022, respectively. This implies that after phenylephrine or vasopressin administration, cerebral oxygenation declines as a result of cerebral vasoconstriction, due to either both cerebral α1 and V1 receptors being equipotentially activated or to an intrinsic myogenic mechanism of cerebral vasculature in reaction to blood pressure elevation. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Intra-Operative Tissue Oxygen Tension Is Increased by Local Insufflation of Humidified-Warm CO2 during Open Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean K.; Lindner, Pernilla; Tait, Noel; Maddocks, Tracy; Riepsamen, Angelique; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2) is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods 15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1) humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2) humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3) dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe. Results Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001), or 96.6% (SD 51.9), and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001), in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001). Conclusions In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature. PMID:25835954

  6. Effect of protein supplementation and presence of an antioxidant on the development of bovine zygotes in synthetic oviduct fluid medium under high or low oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, P; O'Kearney-Flynn, M; Boland, M P

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of protein supplementation of culture medium and the presence of a putative antioxidant on bovine zygote development under 5% (low) and 20% (high) O2. In Experiment 1, presumptive zygotes (n=992) were cultured in synthetic oviduct fluid (SOF) alone or supplemented with 3 mg/mL PVP, 3 mg/mL BSA (SOFB), and/or 10% FCS (SOFBF) in 5% CO2, 5% O2, 90% N2. In Experiment 2, zygotes (n=1916) were cultured in SOF, SOFB or SOFBF with or without taurine under high and low O2. In Experiment 1, presence of BSA or BSA plus FCS significantly increased the speed of development compared to SOF or SOF+PVP. Blastocyst quality was also improved, as evidenced by increased hatching rate and cell numbers. In Experiments 2, taurine had no effect on development irrespective of oxygen concentration or protein supplementation. In conclusion, the presence of protein in the culture medium and culture under reduced O2 significantly improved embryo development. Taurine had no effect on development.

  7. Effect of culture at low oxygen tension on the expression of heat shock proteins in a panel of melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Christopher; Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Pawelec, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Tumours are commonly hypoxic and this can be associated with aggressive tumour type, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Heat shock proteins (hsps) are induced in response to hypoxia, provide cancer cells with protection against tumour-associated stressors and chaperone oncoproteins that drive tumour proliferation. This study examined the effect of different oxygen concentrations on the expression of hsps in melanoma cell lines. Melanoma cell lines were cultured in 2% and 20% O(2). Expression of Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp60, Hsp40 and Hsp32 proteins were determined by flow cytometry. Growth rates and viability were reduced in the majority of cell lines by culture in 2% O(2). Hsp expression was different in 2% compared to 20% O(2) and changes in Hsp90 expression correlated with cell line generation time (P<0.005) and viability (P<0.01). Greater total hsp expression correlated with improved viability in 2% but not 20% O(2) (P<0.05). Relative expression of the different hsps was consistent across cell lines and each correlated with the others (P = 0.0001) but not with Hsp32. Hsp expression was inversely correlated with cell line adhesion to laminin as well as collagen type IV and Breslow depth of the original primary tumour tissue (P<0.05), but not with Clark level or patient survival. All five hsps were identified on the cell surface. Culture in 2% O(2) variably altered hsp expression in a panel of melanoma cell lines. Hsp expression was associated with certain cell line characteristics and clinical parameters of the originating tumour.

  8. Temporary forced oral breathing affects neonates oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination, diaphragm muscles structure and physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Padzys, Guy Stéphane; Omouendze, Linda Priscillia

    2014-11-01

    We studied adaptation of diaphragm, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination to forced oral breathing (lasting for only 4 days) following reversible bilateral nasal obstruction performed on day 8 post-natal male rats. Diaphragm myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination and hormones level were analysed during nasal obstruction period. Diaphragm muscle showed significant increases in adult isoforms (MHC 1, 2a) in oral breathing group versus control. Reversible nasal obstruction was associated with a decrease of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination. Nasal obstruction period was associated with reduced growth of the olfactory bulbs and an initial decrease in lung growth. One day after implementing nasal obstruction, basal corticosterone levels had increased (by over 1000). Oral breathing was also associated with a lower level of thyroid hormone. We conclude that a 4 day nasal obstruction period in young rats leads to hormonal changes and to Diaphragm myosin heavy chain structural adaptation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures.

  10. Quadratic function between arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality risk in sepsis patients: an interaction with simplified acute physiology score.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Ji, Xuqing

    2016-10-13

    Oxygen therapy is widely used in emergency and critical care settings, while there is little evidence on its real therapeutic effect. The study aimed to explore the impact of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) on clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis. A large clinical database was employed for the study. Subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of sepsis were eligible for the study. All measurements of PaO2 were extracted. The primary endpoint was death from any causes during hospital stay. Survey data analysis was performed by using individual ICU admission as the primary sampling unit. Quadratic function was assumed for PaO2 and its interaction with other covariates were explored. A total of 199,125 PaO2 samples were identified for 11,002 ICU admissions. Each ICU stay comprised 18 PaO2 samples in average. The fitted multivariable model supported our hypothesis that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk was in quadratic form. There was significant interaction between PaO2 and SAPS-I (p = 0.007). Furthermore, the main effect of PaO2 on SOFA score was nonlinear. The study shows that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk is in quadratic function form, and there is significant interaction between PaO2 and severity of illness.

  11. Quadratic function between arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality risk in sepsis patients: an interaction with simplified acute physiology score

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Ji, Xuqing

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is widely used in emergency and critical care settings, while there is little evidence on its real therapeutic effect. The study aimed to explore the impact of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) on clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis. A large clinical database was employed for the study. Subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of sepsis were eligible for the study. All measurements of PaO2 were extracted. The primary endpoint was death from any causes during hospital stay. Survey data analysis was performed by using individual ICU admission as the primary sampling unit. Quadratic function was assumed for PaO2 and its interaction with other covariates were explored. A total of 199,125 PaO2 samples were identified for 11,002 ICU admissions. Each ICU stay comprised 18 PaO2 samples in average. The fitted multivariable model supported our hypothesis that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk was in quadratic form. There was significant interaction between PaO2 and SAPS-I (p = 0.007). Furthermore, the main effect of PaO2 on SOFA score was nonlinear. The study shows that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk is in quadratic function form, and there is significant interaction between PaO2 and severity of illness. PMID:27734905

  12. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  13. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  14. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  15. Microfluidic platform generates oxygen landscapes for localized hypoxic activation.

    PubMed

    Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T

    2014-12-21

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes.

  16. The new Licox combined brain tissue oxygen and brain temperature monitor: assessment of in vitro accuracy and clinical experience in severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Campbell; Haitsma, Iain; Zador, Zsolt; Hemphill, J Claude; Morabito, Diane; Manley, Geoffrey; Rosenthal, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring of brain tissue oxygen tension is increasingly being used to monitor patients after severe traumatic brain injury and to guide therapies aimed at maintaining brain tissue oxygen tension above threshold levels. The new Licox PMO combined oxygen and temperature catheter (Integra LifeSciences, Plainsboro, NJ) combines measurements of oxygen tension and temperature in a single probe inserted through a bolt mechanism. In this study, we sought to evaluate the accuracy of the new Licox PMO probe under controlled laboratory conditions and to assess the accuracy of oxygen tension and temperature measurements and the new automated card calibration system. We also describe our clinical experience with the Licox PMO probe. Oxygen tension was measured in a 2-chambered apparatus at different oxygen tensions and temperatures. The new card calibration system was compared with a manually calibrated system. Rates of hematoma, infection, and dislodgement in our clinical experience were recorded. The new Licox PMO probe accurately measures oxygen tension over a wide range of oxygen concentrations and physiological temperatures, but it does have a small tendency to underestimate oxygen tension (mean error, -3.8 +/- 3.5%) that is more pronounced between the temperatures of 33 and 39 degrees C. The thermistor of the PMO probe also has a tendency to underestimate temperature when compared with a resistance thermometer (mean error, -0.67 +/- 0.22 degrees C). The card calibration system was also found to introduce some variability in measurements of oxygen tension when compared with a manually calibrated system. Clinical experience with the new probe indicates good placement within the white matter using the improved bolt system and low rates of hematoma (2.9%), infection (0%), and dislodgement (5.9%). The new Licox PMO probe is accurate but has a small, consistent tendency to under-read oxygen tension that is more pronounced at higher temperatures. The probe tends to under

  17. Hematocrit distribution and tissue oxygenation in large microcirculatory networks.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ian G; Linninger, Andreas A

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen tension in the brain is controlled by the microcirculatory supply of RBC, but the effect of non-Newtonian blood flow rheology on tissue oxygenation is not well characterized. This study assesses different biphasic blood flow models for predicting tissue oxygen tension as a function of microcirculatory hemodynamics. Two existing plasma-skimming laws are compared against measured RBC distributions in rat and hamster microcirculatory networks. A novel biphasic blood flow model is introduced. The computational models predict tissue oxygenation in the mesentery, cremaster muscle, and the human secondary cortex. This investigation shows deficiencies in prior models, including inconsistent plasma-skimming trends and insufficient oxygen perfusion due to the high prevalence (33%) of RBC-free microvessels. Our novel method yields physiologically sound RBC distributions and tissue oxygen tensions within one standard deviation of experimental measurements. A simple, novel biphasic blood flow model is introduced with equal or better predictive power when applied to historic raw data sets. It can overcome limitations of prior models pertaining to trifurcations, anastomoses, and loops. This new plasma-skimming law eases the computations of bulk blood flow and hematocrit fields in large microcirculatory networks and converges faster than prior procedures. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Metabolic Profiling and Flux Analysis of MEL-2 Human Embryonic Stem Cells during Exponential Growth at Physiological and Atmospheric Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Titmarsh, Drew; Krömer, Jens O.; Kao, Li-Pin; Nielsen, Lars; Wolvetang, Ernst; Cooper-White, Justin

    2014-01-01

    As human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) steadily progress towards regenerative medicine applications there is an increasing emphasis on the development of bioreactor platforms that enable expansion of these cells to clinically relevant numbers. Surprisingly little is known about the metabolic requirements of hESCs, precluding the rational design and optimisation of such platforms. In this study, we undertook an in-depth characterisation of MEL-2 hESC metabolic behaviour during the exponential growth phase, combining metabolic profiling and flux analysis tools at physiological (hypoxic) and atmospheric (normoxic) oxygen concentrations. To overcome variability in growth profiles and the problem of closing mass balances in a complex environment, we developed protocols to accurately measure uptake and production rates of metabolites, cell density, growth rate and biomass composition, and designed a metabolic flux analysis model for estimating internal rates. hESCs are commonly considered to be highly glycolytic with inactive or immature mitochondria, however, whilst the results of this study confirmed that glycolysis is indeed highly active, we show that at least in MEL-2 hESC, it is supported by the use of oxidative phosphorylation within the mitochondria utilising carbon sources, such as glutamine to maximise ATP production. Under both conditions, glycolysis was disconnected from the mitochondria with all of the glucose being converted to lactate. No difference in the growth rates of cells cultured under physiological or atmospheric oxygen concentrations was observed nor did this cause differences in fluxes through the majority of the internal metabolic pathways associated with biogenesis. These results suggest that hESCs display the conventional Warburg effect, with high aerobic activity despite high lactate production, challenging the idea of an anaerobic metabolism with low mitochondrial activity. The results of this study provide new insight that can be used in

  19. Metabolic profiling and flux analysis of MEL-2 human embryonic stem cells during exponential growth at physiological and atmospheric oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Turner, Jennifer; Quek, Lake-Ee; Titmarsh, Drew; Krömer, Jens O; Kao, Li-Pin; Nielsen, Lars; Wolvetang, Ernst; Cooper-White, Justin

    2014-01-01

    As human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) steadily progress towards regenerative medicine applications there is an increasing emphasis on the development of bioreactor platforms that enable expansion of these cells to clinically relevant numbers. Surprisingly little is known about the metabolic requirements of hESCs, precluding the rational design and optimisation of such platforms. In this study, we undertook an in-depth characterisation of MEL-2 hESC metabolic behaviour during the exponential growth phase, combining metabolic profiling and flux analysis tools at physiological (hypoxic) and atmospheric (normoxic) oxygen concentrations. To overcome variability in growth profiles and the problem of closing mass balances in a complex environment, we developed protocols to accurately measure uptake and production rates of metabolites, cell density, growth rate and biomass composition, and designed a metabolic flux analysis model for estimating internal rates. hESCs are commonly considered to be highly glycolytic with inactive or immature mitochondria, however, whilst the results of this study confirmed that glycolysis is indeed highly active, we show that at least in MEL-2 hESC, it is supported by the use of oxidative phosphorylation within the mitochondria utilising carbon sources, such as glutamine to maximise ATP production. Under both conditions, glycolysis was disconnected from the mitochondria with all of the glucose being converted to lactate. No difference in the growth rates of cells cultured under physiological or atmospheric oxygen concentrations was observed nor did this cause differences in fluxes through the majority of the internal metabolic pathways associated with biogenesis. These results suggest that hESCs display the conventional Warburg effect, with high aerobic activity despite high lactate production, challenging the idea of an anaerobic metabolism with low mitochondrial activity. The results of this study provide new insight that can be used in

  20. [Apneic oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, A V; Vyzhigina, M A; Parshin, V D; Fedorov, D S

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances in thoracic and tracheal surgery make the anaesthesiologist use different respiratory techniques during the operation. Apneic oxygenation is a one of alternative techniques. This method is relatively easy in use, does not require special expensive equipment and is the only possible technique in several clinical situations when other respiratory methods are undesirable or cannot be used. However there is no enough information about apneic oxygenation in Russian. This article reviews publications about apneic oxygenation. The review deals with experiments on diffusion respiration in animals, physiological changes during apneic oxygenation in man and defines clinical cases when apneic oxygenation can be used.

  1. A quantitative method to monitor reactive oxygen species production by electron paramagnetic resonance in physiological and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Montorsi, Michela; Porcelli, Simone; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the assessment of oxidative stress in health and disease clashes with the lack of consensus on reliable quantitative noninvasive methods applicable. The study aimed at demonstrating that a recently developed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance microinvasive method provides direct evidence of the "instantaneous" presence of ROS returning absolute concentration levels that correlate with "a posteriori" assays of ROS-induced damage by means of biomarkers. The reliability of the choice to measure ROS production rate in human capillary blood rather than in plasma was tested (step I). A significant (P < 0.01) linear relationship between EPR data collected on capillary blood versus venous blood (R (2) = 0.95), plasma (R (2) = 0.82), and erythrocytes (R (2) = 0.73) was found. Then (step II) ROS production changes of various subjects' categories, young versus old and healthy versus pathological at rest condition, were found significantly different (range 0.0001-0.05 P level). The comparison of the results with antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage biomarkers concentrations showed that all changes indicating increased oxidative stress are directly related to ROS production increase. Therefore, the adopted method may be an automated technique for a lot of routine in clinical trials.

  2. Psidium cattleianum fruit extracts are efficient in vitro scavengers of physiologically relevant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Chisté, Renan Campos; Freitas, Marisa; da Silva, Alex Fiori; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-12-15

    Psidium cattleianum, an unexploited Brazilian native fruit, is considered a potential source of bioactive compounds. In the present study, the in vitro scavenging capacity of skin and pulp extracts from P. cattleianum fruits against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was evaluated by in vitro screening assays. Additionally, the composition of phenolic compounds and carotenoids in both extracts was determined by LC-MS/MS. The major phenolic compounds identified and quantified (dry matter) in the skin and pulp extracts of P. cattleianum were ellagic acid (2213-3818 μg/g extracts), ellagic acid deoxyhexoside (1475-2,070 μg/g extracts) and epicatechin gallate (885-1,603 μg/g extracts); while all-trans-lutein (2-10 μg/g extracts), all-trans-antheraxanthin (1.6-9 μg/g extracts) and all-trans-β-carotene (4-6 μg/g extracts) were the major carotenoids identified in both extracts. P. cattleianum pulp extract showed higher scavenging capacity than skin extract for all tested ROS and RNS. Considering the potential beneficial effects to human health, P. cattleianum may be considered as a good source of natural antioxidants and may be useful for the food and phytopharmaceutical industry.

  3. DNA Looping, Supercoiling and Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, Laura

    2007-11-01

    In complex organisms, activation or repression of gene expression by proteins bound to enhancer or silencer elements located several kilobases away from the promoter is a well recognized phenomenon. However, a mechanistic understanding of any of these multiprotein interactions is still incomplete. Part of the difficulty in characterizing long-range interactions is the complexity of the regulatory systems and also an underestimation of the effect of DNA supercoiling and tension. Supercoiling is expected to promote interactions between DNA sites because it winds the DNA into compact plectonemes in which distant DNA segments more frequently draw close. The idea that DNA is also under various levels of tension is becoming more widely accepted. Forces that stretch the double helix in vivo are the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone, the action of motor enzymes perhaps acting upon a topologically constrained sequence of DNA or chromosome segregation during cell mitosis following DNA replication. Presently, little is known about the tension acting on DNA in vivo, but characterization of how physiological regulatory processes, such as loop formation, depend on DNA tension in vitro will indicate the stretching force regimes likely to exist in vivo. In this light, the well studied CI protein of bacteriophage l, which was recently found to cause a of 3.8 kbp loop in DNA, is an ideal system in which to characterize long-range gene regulation. The large size of the loop lends itself to single-molecule techniques, which allow characterization of the dynamics of CI-mediated l DNA looping under controlled levels of supercoiling and tension. Such experiments are being used to discover the principles of long-range interactions in l and in more complex systems.

  4. Oxidases and reactive oxygen species during hematopoiesis: a focus on megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eliades, Alexia; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ravid, Katya

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated as a result of various reactions, control an array of cellular processes. The role of ROS during megakaryocyte (MK) development has been a subject of interest and research. The bone marrow niche is the major site of MK differentiation and maturation. In this environment, a gradient of oxygen tension, from normoxia to hypoxia results in different levels of ROS, impacting cellular physiology. This article provides an overview of major sources of ROS, their implication in different signaling pathways, and their effect on cellular physiology, with a focus on megakaryopoiesis. The importance of ROS-generating oxidases in MK biology and pathology, including myelofibrosis, is also described. PMID:22331622

  5. Tension generation by threads of contractile proteins

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Threads of contractile proteins were formed via extrusion and their isometric tensions and isotonic contraction velocities were measured. We obtained reproducible data by using a new and sensitive tensiometer. The force-velocity curves of actomyosin threads were similar to those of muscle, with isometric tensions of the order of 10g/cm2 and maximum contraction velocites of the order of 10(-2) lengths/s. The data could be fitted by Hill's equation. Addition of tropomyosin and troponin to the threads increased isometric tension and maximum contraction velocity. Threads which contained troponin and tropomyosin required Ca++ for contraction and the dependence of their isometric tension on the level of free Ca++ was like that of muscle. The dependence of tension or of contraction velocity upon temperature or upon ionic strength is similar for actomyosin threads and muscle fibers. In contrast, the dependence of most parameters which are characteristic of the actomyosin interaction in solution (or suspension) upon these variables is not similar to the dependence of the muscle fiber parameters. The conclusion we have drawn from these results is that the mechanism of tension generation in the threads is similar to the mechanism that exists in muscle. Because the protein composition of the thread system can be manipulated readily and because the tensions and velocities of the threads can be related directly to the physiological parameters of muscle fibers, the threads provide a powerful method for studying contractile proteins. PMID:137958

  6. Lignification and tension wood.

    PubMed

    Pilate, Gilles; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard; Yoshinaga, Arata; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Laurans, Françoise; Lapierre, Catherine; Ruel, Katia

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood trees are able to reorient their axes owing to tension wood differentiation. Tension wood is characterised by important ultrastructural modifications, such as the occurrence in a number of species, of an extra secondary wall layer, named gelatinous layer or G-layer, mainly constituted of cellulose microfibrils oriented nearly parallel to the fibre axis. This G-layer appears directly involved in the definition of tension wood mechanical properties. This review gathers the data available in the literature about lignification during tension wood formation. Potential roles for lignin in tension wood formation are inferred from biochemical, anatomical and mechanical studies, from the hypotheses proposed to describe tension wood function and from data coming from new research areas such as functional genomics.

  7. Permanent tensions in organization.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Noora

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change. This study used paradox theory and a case study. The case organization is a public university hospital in Finland involving several stakeholders. The analysis suggests that the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change is a paradox that is part of organizational reality. As an organization learns to live with its permanent tensions, the renewal paradox settles into equilibrium. When tensions are provoked, the paradox is disturbed until it finds a new balance. This flexible nature of the paradox is the force that keeps the different stakeholders simultaneously empowered to maintain their unique missions and cohesive in order to benefit from the larger synergy. This research suggests that identification and evaluation of each permanent tension within an organization is important when executing organizational change. The fact that certain tensions are permanent and cannot be solved may have an influence on how planned change initiatives are executed. The results show that permanent tensions may be harnessed for the benefit of an organizational change. This research demonstrates originality by offering an alternative view of tensions, a view which emphasizes not only their permanent and plural nature but their importance for enabling the organization to change at its own, non-disruptive pace. The research also proposes a new concept, the "renewal paradox", to enhance understanding of the relationship between permanent tensions and organizational change.

  8. Numerical model of fluid flow and oxygen transport in a radial-flow microchannel containing hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, G A; Folch, A; Bhatia, S N; Balis, U J; Yarmush, M L; Toner, M

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of monolayers of cultured hepatocytes into an extracorporeal perfusion system has become a promising approach for the development of a temporary bioartificial liver (BAL) support system. In this paper we present a numerical investigation of the oxygen tension, shear stress, and pressure drop in a bioreactor for a BAL composed of plasma-perfused chambers containing monolayers of porcine hepatocytes. The chambers consist of microfabricated parallel disks with center-to-edge radial flow. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR), measured in vitro for porcine hepatocytes, was curve-fitted using Michaelis-Menten kinetics for simulation of the oxygen concentration profile. The effect of different parameters that may influence the oxygen transport inside the chambers, such as the plasma flow rate, the chamber height, the initial oxygen tension in the perfused plasma, the OUR, and K(m) was investigated. We found that both the plasma flow rate and the initial oxygen tension may have an important effect upon oxygen transport. Increasing the flow rate and/or the inlet oxygen tension resulted in improved oxygen transport to cells in the radial-flow microchannels, and allowed significantly greater diameter reactor without oxygen limitation to the hepatocytes. In the range investigated in this paper (10 microns < H < 100 microns), and for a constant plasma flow rate, the chamber height, H, had a negligible effect on the oxygen transport to hepatocytes. On the contrary, it strongly affected the mechanical stress on the cells that is also crucial for the successful design of the BAL reactors. A twofold decrease in chamber height from 50 to 25 microns produced approximately a fivefold increase in maximal shear stress at the inlet of the reactor from 2 to 10 dyn/cm2. Further decrease in chamber height resulted in shear stress values that are physiologically unrealistic. Therefore, the channel height needs to be carefully chosen in a BAL design to avoid deleterious hydrodynamic

  9. Dynamic properties of photosystem II membranes at physiological temperatures characterized by elastic incoherent neutron scattering. Increased flexibility associated with the inactivation of the oxygen evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gergely; Pieper, Jörg; Krumova, Sashka B; Kovács, László; Trapp, Marcus; Garab, Győző; Peters, Judith

    2012-03-01

    Elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS), a non-invasive technique which is capable of measuring the mean square displacement of atoms in the sample, has been widely used in biology for exploring the dynamics of proteins and lipid membranes but studies on photosynthetic systems are scarce. In this study we investigated the dynamic characteristics of Photosystem II (PSII) membrane fragments between 280 and 340 K, i.e., in the physiological temperature range and in the range of thermal denaturation of some of the protein complexes. The mean square displacement values revealed the presence of a hydration-sensitive transition in the sample between 310 and 320 K, suggesting that the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) plays an important role in the transition. Indeed, in samples in which the OEC had been removed by TRIS- or heat-treatments (323 and 333 K) no such transition was found. Further support on the main role of OEC in these reorganizations is provided by data obtained from differential scanning calorimetry experiments, showing marked differences between the untreated and TRIS-treated samples. In contrast, circular dichroism spectra exhibited only minor changes in the excitonic interactions below 323 K, showing that the molecular organization of the pigment-protein complexes remains essentially unaffected. Our data, along with earlier incoherent neutron scattering data on PSII membranes at cryogenic temperatures (Pieper et al., Biochemistry 46:11398-11409, 2007), demonstrate that this technique can be applied to characterize the dynamic features of PSII membranes, and can be used to investigate photosynthetic membranes under physiologically relevant experimental conditions.

  10. Perspectives on Campus Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, David C., Ed.

    The purpose of this book was to provide background information and insight on campus tensions, and suggest ideas on how to go about reducing these tensions. The papers are divided into 5 parts. Part I, The New Situation, includes papers by Kenneth E. Boulding, William M. Birenbaum, Marcus G. Raskin, and Peter Schrag. Part II, Where the Students…

  11. Tension type headache

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-01-01

    Tension type headaches are common in clinical practice. Earlier known by various names, the diagnosis has had psychological connotations. Recent evidence has helped clarify the neurobiological basis and the disorder is increasingly considered more in the preview of neurologists. The classification, clinical features, differential diagnosis and treatment of tension type headache are discussed in this paper. PMID:23024570

  12. [Tension-type headaches].

    PubMed

    Trkanjec, Zlatko; Aleksić-Shihabi, Anka

    2008-05-01

    Tension-type headache is one of the most common and most significant primary headaches. Tension-type headache is a very heterogeneous disorder. It can be divided into episodic and chronic tension-type headache. The pain is a dull, pressing, tightening, typically band-like sensation. The pain is of non-pulsating quality, the location is bilateral, and there is no nausea, vomiting, phonophobia or photophobia. There are no prodromal symptoms or aura. The pain is mild to moderate and it does not aggravate with routine physical activities. Some patients have increased tenderness of pericranial muscles. Psychological factors are common in tension-type headache. Nitric oxide has an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic tension-type headache. Probably it promotes central sensitization and therefore increases nociception. In differential diagnosis of tension type-headache, all structural and metabolic diseases causing headache have to be ruled out, as well as all other primary headaches. All comorbid and coexistent states should also be considered. In the treatment of tension-type headache, pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods are employed. Analgesics, myorelaxants, anxiolytics and antidepressants are most commonly used, as well as physical therapy, massage, acupuncture, behavioral therapy and psychotherapy. Recently, the applications of botulinum toxin and acupuncture have been described in the treatment and prophylaxis of tension-type headache.

  13. Perspectives on Campus Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, David C., Ed.

    The purpose of this book was to provide background information and insight on campus tensions, and suggest ideas on how to go about reducing these tensions. The papers are divided into 5 parts. Part I, The New Situation, includes papers by Kenneth E. Boulding, William M. Birenbaum, Marcus G. Raskin, and Peter Schrag. Part II, Where the Students…

  14. Tensions in Distributed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Jeanne; Ng, David

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article proposes the utility of using activity theory as an analytical lens to examine the theoretical construct of distributed leadership, specifically to illuminate tensions encountered by leaders and how they resolved these tensions. Research Method: The study adopted the naturalistic inquiry approach of a case study of an…

  15. Surface Tensions and Their Variations with Temperature and Impurities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.; Fine, J.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tensions in this work were determined using the sessile drop technique. This method is based on a comparison of the profile of a liquid drop with the profile calculated by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The comparison can be made in several ways; the traditional Bashforth-Adams procedure was used in conjunction with recently calculated drop shape tables which virtually eliminate interpolation errors. Although previous study has found little difference in measurements with pure and oxygen doped silicon, there is other evidence suggesting that oxygen in dilute concentrations severely depresses the surface tension of silicon. The surface tension of liquid silicon in purified argon atmospheres was measured. A temperature coefficient near -0.28 mJ/square meters K was found. The experiments show a high sensitivity of the surface tension to what is believed are low concentrations of oxygen. Thus one cannot rule out some effect of low levels of oxygen in the results. However, the highest surface tension values obtained in conditions which minimized the residual oxygen pressure are in good agreement with a previous measurement in pure hydrogen. Therefore, depression of the surface tension by oxygen is insignificant in these measurements.

  16. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  17. Brain Tissue Oxygen Monitoring in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Brain injury results from ischemia, tissue hypoxia, and a cascade of secondary events. The cornerstone of neurocritical care management is optimization and maintenance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen and substrate delivery to prevent or attenuate this secondary damage. New techniques for monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PtiO2) are now available. Brain PtiO2 reflects both oxygen delivery and consumption. Brain hypoxia (low brain PtiO2) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with brain injury. Strategies to improve brain PtiO2 have focused mainly on increasing oxygen delivery either by increasing CBF or by increasing arterial oxygen content. The results of nonrandomized studies comparing brain PtiO2-guided therapy with intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure-guided therapy, while promising, have been mixed. More studies are needed including prospective, randomized controlled trials to assess the true value of this approach. The following is a review of the physiology of brain tissue oxygenation, the effect of brain hypoxia on outcome, strategies to increase oxygen delivery, and outcome studies of brain PtiO2-guided therapy in neurocritical care.

  18. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  19. Echinococcal tension pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, Farhan; Al-Omeri, Muayyad M.

    1969-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is rarely mentioned among the causes of pneumothorax in text-books or monographs, especially those written in English. Five examples of tension pneumothorax secondary to ruptured hydatid cyst of the lung are reported: the mechanism of this tension effect and helpful diagnostic points are discussed. We think that surgical correction is the only satisfactory treatment of tension pneumothorax due to ruptured hydatid cyst: surgery is advocated in any suspected cyst as soon as it is discovered so as to avoid any such serious complication. Images PMID:5348321

  20. Enhanced Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging by Overproduction of Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Delays Postharvest Physiological Deterioration of Cassava Storage Roots1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R.; Zhang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava (Manihot esculenta) storage roots is the result of a rapid oxidative burst, which leads to discoloration of the vascular tissues due to the oxidation of phenolic compounds. In this study, coexpression of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) in transgenic cassava was used to explore the intrinsic relationship between ROS scavenging and PPD occurrence. Transgenic cassava plants integrated with the expression cassette p54::MeCu/ZnSOD-35S::MeCAT1 were confirmed by Southern-blot analysis. The expression of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeCAT1 was verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic activity analysis both in the leaves and storage roots. Under exposure to the ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen or to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the transgenic plants showed higher enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT than the wild-type plants. Levels of malondialdehyde, chlorophyll degradation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 accumulation were dramatically reduced in the transgenic lines compared with the wild type. After harvest, the storage roots of transgenic cassava lines show a delay in their PPD response of at least 10 d, accompanied by less mitochondrial oxidation and H2O2 accumulation, compared with those of the wild type. We hypothesize that this is due to the combined ectopic expression of Cu/ZnSOD and CAT leading to an improved synergistic ROS-scavenging capacity of the roots. Our study not only sheds light on the mechanism of the PPD process but also develops an effective approach for delaying the occurrence of PPD in cassava. PMID:23344905

  1. DNA Spools under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulić, I. M.; Schiessel, H.

    2004-06-01

    DNA spools, structures in which DNA is wrapped and helically coiled onto itself or onto a protein core, are ubiquitous in nature. We develop a general theory describing the nonequilibrium behavior of DNA spools under linear tension. Two puzzling and seemingly unrelated recent experimental findings, the sudden quantized unwrapping of nucleosomes and that of DNA toroidal condensates under tension, are theoretically explained and shown to be of the same origin. The study provides new insights into nucleosome and chromatin fiber stability and dynamics.

  2. Role of erythrocyte-released ATP in the regulation of microvascular oxygen supply in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, M L; Ellis, C G; Sprague, R S

    2016-03-01

    In a 1914 book entitled The Respiratory Function of the Blood, Joseph Barcroft stated that 'the cell takes what it needs and leaves the rest'. He postulated that there must be both a 'call for oxygen' and a 'mechanism by which the call elicits a response...' In the past century, intensive investigation has provided significant insights into the haemodynamic and biophysical mechanisms involved in supplying oxygen to skeletal muscle. However, the identification of the mechanism by which tissue oxygen needs are sensed and the affector responsible for altering the upstream vasculature to enable the need to be appropriately met has been a challenge. In 1995, Ellsworth et al. proposed that the oxygen-carrying erythrocyte, by virtue of its capacity to release the vasoactive mediator ATP in response to a decrease in oxygen saturation, could serve both roles. Several in vitro and in situ studies have established that exposure of erythrocytes to reduced oxygen tension induces the release of ATP which does result in a conducted arteriolar vasodilation with a sufficiently rapid time course to make the mechanism physiologically relevant. The components of the signalling pathway for the controlled release of ATP from erythrocytes in response to exposure to low oxygen tension have been determined. In addition, the implications of defective ATP release on human pathological conditions have been explored. This review provides a perspective on oxygen supply and the role that such a mechanism plays in meeting the oxygen needs of skeletal muscle.

  3. Entropic Tension in Crowded Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Sens, Pierre; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Unlike their model membrane counterparts, biological membranes are richly decorated with a heterogeneous assembly of membrane proteins. These proteins are so tightly packed that their excluded area interactions can alter the free energy landscape controlling the conformational transitions suffered by such proteins. For membrane channels, this effect can alter the critical membrane tension at which they undergo a transition from a closed to an open state, and therefore influence protein function in vivo. Despite their obvious importance, crowding phenomena in membranes are much less well studied than in the cytoplasm. Using statistical mechanics results for hard disk liquids, we show that crowding induces an entropic tension in the membrane, which influences transitions that alter the projected area and circumference of a membrane protein. As a specific case study in this effect, we consider the impact of crowding on the gating properties of bacterial mechanosensitive membrane channels, which are thought to confer osmoprotection when these cells are subjected to osmotic shock. We find that crowding can alter the gating energies by more than in physiological conditions, a substantial fraction of the total gating energies in some cases. Given the ubiquity of membrane crowding, the nonspecific nature of excluded volume interactions, and the fact that the function of many membrane proteins involve significant conformational changes, this specific case study highlights a general aspect in the function of membrane proteins. PMID:22438801

  4. Managing the right tension.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Dominic; Favaro, Ken

    2006-12-01

    Of all the competing objectives every company faces, three pairs stand out: profitability versus growth, the short term versus the long term, and the whole organization versus the units. In each case, progress on one front usually comes at the expense of progress on the other. The authors researched the performance of more than 1000 companies worldwide over the past two decades and found that most struggle to succeed across the three tensions. From 1983 to 2003, for example, only 32% of these companies more often than not achieved positive profitability and revenue growth at the same time. The problem, the authors discovered, is not so much that managers don't recognize the tensions--those are all too familiar to anyone who has ever run a business. Rather, it is that managers frequently don't focus on the tension that matters most to their company. Even when they do identify the right tension, they usually make the mistake of prioritizing a "lead" objective within it-for example, profitability over growth. As a result, companies often end up moving first in this direction, then in that, and then back again, never quite resolving the tension. The companies that performed best adopted a very different approach. Instead of setting a lead objective, they looked at how best to strengthen what the two sides of each tension have in common: For profitability and growth,the common bond is customer benefit; for the short term and the long, it is sustainable earnings; and for the whole and its parts, it is particular organizational resources and capabilities. The authors describe how companies can select the right tension, what traps they may fall into when they focus on one side over the other, and how to escape these traps by managing to the bonds between objectives.

  5. Surface Tension Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Burkhard; Engel, Horst; Schleifenbaum, Bernd

    1989-12-01

    A new microscopic technique will be presented for imaging surface topography and the locally varying surface tension of the object. With this technique it is possible to image the locally varying chemical composition of the specimen surface on a microscopic scale because the surface tension depends on the chemical composition. The imaging technique can be described as follows: By a simple preparation technique a thin (thickness several microns) liquid layer (e.g. immersion oil), is placed on the surface of the specimen. The resulting surface tension forces the boundary of the liquid layer to move. As the surface tension is a function of the location the boundary is modulated according to the magnitude of the surface tension at each place. Thus registering the shape of the moving boundary of the liquid layer at equidistant time intervals yields information on the specimen surface. The shape of the moving boundary is detected by a light microscope with differential interference contrast in combination with an image analysis system suited for real-time processing of image sequences in a threshold detection mode.

  6. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  7. [Tissue oxygen exchange and oxidative processes in long-livers: age peculiarities].

    PubMed

    Korkushko, O V; Ivanov, L A; Shatilo, V B

    2012-01-01

    This work was undertaken to study tissue oxygen exchange and oxidative processes in the long-lived individuals who were assumed as the physiologically aging individuals. Oxygen tension was assessed in forearm subcutaneous cellular tissue by means of the polarographic method while performing 10 min oxygen inhalation tests (with spontaneous oxygemogram recording) and a 10 min clamping of vessels. The obtained data served as the tissue oxygen exchange indicator. This approach made us possible to evaluate the oxygen delivery and oxygen uptake. To study qualitative characteristics of oxidative processes, we assessed vacat-oxygen of the blood and urine and estimated the underoxidation coefficient proposed by Muller. We have found that tissue respiration intensity falls, the amount of underoxidated products of the blood and urine rises, and the underoxidation coefficient increases in aging. The decrease of tissue oxygen respiration intensity in subcutaneous cellular tissue reflects the development of tissue hypoxia associated with reduced activity of the enzymes, being involved in oxygen exchange. An age-related decrease of tissue perfusion leads to the formation of circulatory hypoxia and also contributes considerably to tissue hypoxia formation. The revealed changes in the tissue oxygen exchange and oxidative processes in the long-livers are generally correspondent to those that can be seen in the people of 80-89 years. This finding speaks in favor of the physiological aging in the long-livers.

  8. Physiological responses of cultured bovine granulosa cells to elevated temperatures under low and high oxygen in the presence of different concentrations of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Zeebaree, Bayar K; Kwong, Wing Y; Mann, George E; Gutierrez, Carlos G; Sinclair, Kevin D

    2017-09-15

    Our understanding of the effects of temperature on granulosa cell (GC) physiology is primarily limited to in vitro studies conducted under atmospheric (∼20% O2) conditions. In the current series of factorial experiments we identify important effects of O2 level (i.e. 5% vs 20% O2) on GC viability and steroidogenesis, and go onto report effects of standard (37.5 °C) vs high (40.0 °C) temperatures under more physiologically representative (i.e. 5%) O2 levels in the presence of different levels of melatonin (0, 20, 200 and 2000 pg/ml); a potent free-radical scavenger and abundant molecule within the ovarian follicle. Cells aspirated from antral (4-6 mm) follicles were cultured in fibronectin-coated wells using serum-free M199 for up to 144 h. At 37.5 °C viable cell number was enhanced and luteinization reduced under 5 vs 20% O2. Oxygen level interacted (P < 0.001) with time in culture to affect aromatase activity and cell estradiol (E2) production (pg/mL/10(5) cells). These decreased between 48 and 96 h for both O2 levels but increased again by 144 h for cells cultured under 5% but not 20% O2. Progesterone (P4) concentration (ng/mL/10(5) cells) was greater (P < 0.001) under 20 vs 5% O2 at 96 and 144 h. Cell number increased (P < 0.01) with time in culture under 5% O2 irrespective of temperature. However, higher doses of melatonin increased viable cell number at 40.0 °C but reduced viable cell number at 37.5 °C (P = 0.004). Melatonin also reduced (P < 0.001) ROS generation at both O2 levels across all concentrations. E2 increased with time in culture at both temperatures under 5% O2, however P4 declined between 96 and 144 h at 40.0 but not 37.5 °C. Furthermore, melatonin interacted (P < 0.001) with temperature in a dose dependent manner to increase P4 at 37.5 °C but to reduce P4 at 40.0 °C. Transcript expression for HSD3B1 paralleled temporal changes in P4 production, and those for HBA were greater at 5% than 20% O2, suggesting

  9. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Hyper-Adrenergic Hypertension: Biochemical, Physiological, and Pharmacological Evidence from Targeted Ablation of the Chromogranin A (Chga) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Jiaur R.; Zhang, Kuixing; RamachandraRao, Satish P.; Mahata, Manjula; Chen, Yuqing; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Naviaux, Robert K.; Sharma, Kumar; Mahata, Sushil K.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress, an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) outstripping antioxidant defense mechanisms, occurs in cardiovascular pathologies including hypertension. Here, we used biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological approaches to explore the role of derangements of catecholamines, ROS, and NO• in the development of a hyper-adrenergic model of hereditary hypertension: targeted ablation (knockout, KO) of chromogranin A (Chga) in the mouse. Methods and Results Homozygous (−/−) Chga gene knockout (KO) mice were compared to wild-type (WT, +/+) controls. In the KO mouse, elevations of systolic and diastolic BP were accompanied by not only elevated catecholamine (norepinephrine and epinephrine) concentrations, but also increased ROS (H2O2) and isoprostane (an index of lipid peroxidation), as well as depletion of NO•. Renal transcript analyses implicated changes in Nox1/2, Xo/Xdh, and Sod1,2 mRNAs in ROS elevation by the KO state. KO alterations in BP, catecholamines, H2O2, isoprostane, and NO• could be abrogated or even normalized (rescued) by either sympathetic outflow inhibition (with clonidine) or NADPH oxidase inhibition (with apocynin). In cultured renal podocytes, H2O2 production was substantially augmented by epinephrine (likely through b2-adrenergic receptors) and modestly diminished by norepinephrine (likely through a1-adrenergic receptors). Conclusions ROS seem to play a necessary role in the development of hyper-adrenergic hypertension in this model, in a process mechanistically linking elevated BP with catecholamine excess, renal transcriptional responses, ROS elevation, lipid peroxidation, and NO• depletion. Some of the changes seem to be dependent on transcription, while others are immediate. The cycle could be disrupted by inhibition of either sympathetic outflow or NADPH oxidase. Since common genetic variation at the human CHGA locus alters BP, the results have implications for antihypertensive treatment as

  10. Role of reactive oxygen species in hyperadrenergic hypertension: biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological evidence from targeted ablation of the chromogranin a (Chga) gene.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Jiaur R; Zhang, Kuixing; RamachandraRao, Satish P; Mahata, Manjula; Chen, Yuqing; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Naviaux, Robert K; Sharma, Kumar; Mahata, Sushil K; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2010-10-01

    Oxidative stress, an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) outstripping antioxidant defense mechanisms, occurs in cardiovascular pathologies, including hypertension. In the present study, we used biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological approaches to explore the role of derangements of catecholamines, ROS, and the endothelium-derived relaxing factor nitric oxide (NO(•)) in the development of a hyperadrenergic model of hereditary hypertension: targeted ablation (knockout [KO]) of chromogranin A (Chga) in the mouse. Homozygous ⁻(/)⁻ Chga gene knockout (KO) mice were compared with wild-type (WT, +/+) control mice. In the KO mouse, elevations of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were accompanied by not only elevated catecholamine (norepinephrine and epinephrine) concentrations but also increased ROS (H₂O₂) and isoprostane (an index of lipid peroxidation), as well as depletion of NO(•). Renal transcript analyses implicated changes in Nox1/2, Xo/Xdh, and Sod1,2 mRNAs in ROS elevation by the KO state. KO alterations in blood pressure, catecholamines, H₂O₂, isoprostane, and NO(•) could be abrogated or even normalized (rescued) by either sympathetic outflow inhibition (with clonidine) or NADPH oxidase inhibition (with apocynin). In cultured renal podocytes, H₂O₂ production was substantially augmented by epinephrine (probably through β₂-adrenergic receptors) and modestly diminished by norepinephrine (probably through α₁-adrenergic receptors). ROS appear to play a necessary role in the development of hyperadrenergic hypertension in this model, in a process mechanistically linking elevated blood pressure with catecholamine excess, renal transcriptional responses, ROS elevation, lipid peroxidation, and NO(•) depletion. Some of the changes appear to be dependent on transcription, whereas others are immediate. The cycle could be disrupted by inhibition of either sympathetic outflow or NADPH oxidase. Because common genetic

  11. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Gregg L.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology. PMID:26328879

  12. [Treatment of tension headache].

    PubMed

    Schoenen, J

    2000-01-01

    The scientific basis of tension- type headache suffers from the lack of precise pathophysiological knowledge and the heterogenecity of this disorder. Treatment of acute tension-type headache episodes is more effective with an NSAIDs (ibuprofen 400-800mg, naproxen 550-825mg, ketoprofen 50-75mg) than with aspirin or paracetamol. Caffein containing preparations of NSAIDs are slightly superior, but should not be taken frequently to avoid headache chronification. For chronic tension-type headache, relaxation therapies with EMG biofeedback and tricyclics have about the same efficacy rate of 40-50p.100. Physical therapy and acupuncture are in general less effective. There is thus clearly a need for better strategies, e.g. combination of available therapies and novel approaches.

  13. Surface Tension of Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perko, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry and more specifically surface tension are introduced to spacetime. Lagrangian equations of motion for membranes of curved spacetime manifold are derived. The equations of motion in spatial directions are dispersion equations and can be rearranged to Schrodinger's equation where Plank's constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. The equation of motion in the time-direction has two immediately recognizable solutions: electromagnetic waves and corpuscles. The corpuscular membrane solution can assume different genus depending on quantized amounts of surface energy. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found that satisfies general relativity. Application of the surface tension to quantum electrodynamics and implications for quantum chromodynamics are discussed. Although much work remains, it is suggested that spacetime surface tension may provide a classical explanation that combines general relativity with field theories in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  14. Tension solar mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, W.P.

    1986-09-02

    A solar collector is described comprising a central tower having a solar receiver thereon; tension towers positioned concentrically about the central tower;a rigid inner ring disposed about the central tower and sized to permit vertical movement relative to the central tower; cables extending between the inner ring and the tops of each of the tension towers; and a reflectively-coated sheet of flexible material attached to the upper surface of the cables; whereby the action of gravity on the cables and the sheet form a concave reflector for focusing solar energy onto the solar receiver.

  15. Role of Erythrocyte-released ATP in the Regulation of Microvascular Oxygen Supply in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Mary L.; Ellis, Christopher G.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2015-01-01

    In a 1914 book entitled The Respiratory Function of the Blood, Joseph Barcroft stated that “the cell takes what it needs and leaves the rest.” He postulated that there must be both a “call for oxygen” and a “mechanism by which the call elicits a response…” In the past century, intensive investigation has provided significant insights into the hemodynamic and biophysical mechanisms involved in supplying oxygen to skeletal muscle. However, the identification of the mechanism by which tissue oxygen needs are sensed and the affector responsible for altering the upstream vasculature to enable the need to be appropriately met has been a challenge. In 1995, Ellsworth et al proposed that the oxygen carrying erythrocyte, by virtue of its capacity to release the vasoactive mediator ATP in response to a decrease in oxygen saturation, could serve both roles. Several in vitro and in situ studies have established that exposure of erythrocytes to reduced oxygen tension induces the release of ATP which does result in a conducted arteriolar vasodilation with a sufficiently rapid time course to make the mechanism physiologically relevant. The components of the signaling pathway for the controlled release of ATP from erythrocytes in response to exposure to low oxygen tension have been determined. In addition, the implications of defective ATP release on human pathological conditions have been explored. This review provides a perspective on oxygen supply and the role that such a mechanism plays in meeting the oxygen needs of skeletal muscle. PMID:26336065

  16. Oxygen and coronary vascular resistance during autoregulation and metabolic vasodilation in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Drake-Holland, A J; Laird, J D; Noble, M I; Spaan, J A; Vergroesen, I

    1984-01-01

    The hypothesis that tissue oxygen tension controls coronary vascular resistance during changes in perfusion pressure and oxygen consumption was expressed in a simplified mathematical form capable of making quantitative predictions. The predictive value of this formulation of the hypothesis was tested in experiments on anaesthetized mongrel dogs subjected to constant-pressure perfusion of the left main coronary artery, with measurements of coronary blood flow and arterio-venous oxygen content differences. Coronary venous oxygen content was used as an index of tissue oxygenation. The responses of coronary blood flow and arterio-venous oxygen content difference, made over a range of perfusion pressures (which caused autoregulation) and heart rates (which caused metabolic regulation) were predicted qualitatively by the model. Coronary vascular conductance was positively related to metabolic rate only during metabolic regulation (heart rate changes); during autoregulation the relationship between these two variables was inverse. Coronary vascular conductance and resistance values taken from both interventions (both perfusion pressure and heart rate variations) were closely related to coronary venous oxygen content and calculated PO2. These findings suggest that further examination of oxygen tension, as the controller of the coronary vascular bed under physiological conditions should be considered. PMID:6716287

  17. Cognitive Imagery and Physiological Feedback Relaxation Protocols Applied to Clinically Tense Young Adults: A Comparison of State, Trait, and Physiological Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schandler, Steven L.; Dana, Edward R.

    1983-01-01

    Examined changes in tension behaviors and reductions in physiological tension associated with cognitive imagery and electromyographic biofeedback relaxation procedures in 45 college students. Results showed: imagery significantly reduced state anxiety. Self-rest was less effective; biofeedback greatly reduced physiological tension, but not state…

  18. Cognitive Imagery and Physiological Feedback Relaxation Protocols Applied to Clinically Tense Young Adults: A Comparison of State, Trait, and Physiological Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schandler, Steven L.; Dana, Edward R.

    1983-01-01

    Examined changes in tension behaviors and reductions in physiological tension associated with cognitive imagery and electromyographic biofeedback relaxation procedures in 45 college students. Results showed: imagery significantly reduced state anxiety. Self-rest was less effective; biofeedback greatly reduced physiological tension, but not state…

  19. Creating Tension in Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folta, Bernarr

    This paper discusses the rationale and teaching methods for a six-week unit, for a high school freshman English Class, on perception, semantics, and writing, which places special focus on developing tension in student writing. The first four objectives of the course focus on perception and the next two focus on semantics. The seventh…

  20. Coping with Dialectical Tensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockriede, Wayne

    This paper discusses some of the central issues involved in philosophizing about rhetoric by raising two primary questions within the context of three traditional branches of philosophy: ontology, axiology, and epistemology. The two questions raised are: What are dialectical tensions in a philosophy of rhetoric? and How does a person try to cope…

  1. Sensing the Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Spanning over 4 decades, NASA's bolt tension monitoring technology has benefited automakers, airplane builders, and other major manufacturers that rely on the devices to evaluate the performance of computerized torque wrenches and other assembly line mechanisms. In recent years, the advancement of ultrasonic sensors has drastically eased this process for users, ensuring that proper tension and torque are being applied to bolts and fasteners, with less time needed for data analysis. Langley Research Center s Nondestructive Evaluation Branch is one of the latest NASA programs to incorporate ultrasonic sensors within a bolt tension measurement instrument. As a multi-disciplined research group focused on spacecraft and aerospace transportation safety, one of the branch s many commitments includes transferring problem solutions to industry. In 1998, the branch carried out this obligation in a licensing agreement with Micro Control, Inc., of West Bloomfield, Michigan. Micro Control, an automotive inspection company, obtained the licenses to two Langley patents to provide an improved-but-inexpensive means of ultrasonic tension measurement.

  2. Simultaneous Sampling of Tissue Oxygenation and Oxygen Consumption in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, William H.; Song, Bjorn K.; Pittman, Roland N.; Golub, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120–130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5 s compression followed by 15 s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100cm3 min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. PMID:26683232

  3. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100 cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    SciTech Connect

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  5. Dopamine in human follicular fluid is associated with cellular uptake and metabolism-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in granulosa cells: implications for physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Saller, S; Kunz, L; Berg, D; Berg, U; Lara, H; Urra, J; Hecht, S; Pavlik, R; Thaler, C J; Mayerhofer, A

    2014-03-01

    Is the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) in the human ovary involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)? Human ovarian follicular fluid contains DA, which causes the generation of ROS in cultured human granulosa cells (GCs), and alterations of DA levels in follicular fluid and DA uptake/metabolism in GCs in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are linked to increased levels of ROS. DA is an important neurotransmitter in the brain, and the metabolism of DA results in the generation of ROS. DA was detected in human ovarian homogenates, but whether it is present in follicular fluid and plays a role in the follicle is not known. We used human follicular fluid from patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF), GCs from patients with or without PCOS and also employed mathematical modeling to investigate the presence of DA and its effects on ROS. DA in follicular fluid and GCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GC viability, apoptosis and generation of ROS were monitored in GCs upon addition of DA. Inhibitors of DA uptake and metabolism, an antioxidant and DA receptor agonists, were used to study cellular uptake and the mechanism of DA-induced ROS generation. Human GCs were examined for the presence and abundance of transcripts of the DA transporter (DAT; SLC6A3), the DA-metabolizing enzymes monoamine oxidases A/B (MAO-A/B) and catechol-O-methyltransferase and the vesicular monoamine transporter. A computational model was developed to describe and predict DA-induced ROS generation in human GCs. We found DA in follicular fluid of ovulatory follicles of the human ovary and in GCs. DAT and MAO-A/B, which are expressed by GCs, are prerequisites for a DA receptor-independent generation of ROS in GCs. Blockers of DAT and MAO-A/B, as well as an antioxidant, prevented the generation of ROS (P < 0.05). Agonists of DA receptors (D1 and D2) did not induce ROS. DA, in the concentration range found in follicular fluid, did not induce

  6. Obesity Decreases Perioperative Tissue Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kabon, Barbara; Nagele, Angelika; Reddy, Dayakar; Eagon, Chris; Fleshman, James W.; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Background: Obesity is an important risk factor for surgical site infections. The incidence of surgical wound infections is directly related to tissue perfusion and oxygenation. Fat tissue mass expands without a concomitant increase in blood flow per cell, which might result in a relative hypoperfusion with decreased tissue oxygenation. Consequently, we tested the hypotheses that perioperative tissue oxygen tension is reduced in obese surgical patients. Furthermore, we compared the effect of supplemental oxygen administration on tissue oxygenation in obese and non-obese patients. Methods: Forty-six patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were assigned to one of two groups according to their body mass index (BMI): BMI < 30 kg/m2 (non-obese) and BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 (obese). Intraoperative oxygen administration was adjusted to arterial oxygen tensions of ≈150 mmHg and ≈300 mmHg in random order. Anesthesia technique and perioperative fluid management were standardized. Subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was measured with a polarographic electrode positioned within a subcutaneous tonometer in the lateral upper arm during surgery, in the recovery room, and on the first postoperative day. Postoperative tissue oxygen was also measured adjacent to the wound. Data were compared with unpaired two tailed t-tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests; P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Intraoperative subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was significantly less in the obese patients at baseline (36 vs. 57 mmHg, P = 0.002) and with supplemental oxygen administration (47 vs. 76 mmHg, P = 0.014). Immediate postoperative tissue oxygen tension was also significantly less in subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm (43 vs. 54 mmHg, P = 0.011) as well as near the incision (42 vs. 62 mmHg, P = 0.012) in obese patients. In contrast, tissue oxygen tension was comparable in each group on the first postoperative morning. Conclusion: Wound and tissue hypoxia were common in obese

  7. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  8. Affective imaging: psychological and physiological reactions to individually chosen images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorovskaya, Elena A.; Miller, Paige; Prabhu, Girish; Horwitz, Cecelia; Matraszek, Tomasz; Parks, Peter; Blazey, Richard; Endrikhovski, Serguei

    2001-06-01

    In a series of experiments, observers' cognitive and psychophysiological responses to pictorial stimuli were evaluated. In the first experiment, subjects were viewing a set of randomly presented images. After each image presentation, they rates every image on a number of cognitive scales. In the second experiment, images producing certain physiological effects - deactivating, neutral, or activating - were individually selected based on the results of the first experiment and shown to the subjects again. Psychophysiological measurements included electrocardiogram, hand temperature, muscle tension, eye movements, blood oxygen, respiration, and galvanic skin response. Our result indicate that images produced significant emotional changes based on verbal and physiological assessment. The changes were in agreement with the predictions derived from the metric that we developed in a number of cases that exceeded the change level. The direction of changes corresponded to previous findings reported elsewhere.

  9. Device for Tensioning Sheet Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-30

    FOR TENSIONING SHEET MEMBERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the Invention This invention pertains generally to tensioning devices and more...particularly to a device for tensioning thin-sheet materials so as to prevent wrinkling. Description of the Related Art Solar power sources utilized...the system. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for loading a thin-sheet material with tensioning

  10. Precise spatial and temporal control of oxygen within in vitro brain slices via microfluidic gas channels.

    PubMed

    Mauleon, Gerardo; Fall, Christopher P; Eddington, David T

    2012-01-01

    The acute brain slice preparation is an excellent model for studying the details of how neurons and neuronal tissue respond to a variety of different physiological conditions. But open slice chambers ideal for electrophysiological and imaging access have not allowed the precise spatiotemporal control of oxygen in a way that might realistically model stroke conditions. To address this problem, we have developed a microfluidic add-on to a commercially available perfusion chamber that diffuses oxygen throughout a thin membrane and directly to the brain slice. A microchannel enables rapid and efficient control of oxygen and can be modified to allow different regions of the slice to experience different oxygen conditions. Using this novel device, we show that we can obtain a stable and homogeneous oxygen environment throughout the brain slice and rapidly alter the oxygen tension in a hippocampal slice. We also show that we can impose different oxygen tensions on different regions of the slice preparation and measure two independent responses, which is not easily obtainable with current techniques.

  11. Surface tension and microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, J.; Sanz-Andrés, A.; Pérez-Grande, I.; Pindado, S.; Franchini, S.; Alonso, G.

    2014-09-01

    The behaviour of confined liquids on board an orbiting spacecraft is mainly driven by surface tension phenomena, which cause an apparently anomalous response of the liquid when compared with the behaviour that can be observed on an Earth laboratory provided that the amount of liquid is high enough. The reason is that in an orbiting spacecraft the different inertial forces acting on the bulk of the liquid are almost zero, causing thus capillary forces to be the dominant ones. Of course, since gravity forces are proportional to the liquid volume, whereas surface tension forces are proportional to the liquid surface, there are situations on Earth where capillarity can be the dominant effect, as it happens when very small volume liquid samples are considered. However, work with small size samples may require the use of sophisticated optical devices. Leaving aside the neutral buoyancy technique, a way of handling large liquid interfaces is by using drop towers, where the sample falls subjected to the action of Earth’s gravity. This approach is suitable when the characteristic time of the problem under consideration is much smaller than the drop time. In this work the transformation of an out-of-use chimney into a drop tower is presented. Because of the miniaturization, hardiness and low cost of current electronic devices, a drop tower can be used as an inexpensive tool for undergraduate students to experimentally analyse a large variety of surface tension driven phenomena.

  12. Evolution de la caracteristique courant-tension des varistances a base d'oxyde de zinc avec la pression partielle d'oxygene de l'atmosphere de frittage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Roger; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre; Graciet, Michel; Onillon, Marc; Hagenmuller, Paul

    1980-05-01

    In order to decrease the resistivity of zinc oxide grains which is responsible for the intensity limitation observed at high current densities, the dependence of current-voltage characteristics of zinc oxide based varistors on oxygen partial pressure has been investigated. From these studies it appears that the conductivity increases with decreasing oxygen partial pressure, this phenomenon being more significant at low voltages than at higher ones. These results can be related to a slight increase of the donor density, while the superficial trap density decreases strongly, involving a collapse of the barrier height and of the non-linearity exponent.

  13. Repulsive gravity in tension stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J.; Lynden-Bell, D.

    1991-09-01

    In stars, pressure opposes the attractive force of gravity. In general relativity, if the pressure is negative (a tension) and P is less than -1/3 rho(c)-squared, then the resulting gravity is repulsive. Such material is invoked in cosmology to give the inflation of the universe. In tension stars, this repulsive gravity is balanced by the tension. The simplest tension stars only exist in esoteric situations beyond the neck of an Einstein-Rosen bridge in Schwarzschild space. Here, tension material is confined within a massive shell of normal matter. The resulting object, while still repulsive inside, has an attractive exterior gravity and can, in principle, exist without horizons.

  14. Factors controlling oxygen utilization.

    PubMed

    Biaglow, John; Dewhirst, Mark; Leeper, Dennis; Burd, Randy; Tuttle, Steve

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate, theoretically, that oxygen diffusion distance is related to the metabolic rate of tumors (QO2) as well as the oxygen tension. The difference in QO2 rate between tumors can vary by as much as 80-fold. Inhibition of oxygen utilization by glucose or chemical inhibitors can improve the diffusion distance. Combining respiratory inhibitors with increased availability of oxygen will further improve the oxygen diffusion distance for all tumors. A simple means for inhibiting oxygen consumption is the use of glucose (the Crabtree effect). The inhibition of tumor oxygen utilization by glucose occurs in R323OAc mammary carcinoma and 9L glioma cells. However, stimulation of oxygen consumption is observed with glucose in the Q7 hepatoma cell line. MIBG, a known inhibitor of oxygen utilization, blocks oxygen consumption in 9L, but is weakly inhibitory with the Q7. Q7 tumor cells demonstrate an anomalous behavior of glucose and MIBG on oxygen consumption. Our results clearly demonstrate the necessity for comparing effects of different agents on different tumor cells. Generalizations cannot be made with respect to the choice of inhibitor for in vivo use. Our work shows that oxygen consumption also can be inhibited with malonate and chlorosuccinate. These substrates may be effective in vivo, where glucose is low and glutamine is the major substrate. Our results indicate that information about individual tumor substrate-linked metabolic controls may be necessary before attempting to inhibit oxygen utilization in vivo for therapeutic benefit.

  15. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members, which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  16. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-09

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  17. Oxygen-dependent gene expression in fishes.

    PubMed

    Nikinmaa, Mikko; Rees, Bernard B

    2005-05-01

    The role of oxygen in regulating patterns of gene expression in mammalian development, physiology, and pathology has received increasing attention, especially after the discovery of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a transcription factor that has been likened to a "master switch" in the transcriptional response of mammalian cells and tissues to low oxygen. At present, considerably less is known about the molecular responses of nonmammalian vertebrates and invertebrates to hypoxic exposure. Because many animals live in aquatic habitats that are variable in oxygen tension, it is relevant to study oxygen-dependent gene expression in these animals. The purpose of this review is to discuss hypoxia-induced gene expression in fishes from an evolutionary and ecological context. Recent studies have described homologs of HIF in fish and have begun to evaluate their function. A number of physiological processes are known to be altered by hypoxic exposure of fish, although the evidence linking them to HIF is less well developed. The diversity of fish presents many opportunities to evaluate if inter- and intraspecific variation in HIF structure and function correlate with hypoxia tolerance. Furthermore, as an aquatic group, fish offer the opportunity to examine the interactions between hypoxia and other stressors, including pollutants, common in aquatic environments. It is possible, if not likely, that results obtained by studying the molecular responses of fish to hypoxia will find parallels in the oxygen-dependent responses of mammals, including humans. Moreover, novel responses to hypoxia could be discovered through studies of this diverse and species-rich group.

  18. Sublethal mitochondrial stress with an attendant stoichiometric augmentation of reactive oxygen species may precipitate many of the beneficial alterations in cellular physiology produced by caloric restriction, intermittent fasting, exercise and dietary phytonutrients: "Mitohormesis" for health and vitality.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Patrick C

    2006-01-01

    The precise mechanistic sequence producing the beneficial effects on health and lifespan seen with interventions as diverse as caloric restriction, intermittent fasting, exercise, and consumption of dietary phytonutrients is still under active characterization, with large swaths of the research community kept in relative isolation from one another. Among the explanatory models capable of assisting in the identification of precipitating elements responsible for beneficial influences on physiology seen in these states, the hormesis perspective on biological systems under stress has yielded considerable insight into likely evolutionarily consistent organizing principles functioning in all four conditions. Recent experimental findings provide the tantalizing initial lodestones for an entirely new research front examining molecular substrates of stress resistance. In this novel body of research, a surprising new twist has emerged: Reactive oxygen species, derived from the mitochondrial electron transport system, may be necessary triggering elements for a sequence of events that result in benefits ranging from the transiently cytoprotective to organismal-level longevity. With the recent appreciation that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species function as signaling elements in a interconnected matrix of signal transduction, the entire basis of many widely accepted theories of aging that predominated in the past may need to be reconsidered to facilitate the formulation of an new perspective more correctly informed by the most contemporaneous experimental findings. This perspective, the mitohormesis theory, can be used in many disparate domains of inquiry to potentially explain previous findings, as well as point to new targets of research. The utility of this perspective for research on aging is significant, but beyond that this perspective emphasizes the pressing need to rigorously characterize the specific contribution of the stoichiometry of reactive

  19. Modeling spatial distribution of oxygen in 3d culture of islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, John; Wen, Yu; Li, Xiaofei; Guan, Jianjun; Jin, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffold culture of pancreatic β-cell has been proven to be able to better mimic physiological conditions in the body. However, one critical issue with culturing pancreatic β-cells is that β-cells consume large amounts of oxygen, and hence insufficient oxygen supply in the culture leads to loss of β-cell mass and functions. This becomes more significant when cells are cultured in a 3D scaffold. In this study, in order to understand the effect of oxygen tension inside a cell-laden collagen culture on β-cell proliferation, a culture model with encapsulation of an oxygen-generator was established. The oxygen-generator was made by embedding hydrogen peroxide into nontoxic polydimethylsiloxane to avoid the toxicity of a chemical reaction in the β-cell culture. To examine the effectiveness of the oxygenation enabled 3D culture, the spatial-temporal distribution of oxygen tension inside a scaffold was evaluated by a mathematical modeling approach. Our simulation results indicated that an oxygenation-aided 3D culture would augment the oxygen supply required for the β-cells. Furthermore, we identified that cell seeding density and the capacity of the oxygenator are two critical parameters in the optimization of the culture. Notably, cell-laden scaffold cultures with an in situ oxygen supply significantly improved the β-cells' biological function. These β-cells possess high insulin secretion capacity. The results obtained in this work would provide valuable information for optimizing and encouraging functional β-cell cultures. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:221-228, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Pressure Physiology: Studies of Acute and Chronic Exposures to Increased Pressures of Oxygen and Inert Gases in Diving, Decompression and Therapy of Decompression and Isobaric Gas Lesion Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    Environmental Medicine University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Philadelphia, PA 19104 31 December 1985I I U SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Form...ApprovedREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE MNo. 0704.0188 la REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION lb RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS U NA 2a SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3...ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 1 440 - 201-002/ 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification ) Pressure Physiology: Studies of Acute and Chronic 112384

  1. The combined effects of oxygen availability and salinity on physiological responses and scope for growth in the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youji; Hu, Menghong; Wong, Wai Hing; Shin, Paul K S; Cheung, Siu Gin

    2011-01-01

    Mussels were maintained for 4 weeks under different combinations of dissolved oxygen concentration (1.5, 3.0 and 6.0 mg O2 l(-1)) and salinity (15, 20, 25 and 30) in a 3×4 factorial design experiment. Clearance rate (CR), absorption efficiency (AE), respiration rate (RR) and scope for growth (SFG) decreased with decreasing salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration (DO), while excretion rate (ER) increased with decreasing salinity and increasing DO. The O:N ratio was <10 at salinities of 15 and 20, irrespective of DO levels. SFG was negative in most of the treatments, except for those under 6.0 mg O2 l(-1) or at a salinity of 30 when DO was lower. The results may help explain the distribution pattern of Perna viridis in Hong Kong waters and provide guidelines for mussel culture site selection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Establishing a physiological environment for visualized in vitro brain slice recordings by increasing oxygen supply and modifying aCSF content

    PubMed Central

    Hájos, Norbert; Mody, Istvan

    2009-01-01

    Our insights into the basic characteristics of neuronal function were significantly advanced by combining the in vitro slice technique with the visualization of neurons and their processes. The visualization through water immersion objectives requires keeping slices submerged in recording chambers where delivering artificial cerebro-spinal fluid (aCSF) at flow rates of 2–3 ml/min results in a limited oxygen supply [Hájos N, Ellender TJ, Zemankovics R, Mann EO, Exley R, Cragg SJ, et al. Maintaining network activity in submerged hippocampal slices: importance of oxygen supply. Eur J Neurosci 2009;29:319–27]. Here we review two methods aimed at providing sufficient oxygen levels to neurons in submerged slices to enable high energy consuming processes such as elevated firing rates or network oscillations. The use of these methods may also influence the outcome of other electrophysiological experiments in submerged slices including the study of intercellular signaling pathways. In addition, we also emphasize the importance of various aCSF constituents used in in vitro experiments. PMID:19524611

  3. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  4. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE PAGES

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  5. Tension in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Löffek, Stefanie; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Helfrich, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Integrins represent a large family of cell receptors that mediate adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), thereby modulating a variety of cellular functions that are required for proliferation, migration, malignant conversion and invasiveness. During tumorigenesis the conversion of a tumor cell from sessile, stationary phenotype to an invasive phenotype requires the ability of tumor cells to interact with their environment in order to transduce signals from the ECM into the cells. Hence, there is increasing evidence that changes in the composition, topography and tension of tumor matrix can be sensed by integrin receptors, leading to the regulation of intracellular signalling events which subsequently help to fuel cancer progression. The fact that intracellular signals perceived from integrin ligand binding impact on almost all steps of tumor progression, including tumor cell proliferation, survival, metastatic dissemination and colonization of a metastatic niche, renders integrins as ideal candidates for the development of therapeutic agents. In this review we summarize the role of integrins in cancer with the special focus on cancer therapies and the recent progress that has been made in the understanding of “integrin-induced tension in cancer”. Finally, we conclude with clinical evidence for the role of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in the development of therapy-resistant tumors. PMID:27854331

  6. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  7. The story of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Heffner, John E

    2013-01-01

    The history of oxygen from discovery to clinical application for patients with chronic lung disease represents a long and storied journey. Within a relatively short period, early investigators not only discovered oxygen but also recognized its importance to life and its role in respiration. The application of oxygen to chronic lung disease, however, took several centuries. In the modern era, physiologists pursued the chemical nature of oxygen and its physiologic interaction with cellular metabolism and gas transport. It took brazen clinicians, however, to pursue oxygen as a therapeutic resource for patients with chronic lung disease because of the concern in the 20th century of the risks of oxygen toxicity. Application of ambulatory oxygen devices allowed landmark investigations of the long-term effects of continuous oxygen that established its safety and efficacy. Although now well established for hypoxic patients, many questions remain regarding the benefits of oxygen for varying severity and types of chronic lung disease.

  8. [Polypragmasy in chronic tension headache?].

    PubMed

    Aull, S; Maly, J; Mraz, M; Schnider, P; Travniczek, A; Zeiler, K; Wessely, P

    1994-01-01

    The various forms of treatment (drugs as well as non-drug therapy) of patients suffering from tension type headache are presented. Analgesics and non-steroidal antirheumatics are used in the management of episodic tension type headache, as well as acute exacerbation of chronic tension type headache. In view of the presumably multifactorial pathogenesis, a multidimensional therapeutic approach is required in patients with chronic tension type headache. Antidepressive drugs (thymoleptics) are usually prescribed as basic therapy. Additional implementation of non-drug therapeutic measures tailored to individual symptomatology is advisable, such as EMG biofeedback, other relaxation techniques, massage, physiotherapy and--in selected cases--psychotherapy or acupuncture.

  9. Nitinol Fatigue Investigation on Stent-Finish Specimens Using Tension-Tension Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Pike, K.; Zipse, A.; Schlun, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nitinol fatigue strain limit versus both strain amplitude (range 0.25-1.25%) and mean strain (1.0, 2.0, and 4.0%) was investigated using a tension-tension method. In order to apply the fatigue testing results to a nitinol stent and evaluate stent fatigue performance, the dog-bone style specimens were processed from the same raw material common to implantable stent manufacturing, i.e., similar nitinol tubing, surface quality, and electropolished surface. To simulate a physiological environment, the tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted in water at 37 °C. This strain-controlled fatigue test was conducted with a run-out set at 106 cycles. The fatigue strain limit at 106 cycles as well as the mean strain effect and the effects of inclusions are discussed. Fatigue results appeared in a bi-modal pattern when the strain amplitude was at a level between too high, which made all specimens to fail, and too low, which allowed all specimens to survive.

  10. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  11. Kinetics of xylem loading, membrane potential maintenance, and sensitivity of K(+) -permeable channels to reactive oxygen species: physiological traits that differentiate salinity tolerance between pea and barley.

    PubMed

    Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Pottosin, Igor; Zeng, Fanrong; Velarde-Buendía, Ana-Maria; Massart, Amandine; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Hariadi, Yuda; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    Salt sensitive (pea) and salt tolerant (barley) species were used to understand the physiological basis of differential salinity tolerance in crops. Pea plants were much more efficient in restoring otherwise depolarized membrane potential thereby effectively decreasing K(+) efflux through depolarization-activated outward rectifying potassium channels. At the same time, pea root apex was 10-fold more sensitive to physiologically relevant H2 O2 concentration and accumulated larger amounts of H2 O2 under saline conditions. This resulted in a rapid loss of cell viability in the pea root apex. Barley plants rapidly loaded Na(+) into the xylem; this increase was only transient, and xylem and leaf Na(+) concentration remained at a steady level for weeks. On the contrary, pea plants restricted xylem Na(+) loading during the first few days of treatment but failed to prevent shoot Na(+) elevation in the long term. It is concluded that superior salinity tolerance of barley plants compared with pea is conferred by at least three different mechanisms: (1) efficient control of xylem Na(+) loading; (2) efficient control of H2 O2 accumulation and reduced sensitivity of non-selective cation channels to H2 O2 in the root apex; and (3) higher energy saving efficiency, with less ATP spent to maintain membrane potential under saline conditions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effect of eggshell temperature and oxygen concentration during incubation on the developmental and physiological status of broiler hatchlings in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, R; van den Anker, I; Meijerhof, R; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of incubation conditions on the developmental and physiological status of birds in the perinatal period, which spans the end of incubation until the early posthatch period. Embryos were incubated at a normal (37.8°C) or high (38.9°C) eggshell temperature (EST) and a low (17%), normal (21%), or high (25%) O(2) concentration from d 7 until 19 of incubation. After d 19 of incubation, EST was maintained, but O(2) concentrations were 21% for all embryos. Body and organ weights, and hepatic glycogen levels were measured at d 18 of incubation and at 12 and 48 h after emergence from the eggshell. In addition, blood metabolites were measured at 12 and 48 h after emergence from the eggshell. Embryos incubated at a high EST and low O(2) concentration had the highest mortality in the last week of incubation, which may be related to their low yolk-free body mass (YFBM) or a reduced nutrient availability for hatching (i.e., hepatic glycogen). High EST, compared with normal EST, decreased YFBM. This may be due to the shorter incubation duration of 8 h, the lower weight of supply organs (i.e., heart and lung), or a lack of glucose precursors. Because of this lack of glucose precursors, embryos incubated at high EST may have used proteins for energy production instead of for body development at the end of incubation. The YFBM at d 18 of incubation increased with an increase in O(2) concentration. However, differences between the normal and high O(2) concentration disappeared at 12 and 48 h after emergence, possibly because the high O(2) concentration had difficulties adapting to lower O(2) concentrations in the perinatal period. Blood metabolites and hepatic glycogen were comparable among O(2) concentrations, indicating that the physiological status at hatch may be related to the environment that the embryo experienced during the hatching process. In conclusion, EST and O(2) concentration differentially influence the developmental and

  13. Confronting Racial and Religious Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When a community's demographics change quickly in terms of racial, religious, or ethnic makeup, Wessler notes, tension surfaces. Schools are the likeliest place for these kinds of tensions to openly come to a head. Schools can't always avoid conflicts among students who feel mutual prejudice and suspicion. But schools can address simmering…

  14. Confronting Racial and Religious Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When a community's demographics change quickly in terms of racial, religious, or ethnic makeup, Wessler notes, tension surfaces. Schools are the likeliest place for these kinds of tensions to openly come to a head. Schools can't always avoid conflicts among students who feel mutual prejudice and suspicion. But schools can address simmering…

  15. Chemical oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kevin R; Huvard, Gary S; McHugh, Mark; Mallepally, Rajender R; Imbruce, Richard

    2013-01-01

    While pressurized oxygen in tank form, as well as oxygen concentrators, are ubiquitous in civilian healthcare in developed countries for medical use, there are a number of settings where use of these oxygen delivery platforms is problematic. These settings include but are not limited to combat casualty care and healthcare provided in extreme rural environments in undeveloped countries. Furthermore, there are a number of settings where delivery of oxygen other than the pulmonary route to oxygenate tissues would be of value, including severe lung injury, airway obstruction, and others. This paper provides a brief overview of the previous and current attempts to utilize chemical oxygen production strategies to enhance systemic oxygenation. While promising, the routine use of chemically produced oxygen continues to pose significant engineering and physiologic challenges.

  16. Application of Oxygen-Enriched Aeration in the Production of Bacitracin by Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Flickinger, M. C.; Perlman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The physiological effects of controlling the dissolved oxygen tension at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.05 atm by the use of oxygen-enriched aeration were investigated during growth and bacitracin production by Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 10716. Up to a 2.35-fold increase in the final antibiotic yield and a 4-fold increase in the rate of bacitracin synthesis were observed in response to O2-enriched aeration. The increase in antibiotic production was accompanied by increased respiratory activity and an increase in the specific productivity of the culture from 1.3 to 3.6 g of antibiotic per g of cell mass produced. Oxygen enrichment of the aeration decreased medium carbohydrate uptake and the maximum specific growth rate of B. licheniformis from 0.6 h−1 to as low as 0.15 h−1, depending upon the level of enrichment and the conditions of oxygen transfer rate (impeller speed). The response of this culture to O2 enrichment suggests that this method of controlling the dissolved oxygen tension for antibiotic-producing cultures may simulate conditions that would occur if the carbon source were fed slowly, as is often employed to optimize antibiotic production. Analysis of the biologically active bacitracins produced by B. licheniformis ATCC 10716 suggested that the ratio of biologically active peptides was not changed by O2 enrichment, nor were any new biologically active compounds formed. Images PMID:34361

  17. SURFACE TENSION OF SERUM

    PubMed Central

    du Noüy, P. Lecomte

    1925-01-01

    1. The injection of antigen into an animal determines a gradual change in the blood fluid which finds expression in two physicochemical manifestations that can readily be followed, namely a decrease in the static value of the surface tension of serum solutions, and a special form of crystallization when serum diluted with isotonic sodium chloride solution is allowed to evaporate under certain conditions. 2. The change in the blood is at a maximum around the 13th day after the first antigen injection, and decreases progressively thereafter until it can no longer be observed, which is usually around the 30th day. 3. The change follows the same course, whether a single large injection of antigen is made, or many smaller ones. It begins at the same time in either case, it comes to a maximum after the same period, and in its subsequent course it is not affected by the reinjection of antigen. The manifestations of the change would appear to be independent of the presence of antigen in the circulation. 4. The mean length of the protein molecules of the immune serum obtained after the injection of the antigen dealt with is little if at all different from that of the protein molecules of normal serum. 5. It is possible that this reaction is independent of the antibody formation. PMID:19869026

  18. Surface tension effects on instability in viscoelastic respiratory fluids.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Muraari; Lange, Carlos F

    2007-02-01

    This paper establishes the mathematical formalism for the modeling of the mucus layer in the human trachea as a viscoelastic multiphase fluid system with surface tension with a view toward study of instability properties of the air-mucus system aimed at improving the design of new bioaerosol suppressing medication. The effects of surface tension, previously only conjectured and very poorly understood, are clearly established with quantitative relationships. Several very important physiological conclusions are obtained supporting one method of potential treatment and prevention of disease transmission by alteration of the mucus layer properties over other potential methods.

  19. Cadmium-Induced Upregulation of Lipid Peroxidation and Reactive Oxygen Species Caused Physiological, Biochemical, and Ultrastructural Changes in Upland Cotton Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lei; Chen, Yue; Cheng, Xin; Zhu, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) toxicity was investigated in cotton cultivar (ZMS-49) using physiological, ultrastructural, and biochemical parameters. Biomass-based tolerance index decreased, and water contents increased at 500 μM Cd. Photosynthetic efficiency determined by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic pigments declined under Cd stress. Cd contents were more in roots than shoots. A significant decrease in nutrient levels was found in roots and stem. A significant decrease in nutrient levels was found in roots and stems. In response to Cd stress, more MDA and ROS contents were produced in leaves than in other parts of the seedlings. Total soluble proteins were reduced in all parts except in roots at 500 μM Cd. Oxidative metabolism was higher in leaves than aerial parts of the plant. There were insignificant alterations in roots and leaves ultrastructures such as a little increase in nucleoli, vacuoles, starch granules, and plastoglobuli in Cd-imposed stressful conditions. Scanning micrographs at 500 μM Cd showed a reduced number of stomata as well as near absence of closed stomata. Cd depositions were located in cell wall, vacuoles, and intracellular spaces using TEM-EDX technology. Upregulation of oxidative metabolism, less ultrastructural modification, and Cd deposition in dead parts of cells show that ZMS-49 has genetic potential to resist Cd stress, which need to be explored. PMID:24459668

  20. Tension-related activity in the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala: an fMRI study with music

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Moritz; Rohrmeier, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tonal music is characterized by a continuous flow of tension and resolution. This flow of tension and resolution is closely related to processes of expectancy and prediction and is a key mediator of music-evoked emotions. However, the neural correlates of subjectively experienced tension and resolution have not yet been investigated. We acquired continuous ratings of musical tension for four piano pieces. In a subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, we identified blood oxygen level-dependent signal increases related to musical tension in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus). In addition, a region of interest analysis in bilateral amygdala showed activation in the right superficial amygdala during periods of increasing tension (compared with decreasing tension). This is the first neuroimaging study investigating the time-varying changes of the emotional experience of musical tension, revealing brain activity in key areas of affective processing. PMID:23974947

  1. Tension-related activity in the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala: an fMRI study with music.

    PubMed

    Lehne, Moritz; Rohrmeier, Martin; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Tonal music is characterized by a continuous flow of tension and resolution. This flow of tension and resolution is closely related to processes of expectancy and prediction and is a key mediator of music-evoked emotions. However, the neural correlates of subjectively experienced tension and resolution have not yet been investigated. We acquired continuous ratings of musical tension for four piano pieces. In a subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, we identified blood oxygen level-dependent signal increases related to musical tension in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus). In addition, a region of interest analysis in bilateral amygdala showed activation in the right superficial amygdala during periods of increasing tension (compared with decreasing tension). This is the first neuroimaging study investigating the time-varying changes of the emotional experience of musical tension, revealing brain activity in key areas of affective processing.

  2. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Sheiko, Sergei S.; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100–1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer “bottlebrushes” tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of z smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z3/2(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z2 (b/d)2 for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z1/2 / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes (d≅bz) with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb). PMID:27516626

  3. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Sheiko, Sergei S; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2011-06-14

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100-1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer "bottlebrushes" tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of [Formula: see text] smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z(3/2)(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z(2) (b/d)(2) for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z(1/2) / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes [Formula: see text] with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb).

  4. PVP stabilized Pt nano particles catalyzed de-oxygenation of phenoxazine group by hydrazine in physiological buffer media: surfactant competes with reactants for the same surface sites.

    PubMed

    Das, Ranendu Sekhar; Singh, Bula; Banerjee, Rupendranath; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2013-03-21

    PVP capped platinum nano particles (PNP) of 5 nm diameter were prepared and characterized as homogeneous and of spherical nature. At physiological pH range (6.0-8.0), these PNP catalyze the deoxygenation of phenoxazine group containing resazurin (1) by hydrazine. The observed rate constants (k(o)), increase linearly with [PNP] at constant [1] and [Hydrazine]; but first increase and then after reaching a maximum it decrease with increase in [1] as well as in [Hydrazine]. The k(o) values increase linearly with 1/[H(+)] indicating N(2)H(4) as the reducing species that generates from the PNP assisted deprotonation of N(2)H(5)(+). The kinetic observations suggest Langmuir-Hinshelwood type surface reaction mechanism where both 1 and hydrazine are adsorbed on nano particles surface and compete for the same sites. Interestingly, the surfactant molecules, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), though do not take part into reduction reaction but having same type of functional groups as reactants, competes with them for the same surface sites. Adsorption on PNP with same type of functional group is further supported by the FTIR spectra of Pt-PVP and Pt-1. Thus on increasing [PVP], k(o) decreases linearly and only when [PVP] is held constant, the plot of k(o) vs. [PNP] passes through the origin indicating the insignificance of uncatalyzed reaction. The plot of ln k(o) vs. [1] or [Hydrazine] shows two different linear zones with different exponent values with respect to [1] and [Hydrazine]. This indicates that along with the complex heterogeneous surface adsorption processes, the mutual interactions between the reactants are also changing with the relative concentrations of reactants or, in general, with the molar ratio ([Hydrazine]/[1]).

  5. Cyclic mechanical loading enables solute transport and oxygen supply in bone healing: an in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Witt, Florian; Duda, Georg N; Bergmann, Camilla; Petersen, Ansgar

    2014-02-01

    Bone healing is a complex process with an increased metabolic activity and consequently high demand for oxygen. In the hematoma phase, inflammatory cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are initially cut off from direct nutritional supply via blood vessels. Cyclic mechanical loading that occurs, for example, during walking is expected to have an impact on the biophysical environment of the cells but meaningful quantitative experimental data are still missing. In this study, the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical loading within a physiological range significantly contributes to oxygen transport into the fracture hematoma was investigated by an in vitro approach. MSCs were embedded in a fibrin matrix to mimic the hematoma phase during bone healing. Construct geometry, culture conditions, and parameters of mechanical loading in a bioreactor system were chosen to resemble the in vivo situation based on data from human studies and a well-characterized large animal model. Oxygen tension was measured before and after mechanical loading intervals by a chemical optical microsensor. The increase in oxygen tension at the center of the constructs was significant and depended on loading time with maximal values of 9.9%±5.1%, 14.8%±4.9%, and 25.3%±7.2% of normal atmospheric oxygen tension for 5, 15, and 30 min of cyclic loading respectively. Histological staining of hypoxic cells after 48 h of incubation confirmed sensor measurements by showing an increased number of normoxic cells with intermittent cyclic compression compared with unloaded controls. The present study demonstrates that moderate cyclic mechanical loading leads to an increased oxygen transport and thus to substantially enhanced supply conditions for cells entrapped in the hematoma. This link between mechanical conditions and nutrition supply in the early regenerative phases could be employed to improve the environmental conditions for cell metabolism and consequently prevent necrosis.

  6. Cell physiology of mortality and immortality in a Nicotiana interspecific F1 hybrid complies with the quantitative balance between reactive oxygen and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Shomura, Sachiko; Mino, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The cultured cell line, GTH4, of an interspecific F1 hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and N. tabacum L. died after a shift in temperature from 37°C to 26°C. Fluctuations in the cellular amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) were detected in GTH4 after the temperature shift, but not in the mutant, GTH4S, which did not die at 26°C presumably due to the lack of genetic factors involved in cell death. The removal of ROS or NO suppressed cell death in GTH4, suggesting that ROS and NO both acted as mediators of cell death. However, excess amounts of the superoxide anion (O2(-)) or NO alleviated cell death. A series of experiments using generators and scavengers of ROS and NO showed that O2(-) affected the cellular levels of NO, and vice versa, indicating that a quantitative balance between O2(-) and NO was important for hybrid cell death. The combination of NO and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was necessary and sufficient to initiate cell death in GTH4 and GTH4S. Hypoxia, which suppressed cell death in GTH4 at 26°C, reduced the generation of H2O2 and NO, but allowed for the production of O2(-), which acted as a suppressor and/or modulator of cell