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Sample records for physiological role structure

  1. DGK-θ: Structure, Enzymology, and Physiological Roles.

    PubMed

    Tu-Sekine, Becky; Goldschmidt, Hana L; Raben, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are a family of enzymes that catalyze the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). The recognition of the importance of these enzymes has been increasing ever since it was determined that they played a role in the phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) cycle and a number of excellent reviews have already been written [(see van Blitterswijk and Houssa, 2000; Kanoh et al., 2002; Mérida et al., 2008; Tu-Sekine and Raben, 2009, 2011; Shulga et al., 2011; Tu-Sekine et al., 2013) among others]. We now know there are ten mammalian DGKs that are organized into five classes. DGK-θ is the lone member of the Type V class of DGKs and remains as one of the least studied. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure, enzymology, regulation, and physiological roles of this DGK and suggests some future areas of research to understand this DGK isoform.

  2. ROLE OF VARIOUS BRAIN STRUCTURES ON PHYSIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PHYSIOLOGY), DRUGS, RESPIRATION, HYPERTENSION, HEARING, VISION, CEREBRAL CORTEX, SEX HORMONES, BIRTH, REACTION(PSYCHOLOGY), CONDITIONED RESPONSE, DIABETES, PANCREAS, INSULIN, SENSES(PHYSIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), BRAZIL .

  3. Plant Carbonic Anhydrases: Structures, Locations, Evolution, and Physiological Roles.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Robert J; Clayton, Harmony; Mukherjee, Ananya; Ludwig, Martha; Moroney, James V

    2017-01-09

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3(-) and are ubiquitous in nature. Higher plants contain three evolutionarily distinct CA families, αCAs, βCAs, and γCAs, where each family is represented by multiple isoforms in all species. Alternative splicing of CA transcripts appears common; consequently, the number of functional CA isoforms in a species may exceed the number of genes. CAs are expressed in numerous plant tissues and in different cellular locations. The most prevalent CAs are those in the chloroplast, cytosol, and mitochondria. This diversity in location is paralleled in the many physiological and biochemical roles that CAs play in plants. In this review, the number and types of CAs in C3, C4, and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants are considered, and the roles of the α and γCAs are briefly discussed. The remainder of the review focuses on plant βCAs and includes the identification of homologs between species using phylogenetic approaches, a consideration of the inter- and intracellular localization of the proteins, along with the evidence for alternative splice forms. Current understanding of βCA tissue-specific expression patterns and what controls them are reviewed, and the physiological roles for which βCAs have been implicated are presented. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent advances in endophytic exopolysaccharides: Production, structural characterization, physiological role and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Xingchi; Pu, Huimin; Liu, Shuang; Kan, Juan; Jin, Changhai

    2017-02-10

    Endophytes are microorganisms that colonize living, internal tissues of plants without causing any immediate, overt negative effects. In recent years, both endophytic bacteria and fungi have been demonstrated to be excellent exopolysaccharides (EPS) producers. This review focuses on the recent advances in EPS produced by endophytes, including its production, isolation and purification, structural characterization, physiological role and biological activity. In general, EPS production is influenced by media components and cultivation conditions. The structures of purified EPS range from linear homopolysaccharides to highly branched heteropolysaccharides. These structurally novel EPS not only play important roles in plant-endophyte interactions; but also exhibit several biological functions, such as antioxidant, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and prebiotic activities. In order to utilize endophytic EPS on an industrial scale, both yield and productivity enhancement strategies are required at several levels. Besides, the exact mechanisms on the physiological roles and biological functions of EPS should be elucidated in future.

  5. HUMAN PARAOXONASE-1 (PON1): GENE STRUCTURE AND EXPRESSION, PROMISCUOUS ACTIVITIES AND MULTIPLE PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES

    PubMed Central

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Human PON1 is a HDL-associated lipolactonase capable of preventing LDL and cell membrane oxidation and is therefore considered to be atheroprotective. PON1 contributes to the antioxidative function of HDL and reductions in HDL-PON1 activity, prevalent in a wide variety of diseases with an inflammatory component, is believed to lead to dysfunctional HDL which can promote inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, PON1 is multifunctional and may contribute to other HDL functions such as in innate immunity, preventing infection by quorum sensing gram negative bacteria by destroying acyl lactone mediators of quorum sensing, and putative new roles in cancer development and the promotion of healthy ageing. In this review we explore the physiological roles of PON1 in disease development, as well as PON1 gene and protein structure, promiscuous activities and the roles of SNPs and ethnicity in determining PON1 activity. PMID:25965560

  6. Human paraoxonase-1 (PON1): Gene structure and expression, promiscuous activities and multiple physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2015-08-01

    Human PON1 is a HDL-associated lipolactonase capable of preventing LDL and cell membrane oxidation and is therefore considered to be atheroprotective. PON1 contributes to the antioxidative function of HDL and reductions in HDL-PON1 activity, prevalent in a wide variety of diseases with an inflammatory component, are believed to lead to dysfunctional HDL which can promote inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, PON1 is multifunctional and may contribute to other HDL functions such as in innate immunity, preventing infection by quorum sensing gram negative bacteria by destroying acyl lactone mediators of quorum sensing, and putative new roles in cancer development and the promotion of healthy ageing. In this review we explore the physiological roles of PON1 in disease development, as well as PON1 gene and protein structure, promiscuous activities and the roles of SNPs and ethnicity in determining PON1 activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Structure, localization and physiologic role of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)].

    PubMed

    Vincze, E; Köves, K

    2001-03-11

    PACAP was isolated on the basis of its ability to stimulate adenylate cyclase in primary anterior pituitary cell culture from ovine hypothalami by Miyata et al. in 1989. This peptide is structurally related to the secretin family and shows a 67% sequence homology with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). The amino acid sequence of PACAP has been highly preserved during the evolution that may be connected with its important physiological role. Similar to other "brain-gut peptides" PACAP is localized not only in the central but in the peripheral nervous system and in non-neural tissues as well. In addition to its hypophysiotropic effects in the hypothalamo-hypophysial system PACAP exerts its effects on water-salt balance, cardiovascular functions, gastrointestinal motility and secretion and also on the regulation of reproductive functions. PACAP has a role in certain neuro-immuno-endocrine processes, in the differentiation of the nervous system, and it has neuroprotective effects in the case of ischaemia and various toxic agents. Locally PACAP takes its effects as an auto- and paracrine hormone, a neurotransmitter or a neuromodulator in different organs. Besides VIP, PACAP plays an important role in the function of the photo-neuro-endocrine system.

  8. Physiological roles of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages are present in mammals from midgestation, contributing to physiologic homeostasis throughout life. Macrophages arise from yolk sac and foetal liver progenitors during embryonic development in the mouse and persist in different organs as heterogeneous, self-renewing tissue-resident populations. Bone marrow-derived blood monocytes are recruited after birth to replenish tissue-resident populations and to meet further demands during inflammation, infection and metabolic perturbations. Macrophages of mixed origin and different locations vary in replication and turnover, but are all active in mRNA and protein synthesis, fulfilling organ-specific and systemic trophic functions, in addition to host defence. In this review, we emphasise selected properties and non-immune functions of tissue macrophages which contribute to physiologic homeostasis.

  9. The Growing Outer Epidermal Wall: Design and Physiological Role of a Composite Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, U.

    2008-01-01

    Background The cells of growing plant organs secrete an extracellular fibrous composite (the primary wall) that allows the turgid protoplasts to expand irreversibly via wall-yielding events, which are regulated by processes within the cytoplasm. The role of the epidermis in the control of stem elongation is described with special reference to the outer epidermal wall (OEW), which forms a ‘tensile skin’. Novel Facts The OEW is much thicker and less extensible than the walls of the inner tissues. Moreover, in the OEW the amount of cellulose per unit wall mass is considerably greater than in the inner tissues. Ultrastructural studies have shown that the expanding OEW is composed of a highly ordered internal and a diffuse outer half, with helicoidally organized cellulose microfibrils in the inner (load-bearing) region of this tension-stressed organ wall. The structural and mechanical backbone of the wall consists of helicoids, i.e. layers of parallel, inextensible cellulose microfibrils. These ‘plywood laminates’ contain crystalline ‘cables’ orientated in all directions with respect to the axis of elongation (isotropic material). Cessation of cell elongation is accompanied by a loss of order, i.e. the OEW is a dynamic structure. Helicoidally arranged extracellular polymers have also been found in certain bacteria, algae, fungi and animals. In the insect cuticle crystalline cutin nanofibrils form characteristic ‘OEW-like’ herringbone patterns. Conclusions Theoretical considerations, in vitro studies and computer simulations suggest that extracellular biological helicoids form by directed self-assembly of the crystalline biopolymers. This spontaneous generation of complex design ‘without an intelligent designer’ evolved independently in the protective ‘skin’ of plants, animals and many other organisms. PMID:18258808

  10. Extensive Evolution of Cereal Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Translates into Unique Structural Features, Activation Mechanisms, and Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    De Zaeytijd, Jeroen; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a class of cytotoxic enzymes that can depurinate rRNAs thereby inhibiting protein translation. Although these proteins have also been detected in bacteria, fungi, and even some insects, they are especially prevalent in the plant kingdom. This review focuses on the RIPs from cereals. Studies on the taxonomical distribution and evolution of plant RIPs suggest that cereal RIPs have evolved at an enhanced rate giving rise to a large and heterogeneous RIP gene family. Furthermore, several cereal RIP genes are characterized by a unique domain architecture and the lack of a signal peptide. This advanced evolution of cereal RIPs translates into distinct structures, activation mechanisms, and physiological roles. Several cereal RIPs are characterized by activation mechanisms that include the proteolytic removal of internal peptides from the N-glycosidase domain, a feature not documented for non-cereal RIPs. Besides their role in defense against pathogenic fungi or herbivorous insects, cereal RIPs are also involved in endogenous functions such as adaptation to abiotic stress, storage, induction of senescence, and reprogramming of the translational machinery. The unique properties of cereal RIPs are discussed in this review paper. PMID:28353660

  11. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  12. Physiological regulatory networks: ecological roles and evolutionary constraints.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alan A; Martin, Lynn B; Wingfield, John C; McWilliams, Scott R; Dunne, Jennifer A

    2012-08-01

    Ecological and evolutionary physiology has traditionally focused on one aspect of physiology at a time. Here, we discuss the implications of considering physiological regulatory networks (PRNs) as integrated wholes, a perspective that reveals novel roles for physiology in organismal ecology and evolution. For example, evolutionary response to changes in resource abundance might be constrained by the role of dietary micronutrients in immune response regulation, given a particular pathogen environment. Because many physiological components impact more than one process, organismal homeostasis is maintained, individual fitness is determined and evolutionary change is constrained (or facilitated) by interactions within PRNs. We discuss how PRN structure and its system-level properties could determine both individual performance and patterns of physiological evolution.

  13. Structure and sensory physiology of the leg scolopidial organs in Mantophasmatodea and their role in vibrational communication.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, M J B; Lang, D; Metscher, B; Pass, G; Picker, M D; Wolf, H

    2010-07-01

    Individuals of the insect order Mantophasmatodea use species-specific substrate vibration signals for mate recognition and location. In insects, substrate vibration is detected by mechanoreceptors in the legs, the scolopidial organs. In this study we give a first detailed overview of the structure, sensory sensitivity, and function of the leg scolopidial organs in two species of Mantophasmatodea and discuss their significance for vibrational communication. The structure and number of the organs are documented using light microscopy, SEM, and x-ray microtomography. Five scolopidial organs were found in each leg of male and female Mantophasmatodea: a femoral chordotonal organ, subgenual organ, tibial distal organ, tibio-tarsal scolopidial organ, and tarso-pretarsal scolopidial organ. The femoral chordotonal organ, consisting of two separate scoloparia, corresponds anatomically to the organ of a stonefly (Nemoura variegata) while the subgenual organ complex resembles the very sensitive organs of the cockroach Periplatena americana (Blattodea). Extracellular recordings from the leg nerve revealed that the leg scolopidial organs of Mantophasmatodea are very sensitive vibration receptors, especially for low-frequency vibrations. The dominant frequencies of the vibratory communication signals of Mantophasmatodea, acquired from an individual drumming on eight different substrates, fall in the frequency range where the scolopidial organs are most sensitive.

  14. The physiological roles of primary phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Follo, Matilde Y; Cocco, Lucio; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2013-09-01

    The roles of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) have been extensively investigated in diverse cell lines and pathological conditions. Among the PLC isozmes, primary PLCs, PLC-β and PLC-γ, are directly activated by receptor activation, unlike other secondary PLCs (PLC-ɛ, PLC-δ1, and PLC-η1). PLC-β isozymes are activated by G protein couple receptor and PLC-γ isozymes are activated by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Primary PLCs are differentially expressed in different tissues, suggesting their specific roles in diverse tissues and regulate a variety of physiological and pathophysiological functions. Thus, dysregulation of phospholipases contributes to a number of human diseases and primary PLCs have been identified as therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of diseases. Here we review the roles of primary PLCs in physiology and their impact in pathology.

  15. [The role of physiology in modern surgery].

    PubMed

    2006-04-01

    Through the analysis of recent achievements in the field of surgery we have demonstrated convincingly that physiological studies in both humans and animal models are the keystone of modern surgery. Physiological studies of blood circulation, respiration, digestion and other functions have laid the foundations for major fields of surgery. Their role is the most evident in the development of cardiac surgery. Notably, one of the outstanding breakthroughs in the medical science of the 20th century--the extracorporeal blood circulation--was made by the Russian physiologist S. S. Bryukhovenko. We have shown that noninvasive diagnostic procedures such as echocardiography are of outmost significance on all stages of the surgical treatment (pre- and intraoperational diagnostics and medical rehabilitation). The great impact of physiology on the development of surgery has also led to the progress of related fields of medicine--anesthesiology, intensive care, functional diagnostics, transplantation, rehabilitation, and many others.

  16. Structure, physiology, and biochemistry of collagens.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2014-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are connective tissues that guide motion, share loads, and transmit forces in a manner that is unique to each as well as the anatomical site and biomechanical stresses to which they are subjected. Collagens are the major molecular components of both tendons and ligaments. The hierarchical structure of tendon and its functional properties are determined by the collagens present, as well as their supramolecular organization. There are 28 different types of collagen that assemble into a variety of supramolecular structures. The assembly of specific supramolecular structures is dependent on the interaction with other matrix molecules as well as the cellular elements. Multiple suprastructural assemblies are integrated to form the functional tendon/ligament. This chapter begins with a discussion of collagen molecules. This is followed by a definition of the supramolecular structures assembled by different collagen types. The general principles involved in the assembly of collagen-containing suprastructures are presented focusing on the regulation of tendon collagen fibrillogenesis. Finally, site-specific differences are discussed. While generalizations can be made, differences exist between different tendons as well as between tendons and ligaments. Compositional differences will impact structure that in turn will determine functional differences. Elucidation of the unique physiology and pathophysiology of different tendons and ligaments will require an appreciation of the role compositional differences have on collagen suprastructural assembly, tissue organization, and function.

  17. Physiological roles of small RNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Michaux, Charlotte; Verneuil, Nicolas; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2014-06-01

    Unlike proteins, RNA molecules have emerged lately as key players in regulation in bacteria. Most reviews hitherto focused on the experimental and/or in silico methods used to identify genes encoding small RNAs (sRNAs) or on the diverse mechanisms of these RNA regulators to modulate expression of their targets. However, less is known about their biological functions and their implications in various physiological responses. This review aims to compile what is known presently about the diverse roles of sRNA transcripts in the regulation of metabolic processes, in different growth conditions, in adaptation to stress and in microbial pathogenesis. Several recent studies revealed that sRNA molecules are implicated in carbon metabolism and transport, amino acid metabolism or metal sensing. Moreover, regulatory RNAs participate in cellular adaptation to environmental changes, e.g. through quorum sensing systems or development of biofilms, and analyses of several sRNAs under various physiological stresses and culture conditions have already been performed. In addition, recent experiments performed with Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens showed that regulatory RNAs play important roles in microbial virulence and during infection. The combined results show the diversity of regulation mechanisms and physiological processes in which sRNA molecules are key actors.

  18. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. The role of prostaglandins in reproductive physiology.

    PubMed

    Bardin, T P

    1970-10-01

    Research on the physiopathologic and biochemical nature of prostaglandins (PGs) suggest that PGs play a role in reproductive physiology. In vitro studies show that the PGE series decrease the motility of the human uterus, fallopian tubes, and ureter, and produce vasodilatation. PGFs cause vasoconstriction and increased motility of the uterus, fallopian tubes, ureter, and gastrointestinal muscle. PGs are also known to inhibit lipolysis, platelet aggregation, and gastric secretion. The exact mechanism of PGs are not fully understood, but evidence suggests that many responses can be attributed to interference with the enzyme adenyl cyclase, which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) from adenosine triphosphate. The adenyl cyclase-cyclic AMP system mediates lipolysis, steroidogenesis, gastric secretion, certain smooth muscle motility responses, and increase in permeability due to vasopressin. Early studies of the myometrial effects of PGs showed that the PGE series inhibited the motility of the human myometrium in vitro while the PGF series produced mixed responses. The role of PGF2alpha in parturition has not been established but evidence suggests that it has a potential role as an oxytocic in cases of therapeutic abortion. In the area of human fertility, the physiologic role of PGs in seminal fluid is hypothesized to facilitate the migration of spermatozoa from the vagina into the uterine cavity. Karolinska Institute researchers have found that some infertile males have low PG levels in their ejaculates and are now working with methods of improving the PG levels to improve their fertility. Pickles et al. proposed a potential role for PGs in the etiology of dysmenorrhea, having found a significantly higher ratio of PGF to PGE in a series of patients with severe dysmenorrhea than in a comparable series of normal patients. The luteolytic and antinidatory effects of PGF2alpha are being investigated and studies appear encouraging. PGs have

  20. Edaphic, structural and physiological contrasts across Amazon Basin forest-savanna ecotones suggest a role for potassium as a key modulator of tropical woody vegetation structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, J.; Domingues, T. F.; Schrodt, F.; Ishida, F. Y.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Saiz, G.; Quesada, C. A.; Schwarz, M.; Torello-Raventos, M.; Gilpin, M.; Marimon, B. S.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Ratter, J. A.; Grace, J.; Nardoto, G. B.; Veenendaal, E.; Arroyo, L.; Villarroel, D.; Killeen, T. J.; Steininger, M.; Phillips, O. L.

    2015-11-01

    Sampling along a precipitation gradient in tropical South America extending from ca. 0.8 to 2.0 m a-1, savanna soils had consistently lower exchangeable cation concentrations and higher C / N ratios than nearby forest plots. These soil differences were also reflected in canopy averaged leaf traits with savanna trees typically having higher leaf mass per unit area but lower mass-based nitrogen (Nm) and potassium (Km). Both Nm and Km also increased with declining mean annual precipitation (PA), but most area-based leaf traits such as leaf photosynthetic capacity showed no systematic variation with PA or vegetation type. Despite this invariance, when taken in conjunction with other measures such as mean canopy height, area-based soil exchangeable potassium content, [K]sa , proved to be an excellent predictor of several photosynthetic properties (including 13C isotope discrimination). Moreover, when considered in a multivariate context with PA and soil plant available water storage capacity (θP) as covariates, [K]sa also proved to be an excellent predictor of stand-level canopy area, providing drastically improved fits as compared to models considering just PA and/or θP. Neither calcium, nor magnesium, nor soil pH could substitute for potassium when tested as alternative model predictors (ΔAIC > 10). Nor for any model could simple soil texture metrics such as sand or clay content substitute for either [K]sa or θP. Taken in conjunction with recent work in Africa and the forests of the Amazon Basin, this suggests - in combination with some newly conceptualised interacting effects of PA and θP also presented here - a critical role for potassium as a modulator of tropical vegetation structure and function.

  1. Prohibitin( PHB) roles in granulosa cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Indrajit; Thomas, Kelwyn; Thompson, Winston E

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian granulosa cells (GC) play an important role in the growth and development of the follicle in the process known as folliculogenesis. In the present review, we focus on recent developments in prohibitin (PHB) research in relation to GC physiological functions. PHB is a member of a highly conserved eukaryotic protein family containing the repressor of estrogen activity (REA)/stomatin/PHB/flotillin/HflK/C (SPFH) domain (also known as the PHB domain) found in diverse species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. PHB is ubiquitously expressed in a circulating free form or is present in multiple cellular compartments including mitochondria, nucleus and plasma membrane. In mitochondria, PHB is anchored to the mitochondrial inner membrane and forms complexes with the ATPases associated with proteases having diverse cellular activities. PHB continuously shuttles between the mitochondria, cytosol and nucleus. In the nucleus, PHB interacts with various transcription factors and modulates transcriptional activity directly or through interactions with chromatin remodeling proteins. Many functions have been attributed to the mitochondrial and nuclear PHB complexes such as cellular differentiation, anti-proliferation, morphogenesis and maintenance of the functional integrity of the mitochondria. However, to date, the regulation of PHB expression patterns and GC physiological functions are not completely understood.

  2. Prohibitin (PHB) roles in granulosa cell physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Indrajit; Thomas, Kelwyn; Thompson, Winston E.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian granulosa cells (GC) play an important role in the growth and development of the follicle in the process known as folliculogenesis. In the present review, we focus on the recent developments in prohibitin (PHB) research in relation to GC physiological functions. PHB is a member of highly conserved eukaryotic protein family containing the repressor of estrogen activity (REA)/stomatin/prohibitin/flotillin/HflK/C (SPFH) domain [also known as the PHB domain] found in divergent species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. PHB is ubiquitously expressed either in circulating free form or is present in multiple cellular compartments including mitochondria, nucleus and plasma membrane. In mitochondria, PHB is anchored to the mitochondrial inner membrane (IMM), and form complexes with the ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities (m-AAA) proteases. PHB continuously shuttles between the mitochondria, cytosol and nucleus. In the nucleus, PHB interacts with various transcription factors and modulate transcriptional activity directly or through interactions with chromatin remodeling proteins. Multiple functions have been attributed to the mitochondrial and nuclear prohibitin complexes such as cellular differentiation, anti-proliferation, morphogenesis and maintaining the functional integrity of the mitochondria. However, to date, the regulation of PHB expression patterns and GC physiological functions are not completely understood. PMID:26496733

  3. Physiological roles of ghrelin on obesity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Ida, Takanori; Nakamura, Yuki; Shiimura, Yuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Kojima, Masayasu

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that acts as an endogenous ligand of orphan G-protein coupled receptor. Ghrelin has various physiological functions, such as the stimulation of growth hormone release and of appetite, and fat accumulation. Ghrelin is the only peripheral hormone to transmit satiety signal. Mature ghrelin peptide is consisted of 28 amino acid residues, and is unusual among peptide hormones in that Ser3 is n-octanoylated to obtain. Furthermore, this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. In order to add this side chain to acyl ghrelin, it is necessary for the recently discovered enzyme, ghrelin-O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Therefore, to understand of ghrelin's functions, it is useful to obtain the knowledge on structures and functions of ghrelin, ghrelin receptor and GOAT. Here, we review our current understanding of the structures and functions of ghrelin, and the relation between obesity and ghrelin. Finally, we referred to the ghrelin and related substances as a drug design target for obesity.

  4. Selenoproteins: Molecular Pathways and Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient with important functions in human health and relevance to several pathophysiological conditions. The biological effects of selenium are largely mediated by selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins) that are present in all three domains of life. Although selenoproteins represent diverse molecular pathways and biological functions, all these proteins contain at least one selenocysteine (Sec), a selenium-containing amino acid, and most serve oxidoreductase functions. Sec is cotranslationally inserted into nascent polypeptide chains in response to the UGA codon, whose normal function is to terminate translation. To decode UGA as Sec, organisms evolved the Sec insertion machinery that allows incorporation of this amino acid at specific UGA codons in a process requiring a cis-acting Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element. Although the basic mechanisms of Sec synthesis and insertion into proteins in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes have been studied in great detail, the identity and functions of many selenoproteins remain largely unknown. In the last decade, there has been significant progress in characterizing selenoproteins and selenoproteomes and understanding their physiological functions. We discuss current knowledge about how these unique proteins perform their functions at the molecular level and highlight new insights into the roles that selenoproteins play in human health. PMID:24987004

  5. Protein disulfide isomerase a multifunctional protein with multiple physiological roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Khan, Hyder; Mutus, Bulent

    2014-08-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), is a member of the thioredoxin superfamily of redox proteins. PDI has three catalytic activities including, thiol-disulfide oxireductase, disulfide isomerase and redox-dependent chaperone. Originally, PDI was identified in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequently detected at additional locations, such as cell surfaces and the cytosol. This review will provide an overview of the recent advances in relating the structural features of PDI to its multiple catalytic roles as well as its physiological and pathophysiological functions related to redox regulation and protein folding.

  6. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  7. Development of the field of structural physiology

    PubMed Central

    FUJIYOSHI, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Electron crystallography is especially useful for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins — key molecules with important functions in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique for analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers that closely simulate their natural biological environment. Utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium-cooled specimen stages that were developed through a personal motivation to understand the functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, the structures of membrane proteins can be analyzed at a higher than 3 Å resolution. This review covers four objectives. First, I introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, I recount some of the struggles involved in developing cryo-electron microscopes. Third, I review the structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins mainly by electron crystallography using cryo-electron microscopes. Finally, I discuss multifunctional channels named “adhennels” based on structures analyzed using electron and X-ray crystallography. PMID:26560835

  8. Tuning of Peroxiredoxin Catalysis for Various Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) make up an ancient family of enzymes that are the predominant peroxidases for nearly all organisms and play essential roles in reducing hydrogen peroxide, organic hydroperoxides, and peroxynitrite. Even between distantly related organisms, the core protein fold and key catalytic residues related to its cysteine-based catalytic mechanism have been retained. Given that these enzymes appeared early in biology, Prxs have experienced more than 1 billion years of optimization for specific ecological niches. Although their basic enzymatic function remains the same, Prxs have diversified and are involved in roles such as protecting DNA against mutation, defending pathogens against host immune responses, suppressing tumor formation, and—for eukaryotes—helping regulate peroxide signaling via hyperoxidation of their catalytic Cys residues. Here, we review the current understanding of the physiological roles of Prxs by analyzing knockout and knockdown studies from ∼25 different species. We also review what is known about the structural basis for the sensitivity of some eukaryotic Prxs to inactivation by hyperoxidation. In considering the physiological relevance of hyperoxidation, we explore the distribution across species of sulfiredoxin (Srx), the enzyme responsible for rescuing hyperoxidized Prxs. We unexpectedly find that among eukaryotes appearing to have a “sensitive” Prx isoform, some do not contain Srx. Also, as Prxs are suggested to be promising targets for drug design, we discuss the rationale behind recently proposed strategies for their selective inhibition. PMID:25403613

  9. The role of physiology in the development of golf performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark F

    2010-08-01

    The attainment of consistent high performance in golf requires effective physical conditioning that is carefully designed and monitored in accordance with the on-course demands the player will encounter. Appreciating the role that physiology plays in the attainment of consistent performance, and how a player's physicality can inhibit performance progression, supports the notion that the application of physiology is fundamental for any player wishing to excel in golf. With cardiorespiratory, metabolic, hormonal, musculoskeletal and nutritional demands acting on the golfer within and between rounds, effective physical screening of a player will ensure physiological and anatomical deficiencies that may influence performance are highlighted. The application of appropriate golf-specific assessment methods will ensure that physical attributes that have a direct effect on golf performance can be measured reliably and accurately. With the physical development of golf performance being achieved through a process of conditioning with the purpose of inducing changes in structural and metabolic functions, training must focus on foundation whole-body fitness and golf-specific functional strength and flexibility activities. For long-term player improvement to be effective, comprehensive monitoring will ensure the player reaches an optimal physical state at predetermined times in the competitive season. Through continual assessment of a player's physical attributes, training effectiveness and suitability, and the associated adaptive responses, key physical factors that may impact most on performance success can be determined.

  10. Physiological roles of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2012-10-26

    Historically, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) were thought to exclusively cause cellular damage and lack a physiological function. Accumulation of ROS and oxidative damage have been linked to multiple pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, and premature aging. Thus, mROS were originally envisioned as a necessary evil of oxidative metabolism, a product of an imperfect system. Yet few biological systems possess such flagrant imperfections, thanks to the persistent optimization of evolution, and it appears that oxidative metabolism is no different. More and more evidence suggests that mROS are critical for healthy cell function. In this Review, we discuss this evidence following some background on the generation and regulation of mROS.

  11. Bioactive Pigments from Marine Bacteria: Applications and Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Soliev, Azamjon B.; Hosokawa, Kakushi; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Research into natural products from the marine environment, including microorganisms, has rapidly increased over the past two decades. Despite the enormous difficulty in isolating and harvesting marine bacteria, microbial metabolites are increasingly attractive to science because of their broad-ranging pharmacological activities, especially those with unique color pigments. This current review paper gives an overview of the pigmented natural compounds isolated from bacteria of marine origin, based on accumulated data in the literature. We review the biological activities of marine compounds, including recent advances in the study of pharmacological effects and other commercial applications, in addition to the biosynthesis and physiological roles of associated pigments. Chemical structures of the bioactive compounds discussed are also presented. PMID:21961023

  12. Metabolism and physiologic roles of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Oski, F A

    1977-10-01

    Antioxidant effect of vitamin E averts hemolytic anemia in low-birthweight infants fed formula rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. Tocopherol supplementation has also been shown to decrease the incidence and severity of retrolental fibroplasia and the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Although the vitamin lowers platelet hyperaggregability, its role as an antithrombotic agent is still unclear.

  13. Quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases: structure, function, and physiology.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirohide; Mathews, F Scott; Adachi, Osao; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2004-08-01

    Quino(hemo)protein alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) that have pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as the prosthetic group are classified into 3 groups, types I, II, and III. Type I ADH is a simple quinoprotein having PQQ as the only prosthetic group, while type II and type III ADHs are quinohemoprotein having heme c as well as PQQ in the catalytic polypeptide. Type II ADH is a soluble periplasmic enzyme and is widely distributed in Proteobacteria such as Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Comamonas, etc. In contrast, type III ADH is a membrane-bound enzyme working on the periplasmic surface solely in acetic acid bacteria. It consists of three subunits that comprise a quinohemoprotein catalytic subunit, a triheme cytochrome c subunit, and a third subunit of unknown function. The catalytic subunits of all the quino(hemo)protein ADHs have a common structural motif, a quinoprotein-specific superbarrel domain, where PQQ is deeply embedded in the center. In addition, in the type II and type III ADHs this subunit contains a unique heme c domain. Various type II ADHs each have a unique substrate specificity, accepting a wide variety of alcohols, as is discussed on the basis of recent X-ray crystallographic analyses. Electron transfer within both type II and III ADHs is discussed in terms of the intramolecular reaction from PQQ to heme c and also from heme to heme, and in terms of the intermolecular reaction with azurin and ubiquinone, respectively. Unique physiological functions of both types of quinohemoprotein ADHs are also discussed.

  14. Structural investigation into physiological DNA phosphorothioate modification

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Wenxian; Hu, Zhongpei; Shen, Jie; Wang, Chunxi; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Huili; Long, Dewu; Liu, Maili; Cao, Chunyang

    2016-01-01

    DNA phosphorothioate (PT) modification, with sulfur replacing a nonbridging phosphate oxygen in a sequence and stereo specific manner, is a novel physiological variation in bacteria. But what effects on DNA properties PT modification has is still unclear. To address this, we prepared three double-stranded (ds) DNA decamers, d(CGPXGCCGCCGA) with its complementary strand d(TCGGCGPXGCCG) (where X = O or S, i.e., PT-free dsDNA, [Sp, Sp]-PT dsDNA or [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA) located in gene of Streptomyces lividans. Their melting temperature (Tm) measurement indicates that [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA is most unstable. Their electron transfer potential detection presents an order of anti-oxidation properties: Sp-PT DNA > Rp-PT DNA > PT-free DNA. Their NMR structures demonstrate that PT modification doesn’t change their B-form conformation. The sulfur in [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA locates in the major groove, with steric effects on protons in the sugar close to modification sites, resulting in its unstability, and facilitating its selectively interactions with ScoMcrA. We thought that PT modification was dialectical to the bacteria. It protects the hosting bacteria by working as antioxidant against H2O2, and acts as a marker, directing restriction enzyme observed in other hosts, like ScoMcrA, to correctly cleave the PT modified DNA, so that bacteria cannot spread and survive. PMID:27169778

  15. Structural investigation into physiological DNA phosphorothioate modification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wenxian; Hu, Zhongpei; Shen, Jie; Wang, Chunxi; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Huili; Long, Dewu; Liu, Maili; Cao, Chunyang

    2016-05-12

    DNA phosphorothioate (PT) modification, with sulfur replacing a nonbridging phosphate oxygen in a sequence and stereo specific manner, is a novel physiological variation in bacteria. But what effects on DNA properties PT modification has is still unclear. To address this, we prepared three double-stranded (ds) DNA decamers, d(CG(PX)GCCGCCGA) with its complementary strand d(TCGGCG(PX)GCCG) (where X = O or S, i.e., PT-free dsDNA, [Sp, Sp]-PT dsDNA or [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA) located in gene of Streptomyces lividans. Their melting temperature (Tm) measurement indicates that [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA is most unstable. Their electron transfer potential detection presents an order of anti-oxidation properties: Sp-PT DNA > Rp-PT DNA > PT-free DNA. Their NMR structures demonstrate that PT modification doesn't change their B-form conformation. The sulfur in [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA locates in the major groove, with steric effects on protons in the sugar close to modification sites, resulting in its unstability, and facilitating its selectively interactions with ScoMcrA. We thought that PT modification was dialectical to the bacteria. It protects the hosting bacteria by working as antioxidant against H2O2, and acts as a marker, directing restriction enzyme observed in other hosts, like ScoMcrA, to correctly cleave the PT modified DNA, so that bacteria cannot spread and survive.

  16. [Evolutionary-biological peculiarities of transglutaminase. Structure, physiological functions, application].

    PubMed

    Shleĭkin, A G; Danilov, N P

    2011-01-01

    Transglutaminasc (protein-glutamine gamma-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.13, TG) catalyzes reactions of the acyl transfer, which introduce the epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)lysine bonds between proteins to create polymers of high mol. mass. Properties of the TG enzyme are described. Its structure is considered: there are characterized items of the TG life cycle and stability, its biological (physiological) role, and significance in pathology and medicine as well as obtaining of the purified enzyme preparations and their use. There are compared TG from different sources: of animal and microbial origin. Mechanism of catalysis of microbial TG is discussed. There are presented characteristics of isoenzymes from different biological sources.

  17. Structure-Function Relations in Physiology Education: Where's the Mechanism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lira, Matthew E.; Gardner, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such…

  18. Structure-based functional study reveals multiple roles of transmembrane segment IX and loop VIII-IX in NhaA Na+/H+ antiporter of Escherichia coli at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Tzubery, Tzvi; Rimon, Abraham; Padan, Etana

    2008-06-06

    The three-dimensional crystal structure of Escherichia coli NhaA determined at pH 4 provided the first structural insights into the mechanism of antiport and pH regulation of a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. However, because NhaA is activated at physiological pH (pH 6.5-8.5), many questions pertaining to the active state of NhaA have remained open including the structural and physiological roles of helix IX and its loop VIII-IX. Here we studied this NhaA segment (Glu(241)-Phe(267)) by structure-based biochemical approaches at physiological pH. Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis identified new mutations affecting the pH dependence of NhaA, suggesting their contribution to the "pH sensor." Furthermore mutation F267C reduced the H(+)/Na(+) stoichiometry of the antiporter, and F267C/F344C inactivated the antiporter activity. Tests of accessibility to [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide, a membrane-impermeant positively charged SH reagent with a width similar to the diameter of hydrated Na(+), suggested that at physiological pH the cytoplasmic cation funnel is more accessible than at acidic pH. Assaying intermolecular cross-linking in situ between single Cys replacement mutants uncovered the NhaA dimer interface at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane; between Leu(255) and the cytoplasm, many Cys replacements cross-link with various cross-linkers spanning different distances (10-18 A) implying a flexible interface. L255C formed intermolecular S-S bonds, cross-linked only with a 5-A cross-linker, and when chemically modified caused an alkaline shift of 1 pH unit in the pH dependence of NhaA and a 6-fold increase in the apparent K(m) for Na(+) of the exchange activity suggesting a rigid point in the dimer interface critical for NhaA activity and pH regulation.

  19. Physiological arousal: a role for hypothalamic systems.

    PubMed

    Adamantidis, A; de Lecea, L

    2008-05-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) has long been known as a homeostasis center of the brain that modulates feeding behavior, arousal and reward. The hypocretins (Hcrts, also called orexins) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are neuropeptides produced in two intermingled populations of a few thousand neurons in the LH. The Hcrts have a prominent role in regulating the stability of arousal, since Hcrt system deficiency leads to narcolepsy. MCH is an important modulator of energy balance, as MCH system deficiency in mice leads to leanness and increased metabolism. Recently, MCH has been proposed to modulate rapid eye movement sleep in rodents. In this review, we propose a working model of the cross-talk between Hcrt and MCH circuits that may provide an arousal balance system to regulate complex goal-oriented behaviors.

  20. Separating foliar physiology from morphology reveals the relative roles of vertically structured transpiration factors within red maple crowns and limitations of larger scale models

    PubMed Central

    Bauerle, William L.; Bowden, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    A spatially explicit mechanistic model, MAESTRA, was used to separate key parameters affecting transpiration to provide insights into the most influential parameters for accurate predictions of within-crown and within-canopy transpiration. Once validated among Acer rubrum L. genotypes, model responses to different parameterization scenarios were scaled up to stand transpiration (expressed per unit leaf area) to assess how transpiration might be affected by the spatial distribution of foliage properties. For example, when physiological differences were accounted for, differences in leaf width among A. rubrum L. genotypes resulted in a 25% difference in transpiration. An in silico within-canopy sensitivity analysis was conducted over the range of genotype parameter variation observed and under different climate forcing conditions. The analysis revealed that seven of 16 leaf traits had a ≥5% impact on transpiration predictions. Under sparse foliage conditions, comparisons of the present findings with previous studies were in agreement that parameters such as the maximum Rubisco-limited rate of photosynthesis can explain ∼20% of the variability in predicted transpiration. However, the spatial analysis shows how such parameters can decrease or change in importance below the uppermost canopy layer. Alternatively, model sensitivity to leaf width and minimum stomatal conductance was continuous along a vertical canopy depth profile. Foremost, transpiration sensitivity to an observed range of morphological and physiological parameters is examined and the spatial sensitivity of transpiration model predictions to vertical variations in microclimate and foliage density is identified to reduce the uncertainty of current transpiration predictions. PMID:21617246

  1. Separating foliar physiology from morphology reveals the relative roles of vertically structured transpiration factors within red maple crowns and limitations of larger scale models.

    PubMed

    Bauerle, William L; Bowden, Joseph D

    2011-08-01

    A spatially explicit mechanistic model, MAESTRA, was used to separate key parameters affecting transpiration to provide insights into the most influential parameters for accurate predictions of within-crown and within-canopy transpiration. Once validated among Acer rubrum L. genotypes, model responses to different parameterization scenarios were scaled up to stand transpiration (expressed per unit leaf area) to assess how transpiration might be affected by the spatial distribution of foliage properties. For example, when physiological differences were accounted for, differences in leaf width among A. rubrum L. genotypes resulted in a 25% difference in transpiration. An in silico within-canopy sensitivity analysis was conducted over the range of genotype parameter variation observed and under different climate forcing conditions. The analysis revealed that seven of 16 leaf traits had a ≥5% impact on transpiration predictions. Under sparse foliage conditions, comparisons of the present findings with previous studies were in agreement that parameters such as the maximum Rubisco-limited rate of photosynthesis can explain ∼20% of the variability in predicted transpiration. However, the spatial analysis shows how such parameters can decrease or change in importance below the uppermost canopy layer. Alternatively, model sensitivity to leaf width and minimum stomatal conductance was continuous along a vertical canopy depth profile. Foremost, transpiration sensitivity to an observed range of morphological and physiological parameters is examined and the spatial sensitivity of transpiration model predictions to vertical variations in microclimate and foliage density is identified to reduce the uncertainty of current transpiration predictions.

  2. Phosphatonins: physiological role and pathological changes

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Loredana; Mazzotta, Celestina; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Summary Maintenance of proper serum phosphate concentrations is required for healthy life, and critical for normal skeletal development and integrity. Several hormones and regulatory factors such as vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and the phosphatonins (FGF-23, sFRP-4, MEPE) among others, may play a role only in the long-term regulation of phosphorus homeostasis. FGF23 is part of a previously unrecognized hormonal bone-parathyroid-kidney axis. Its synthesis and secretion by osteocytes are positively regulated by 1,25(OH)2D and serum phosphorus and negatively by the phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX), and the enzyme N-acetyl galactosamine trasferase 3 (PPGGalNacT3), encoded by GALnT3 gene, prevents its degradation. FGF23 requires Klotho protein as a coreceptor for high affinity binding to cognate FGF receptors (FGFRs). Mutations of any of FGF23, Klotho or GALnT3 genes can lead to a syndrome characterized by hyperphosphatemia, ectopic calcifications and recurrent long bone lesions with hyperostosis. Phosphatonin have been shown to be implicated in several common diseases involving kidney and mineral metabolism. FGF23 might also represent a promising putative marker for bone healing. PMID:22783327

  3. Understanding the physiological roles of the neuronal calcium sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Calcium signalling plays a crucial role in the control of neuronal function and plasticity. Changes in neuronal Ca2+ concentration are detected by Ca2+-binding proteins that can interact with and regulate target proteins to modify their function. Members of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) protein family have multiple non-redundant roles in the nervous system. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the physiological roles of the NCS proteins and the molecular basis for their specificity. PMID:22269068

  4. Physiological role of SLC12 family members in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Bazúa-Valenti, Silvana; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    The solute carrier family 12, as numbered according to Human Genome Organisation (HUGO) nomenclature, encodes the electroneutral cation-coupled chloride cotransporters that are expressed in many cells and tissues; they play key roles in important physiological events, such as cell volume regulation, modulation of the intracellular chloride concentration, and transepithelial ion transport. Most of these family members are expressed in specific regions of the nephron. The Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2, which is located in the thick ascending limb, and the Na-Cl cotransporter, which is located in the distal convoluted tubule, play important roles in salt reabsorption and serve as the receptors for loop and thiazide diuretics, respectively (Thiazide diuretics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in the world.). The activity of these transporters correlates with blood pressure levels; thus, their regulation has been a subject of intense research for more than a decade. The K-Cl cotransporters KCC1, KCC3, and KCC4 are expressed in several nephron segments, and their role in renal physiology is less understood but nevertheless important. Evidence suggests that they are involved in modulating proximal tubule glucose reabsorption, thick ascending limb salt reabsorption and collecting duct proton secretion. In this work, we present an overview of the physiological roles of these transporters in the kidney, with particular emphasis on the knowledge gained in the past few years. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The role of cystatins in tick physiology and blood feeding

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Valdés, James J.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ticks, as obligate hematophagous ectoparasites, impact greatly on animal and human health because they transmit various pathogens worldwide. Over the last decade, several cystatins from different hard and soft ticks were identified and biochemically analyzed for their role in the physiology and blood feeding lifestyle of ticks. All these cystatins are potent inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases, but not of legumain. Tick cystatins were either detected in the salivary glands and/or the midgut, key tick organs responsible for blood digestion and the expression of pharmacologically potent salivary proteins for blood feeding. For example, the transcription of two cystatins named HlSC-1 and Sialostatin L2 was highly upregulated in these tick tissues during feeding. Vaccinating hosts against Sialostatin L2 and Om-cystatin 2 as well as silencing of a cystatin gene from Amblyomma americanum significantly inhibited the feeding ability of ticks. Additionally, Om-cystatin 2 and Sialostatin L possessed strong host immunosuppressive properties by inhibiting dendritic cell maturation due to their interaction with cathepsin S. These two cystatins, together with Sialostatin L2 are the first tick cystatins with resolved three-dimensional structure. Sialostatin L, furthermore, showed preventive properties against autoimmune diseases. In the case of the cystatin Hlcyst-2, experimental evidence showed its role in tick innate immunity, since increased Hlcyst-2 transcript levels were detected in Babesia gibsoni-infected larval ticks and the protein inhibited Babesia growth. Other cystatins, such as Hlcyst-1 or Om-cystatin 2 are assumed to be involved in regulating blood digestion. Only for Bmcystatin was a role in tick embryogenesis suggested. Finally, all the biochemically analyzed tick cystatins are powerful protease inhibitors, and some may be novel antigens for developing anti-tick vaccines and drugs of medical importance due to their stringent target specificity

  6. Differential physiological roles of ESCRT complexes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Wan; Sung, Hyun; Shin, Donghyuk; Shen, Haihong; Ahnn, Joohong; Lee, Sun-Kyung; Lee, Sangho

    2011-06-01

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) complexes are involved in endosomal trafficking to the lysosome, cytokinesis, and viral budding. Extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural studies on the ESCRT system have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. However, the question of how the ESCRT system functions at the whole organism level has not been fully explored. In C. elegans, we performed RNAi experiments to knock-down gene expression of components of the ESCRT system and profiled their effects on protein degradation and endocytosis of YP170, a yolk protein. Targeted RNAi knock-down of ESCRT-I (tsg-101 and vps-28) and ESCRT-III (vps-24, and vps-32.2) components interfered with protein degradation while knock-down of ESCRT-II (vps-25 and vps-36) and ESCRT-III (vps-20 and vps-24) components hampered endocytosis. In contrast, the knockdown of vps-37, another ESCRT-I component, showed no defect in either YP170 uptake or degradation. Depletion of at least one component from each complex - ESCRT-0 (hgrs-1), ESCRT-I (tsg-101, vps-28, and vps-37), ESCRT-II (vps-36), ESCRT-III (vps-24), and Vps4 (vps-4) - resulted in abnormal distribution of embryos in the uterus of worms, possibly due to abnormal ovulation, fertilization, and egglaying. These results suggest differential physiological roles of ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III complexes in the context of the whole organism, C. elegans.

  7. Mitophagy in yeast: Molecular mechanisms and physiological role.

    PubMed

    Kanki, Tomotake; Furukawa, Kentaro; Yamashita, Shun-ichi

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria autophagy (mitophagy) is a process that selectively degrades mitochondria via autophagy. Recently, there has been significant progress in the understanding of mitophagy in yeast. Atg32, a mitochondrial outer membrane receptor, is indispensable for mitophagy. Phosphorylation of Atg32 is an initial cue for selective mitochondrial degradation. Atg32 expression and phosphorylation regulate the induction and efficiency of mitophagy. In addition to Atg32-related processes, recent studies have revealed that mitochondrial fission and the mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contact site may play important roles in mitophagy. Mitochondrial fission is required to regulate mitochondrial size. Mitochondria-ER contact is mediated by the ER-mitochondria encounter structure and is important to supply lipids from the ER for autophagosome biogenesis for mitophagy. Mitophagy is physiologically important for regulating the number of mitochondria, diminishing mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, and extending chronological lifespan under caloric restriction. These findings suggest that mitophagy contributes to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis. However, whether mitophagy selectively degrades damaged or dysfunctional mitochondria in yeast is unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of hydrogen sulfide in the physiology of penile erection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Villalta, Jackie; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), which is a well-known toxic gas, has recently been recognized as a biological messenger that plays an important role in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Relatively high levels of H(2)S have been discovered in mammalian tissues. It is mainly synthesized by 2 enzymes, including cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lysase, which utilize L-cysteine as substrate to produce H(2)S. H(2)S has been demonstrated to exhibit potent vasodilator activity both in vitro and in vivo by relaxing vascular smooth muscle. Recently, H(2)S has been discovered in penile tissue with smooth muscle relaxant effects. Furthermore, other effects of H(2)S could play a role in the physiology of erection. Understanding H(2)S in the physiology of erection might provide alternative erectile dysfunction strategies for those patients with poor or no response to type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitors. This review intends to present the H(2)S pathway in penile tissue and the potential role of H(2)S in the physiology of erections.

  9. Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Physiology of Penile Erection

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Villalta, Jackie; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a well known toxic gas, has recently been recognized as a biological messenger, which plays an important role in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Relatively high levels of H2S have been discovered in mammalian tissues. It is mainly synthesized by two enzymes including cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lysase, which utilize L-cysteine as substrate to produce H2S. H2S has been demonstrated to exhibit potent vasodilator activity both in vitro and in vivo by relaxing vascular smooth muscle. Recently, H2S has been discovered in penile tissue with smooth muscle relaxant effects. Furthermore, other effects of H2S may play a role in the physiology of erection. Understanding of H2S in the physiology of erection might provide alternative erectile dysfunction (ED) strategies for those patients with poor or no response to type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE5i). This review intends to present the H2S pathway in penile tissue and the potential role of H2S in the physiology of erections. PMID:22016355

  10. Structure and Physiological Actions of Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide hormone, discovered as being the endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide presenting a unique n-octanoylation modification on its serine in position 3, catalyzed by ghrelin O-acyl transferase. Ghrelin is mainly produced by a subset of stomach cells and also by the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and other tissues. Transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational processes generate ghrelin and ghrelin-related peptides. Homo- and heterodimers of growth hormone secretagogue receptor, and as yet unidentified receptors, are assumed to mediate the biological effects of acyl ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin, respectively. Ghrelin exerts wide physiological actions throughout the body, including growth hormone secretion, appetite and food intake, gastric secretion and gastrointestinal motility, glucose homeostasis, cardiovascular functions, anti-inflammatory functions, reproductive functions, and bone formation. This review focuses on presenting the current understanding of ghrelin and growth hormone secretagogue receptor biology, as well as the main physiological effects of ghrelin. PMID:24381790

  11. The role of mitochondrial respiration in physiological and evolutionary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayatri

    2006-09-01

    Aerobic mitochondria serve as the power sources of eukaryotes by producing ATP through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The enzymes involved in OXPHOS are multisubunit complexes encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Thus, regulation of respiration is necessarily a highly coordinated process that must organize production, assembly and function of mitochondria to meet an organism's energetic needs. Here I review the role of OXPHOS in metabolic adaptation and diversification of higher animals. On a physiological timescale, endocrine-initiated signaling pathways allow organisms to modulate respiratory enzyme concentration and function under changing environmental conditions. On an evolutionary timescale, mitochondrial enzymes are targets of natural selection, balancing cytonuclear coevolutionary constraints against physiological innovation. By synthesizing our knowledge of biochemistry, physiology and evolution of respiratory regulation, I propose that we can now explore questions at the interface of these fields, from molecular translation of environmental cues to selection on mitochondrial haplotype variation.

  12. Marine Microbial Secondary Metabolites: Pathways, Evolution and Physiological Roles.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Daniela; Coppola, Daniela; Russo, Roberta; Denaro, Renata; Giuliano, Laura; Lauro, Federico M; di Prisco, Guido; Verde, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Microbes produce a huge array of secondary metabolites endowed with important ecological functions. These molecules, which can be catalogued as natural products, have long been exploited in medical fields as antibiotics, anticancer and anti-infective agents. Recent years have seen considerable advances in elucidating natural-product biosynthesis and many drugs used today are natural products or natural-product derivatives. The major contribution to recent knowledge came from application of genomics to secondary metabolism and was facilitated by all relevant genes being organised in a contiguous DNA segment known as gene cluster. Clustering of genes regulating biosynthesis in bacteria is virtually universal. Modular gene clusters can be mixed and matched during evolution to generate structural diversity in natural products. Biosynthesis of many natural products requires the participation of complex molecular machines known as polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. Discovery of new evolutionary links between the polyketide synthase and fatty acid synthase pathways may help to understand the selective advantages that led to evolution of secondary-metabolite biosynthesis within bacteria. Secondary metabolites confer selective advantages, either as antibiotics or by providing a chemical language that allows communication among species, with other organisms and their environment. Herewith, we discuss these aspects focusing on the most clinically relevant bioactive molecules, the thiotemplated modular systems that include polyketide synthases, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and fatty acid synthases. We begin by describing the evolutionary and physiological role of marine natural products, their structural/functional features, mechanisms of action and biosynthesis, then turn to genomic and metagenomic approaches, highlighting how the growing body of information on microbial natural products can be used to address fundamental problems in

  13. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, WJ; Clarke, SA; Quinn, TA; Holmes, JW

    2016-01-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following an MI, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. PMID:26426470

  14. ClC-5: Physiological role and biophysical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Michael; Zifarelli, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Cl(-) transport in animal cells has fundamental physiological roles and it is mediated by a variety of protein families, one of them being the CLC family of ion channels and transporters. Besides their physiological relevance, CLC proteins show peculiar biophysical properties. This review will focus on a member of the CLC protein family, the endosomal Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter ClC-5. ClC-5 mutations cause Dent's disease, a renal syndrome due to defective protein reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This established the critical function of ClC-5 for endocytosis. However, our understanding of ClC-5's molecular role in endosomes and of its biophysical properties has proved elusive in spite of important progress achieved in the last two decades. Early models in which ClC-5 would provide a shunt conductance to enable efficient endosomal acidification conflicted with the antiport activity of ClC-5 that has more recently emerged. Currently, the physiological role of ClC-5 is hotly debated and its biophysical properties are still not fully understood.

  15. Contemporary evidence on the physiological role of reactive oxygen species in human sperm function.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, Stefan S; Agarwal, Ashok; Halabi, Jacques; Tvrda, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in male fertility. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with a variety of male fertility complications, including leukocytospermia, varicocele and idiopathic infertility. The subsequent oxidative insult to spermatozoa can manifest as insufficient energy metabolism, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, leading to loss of motility and viability. However, various studies have demonstrated that physiological amounts of ROS play important roles in the processes of spermatozoa maturation, capacitation, hyperactivation and acrosome reaction. It is therefore crucial to define and understand the delicate oxidative balance in male reproductive cells and tissues for a better understanding of both positive as well as negative impact of ROS production on the fertilizing ability. This review will discuss the specific physiological roles, mechanisms of action and effects that ROS have on the acquisition of structural integrity and physiological activity of spermatozoa.

  16. Emerging role of mitophagy in human diseases and physiology.

    PubMed

    Um, Jee-Hyun; Yun, Jeanho

    2017-04-03

    Mitophagy is a process of selective removal of damaged or unnecessary mitochondria using autophagic machineries. Mitophagy plays an essential role in mitochondria quality control and mitochondria homeostasis. Mitochondria dysfunctions and mitophagy defects in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, metabolic diseases indicate a close link between human disease and mitophagy activity. Furthermore, recent studies showing the involvement of mitophagy in differentiation and development, suggest that mitophagy may play a more active role in controlling cellular functions. The better understanding of mitophagy will provide insight about human disease and offering novel chance for treatment. This review mainly focuses on the recent implications of mitophagy in human diseases and normal physiology.

  17. Dietary boron: progress in establishing essential roles in human physiology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Curtiss D

    2012-06-01

    This review summarizes the progress made in establishing essential roles for boron in human physiology and assesses that progress in view of criteria for essentiality of elements. The evidence to date suggests that humans and at least some higher animals may use boron to support normal biological functions. These include roles in calcium metabolism, bone growth and maintenance, insulin metabolism, and completion of the life cycle. The biochemical mechanisms responsible for these effects are poorly understood but the nature of boron biochemistry suggests further characterization of the cell signaling molecules capable of complexing with boron. Such characterization may provide insights into the biochemical function(s) of boron in humans.

  18. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-09-20

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Clarifying the Roles of Homeostasis and Allostasis in Physiological Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Douglas S.; Woods, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis, the dominant explanatory framework for physiological regulation, has undergone significant revision in recent years, with contemporary models differing significantly from the original formulation. Allostasis, an alternative view of physiological regulation, goes beyond its homeostatic roots, offering novel insights relevant to our understanding and treatment of several chronic health conditions. Despite growing enthusiasm for allostasis, the concept remains diffuse, due in part to ambiguity as to how the term is understood and used, impeding meaningful translational and clinical research on allostasis. Here we provide a more focused understanding of homeostasis and allostasis by explaining how both play a role in physiological regulation, and a critical analysis of regulation suggests how homeostasis and allostasis can be distinguished. Rather than focusing on changes in the value of a regulated variable (e.g., body temperature, body adiposity, or reward), research investigating the activity and relationship among the multiple regulatory loops that influence the value of these regulated variables may be the key to distinguishing homeostasis and allostasis. The mechanisms underlying physiological regulation and dysregulation are likely to have important implications for health and disease. PMID:24730599

  20. The role thermal physiology plays in species invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of physiological phenotypes that may play a part in the establishment of non-native species can broaden our understanding about the ecology of species invasion. Here, an assessment was carried out by comparing the responses of invasive and native species to thermal stress. The goal was to identify physiological patterns that facilitate invasion success and to investigate whether these traits are widespread among invasive ectotherms. Four hypotheses were generated and tested using a review of the literature to determine whether they could be supported across taxonomically diverse invasive organisms. The four hypotheses are as follows: (i) broad geographical temperature tolerances (thermal width) confer a higher upper thermal tolerance threshold for invasive rather than native species; (ii) the upper thermal extreme experienced in nature is more highly correlated with upper thermal tolerance threshold for invasive vs. native animals; (iii) protein chaperone expression—a cellular mechanism that underlies an organism's thermal tolerance threshold—is greater in invasive organisms than in native ones; and (iv) acclimation to higher temperatures can promote a greater range of thermal tolerance for invasive compared with native species. Each hypothesis was supported by a meta-analysis of the invasive/thermal physiology literature, providing further evidence that physiology plays a substantial role in the establishment of invasive ectotherms. PMID:27293666

  1. The role thermal physiology plays in species invasion.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of physiological phenotypes that may play a part in the establishment of non-native species can broaden our understanding about the ecology of species invasion. Here, an assessment was carried out by comparing the responses of invasive and native species to thermal stress. The goal was to identify physiological patterns that facilitate invasion success and to investigate whether these traits are widespread among invasive ectotherms. Four hypotheses were generated and tested using a review of the literature to determine whether they could be supported across taxonomically diverse invasive organisms. The four hypotheses are as follows: (i) broad geographical temperature tolerances (thermal width) confer a higher upper thermal tolerance threshold for invasive rather than native species; (ii) the upper thermal extreme experienced in nature is more highly correlated with upper thermal tolerance threshold for invasive vs. native animals; (iii) protein chaperone expression-a cellular mechanism that underlies an organism's thermal tolerance threshold-is greater in invasive organisms than in native ones; and (iv) acclimation to higher temperatures can promote a greater range of thermal tolerance for invasive compared with native species. Each hypothesis was supported by a meta-analysis of the invasive/thermal physiology literature, providing further evidence that physiology plays a substantial role in the establishment of invasive ectotherms.

  2. Physiological Roles of Adipokines, Hepatokines, and Myokines in Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Sang-Gun; Suzuki, Yutaka; Gotoh, Takafumi; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Katoh, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of leptin secreted from adipocytes, specialized tissues and cells have been found that secrete the several peptides (or cytokines) that are characterized to negatively and positively regulate the metabolic process. Different types of adipokines, hepatokines, and myokines, which act as cytokines, are secreted from adipose, liver, and muscle tissue, respectively, and have been identified and examined for their physiological roles in humans and disease in animal models. Recently, various studies of these cytokines have been conducted in ruminants, including dairy cattle, beef cattle, sheep, and goat. Interestingly, a few cytokines from these tissues in ruminants play an important role in the post-parturition, lactation, and fattening (marbling) periods. Thus, understanding these hormones is important for improving nutritional management in dairy cows and beef cattle. However, to our knowledge, there have been no reviews of the characteristics of these cytokines in beef and dairy products in ruminants. In particular, lipid and glucose metabolism in adipose tissue, liver tissue, and muscle tissue are very important for energy storage, production, and synthesis, which are regulated by these cytokines in ruminant production. In this review, we summarize the physiological roles of adipokines, hepatokines, and myokines in ruminants. This discussion provides a foundation for understanding the role of cytokines in animal production of ruminants. PMID:26732322

  3. Physiological role of taurine--from organism to organelle.

    PubMed

    Lambert, I H; Kristensen, D M; Holm, J B; Mortensen, O H

    2015-01-01

    Taurine is often referred to as a semi-essential amino acid as newborn mammals have a limited ability to synthesize taurine and have to rely on dietary supply. Taurine is not thought to be incorporated into proteins as no aminoacyl tRNA synthetase has yet been identified and is not oxidized in mammalian cells. However, taurine contributes significantly to the cellular pool of organic osmolytes and has accordingly been acknowledged for its role in cell volume restoration following osmotic perturbation. This review describes taurine homeostasis in cells and organelles with emphasis on taurine biophysics/membrane dynamics, regulation of transport proteins involved in active taurine uptake and passive taurine release as well as physiological processes, for example, development, lung function, mitochondrial function, antioxidative defence and apoptosis which seem to be affected by a shift in the expression of the taurine transporters and/or the cellular taurine content. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Physiological roles of the melanocortin MC3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Renquist, Benjamin J.; Lippert, Rachel; Sebag, Julien A.; Ellacott, Kate L.J.; Cone, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin MC3 receptor remains the most enigmatic of the melanocortin receptors with regard to its physiological functions. The receptor is expressed both in the CNS and in multiple tissues in the periphery. It appears to be an inhibitory autoreceptor on proopiomelanocortin neurons, yet global deletion of the receptor causes an obesity syndrome. Knockout of the receptor increases adipose mass without a readily measurable increase in food intake or decrease in energy expenditure. And finally, no melanocortin MC3 receptor null humans have been identified and associations between variant alleles of the melanocortin MC3 receptor and disease remain controversial, so the physiological role of the receptor in humans remains to be determined. PMID:21211527

  5. A novel physiological role for cardiac myoglobin in lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Esfeld, Sonja; Coman, Cristina; Ahrends, Robert; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Flögel, Ulrich; Rassaf, Tienush; Totzeck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Continuous contractile activity of the heart is essential and the required energy is mostly provided by fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Myocardial lipid accumulation can lead to pathological responses, however the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The role of myoglobin in dioxygen binding in cardiomyocytes and oxidative skeletal muscle has widely been appreciated. Our recent work established myoglobin as a protector of cardiac function in hypoxia and disease states. We here unravel a novel role of cardiac myoglobin in governing FA metabolism to ensure the physiological energy production through β-oxidation, preventing myocardial lipid accumulation and preserving cardiac functions. In vivo1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy unveils a 3-fold higher deposition of lipids in mouse hearts lacking myoglobin, which was associated with depressed cardiac function compared to wild-type hearts as assessed by echocardiography. Mass spectrometry reveals a marked increase in tissue triglycerides with preferential incorporation of palmitic and oleic acids. Phospholipid levels as well as the metabolome, transcriptome and proteome related to FA metabolism tend to be unaffected by myoglobin ablation. Our results reveal a physiological role of myoglobin in FA metabolism with the lipid accumulation-suppressing effects of myoglobin preventing cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:28230173

  6. Pavlov at home and abroad: His role in international physiology.

    PubMed

    Tansey, E M

    2006-04-30

    Contemporary science is conducted internationally. This is a comparatively recent phenomenon that developed during the last century, most notably after the second world war. During the first half of the twentieth century, however, I P Pavlov became the first major international physiologist, travelling widely and contributing to major scientific meetings around the world. This paper records and assesses Pavlov's international role, with an especial focus on the International Congresses of Physiology, set in the dynamic context of his domestic position in Imperial Russia and later in the Soviet Union.

  7. Brown and beige fat: Physiological roles beyond heat-generation

    PubMed Central

    Kajimura, Shingo; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Seale, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Since brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy through UCP1, BAT has garnered attention as a therapeutic intervention for obesity and metabolic diseases including type2 diabetes. As we better understand the physiological roles of classical brown and beige adipocytes, it is becoming clear that BAT is not simply a heat-generating organ. Increased beige fat mass in response to a variety of external/internal cues is associated with significant improvements in glucose and lipid homeostasis that may not be entirely mediated by UCP1. We aim to discuss recent insights regarding the developmental lineages, molecular regulation, and new functions for brown and beige adipocytes. PMID:26445512

  8. Mammalian aquaporins: diverse physiological roles and potential clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins have multiple distinct roles in mammalian physiology. Phenotype analysis of aquaporin-knockout mice has confirmed the predicted role of aquaporins in osmotically driven transepithelial fluid transport, as occurs in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. Aquaporins also facilitate water movement into and out of the brain in various pathologies such as stroke, tumour, infection and hydrocephalus. A major, unexpected cellular role of aquaporins was revealed by analysis of knockout mice: aquaporins facilitate cell migration, as occurs in angiogenesis, tumour metastasis, wound healing, and glial scar formation. Another unexpected role of aquaporins is in neural function – in sensory signalling and seizure activity. The water-transporting function of aquaporins is likely responsible for these roles. A subset of aquaporins that transport both water and glycerol, the ‘aquaglyceroporins’, regulate glycerol content in epidermal, fat and other tissues. Mice lacking various aquaglyceroporins have several interesting phenotypes, including dry skin, resistance to skin carcinogenesis, impaired cell proliferation, and altered fat metabolism. The various roles of aquaporins might be exploited clinically by development of drugs to alter aquaporin expression or function, which could serve as diuretics, and in the treatment of brain swelling, glaucoma, epilepsy, obesity and cancer. PMID:18482462

  9. Neuronal SUMOylation: Mechanisms, Physiology, and Roles in Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Jeremy M.; Craig, Tim J.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein SUMOylation is a critically important posttranslational protein modification that participates in nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. In the nearly 20 years since its discovery, SUMOylation has emerged as a major regulator of nuclear function, and more recently, it has become clear that SUMOylation has key roles in the regulation of protein trafficking and function outside of the nucleus. In neurons, SUMOylation participates in cellular processes ranging from neuronal differentiation and control of synapse formation to regulation of synaptic transmission and cell survival. It is a highly dynamic and usually transient modification that enhances or hinders interactions between proteins, and its consequences are extremely diverse. Hundreds of different proteins are SUMO substrates, and dysfunction of protein SUMOylation is implicated in a many different diseases. Here we briefly outline core aspects of the SUMO system and provide a detailed overview of the current understanding of the roles of SUMOylation in healthy and diseased neurons. PMID:25287864

  10. The role of heart rate variability in sports physiology.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jin-Guo

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a relevant marker reflecting cardiac modulation by sympathetic and vagal components of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Although the clinical application of HRV is mainly associated with the prediction of sudden cardiac death and assessing cardiovascular and metabolic illness progression, recent observations have suggested its applicability to physical exercise training. HRV is becoming one of the most useful tools for tracking the time course of training adaptation/maladaptation of athletes and in setting the optimal training loads leading to improved performances. However, little is known regarding the role of HRV and the internal effects of physical exercise on an athlete, which may be useful in designing fitness programs ensuring sufficient training load that may correspond with the specific ability of the athlete. In this review, we offer a comprehensive assessment of investigations concerning the interrelation between HRV and ANS, and examine how the application of HRV to physical exercise may play a role in sports physiology.

  11. Role of Ergothioneine in Microbial Physiology and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Bridgette M; Chinta, Krishna C; Reddy, Vineel P; Steyn, Adrie J C

    2017-09-08

    L-ergothioneine is synthesized in actinomycetes, cyanobacteria, methylobacteria, and some fungi. In contrast to other low-molecular-weight redox buffers, glutathione and mycothiol, ergothioneine is primarily present as a thione rather than a thiol at physiological pH, which makes it resistant to autoxidation. Ergothioneine regulates microbial physiology and enables the survival of microbes under stressful conditions encountered in their natural environments. In particular, ergothioneine enables pathogenic microbes, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), to withstand hostile environments within the host to establish infection. Recent Advances: Ergothioneine has been reported to maintain bioenergetic homeostasis in Mtb and protect Mtb against oxidative stresses, thereby enhancing the virulence of Mtb in a mouse model. Furthermore, ergothioneine augments the resistance of Mtb to current frontline anti-TB drugs. Recently, an opportunistic fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus, which infects immunocompromised individuals, has been found to produce ergothioneine, which is important in conidial health and germination, and contributes to the fungal resistance against redox stresses. The molecular mechanisms of the functions of ergothioneine in microbial physiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. It is currently not known if ergothioneine is used in detoxification or antioxidant enzymatic pathways. As ergothioneine is involved in bioenergetic and redox homeostasis and antibiotic susceptibility of Mtb, it is of utmost importance to advance our understanding of these mechanisms. A clear understanding of the role of ergothioneine in microbes will advance our knowledge of how this thione enhances microbial virulence and resistance to the host's defense mechanisms to avoid complete eradication. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  12. Circulating opioids: possible physiological roles in central nervous function.

    PubMed

    Henry, J L

    1982-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed regarding the release of endorphins by such diverse conditions as stress, long distance running, acupuncture, sexual activity, suggestion and ritualistic dancing ceremonies. Additional evidence is cited regarding possible physiological roles of endorphins in antinociception, socialization, euphoria, some mental disorders, drive states and vegetative functions. The concentration of this latter type of evidence is on conditions during which endorphins seem to be exerting effects on a number of different systems together (for example, euphoria is almost always accompanied by analgesia), and the possibility is suggested that the activation of a number of functions together may be due to a global activation of opiate receptors throughout the CNS. A possible basis for this global activation arises from results from this laboratory indicating the presence of a blood-borne opioid hormone, secreted by the pituitary or by an endocrine gland under pituitary control, which is capable of passing from the blood into the CNS. This diffuse endorphinergic system, which is complementary to the well-established endorphinergic neuronal systems in the CNS, thus derives its property of global action on opiate receptors by the diffuse means by which the hormone reaches its target sites, i.e., by passing through the blood brain barrier. Thus, while each specific endorphin-mediated function can be activated by the activation of its respective neural pathway, it is proposed that the hormonal endorphinergic mechanism is activated to produce a global response provoked by conditions to which a more generalized response, including physiological and behavioural changes, is most appropriate.

  13. The role of adiponectin in human vascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Vaiopoulos, Aristeidis G; Marinou, Kyriakoula; Christodoulides, Constantinos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-03-08

    Adiponectin (ApN) is an adipose tissue-derived hormone which is involved in a wide variety of physiological processes including energy metabolism, inflammation, and vascular physiology via actions on a broad spectrum of target organs including liver, skeletal muscle, and vascular endothelium. Besides possessing insulin sensitizing and anti-inflammatory properties ApN also exerts a pivotal role in vascular protection through activation of multiple intracellular signaling cascades. Enhancement of nitric oxide generation and attenuation of reactive oxygen species production in endothelial cells along with reduced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration constitute some of ApN's vasoprotective actions. Additionally, recent data indicate that ApN has direct myocardio-protective effects. Decreased plasma ApN levels are implicated in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis and may serve as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker as well as a rational pharmaco-therapeutic target to treat these disorders. This review article summarizes recent work on the cardiovascular actions of ApN.

  14. Microbial 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins: Insights into Their Complex Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Michel B.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The peroxiredoxins (Prxs) constitute a very large and highly conserved family of thiol-based peroxidases that has been discovered only very recently. We consider here these enzymes through the angle of their discovery, and of some features of their molecular and physiological functions, focusing on complex phenotypes of the gene mutations of the 2-Cys Prxs subtype in yeast. As scavengers of the low levels of H2O2 and as H2O2 receptors and transducers, 2-Cys Prxs have been highly instrumental to understand the biological impact of H2O2, and in particular its signaling function. 2-Cys Prxs can also become potent chaperone holdases, and unveiling the in vivo relevance of this function, which is still not established, should further increase our knowledge of the biological impact and toxicity of H2O2. The diverse molecular functions of 2-Cys Prx explain the often-hard task of relating them to peroxiredoxin genes phenotypes, which underscores the pleiotropic physiological role of these enzymes and complex biologic impact of H2O2. PMID:26813659

  15. The role of hydration in vocal fold physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Leydon, Ciara

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Increased vocal fold hydration is a popular target in the prevention and management of voice disorders. Current intervention strategies focus on enhancing both systemic (internal) and superficial (surface) hydration. This paper will review relevant bench and human subject research on the role of hydration in vocal fold physiology. Recent findings Bench and human subject studies provide converging evidence that systemic and superficial dehydration are detrimental to vocal fold physiology. Dehydration challenges increase the viscous properties of excised vocal fold tissue. Systemic, superficial, and combined drying challenges increase aerodynamic and acoustic measures of voice production in speakers. Emerging theoretical and clinical evidence suggest that increasing both systemic and superficial hydration levels may benefit voice production, however, robust evidence for positive outcomes of hydration treatments is lacking. Summary Increased systemic and superficial vocal fold hydration as a component of vocal hygiene may improve overall health and efficiency of the vocal apparatus. However, continued exploration of biological mechanisms regulating vocal fold hydration is needed to optimize clinical hydration interventions. Specifically, the development of hydration treatments that maximize positive phonatory outcomes will necessitate understanding of the signaling pathways linking systemic and superficial hydration. PMID:20386449

  16. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  17. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  18. Physiological role of stalk lengthening in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eric A; Schlimpert, Susan; Hughes, Velocity; Brun, Yves V; Thanbichler, Martin; Gitai, Zemer

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus forms a thin polar stalk, which mediates its attachment to solid surfaces. Whereas stalks remain short (1 µm) in nutrient-rich conditions, they lengthen dramatically (up to 30 µm) upon phosphate starvation. A long-standing hypothesis is that the Caulobacter stalk functions as a nutrient scavenging “antenna” that facilitates phosphate uptake and transport to the cell body. The mechanistic details of this model must be revisited, given our recent identification of a protein-mediated diffusion barrier, which prevents the exchange of both membrane and soluble proteins between the stalk extension and the cell body. In this report, we discuss the potential of stalks to facilitate nutrient uptake and propose additional physiological roles for stalk elongation in Caulobacter cells. PMID:23986806

  19. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  20. The molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Motoki; Ito, Kohji

    2015-10-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs widely in plants ranging from algae to angiosperms. However, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming have long remained unelucidated. Recent molecular genetic approaches have identified specific myosin members (XI-2 and XI-K as major and XI-1, XI-B, and XI-I as minor motive forces) for the generation of cytoplasmic streaming among 13 myosin XIs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Simultaneous knockout of these myosin XI members led to a reduced velocity of cytoplasmic streaming and marked defects of plant development. Furthermore, the artificial modifications of myosin XI-2 velocity changed plant and cell sizes along with the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming. Therefore, we assume that cytoplasmic streaming is one of the key regulators in determining plant size.

  1. The physiological and pathophysiological roles of platelet CLEC-2

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Núñez, Leyre; Langan, Stacey A; Nash, Gerard B; Watson, Steve P

    2013-01-01

    Summary CLEC-2 is a C-type lectin receptor which is highly expressed on platelets but also found at low levels on different immune cells. CLEC-2 elicits powerful platelet activation upon engagement by its endogenous ligand, the mucin-type glycoprotein podoplanin. Podoplanin is expressed in a variety of tissues including lymphatic endothelial cells, kidney podocytes, type I lung epithelial cells, lymph node stromal cells and the choroid plexus epithelium. Animal models have shown that the correct separation of the lymphatic and blood vasculatures during embryonic development is dependent on CLEC-2-mediated platelet activation. Additionally, podoplanin deficient mice show abnormalities in heart, lungs, and lymphoid tissues, whereas absence of CLEC-2 affects brain development. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular pathways regulating CLEC-2 and podoplanin function and suggests other physiological and pathological processes where this molecular interaction might exert crucial roles. PMID:23572154

  2. Role of defects in the physiological fate of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinen, Aleksandr; Podila, Ramakrishna; Zhu, Jingyi; Puneet, Pooja; Kahru, Anne; Rao, Apparao; National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Talinn Team; Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson Team

    2014-03-01

    Charged defects play an important role in not only materials properties (P. Puneet et al., Scientific Reports, 3, 3212 (2013)) but also in the determination of how materials interact at the nano-bio interface. Recently, it was shown that any physiological response, and hence the fate of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biological media, is dictated by the formation of protein-corona. Accordingly, we explored how defects in CNTs influence the biological interactions and protein corona formation using micro-Raman spectroscopy, electrochemistry, photoluminescence, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. Our results show that the interaction of CNTs and proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and fetal serum) is strongly influenced by charge-transfer between defects and proteins ensuing in protein-unfolding which leads to a gain in conformational entropy.

  3. The role of leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Janeckova, R

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on current knowledge of leptin biology and the role of leptin in various physiological and pathophysiological states. Leptin is involved in the regulation of body weight. Serum leptin can probably be considered as one of the best biological markers reflecting total body fat in both animals and humans. Obesity in man is accompanied by increased circulating leptin concentrations. Gender differences clearly exist. Leptin is not only correlated to a series of endocrine parameters such as insulin, glucocorticoids, thyroid hormones, testosterone, but it also seems to be involved in mediating some endocrine mechanisms (onset of puberty, insulin secretion) and diseases (obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome). It has also been suggested that leptin can act as a growth factor in the fetus and the neonate.

  4. Physiological role of ROCKs in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Noma, Kensuke; Oyama, Naotsugu; Liao, James K

    2006-03-01

    Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs), the immediate downstream targets of RhoA, are ubiquitously expressed serine-threonine protein kinases that are involved in diverse cellular functions, including smooth muscle contraction, actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and motility, and gene expression. Recent studies have shown that ROCKs may play a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases such as vasospastic angina, ischemic stroke, and heart failure. Indeed, inhibition of ROCKs by statins or other selective inhibitors leads to the upregulation and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and reduction of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Thus inhibition of ROCKs may contribute to some of the cholesterol-independent beneficial effects of statin therapy. Currently, two ROCK isoforms have been identified, ROCK1 and ROCK2. Because ROCK inhibitors are nonselective with respect to ROCK1 and ROCK2 and also, in some cases, may be nonspecific with respect to other ROCK-related kinases such as myristolated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS), protein kinase A, and protein kinase C, the precise role of ROCKs in cardiovascular disease remains unknown. However, with the recent development of ROCK1- and ROCK2-knockout mice, further dissection of ROCK signaling pathways is now possible. Herein we review what is known about the physiological role of ROCKs in the cardiovascular system and speculate about how inhibition of ROCKs could provide cardiovascular benefits.

  5. The physiological roles and metabolism of ascorbate in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Szilvia Z; Schansker, Gert; Garab, Győző

    2013-06-01

    Ascorbate is a multifunctional metabolite in plants. It is essential for growth control, involving cell division and cell wall synthesis and also involved in redox signaling, in the modulation of gene expression and regulation of enzymatic activities. Ascorbate also fulfills crucial roles in scavenging reactive oxygen species, both enzymatically and nonenzymatically, a well-established phenomenon in the chloroplasts stroma. We give an overview on these important physiological functions and would like to give emphasis to less well-known roles of ascorbate, in the thylakoid lumen, where it also plays multiple roles. It is essential for photoprotection as a cofactor for violaxanthin de-epoxidase, a key enzyme in the formation of nonphotochemical quenching. Lumenal ascorbate has recently also been shown to act as an alternative electron donor of photosystem II once the oxygen-evolving complex is inactivated and to protect the photosynthetic machinery by slowing down donor-side induced photoinactivation; it is yet to be established if ascorbate has a similar role in the case of other stress effects, such as high light and UV-B stress. In bundle sheath cells, deficient in oxygen evolution, ascorbate provides electrons to photosystem II, thereby poising cyclic electron transport around photosystem I. It has also been shown that, by supporting linear electron transport through photosystem II in sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells, in which oxygen evolution is largely inhibited, externally added ascorbate enhances hydrogen production. For fulfilling its multiple roles, Asc has to be transported into the thylakoid lumen and efficiently regenerated; however, very little is known yet about these processes.

  6. Physiological role and regulation of iodothyronine deiodinases: a 2011 update

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Alessandro; Zavacki, Ann Marie; Harney, John W.; Larsen, P. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) is a prohormone secreted by the thyroid. T4 has a long half life in circulation and it is tightly regulated to remain constant in a variety of circumstances. However, the availability of iodothyronine selenodeiodinases allow both the initiation or the cessation of thyroid hormone action and can result in surprisingly acute changes in the intracellular concentration of the active hormone T3, in a tissue-specific and chronologically-determined fashion, in spite of the constant circulating levels of the prohormone. This fine-tuning of thyroid hormone signaling is becoming widely appreciated in the context of situations where the rapid modifications in intracellular T3 concentrations are necessary for developmental changes or tissue repair. Given the increasing availability of genetic models of deiodinase deficiency, new insights into the role of these important enzymes are being recognized. In this review, we have incorporated new information regarding the special role played by these enzymes into our current knowledge of thyroid physiology, emphasizing the clinical significance of these new insights. PMID:21427525

  7. Physiology and role of irisin in glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Perakakis, Nikolaos; Triantafyllou, Georgios A; Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Huh, Joo Young; Park, Kyung Hee; Seufert, Jochen; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2017-02-17

    Irisin is a myokine that leads to increased energy expenditure by stimulating the 'browning' of white adipose tissue. In the first description of this hormone, increased levels of circulating irisin, which is cleaved from its precursor fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5, were associated with improved glucose homeostasis by reducing insulin resistance. Consequently, several studies attempted to characterize the role of irisin in glucose regulation, but contradictory results have been reported, and even the existence of this hormone has been questioned. In this Review, we present the current knowledge on the physiology of irisin and its role in glucose homeostasis. We describe the mechanisms involved in the synthesis, secretion, circulation and regulation of irisin, and the controversies regarding the measurement of irisin. We also discuss the direct effects of irisin on glucose regulatory mechanisms in different organs, the indirect effects and interactions with other hormones, and the important open questions with regard to irisin in those organs. Finally, we present the results from animal interventional studies and from human clinical studies investigating the association of irisin with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome.

  8. The role of heart rate variability in sports physiology

    PubMed Central

    DONG, JIN-GUO

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a relevant marker reflecting cardiac modulation by sympathetic and vagal components of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Although the clinical application of HRV is mainly associated with the prediction of sudden cardiac death and assessing cardiovascular and metabolic illness progression, recent observations have suggested its applicability to physical exercise training. HRV is becoming one of the most useful tools for tracking the time course of training adaptation/maladaptation of athletes and in setting the optimal training loads leading to improved performances. However, little is known regarding the role of HRV and the internal effects of physical exercise on an athlete, which may be useful in designing fitness programs ensuring sufficient training load that may correspond with the specific ability of the athlete. In this review, we offer a comprehensive assessment of investigations concerning the interrelation between HRV and ANS, and examine how the application of HRV to physical exercise may play a role in sports physiology. PMID:27168768

  9. Physiological and pathophysiological roles of NAMPT and NAD metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garten, Antje; Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; de Giorgis, Tommaso; Kiess, Wieland

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a regulator of the intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pool. NAD is an essential coenzyme involved in cellular redox reactions and is a substrate for NAD-dependent enzymes. In various metabolic disorders and during ageing, levels of NAD are decreased. Through its NAD-biosynthetic activity, NAMPT influences the activity of NAD-dependent enzymes, thereby regulating cellular metabolism. In addition to its enzymatic function, extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT) has cytokine-like activity. Abnormal levels of eNAMPT are associated with various metabolic disorders. NAMPT is able to modulate processes involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and related disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by influencing the oxidative stress response, apoptosis, lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation and insulin resistance. NAMPT also has a crucial role in cancer cell metabolism, is often overexpressed in tumour tissues and is an experimental target for antitumour therapies. In this Review, we discuss current understanding of the functions of NAMPT and highlight progress made in identifying the physiological role of NAMPT and its relevance in various human diseases and conditions, such as obesity, NAFLD, T2DM, cancer and ageing.

  10. Metabolism, Physiological Role, and Clinical Implications of Sphingolipids in Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Piotrowska, Dominika M.; Wiesiołek, Patrycja; Chabowska, Anna Małgorzata; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids in digestive system are responsible for numerous important physiological and pathological processes. In the membrane of gut epithelial cells, sphingolipids provide structural integrity, regulate absorption of some nutrients, and act as receptors for many microbial antigens and their toxins. Moreover, bioactive sphingolipids such as ceramide or sphingosine-1-phosphate regulate cellular growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death—apoptosis. Although it is well established that sphingolipids have clinical implications in gastrointestinal tumorigenesis or inflammation, further studies are needed to fully explore the role of sphingolipids in neoplastic and inflammatory diseases in gastrointestinal tract. Pharmacological agents which regulate metabolism of sphingolipids can be potentially used in the management of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this work is to critically the review physiological and pathological roles of sphingolipids in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24083248

  11. The role of endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in cardiovascular physiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a primary function of mediating xenobiotic metabolism through transcriptional activation of Phase I and Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. Although no high-affinity physiological activators of AHR have been discovered, the endogenous signaling of the AHR pathway is believed to play an important role in the development and function of the cardiovascular system, based on the observations on ahr gene-deficient mice. The AHR knockout mice develop cardiac hypertrophy, abnormal vascular structure in multiple organs and altered blood pressure depending on their host environment. In this review, the endogenous role of AHR in cardiovascular physiology, including heart function, vascular development and blood pressure regulation has been summarized and discussed. PMID:21814412

  12. Metabolism, physiological role, and clinical implications of sphingolipids in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Krzysztof; Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Piotrowska, Dominika M; Wiesiołek, Patrycja; Chabowska, Anna Małgorzata; Zendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids in digestive system are responsible for numerous important physiological and pathological processes. In the membrane of gut epithelial cells, sphingolipids provide structural integrity, regulate absorption of some nutrients, and act as receptors for many microbial antigens and their toxins. Moreover, bioactive sphingolipids such as ceramide or sphingosine-1-phosphate regulate cellular growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death-apoptosis. Although it is well established that sphingolipids have clinical implications in gastrointestinal tumorigenesis or inflammation, further studies are needed to fully explore the role of sphingolipids in neoplastic and inflammatory diseases in gastrointestinal tract. Pharmacological agents which regulate metabolism of sphingolipids can be potentially used in the management of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this work is to critically the review physiological and pathological roles of sphingolipids in the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Reproducibility of Quantitative Structural and Physiological MRI Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-09

    three times over 5 days on a Siemens 3T Verio scanner equipped with a 32-channel phase array coil. Structural (T1, T2-weighted, and diffusion-weighted...in healthy subjects while controlling physiological and technical parameters. Methods: Twenty- five subjects were imaged three times over 5 days on a...environment with a consistently maintained meal time, sleep/wake time, and exercise program. Commencing 7 days prior to the first MRI and continuing

  14. Physiological Role of Gut Microbiota for Maintaining Human Health.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human body is colonized by an extremely complex and abundant aggregation of microbes, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Recent studies have focused on the link between these microbes and our health. Diet contributes to shaping the gut microbial structure and influences metabolic functions of the host. Alteration of the microbial structure and function (dysbiosis) is associated with the pathogenesis of various disorders. Fermentation is the process by which anaerobic bacteria (Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) break down indigestible carbohydrates to short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs; acetate, propionate and butyrate), collaborating with species specialized in oligosaccharide fermentation (e.g. Bifidobacteria). Butyrate and propionate can regulate intestinal physiology and immune function, while acetate acts as a substrate for lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. The gut microbiota regulates immune homeostasis via the induction of regulatory T cells and Th17 cells. In addition, butyrate has strong anti-inflammatory effects possibly through the inhibition of histone deacetylase activity. Metabolic products generated by the gut microbiota, such as SCFAs, GABA, tryptophan, serotonin and catecholamine, transmit a signal to resident cells in the gut. Advances made in the DNA sequencing technology and bioinformatics have revolutionized our understanding of the microbes in the gut. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  16. Bacterial mechanosensitive channels: progress towards an understanding of their roles in cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Booth, Ian R

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels sense the changes in lateral tension in the bilayer of the cytoplasmic membrane generated by rapid water flow into the cell. Two major structural families are found widely distributed across bacteria and archaea: MscL and MscS. Our understanding of the mechanisms of gating has advanced rapidly through genetic analysis, structural biology and electrophysiology. It is only recently that the analysis of the physiological roles of the channels has kept pace with mechanistic studies. Recent advances have increased our understanding of the role of the channels in preventing structural perturbation during osmotic transitions and its relationship to water flow across the membrane. It is to these recent developments that this review is dedicated.

  17. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cognition in physiology and disease: pharmacological targets and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Costa, Veronica; Lugert, Sebastian; Jagasia, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a remarkable form of brain structural plasticity by which new functional neurons are generated from adult neural stem cells/precursors. Although the precise role of this process remains elusive, adult hippocampal neurogenesis is important for learning and memory and it is affected in disease conditions associated with cognitive impairment, depression, and anxiety. Immature neurons in the adult brain exhibit an enhanced structural and synaptic plasticity during their maturation representing a unique population of neurons to mediate specific hippocampal function. Compelling preclinical evidence suggests that hippocampal neurogenesis is modulated by a broad range of physiological stimuli which are relevant in cognitive and emotional states. Moreover, multiple pharmacological interventions targeting cognition modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, recent genetic approaches have shown that promoting neurogenesis can positively modulate cognition associated with both physiology and disease. Thus the discovery of signaling pathways that enhance adult neurogenesis may lead to therapeutic strategies for improving memory loss due to aging or disease. This chapter endeavors to review the literature in the field, with particular focus on (1) the role of hippocampal neurogenesis in cognition in physiology and disease; (2) extrinsic and intrinsic signals that modulate hippocampal neurogenesis with a focus on pharmacological targets; and (3) efforts toward novel strategies pharmacologically targeting neurogenesis and identification of biomarkers of human neurogenesis.

  18. Role of Computer Graphics in Simulations for Teaching Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modell, H. I.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a revision of existing respiratory physiology simulations to promote active learning experiences for individual students. Computer graphics were added to aid student's conceptualization of the physiological system. Specific examples are provided, including those dealing with alveolar gas equations and effects of anatomic shunt flow on…

  19. TRPV4: physiological role and therapeutic potential in respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Neil M; Ravindran, Krishnan; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-04-01

    Members of the family of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a host of lung diseases. The role of these multimodal cation channels in lung homeostasis is thought to stem from their ability to respond to changes in mechanical stimuli (i.e., shear and stretch), as well as to various protein and lipid mediators. The vanilloid subfamily member, TRPV4, which is highly expressed in the majority of lung cell types, is well positioned for critical involvement in several pulmonary conditions, including edema formation, control of pulmonary vascular tone, and the lung response to local or systemic inflammatory insults. In recent years, several pharmacological inhibitors of TRPV4 have been developed, and the current generation of compounds possess high affinity and specificity for TRPV4. As such, we have now entered a time where the therapeutic potential of TRPV4 inhibitors can be systematically examined in a variety of lung diseases. Due to this fact, this review seeks to describe the current state of the art with respect to the role of TRPV4 in pulmonary homeostasis and disease, and to highlight the current and future roles of TRPV4 inhibitors in disease treatment. We will first focus on genera aspects of TRPV4 structure and function, and then will discuss known roles for TRPV4 in pulmonary diseases, including pulmonary edema formation, pulmonary hypertension, and acute lung injury. Finally, both promising aspects and potential pitfalls of the clinical use of TRPV4 inhibitors will be examined.

  20. Physiological roles of taurine in heart and muscle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Taurine (aminoethane sulfonic acid) is an ubiquitous compound, found in very high concentrations in heart and muscle. Although taurine is classified as an amino acid, it does not participate in peptide bond formation. Nonetheless, the amino group of taurine is involved in a number of important conjugation reactions as well as in the scavenging of hypochlorous acid. Because taurine is a fairly inert compound, it is an ideal modulator of basic processes, such as osmotic pressure, cation homeostasis, enzyme activity, receptor regulation, cell development and cell signalling. The present review discusses several physiological functions of taurine. First, the observation that taurine depletion leads to the development of a cardiomyopathy indicates a role for taurine in the maintenance of normal contractile function. Evidence is provided that this function of taurine is mediated by changes in the activity of key Ca2+ transporters and the modulation Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofibrils. Second, in some species, taurine is an established osmoregulator, however, in mammalian heart the osmoregulatory function of taurine has recently been questioned. Third, taurine functions as an indirect regulator of oxidative stress. Although this action of taurine has been widely discussed, its mechanism of action is unclear. A potential mechanism for the antioxidant activity of taurine is discussed. Fourth, taurine stabilizes membranes through direct interactions with phospholipids. However, its inhibition of the enzyme, phospholipid N-methyltransferase, alters the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine content of membranes, which in turn affects the function of key proteins within the membrane. Finally, taurine serves as a modulator of protein kinases and phosphatases within the cardiomyocyte. The mechanism of this action has not been studied. Taurine is a chemically simple compound, but it has profound effects on cells. This has led to the suggestion that taurine is an

  1. Physiological roles of taurine in heart and muscle.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Jong, Chian Ju; Ramila, K C; Azuma, Junichi

    2010-08-24

    Taurine (aminoethane sulfonic acid) is an ubiquitous compound, found in very high concentrations in heart and muscle. Although taurine is classified as an amino acid, it does not participate in peptide bond formation. Nonetheless, the amino group of taurine is involved in a number of important conjugation reactions as well as in the scavenging of hypochlorous acid. Because taurine is a fairly inert compound, it is an ideal modulator of basic processes, such as osmotic pressure, cation homeostasis, enzyme activity, receptor regulation, cell development and cell signalling. The present review discusses several physiological functions of taurine. First, the observation that taurine depletion leads to the development of a cardiomyopathy indicates a role for taurine in the maintenance of normal contractile function. Evidence is provided that this function of taurine is mediated by changes in the activity of key Ca2+ transporters and the modulation Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofibrils. Second, in some species, taurine is an established osmoregulator, however, in mammalian heart the osmoregulatory function of taurine has recently been questioned. Third, taurine functions as an indirect regulator of oxidative stress. Although this action of taurine has been widely discussed, its mechanism of action is unclear. A potential mechanism for the antioxidant activity of taurine is discussed. Fourth, taurine stabilizes membranes through direct interactions with phospholipids. However, its inhibition of the enzyme, phospholipid N-methyltransferase, alters the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine content of membranes, which in turn affects the function of key proteins within the membrane. Finally, taurine serves as a modulator of protein kinases and phosphatases within the cardiomyocyte. The mechanism of this action has not been studied. Taurine is a chemically simple compound, but it has profound effects on cells. This has led to the suggestion that taurine is an

  2. Research Advances on Structural Characterization of Resistant Starch and Its Structure-Physiological Function Relationship: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Boye, Joyce I

    2016-09-19

    Resistant starch (RS) is defined as the fraction of starch that escapes digestion in the small intestine due to either difficult enzyme/starch contact or to the strength of the crystalline regions formed both in native starch and in those retrograded starch. RS occurs naturally in some foods, and some may be generated in others as the results of several processing conditions. A variety of techniques have been employed to obtain structural characteristics of resistant starch such as their crystallinity, structural order, chain length distribution and conformation, helicity, and double helical structures. These structure plays an important role in determining the physiological properties of RS such as their prebiotic and hypoglycaemic properties. However, such topic on structural characterization of RS and their structure-physiological function relationship have not been reviewed in previous literatures. Therefore, this review focuses on the past and current achievements of research on structural characterizations of a range of resistant starch prepared from different sources of native starches as a result of a variety of processing conditions. The potential relationships between the structure and the physiological properties of RS which is of paramount importance for the furtherance understanding and application of RS are also reviewed in this study.

  3. Adrenomedullin in the kidney-renal physiological and pathophysiological roles.

    PubMed

    Nishikimi, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    malignant hypertensive models. This review describes the biochemistry, physiology, and circulating levels of AM and also discusses what is known about the pathophysiological role of AM in renal disease.

  4. Coordination of physiological and structural traits in Amazon forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Baker, T. R.; Paiva, R.; Quesada, C. A.; Santos, A. J. B.; Schwarz, M.; Ter Steege, H.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.

    2012-02-01

    Many plant traits covary in a non-random manner reflecting interdependencies associated with "ecological strategy" dimensions. To understand how plants integrate their structural and physiological investments, data on leaf and leaflet size and the ratio of leaf area to sapwood area (ΦLS) obtained for 1020 individual trees (encompassing 661 species) located in 52 tropical forest plots across the Amazon Basin were incorporated into an analysis utilising existing data on species maximum height (Hmax), seed size, leaf mass per unit area (MA), foliar nutrients and δ13C, and branch xylem density (ρx). Utilising a common principal components approach allowing eigenvalues to vary between two soil fertility dependent species groups, five taxonomically controlled trait dimensions were identified. The first involves primarily cations, foliar carbon and MA and is associated with differences in foliar construction costs. The second relates to some components of the classic "leaf economic spectrum", but with increased individual leaf areas and a higher ΦLS newly identified components for tropical tree species. The third relates primarily to increasing Hmax and hence variations in light acquisition strategy involving greater MA, reductions in ΦLS and less negative δ13C. Although these first three dimensions were more important for species from high fertility sites the final two dimensions were more important for low fertility species and were associated with variations linked to reproductive and shade tolerance strategies. Environmental conditions influenced structural traits with ρx of individual species decreasing with increased soil fertility and higher temperatures. This soil fertility response appears to be synchronised with increases in foliar nutrient concentrations and reductions in foliar [C]. Leaf and leaflet area and ΦLS were less responsive to the environment than ρx. Thus, although genetically determined foliar traits such as those associated with leaf

  5. Role of proteomics in physiologic and pathologic conditions of dentistry: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Nirmal, Ramadas Madhavan; Santhadevy, Arumugam; Anusushanth, Abraham; Charanya, Duraisamy; Rojiluke; Sri Chinthu, K. K.; Yamunadevi, Andamuthu

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of structure and function of proteins in a large scale. For any living organism, preteins are considered to be the vital part because of its role in metabolic pathways of cells. These proteins not only play a role in physiological condition of the cell but also in altered manner during pathologic conditions. These altered proteins in diseased conditions are called as biomarkers. Several such biomarkers were identified in oral diseaes. This review is a brief note on proteins involved in odontogenesis and list of altered proteins proteins identified in various dental and oral diseases. The knowledge about the role of proteomics in dentistry and the importance of proteomic studies in early diagnosis and prognostic part of oral diseases helps in appliction of precised and sucessful treatment. PMID:26538875

  6. Role of integrin signalling through integrin-linked kinase in skin physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Eckes, Beate; Krieg, Thomas; Wickström, Sara A

    2014-07-01

    Cell-matrix adhesions provide structural stability to the tissue and regulate intracellular signalling pathways that are important for cell fate decisions of the different cell populations within the skin. As a consequence of these central functions, genetic or functional impairment of various key protein components of matrix adhesions plays a causative role in the aetiology or pathophysiology in a large variety of skin disorders. Research towards understanding the molecular composition of these adhesions as well as the mechanisms by which they transmit signals is therefore of obvious importance. In this essay, we discuss the roles of integrin-linked kinase, a key component of cell-matrix adhesions, in the (patho)physiology of skin and in particular highlight its role in regulating mechanical tension and matrix remodelling both in the epidermis and in the dermis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Discovery of cytoglobin and its roles in physiology and pathology of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIZATO, Katsutoshi; THUY, Le Thi Thanh; SHIOTA, Goshi; KAWADA, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (CYGB), a new member of the globin family, was discovered in 2001 as a protein associated with stellate cell activation (stellate cell activation-associated protein [STAP]). Knowledge of CYGB, including its crystal, gene, and protein structures as well as its physiological and pathological importance, has increased progressively. We investigated the roles of oxygen (O2)-binding CYGB as STAP in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to understand the part played by this protein in their pathophysiological activities. Studies involving CYGB-gene-deleted mice have led us to suppose that CYGB functions as a regulator of O2 homeostasis; when O2 homeostasis is disrupted, HSCs are activated and play a key role(s) in hepatic fibrogenesis. In this review, we discuss the rationale for this hypothesis. PMID:26972599

  8. Pro-angiogenic Role of Insulin: From Physiology to Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Carlos A.; Herlitz, Kurt; Troncoso, Felipe; Guevara, Katherine; Acurio, Jesenia; Aguayo, Claudio; Godoy, Alejandro S.; González, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    The underlying molecular mechanisms involve in the regulation of the angiogenic process by insulin are not well understood. In this review article, we aim to describe the role of insulin and insulin receptor activation on the control of angiogenesis and how these mechanisms can be deregulated in human diseases. Functional expression of insulin receptors and their signaling pathways has been described on endothelial cells and pericytes, both of the main cells involved in vessel formation and maturation. Consequently, insulin has been shown to regulate endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and in vitro tubular structure formation through binding to its receptors and activation of intracellular phosphorylation cascades. Furthermore, insulin-mediated pro-angiogenic state is potentiated by generation of vascular growth factors, such as the vascular endothelial growth factor, produced by endothelial cells. Additionally, diseases such as insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, and cancer may be associated with the deregulation of insulin-mediated angiogenesis. Despite this knowledge, the underlying molecular mechanisms need to be elucidated in order to provide new insights into the role of insulin on angiogenesis. PMID:28424632

  9. Pro-angiogenic Role of Insulin: From Physiology to Pathology.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos A; Herlitz, Kurt; Troncoso, Felipe; Guevara, Katherine; Acurio, Jesenia; Aguayo, Claudio; Godoy, Alejandro S; González, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    The underlying molecular mechanisms involve in the regulation of the angiogenic process by insulin are not well understood. In this review article, we aim to describe the role of insulin and insulin receptor activation on the control of angiogenesis and how these mechanisms can be deregulated in human diseases. Functional expression of insulin receptors and their signaling pathways has been described on endothelial cells and pericytes, both of the main cells involved in vessel formation and maturation. Consequently, insulin has been shown to regulate endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and in vitro tubular structure formation through binding to its receptors and activation of intracellular phosphorylation cascades. Furthermore, insulin-mediated pro-angiogenic state is potentiated by generation of vascular growth factors, such as the vascular endothelial growth factor, produced by endothelial cells. Additionally, diseases such as insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, and cancer may be associated with the deregulation of insulin-mediated angiogenesis. Despite this knowledge, the underlying molecular mechanisms need to be elucidated in order to provide new insights into the role of insulin on angiogenesis.

  10. The Evolving Role of Animal Laboratories in Physiology Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ra'anan, Alice W.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory exercises are intended to illustrate concepts and add an active learning component to courses. Since the 1980s, there has been a decline in animal laboratories offered in conjunction with medical physiology courses. The most important single reason for this is cost, but other contributing factors include the development of computer…

  11. [Epicardial adipose tissue and its role in cardiac physiology and disease].

    PubMed

    Toczyłowski, Kacper; Gruca, Michał; Baranowski, Marcin

    2013-06-20

    Adipose tissue secretes a number of cytokines, referred to as adipokines. Intensive studies conducted over the last two decades showed that adipokines exert broad effects on cardiac metabolism and function. In addition, the available data strongly suggests that these cytokines play an important role in development of cardiovascular diseases. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has special properties that distinguish it from other deposits of visceral fat. Overall, there appears to be a close functional and anatomic relationship between the EAT and the cardiac muscle. They share the same coronary blood supply, and there is no structure separating the adipose tissue from the myocardium or coronary arteries. The role of EAT in osierdziocardiac physiology remains unclear. Its putative functions include buffering coronary arteries against the torsion induced by the arterial pulse wave and cardiac contraction, regulating fatty acid homeostasis in the coronary microcirculation, thermogenesis, and neuroprotection of the cardiac autonomic ganglia and nerves. Obesity (particularly the abdominal phenotype) leads to elevated EAT content, and the available data suggests that high amount of this fat depot is associated with increased risk of ischemic heart disease, cardiac hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. The mass of EAT is small compared to other fat deposits in the body. Nevertheless, its close anatomic relationship to the heart suggests that this organ is highly exposed to EAT-derived adipokines which makes this tissue a very promising area of research. In this paper we review the current knowledge on the role of EAT in cardiac physiology and development of heart disease.

  12. Structural and physiological characterization during wheat pericarp development.

    PubMed

    Xiong, F; Yu, X R; Zhou, L; Wang, F; Xiong, A S

    2013-08-01

    The cytological and physiological features of developing wheat pericarp were clearly characterized in this report. Our results may be helpful to articulate the functions of pericarp during the seed development. Although wheat pericarp has been well studied, knowledge of the sequence of events in the process of pericarp development is incomplete. In the present study, the structural development process of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) pericarp was investigated in detail using resin microtomy and microscopy. Chlorophyll contents, and photosynthetic and respiratory rates, in pericarp were determined using spectrophotometer and an oxygen electrode, respectively. Mineral nutrient contents were also determined using scanning electron microscopy. The main results are as follows: (1) based on the structures and physiological characteristics observed, the developmental process of pericarp was divided into four stages, growth, formation, extinction and maturation stages, pericarp exhibited specific features at each stage. (2) Pericarp development differed in different parts, or varieties, of wheat. The dorsal pericarp had fewer starch grains and slower rates of apoptosis than the abdominal mesocarp. The cross cells in dorsal pericarp had an irregular outline. When compared with soft wheat cv. Yangmai 11, mesocarp cells in hard wheat cv. Xumai 30 had more starch grains, larger cell size and longer development duration. (3) The chlorophyll content, photosynthesis rate and respiratory rate in pericarp increased gradually, reaching a maximum about 16 days after anthesis, and later decreased continually. The photosynthetic rate in pericarp was lower than the respiration rate. (4) The contents of mineral elements in pericarp, such as calcium, zinc, iron and potassium were higher than those in the inner endosperm. The data indicate that wheat pericarp has many functions, e.g. protection, photosynthesis, mineral accumulation, synthesis and degradation of starch.

  13. Observing phytoplankton physiology and ocean ecosystem structure from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Patrick

    Changes in ocean circulation in response to anthropogenic climate change affect ocean biology on a global scale. Based on a previously published empirical model that links ocean circulation to chlorophyll and chlorophyll to primary production, I predict an increase in primary production of 10--27% at the end of the 23rd century under four times pre-industrial atmospheric CO 2. The uncertainty in this prediction largely stems from the reliance on chlorophyll as the only model constraint. Chlorophyll concentrations are difficult to interpret, as they depend on phytoplankton biomass and cellular pigmentation, which adjusts to growth conditions. The objective of this thesis is to bridge the gap between laboratory-based knowledge of physiological adjustments to growth conditions and global satellite observations to reduce ambiguities in the interpretation of chlorophyll concentrations on a global scale. Satellite estimates of phytoplankton carbon and the chlorophyll to carbon ratio (Chl:C), a measure of pigmentation, are the foundation of this work. My main contribution is a re-evaluation of chlorophyll variability in the eastern subarctic Pacific, which updates the old paradigm for seasonal phytoplankton dynamics in this iron-limited region. In contrast to previous studies, I conclude that the consistently low chlorophyll concentrations are caused by a suppression of Chl:C by iron stress, rather than by reduced accumulation of phytoplankton biomass. Field observations during iron enrichment experiments and model simulations confirm that the satellite-observed suppression of Chl:C is consistent with physiological adjustments to low iron. On a global scale, I analyze how phytoplankton biomass and pigmentation interact to yield the spatial structure in surface chlorophyll and I employ a mechanistic photoacclimation model to diagnose the contributions of light, nutrients and temperature to the spatial structure in Chl:C. I further argue that the temporal variability of

  14. Coordination of physiological and structural traits in Amazon forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Baker, T. R.; Paiva, R.; Quesada, C. A.; Santos, A. J. B.; Schwarz, M.; Ter Steege, H.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.

    2011-05-01

    Many plant traits covary in a non-random manner reflecting interdependencies associated with "ecological strategy" dimensions. To understand how plants modulate their structural investments to best maintain and utilise their physiological capabilities, data on leaf and leaflet size and the ratio of leaf area to sapwood area (ΦLS) obtained for 1040 tree species located in 53 tropical forest plots across the Amazon Basin were incorporated into an analysis utilising existing data on species maximum height (Hmax), seed size, leaf mass per unit area (MA), foliar nutrients and δ13C and branch xylem density (ρx). Utilising a common principal components approach allowing eigenvalues to vary between two soil fertility dependent species groups, five genetically controlled trait dimensions were identified. The first involves primarily cations, foliar carbon and MA and is associated with differences in foliar construction costs. The second relates to the classic "leaf economic spectrum", but with increased individual leaf areas and a higher ΦLS newly identified components. The third relates primarily to increasing Hmax and hence variations in light acquisition strategy involving greater MA, reductions in ΦLS and less negative δ13C. Although these first three dimensions were more important for species from high fertility sites the final two dimensions were more important for low fertility species and were associated with variations linked to reproductive and shade tolerance strategies. Environmental conditions also influenced structural traits with ρx decreasing with increased soil fertility and decreasing with increased temperatures. This soil fertility response appears to be synchronised with increases in foliar nutrient concentrations and reductions in foliar [C]. Leaf and leaflet area and ΦLS were less responsive to the environment than ρx. Thus although genetically determined foliar traits such as those associated with leaf construction costs coordinate

  15. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ulla C

    2015-01-15

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. The Role of Pharmacology in Ureteral Physiology and Expulsive Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerde, Travis J.; Nakada, Stephen Y.

    2007-04-01

    Research in the field of ureteral physiology and pharmacology has traditionally been directed toward relaxation of ureteral spasm as a mechanism of analgesia during painful ureteral obstruction, most often stone-induced episodes. However, interest in this field has expanded greatly in recent years with the expanded use of alpha-blocker therapy for inducing stone passage, a usage now termed "medical expulsive therapy". While most clinical reports involving expulsive therapy have focused on alpha receptor or calcium channel blockade, there are diverse studies investigating pharmacological ureteral relaxation with novel agents including cyclooxygenase inhibitors, small molecule beta receptor agonists, neurokinin antagonists, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. In addition, cutting edge molecular biology research is revealing promising potential therapeutic targets aimed at specific molecular changes that occur during the acute obstruction that accompanies stone disease. The purpose of this report is to review the use of pharmacological agents as ureteral smooth muscle relaxants clinically, and to look into the future of expulsive therapy by reviewing the available literature of ureteral physiology and pharmacology research.

  17. What role does plant physiology play in limiting species distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kauwe, M. G.; Medlyn, B. E.; Beaumont, L.; Duursma, R.; Baumgartner, J.

    2015-12-01

    To predict vulnerability of tree species to changes in climate, we need to understand what processes are currently limiting their distributions. Although the limits to distribution is among the most fundamental of ecological questions, there are few studies that determine quantitatively which processes can explain observed distributions. Focusing on two contrasting Eucalypt species, a fast-growing coastal species (E. saligna) and a slower-growing inland species (E. sideroxylon), we examined to what extent plant physiological characteristics limit species distributions. The ecophysiology of both species has been extensively characterised in both controlled and field environments. We parameterised an ecosystem model (GDAY, Generic Decomposition and Yield) for both species, using the best available experimental data. We then used the model to predict the spatial distribution of productivity for these species in eastern Australia, and compared these predictions with the actual distributions. The results of this comparison allow us to identify where the distributions of these species are limited by physiological constraints on productivity, and consequently their vulnerability to changes in climate.

  18. The Cajal school and the physiological role of astrocytes: a way of thinking

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Marta; Araque, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Cajal is widely recognized by the scientific community for his important contributions to our knowledge of the neuronal organization of the nervous system. His studies on neuroglial cells are less recognized, yet they are no less relevant to our current understanding of the cellular bases of brain structure. Two pioneering studies published a century ago –“Something about the physiological significance of neuroglia” (Ramón y Cajal, 1897) and “A contribution to the understanding of neuroglia in the human brain” (Ramón y Cajal, 1913)—focused on glial cells and their role in brain physiology. Novel findings obtained using state-of-the-art and sophisticated technologies largely confirm many of the groundbreaking hypotheses proposed by Cajal related to the structural-functional properties of neuroglia. Here we propose to the reader a journey guided by the ideas of Cajal through the recent findings on the functional significance of astrocytes, the most abundant neuroglial cell type in the nervous system. Astrocyte–neuron interaction, which represents an emerging field in current neuroscience with important implications for our understanding of the cellular processes underlying brain function, has its roots in many of the original concepts proposed by Cajal. PMID:24904302

  19. Role of thermal physiology and bioenergetics on adaptation in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri): the experiment test

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Fang; Wang, Zheng-kun; Zhu, Wan-long

    2017-01-01

    Ambient conditions, as temperature and photoperiod, play a key role in animals’ physiology and behaviors. To test the hypothesis that the maximum thermal physiological and bioenergetics tolerances are induced by extreme environments in Tupaia belangeri. We integrated the acclimatized and acclimated data in several physiological, hormonal, and biochemical markers of thermogenic capacity and bioenergetics in T. belangeri. Results showed that T. belangeri increased body mass, thermogenesis capacity, protein contents and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity of liver and brown adipose tissue in winter-like environments, which indicated that temperature was the primary signal for T. belangeri to regulate several physiological capacities. The associated photoperiod signal also elevated the physiological capacities. The regulations of critical physiological traits play a primary role in meeting the survival challenges of winter-like condition in T. belangeri. Together, to cope with cold, leptin may play a potential role in thermogenesis and body mass regulation, as this hormonal signal is associated with other hormones. The strategies of thermal physiology and bioenergetics differs between typical Palearctic species and the local species. However, the maximum thermal physiology and bioenergetic tolerance maybe is an important strategy to cope with winter-like condition of T. belangeri. PMID:28145515

  20. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  1. Mechanisms and physiological roles of K+ efflux from root cells.

    PubMed

    Demidchik, Vadim

    2014-05-15

    Potassium is the most abundant macronutrient, which is involved in a multitude of physiological processes. Potassium uptake in roots is crucial for plants; however, K(+) efflux can also occur and has important functions. Potassium efflux from roots is mainly induced by stresses, such as pathogens, salinity, freezing, oxidants and heavy metals. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exogenous purines also cause this reaction. The depolarisation and activation of cation channels are required for K(+) efflux from plant roots. Potassium channels and nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) are involved in this process. Some of them are 'constitutive', while the others require a chemical agent for activation. In Arabidopsis, there are 77 genes that can potentially encode K(+)-permeable channels. Potassium-selective channel genes include 9 Shaker and 6 Tandem-Pore K(+) channels. Genes of NSCCs are more abundant and present by 20 cyclic nucleotide gated channels, 20 ionotropic glutamate receptors, 1 two-pore channel, 10 mechanosensitive-like channels, 2 mechanosensitive 'Mid1-Complementing Activity' channels, 1 mechanosensitive Piezo channel, and 8 annexins. Two Shakers (SKOR and GORK) and several NSCCs are expressed in root cell plasma membranes. SKOR mediates K(+) efflux from xylem parenchyma cells to xylem vessels while GORK is expressed in the epidermis and functions in K(+) release. Both these channels are activated by ROS. The GORK channel activity is stimulated by hydroxyl radicals that are generated in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner in stress conditions, such as salinity or pathogen attack, resulting in dramatic K(+) efflux from root cells. Potassium loss simulates cytosolic proteases and endonucleases, leading to programmed cell death. Other physiological functions of K(+) efflux channels include repolarisation of the plasma membrane during action potentials and the 'hypothetical' function of a metabolic switch, which provides inhibition of energy-consuming biosyntheses and

  2. Fitting C² continuous parametric surfaces to frontiers delimiting physiologic structures.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Jason D; Epstein, Matthew; Beaumont, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique to fit C(2) continuous parametric surfaces to scattered geometric data points forming frontiers delimiting physiologic structures in segmented images. Such mathematical representation is interesting because it facilitates a large number of operations in modeling. While the fitting of C(2) continuous parametric curves to scattered geometric data points is quite trivial, the fitting of C(2) continuous parametric surfaces is not. The difficulty comes from the fact that each scattered data point should be assigned a unique parametric coordinate, and the fit is quite sensitive to their distribution on the parametric plane. We present a new approach where a polygonal (quadrilateral or triangular) surface is extracted from the segmented image. This surface is subsequently projected onto a parametric plane in a manner to ensure a one-to-one mapping. The resulting polygonal mesh is then regularized for area and edge length. Finally, from this point, surface fitting is relatively trivial. The novelty of our approach lies in the regularization of the polygonal mesh. Process performance is assessed with the reconstruction of a geometric model of mouse heart ventricles from a computerized tomography scan. Our results show an excellent reproduction of the geometric data with surfaces that are C(2) continuous.

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Senescence Marker Protein 30: Insights Linking Structural, Enzymatic, and Physiological Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborti, Subhendu; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2010-05-25

    Human senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30), which functions enzymatically as a lactonase, hydrolyzes various carbohydrate lactones. The penultimate step in vitamin-C biosynthesis is catalyzed by this enzyme in nonprimate mammals. It has also been implicated as an organophosphate hydrolase, with the ability to hydrolyze diisopropyl phosphofluoridate and other nerve agents. SMP30 was originally identified as an aging marker protein, whose expression decreased androgen independently in aging cells. SMP30 is also referred to as regucalcin and has been suggested to have functions in calcium homeostasis. The crystal structure of the human enzyme has been solved from X-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.4 {angstrom}. The protein has a 6-bladed {beta}-propeller fold, and it contains a single metal ion. Crystal structures have been solved with the metal site bound with either a Ca{sup 2+} or a Zn{sup 2+} atom. The catalytic role of the metal ion has been confirmed by mutagenesis of the metal coordinating residues. Kinetic studies using the substrate gluconolactone showed a k{sub cat} preference of divalent cations in the order Zn{sup 2+} > Mn{sup 2+} > Ca{sup 2+} > Mg{sup 2+}. Notably, the Ca{sup 2+} had a significantly higher value of K{sub d} compared to those of the other metal ions tested (566, 82, 7, and 0.6 {micro}m for Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+}, respectively), suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+}-bound form may be physiologically relevant for stressed cells with an elevated free calcium level.

  4. Role of nitric oxide in murine conventional outflow physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason Y. H.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Bertrand, Jacques; Read, A. Thomas; Marando, Catherine M.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for glaucoma. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) decreases IOP by increasing outflow facility, but whether endogenous NO production contributes to the physiological regulation of outflow facility is unclear. Outflow facility was measured by pressure-controlled perfusion in ex vivo eyes from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or transgenic mice expressing human endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) superimposed on the endogenously expressed murine eNOS (eNOS-GFPtg). In WT mice, exogenous NO delivered by 100 μM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) increased outflow facility by 62 ± 28% (SD) relative to control eyes perfused with the inactive SNAP analog N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (NAP; n = 5, P = 0.016). In contrast, in eyes from eNOS-GFPtg mice, SNAP had no effect on outflow facility relative to NAP (−9 ± 4%, P = 0.40). In WT mice, the nonselective NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10 μM) decreased outflow facility by 36 ± 13% (n = 5 each, P = 0.012), but 100 μM l-NAME had no detectable effect on outflow facility (−16 ± 5%, P = 0.22). An eNOS-selective inhibitor (cavtratin, 50 μM) decreased outflow facility by 19 ± 12% in WT (P = 0.011) and 39 ± 25% in eNOS-GFPtg (P = 0.014) mice. In the conventional outflow pathway of eNOS-GFPtg mice, eNOS-GFP expression was localized to endothelial cells lining Schlemm's canal and the downstream vessels, with no apparent expression in the trabecular meshwork. These results suggest that endogenous NO production by eNOS within endothelial cells of Schlemm's canal or downstream vessels contributes to the physiological regulation of aqueous humor outflow facility in mice, representing a viable strategy to more successfully lower IOP in glaucoma. PMID:26040898

  5. Sight and insight--on the physiological role of nitric oxide in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Cudeiro, J; Rivadulla, C

    1999-03-01

    Research in the fields of cellular communication and signal transduction in the brain has moved very rapidly in recent years. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the latest discoveries in the arena of messenger molecules. Current evidence indicates that, in visual system, NO is produced in both postsynaptic and presynaptic structures and acts as a neurotransmitter, albeit of a rather unorthodox type. Under certain conditions it can switch roles to become either neuronal 'friend' or 'foe'. Nitric oxide is a gas that diffuses through all physiological barriers to act on neighbouring cells across an extensive volume on a specific time scale. It, therefore,has the opportunity to control the processing of vision from the lowest level of retinal transduction to the control of neuronal excitability in the visual cortex.

  6. Cytosolic phospholipase A₂: physiological function and role in disease.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Christina C

    2015-08-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme.

  7. A physiological role for HgII during phototrophic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, D. S.; Poulain, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    The bioaccumulation of toxic monomethylmercury is influenced by the redox reactions that determine the amount of mercury (Hg) substrate--HgII or Hg0 (refs ,)--that is available for methylation. Phototrophic microorganisms can reduce HgII to Hg0 (ref. ). This reduction has been linked to a mixotrophic lifestyle, in which microbes gain energy photosynthetically but acquire diverse carbon compounds for biosynthesis from the environment. Photomixotrophs must maintain redox homeostasis to disperse excess reducing power due to the accumulation of reduced enzyme cofactors. Here we report laboratory experiments in which we exposed purple bacteria growing in a bioreactor to HgII and monitored Hg0 concentrations. We show that phototrophs use HgII as an electron sink to maintain redox homeostasis. Hg0 concentrations increased only when bacteria grew phototrophically, and when bacterial enzyme cofactor ratios indicated the presence of an intracellular redox imbalance. Under such conditions, bacterial growth rates increased with increasing HgII concentrations; when alternative electron sinks were added, Hg0 production decreased. We conclude that Hg can fulfil a physiological function in bacteria, and that photomixotrophs can modify the availability of Hg to methylation sites.

  8. [Prostaglandins and their role in the physiology of reproduction].

    PubMed

    Husson, J F

    1971-01-01

    PGs (protsglandins), discovered in 1930s, are fatty unsaturated acids with 20 carbon atoms. There are 4 main groups, i.e. types A, B, E, and F, each containing different components. PGs have been identified in a great number of human and animal tissues; their activity is exercised on the majority of tissues and in different ways in humans and in animals. The most evident effects of PGs take place in reproductive physiology. PGs inhibit the contractility of the nonpregnant uterus in vitro, but augment the contractility in vivo. On the pregnant uterus, in vivo or in vitro, PGs cause an increase in tonus and the apparition of contractions. Thus, PGs appear to be particularly indicated in induction of therapeutic abortion and of labor, with different results according to dosage and mode of administration. The human sperm has been found to be very rich in PGs, and sterile men have apparently lower levels of PGs than fertile ones. It has also been demonstrated on laboratory animals that PGs may retard or inhibit the migration of the fertilized egg through the tubes, thus making nidation impossible.

  9. Cytosolic phospholipase A2: physiological function and role in disease

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme. PMID:25838312

  10. Physiological roles revealed by ghrelin and ghrelin receptor deficient mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ghrelin is a hormone made in the stomach and known primarily for its growth hormone releasing and orexigenic properties. Nevertheless, ghrelin through its receptor, the GHS-R1a, has been shown to exert many roles including regulation of glucose homeostasis, memory & learning, food addiction and neur...

  11. Hepatic PPARs: their role in liver physiology, fibrosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zardi, E M; Navarini, L; Sambataro, G; Piccinni, P; Sambataro, F M; Spina, C; Dobrina, A

    2013-01-01

    Complex molecular and cellular mechanisms are involved in the pathway of liver fibrosis. Activation and transformation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are considered the two main reasons for the cause and development of liver fibrosis. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belonging to the family of ligand-activated transcription factors play a key role in liver homeostasis, regulating adipogenesis and inhibiting fibrogenesis in HSCs. Normal transcriptional function of PPARs contributes to maintain HSCs in quiescent phase. A reduced expression of PPARs in HSCs greatly induces a progression of liver fibrosis and an increased production of collagen. Here, we discuss role and function of PPARs and we take into consideration molecular factors able to reduce PPARs activity in HSCs. Finally, although further validations are needed, we illustrate novel strategies available from in vitro and animal studies on how some PPARs-agonists have been proved effective as antifibrotic substances in liver disease.

  12. The Role of Daily Activities in Youths’ Stress Physiology

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Susan M.; Blocklin, Michelle K.; Walter, Kimberly N.; Davis, Kelly D.; Almeida, David M.; Klein, Laura Cousino

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study examined links between diurnal patterns of the stress hormone, cortisol, and adolescents’ time in nine common daily activities. Method During eight consecutive nightly telephone interviews, 28 youths (n = 12 girls), 10-18 years of age, reported their day’s activities. On four days, four saliva samples also were collected and assayed for cortisol. Multilevel models assessed within- and between-person associations between time in each activity and cortisol Area Under the Curve (AUC), cortisol awakening response (CAR), morning peak (30 minutes after wake up) and daily decline (morning peak to bedtime). Results Links with AUC were found for most activities; significant associations with cortisol rhythms suggested that most effects were due to anticipation of the day’s activities. Specifically, on days when youths spent more time than usual on videogames and TV they had lower AUCs, with lower morning peaks. Youths who spent more time reading (within-person) and in computer activities (between-person) had higher AUCs, with stronger CARs (within-person). Youths who slept more had lower AUCs, with lower morning peaks on both the between- and within-person levels. Amounts of time spent in clubs, and for older adolescents, sports, were also linked to lower AUCs. Finally, youths who spent more time in school/schoolwork had lower AUCs, but on days when youths spent more time than usual in school, they had higher AUCs, stronger CARs, and steeper daily declines. Conclusion Beyond their known implications for psychological adjustment, youths’ everyday activities are linked to stress physiology. PMID:23174474

  13. Possible physiological roles of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins--UCPn.

    PubMed

    Jezek, Petr

    2002-10-01

    Five mitochondrial uncoupling proteins exist in the human gemone: UCP2, expressed ubiquitously; UCP1, exclusively in brown adipose tissue (BAT); UCP3, predominantly in muscle; UCP4 and BMCP (UCP5), in brain. UCP4 is the ancestral prototype from which the other UCPn diverged. Findings on the level of organism and reconstituted recombinant proteins demonstrated that UCPn exhibit a protonophoric function, documented by overexpression in mice, L6 myotubes, INS1 cells, muscle, and yeast. In a few cases (yeast), this protonophoric function was correlated with elevated fatty acid (FA) levels. Reconstituted UCPn exhibited nucleotide-sensitive FA induced H(+) uniport. Two mechanisms, local buffering or FA cycling were suggested as an explanation. A basic UCPn role with mild uncoupling is to accelerate metabolism and reduce reactive oxygen species. UCP2 (UCP3) roles were inferred from transcriptional up-regulation mediated by FAs via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, cytokines, leptin signalling via hypothalamic pathway, and by thyroide and beta2 adrenergic stimulation. The latter indicated a role in catecholamine-induced thermogenesis in skeletal muscle. UCP2 (UCP3) may contribute to body weight regulation, although obesity was not induced in knockout (KO) mice. An obesity reduction in middle-aged humans was associated with the less common allele of -866 G/A polymorphism in the ucp2 gene promoter enhancing the exon 8 insertion: deletion transcript ratio. Up-regulated UCP2 transcription by pyrogenic cytokines (tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)) suggested a role in fever. UCP2 could induce type 2 diabetes as developed from obesity due to up-regulated UCP2 transcription by FAs in pancreatic beta-cells. UCPn might be pro-apoptotic as well as anti-apoptotic, depending on transcriptional and biochemical regulation. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Role of laminins in physiological and pathological angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Orend, Gertraud; Mammadova-Bach, Elmina; Spenlé, Caroline; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of endothelial cells and pericytes with their microenvironment, in particular with the basement membrane, plays a crucial role during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In this review, we focus on laminins, a major family of extracellular matrix molecules present in basement membranes. Laminins interact with cell surface receptors to trigger intracellular signalling that shapes cell behaviour. Each laminin exerts a distinct effect on endothelial cells and pericytes which largely depends on the adhesion receptor profile expressed on the cell surface. Moreover, proteolytic cleavage of laminins may affect their role in angiogenesis. We report in vitro and in vivo data on laminin-111, -411, -511 and -332 and their associated signalling that regulates cell behaviour and angiogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. We also discuss how tissue-specific deletion of laminin genes affects the behaviour of endothelial cells and pericytes and thus angiogenesis. Finally, we examine how coculture systems with defined laminin expression contribute to our understanding of the roles of laminins in normal and pathological vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.

  15. The physiological role of endoglin in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    López-Novoa, José M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2010-10-01

    Endoglin (CD105) is an integral membrane glycoprotein that serves as a coreceptor for members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily of proteins. A major role for endoglin in regulating transforming growth factor-β-dependent vascular remodeling and angiogenesis has been postulated based on the following: 1) endoglin is the gene mutated in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1, a disease characterized by vascular malformations; 2) endoglin knockout mice die at midgestation because of defective angiogenesis; 3) endoglin is overexpressed in neoangiogenic vessels, during inflammation, and in solid tumors; and 4) endoglin regulates the expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, which is involved in angiogenesis and vascular tone. Besides the predominant form of the endoglin receptor (long endoglin isoform), two additional forms of endoglin have been recently reported to play a role in the vascular pathology and homeostasis: the alternatively spliced short endoglin isoform and a soluble endoglin form that is proteolytically cleaved from membrane-bound endoglin. The purpose of this review is to underline the role that the different forms of endoglin play in regulating angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, and vascular tone, as well as to analyze the molecular and cellular mechanisms supporting these effects.

  16. Role of renal vascular potassium channels in physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Salomonsson, Max; Brasen, Jens Christian; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2017-03-30

    The control of renal vascular tone is important for the regulation of salt and water balance, blood pressure and the protection against damaging elevated glomerular pressure. The K(+) conductance is a major factor in the regulation of the membrane potential (Vm ) in vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) and endothelial cells (EC). The vascular tone is controlled by Vm via its effect on the opening probability of voltage operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCC) in VSMC. When K(+) conductance increases Vm becomes more negative and vasodilation follows, while deactivation of K(+) channels leads to depolarization and vasoconstriction. K(+) channels in EC indirectly participate in the control of vascular tone by endothelium derived vasodilation. Therefore, by regulating the tone of renal resistance vessels, K(+) channels have a potential role in the control of fluid homeostasis and blood pressure as well as in the protection of the renal parenchyma. The main classes of K(+) channels (calcium activated (KCa ), inward rectifier (Kir ), voltage activated (Kv ) and ATP sensitive (KATP )) have been found in the renal vessels. In this review, we summarize results available in the literature and our own studies in the field. We compare the ambiguous in vitro and in vivo results. We discuss the role of single types of K(+) channels and the integrated function of several classes. We also deal with the possible role of renal vascular K(+) channels in the pathophysiology of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and sepsis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Linking vegetation structure, function and physiology through spectroscopic remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbin, S.; Singh, A.; Couture, J. J.; Shiklomanov, A. N.; Rogers, A.; Desai, A. R.; Kruger, E. L.; Townsend, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem process models require detailed information on ecosystem states and canopy properties to properly simulate the fluxes of carbon (C), water and energy from the land to the atmosphere and assess the vulnerability of ecosystems to perturbations. Current models fail to adequately capture the magnitude, spatial variation, and seasonality of terrestrial C uptake and storage, leading to significant uncertainties in the size and fate of the terrestrial C sink. By and large, these parameter and process uncertainties arise from inadequate spatial and temporal representation of plant traits, vegetation structure, and functioning. With increases in computational power and changes to model architecture and approaches, it is now possible for models to leverage detailed, data rich and spatially explicit descriptions of ecosystems to inform parameter distributions and trait tradeoffs. In this regard, spectroscopy and imaging spectroscopy data have been shown to be invaluable observational datasets to capture broad-scale spatial and, eventually, temporal dynamics in important vegetation properties. We illustrate the linkage of plant traits and spectral observations to supply key data constraints for model parameterization. These constraints can come either in the form of the raw spectroscopic data (reflectance, absorbtance) or physiological traits derived from spectroscopy. In this presentation we highlight our ongoing work to build ecological scaling relationships between critical vegetation characteristics and optical properties across diverse and complex canopies, including temperate broadleaf and conifer forests, Mediterranean vegetation, Arctic systems, and agriculture. We focus on work at the leaf, stand, and landscape scales, illustrating the importance of capturing the underlying variability in a range of parameters (including vertical variation within canopies) to enable more efficient scaling of traits related to functional diversity of ecosystems.

  18. The emerging physiological roles of the SLC14A family of urea transporters

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, urea is the main nitrogenous breakdown product of protein catabolism and is produced in the liver. In certain tissues, the movement of urea across cell membranes is specifically mediated by a group of proteins known as the SLC14A family of facilitative urea transporters. These proteins are derived from two distinct genes, UT-A (SLC14A2) and UT-B (SLC14A1). Facilitative urea transporters play an important role in two major physiological processes – urinary concentration and urea nitrogen salvaging. Although UT-A and UT-B transporters both have a similar basic structure and mediate the transport of urea in a facilitative manner, there are a number of significant differences between them. UT-A transporters are mainly found in the kidney, are highly specific for urea, have relatively lower transport rates and are highly regulated at both gene expression and cellular localization levels. In contrast, UT-B transporters are more widespread in their tissue location, transport both urea and water, have a relatively high transport rate, are inhibited by mercurial compounds and currently appear to be less acutely regulated. This review details the fundamental research that has so far been performed to investigate the function and physiological significance of these two types of urea transporters. PMID:21449978

  19. [Biological role of heterogeneous glycoprotein structures].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate molecules connected mostly with covalent junctions to protein chains are called glycoproteins. These carbohydrate molecules are attached to the protein core in different qualities and order. When the protein core is connected with acidic components such as uronic acid or SO4 radicals, they are called proteoglycans. The currently used name "glycosaminoglycan" in this case is not entirely correct. In the living world polymannane structures occur, too. Glycoproteins do not only exceptionally hold acidic groups but they have neuraminic acid derivatives. Tissue, cellular and matrix structures, and mostly all serum "proteins" are mainly glycoproteins. In the everyday clinical practice glycoproteins are mentioned as proteins. Nevertheless, the inadequate use of the concept may cause errors in the attitudes, too. This paper aims to correct this notion, because the term of "glycobiology" has already been expanded to be an independent scientific field. The practical clinical consequences of recent knowledge in this field are also summarized including novel findings on glycoprotein structures and functions. The importance of the quantity of carbohydrates, and their structural arrangements are also presented. In short, significance of glycoprotein-carbohydrate structures, as well as their physiological and pathological roles are reviewed in order to introduce the field of "glycobiology". Orosomucoid and immunoglobulins are discussed separately. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1185-1192.

  20. The Role of Biotin in Bacterial Physiology and Virulence: a Novel Antibiotic Target for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Salaemae, Wanisa; Booker, Grant W; Polyak, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    Biotin is an essential cofactor for enzymes present in key metabolic pathways such as fatty acid biosynthesis, replenishment of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin is synthesized de novo in microorganisms, plants, and fungi, but this metabolic activity is absent in mammals, making biotin biosynthesis an attractive target for antibiotic discovery. In particular, biotin biosynthesis plays important metabolic roles as the sole source of biotin in all stages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis life cycle due to the lack of a transporter for scavenging exogenous biotin. Biotin is intimately associated with lipid synthesis where the products form key components of the mycobacterial cell membrane that are critical for bacterial survival and pathogenesis. In this review we discuss the central role of biotin in bacterial physiology and highlight studies that demonstrate the importance of its biosynthesis for virulence. The structural biology of the known biotin synthetic enzymes is described alongside studies using structure-guided design, phenotypic screening, and fragment-based approaches to drug discovery as routes to new antituberculosis agents.

  1. Physiological and pathological roles of mitochondrial SLC25 carriers

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Aguilar, Manuel; Baines, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrion relies on compartmentalization of certain enzymes, ions and metabolites for the sake of efficient metabolism. In order to fulfil its activities, a myriad of carriers are properly expressed, targeted and folded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Among these carriers, the six-transmembrane-helix mitochondrial SLC25 (solute carrier family 25) proteins facilitate transport of solutes with disparate chemical identities across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Although their proper function replenishes building blocks needed for metabolic reactions, dysfunctional SLC25 proteins are involved in pathological states. It is the purpose of the present review to cover the current knowledge on the role of SLC25 transporters in health and disease. PMID:23988125

  2. The micromechanical role of the annulus fibrosus components under physiological loading of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Ayturk, Ugur M; Garcia, Jose J; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2010-06-01

    To date, studies that have investigated the kinematics of spinal motion segments have largely focused on the contributions that the spinal ligaments play in the resultant motion patterns. However, the specific roles played by intervertebral disk components, in particular the annulus fibrosus, with respect to global motion is not well understood in spite of the relatively large literature base with respect to the local ex vivo mechanical properties of the tissue. The primary objective of this study was to implement the nonlinear and orthotropic mechanical behavior of the annulus fibrosus in a finite element model of an L4/L5 functional spinal unit in the form of a strain energy potential where the individual mechanical contributions of the ground substance and fibers were explicitly defined. The model was validated biomechanically under pure moment loading to ensure that the individual role of each soft tissue structure during load bearing was consistent throughout the physiologically relevant loading range. The fibrous network of the annulus was found to play critical roles in limiting the magnitude of the neutral zone and determining the stiffness of the elastic zone. Under flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation, the collagen fibers were observed to bear the majority of the load applied to the annulus fibrosus, especially in radially peripheral regions where disk bulging occurred. For the first time, our data explicitly demonstrate that the exact fiber recruitment sequence is critically important for establishing the range of motion and neutral zone magnitudes of lumbar spinal motion segments.

  3. Physiological and Pharmacological Roles of FGF21 in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peng; Zhang, Fangfang; Yu, Lechu; Lin, Xiufei; He, Luqing; Li, Xiaokun; Lu, Xuemian; Yan, Xiaoqing; Tan, Yi; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most severe diseases in clinics. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is regarded as an important metabolic regulator playing a therapeutic role in diabetes and its complications. The heart is a key target as well as a source of FGF21 which is involved in heart development and also induces beneficial effects in CVDs. Our review is to clarify the roles of FGF21 in CVDs. Strong evidence showed that the development of CVDs including atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, myocardial ischemia, cardiac hypertrophy, and diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with serum FGF21 levels increase which was regarded as a compensatory response to induced cardiac protection. Furthermore, administration of FGF21 suppressed the above CVDs. Mechanistic studies revealed that FGF21 induced cardiac protection likely by preventing cardiac lipotoxicity and the associated oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Normally, FGF21 induced therapeutic effects against CVDs via activation of the above kinases-mediated pathways by directly binding to the FGF receptors of the heart in the presence of β-klotho. However, recently, growing evidence showed that FGF21 induced beneficial effects on peripheral organs through an indirect way mediated by adiponectin. Therefore whether adiponectin is also involved in FGF21-induced cardiac protection still needs further investigation. PMID:27247947

  4. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  5. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  6. A Role for Antibiotics in Mineral Dissolution and Biofilm Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    Respiration by bacteria is remarkable due to their ability to use a variety of compounds, including insoluble minerals, as terminal electron acceptors. How bacteria solve the problem of breathing something that is solid is poorly understood, but recent evidence points to the role of redox active natural products in shuttling electrons between microbes and minerals. Given the ubiquity of these substances in natural waters and soils, we must now revisit previous conclusions about whether direct contact between microbes and minerals is necessary to promote reductive mineral dissolution. To explore the degree to which extracellular electron transfer catalyzes important biogeochemical processes, we are studying the types of molecules that function as electron shuttles, including redox active antibiotics. I will discuss my laboratory's current understanding of how interspecies exchange of these molecules promotes mineral dissolution, as well as our emerging hypotheses regarding their function in biofilms.

  7. Circadian Control of Cardiac Metabolism: Physiologic Roles and Pathologic Implications.

    PubMed

    Young, Martin E

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of the day, the heart is challenged with dramatic fluctuations in energetic demand and nutrient availability. It is therefore not surprising that rhythms in cardiac metabolism have been reported at multiple levels, including the utilization of glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. Evidence has emerged suggesting that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is in large part responsible for governing cardiac metabolic rhythms. In doing so, the cardiomyocyte clock temporally partitions ATP generation for increased contractile function during the active period, promotes nutrient storage at the end of the active period, and facilitates protein turnover (synthesis and degradation) during the beginning of the sleep phase. This review highlights the roles of cardiac metabolism rhythms as well as the potential pathological consequences of their impairment.

  8. Local retrograde and destination transfer of physiological regulators as an important regulatory system and its role. Facts and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Krzymowski, T; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2012-02-01

    In recent decades, among many physiological regulatory systems operating as local and central controls, the mechanism of the local regulatory system based on the uptake and retrograde transfer of hormones and other physiological regulators to the places of their secretion or their destination transfer to nearby structures has become precisely understood. The system of the retrograde transfer and local destination transfer of the physiological regulators, situated between endocrine and paracrine regulation, operates primarily on the basis of specific morphological adaptations of the local blood circulatory system and lymphatic system. These adaptations enable the transfer of the regulatory molecules through the walls of blood and lymph vessels and locally increase their concentrations in the arterial blood supplying the organ secreting them (retrograde transfer) or a nearby organ (destination transfer). Extensive studies on the structure and functions of the retrograde and destination transfer system have focused on several key areas: the female and male reproductive organs, the perihypophyseal vascular complex (the venous cavernous sinus and the internal carotid artery or the rete mirabile of the internal carotid artery or maxillary artery), and the periophthalmic vascular complex (the venous ophthalmic sinus or plexus and the rete mirabile of the external ophthalmic artery). The local retrograde transfer of regulatory molecules not only allows them to be reused but also influences their production by a feedback mechanism. The local destination transfer of physiological regulators can selectively supply nearby organs with certain regulatory factors and thereby affect their function. Many observations indicate that the retrograde and local destination transfer of hormones and other biologically active substances may be a universal physiological regulatory mechanism, operating with only minor modifications in various species of animals and in humans. This review

  9. Sugar for the brain: the role of glucose in physiological and pathological brain function.

    PubMed

    Mergenthaler, Philipp; Lindauer, Ute; Dienel, Gerald A; Meisel, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The mammalian brain depends upon glucose as its main source of energy, and tight regulation of glucose metabolism is critical for brain physiology. Consistent with its critical role for physiological brain function, disruption of normal glucose metabolism as well as its interdependence with cell death pathways forms the pathophysiological basis for many brain disorders. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how glucose metabolism sustains basic brain physiology. We synthesize these findings to form a comprehensive picture of the cooperation required between different systems and cell types, and the specific breakdowns in this cooperation that lead to disease.

  10. Sugar for the brain: the role of glucose in physiological and pathological brain function

    PubMed Central

    Mergenthaler, Philipp; Lindauer, Ute; Dienel, Gerald A.; Meisel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian brain depends upon glucose as its main source of energy, and tight regulation of glucose metabolism is critical for brain physiology. Consistent with its critical role for physiological brain function, disruption of normal glucose metabolism as well as its interdependence with cell death pathways forms the pathophysiological basis for many brain disorders. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how glucose metabolism sustains basic brain physiology. We aim at synthesizing these findings to form a comprehensive picture of the cooperation required between different systems and cell types, and the specific breakdowns in this cooperation which lead to disease. PMID:23968694

  11. The physiology of learning and memory: role of peptides and stress.

    PubMed

    Gülpinar, M A; Yegen, B C

    2004-12-01

    The neuropeptides, as well as their respective receptors, are widely distributed throughout the mammalian central nervous system. During learning and memory processes, besides structural synaptic remodeling, changes are observed at molecular and metabolic levels with the alterations in neurotransmitter and neuropeptide synthesis and release. While there is consensus that brain cholinergic neurotransmission plays a critical role in the processes related to learning and memory, it is also well known that these functions are influenced by a tremendous number of neuropeptides and non-peptide molecules. Arginine vasopressin (AVP), oxytocin, angiotensin II, insulin, growth factors, serotonin (5-HT), melanin concentrating hormone, histamine, bombesin and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), dopamine, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) have modulatory effects on learning and memory. Among these peptides CCK, 5-HT and CRF play strategic roles in the modulation of memory processes under stressful conditions. CRF is accepted as the main neuropeptide involved in both physical and emotional stress, with a protective role during stress, possibly through the activation of the hypothalamo-pitiuitary (HPA) axis. The peptide CCK has been proposed to facilitate memory processing and CCK-like immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus was observed upon stress exposure, suggesting that CCK may participate in the central control of stress response and stress-induced memory dysfunction. On the other hand, 5-HT appears to play a role in behaviors that involve a high cognitive demand and stress exposure activates serotonergic systems in a variety of brain regions. The physiological role and therapeutic efficacy of various neuropeptides and the impact of stress exposure in the acquisition and consolidation of memory will be reviewed thoroughly.

  12. TRPV4 channels: physiological and pathological role in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-11-01

    TRPV4 channels are non-selective cation channels permeable to Ca(2+), Na(+), and Mg(2+) ions. Recently, TRPV4 channels have received considerable attention as these channels are widely expressed in the cardiovascular system including endothelial cells, cardiac fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscles, and peri-vascular nerves. Therefore, these channels possibly play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. TRPV4 channels critically regulate flow-induced arteriogenesis, TGF-β1-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, and heart failure-induced pulmonary edema. These channels also mediate hypoxia-induced increase in proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and progression of pulmonary hypertension. These channels also maintain flow-induced vasodilation and preserve vascular function by directly activating Ca(2+)-dependent KCa channels. Furthermore, these may also induce vasodilation and maintain blood pressure indirectly by evoking the release of NO, CGRP, and substance P. The present review discusses the evidences and the potential mechanisms implicated in diverse responses including arteriogenesis, cardiac remodeling, congestive heart failure-induced pulmonary edema, pulmonary hypertension, flow-induced dilation, regulation of blood pressure, and hypoxic preconditioning.

  13. On the role of melatonin in skin physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Fischer, Tobias W; Zmijewski, Michal A; Wortsman, Jacobo; Semak, Igor; Zbytek, Blazej; Slominski, Radomir M; Tobin, Desmond J

    2005-07-01

    Melatonin has been experimentally implicated in skin functions such as hair growth cycling, fur pigmentation, and melanoma control, and melatonin receptors are expressed in several skin cells including normal and malignant keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts. Melatonin is also able to suppress ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage to skin cells and shows strong antioxidant activity in UV exposed cells. Moreover, we recently uncovered expression in the skin of the biochemical machinery involved in the sequential transformation of l-tryptophan to serotonin and melatonin. Existence of the biosynthetic pathway was confirmed by detection of the corresponding genes and proteins with actual demonstration of enzymatic activities for tryptophan hydroxylase, serotonin N-acetyl-transferase, and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase in extracts from skin and skin cells. Initial evidence for in vivo synthesis of melatonin and its metabolism was obtained in hamster skin organ culture and in one melanoma line. Therefore, we propose that melatonin (synthesized locally or delivered topically) could counteract or buffer external (environmental) or internal stresses to preserve the biological integrity of the organ and to maintain its home-ostasis. Furthermore, melatonin could have a role in protection against solar radiation or even in the management of skin diseases.

  14. On the Role of Melatonin in Skin Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, A.; Fischer, T. W.; Zmijewski, M. A.; Wortsman, J.; Semak, I.; Zbytek, B.; Slominski, R. M.; Tobin, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Melatonin has been experimentally implicated in skin functions such as hair growth cycling, fur pigmentation, and melanoma control, and melatonin receptors are expressed in several skin cells including normal and malignant keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts. Melatonin is also able to suppress ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage to skin cells and shows strong antioxidant activity in UV exposed cells. Moreover, we recently uncovered expression in the skin of the biochemical machinery involved in the sequential transformation of l-tryptophan to serotonin and melatonin. Existence of the biosynthetic pathway was confirmed by detection of the corresponding genes and proteins with actual demonstration of enzymatic activities for tryptophan hydroxylase, serotonin N-acetyl-transferase, and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase in extracts from skin and skin cells. Initial evidence for in vivo synthesis of melatonin and its metabolism was obtained in hamster skin organ culture and in one melanoma line. Therefore, we propose that melatonin (synthesized locally or delivered topically) could counteract or buffer external (environmental) or internal stresses to preserve the biological integrity of the organ and to maintain its homeostasis. Furthermore, melatonin could have a role in protection against solar radiation or even in the management of skin diseases. PMID:16217127

  15. The role of apelins in the physiology of the heart.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suna; Eren, Mehmet Nesimi; Sahin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    Apelins are a peptide hormone known as the ligand for the G protein-coupled APJ receptor. There are many different forms of apelin in the circulation. Apelins and their receptors are expressed in the central nervous system, including the hypothalamus, and in numerous other peripheral tissues. These peptides are also synthesized in and secreted from the adipose tissues. Additionally, apelins were immunohistochemically shown to be synthesized in smooth muscle cells in the media of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) and the saphenous vein, fibroblast cells in the media of the aorta and endothelial cells of the intima. Similarly, it was recently reported that the enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) measurements of apelins were similar to its immunohistochemical data in the tissues of the aorta and left internal mammary artery. Apelins which are rapidly eliminated from the circulation have a half life of less than eight minutes. The normal concentration of apelins in the human plasma ranges between 1.3 ng/mL and 246±0.045 ng/mL. Apelins serve important functions in food intake, vasopressin (anti-diuretic hormone: ADH) and histamine release, gastric acid, bicarbonate secretion and insulin secretion, diuresis, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, glucose-fluid balance and regulation of gastrointestinal motility and cardiovascular system. Therefore, this review aims to focus on the potential role of the apelin system in the balance of the cardiovascular system.

  16. [Physiological and pathophysiological role of the circadian clock system].

    PubMed

    Halmos, Tamás; Suba, Ilona

    2012-09-02

    It has been well known for ages that in living organisms the rhythmicity of biological processes is linked to the ~ 24-hour light-dark cycle. However, the exact function of the circadian clock system has been explored only in the past decades. It came to light that the photosensitive primary "master clock" is situated in the suprachiasmatic photosensitive nuclei of the special hypothalamic region, and that it is working according to ~24-hour changes of light and darkness. The master clock sends its messages to the peripheral "slave clocks". In many organs, like pancreatic β-cells, the slave clocks have autonomic functions as well. Two essential components of the clock system are proteins encoded by the CLOCK and BMAL1 genes. CLOCK genes are in interaction with endonuclear receptors such as peroxisoma-proliferator activated receptors and Rev-erb-α, as well as with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, regulating the adaptation to stressors, energy supply, metabolic processes and cardiovascular system. Melatonin, the product of corpus pineale has a significant role in the functions of the clock system. The detailed discovery of the clock system has changed our previous knowledge about the development of many diseases. The most explored fields are hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic processes, mental disorders, cancers, sleep apnoe and joint disorders. CLOCK genes influence ageing as well. The recognition of the periodicity of biological processes makes the optimal dosing of certain drugs feasible. The more detailed discovery of the interaction of the clock system might further improve treatment and prevention of many disorders.

  17. The role of silicon in physiology of the medicinal plant (Lonicera japonica L.) under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Gengmao, Zhao; Shihui, Li; Xing, Sun; Yizhou, Wang; Zipan, Chang

    2015-08-03

    Silicon(Si) is the only element which can enhance the resistance to multiple stresses. However, the role of silicon in medicinal plants under salt stress is not yet understood. This experiment was conducted to study the effects of silicon addition on the growth, osmotic adjustments, photosynthetic characteristics, chloroplast ultrastructure and Chlorogenic acid (CGA) production of Honeysuckle plant (Lonicera japonica L.) under salt-stressed conditions. Salinity exerted an adverse effect on the plant fresh weight and dry weight, whilst 0.5 g L(-1) K2SiO3 · nH2O addition obviously improved the plant growth. Although Na(+) concentration in plant organs was drastically increased with increasing salinity, higher levels of K(+)/Na(+) ratio was obtained after K2SiO3 · nH2O addition. Salinity stress induced the destruction of the chloroplast envelope; however, K2SiO3 · nH2O addition counteracted the adverse effect by salinity on the structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. K2SiO3 · nH2O addition also enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. To sum up, exogenous Si plays a key role in enhancing its resistance to salt stresses in physiological base, thereby improving the growth and CGA production of Honeysuckle plant.

  18. The role of silicon in physiology of the medicinal plant (Lonicera japonica L.) under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Gengmao, Zhao; Shihui, Li; Xing, Sun; Yizhou, Wang; Zipan, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Silicon(Si) is the only element which can enhance the resistance to multiple stresses. However, the role of silicon in medicinal plants under salt stress is not yet understood. This experiment was conducted to study the effects of silicon addition on the growth, osmotic adjustments, photosynthetic characteristics, chloroplast ultrastructure and Chlorogenic acid (CGA) production of Honeysuckle plant (Lonicera japonica L.) under salt-stressed conditions. Salinity exerted an adverse effect on the plant fresh weight and dry weight, whilst 0.5 g L−1 K2SiO3·nH2O addition obviously improved the plant growth. Although Na+ concentration in plant organs was drastically increased with increasing salinity, higher levels of K+/Na+ ratio was obtained after K2SiO3·nH2O addition. Salinity stress induced the destruction of the chloroplast envelope; however, K2SiO3·nH2O addition counteracted the adverse effect by salinity on the structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. K2SiO3·nH2O addition also enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. To sum up, exogenous Si plays a key role in enhancing its resistance to salt stresses in physiological base, thereby improving the growth and CGA production of Honeysuckle plant. PMID:26235534

  19. The role of silicon in physiology of the medicinal plant (Lonicera japonica L.) under salt stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gengmao, Zhao; Shihui, Li; Xing, Sun; Yizhou, Wang; Zipan, Chang

    2015-08-01

    Silicon(Si) is the only element which can enhance the resistance to multiple stresses. However, the role of silicon in medicinal plants under salt stress is not yet understood. This experiment was conducted to study the effects of silicon addition on the growth, osmotic adjustments, photosynthetic characteristics, chloroplast ultrastructure and Chlorogenic acid (CGA) production of Honeysuckle plant (Lonicera japonica L.) under salt-stressed conditions. Salinity exerted an adverse effect on the plant fresh weight and dry weight, whilst 0.5 g L-1 K2SiO3·nH2O addition obviously improved the plant growth. Although Na+ concentration in plant organs was drastically increased with increasing salinity, higher levels of K+/Na+ ratio was obtained after K2SiO3·nH2O addition. Salinity stress induced the destruction of the chloroplast envelope; however, K2SiO3·nH2O addition counteracted the adverse effect by salinity on the structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. K2SiO3·nH2O addition also enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. To sum up, exogenous Si plays a key role in enhancing its resistance to salt stresses in physiological base, thereby improving the growth and CGA production of Honeysuckle plant.

  20. The Physiological Role of Progesterone Receptors in Breast Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    AD GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-94- J -4254 TITLE: The Physiological Role of Progesterone Receptors in Breast Development and Tumorigenesis PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS The Physiological Role of Progesterone Receptors in Breast Development and Tumorigenesis DAMDI7-94- J -4254 6. AUTHOR(S) Orla M...1985). 4. R. Clarke, R.B. Dickson, M.E. Lippman, Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol. 12, 1 (1992). 5. R.M. Evans, Science 240, 889 (1988). 6. S.Y. Tsai, M.- J

  1. Probing Temporal Structures in the Nonstationarity of Physiological Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bernaola-Galvan, Pedro; Amaral, Luis A. N.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2000-03-01

    We ask if there is an element of complexity to the nonstationarity in physiological signals. We hypothesise that appearence of segments with different mean values in the signal is related to different physiologic responses to external stimuli. We focus on the statistical properties and temporal organization of segments in the signal with well defined mean, significantly different from the mean of the adjacent segments. For that we subdivide heartbeat time series in such a way as to maximize the difference in the mean values between adjacent segments. To identify different segments we develop a new technique based on the Student's statistics. We observe that the distribution of the lenghts of segments follows a power law for the data during wake activity from both healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure. Data from both groups during sleep showes a breakdown in this power-law behavior with a crossover at lenght at ≈ 300 beats.

  2. Molecular and functional diversity of yeast and fungal lipases: their role in biotechnology and cellular physiology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rani; Kumari, Arti; Syal, Poonam; Singh, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    Lipase catalyzes hydrolysis of fats in lipid water interphase and perform variety of biotransformation reactions under micro aqueous conditions. The major sources include microbial lipases; among these yeast and fungal lipases are of special interest because they can carry out various stereoselective reactions. These lipases are highly diverse and are categorized into three classes on the basis of oxyanion hole: GX, GGGX and Y. The detailed phylogenetic analysis showed that GX family is more diverse than GGGX and Y family. Sequence and structural comparisons revealed that lipases are conserved only in the signature sequence region. Their characteristic structural determinants viz. lid, binding pocket and oxyanion hole are hotspots for mutagenesis. Few examples are cited in this review to highlight the multidisciplinary approaches for designing novel enzyme variants with improved thermo stability and substrate specificity. In addition, we present a brief account on biotechnological applications of lipases. Lipases have also gained attention as virulence factors, therefore, we surveyed the role of lipases in yeast physiology related to colonization, adhesion, biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The new genomic era has opened numerous possibilities to genetically manipulate lipases for food, fuel and pharmaceuticals.

  3. Arginase-boronic acid complex highlights a physiological role in erectile function.

    PubMed

    Cox, J D; Kim, N N; Traish, A M; Christianson, D W

    1999-11-01

    The crystal structure of the complex between the binuclear manganese metalloenzyme arginase and the boronic acid analog of L-arginine, 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), has been determined at 1.7 A resolution from a crystal perfectly twinned by hemihedry. ABH binds as the tetrahedral boronate anion, with one hydroxyl oxygen symmetrically bridging the binuclear manganese cluster and a second hydroxyl oxygen coordinating to Mn2+A. This binding mode mimics the transition state of a metal-activated hydroxide mechanism. This transition state structure differs from that occurring in NO biosynthesis, thereby explaining why ABH does not inhibit NO synthase. We also show that arginase activity is present in the penis. Accordingly, the tight binding and specificity of ABH allows us to probe the physiological role of arginase in modulating the NO-dependent smooth muscle relaxation required for erection. Strikingly, ABH causes significant enhancement of nonadrenergic, noncholinergic nerve-mediated relaxation of penile corpus cavernosum smooth muscle, suggesting that arginase inhibition sustains L-arginine concentrations for NO synthase activity. Therefore, human penile arginase is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

  4. The elusive structural role of ubiquitinated histones.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan C; Jason, Laure; Ausió, Juan

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly apparent that histone posttranslational modifications are important in chromatin structure and dynamics. However, histone ubiquitination has received little attention. Histones H1, H3, H2A, and H2B can be ubiquitinated in vivo, but the most prevalent are uH2A and uH2B. The size of this modification suggests some sort of structural impact. Physiological observations suggest that ubiquitinated histones may have multiple functions and structural effects. Ubiquitinated histones have been correlated with transcriptionally active DNA, implying that it may prevent chromatin folding or help maintain an open conformation. Also, in some organisms during spermiogenesis, a process involving extensive chromatin remodeling, uH2A levels increase just prior to histone replacement by protamines. Determination of chromatin's structural changes resulting from histone ubiquitination is therefore important. Recent work using reconstituted nucleosomes and chromatin fibers containing uH2A indicate that in the absence of linker histones, ubiquitination has little structural impact. DNase I digests and analytical ultracentrifugation of reconstituted ubiquitinated nucleosomes show no structural differences. Solubility assays using reconstituted chromatin fibers in the presence of divalent ions demonstrate that uH2A fibers are slightly more prone to aggregation than controls, and analytical ultracentrifugation results with different MgCl2 and NaCl concentrations determined that chromatin folding is not affected by this modification. Additional work to assess possible synergistic affects with histone acetylation also precludes any structural implications. Protamine displacement experiments concluded that the presence of uH2A does not significantly affect the ability of the protamines to displace histones. In addition, uH2A does not interfere with histone H1 binding to the nucleosome. While work with uH2B remains insufficient to come to any definitive conclusions about its

  5. Early Childcare, Executive Functioning, and the Moderating Role of Early Stress Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Daniel; Willoughby, Michael T.; Blair, Clancy; Ursache, Alexandra; Granger, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention studies indicate that children's childcare experiences can be leveraged to support the development of executive functioning (EF). The role of more normative childcare experiences is less clear. Increasingly, theory and empirical work suggest that individual differences in children's physiological stress systems may be associated with…

  6. Physiological Regulation of Stress in Referred Adolescents: The Role of the Parent-Adolescent Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willemen, Agnes M.; Schuengel, Carlo; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychopathology in youth appears to be linked to deficits in regulating affective responses to stressful situations. In children, high-quality parental support facilitates affect regulation. However, in adolescence, the role of parent-child interaction in the regulation of affect is unclear. This study examined physiological reactivity…

  7. Physiological Regulation of Stress in Referred Adolescents: The Role of the Parent-Adolescent Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willemen, Agnes M.; Schuengel, Carlo; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychopathology in youth appears to be linked to deficits in regulating affective responses to stressful situations. In children, high-quality parental support facilitates affect regulation. However, in adolescence, the role of parent-child interaction in the regulation of affect is unclear. This study examined physiological reactivity…

  8. Early Childcare, Executive Functioning, and the Moderating Role of Early Stress Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Daniel; Willoughby, Michael T.; Blair, Clancy; Ursache, Alexandra; Granger, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention studies indicate that children's childcare experiences can be leveraged to support the development of executive functioning (EF). The role of more normative childcare experiences is less clear. Increasingly, theory and empirical work suggest that individual differences in children's physiological stress systems may be associated with…

  9. Dominant role of plant physiology in trend and variability of gross primary productivity in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sha; Zhang, Yao; Ciais, Philippe; Xiao, Xiangming; Luo, Yiqi; Caylor, Kelly K.; Huang, Yuefei; Wang, Guangqian

    2017-02-01

    Annual gross primary productivity (GPP) varies considerably due to climate-induced changes in plant phenology and physiology. However, the relative importance of plant phenology and physiology on annual GPP variation is not clear. In this study, a Statistical Model of Integrated Phenology and Physiology (SMIPP) was used to evaluate the relative contributions of maximum daily GPP (GPPmax) and the start and end of growing season (GSstart and GSend) to annual GPP variability, using a regional GPP product in North America during 2000-2014 and GPP data from 24 AmeriFlux sites. Climatic sensitivity of the three indicators was assessed to investigate the climate impacts on plant phenology and physiology. The SMIPP can explain 98% of inter-annual variability of GPP over mid- and high latitudes in North America. The long-term trend and inter-annual variability of GPP are dominated by GPPmax both at the ecosystem and regional scales. During warmer spring and autumn, GSstart is advanced and GSend delayed, respectively. GPPmax responds positively to summer temperature over high latitudes (40-80°N), but negatively in mid-latitudes (25-40°N). This study demonstrates that plant physiology, rather than phenology, plays a dominant role in annual GPP variability, indicating more attention should be paid to physiological change under futher climate change.

  10. Dominant role of plant physiology in trend and variability of gross primary productivity in North America

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Zhang, Yao; Ciais, Philippe; Xiao, Xiangming; Luo, Yiqi; Caylor, Kelly K.; Huang, Yuefei; Wang, Guangqian

    2017-01-01

    Annual gross primary productivity (GPP) varies considerably due to climate-induced changes in plant phenology and physiology. However, the relative importance of plant phenology and physiology on annual GPP variation is not clear. In this study, a Statistical Model of Integrated Phenology and Physiology (SMIPP) was used to evaluate the relative contributions of maximum daily GPP (GPPmax) and the start and end of growing season (GSstart and GSend) to annual GPP variability, using a regional GPP product in North America during 2000–2014 and GPP data from 24 AmeriFlux sites. Climatic sensitivity of the three indicators was assessed to investigate the climate impacts on plant phenology and physiology. The SMIPP can explain 98% of inter-annual variability of GPP over mid- and high latitudes in North America. The long-term trend and inter-annual variability of GPP are dominated by GPPmax both at the ecosystem and regional scales. During warmer spring and autumn, GSstart is advanced and GSend delayed, respectively. GPPmax responds positively to summer temperature over high latitudes (40–80°N), but negatively in mid-latitudes (25–40°N). This study demonstrates that plant physiology, rather than phenology, plays a dominant role in annual GPP variability, indicating more attention should be paid to physiological change under futher climate change. PMID:28145496

  11. From Tusko to Titin: the role for comparative physiology in an era of molecular discovery.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, S L; Nishikawa, K C

    2015-06-15

    As we approach the centenary of the term "comparative physiology," we reexamine its role in modern biology. Finding inspiration in Krogh's classic 1929 paper, we first look back to some timeless contributions to the field. The obvious and fascinating variation among animals is much more evident than is their shared physiological unity, which transcends both body size and specific adaptations. The "unity in diversity" reveals general patterns and principles of physiology that are invisible when examining only one species. Next, we examine selected contemporary contributions to comparative physiology, which provides the context in which reductionist experiments are best interpreted. We discuss the sometimes surprising insights provided by two comparative "athletes" (pronghorn and rattlesnakes), which demonstrate 1) animals are not isolated molecular mechanisms but highly integrated physiological machines, a single "rate-limiting" step may be exceptional; and 2) extremes in nature are rarely the result of novel mechanisms, but rather employ existing solutions in novel ways. Furthermore, rattlesnake tailshaker muscle effectively abolished the conventional view of incompatibility of simultaneous sustained anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative ATP production. We end this review by looking forward, much as Krogh did, to suggest that a comparative approach may best lend insights in unraveling how skeletal muscle stores and recovers mechanical energy when operating cyclically. We discuss and speculate on the role of the largest known protein, titin (the third muscle filament), as a dynamic spring capable of storing and recovering elastic recoil potential energy in skeletal muscle.

  12. The role of vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary prevention. A position paper from the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripheral circulation: Endorsed by the Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology (ARTERY) Society.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Aboyans, Victor; Brodmann, Marianne; Cífková, Renata; Cosentino, Francesco; De Carlo, Marco; Gallino, Augusto; Landmesser, Ulf; Laurent, Stéphane; Lekakis, John; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Naka, Katerina K; Protogerou, Athanasios D; Rizzoni, Damiano; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Van Bortel, Luc; Weber, Thomas; Yamashina, Akira; Zimlichman, Reuven; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Cockcroft, John; O'Rourke, Michael; Park, Jeong Bae; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Sillesen, Henrik; Townsend, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    While risk scores are invaluable tools for adapted preventive strategies, a significant gap exists between predicted and actual event rates. Additional tools to further stratify the risk of patients at an individual level are biomarkers. A surrogate endpoint is a biomarker that is intended as a substitute for a clinical endpoint. In order to be considered as a surrogate endpoint of cardiovascular events, a biomarker should satisfy several criteria, such as proof of concept, prospective validation, incremental value, clinical utility, clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, ease of use, methodological consensus, and reference values. We scrutinized the role of peripheral (i.e. not related to coronary circulation) noninvasive vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary cardiovascular disease prevention. Most of the biomarkers examined fit within the concept of early vascular aging. Biomarkers that fulfill most of the criteria and, therefore, are close to being considered a clinical surrogate endpoint are carotid ultrasonography, ankle-brachial index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity; biomarkers that fulfill some, but not all of the criteria are brachial ankle pulse wave velocity, central haemodynamics/wave reflections and C-reactive protein; biomarkers that do no not at present fulfill essential criteria are flow-mediated dilation, endothelial peripheral arterial tonometry, oxidized LDL and dysfunctional HDL. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether a specific vascular biomarker is overly superior. A prospective study in which all vascular biomarkers are measured is still lacking. In selected cases, the combined assessment of more than one biomarker may be required. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. NADPH–Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase: Roles in Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xinxin; Wolf, C. Roland; Porter, Todd D.; Pandey, Amit V.; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Finn, Robert D.; Ronseaux, Sebastien; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zou, Ling; Flück, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and held at the Experimental Biology 2012 meeting in San Diego, California, on April 25, 2012. The symposium speakers summarized and critically evaluated our current understanding of the physiologic, pharmacological, and toxicological roles of NADPH–cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR), a flavoprotein involved in electron transfer to microsomal cytochromes P450 (P450), cytochrome b5, squalene mono-oxygenase, and heme oxygenase. Considerable insight has been derived from the development and characterization of mouse models with conditional Por deletion in particular tissues or partial suppression of POR expression in all tissues. Additional mouse models with global or conditional hepatic deletion of cytochrome b5 are helping to clarify the P450 isoform- and substrate-specific influences of cytochrome b5 on P450 electron transfer and catalytic function. This symposium also considered studies using siRNA to suppress POR expression in a hepatoma cell–culture model to explore the basis of the hepatic lipidosis phenotype observed in mice with conditional deletion of Por in liver. The symposium concluded with a strong translational perspective, relating the basic science of human POR structure and function to the impacts of POR genetic variation on human drug and steroid metabolism. PMID:23086197

  14. The physiologic and therapeutic role of heparin in implantation and placentation

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Michela; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Koifman, Arie; Leron, Elad; Eshkoli, Tamar; Mazor, Moshe; Holcberg, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Implantation, trophoblast development and placentation are crucial processes in the establishment and development of normal pregnancy. Abnormalities of these processes can lead to pregnancy complications known as the great obstetrical syndromes: preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal demise, premature prelabor rupture of membranes, preterm labor, and recurrent pregnancy loss. There is mounting evidence regarding the physiological and therapeutic role of heparins in the establishment of normal gestation and as a modality for treatment and prevention of pregnancy complications. In this review, we will summarize the properties and the physiological contributions of heparins to the success of implantation, placentation and normal pregnancy. PMID:25653897

  15. Estimation of the physiological mechanical conditioning in vascular tissue engineering by a predictive fluid-structure interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Tresoldi, Claudia; Bianchi, Elena; Pellegata, Alessandro Filippo; Dubini, Gabriele; Mantero, Sara

    2017-08-01

    The in vitro replication of physiological mechanical conditioning through bioreactors plays a crucial role in the development of functional Small-Caliber Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels. An in silico scaffold-specific model under pulsatile perfusion provided by a bioreactor was implemented using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach for viscoelastic tubular scaffolds (e.g. decellularized swine arteries, DSA). Results of working pressures, circumferential deformations, and wall shear stress on DSA fell within the desired physiological range and indicated the ability of this model to correctly predict the mechanical conditioning acting on the cells-scaffold system. Consequently, the FSI model allowed us to a priori define the stimulation pattern, driving in vitro physiological maturation of scaffolds, especially with viscoelastic properties.

  16. Physiological and pathological roles of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor neuroserpin in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tsang, Vicky W. K.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    Although its roles in the vascular space are most well-known, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is widely expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, where its activity is believed to be regulated by neuroserpin, a predominantly brain-specific member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. In the normal physiological state, tPA has been shown to play roles in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. Ischemic damage, however, may lead to excess tPA activity in the brain and this is believed to contribute to neurodegeneration. In this article, we briefly review the physiological and pathological roles of tPA in the nervous system, which includes neuronal migration, axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, neuroprotection and neurodegeneration, as well as a contribution to neurological disease. We summarize tPA's multiple mechanisms of action and also highlight the contributions of the inhibitor neuroserpin to these processes. PMID:26528129

  17. Effect of noisy stimulation on neurobiological sensitization systems and its role for normal and pathological physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Martin; Braun, Hans; Krieg, J.\\:Urgen-Christian

    2004-03-01

    Sensitization is discussed as an important phenomenon playing a role in normal physiology but also with respect to the initiation and progression of a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsia, substance-related disorders or recurrent affective disorders. The relevance to understand the dynamics of sensitization phenomena is emphasized by recent findings that even single stimulations can induce longlasting changes in biological systems. To address specific questions associated with the sensitization dynamics, we use a computational approach and develop simple but physiologically-plausible models. In the present study we examine the effect of noisy stimulation on sensitization development in the model. We consider sub- and suprathresold stimulations with varying noise intensities and determine as response measures the (i) absolute number of stimulus-induced sensitzations and (ii) the temporal relsation of stimulus-sensitization coupling. The findings indicate that stochastic effects including stochastic resonance might well contribute to the physiology of sensitization mechanisms under both nomal and pathological conditions.

  18. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  19. Physiological Role of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in Food-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Monedero, Vicente; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are widespread signal transduction pathways mainly found in bacteria where they play a major role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions. TCSs generally consist of sensor histidine kinases that autophosphorylate in response to a specific stimulus and subsequently transfer the phosphate group to their cognate response regulators thus modulating their activity, usually as transcriptional regulators. In this review we present the current knowledge on the physiological role of TCSs in species of the families Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae of the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). LAB are microorganisms of great relevance for health and food production as the group spans from starter organisms to pathogens. Whereas the role of TCSs in pathogenic LAB (most of them belonging to the family Streptococcaceae) has focused the attention, the roles of TCSs in commensal LAB, such as most species of Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae, have been somewhat neglected. However, evidence available indicates that TCSs are key players in the regulation of the physiology of these bacteria. The first studies in food-associated LAB showed the involvement of some TCSs in quorum sensing and production of bacteriocins, but subsequent studies have shown that TCSs participate in other physiological processes, such as stress response, regulation of nitrogen metabolism, regulation of malate metabolism, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, among others. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The 2-Hydroxycarboxylate Transporter Family: Physiology, Structure, and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sobczak, Iwona; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2005-01-01

    The 2-hydroxycarboxylate transporter family is a family of secondary transporters found exclusively in the bacterial kingdom. They function in the metabolism of the di- and tricarboxylates malate and citrate, mostly in fermentative pathways involving decarboxylation of malate or oxaloacetate. These pathways are found in the class Bacillales of the low-CG gram-positive bacteria and in the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria. The pathways have evolved into a remarkable diversity in terms of the combinations of enzymes and transporters that built the pathways and of energy conservation mechanisms. The transporter family includes H+ and Na+ symporters and precursor/product exchangers. The proteins consist of a bundle of 11 transmembrane helices formed from two homologous domains containing five transmembrane segments each, plus one additional segment at the N terminus. The two domains have opposite orientations in the membrane and contain a pore-loop or reentrant loop structure between the fourth and fifth transmembrane segments. The two pore-loops enter the membrane from opposite sides and are believed to be part of the translocation site. The binding site is located asymmetrically in the membrane, close to the interface of membrane and cytoplasm. The binding site in the translocation pore is believed to be alternatively exposed to the internal and external media. The proposed structure of the 2HCT transporters is different from any known structure of a membrane protein and represents a new structural class of secondary transporters. PMID:16339740

  1. Causal Structure of Brain Physiology after Brain Injury from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Rahman, Shah Atiqur; Huang, Yuxiao; Frey, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, J. Michael; Albers, David; Falo, Cristina Maria; Park, Soojin; Agarwal, Sachin; Connolly, E. Sander; Kleinberg, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High frequency physiologic data are routinely generated for intensive care patients. While massive amounts of data make it difficult for clinicians to extract meaningful signals, these data could provide insight into the state of critically ill patients and guide interventions. We develop uniquely customized computational methods to uncover the causal structure within systemic and brain physiologic measures recorded in a neurological intensive care unit after subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the data have many missing values, poor signal-to-noise ratio, and are composed from a heterogeneous patient population, our advanced imputation and causal inference techniques enable physiologic models to be learned for individuals. Our analyses confirm that complex physiologic relationships including demand and supply of oxygen underlie brain oxygen measurements and that mechanisms for brain swelling early after injury may differ from those that develop in a delayed fashion. These inference methods will enable wider use of ICU data to understand patient physiology. PMID:27123582

  2. Causal Structure of Brain Physiology after Brain Injury from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jan; Rahman, Shah Atiqur; Huang, Yuxiao; Frey, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, J Michael; Albers, David; Falo, Cristina Maria; Park, Soojin; Agarwal, Sachin; Connolly, E Sander; Kleinberg, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High frequency physiologic data are routinely generated for intensive care patients. While massive amounts of data make it difficult for clinicians to extract meaningful signals, these data could provide insight into the state of critically ill patients and guide interventions. We develop uniquely customized computational methods to uncover the causal structure within systemic and brain physiologic measures recorded in a neurological intensive care unit after subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the data have many missing values, poor signal-to-noise ratio, and are composed from a heterogeneous patient population, our advanced imputation and causal inference techniques enable physiologic models to be learned for individuals. Our analyses confirm that complex physiologic relationships including demand and supply of oxygen underlie brain oxygen measurements and that mechanisms for brain swelling early after injury may differ from those that develop in a delayed fashion. These inference methods will enable wider use of ICU data to understand patient physiology.

  3. The apelinergic system: the role played in human physiology and pathology and potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Ladeiras-Lopes, Ricardo; Ferreira-Martins, João; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2008-05-01

    Apelin is a recently discovered peptide, identified as an endogenous ligand of receptor APJ. Apelin and receptor APJ are expressed in a wide variety of tissues including heart, brain, kidneys and lungs. Their interaction may have relevant pathophysiologic effects in those tissues. In fact, the last decade has been rich in illustrating the possible roles played by apelin in human physiology, namely as a regulating peptide of cardiovascular, hypothalamus-hypophysis, gastrointestinal, and immune systems. The possible involvement of apelin in the pathogenesis of high prevalence conditions and comorbidities - such as hypertension, heart failure, and Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 (T2DM) - rank it as a likely therapeutic target to be investigated in the future. The present paper is an overview of apelin physiologic effects and presents the possible role played by this peptide in the pathogenesis of a number of conditions as well as the therapeutic implications that might, therefore, be investigated.

  4. Distinct in vivo roles of caspase-8 in beta-cells in physiological and diabetes models.

    PubMed

    Liadis, Nicole; Salmena, Leonardo; Kwan, Edwin; Tajmir, Panteha; Schroer, Stephanie A; Radziszewska, Anna; Li, Xie; Sheu, Laura; Eweida, Mohamed; Xu, Shilong; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Hakem, Razqallah; Woo, Minna

    2007-09-01

    Inadequate pancreatic beta-cell mass resulting from excessive beta-cell apoptosis is a key defect in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Caspases are the major molecules involved in apoptosis; however, in vivo roles of specific caspases in diabetes are unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of Caspase (Casp)8 in beta-cells in vivo. Using the Cre-loxP system, mice lacking Casp8 in beta-cells (RIPcre(+)Casp8(fl/fl) mice) were generated to address the role of Casp8 in beta-cells in physiological and diabetes models. We show that islets isolated from RIPcre(+)Casp8(fl/fl) mice were protected from Fas ligand (FasL)-and ceramide-induced cell death. Furthermore, RIPcre(+)Casp8(fl/fl) mice were protected from in vivo models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In addition to being the central mediator of apoptosis in diabetes models, we show that Casp8 is critical for maintenance of beta-cell mass under physiological conditions. With aging, RIPcre(+)Casp8(fl/fl) mice gradually develop hyperglycemia and a concomitant decline in beta-cell mass. Their islets display decreased expression of molecules involved in insulin/IGF-I signaling and show decreased pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 and cAMP response element binding protein expression. At the level of individual islets, we observed increased insulin secretory capacity associated with increased expression of exocytotic proteins. Our results show distinct context-specific roles of Casp8 in physiological and disease states; Casp8 is essential for beta-cell apoptosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes models and in regulating beta-cell mass and insulin secretion under physiological conditions.

  5. Predicting the Physiological Role of Circadian Metabolic Regulation in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Voytsekh, Olga; Mittag, Maria; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Although the number of reconstructed metabolic networks is steadily growing, experimental data integration into these networks is still challenging. Based on elementary flux mode analysis, we combine sequence information with metabolic pathway analysis and include, as a novel aspect, circadian regulation. While minimizing the need of assumptions, we are able to predict changes in the metabolic state and can hypothesise on the physiological role of circadian control in nitrogen metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. PMID:21887226

  6. A role for maternal physiological state in preserving auditory cortical plasticity for salient infant calls

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank G.; Galindo-Leon, Edgar E.; Ivanova, Tamara N.; Mappus, Rudolph C.; Liu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing interest in sensory system plasticity in the natural context of motherhood has created the need to investigate how intrinsic physiological state (e.g., hormonal, motivational, etc.) interacts with sensory experience to drive adaptive cortical plasticity for behaviorally relevant stimuli. Using a maternal mouse model of auditory cortical inhibitory plasticity for ultrasonic pup calls, we examined the role of pup care versus maternal physiological state in the long-term retention of this plasticity. Very recent experience caring for pups by Early Cocarers, which are virgins, produced stronger call-evoked lateral-band inhibition in auditory cortex. However, this plasticity was absent when measured post-weaning in Cocarers, even though it was present at the same time point in Mothers, whose pup experience occurred under a maternal physiological state. A two-alternative choice phonotaxis task revealed that the same animal groups (Early Cocarers and Mothers) demonstrating stronger lateral-band inhibition also preferred pup calls over a neutral sound, a correlation consistent with the hypothesis that this inhibitory mechanism may play a mnemonic role and is engaged to process sounds that are particularly salient. Our electrophysiological data hints at a possible mechanism through which the maternal physiological state may act to preserve the cortical plasticity: selectively suppressing detrimental spontaneous activity in neurons that are responsive to calls, an effect observed only in Mothers. Taken together, the maternal physiological state during the care of pups may help maintain the memory trace of behaviorally salient infant cues within core auditory cortex, potentially ensuring a more rapid induction of future maternal behavior. PMID:23707982

  7. Physiological adaptations to interval training and the role of exercise intensity.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, Martin J; Gibala, Martin J

    2017-05-01

    Interval exercise typically involves repeated bouts of relatively intense exercise interspersed by short periods of recovery. A common classification scheme subdivides this method into high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 'near maximal' efforts) and sprint interval training (SIT; 'supramaximal' efforts). Both forms of interval training induce the classic physiological adaptations characteristic of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) such as increased aerobic capacity (V̇O2 max ) and mitochondrial content. This brief review considers the role of exercise intensity in mediating physiological adaptations to training, with a focus on the capacity for aerobic energy metabolism. With respect to skeletal muscle adaptations, cellular stress and the resultant metabolic signals for mitochondrial biogenesis depend largely on exercise intensity, with limited work suggesting that increases in mitochondrial content are superior after HIIT compared to MICT, at least when matched-work comparisons are made within the same individual. It is well established that SIT increases mitochondrial content to a similar extent to MICT despite a reduced exercise volume. At the whole-body level, V̇O2 max is generally increased more by HIIT than MICT for a given training volume, whereas SIT and MICT similarly improve V̇O2 max despite differences in training volume. There is less evidence available regarding the role of exercise intensity in mediating changes in skeletal muscle capillary density, maximum stroke volume and cardiac output, and blood volume. Furthermore, the interactions between intensity and duration and frequency have not been thoroughly explored. While interval training is clearly a potent stimulus for physiological remodelling in humans, the integrative response to this type of exercise warrants further attention, especially in comparison to traditional endurance training. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  8. Role of APP Interactions with Heterotrimeric G Proteins: Physiological Functions and Pathological Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Copenhaver, Philip F.; Kögel, Donat

    2017-01-01

    Following the discovery that the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the source of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) that accumulate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), structural analyses suggested that the holoprotein resembles a transmembrane receptor. Initial studies using reconstituted membranes demonstrated that APP can directly interact with the heterotrimeric G protein Gαo (but not other G proteins) via an evolutionarily G protein-binding motif in its cytoplasmic domain. Subsequent investigations in cell culture showed that antibodies against the extracellular domain of APP could stimulate Gαo activity, presumably mimicking endogenous APP ligands. In addition, chronically activating wild type APP or overexpressing mutant APP isoforms linked with familial AD could provoke Go-dependent neurotoxic responses, while biochemical assays using human brain samples suggested that the endogenous APP-Go interactions are perturbed in AD patients. More recently, several G protein-dependent pathways have been implicated in the physiological roles of APP, coupled with evidence that APP interacts both physically and functionally with Gαo in a variety of contexts. Work in insect models has demonstrated that the APP ortholog APPL directly interacts with Gαo in motile neurons, whereby APPL-Gαo signaling regulates the response of migratory neurons to ligands encountered in the developing nervous system. Concurrent studies using cultured mammalian neurons and organotypic hippocampal slice preparations have shown that APP signaling transduces the neuroprotective effects of soluble sAPPα fragments via modulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, providing a mechanism for integrating the stress and survival responses regulated by APP. Notably, this effect was also inhibited by pertussis toxin, indicating an essential role for Gαo/i proteins. Unexpectedly, C-terminal fragments (CTFs) derived from APP have also been found to interact with Gαs, whereby CTF-Gαs signaling can promote neurite

  9. Role of APP Interactions with Heterotrimeric G Proteins: Physiological Functions and Pathological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Philip F; Kögel, Donat

    2017-01-01

    Following the discovery that the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the source of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD), structural analyses suggested that the holoprotein resembles a transmembrane receptor. Initial studies using reconstituted membranes demonstrated that APP can directly interact with the heterotrimeric G protein Gαo (but not other G proteins) via an evolutionarily G protein-binding motif in its cytoplasmic domain. Subsequent investigations in cell culture showed that antibodies against the extracellular domain of APP could stimulate Gαo activity, presumably mimicking endogenous APP ligands. In addition, chronically activating wild type APP or overexpressing mutant APP isoforms linked with familial AD could provoke Go-dependent neurotoxic responses, while biochemical assays using human brain samples suggested that the endogenous APP-Go interactions are perturbed in AD patients. More recently, several G protein-dependent pathways have been implicated in the physiological roles of APP, coupled with evidence that APP interacts both physically and functionally with Gαo in a variety of contexts. Work in insect models has demonstrated that the APP ortholog APPL directly interacts with Gαo in motile neurons, whereby APPL-Gαo signaling regulates the response of migratory neurons to ligands encountered in the developing nervous system. Concurrent studies using cultured mammalian neurons and organotypic hippocampal slice preparations have shown that APP signaling transduces the neuroprotective effects of soluble sAPPα fragments via modulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, providing a mechanism for integrating the stress and survival responses regulated by APP. Notably, this effect was also inhibited by pertussis toxin, indicating an essential role for Gαo/i proteins. Unexpectedly, C-terminal fragments (CTFs) derived from APP have also been found to interact with Gαs, whereby CTF-Gαs signaling can promote neurite outgrowth

  10. Perceptual and physiological evidence for a role for early visual areas in motion-induced blindness

    PubMed Central

    Libedinsky, Camilo; Savage, Tristram; Livingstone, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Visual disappearance illusions, such as motion-induced blindness, are commonly used to study the neural correlates of visual perception. In such illusions a salient visual target becomes perceptually invisible. Previous studies are inconsistent regarding the role of early visual areas in these illusions. Here we provide physiological and psychophysical evidence suggesting a role for early visual areas in generating motion-induced blindness, and we provide a conceptual model by which different brain areas might contribute to the perceptual disappearance in this illusion. PMID:19271884

  11. Structure and physiological functions of the human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Zieleniak, Andrzej; Wójcik, Marzena; Woźniak, Lucyna A

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. To date, three different PPAR isotypes, namely PPAR-alpha, -delta, and -gamma, have been identified in vertebrates and have distinct patterns of tissue distribution. Like all nuclear receptors, the human PPAR-gamma (hPPAR-gamma) is characterized by a modular structure composed of an N-terminal A/B domain, a DNA-binding domain with two zinc fingers (C domain), a D domain, and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain (E/F domain). Human PPAR-gamma exists in two protein isoforms, hPPAR-gamma(1) and -gamma(2), with different lengths of the N-terminal. The hPPAR-gamma(2) isoform is predominantly expressed in adipose tissue, whereas hPPAR-gamma(1) is relatively widely expressed. Human PPAR-gamma plays a critical physiological role as a central transcriptional regulator of both adipogenic and lipogenic programs. Its transcriptional activity is induced by the binding of endogenous and synthetic lipophilic ligands, which has led to the determination of many roles for PPAR-gamma in pathological states such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer. Of the synthetic ligands, the thiazolidinedione class of insulin-sensitizing drugs (ciglitazone, pioglitazone, troglitazone, rosiglitazone) is employed clinically in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  12. Bridging Between Proline Structure, Functions, Metabolism, and Involvement in Organism Physiology.

    PubMed

    Saibi, Walid; Feki, Kaouthar; Yacoubi, Ines; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-08-01

    Much is now known about proline multifunctionality and metabolism; some aspects of its biological functions are still unclear. Here, we discuss some cases in the proline, structure, definition, metabolism, compartmentalization, accumulation, plausible functions and also its implication in homeostasis and organism physiology. Indeed, we report the role of proline in cellular homeostasis, including redox balance and energy status and their implication as biocatalyst for aldolase activity. Proline can act as a signaling molecule to modulate mitochondrial functions, influence cell proliferation or cell death, and trigger specific gene expression, which can be essential for plant recovery from stresses. Although, the regulation and the function of proline accumulation, during abiotic stresses, are not yet completely understood. The engineering of proline metabolism could lead to new opportunities to improve plant tolerance against environmental stresses. This atypical amino acid has a potential role in the toxicity during growth of some microorganism, vegetal, and mammalian species. Furthermore, we note that the purpose through the work is to provide a rich, concise, and mostly cohesive source on proline, considered as a platform and an anchor between several disciplines and biological functions.

  13. Bone structure, metabolism, and physiology: its impact on dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Marx, R E; Garg, A K

    1998-01-01

    When placing implants in the mandible or maxilla, it is important for clinicians to understand the process of bone remodeling, the different types of bone, and how these factors can affect the integration of osseous dental implants. Approximately 0.7% of a human skeleton is resorbed daily and replaced by new healthy bone. With aging and metabolic disease states, the normal turnover process may be reduced, resulting in an increase in the mean age of the present bone. This increase can affect the placement and integration of implants. Herein follows a discussion of different types of bone cells, the metabolism of bone, the microscopic, macroscopic, and molecular structure of bone, and the process of bone modeling and remodeling.

  14. Physiological regulation of stress in referred adolescents: the role of the parent-adolescent relationship.

    PubMed

    Willemen, Agnes M; Schuengel, Carlo; Koot, Hans M

    2009-04-01

    Psychopathology in youth appears to be linked to deficits in regulating affective responses to stressful situations. In children, high-quality parental support facilitates affect regulation. However, in adolescence, the role of parent-child interaction in the regulation of affect is unclear. This study examined physiological reactivity to and recovery from stress in adolescents at risk for psychopathology, and their associations with internalising and externalising problems and parent-adolescent interactions. A total of 99 adolescents (M = 13.57 years, SD = 1.83) with a history of mental health problems underwent the Alarm Stress Task and were reunited with their primary caregiver after the stressor, while the physiological responses of the parasympathetic (respiratory sinus arrhythmia) and sympathetic (pre-ejection period) systems were measured. The quality of parent-adolescent interaction was determined from observations of secure-base seeking and providing during the task. Affect regulation was measured as physiological reactivity and recovery after the stressor. Adolescents with high levels of externalising problems and low levels of secure-base support showed weaker parasympathetic reactivity and recovery. Higher level of adolescent secure-base seeking was associated with stronger sympathetic reactivity and recovery. Secure-base interactions between parents and adolescents facilitate physiological regulation of stress, especially for adolescents with externalising symptomatology.

  15. Physiological and subjective effects of traffic noise: the role of negative self-statements.

    PubMed

    Vera, M N; Vila, J; Godoy, J F

    1992-05-01

    This study assesses physiological and subjective effects of traffic noise and the mediator role that negative self-statements play. 84 female students underwent a Physiological Reaction Test to two 15 min presentations of high intensity traffic noise (85-95 dB) under two Noise conditions--with and without negative self-statements. Half of the subjects were given specific instructions to increase the credibility of the self-statements. Dependent variables were frontal EMG, electrodermal variables (conductance level and number of responses) and subjective tension. Traffic noise provoked subjective tension and physiological responses. Only the number of electrodermal responses habituated between noise presentations, the rest of the physiological variables did not habituate. Negative self-statements had the greatest effect on frontal EMG. In fact, only the noise with negative self-statements condition produced a significant EMG increase in the first part of the Test. Instructions increased subjective tension and also increased the effect of the self-statements on the electrodermal variables. The implications of these results for psychosomatic problems and the importance of negative self-statements are discussed.

  16. The role of a scientific society in physiology education: current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Matyas, M L

    1998-12-01

    As a professional society of physiologists involved in research and teaching, the American Physiological Society (APS) is "...devoted to fostering education, scientific research, and the dissemination of information in the physiological sciences." Established long-range goals for education guide the development of current and future programs at all education levels. K-12 outreach programs develop working relationships between physiologists and K-12 teachers within local communities and improve the quality of precollege science education. At the undergraduate level, APS programs foster excellence in physiology education and promote student interest in physiology careers. At the graduate level, activities promote excellence in graduate training and the professional development of students, including a focus on underrepresented groups. At each of these levels, the Society includes activities for the continuing education of its members. Looking to the future, the Society plans to expand the programs and resources offered to researchers and educators at all levels. On-line programs, resources, and communications have been initiated and will play an even more important role in the future.

  17. Physiological characterization of an Escherichia coli mutant altered in the structure of murein lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yem, D W; Wu, H C

    1978-01-01

    Studies using isogenic transductant strains mlpA+ and mlpA as well as reversion analysis suggested that the physiological consequences of a structural gene mutation in murein lipoprotein include (i) increased sensitivity toward chelating agents ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ethyleneglycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N-tetraacetic acid, (ii) leakage of periplasmic enzyme ribonuclease, (iii) weakened association between the outer membrane and the rigid layer accentuated by Mg2+ starvation, resulting in the formation of outer membrane blebs, and (iv) decreased growth rate in media of low ionic strength or low osmolarity. It is suggested that the bound form of lipoprotein plays an important role in the maintenance of the structural integrity of the outer membrane of the Escherichia coli cell envelope. Other outer membrane components may also contribute to the anchorage of outer membrane to the rigid layer, probably through ionic interactions with divalent cations. Using the phenotype of ribonuclease leakage as an unselected marker in a three-factor cross with P1 transduction, we were able to establish the gene order of man mlpA aroD pps on the E. coli chromosome. Images PMID:417067

  18. NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Purification, kinetic properties, and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, A; Avendano, A; Riego, L; Gonzalez, A

    2001-11-23

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDHs) encoded by GDH1 and GDH3 catalyze the synthesis of glutamate from ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. The GDH2-encoded NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase degrades glutamate producing ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. Until very recently, it was considered that only one biosynthetic NADP-GDH was present in S. cerevisiae. This fact hindered understanding the physiological role of each isoenzyme and the mechanisms involved in alpha-ketoglutarate channeling for glutamate biosynthesis. In this study, we purified and characterized the GDH1- and GDH3-encoded NADP-GDHs; they showed different allosteric properties and rates of alpha-ketoglutarate utilization. Analysis of the relative levels of these proteins revealed that the expression of GDH1 and GDH3 is differentially regulated and depends on the nature of the carbon source. Moreover, the physiological study of mutants lacking or overexpressing GDH1 or GDH3 suggested that these genes play nonredundant physiological roles. Our results indicate that the coordinated regulation of GDH1-, GDH3-, and GDH2-encoded enzymes results in glutamate biosynthesis and balanced utilization of alpha-ketoglutarate under fermentative and respiratory conditions. The possible relevance of the duplicated NADP-GDH pathway in the adaptation to facultative metabolism is discussed.

  19. Evidence for a physiological role of intracellularly occurring photolabile nitrogen oxides in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Opländer, Christian; Wetzel, Wiebke; Cortese, Miriam M; Pallua, Norbert; Suschek, Christoph V

    2008-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in human skin biology. Cutaneous NO can be produced enzymatically by NO synthases (NOS) as well as enzyme independently via photodecomposition of photolabile nitrogen oxides (PNOs) such as nitrite or nitroso compounds, both found in human skin tissue in comparably high concentrations. Although the physiological role of NOS-produced NO in human skin is well defined, nothing is known about the biological relevance or the chemical origin of intracellularly occurring PNOs. We here, for the first time, give evidence that in human skin fibroblasts (FB) PNOs represent the oxidation products of NOS-produced NO and that in human skin fibroblasts intracellularly occurring PNOs effectively protect against the injurious effects of UVA radiation by a NO-dependent mechanism. In contrast, in PNO-depleted FB cultures an increased susceptibility to UVA-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death is observed, whereas supplementation of PNO-depleted FB cultures with physiological nitrite concentrations (10 microM) or with exogenously applied NO completely restores UVA-increased injuries. Thus, intracellular PNOs are biologically relevant and represent an important initial shield functioning in human skin physiology against UVA radiation. Consequently, nonphysiological low PNO concentrations might promote known UVA-related skin injuries such as premature aging and carcinogenesis.

  20. The physiological role of cardiac cytoskeleton and its alterations in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Vasco; Nijenkamp, Louise L A M; Regan, Jessica A; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2014-02-01

    Cardiac muscle cells are equipped with specialized biochemical machineries for the rapid generation of force and movement central to the work generated by the heart. During each heart beat cardiac muscle cells perceive and experience changes in length and load, which reflect one of the fundamental principles of physiology known as the Frank-Starling law of the heart. Cardiac muscle cells are unique mechanical stretch sensors that allow the heart to increase cardiac output, and adjust it to new physiological and pathological situations. In the present review we discuss the mechano-sensory role of the cytoskeletal proteins with respect to their tight interaction with the sarcolemma and extracellular matrix. The role of contractile thick and thin filament proteins, the elastic protein titin, and their anchorage at the Z-disc and M-band, with associated proteins are reviewed in physiologic and pathologic conditions leading to heart failure. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé

  1. Novel and potential physiological roles of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-07-15

    The vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA) is a multi-subunit enzyme that uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to transport H(+) across biological membranes. VHA plays a universal role in essential cellular functions, such as the acidification of lysosomes and endosomes. In addition, the VHA-generated H(+)-motive force can drive the transport of diverse molecules across cell membranes and epithelia for specialized physiological functions. Here, I discuss diverse physiological functions of VHA in marine animals, focusing on recent discoveries about base secretion in shark gills, potential bone dissolution by Osedax bone-eating worms and its participation in a carbon-concentrating mechanism that promotes coral photosynthesis. Because VHA is evolutionarily conserved among eukaryotes, it is likely to play many other essential physiological roles in diverse marine organisms. Elucidating and characterizing basic VHA-dependent mechanisms could help to determine species responses to environmental stress, including (but not limited to) that resulting from climate change. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. The integrative role of the sigh in psychology, physiology, pathology, and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2014-01-01

    "Sighs, tears, grief, distress" expresses Johann Sebastian Bach in a musical example for the relationship between sighs and deep emotions. This review explores the neurobiological basis of the sigh and its relationship with psychology, physiology, and pathology. Sighs monitor changes in brain states, induce arousal, and reset breathing variability. These behavioral roles homeostatically regulate breathing stability under physiological and pathological conditions. Sighs evoked in hypoxia evoke arousal and thereby become critical for survival. Hypoarousal and failure to sigh have been associated with sudden infant death syndrome. Increased breathing irregularity may provoke excessive sighing and hyperarousal, a behavioral sequence that may play a role in panic disorders. Essential for generating sighs and breathing is the pre-Bötzinger complex. Modulatory and synaptic interactions within this local network and between networks located in the brainstem, cerebellum, cortex, hypothalamus, amygdala, and the periaqueductal gray may govern the relationships between physiology, psychology, and pathology. Unraveling these circuits will lead to a better understanding of how we balance emotions and how emotions become pathological. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Integrative Role of the Sigh in Psychology, Physiology, Pathology, and Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2015-01-01

    “Sighs, tears, grief, distress” expresses Johann Sebastian Bach in a musical example for the relationship between sighs and deep emotions. This review explores the neurobiological basis of the sigh and its relationship with psychology, physiology, and pathology. Sighs monitor changes in brain states, induce arousal, and reset breathing variability. These behavioral roles homeostatically regulate breathing stability under physiological and pathological conditions. Sighs evoked in hypoxia evoke arousal and thereby become critical for survival. Hypoarousal and failure to sigh have been associated with sudden infant death syndrome. Increased breathing irregularity may provoke excessive sighing and hyperarousal, a behavioral sequence that may play a role in panic disorders. Essential for generating sighs and breathing is the pre-Bötzinger complex. Modulatory and synaptic interactions within this local network and between networks located in the brainstem, cerebellum, cortex, hypothalamus, amygdala, and the periaqueductal gray may govern the relationships between physiology, psychology, and pathology. Unraveling these circuits will lead to a better understanding of how we balance emotions and how emotions become pathological. PMID:24746045

  4. Senescence Marker Protein 30: Functional and Structural Insights to its Unknown Physiological Function

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stephanie H.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30) is a multifunctional protein involved in cellular Ca2+ homeostasis and the biosynthesis of ascorbate in non-primate mammals. The primary structure of the protein is highly conserved among vertebrates, suggesting the existence of a significant physiological function common to all mammals, including primates. Enzymatic activities of SMP30 include aldonolactone and organophosphate hydrolysis. Protective effects against apoptosis and oxidative stress have been reported. X-ray crystallography revealed that SMP30 is a six-bladed β-propeller with structural similarity to paraoxonase 1, another protein with lactonase and organophosphate hydrolase activities. SMP30 has recently been tied to several physiological conditions including osteoporosis, liver fibrosis, diabetes, and cancer. This review aims to describe the recent advances made toward understanding the connection between molecular structure, enzymatic activity and physiological function of this highly conserved, multifaceted protein. PMID:22844387

  5. Estradiol protective role in atherogenesis through LDL structure modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Brunelli, Roberto; Ciasca, Gabriele; Maiorana, Alessandro; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Valentina; Parasassi, Tiziana; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Relevant physiological functions are exerted by circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as eventual pathological processes triggering atherogenesis. Modulation of these functions can well be founded on modifications of LDL structure. Given its large dimension, multicomponent organization and strong interactions between the protein apoB-100 and lipids, determining LDL 3D structure remains a challenge. We propose a novel quantitative physical approach to this complex biological problem. We introduce a three-component model, fitted to small angle x-ray scattering data on LDL maintained in physiological conditions, able to achieve a consistent 3D structure. Unexpected features include three distinct protein domains protruding out of a sphere, quite rough in its surface, where several core lipid areas are exposed. All LDL components are affected by 17-β-estradiol (E2) binding to apoB-100. Mostly one of the three protruding protein domains, dramatically reducing its presence on the surface and with a consequent increase of core lipids’ exposure. This result suggests a structural basis for some E2 protecting roles and LDL physiological modifications.

  6. Role of Regulators of G Protein Signaling Proteins in Bone Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jules, Joel; Yang, Shuying; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins enhance the intrinsic GTPase activity of α subunits of the heterotrimeric G protein complex of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and thereby inactivate signal transduction initiated by GPCRs. The RGS family consists of nearly 37 members with a conserved RGS homology domain which is critical for their GTPase accelerating activity. RGS proteins are expressed in most tissues, including heart, lung, brain, kidney, and bone and play essential roles in many physiological and pathological processes. In skeletal development and bone homeostasis as well as in many bone disorders, RGS proteins control the functions of various GPCRs, including the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 and calcium-sensing receptor and also regulate various critical signaling pathways, such as Wnt and calcium oscillations. This chapter will discuss the current findings on the roles of RGS proteins in regulating signaling of key GPCRs in skeletal development and bone homeostasis. We also will examine the current updates of RGS proteins’ regulation of calcium oscillations in bone physiology and highlight the roles of RGS proteins in selected bone pathological disorders. Despite the recent advances in bone and mineral research, RGS proteins remain understudied in the skeletal system. Further understanding of the roles of RGS proteins in bone should not only provide great insights into the molecular basis of various bone diseases but also generate great therapeutic drug targets for many bone diseases. PMID:26123302

  7. Influence of phosphorus availability on the community structure and physiology of cultured biofilms.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Chun; Qin, Hongjie; Li, Yinxia; Zheng, Jiaoli; Peng, Chengrong; Li, Dunhai

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms have important effects on nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems. However, publications about the community structure and functions under laboratory conditions are rare. This study focused on the developmental and physiological properties of cultured biofilms under various phosphorus concentrations performed in a closely controlled continuous flow incubator. The results showed that the biomass (Chl a) and photosynthesis of algae were inhibited under P-limitation conditions, while the phosphatase activity and P assimilation rate were promoted. The algal community structure of biofilms was more likely related to the colonization stage than with the phosphorus availability. Cyanobacteria were more competitive than other algae in biofilms, particularly when cultured under low P levels. A dominance shift occurred from non-filamentous algae in the early stage to filamentous algae in the mid and late stages under P concentrations of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.6 mg/L. However, the total N content, dry weight biomass and bacterial community structure of biofilms were unaffected by phosphorus availability. This may be attributed to the low respiration rate, high accumulation of extracellular polymeric substances and high alkaline phosphatase activity in biofilms when phosphorus availability was low. The bacterial community structure differed over time, while there was little difference between the four treatments, which indicated that it was mainly affected by the colonization stage of the biofilms rather than the phosphorus availability. Altogether, these results suggested that the development of biofilms was influenced by the phosphorus availability and/or the colonization stage and hence determined the role that biofilms play in the overlying water.

  8. Heterogeneity in vascular smooth muscle cell embryonic origin in relation to adult structure, physiology, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Bader, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in vascular physiology and disease response exist throughout the vascular tree. While these differences in physiology and disease correspond to regional vascular environmental conditions, there is also compelling evidence that the embryonic origins of the smooth muscle inherent to the vessels may play a role. Here we review what is known regarding the role of embryonic origin of vascular smooth muscle cells during vascular development. The focus of this review is to highlight the heterogeneity in the origins of vascular smooth muscle cells and the resulting regional physiologies of the vessels. Our goal is to stimulate future investigation into this area and provide a better understanding of vascular organogenesis and disease. PMID:25546231

  9. Physiological roles of autophagy in plants: does plant autophagy have a pro-death function?

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kohki

    2010-05-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular process for vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components. Early morphological studies suggested that autophagy occurs in plant cells and predicted that autophagy has a variety of functions in plant growth and development. However, it is only since the identification of autophagy genes that the physiological roles of autophagy in plants have become apparent. Recent reverse genetic studies indicate that autophagy defects in higher plants result in early senescence and excessive immunity-related programmed cell death (PCD), irrespective of nutrient conditions, suggesting that plant autophagy has an important pro-survival function during these types of cell death. Further biochemical and pharmacological studies in combination with double mutant analyses revealed that excessive salicylic acid (SA) signaling is a major factor in autophagy-defective plant-dependent cell death and that the SA signal can induce autophagy. These results demonstrate a novel physiological function for plant autophagy that operates a negative feedback loop to modulate SA signaling.

  10. Role of the liver X receptors in skin physiology: Putative pharmacological targets in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Zangbéwendé Guy; Fouache, Allan; Trousson, Amalia; Baron, Silvère; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A

    2017-03-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily that have been shown to regulate various physiological functions such as lipid metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis. Concordant reports have elicited the possibility to target them to cure many human diseases including arteriosclerosis, cancer, arthritis, and diabetes. The high relevance of modulating LXR activities to treat numerous skin diseases, mainly those with exacerbated inflammation processes, contrasts with the lack of approved therapeutic use. This review makes an assessment to sum up the findings regarding the physiological roles of LXRs in skin and help progress towards the therapeutic and safe management of their activities. It focuses on the possible pharmacological targeting of LXRs to cure or prevent selected skin diseases.

  11. The role of plant physiology in hydrology: looking backwards and forwards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.

    2007-01-01

    conservative? An important contribution both to the similar and low transpiration is the likely reduction of stomatal conductance of the foliage associated with increasing air humidity deficit. A greater response is usually found when initial conductances are highest. Also contributing to similarities in transpiration from forest stands would be a compensatory role of understories and that deficits in soil moisture may not come into play until severe soil water deficits occur. Physiological studies have been conducted in many locations overseas. The modest transpiration of tropical rainforest is intriguing - Why is tropical rainforest transpiration so low? In common with temperate trees the reduction of stomatal conductance of tropical trees in association with increasing air humidity deficit will limit transpiration. In addition the high leaf area index of tropical rainforest creates conditions in the lower canopy layers that mean transpiration from those layers is much reduced from what might be possible. As well as being used to quantify and understand transpiration, physiological techniques might be used to assess when plants require water. What is the first signal that plants need water? Studies on sugar cane in Mauritius indicated that leaf growth was the most sensitive measure. A look forward to the future suggests that there will be a continued need for physiological measurements particularly where other techniques more suited to extensive vegetation are not appropriate. There are many unresolved issues about water use from fragmented, heterogeneous vegetation and physiological approaches are best suited to these. The measurement of sap flow in individual stems will be an important methodology in the future but there are still methodological issues to resolve.

  12. Crystal Structure of Human Senescence Marker Protein 30; Insights Linking Structural, Enzymatic and Physiological Functions †,‡

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborti, Subhendu; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Human senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30), which functions enzymatically as a lactonase, hydrolyzes various carbohydrate lactones. The penultimate step in vitamin-C biosynthesis is catalyzed by this enzyme in non-primate mammals. It has also been implicated as an organophosphate hydrolase, with the ability to hydrolyze diisopropyl phosphofluoridate and other nerve agents. SMP30 was originally identified as an aging marker protein, whose expression decreased androgen independently in aging cells. SMP30 is also referred to as regucalcin and has been suggested to have functions in calcium homeostasis. The crystal structure of the human enzyme has been solved from X-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.4 Å. The protein has a 6-bladed β-propeller fold and it contains a single metal ion. Crystal structures have been solved with the metal site bound with either a Ca2+ or a Zn2+ atom. The catalytic role of the metal ion has been confirmed by mutagenesis of the metal coordinating residues. Kinetic studies using the substrate gluconolactone showed a kcat preference of divalent cations in the order Zn2+ > Mn2+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+. Notably, the Ca2+ had a significantly higher value of Kd compared to the other metal ions tested (566, 82, 7 and 0.6 µm for Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+, respectively), suggesting the Ca2+-bound form may be physiologically relevant for stressed cells with an elevated free calcium level. PMID:20329768

  13. Monomeric Alpha-Synuclein Exerts a Physiological Role on Brain ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Angelova, Plamena R.; Ninkina, Natalia N.; Gandhi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded α-synuclein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, knowledge about a physiological role for the native, unfolded α-synuclein is limited. Using brains of mice lacking α-, β-, and γ-synuclein, we report that extracellular monomeric α-synuclein enters neurons and localizes to mitochondria, interacts with ATP synthase subunit α, and modulates ATP synthase function. Using a combination of biochemical, live-cell imaging and mitochondrial respiration analysis, we found that brain mitochondria of α-, β-, and γ-synuclein knock-out mice are uncoupled, as characterized by increased mitochondrial respiration and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, synuclein deficiency results in reduced ATP synthase efficiency and lower ATP levels. Exogenous application of low unfolded α-synuclein concentrations is able to increase the ATP synthase activity that rescues the mitochondrial phenotypes observed in synuclein deficiency. Overall, the data suggest that α-synuclein is a previously unrecognized physiological regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetics through its ability to interact with ATP synthase and increase its efficiency. This may be of particular importance in times of stress or PD mutations leading to energy depletion and neuronal cell toxicity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Misfolded α-synuclein aggregations in the form of Lewy bodies have been shown to be a pathological hallmark in histological staining of Parkinson's disease (PD) patient brains. It is known that misfolded α-synuclein is a key driver in PD pathogenesis, but the physiological role of unfolded monomeric α-synuclein remains unclear. Using neuronal cocultures and isolated brain mitochondria of α-, β-, and γ-synuclein knock-out mice and monomeric α-synuclein, this current study shows that α-synuclein in its unfolded monomeric form improves ATP synthase efficiency and mitochondrial function. The ability of monomeric α-synuclein to enhance

  14. Differential Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 in Physiological Versus Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Traynham, Christopher J; Cannavo, Alessandro; Zhou, Yan; Vouga, Alexandre G; Woodall, Benjamin P; Hullmann, Jonathan; Ibetti, Jessica; Gold, Jessica I; Chuprun, J Kurt; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J

    2015-12-04

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are dynamic regulators of cellular signaling. GRK5 is highly expressed within myocardium and is upregulated in heart failure. Although GRK5 is a critical regulator of cardiac G protein-coupled receptor signaling, recent data has uncovered noncanonical activity of GRK5 within nuclei that plays a key role in pathological hypertrophy. Targeted cardiac elevation of GRK5 in mice leads to exaggerated hypertrophy and early heart failure after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) because of GRK5 nuclear accumulation. In this study, we investigated the role of GRK5 in physiological, swimming-induced hypertrophy (SIH). Cardiac-specific GRK5 transgenic mice and nontransgenic littermate control mice were subjected to a 21-day high-intensity swim protocol (or no swim sham controls). SIH and specific molecular and genetic indices of physiological hypertrophy were assessed, including nuclear localization of GRK5, and compared with TAC. Unlike after TAC, swim-trained transgenic GRK5 and nontransgenic littermate control mice exhibited similar increases in cardiac growth. Mechanistically, SIH did not lead to GRK5 nuclear accumulation, which was confirmed in vitro as insulin-like growth factor-1, a known mediator of physiological hypertrophy, was unable to induce GRK5 nuclear translocation in myocytes. We found specific patterns of altered gene expression between TAC and SIH with GRK5 overexpression. Further, SIH in post-TAC transgenic GRK5 mice was able to preserve cardiac function. These data suggest that although nuclear-localized GRK5 is a pathological mediator after stress, this noncanonical nuclear activity of GRK5 is not induced during physiological hypertrophy. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Differential Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 in Physiological Versus Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Traynham, Christopher J.; Cannavo, Alessandro; Zhou, Yan; Vouga, Alexandre G.; Woodall, Benjamin P.; Hullmann, Jonathan; Ibetti, Jessica; Gold, Jessica I.; Chuprun, J. Kurt; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) are dynamic regulators of cellular signaling. GRK5 is highly expressed within myocardium and is up-regulated in heart failure (HF). Although GRK5 is a critical regulator of cardiac GPCR signaling, recent data has uncovered non-canonical activity of GRK5 within nuclei that plays a key role in pathological hypertrophy. Targeted cardiac elevation of GRK5 in mice leads to exaggerated hypertrophy and early HF after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) due to GRK5 nuclear accumulation. Objective In this study we investigated the role of GRK5 in physiological, swimming induced hypertrophy (SIH). Methods and Results Cardiac-specific GRK5 transgenic mice (TgGRK5) and non-transgenic littermate control (NLC) mice were subjected to a 21-day high intensity swim protocol (or no swim sham controls). SIH and specific molecular and genetic indices of physiological hypertrophy were assessed including nuclear localization of GRK5 and compared to TAC. Unlike after TAC, swim-trained TgGRK5 and NLC mice exhibited similar increases in cardiac growth. Mechanistically, SIH did not lead to GRK5 nuclear accumulation, which was confirmed in vitro as insulin-like growth factor-1, a known mediator of physiological hypertrophy, was unable to induce GRK5 nuclear translocation in myocytes. We found specific patterns of altered gene expression between TAC and SIH with GRK5 overexpression. Further, SIH in post-TAC TgGRK5 mice was able to preserve cardiac function. Conclusions These data suggest that while nuclear-localized GRK5 is a pathological mediator after stress, this non-canonical nuclear activity of GRK5 is not induced during physiological hypertrophy. PMID:26515328

  16. A differential role for nitric oxide in two forms of physiological angiogenesis in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James L; Cartland, David; Hussain, Arif; Egginton, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    NO plays a role in a variety of in vitro models of angiogenesis, although confounding effects of NO on non-endothelial tissues make its role during in vivo angiogenesis unclear. We therefore examined the effects of NO on two physiological models of angiogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle: (1) administration of prazosin (50 mg l−1) thereby increasing blood flow; and (2) muscle overload from surgical ablation of a functional synergist. These models induce angiogenesis via longitudinal splitting and capillary sprouting, respectively. Administration of NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) abolished the increase in capillary to fibre ratio (C:F) in response to prazosin administration, along with the increases in luminal filopodia and large endothelial vacuoles. l-NNA prevented luminal filopodia and vacuolisation in response to extirpation, but had no effect on abluminal sprouting, and little effect on C:F. Comparison of mice lacking endothelial (eNOS−/−) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS−/−) showed that longitudinal splitting is eNOS-dependent, and Western blotting demonstrated an increase in eNOS but not inducible NOS (iNOS) expression. These data show that there are two pathways of physiological angiogenesis in skeletal muscle characterised by longitudinal splitting and capillary sprouting, respectively. NO generated by eNOS plays an essential role in splitting but not in sprouting angiogenesis, which has important implications for angiogenic therapies that target NO. PMID:16293647

  17. Dynamics and Physiological Roles of Stochastic Firing Patterns Near Bifurcation Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bing; Gu, Huaguang

    2017-06-01

    Different stochastic neural firing patterns or rhythms that appeared near polarization or depolarization resting states were observed in biological experiments on three nervous systems, and closely matched those simulated near bifurcation points between stable equilibrium point and limit cycle in a theoretical model with noise. The distinct dynamics of spike trains and interspike interval histogram (ISIH) of these stochastic rhythms were identified and found to build a relationship to the coexisting behaviors or fixed firing frequency of four different types of bifurcations. Furthermore, noise evokes coherence resonances near bifurcation points and plays important roles in enhancing information. The stochastic rhythms corresponding to Hopf bifurcation points with fixed firing frequency exhibited stronger coherence degree and a sharper peak in the power spectrum of the spike trains than those corresponding to saddle-node bifurcation points without fixed firing frequency. Moreover, the stochastic firing patterns changed to a depolarization resting state as the extracellular potassium concentration increased for the injured nerve fiber related to pathological pain or static blood pressure level increased for aortic depressor nerve fiber, and firing frequency decreased, which were different from the physiological viewpoint that firing frequency increased with increasing pressure level or potassium concentration. This shows that rhythms or firing patterns can reflect pressure or ion concentration information related to pathological pain information. Our results present the dynamics of stochastic firing patterns near bifurcation points, which are helpful for the identification of both dynamics and physiological roles of complex neural firing patterns or rhythms, and the roles of noise.

  18. Central role of soluble adenylyl cyclase and cAMP in sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Krapf, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cylases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. PMID:25066614

  19. Potential role of retinoids in ovarian physiology and pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanwen; Li, Chunjin; Chen, Lu; Wang, Fengge; Zhou, Xu

    2017-03-27

    Retinoids (retinol and its derivatives) are required for maintaining vision, immunity, barrier function, reproduction, embryogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, retinoid signaling plays a key role in initiating meiosis of germ cells of the mammalian fetal ovary. Recently, studies indicated that precise retinoid level regulation in the ovary provides a molecular control of ovarian development, steroidogenesis and oocyte maturation. Besides, abnormal retinoid signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common ovarian endocrinopathies in reproductive-aged women worldwide. This review primarily summarizes recent advancements made in investigating the action of retinoid signaling in ovarian physiology as well as the abnormal retinoid signaling in PCOS.

  20. The Role of Nature in Coping with Psycho-Physiological Stress: A Literature Review on Restorativeness

    PubMed Central

    Berto, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Physical settings can play a role in coping with stress; in particular experimental research has found strong evidence between exposure to natural environments and recovery from physiological stress and mental fatigue, giving support to both Stress Recovery Theory and Attention Restoration Theory. In fact, exposure to natural environments protects people against the impact of environmental stressors and offer physiological, emotional and attention restoration more so than urban environments. Natural places that allow the renewal of personal adaptive resources to meet the demands of everyday life are called restorative environments. Natural environments elicit greater calming responses than urban environments, and in relation to their vision there is a general reduction of physiological symptoms of stress. Exposure to natural scenes mediates the negative effects of stress reducing the negative mood state and above all enhancing positive emotions. Moreover, one can recover the decrease of cognitive performance associated with stress, especially reflected in attention tasks, through the salutary effect of viewing nature. Giving the many benefits of contact with nature, plans for urban environments should attend to restorativeness. PMID:25431444

  1. The Role of Psychological and Physiological Factors in Decision Making under Risk and in a Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Fooken, Jonas; Schaffner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Different methods to elicit risk attitudes of individuals often provide differing results despite a common theory. Reasons for such inconsistencies may be the different influence of underlying factors in risk-taking decisions. In order to evaluate this conjecture, a better understanding of underlying factors across methods and decision contexts is desirable. In this paper we study the difference in result of two different risk elicitation methods by linking estimates of risk attitudes to gender, age, and personality traits, which have been shown to be related. We also investigate the role of these factors during decision-making in a dilemma situation. For these two decision contexts we also investigate the decision-maker's physiological state during the decision, measured by heart rate variability (HRV), which we use as an indicator of emotional involvement. We found that the two elicitation methods provide different individual risk attitude measures which is partly reflected in a different gender effect between the methods. Personality traits explain only relatively little in terms of driving risk attitudes and the difference between methods. We also found that risk taking and the physiological state are related for one of the methods, suggesting that more emotionally involved individuals are more risk averse in the experiment. Finally, we found evidence that personality traits are connected to whether individuals made a decision in the dilemma situation, but risk attitudes and the physiological state were not indicative for the ability to decide in this decision context. PMID:26834591

  2. Physiological role of gap-junctional hemichannels. Extracellular calcium-dependent isosmotic volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Quist, A P; Rhee, S K; Lin, H; Lal, R

    2000-03-06

    Hemichannels in the overlapping regions of apposing cells plasma membranes join to form gap junctions and provide an intercellular communication pathway. Hemichannels are also present in the nonjunctional regions of individual cells and their activity is gated by several agents, including calcium. However, their physiological roles are unknown. Using techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescent dye uptake assay, and laser confocal immunofluorescence imaging, we have examined the extracellular calcium-dependent modulation of cell volume. In response to a change in the extracellular physiological calcium concentration (1.8 to physiological calcium in an otherwise isosmotic situation.

  3. Cognitive Flexibility and Undergraduate Physiology Students: Increasing Advanced Knowledge Acquisition within an Ill-Structured Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Ashley E.; Rozell, Timothy G.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility is defined as the ability to assimilate previously learned information and concepts to generate novel solutions to new problems. This skill is crucial for success within ill-structured domains such as biology, physiology, and medicine, where many concepts are simultaneously required for understanding a complex problem, yet…

  4. A Trial of the Objective Structured Practical Examination in Physiology at Melaka Manipal Medical College, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Raghavendra, Rao; Surekha, Kamath; Asha, Kamath

    2009-01-01

    A single examination does not fulfill all the functions of assessment. The present study was undertaken to determine the reliability and student satisfaction regarding the objective structured practical examination (OSPE) as a method of assessment of laboratory exercises in physiology before implementing it in the forthcoming university…

  5. A Trial of the Objective Structured Practical Examination in Physiology at Melaka Manipal Medical College, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Raghavendra, Rao; Surekha, Kamath; Asha, Kamath

    2009-01-01

    A single examination does not fulfill all the functions of assessment. The present study was undertaken to determine the reliability and student satisfaction regarding the objective structured practical examination (OSPE) as a method of assessment of laboratory exercises in physiology before implementing it in the forthcoming university…

  6. A New Physiological Role for the DNA Molecule as a Protector against Drying Stress in Desiccation-Tolerant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    García-Fontana, Cristina; Narváez-Reinaldo, Juan J.; Castillo, Francisco; González-López, Jesús; Luque, Irene; Manzanera, Maximino

    2016-01-01

    The DNA molecule is associated with the role of encoding information required to produce RNA which is translated into proteins needed by the cell. This encoding involves information transmission to offspring or to other organisms by horizontal transfer. However, despite the abundance of this molecule in both the cell and the environment, its physiological role seems to be restricted mainly to that of a coding and inheritance molecule. In this paper, we report a new physiological role for the DNA molecule as involved in protection against desiccation, in addition to its well-established main information transfer and other recently reported functions such as bio-film formation in eDNA form. Desiccation-tolerant microorganisms such as Microbacterium sp. 3J1 significantly upregulate genes involved in DNA synthesis to produce DNA as part of their defensive mechanisms to protect protein structures and functions from drying according to RNA-seq analysis. We have observed the intracellular overproduction of DNA in two desiccation-tolerant microorganisms, Microbacterium sp. 3J1 and Arthrobacter siccitolerans 4J27, in response to desiccation signals. In addition, this conclusion can be made from our observations that synthetic DNA protects two proteins from drying and when part of a xeroprotectant preparation, DNA from various organisms including desiccation-sensitive species, does the same. Removal of DNA by nuclease treatment results in absence of this additive protective effect. We validated this role in biochemical and biophysical assays in proteins and occurs in trans even with short, single chains of synthetically produced DNA. PMID:28066383

  7. Interpreting the possible ecological role(s) of cyanotoxins: compounds for competitive advantage and/or physiological aide?

    PubMed

    Holland, Aleicia; Kinnear, Susan

    2013-06-27

    To date, most research on freshwater cyanotoxin(s) has focused on understanding the dynamics of toxin production and decomposition, as well as evaluating the environmental conditions that trigger toxin production, all with the objective of informing management strategies and options for risk reduction. Comparatively few research studies have considered how this information can be used to understand the broader ecological role of cyanotoxin(s), and the possible applications of this knowledge to the management of toxic blooms. This paper explores the ecological, toxicological, and genetic evidence for cyanotoxin production in natural environments. The possible evolutionary advantages of toxin production are grouped into two main themes: That of "competitive advantage" or "physiological aide". The first grouping illustrates how compounds produced by cyanobacteria may have originated from the need for a cellular defence mechanism, in response to grazing pressure and/or resource competition. The second grouping considers the contribution that secondary metabolites make to improved cellular physiology, through benefits to homeostasis, photosynthetic efficiencies, and accelerated growth rates. The discussion also includes other factors in the debate about possible evolutionary roles for toxins, such as different modes of exposures and effects on non-target (i.e., non-competitive) species. The paper demonstrates that complex and multiple factors are at play in driving evolutionary processes in aquatic environments. This information may provide a fresh perspective on managing toxic blooms, including the need to use a "systems approach" to understand how physico-chemical conditions, as well biological stressors, interact to trigger toxin production.

  8. Distinctive topologies of partner-switching signaling networks correlate with their physiological roles

    PubMed Central

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Brody, Margaret S.; Price, Chester W.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulatory networks controlling bacterial gene expression often evolve from common origins and share homologous proteins and similar network motifs. However, when functioning in different physiological contexts, these motifs may be re-arranged with different topologies that significantly affect network performance. Here we analyze two related signaling networks in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis in order to assess the consequences of their different topologies, with the aim of formulating design principles applicable to other systems. These two networks control the activities of the general stress response factor σB and the first sporulation-specific factor σF. Both networks have at their core a “partner-switching” mechanism, in which an anti-sigma factor forms alternate complexes either with the sigma factor, holding it inactive, or with an anti-anti-sigma factor, thereby freeing sigma. However, clear differences in network structure are apparent: the anti-sigma-factor for σF forms a long-lived, “dead-end” complex with its anti-anti-sigma factor and ADP, whereas the genes encoding σB and its network partners lie in a σB-controlled operon, resulting in positive and negative feedback loops. We constructed mathematical models of both networks and examined which features were critical for the performance of each design. The σF model predicts that the self-enhancing formation of the dead-end complex transforms the network into a largely irreversible hysteretic switch; the simulations reported here also demonstrate that hysteresis and slow turn off kinetics are the only two system properties associated with this complex formation. By contrast, the σB model predicts that the positive and negative feedback loops produce graded, reversible behavior with high regulatory capacity and fast response time. Our models demonstrate how alterations in network design result in different system properties that correlate with regulatory demands. These design

  9. Physiological roles for the subfornical organ: a dynamic transcriptome shaped by autonomic state.

    PubMed

    Hindmarch, Charles Colin Thomas; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2016-03-15

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ recognized for its ability to sense and integrate hydromineral and hormonal circulating fluid balance signals, information which is transmitted to central autonomic nuclei to which SFO neurons project. While the role of SFO was once synonymous with physiological responses to osmotic, volumetric and cardiovascular challenge, recent data suggest that SFO neurons also sense and integrate information from circulating signals of metabolic status. Using microarrays, we have confirmed the expression of receptors already described in the SFO, and identified many novel transcripts expressed in this circumventricular organ including receptors for many of the critical circulating energy balance signals such as adiponectin, apelin, endocannabinoids, leptin, insulin and peptide YY. This transcriptome analysis also identified SFO transcripts, the expressions of which are significantly changed by either 72 h dehydration, or 48 h starvation, compared to fed and euhydrated controls. Expression and potential roles for many of these targets are yet to be confirmed and elucidated. Subsequent validation of data for adiponectin and leptin receptors confirmed that receptors for both are expressed in the SFO, that discrete populations of neurons in this tissue are functionally responsive to these adipokines, and that such responsiveness is regulated by physiological state. Thus, transcriptomic analysis offers great promise for understanding the integrative complexity of these physiological systems, especially with development of technologies allowing description of the entire transcriptome of single, carefully phenotyped, SFO neurons. These data will ultimately elucidate mechanisms through which these uniquely positioned neurons respond to and integrate complex circulating signals.

  10. Physiological roles for the subfornical organ: a dynamic transcriptome shaped by autonomic state

    PubMed Central

    Hindmarch, Charles Colin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ recognized for its ability to sense and integrate hydromineral and hormonal circulating fluid balance signals, information which is transmitted to central autonomic nuclei to which SFO neurons project. While the role of SFO was once synonymous with physiological responses to osmotic, volumetric and cardiovascular challenge, recent data suggest that SFO neurons also sense and integrate information from circulating signals of metabolic status. Using microarrays, we have confirmed the expression of receptors already described in the SFO, and identified many novel transcripts expressed in this circumventricular organ including receptors for many of the critical circulating energy balance signals such as adiponectin, apelin, endocannabinoids, leptin, insulin and peptide YY. This transcriptome analysis also identified SFO transcripts, the expressions of which are significantly changed by either 72 h dehydration, or 48 h starvation, compared to fed and euhydrated controls. Expression and potential roles for many of these targets are yet to be confirmed and elucidated. Subsequent validation of data for adiponectin and leptin receptors confirmed that receptors for both are expressed in the SFO, that discrete populations of neurons in this tissue are functionally responsive to these adipokines, and that such responsiveness is regulated by physiological state. Thus, transcriptomic analysis offers great promise for understanding the integrative complexity of these physiological systems, especially with development of technologies allowing description of the entire transcriptome of single, carefully phenotyped, SFO neurons. These data will ultimately elucidate mechanisms through which these uniquely positioned neurons respond to and integrate complex circulating signals. PMID:26227400

  11. Mechanisms and Physiological Roles of the CBL-CIPK Networking System in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jingjing; Manik, S. M. Nuruzzaman; Shi, Sujuan; Chao, Jiangtao; Jin, Yirong; Wang, Qian; Liu, Haobao

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin B-like protein (CBL)-CBL-interacting protein kinase (CIPK) network is one of the vital regulatory mechanisms which decode calcium signals triggered by environmental stresses. Although the complicated regulation mechanisms and some novel functions of CBL-CIPK signaling network in plants need to be further elucidated, numerous advances have been made in its roles involved in the abiotic stresses. This review chiefly introduces the progresses about protein interaction, classification and expression pattern of different CBLs and CIPKs in Arabidopsis thaliana, summarizes the physiological roles of CBL-CIPK pathway while pointing out some new research ideas in the future, and finally presents some unique perspectives for the further study. The review might provide new insights into the functional characterization of CBL-CIPK pathway in Arabidopsis, and contribute to a deeper understanding of CBL-CIPK network in other plants or stresses. PMID:27618104

  12. The different role of sex hormones on female cardiovascular physiology and function: not only oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Salerni, Sara; Di Francescomarino, Samanta; Cadeddu, Christian; Acquistapace, Flavio; Maffei, Silvia; Gallina, Sabina

    2015-06-01

    Human response to different physiologic stimuli and cardiovascular (CV) adaptation to various pathologies seem to be gender specific. Sex-steroid hormones have been postulated as the major contributors towards these sex-related differences. This review will discuss current evidence on gender differences in CV function and remodelling, and will present the different role of the principal sex-steroid hormones on female heart. Starting from a review of sex hormones synthesis, receptors and CV signalling, we will summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of sex hormones on the regulation of our daily activities throughout the life, via the modulation of autonomic nervous system, excitation-contraction coupling pathway and ion channels activity. Many unresolved questions remain even if oestrogen effects on myocardial remodelling and function have been extensively studied. So this work will focus attention also on the controversial and complex relationship existing between androgens, progesterone and female heart. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  13. TXNDC5, a newly discovered disulfide isomerase with a key role in cell physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Horna-Terrón, Elena; Pradilla-Dieste, Alberto; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Osada, Jesús

    2014-12-17

    Thioredoxin domain-containing 5 (TXNDC5) is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, acting as a chaperone of endoplasmic reticulum under not fully characterized conditions As a result, TXNDC5 interacts with many cell proteins, contributing to their proper folding and correct formation of disulfide bonds through its thioredoxin domains. Moreover, it can also work as an electron transfer reaction, recovering the functional isoform of other protein disulfide isomerases, replacing reduced glutathione in its role. Finally, it also acts as a cellular adapter, interacting with the N-terminal domain of adiponectin receptor. As can be inferred from all these functions, TXNDC5 plays an important role in cell physiology; therefore, dysregulation of its expression is associated with oxidative stress, cell ageing and a large range of pathologies such as arthritis, cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, vitiligo and virus infections. Its implication in all these important diseases has made TXNDC5 a susceptible biomarker or even a potential pharmacological target.

  14. The Caenorhabditis elegans epidermis as a model skin. II: differentiation and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Andrew D; Xu, Suhong

    2012-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans epidermis forms one of the principal barrier epithelia of the animal. Differentiation of the epidermis begins in mid embryogenesis and involves apical-basal polarization of the cytoskeletal and secretory systems as well as cellular junction formation. Secretion of the external cuticle layers is one of the major developmental and physiological specializations of the epidermal epithelium. The four post-embryonic larval stages are separated by periodic moults, in which the epidermis generates a new cuticle with stage-specific characteristics. The differentiated epidermis also plays key roles in endocrine signaling, fat storage, and ionic homeostasis. The epidermis is intimately associated with the development and function of the nervous system, and may have glial-like roles in modulating neuronal function. The epidermis provides passive and active defenses against skin-penetrating pathogens and can repair small wounds. Finally, age-dependent deterioration of the epidermis is a prominent feature of aging and may affect organismal aging and lifespan.

  15. The plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger and its role in physiological and pathophysiological processes.

    PubMed

    Mahnensmith, R L; Aronson, P S

    1985-06-01

    The plasma membranes of most if not all vertebrate cells contain a transport system that mediates the transmembrane exchange of sodium for hydrogen. The kinetic properties of this transport system include a 1:1 stoichiometry, affinity for lithium and ammonium ion in addition to sodium and hydrogen, the ability to function in multiple 1:1 exchange modes involving these four cations, sensitivity to inhibition by amiloride and its analogues, and allosteric regulation by intracellular protons. The plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger plays a physiological role in the regulation of intracellular pH, the control of cell growth and proliferation, stimulus-response coupling in white cells and platelets, the metabolic response to hormones such as insulin and glucocorticoids, the regulation of cell volume, and the transepithelial absorption and secretion of sodium, hydrogen, bicarbonate and chloride ions, and organic anions. Preliminary evidence raises the possibility that the sodium-hydrogen exchanger may play a pathophysiological role in such diverse conditions as renal acid-base disorders, essential hypertension, cancer, and tissue or organ hypertrophy. Thus, future research on cellular acid-base homeostasis in general, and on plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchange in particular, will enhance our understanding of a great variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes.

  16. Structural basis for multifunctional roles of mammalian aminopeptidase N

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian aminopeptidase N (APN) plays multifunctional roles in many physiological processes, including peptide metabolism, cell motility and adhesion, and coronavirus entry. Here we determined crystal structures of porcine APN at 1.85 Å resolution and its complexes with a peptide substrate and a variety of inhibitors. APN is a cell surface-anchored and seahorse-shaped zinc-aminopeptidase that forms head-to-head dimers. Captured in a catalytically active state, these structures of APN illustrate a detailed catalytic mechanism for its aminopeptidase activity. The active site and peptide-binding channel of APN reside in cavities with wide openings, allowing easy access to peptides. The cavities can potentially open up further to bind the exposed N terminus of proteins. The active site anchors the N-terminal neutral residue of peptides/proteins, and the peptide-binding channel binds the remainder of the peptides/proteins in a sequence-independent fashion. APN also provides an exposed outer surface for coronavirus binding, without its physiological functions being affected. These structural features enable APN to function ubiquitously in peptide metabolism, interact with other proteins to mediate cell motility and adhesion, and serve as a coronavirus receptor. This study elucidates multifunctional roles of APN and can guide therapeutic efforts to treat APN-related diseases. PMID:23071329

  17. MOTIVATIONAL STRUCTURE AND PERCEIVED ROLE DISPARITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BENNETT, WILLIAM S., JR.

    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CLASSES OF COGNITIVE PHENOMENA WAS INVESTIGATED, I.E., THE MOTIVATIONAL STRUCTURE AND THE DEGREE OF PERCEIVED ROLE DISPARITY OF TEACHERS. ONE ELEMENT OF MOTIVATION, CALLED "ORIENTATION FOR CHANGE," WAS RELATED TO DIFFERENT TYPES OF ROLE DISPARITY, INCLUDING "OPTIMISM" OR THE EXTENT IN WHICH THE…

  18. The physiological and ecological roles of volatile halogen production by marine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Claire; Sun, Shuo

    2015-04-01

    Sea-to-air halogen flux is known to have a major impact on catalytic ozone cycling and aerosol formation in the troposphere. The biological production of volatile organic (e.g. bromoform, diiodomethane) and reactive inorganic halogens (e.g. molecular iodine) is believed to play an important role in mediating halogen emissions from the marine environment. Marine diatoms in particular are known to produce the organic and inorganic volatile halogens at high rates in pelagic waters and sea-ice systems. The climate-induced changes in diatom communities that have already been observed and are expected to occur throughout the world's oceans as warming progresses are likely to alter sea-to-air halogen flux. However, we currently have insufficient understanding of the physiological and ecological functions of volatile halogen production to develop modelling tools that can predict the nature and magnitude of the impact. The results of a series of laboratory studies aimed at establishing the physiological and ecological role of volatile halogen production in two marine polar diatoms (Thalassiosira antarctica and Porosira glacialis) will be described in this presentation. We will focus on our work investigating how the activity of the haloperoxidases, a group of enzymes known to be involved in halogenation reactions in marine organisms, is altered by environmental conditions. This will involve exploring the antioxidative defence role proposed for marine haloperoxidases by showing specifically how halogenating activity varies with photosynthetic rate and changes in the ambient light conditions in the two model marine diatoms. We will also present results from our experiments designed to investigate how volatile halogen production is impacted by and influences diatom-bacterial interactions. We will discuss how improved mechanistic understanding like this could pave the way for future volatile halogen-ecosystem model development.

  19. Role of light wavelengths in synchronization of circadian physiology in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Yadav, G; Malik, S; Rani, S; Kumar, V

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated whether at identical duration and equal energy level birds presented with short (450nm; blue, B) and long (640nm; red, R) light wavelengths would differentially interpret them and exhibit wavelength-dependent circadian behavioral and physiological responses, despite the difference in their breeding latitudes. Temperate migratory blackheaded buntings (Emberiza melanocephala) and subtropical non-migratory Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) initially entrained to 12h light:12h darkness (12L:12D; L=0.33μM/m(2)/s, D=0μM/m(2)/s) in two groups of each, groups 1 and 2, were subjected to constant light (LL, 0.33μM/m(2)/s), which rendered them arrhythmic in the activity behavior. They were then exposed for about two weeks each to 12B:12R and 12R:12B (group 1) or 12R:12B and 12B:12R (group 2) at 0.33μM/m(2)/s light energy level. Blue and red light periods were interpreted as the day and night, respectively, with activity and no-activity in non-migratory weaverbirds or activity and intense activity (Zugunruhe, migratory night restlessness) in the migratory buntings. Consistent with this, plasma melatonin levels under B:R, not R:B, light cycle were low and high in blue and red light periods, respectively. A similar diurnal pattern was absent in the cortisol levels, however. These results show an important role of light wavelengths in synchronization of the circadian clock governed behavior and physiology to the photoperiodic environment, and suggest that photoperiodic timing might be a conserved physiological adaptation in many more birds, regardless of the difference in breeding latitudes, than has been generally envisaged.

  20. Cognitive flexibility and undergraduate physiology students: increasing advanced knowledge acquisition within an ill-structured domain.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ashley E; Rozell, Timothy G

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive flexibility is defined as the ability to assimilate previously learned information and concepts to generate novel solutions to new problems. This skill is crucial for success within ill-structured domains such as biology, physiology, and medicine, where many concepts are simultaneously required for understanding a complex problem, yet the problem consists of patterns or combinations of concepts that are not consistently used or needed across all examples. To succeed within ill-structured domains, a student must possess a certain level of cognitive flexibility: rigid thought processes and prepackaged informational retrieval schemes relying on rote memorization will not suffice. In this study, we assessed the cognitive flexibility of undergraduate physiology students using a validated instrument entitled Student's Approaches to Learning (SAL). The SAL evaluates how deeply and in what way information is processed, as well as the investment of time and mental energy that a student is willing to expend by measuring constructs such as elaboration and memorization. Our results indicate that students who rely primarily on memorization when learning new information have a smaller knowledge base about physiological concepts, as measured by a prior knowledge assessment and unit exams. However, students who rely primarily on elaboration when learning new information have a more well-developed knowledge base about physiological concepts, which is displayed by higher scores on a prior knowledge assessment and increased performance on unit exams. Thus students with increased elaboration skills possibly possess a higher level of cognitive flexibility and are more likely to succeed within ill-structured domains. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Analysis of Structural and Physiological Profiles To Assess the Effects of Cu on Biofilm Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Massieux, B.; Boivin, M. E. Y.; van den Ende, F. P.; Langenskiöld, J.; Marvan, P.; Barranguet, C.; Admiraal, W.; Laanbroek, H. J.; Zwart, G.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of copper on the structure and physiology of freshwater biofilm microbial communities. For this purpose, biofilms that were grown during 4 weeks in a shallow, slightly polluted ditch were exposed, in aquaria in our laboratory, to a range of copper concentrations (0, 1, 3, and 10 μM). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed changes in the bacterial community in all aquaria. The extent of change was related to the concentration of copper applied, indicating that copper directly or indirectly caused the effects. Concomitantly with these changes in structure, changes in the metabolic potential of the heterotrophic bacterial community were apparent from changes in substrate use profiles as assessed on Biolog plates. The structure of the phototrophic community also changed during the experiment, as observed by microscopic analysis in combination with DGGE analysis of eukaryotic microorganisms and cyanobacteria. However, the extent of community change, as observed by DGGE, was not significantly greater in the copper treatments than in the control. Yet microscopic analysis showed a development toward a greater proportion of cyanobacteria in the treatments with the highest copper concentrations. Furthermore, copper did affect the physiology of the phototrophic community, as evidenced by the fact that a decrease in photosynthetic capacity was detected in the treatment with the highest copper concentration. Therefore, we conclude that copper affected the physiology of the biofilm and had an effect on the structure of the communities composing this biofilm. PMID:15294780

  2. Rice Physiology

    Treesearch

    P.A. Counce; Davidi R. Gealy; Shi-Jean Susana Sung

    2002-01-01

    Physiology occurs tn physical space through chemical reactions constrained by anatomy and morphology, yet guided by genetics. Physiology has been called the logic of life. Genes encode structural and fimcdonal proteins. These proteins are subsequently processed to produce enzymes that direct and govern the biomechanical processes involved in the physiology of the...

  3. Physiological role for the cochaperone FKBP52 in androgen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Prapapanich, Viravan; Cox, Marc B; Riggs, Daniel L; Suarez-Quian, Carlos; Smith, David F

    2005-06-01

    Molecular chaperones mediate multiple aspects of steroid receptor function, but the physiological importance of most receptor-associated cochaperones has not been determined. To help fill this gap, we targeted for disruption the mouse gene for the 52-kDa FK506 binding protein, FKBP52, a 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90)-binding immunophilin found in steroid receptor complexes. A mouse line lacking FKBP52 (52KO) was generated and characterized. Male 52KO mice have several defects in reproductive tissues consistent with androgen insensitivity; among these defects are ambiguous external genitalia and dysgenic prostate. FKBP52 and androgen receptor (AR) are coexpressed in prostate epithelial cells of wild-type mice. However, FKBP52 and AR are similarly coexpressed in testis even though testis morphology and spermatogenesis in 52KO males are usually normal. Molecular studies confirm that FKBP52 is a component of AR complexes, and cellular studies in yeast and human cell models demonstrate that FKBP52 can enhance AR-mediated transactivation. AR enhancement requires FKBP52 peptidylprolyl isomerase activity as well as Hsp90-binding ability, and enhancement probably relates to an affect of FKBP52 on AR-folding pathways. In the presence of FKBP52, but not other cochaperones, the function of a minimally active AR point mutant can be dramatically restored. We conclude that FKBP52 is an AR folding factor that has critically important physiological roles in some male reproductive tissues.

  4. Physiological and pharmacological roles of ABCG2 (BCRP): recent findings in Abcg2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Vlaming, Maria L H; Lagas, Jurjen S; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2009-01-31

    The multidrug transporter ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP) can actively extrude a broad range of endogenous and exogenous substrates across biological membranes. ABCG2 limits oral availability and mediates hepatobiliary and renal excretion of its substrates, and thus influences the pharmacokinetics of many drugs. Recent work, relying mainly on the use of Abcg2(-/-) mice, has revealed important contributions of ABCG2 to the blood-brain, blood-testis and blood-fetal barriers. Together, these functions indicate a primary biological role of ABCG2 in protecting the organism from a range of xenobiotics. In addition, several other physiological functions of ABCG2 have been observed, including extrusion of porphyrins and/or porphyrin conjugates from hematopoietic cells, liver and harderian gland, as well as secretion of vitamin B(2) (riboflavin) and possibly other vitamins (biotin, vitamin K) into breast milk. However, the physiological significance of these processes has been difficult to establish, indicating that there is still a lot to learn about this intriguing protein.

  5. Roles of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ in skeletal muscle physiology.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Ravikumar; Wahli, Walter

    2017-05-01

    More than two decades of studying Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) has led to an understanding of their implications in various physiological processes that are key for health and disease. All three PPAR isotypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, are activated by a variety of molecules, including fatty acids, eicosanoids and phospholipids, and regulate a spectrum of genes involved in development, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, inflammation, and proliferation and differentiation of many cell types in different tissues. The hypolipidemic and antidiabetic functions of PPARα and PPARγ in response to fibrate and thiazolidinedione treatment, respectively, are well documented. However, until more recently the functions of PPARβ/δ were less well defined, but are now becoming more recognized in fatty acid metabolism, energy expenditure, and tissue repair. Skeletal muscle is an active metabolic organ with high plasticity for adaptive responses to varying conditions such as fasting or physical exercise. It is the major site of energy expenditure resulting from lipid and glucose catabolism. Here, we review the multifaceted roles of PPARβ/δ in skeletal muscle physiology.

  6. Adrenal clocks and the role of adrenal hormones in the regulation of circadian physiology.

    PubMed

    Leliavski, Alexei; Dumbell, Rebecca; Ott, Volker; Oster, Henrik

    2015-02-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subordinate clocks that disseminate time information to various central and peripheral tissues. While the function of the SCN in circadian rhythm regulation has been extensively studied, we still have limited understanding of how peripheral tissue clock function contributes to the regulation of physiological processes. The adrenal gland plays a special role in this context as adrenal hormones show strong circadian secretion rhythms affecting downstream physiological processes. At the same time, they have been shown to affect clock gene expression in various other tissues, thus mediating systemic entrainment to external zeitgebers and promoting internal circadian alignment. In this review, we discuss the function of circadian clocks in the adrenal gland, how they are reset by the SCN and may further relay time-of-day information to other tissues. Focusing on glucocorticoids, we conclude by outlining the impact of adrenal rhythm disruption on neuropsychiatric, metabolic, immune, and malignant disorders.

  7. Biological underpinnings of breastfeeding challenges: the role of genetics, diet, and environment on lactation physiology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeon; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2016-08-01

    Lactation is a dynamic process that has evolved to produce a complex biological fluid that provides nutritive and nonnutritive factors to the nursing offspring. It has long been assumed that once lactation is successfully initiated, the primary factor regulating milk production is infant demand. Thus, most interventions have focused on improving breastfeeding education and early lactation support. However, in addition to infant demand, increasing evidence from studies conducted in experimental animal models, production animals, and breastfeeding women suggests that a diverse array of maternal factors may also affect milk production and composition. In this review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of the role of maternal genetics and modifiable factors, such as diet and environmental exposures, on reproductive endocrinology, lactation physiology, and the ability to successfully produce milk. To identify factors that may affect lactation in women, we highlight some information gleaned from studies in experimental animal models and production animals. Finally, we highlight the gaps in current knowledge and provide commentary on future research opportunities aimed at improving lactation outcomes in breastfeeding women to improve the health of mothers and their infants. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. [Carbon monoxide in human physiology--its role in the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Jasnos, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Kwiecień, Sławomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-30

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is produced endogenously in the body as a byproduct of heme degradation catalyzed by the action of heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. An inducible form, HO-1, responds to many factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, heme, bacterial endotoxins, proinflammatory cytokines and heavy metals. HO-2 is constitutively expressed under basal conditions in most human tissues including brain and gonads. Recent data show that CO is a gaseous mediator with multidirectional biological activity. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. CO shares many properties with another established vasodilatator and neurotransmitter - nitric oxide (NO). Both CO and NO are involved in neural transmission, modulation of blood vessel function and inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding to guanylate cyclase, stimulation of the production of cGMP, activation of Ca2+-dependent potassium channels and stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases are well known cellular targets of CO action. Since CO is nowadays a subject of extensive investigation in many centers worldwide, the aim of the present study was to present the role of CO in various aspects of human physiology with special focus on its activity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Narrative review: the role of leptin in human physiology: emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodore; Kelesidis, Iosif; Chou, Sharon; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2010-01-19

    Leptin is a hormone secreted by adipose tissue in direct proportion to amount of body fat. The circulating leptin levels serve as a gauge of energy stores, thereby directing the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, and metabolism. Persons with congenital deficiency are obese, and treatment with leptin results in dramatic weight loss through decreased food intake and possible increased energy expenditure. However, most obese persons are resistant to the weight-reducing effects of leptin. Recent studies suggest that leptin is physiologically more important as an indicator of energy deficiency, rather than energy excess, and may mediate adaptation by driving increased food intake and directing neuroendocrine function to converse energy, such as inducing hypothalamic hypogonadism to prevent fertilization. Current studies investigate the role of leptin in weight-loss management because persons who have recently lost weight have relative leptin deficiency that may drive them to regain weight. Leptin deficiency is also evident in patients with diet- or exercise-induced hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. Replacement of leptin in physiologic doses restores ovulatory menstruation in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and improves metabolic dysfunction in patients with lipoatrophy, including lipoatrophy associated with HIV or highly active antiretroviral therapy. The applications of leptin continue to grow and will hopefully soon be used therapeutically.

  10. Interpreting the Possible Ecological Role(s) of Cyanotoxins: Compounds for Competitive Advantage and/or Physiological Aide?

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Aleicia; Kinnear, Susan

    2013-01-01

    To date, most research on freshwater cyanotoxin(s) has focused on understanding the dynamics of toxin production and decomposition, as well as evaluating the environmental conditions that trigger toxin production, all with the objective of informing management strategies and options for risk reduction. Comparatively few research studies have considered how this information can be used to understand the broader ecological role of cyanotoxin(s), and the possible applications of this knowledge to the management of toxic blooms. This paper explores the ecological, toxicological, and genetic evidence for cyanotoxin production in natural environments. The possible evolutionary advantages of toxin production are grouped into two main themes: That of “competitive advantage” or “physiological aide”. The first grouping illustrates how compounds produced by cyanobacteria may have originated from the need for a cellular defence mechanism, in response to grazing pressure and/or resource competition. The second grouping considers the contribution that secondary metabolites make to improved cellular physiology, through benefits to homeostasis, photosynthetic efficiencies, and accelerated growth rates. The discussion also includes other factors in the debate about possible evolutionary roles for toxins, such as different modes of exposures and effects on non-target (i.e., non-competitive) species. The paper demonstrates that complex and multiple factors are at play in driving evolutionary processes in aquatic environments. This information may provide a fresh perspective on managing toxic blooms, including the need to use a “systems approach” to understand how physico-chemical conditions, as well biological stressors, interact to trigger toxin production. PMID:23807545

  11. The role of IL-6 in the physiologic versus hypertensive blood pressure actions of angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Manhiani, M Marlina; Seth, Dale M; Banes-Berceli, Amy K L; Satou, Ryosuke; Navar, L Gabriel; Brands, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a critical physiologic regulator of volume homeostasis and mean arterial pressure (MAP), yet it also is known to induce immune mechanisms that contribute to hypertension. This study determined the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the physiologic effect of AngII to maintain normal MAP during low-salt (LS) intake, and whether hypertension induced by plasma AngII concentrations measured during LS diet required IL-6. IL-6 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were placed on LS diet for 7 days, and MAP was measured 19 h/day with telemetry. MAP was not affected by LS in either group, averaging 101 ± 4 and 100 ± 4 mmHg in WT and KO mice, respectively, over the last 3 days. Seven days of ACEI decreased MAP ∼25 mmHg in both groups. In other KO and WT mice, AngII was infused at 200 ng/kg per minute to approximate plasma AngII levels during LS. Surgical reduction of kidney mass and high-salt diet were used to amplify the blood pressure effect. The increase in MAP after 7 days was not different, averaging 20 ± 5 and 22 ± 6 mmHg in WT and KO mice, respectively. Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer of activated transcription (STAT3) phosphorylation were not affected by LS, but were increased by AngII infusion at 200 and 800 ng/kg per minute. These data suggest that physiologic levels of AngII do not activate or require IL-6 to affect blood pressure significantly, whether AngII is maintaining blood pressure on LS diet or causing blood pressure to increase. JAK2/STAT3 activation, however, is tightly associated with AngII hypertension, even when caused by physiologic levels of AngII. PMID:26486161

  12. The physiological role of DC-SIGN: a tale of mice and men.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2013-10-01

    The innate immune receptor DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin) was discovered over a decade ago and was initially identified as a pattern recognition receptor. In addition to its ability to recognize a broad range of pathogen-derived ligands and self-glycoproteins, DC-SIGN also mediates intercellular adhesion, as well as antigen uptake and signaling, which is a functional hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs). Most research on DC-SIGN has relied on in vitro studies. The in vivo function of DC-SIGN is difficult to address, in part because there are eight genetic homologs in mice with no clear DC-SIGN ortholog. Here, we summarize the functions attributed to DC-SIGN based on in vitro data and discuss the limitations of available mouse models to uncover the physiological role of this receptor in vivo.

  13. The Cellular Prion Protein (PrPC): Its Physiological Function and Role in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Westergard, Laura; Christensen, Heather M.; Harris, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by conversion of a normal cell-surface glycoprotein (PrPC) into a conformationally altered isoform (PrPSc) that is infectious in the absence of nucleic acid. Although a great deal has been learned about PrPSc and its role in prion propagation, much less is known about the physiological function of PrPC. In this review, we will summarize some of the major proposed functions for PrPC, including protection against apoptotic and oxidative stress, cellular uptake or binding of copper ions, transmembrane signaling, formation and maintenance of synapses, and adhesion to the extracellular matrix. We will also outline how loss or subversion of the cytoprotective or neuronal survival activities of PrPC might contribute to the pathogenesis of prion diseases, and how similar mechanisms are probably operative in other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17451912

  14. Novel physiological roles for glutathione in sequestering acetaldehyde to confer acetaldehyde tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsufuji, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kohei; Yamauchi, Kosei; Mitsunaga, Tohru; Hayakawa, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we identified novel physiological functions of glutathione in acetaldehyde tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains deleted in the genes encoding the enzymes involved in glutathione synthesis and reduction, GSH1, GSH2 and GLR1, exhibited severe growth defects compared to wild-type under acetaldehyde stress, although strains deleted in the genes encoding glutathione peroxidases or glutathione transferases did not show any growth defects. On the other hand, intracellular levels of reduced glutathione decreased in the presence of acetaldehyde in response to acetaldehyde concentration. Moreover, we show that glutathione can trap a maximum of four acetaldehyde molecules within its molecule in a non-enzymatic manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that glutathione has an important role in acetaldehyde tolerance, as a direct scavenger of acetaldehyde in the cell.

  15. Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin systems--the role in bacterial physiology and application in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Michal; Rojowska, Anna; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed multiple complex mechanisms ensuring an adequate response to environmental changes. In this context, bacterial cell division and growth are subject to strict control to ensure metabolic balance and cell survival. A plethora of studies cast light on toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems as metabolism regulators acting in response to environmental stress conditions. Many of those studies suggest direct relations between the TA systems and the pathogenic potential or antibiotic resistance of relevant bacteria. Other studies point out that TA systems play a significant role in ensuring stability of mobile genetic material. The evolutionary origin and relations between various TA systems are still a subject of a debate. The impact of toxin-antitoxin systems on bacteria physiology prompted their application in molecular biology as tools allowing cloning of some hard-to-maintain genes, plasmid maintenance and production of recombinant proteins.

  16. Biological and physiological role of reactive oxygen species--the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Zuo, L; Zhou, T; Pannell, B K; Ziegler, A C; Best, T M

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are chemically reactive molecules that are naturally produced within biological systems. Research has focused extensively on revealing the multi-faceted and complex roles that ROS play in living tissues. In regard to the good side of ROS, this article explores the effects of ROS on signalling, immune response and other physiological responses. To review the potentially bad side of ROS, we explain the consequences of high concentrations of molecules that lead to the disruption of redox homeostasis, which induces oxidative stress damaging intracellular components. The ugly effects of ROS can be observed in devastating cardiac, pulmonary, neurodegenerative and other disorders. Furthermore, this article covers the regulatory enzymes that mitigate the effects of ROS. Glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase are discussed in particular detail. The current understanding of ROS is incomplete, and it is imperative that future research be performed to understand the implications of ROS in various therapeutic interventions.

  17. Improved in-cell structure determination of proteins at near-physiological concentration

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Teppei; Hanashima, Tomomi; Hosoya, Saori; Shimazaki, Manato; Ikeda, Shiro; Mishima, Masaki; Güntert, Peter; Ito, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Investigating three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins in living cells by in-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy opens an avenue towards understanding the structural basis of their functions and physical properties under physiological conditions inside cells. In-cell NMR provides data at atomic resolution non-invasively, and has been used to detect protein-protein interactions, thermodynamics of protein stability, the behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, etc. in cells. However, so far only a single de novo 3D protein structure could be determined based on data derived only from in-cell NMR. Here we introduce methods that enable in-cell NMR protein structure determination for a larger number of proteins at concentrations that approach physiological ones. The new methods comprise (1) advances in the processing of non-uniformly sampled NMR data, which reduces the measurement time for the intrinsically short-lived in-cell NMR samples, (2) automatic chemical shift assignment for obtaining an optimal resonance assignment, and (3) structure refinement with Bayesian inference, which makes it possible to calculate accurate 3D protein structures from sparse data sets of conformational restraints. As an example application we determined the structure of the B1 domain of protein G at about 250 μM concentration in living E. coli cells. PMID:27910948

  18. The role of connexins in ear and skin physiology - functional insights from disease-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Nicholson, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Defects in several different connexins have been associated with several different diseases. The most common of these is deafness, where a few mutations in connexin (Cx) 26 have been found to contribute to over 50% of the incidence of non-syndromic deafness in different human populations. Other mutations in Cx26 or Cx30 have also been associated with various skin phenotypes linked to deafness (palmoplanta keratoderma, Bart-Pumphrey syndrome, Vohwinkel syndrome, keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome, etc.). The large array of disease mutants offers unique opportunities to gain insights into the underlying function of gap junction proteins and their channels in the normal and pathogenic physiologies of the cochlea and epidermis. This review focuses on those mutants where the impact on channel function has been assessed, and correlated with the disease phenotype, or organ function in knock-out mouse models. These approaches have provided evidence supporting a role of gap junctions and hemichannels in K(+) removal and recycling in the ear, as well as possible roles for nutrient passage, in the cochlea. In contrast, increases in hemichannel opening leading to increased cell death, were associated with several keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome skin disease/hearing mutants. In addition to providing clues for therapeutic strategies, these findings allow us to better understand the specific functions of connexin channels that are important for normal tissue function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The communicating junctions, roles and dysfunctions.

  19. Understanding protein synthesis: a role-play approach in large undergraduate human anatomy and physiology classes.

    PubMed

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section presented with a traditional lecture served as the control group. A pretest/posttest assessment and a survey were administered to both sections and used in data analysis. In addition, overall test scores and item analysis were examined. The analysis revealed that participants in both groups improved significantly from pretest to posttest, but there were no significant differences between the groups in posttest scores. Neither group showed a significant change from posttest to the exam. However, there was a moderate positive effect on engagement and satisfaction survey questions from being in the study group (based on 255 total surveys returned by both groups). The role-play activity was at least as effective as the lecture in terms of student performance on the above-mentioned assessments. In addition, it proved successful in engaging students in the learning process and increasing their satisfaction.

  20. Phospholipases of Mineralization Competent Cells and Matrix Vesicles: Roles in Physiological and Pathological Mineralizations

    PubMed Central

    Mebarek, Saida; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Magne, David; Do, Le Duy; Bandorowicz-Pikula, Joanna; Pikula, Slawomir; Buchet, René

    2013-01-01

    The present review aims to systematically and critically analyze the current knowledge on phospholipases and their role in physiological and pathological mineralization undertaken by mineralization competent cells. Cellular lipid metabolism plays an important role in biological mineralization. The physiological mechanisms of mineralization are likely to take place in tissues other than in bones and teeth under specific pathological conditions. For instance, vascular calcification in arteries of patients with renal failure, diabetes mellitus or atherosclerosis recapitulates the mechanisms of bone formation. Osteoporosis—a bone resorbing disease—and rheumatoid arthritis originating from the inflammation in the synovium are also affected by cellular lipid metabolism. The focus is on the lipid metabolism due to the effects of dietary lipids on bone health. These and other phenomena indicate that phospholipases may participate in bone remodelling as evidenced by their expression in smooth muscle cells, in bone forming osteoblasts, chondrocytes and in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Among various enzymes involved, phospholipases A1 or A2, phospholipase C, phospholipase D, autotaxin and sphingomyelinase are engaged in membrane lipid remodelling during early stages of mineralization and cell maturation in mineralization-competent cells. Numerous experimental evidences suggested that phospholipases exert their action at various stages of mineralization by affecting intracellular signaling and cell differentiation. The lipid metabolites—such as arachidonic acid, lysophospholipids, and sphingosine-1-phosphate are involved in cell signaling and inflammation reactions. Phospholipases are also important members of the cellular machinery engaged in matrix vesicle (MV) biogenesis and exocytosis. They may favour mineral formation inside MVs, may catalyse MV membrane breakdown necessary for the release of mineral deposits into extracellular matrix (ECM), or participate in

  1. The mechanistic basis of Myxococcus xanthus rippling behavior and its physiological role during predation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Vaksman, Zalman; Litwin, Douglas B; Shi, Peng; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2012-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus cells self-organize into periodic bands of traveling waves, termed ripples, during multicellular fruiting body development and predation on other bacteria. To investigate the mechanistic basis of rippling behavior and its physiological role during predation by this Gram-negative soil bacterium, we have used an approach that combines mathematical modeling with experimental observations. Specifically, we developed an agent-based model (ABM) to simulate rippling behavior that employs a new signaling mechanism to trigger cellular reversals. The ABM has demonstrated that three ingredients are sufficient to generate rippling behavior: (i) side-to-side signaling between two cells that causes one of the cells to reverse, (ii) a minimal refractory time period after each reversal during which cells cannot reverse again, and (iii) physical interactions that cause the cells to locally align. To explain why rippling behavior appears as a consequence of the presence of prey, we postulate that prey-associated macromolecules indirectly induce ripples by stimulating side-to-side contact-mediated signaling. In parallel to the simulations, M. xanthus predatory rippling behavior was experimentally observed and analyzed using time-lapse microscopy. A formalized relationship between the wavelength, reversal time, and cell velocity has been predicted by the simulations and confirmed by the experimental data. Furthermore, the results suggest that the physiological role of rippling behavior during M. xanthus predation is to increase the rate of spreading over prey cells due to increased side-to-side contact-mediated signaling and to allow predatory cells to remain on the prey longer as a result of more periodic cell motility.

  2. The Mechanistic Basis of Myxococcus xanthus Rippling Behavior and Its Physiological Role during Predation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Vaksman, Zalman; Litwin, Douglas B.; Shi, Peng; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2012-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus cells self-organize into periodic bands of traveling waves, termed ripples, during multicellular fruiting body development and predation on other bacteria. To investigate the mechanistic basis of rippling behavior and its physiological role during predation by this Gram-negative soil bacterium, we have used an approach that combines mathematical modeling with experimental observations. Specifically, we developed an agent-based model (ABM) to simulate rippling behavior that employs a new signaling mechanism to trigger cellular reversals. The ABM has demonstrated that three ingredients are sufficient to generate rippling behavior: (i) side-to-side signaling between two cells that causes one of the cells to reverse, (ii) a minimal refractory time period after each reversal during which cells cannot reverse again, and (iii) physical interactions that cause the cells to locally align. To explain why rippling behavior appears as a consequence of the presence of prey, we postulate that prey-associated macromolecules indirectly induce ripples by stimulating side-to-side contact-mediated signaling. In parallel to the simulations, M. xanthus predatory rippling behavior was experimentally observed and analyzed using time-lapse microscopy. A formalized relationship between the wavelength, reversal time, and cell velocity has been predicted by the simulations and confirmed by the experimental data. Furthermore, the results suggest that the physiological role of rippling behavior during M. xanthus predation is to increase the rate of spreading over prey cells due to increased side-to-side contact-mediated signaling and to allow predatory cells to remain on the prey longer as a result of more periodic cell motility. PMID:23028301

  3. The Role of Exercise in Cardiac Aging: From Physiology to Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jason; Rhee, James; Chaudhari, Vinita; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2016-01-22

    Aging induces structural and functional changes in the heart that are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and impaired functional capacity in the elderly. Exercise is a diagnostic and therapeutic tool, with the potential to provide insights into clinical diagnosis and prognosis, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which aging influences cardiac physiology and function. In this review, we first provide an overview of how aging impacts the cardiac response to exercise, and the implications this has for functional capacity in older adults. We then review the underlying molecular mechanisms by which cardiac aging contributes to exercise intolerance, and conversely how exercise training can potentially modulate aging phenotypes in the heart. Finally, we highlight the potential use of these exercise models to complement models of disease in efforts to uncover new therapeutic targets to prevent or treat heart disease in the aging population.

  4. [The role of endocannabinoid system in physiological and pathological processes in the eye].

    PubMed

    Nadolska, Krystyna; Goś, Roman

    2008-01-01

    Plant of Cannabis sativa/ marihuana except for its psychotropic effects possesses a range of pharmacological properties, that has been utilized for medical purposes over a period of millenia. Investigations concerning biochemical mechanism of action of the main and most active pharmacological compound of Cannabis sativa, cannabinoid 9-THC, contributed to the discovery of cannabinoid receptors both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues, that mediated actions of this substance. The discovery made possible identification of a new, endogenous signaling system reffered to as the endocannabinoid system. Besides cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, the system includes it's endogenic ligands (endocannabinoids) and compounds that participate in their biosynthesis and inactivation. Structure and functioning of the endocannabinoid system is conservative in all vertebrates. It's activation with plant, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids has an influence on multiple physiological and pathological processes within the eye.

  5. The Role of Exercise in Cardiac Aging: From Physiology to Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Jason; Rhee, James; Chaudhari, Vinita; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Aging induces structural and functional changes in the heart that are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and impaired functional capacity in the elderly. Exercise is a diagnostic and therapeutic tool, with the potential to provide insights into clinical diagnosis and prognosis, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which aging influences cardiac physiology and function. In this review, we first provide an overview of how aging impacts the cardiac response to exercise and the implications this has for functional capacity in older adults. We then review the underlying molecular mechanisms by which cardiac aging contributes to exercise intolerance, and conversely how exercise training can potentially modulate aging phenotypes in the heart. Finally, we highlight the potential use of these exercise models to complement models of disease in efforts to uncover new therapeutic targets to prevent or treat heart disease in the aging population. PMID:26838314

  6. [ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels in muscle cells: features and physiological role].

    PubMed

    Vadziuk, O B

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of plasma membranes belong to the inward rectifier potassium channels type. They are involved in coupling of electrical activity of muscle cell with its metabolic state. These channels are heterooctameric and consist of two types of subunits: four poreforming (Kir 6.x) and four regulatory (SUR, sulfonylurea receptor). The Kir subunits contain highly selective K+ filter and provide for high-velocity K+ currents. The SUR subunits contain binding sites for activators and blockers and have metabolic sensor, which enables channel activation under conditions of metabolic stress. ATP blocks K+ currents through the ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels in the most types of muscle cells. However, functional activity of these channels does not depend on absolute concentration of ATP but on the ATP/ADP ratio and presence of Mg2+. Physiologically active substances, such as phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and fatty acid esters can regulate the activity of these structures in muscle cells. Activation of these channels under ischemic conditions underlies their cytoprotective action, which results in prevention of Ca2+ overload in cytosol. In contrast to ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of plasma membranes, the data regarding the structure and function of ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of mitochondrial membrane are contradictory. Pore-forming subunits of this channel have not been firmly identified yet. ATP-sensitive K+ transport through the mitochondrial membrane is easily tested by different methods, which are briefly reviewed in this paper. Interaction of mitoK(ATP) with physiological and pharmacological ligands is discussed as well.

  7. [Nitric oxide pathway and female lower urinary tract. Physiological and pathophysiological role].

    PubMed

    Gamé, X; Rischmann, P; Arnal, J-F; Malavaud, B

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to review the literature on nitric oxide and female lower urinary tract. A literature review through the PubMed library until December, 31 2012 was carried out using the following keywords: lower urinary tract, bladder, urethra, nervous central system, innervation, female, women, nitric oxide, phosphodiesterase, bladder outlet obstruction, urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, urinary tract infection. Two nitric oxide synthase isoforms, the neuronal (nNOS) and the endothelial (eNOS), are constitutively expressed in the lower urinary tract. Nevertheless, nNOS is mainly expressed in the bladder neck and the urethra. In the bladder, NO modulates the afferent neurons activity. In pathological condition, inducible NOS expression induces an increase in detrusor contractility and bladder wall thickness and eNOS facilitates Escherichia coli bladder wall invasion inducing recurrent urinary tract infections. In the urethra, NO play a major role in smooth muscle cells relaxation. The NO pathway plays a major role in the female lower urinary tract physiology and physiopathology. While it acts mainly on bladder outlet, in pathological condition, it is involved in bladder dysfunction occurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Does Pro12Ala Polymorphism Enhance the Physiological Role of PPARγ2?

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, A. C.; Oliveira, R.; Castro, A. C.; Fernandes, R.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) are two major public health problems that have motivated the scientific community to investigate the high contribution of genetic factors to these disorders. The peroxisome proliferator activated by gamma 2 (PPARγ2) plays an important role in the lipid metabolism. Since PPARγ2 is expressed mainly in adipose tissue, a moderate reduction of its activity influences the sensitivity to insulin, diabetes, and other metabolic parameters. The present study aims to contribute to the elucidation of the impact of the Pro12Ala polymorphism associated with T2D and obesity through a meta-analysis study of the literature that included approximately 11500 individuals, from which 3870 were obese and 7625 were diabetic. Statistical evidence supports protective effect in T2D of polymorphism Pro12Ala of PPARγ2 (OR = 0.702 with 95% CI: 0.622; 0.791, P < 0.01). Conversely the same polymorphism Pro12Ala of PPARγ2 seems to favor obesity since 1.196 more chance than nonobese was found (OR = 1.196 with 95% CI: 1.009; 1.417, P < 0.004). Our results suggest that Pro12Ala polymorphism enhances both adipogenic and antidiabetogenic physiological role of PPARγ. Does Pro12Ala polymorphism represent an evolutionary step towards the stabilization of the molecular function of PPARγ transcription factor signaling pathway? PMID:23983677

  9. The emerging roles of AhR in physiology and immunity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2013-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is traditionally defined as a transcriptional regulator involved in adaptive xenobiotic response, however, emerging evidence supports physiological functions of AhR in normal cell development and immune response. The role of AhR in immunomodulation is multi-dimensional. On the one hand, activation of AhR by TCDD and other ligands leads to profound immunosuppression, potentially via skewed Th1/Th2 cell balance toward Th1 dominance, and boosted Treg cell differentiation. On the other hand, activation of AhR can also induce Th17 cell polarization and increase the severity of autoimmune disease. In addition to T lymphocytes, the AhR also appears to play a vital role in B cell maturation, and regulates the activity of macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils following lipopolysaccharide challenge or influenza virus infection. In these scenarios, activation of AhR is associated with decreased host response and reduced survival. Furthermore, gene knock out studies suggest that AhR is indispensable for the postnatal maintenance of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and skin-resident dendritic epidermal gamma delta T cells, providing a potential link between AhR and gut immunity and wound healing. It is well accepted that the magnitude and the type of immune response is dependent on the local cytokine milieu and the AhR appears to be one of the key factors involved in the fine turning of this cytokine balance.

  10. Human Tumour Necrosis Factor: Physiological and Pathological Roles in Placenta and Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Haider, S.; Knöfler, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNF) is a well known member of the TNF superfamily consisting of at least 18 ligands and 29 different receptors involved in numerous cellular processes. TNF signals through two distinct receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 thereby controlling expression of cytokines, immune receptors, proteases, growth factors and cell cycle genes which in turn regulate inflammation, survival, apoptosis, cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Since expression of TNF was discovered in amnion and placenta many studies demonstrated the presence of the cytokine and its receptors in the diverse human reproductive tissues. Whereas TNF has been implicated in ovulation, corpus luteum formation and luteolysis, this review focuses on the functions of TNF in human placental, endometrial and decidual cell types of normal tissues and also discusses its role in endometrial and gestational diseases. Physiological levels of the cytokine could be important for balancing cell fusion and apoptotic shedding of villous trophoblasts and to limit trophoblast invasion into maternal decidua. Regulation of the TNF/TNFR system by steroid hormones also suggests a role in uterine function including menstrual cycle-dependent destruction and regeneration of endometrial tissue. Aberrant levels of TNF, however, are associated with diverse reproductive diseases such as amniotic infections, recurrent spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, preterm labour or endometriosis. Hence, concentrations, receptor distribution and length of stimulation determine whether TNF has beneficial or adverse effects on female reproduction and pregnancy. PMID:19027157

  11. Cell culture models and animal models for studying the patho-physiological role of renal aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Tamma, G; Procino, G; Svelto, M; Valenti, G

    2012-06-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are key players regulating urinary-concentrating ability. To date, eight aquaporins have been characterized and localized along the nephron, namely, AQP1 located in the proximal tubule, thin descending limb of Henle, and vasa recta; AQP2, AQP3 and AQP4 in collecting duct principal cells; AQP5 in intercalated cell type B; AQP6 in intercalated cells type A in the papilla; AQP7, AQP8 and AQP11 in the proximal tubule. AQP2, whose expression and cellular distribution is dependent on vasopressin stimulation, is involved in hereditary and acquired diseases affecting urine-concentrating mechanisms. Due to the lack of selective aquaporin inhibitors, the patho-physiological role of renal aquaporins has not yet been completely clarified, and despite extensive studies, several questions remain unanswered. Until the recent and large-scale development of genetic manipulation technology, which has led to the generation of transgenic mice models, our knowledge on renal aquaporin regulation was mainly based on in vitro studies with suitable renal cell models. Transgenic and knockout technology approaches are providing pivotal information on the role of aquaporins in health and disease. The main goal of this review is to update and summarize what we can learn from cell and animal models that will shed more light on our understanding of aquaporin-dependent renal water regulation.

  12. TXNDC5, a Newly Discovered Disulfide Isomerase with a Key Role in Cell Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Horna-Terrón, Elena; Pradilla-Dieste, Alberto; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Osada, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin domain-containing 5 (TXNDC5) is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, acting as a chaperone of endoplasmic reticulum under not fully characterized conditions As a result, TXNDC5 interacts with many cell proteins, contributing to their proper folding and correct formation of disulfide bonds through its thioredoxin domains. Moreover, it can also work as an electron transfer reaction, recovering the functional isoform of other protein disulfide isomerases, replacing reduced glutathione in its role. Finally, it also acts as a cellular adapter, interacting with the N-terminal domain of adiponectin receptor. As can be inferred from all these functions, TXNDC5 plays an important role in cell physiology; therefore, dysregulation of its expression is associated with oxidative stress, cell ageing and a large range of pathologies such as arthritis, cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, vitiligo and virus infections. Its implication in all these important diseases has made TXNDC5 a susceptible biomarker or even a potential pharmacological target. PMID:25526565

  13. Tomato Plant Proteins Actively Responding to Fungal Applications and Their Role in Cell Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Zoobia; Shafique, Sobiya; Ahmad, Aqeel; Shafique, Shazia; Yasin, Nasim A.; Ashraf, Yaseen; Ibrahim, Asma; Akram, Waheed; Noreen, Sibgha

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of protein induction in tomato plants has been investigated after the applications of pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungal species. Moreover, particular roles of the most active protein against biological applications were also determined using chromatographic techniques. Alternaria alternata and Penicillium oxalicum were applied as a pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungal species, respectively. Protein profile analysis revealed that a five protein species (i.e., protein 1, 6, 10, 12, and 13) possessed completely coupled interaction with non-pathogenic inducer application (P. oxalicum). However, three protein species (i.e., 10, 12, and 14) recorded a strong positive interaction with both fungal species. Protein 14 exhibited the maximum interaction with fungal applications, and its role in plant metabolism was studied after its identification as protein Q9M1W6. It was determined that protein Q1M1W6 was involved in guaiacyl lignin biosynthesis, and its inhibition increased the coumarin contents in tomato plants. Moreover, it was also observed that the protein Q9M1W6 takes significant part in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and Indole acetic acid contents, which are defense and growth factors of tomato plants. The study will help investigators to design fundamental rules of plant proteins affecting cell physiology under the influence of external fungal applications. PMID:27445848

  14. The C. elegans epidermis as a model skin. II: differentiation and physiological roles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Suhong

    2012-01-01

    The C. elegans epidermis forms one of the principal barrier epithelia of the animal. Differentiation of the epidermis begins in mid embryogenesis and involves apical-basal polarization of the cytoskeletal and secretory systems as well as cellular junction formation. Secretion of the external cuticle layers is one of the major developmental and physiological specializations of the epidermal epithelium. The four post-embryonic larval stages are separated by periodic moults, in which the epidermis generates a new cuticle with stage-specific characteristics. The differentiated epidermis also plays key roles in endocrine signaling, fat storage, and ionic homeostasis. The epidermis is intimately associated with the development and function of the nervous system, and may have glial-like roles in modulating neuronal function. The epidermis provides passive and active defenses against skin-penetrating pathogens and can repair small wounds. Finally, age-dependent deterioration of the epidermis is a prominent feature of aging and may affect organismal aging and lifespan. PMID:23539358

  15. Gli-Similar (Glis) Proteins: Their Mechanisms of Action, Physiological Functions, and Roles in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lichti-Kaiser, Kristin; ZeRuth, Gary; Kang, Hong Soon; Vasanth, Shivakumar; Jetten, Anton M.

    2013-01-01

    Gli-similar (Glis) 1–3 proteins constitute a sub-family of Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins that are closely related to members of the Gli family. Glis proteins have been implicated in several pathologies, including cystic kidney disease, diabetes, hypothyroidism, fibrosis, osteoporosis, psoriasis, and cancer. In humans, a mutation in the Glis2 gene has been linked to the development of nephronophthisis (NPHP), a recessive cystic kidney disease, while mutations in Glis3 lead to an extended multi-system phenotype that includes the development of neonatal diabetes, polycystic kidneys, congenital hypothyroidism, and facial dysmorphism. Glis3 has also been identified as a risk locus for type-1 and type-2 diabetes and additional studies have revealed a role for Glis3 in pancreatic endocrine development, β-cell maintenance, and insulin regulation. Similar to Gli1-3, Glis2 and 3 have been reported to localize to the primary cilium. These studies appear to suggest that Glis proteins are part of a primary cilium-associated signaling pathway(s). It has been hypothesized that Glis proteins are activated through post-translational modifications and subsequently translocate to the nucleus where they regulate transcription by interacting with Glis binding sites in the promoter regions of target genes. This chapter will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of the Glis family of proteins, their physiological functions, as well as their roles in disease. PMID:22391303

  16. Gli-similar proteins: their mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease.

    PubMed

    Lichti-Kaiser, Kristin; ZeRuth, Gary; Kang, Hong Soon; Vasanth, Shivakumar; Jetten, Anton M

    2012-01-01

    Gli-similar (Glis) 1-3 proteins constitute a subfamily of Krüppel-like zinc-finger proteins that are closely related to members of the Gli family. Glis proteins have been implicated in several pathologies, including cystic kidney disease, diabetes, hypothyroidism, fibrosis, osteoporosis, psoriasis, and cancer. In humans, a mutation in the Glis2 gene has been linked to the development of nephronophthisis (NPHP), a recessive cystic kidney disease, while mutations in Glis3 lead to an extended multisystem phenotype that includes the development of neonatal diabetes, polycystic kidneys, congenital hypothyroidism, and facial dysmorphism. Glis3 has also been identified as a risk locus for type-1 and type-2 diabetes and additional studies have revealed a role for Glis3 in pancreatic endocrine development, β-cell maintenance, and insulin regulation. Similar to Gli1-3, Glis2 and 3 have been reported to localize to the primary cilium. These studies appear to suggest that Glis proteins are part of a primary cilium-associated signaling pathway(s). It has been hypothesized that Glis proteins are activated through posttranslational modifications and subsequently translocate to the nucleus where they regulate transcription by interacting with Glis-binding sites in the promoter regions of target genes. This chapter summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of the Glis family of proteins, their physiological functions, as well as their roles in disease.

  17. Emerging roles of aquaporins in relation to the physiology of blood-feeding arthropods.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Joshua B; Hansen, Immo A; Szuter, Elise M; Drake, Lisa L; Burnett, Denielle L; Attardo, Geoffrey M

    2014-10-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are proteins that span plasma membranes allowing the movement of water and small solutes into or out of cells. The type, expression levels and activity of AQPs play a major role in the relative permeability of each cell to water or other solutes. Research on arthropod AQPs has expanded in the last 10 years due to the completion of several arthropod genome projects and the increased availability of genetic information accessible through other resources such as de novo transcriptome assemblies. In particular, there has been significant advancement in elucidating the roles that AQPs serve in relation to the physiology of blood-feeding arthropods of medical importance. The focus of this review is upon the significance of AQPs in relation to hematophagy in arthropods. This will be accomplished via a narrative describing AQP functions during the life history of hematophagic arthropods that includes the following critical phases: (1) Saliva production necessary to blood feeding, (2) Intake and excretion of water during blood digestion, (3) Reproduction and egg development and (4) Off-host environmental stress tolerance. The concentration on these phases will highlight known vulnerabilities in the biology of hematophagic arthropods that could be used to develop novel control strategies as well as research topics that have yet to be examined.

  18. A reduced order model for fluid-structure interaction of thin shell structures conveying fluid for physiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gary Han; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a reduced-order model (ROM) is constructed to study fluid-structure interaction of thin shell structures conveying fluid. The method of snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is used to construct the reduced-order bases based on a series of CFD results, which then are improved using a QR-factorization technique to satisfy the various boundary conditions in physiological flow problems. In the process, two sets of POD modes are extracted: those due to the shell wall's motion and those due to the pulsatile flow. The Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) technique is used for selecting the final POD modes used in the reduced-order model. The structure model is solved by Galerkin's method and the FSI coupling is done by adapting a coupled momentum method. The results show that the dynamic behavior of thin shells conveying fluid is closely related to the distribution of the shell's Gaussian curvature, the existence of imperfections and the physiological flow conditions. This method can effectively construct a computationally efficient FSI model, which allows us to examine a wide range of parameters which exist in real-life physiological problems.

  19. Role of coronary physiology in the contemporary management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Kharbanda, Rajesh K

    2015-02-16

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide with approximately 1 in 30 patients with stable CAD experiencing death or acute myocardial infarction each year. The presence and extent of resultant myocardial ischaemia has been shown to confer an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Whilst, optimal medical therapy (OMT) forms the cornerstone of the management of patients with stable CAD, a significant number of patients present with ischaemia refractory to OMT. Historically coronary angiography alone has been used to determine coronary lesion severity in both stable and acute settings. It is increasingly clear that this approach fails to accurately identify the haemodynamic significance of lesions; especially those that are visually "intermediate" in severity. Revascularisation based upon angiographic appearances alone may not reduce coronary events above OMT. Technological advances have enabled the measurement of physiological indices including the fractional flow reserve, the index of microcirculatory resistance and the coronary flow reserve. The integration of these parameters into the routine management of patients presenting to the cardiac catheterization laboratory with CAD represents a critical adjunctive tool in the optimal management of these patients by identifying patients that would most benefit from revascularisation and importantly also highlighting patients that would not gain benefit and therefore reducing the likelihood of adverse outcomes associated with coronary revascularisation. Furthermore, these techniques are applicable to a broad range of patients including those with left main stem disease, proximal coronary disease, diabetes mellitus, previous percutaneous coronary intervention and with previous coronary artery bypass grafting. This review will discuss current concepts relevant to coronary physiology assessment, its role in the management of both stable and acute patients and future applications.

  20. Elevated Pressure Triggers a Physiological Release of ATP from the Retina: Possible Role for Pannexin Hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Reigada, David; Lu, Wennan; Zhang, May; Mitchell, Claire H.

    2008-01-01

    Increased hydrostatic pressure can damage neurons, although the mechanisms linking pressure to neurochemical imbalance or cell injury are not fully established. Throughout the body, mechanical perturbations such as shear stress, cell stretching, or changes in pressure can lead to excessive release of ATP. It is thus possible that increased pressure across neural tissues triggers an elevated release of ATP into extracellular space. As stimulation of the P2X7 receptor for ATP on retinal ganglion cells leads to elevation of intracellular calcium and excitotoxic death, we asked whether increased levels of extracellular ATP accompanied an elevation in pressure across the retina. The hydrostatic pressure surrounding bovine retinal eyecups was increased and the ATP content of the vitreal compartment adjacent to the retina was determined. A step increase of only 20 mmHg induced a three-fold increase in the vitreal ATP concentration. The ATP levels correlated closely with the degree of pressure increase over 20–100 mmHg range. The increase was transient at lower pressures but sustained at higher pressures. The rise in vitreal ATP was the same regardless of whether nitrogen or air was used to increase pressure, implying changes in oxygen partial pressure did not contribute. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was not affected by pressure, ruling out a substantial contribution from cell lysis. The ATP increase was largely inhibited by either 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) or carbenoxolone (CBX). While this is consistent with physiological release of ATP through pannexins hemichannels, a contribution from anion channels, vesicular release or other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. In conclusion, a step elevation in pressure leads to a physiologic increase in the levels of extracellular ATP bathing retinal neurons. This excess extracellular ATP may link increased pressure to the death of ganglion cells in acute glaucoma, and suggests a role for ATP in the

  1. The role of anxiety sensitivity in subjective and physiological responses to social and physical stressors.

    PubMed

    Conrod, Patricia J

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the specificity of the relationship between anxiety sensitivity (AS), a measure of catastrophizing about arousal-related sensations, and pain responses, by examining the effect of AS on responses to stressors of a physical and social nature. Healthy men and women (n = 129) between the ages of 18 and 25 years were recruited from the community to participate in a study examining subjective, cognitive and behavioural responses to different types of stressors. Participants were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: (i) a neutral condition in which they sat quietly and read a popular magazine; (ii) a social stress condition in which they anticipated having to give a self-disclosing speech; and (iii) a physical stress condition in which they were presented with 3 countdown to shock trials where a mild electrical shock was administered on the non-dominant arm. Subjective ratings and physiological responses were recorded in anticipation of the stressor and immediately after stress exposure. Results indicated that AS was indirectly related to pain ratings via its effect on anticipatory anxiety ratings. AS was associated with anticipatory anxiety ratings, regardless of whether the stressor was of a physical or social nature. Furthermore, AS was not shown to be directly associated with exaggerated subjective or physiological reactions to the physical stressor. These results indicate that the role of AS in pain responses may be mediated through a global effect on anxiety, and limited to the anticipatory stage of the pain experience. If future studies yield similar findings in pain patients, then they would suggest that interventions for helping individuals high in AS should focus on catastrophic thinking in anticipation of stressors in general, rather than on pain-specific stressors.

  2. Central role of the BK channel in urinary bladder smooth muscle physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Georgi V

    2014-09-15

    The physiological functions of the urinary bladder are to store and periodically expel urine. These tasks are facilitated by the contraction and relaxation of the urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM), also known as detrusor smooth muscle, which comprises the bladder wall. The large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK, BKCa, MaxiK, Slo1, or KCa1.1) channel is highly expressed in UBSM and is arguably the most important physiologically relevant K(+) channel that regulates UBSM function. Its significance arises from the fact that the BK channel is the only K(+) channel that is activated by increases in both voltage and intracellular Ca(2+). The BK channels control UBSM excitability and contractility by maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping the repolarization phase of the spontaneous action potentials that determine UBSM spontaneous rhythmic contractility. In UBSM, these channels have complex regulatory mechanisms involving integrated intracellular Ca(2+) signals, protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and close functional interactions with muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors. BK channel dysfunction is implicated in some forms of bladder pathologies, such as detrusor overactivity, and related overactive bladder. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the functional role of UBSM BK channels under normal and pathophysiological conditions and provides new insight toward the BK channels as targets for pharmacological or genetic control of UBSM function. Modulation of UBSM BK channels can occur by directly or indirectly targeting their regulatory mechanisms, which has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches for bladder dysfunction, such as overactive bladder and detrusor underactivity.

  3. Molecular Analysis of Atypical Family 18 Chitinase from Fujian Oyster Crassostrea angulata and Its Physiological Role in the Digestive System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingye; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Lingling; Pu, Fei; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    Chitinolytic enzymes have an important physiological significance in immune and digestive systems in plants and animals, but chitinase has not been identified as having a role in the digestive system in molluscan. In our study, a novel chitinase homologue, named Ca-Chit, has been cloned and characterized as the oyster Crassostrea angulate. The 3998bp full-length cDNA of Ca-Chit consisted of 23bp 5-UTR, 3288 ORF and 688bp 3-UTR. The deduced amino acids sequence shares homologue with the chitinase of family 18. The molecular weight of the protein was predicted to be 119.389 kDa, with a pI of 6.74. The Ca-Chit protein was a modular enzyme composed of a glycosyl hydrolase family 18 domain, threonine-rich region profile and a putative membrane anchor domain. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in different adult tissues showed that the mRNA of Ca-Chit expressed markedly higher visceral mass than any other tissues. The results of the whole mount in-situ hybridization displayed that Ca-Chit starts to express the visceral mass of D-veliger larvae and then the digestive gland forms a crystalline structure during larval development. Furthermore, the adult oysters challenged by starvation indicated that the Ca-Chit expression would be regulated by feed. All the observations made suggest that Ca-Chit plays an important role in the digestive system of the oyster, Crassostrea angulate.

  4. Multifaceted Roles of Metzincins in CNS Physiology and Pathology: From Synaptic Plasticity and Cognition to Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brzdak, Patrycja; Nowak, Daria; Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) and membrane proteolysis play a key role in structural and functional synaptic plasticity associated with development and learning. A growing body of evidence underscores the multifaceted role of members of the metzincin superfamily, including metalloproteinases (MMPs), A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases (ADAMs), A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTSs) and astacins in physiological and pathological processes in the central nervous system (CNS). The expression and activity of metzincins are strictly controlled at different levels (e.g., through the regulation of translation, limited activation in the extracellular space, the binding of endogenous inhibitors and interactions with other proteins). Thus, unsurprising is that the dysregulation of proteolytic activity, especially the greater expression and activation of metzincins, is associated with neurodegenerative disorders that are considered synaptopathies, especially Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We review current knowledge of the functions of metzincins in the development of AD, mainly the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, the degradation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide and several pathways for Aβ clearance across brain barriers (i.e., blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB)) that contain specific receptors that mediate the uptake of Aβ peptide. Controlling the proteolytic activity of metzincins in Aβ-induced pathological changes in AD patients’ brains may be a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:28713245

  5. Physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic roles of 5-HT systems in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    1998-01-01

    Multiple 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors have been identified (5-HT1A/1B/1D/1E/1F, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT3A/3B, 5-HT4A/4B, 5-HT5A/5B, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7A/7B/7C/7D) and extensive evidence suggests that 5-HT receptors have a role in learning and memory. Indeed, available evidence strongly supports physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic roles of 5-HT systems in cognitive processes, although the evidence seems incomplete. Indeed, there has been a clear tendency to use pre-learning administration most frequently, whereas post-learning and pre-retention administration protocols have been utilized in only a few studies, and probably this trend has led to missed relevant information. For instance, when pre- vs post-training administration of 5-HT1A agonist, 5-HT2 antagonists and 5-HT4 agonists have been compared contrasting findings were reported in aversive and appetitive learning tasks. Emerging evidence also indicates that 5-HT1A and 5-HT4 receptor agonists, as well as, 5-HT1A antagonists, 5-HT2 antagonists, 5-HT3 antagonists and 5-HT uptake inhibitors may have therapeutic utility in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and amnesia. Inasmuch as the activation or blockade of diverse 5-HT receptors is able to modulate cognitive processes, and 5-HT uptake inhibition could have therapeutic applications in the treatment of cognitive disorders, it seems evident that the role of 5-HT in learning and memory is more complex than a simple imbalance. Consequently, the notion that activation of the 5-HT systems impairs performance, whereas reduced serotonergic function may facilitate learning, must be reconsidered.

  6. Is boron involved solely in structural roles in vascular plants?

    PubMed Central

    Rexach, Jesús; Navarro-Gochicoa, María Teresa; Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Beato, Víctor Manuel; Maldonado, José María; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan José

    2008-01-01

    It is very well proved that boron (B) plays a primary structural role in the plant cell wall. In addition, this micronutrient has been involved in a great variety of physiological processes in vascular plants. It has been reported that B deficiency induces stress-responsive genes and, in tobacco plants, it seems to decrease net nitrate uptake by repressing expression of root plasmalemma H+-ATPase gene. Moreover, root asparagine concentration is clearly increased under B deficiency, as also observed for other abiotic stresses. Accumulation of asparagine in response to abiotic stresses could be an ammonium detoxification mechanism when high amounts of ammonium are internally generated by deamination of soluble amino acids released from enhanced proteolysis under stress conditions. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the several effects caused by B deficiency are unknown. Although a mechanism has been reported to explain B effects based on signals via the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum, we propose and discuss the possible role of B as a cellular signal through transcription factors. This hypothetical mechanism could explain not only its diverse effects on so many physiological processes, but also that a negligible amount of boron into the protoplast can be decisive for the normal development of such events. PMID:19704761

  7. Is boron involved solely in structural roles in vascular plants?

    PubMed

    González-Fontes, Agustín; Rexach, Jesús; Navarro-Gochicoa, María Teresa; Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Beato, Víctor Manuel; Maldonado, José María; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan José

    2008-01-01

    It is very well proved that boron (B) plays a primary structural role in the plant cell wall. In addition, this micronutrient has been involved in a great variety of physiological processes in vascular plants. It has been reported that B deficiency induces stress-responsive genes and, in tobacco plants, it seems to decrease net nitrate uptake by repressing expression of root plasmalemma H(+)-ATPase gene. Moreover, root asparagine concentration is clearly increased under B deficiency, as also observed for other abiotic stresses. Accumulation of asparagine in response to abiotic stresses could be an ammonium detoxification mechanism when high amounts of ammonium are internally generated by deamination of soluble amino acids released from enhanced proteolysis under stress conditions. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the several effects caused by B deficiency are unknown. Although a mechanism has been reported to explain B effects based on signals via the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum, we propose and discuss the possible role of B as a cellular signal through transcription factors. This hypothetical mechanism could explain not only its diverse effects on so many physiological processes, but also that a negligible amount of boron into the protoplast can be decisive for the normal development of such events.

  8. Pleiotrophin expression and role in physiological angiogenesis in vivo: potential involvement of nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Koutsioumpa, Marina; Drosou, Georgia; Mikelis, Constantinos; Theochari, Katerina; Vourtsis, Dionussios; Katsoris, Panagiotis; Giannopoulou, Efstathia; Courty, Jose; Petrou, Christos; Magafa, Vassiliki; Cordopatis, Paul; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2012-03-16

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding growth factor with significant role(s) in tumour growth and angiogenesis. Although implication of endogenous PTN has been studied in several in vivo models of tumour angiogenesis, its role in physiological angiogenesis has not been addressed. In the present work, we studied expression and functional significance of endogenous PTN during angiogenesis in the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Using molecular, cellular and biochemical assays, we studied the expression pattern of PTN in CAM and human endothelial cells and its possible interaction with nucleolin (NCL). CAM cells were transfected with a pCDNA3.1 vector, empty (PC) or containing full length cDNA for PTN in antisense orientation (AS-PTN). Angiogenesis was estimated by measuring total vessel length. In vitro, human endothelial cells migration was studied by using a transwell assay, and down-regulation of NCL was performed by using a proper siRNA. Endogenous PTN mRNA and protein levels, as well as protein levels of its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ) were maximal at early stages, when CAM angiogenesis is active. Application of AS-PTN onto CAM at days of active angiogenesis was not toxic to the tissue and led to dose-dependent decreased expression of endogenous PTN, ERK1/2 activity and angiogenesis. Interestingly, endogenous PTN was also immunolocalized at the endothelial cell nucleus, possibly through interaction with NCL, a protein that has a significant role in the nuclear translocation of many proteins. Down-regulation of NCL by siRNA in human endothelial cells significantly decreased nuclear PTN, verifying this hypothesis. Moreover, it led to abolishment of PTN-induced endothelial cell migration, suggesting, for the first time, that PTN-NCL interaction has a functional significance. Expression of endogenous PTN correlates with and seems to be involved in angiogenesis of the chicken embryo CAM. Our data suggest that NCL may

  9. The multiple roles of sucrase-isomaltase in the intestinal physiology.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Birthe; Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y

    2016-12-01

    Osmotic diarrhea and abdominal pain in humans are oftentimes associated with carbohydrate malabsorption in the small intestine due to loss of function of microvillar disaccharidases. Disaccharidases are crucial for the digestion and the subsequent absorption of carbohydrates. This review focuses on sucrase-isomaltase as the most abundant intestinal disaccharidase and the primary or induced pathological conditions that affect its physiological function. Congenital defects are primary factors which directly influence the transport and function of sucrase-isomaltase in a healthy epithelium. Based on the mutation type and the pattern of inheritance, a mutation in the sucrase-isomaltase gene may exert a variety of symptoms ranging from mild to severe. However, structure and function of wild type sucrase-isomaltase can be also affected by secondary factors which influence its structure and function either specifically via certain inhibitors and therapeutic agents or generally as a part of intestinal pathogenesis, for example in the inflammatory responses. Diagnosis of sucrase-isomaltase deficiency and discriminating it from other gastrointestinal intolerances can be latent in the patients because of common symptoms observed in all of these cases.Here, we summarize the disorders that implicate the digestive function of sucrase-isomaltase as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies utilized to restore normal intestinal function.

  10. The Physiology of Fear: Reconceptualizing the Role of the Central Amygdala in Fear Learning

    PubMed Central

    Keifer, Orion P.; Hurt, Robert C.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    The historically understood role of the central amygdala (CeA) in fear learning is to serve as a passive output station for processing and plasticity that occurs elsewhere in the brain. However, recent research has suggested that the CeA may play a more dynamic role in fear learning. In particular, there is growing evidence that the CeA is a site of plasticity and memory formation, and that its activity is subject to tight regulation. The following review examines the evidence for these three main roles of the CeA as they relate to fear learning. The classical role of the CeA as a routing station to fear effector brain structures like the periaqueductal gray, the lateral hypothalamus, and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus will be briefly reviewed, but specific emphasis is placed on recent literature suggesting that the CeA 1) has an important role in the plasticity underlying fear learning, 2) is involved in regulation of other amygdala subnuclei, and 3) is itself regulated by intra- and extra-amygdalar input. Finally, we discuss the parallels of human and mouse CeA involvement in fear disorders and fear conditioning, respectively. PMID:26328883

  11. The Physiology of Fear: Reconceptualizing the Role of the Central Amygdala in Fear Learning.

    PubMed

    Keifer, Orion P; Hurt, Robert C; Ressler, Kerry J; Marvar, Paul J

    2015-09-01

    The historically understood role of the central amygdala (CeA) in fear learning is to serve as a passive output station for processing and plasticity that occurs elsewhere in the brain. However, recent research has suggested that the CeA may play a more dynamic role in fear learning. In particular, there is growing evidence that the CeA is a site of plasticity and memory formation, and that its activity is subject to tight regulation. The following review examines the evidence for these three main roles of the CeA as they relate to fear learning. The classical role of the CeA as a routing station to fear effector brain structures like the periaqueductal gray, the lateral hypothalamus, and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus will be briefly reviewed, but specific emphasis is placed on recent literature suggesting that the CeA 1) has an important role in the plasticity underlying fear learning, 2) is involved in regulation of other amygdala subnuclei, and 3) is itself regulated by intra- and extra-amygdalar input. Finally, we discuss the parallels of human and mouse CeA involvement in fear disorders and fear conditioning, respectively.

  12. Physiological adaptation along environmental gradients and replicated hybrid zone structure in swordtails (Teleostei: Xiphophorus).

    PubMed

    Culumber, Z W; Shepard, D B; Coleman, S W; Rosenthal, G G; Tobler, M

    2012-09-01

    Local adaptation is often invoked to explain hybrid zone structure, but empirical evidence of this is generally rare. Hybrid zones between two poeciliid fishes, Xiphophorus birchmanni and X. malinche, occur in multiple tributaries with independent replication of upstream-to-downstream gradients in morphology and allele frequencies. Ecological niche modelling revealed that temperature is a central predictive factor in the spatial distribution of pure parental species and their hybrids and explains spatial and temporal variation in the frequency of neutral genetic markers in hybrid populations. Among populations of parentals and hybrids, both thermal tolerance and heat-shock protein expression vary strongly, indicating that spatial and temporal structure is likely driven by adaptation to local thermal environments. Therefore, hybrid zone structure is strongly influenced by interspecific differences in physiological mechanisms for coping with the thermal environment.

  13. Physiology complements population structure of two endemic log-dwelling beetles.

    PubMed

    Schmuki, Christina; Woodman, James D; Sunnucks, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Given rapid, global land modification and the likelihood of major global climate changes, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the physiological limits and capabilities of species to allow more accurate prediction of species' distributions under different scenarios of climate and landscape management. We studied whether the different habitat requirements of two species of tenebrionid beetles in temperate eucalypt forest could explain their patterns of dispersal and gene flow by applying flow-through respirometry to analysis of their physiological responses to different, ecologically relevant temperatures. Both Adelium calosomoides and Apasis puncticeps showed sensitivity to increasing temperatures (in terms of water loss), but Ap. puncticeps lost more water per unit of CO2 produced than did Ad. calosomoides. Recovery time from chill coma was also significantly longer for Ap. puncticeps than Ad. calosomoides. This supported prior qualitative assessment that Ap. puncticeps is more of a habitat specialist than Ad. calosomoides, at least concerning the critical factor of moisture requirements, and is consistent with stronger population genetic patterning and inferred low mobility of Ap. puncticeps. Despite its relatively lower mobility as deduced from population genetic structure, Ap. puncticeps walked four times faster than Ad. calosomoides in a laboratory assay, indicating that, for these species, mobility and gene flow are influenced more by physiological limitations than by speed.

  14. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Physiological roles of zinc transporters: molecular and genetic importance in zinc homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takafumi; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace mineral that regulates the expression and activation of biological molecules such as transcription factors, enzymes, adapters, channels, and growth factors, along with their receptors. Zn deficiency or excessive Zn absorption disrupts Zn homeostasis and affects growth, morphogenesis, and immune response, as well as neurosensory and endocrine functions. Zn levels must be adjusted properly to maintain the cellular processes and biological responses necessary for life. Zn transporters regulate Zn levels by controlling Zn influx and efflux between extracellular and intracellular compartments, thus, modulating the Zn concentration and distribution. Although the physiological functions of the Zn transporters remain to be clarified, there is growing evidence that Zn transporters are related to human diseases, and that Zn transporter-mediated Zn ion acts as a signaling factor, called "Zinc signal". Here we describe critical roles of Zn transporters in the body and their contribution at the molecular, biochemical, and genetic levels, and review recently reported disease-related mutations in the Zn transporter genes.

  16. The molecular and physiological roles of ABCC6: more than meets the eye

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Olivier; Martin, Ludovic; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Leftheriotis, Georges; Váradi, András; Brampton, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal mineralization occurs in the context of several common conditions, including advanced age, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, chronic renal failure, and certain genetic conditions. Metabolic, mechanical, infectious, and inflammatory injuries promote ectopic mineralization through overlapping yet distinct molecular mechanisms of initiation and progression. The ABCC6 protein is an ATP-dependent transporter primarily found in the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. ABCC6 exports unknown substrates from the liver presumably for systemic circulation. ABCC6 deficiency is the primary cause for chronic and acute forms of ectopic mineralization described in diseases such as pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), β-thalassemia, and generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) in humans and dystrophic cardiac calcification (DCC) in mice. These pathologies are characterized by mineralization of cardiovascular, ocular, and dermal tissues. PXE and to an extent GACI are caused by inactivating ABCC6 mutations, whereas the mineralization associated with β-thalassemia patients derives from a liver-specific change in ABCC6 expression. DCC is an acquired phenotype resulting from cardiovascular insults (ischemic injury or hyperlipidemia) and secondary to ABCC6 insufficiency. Abcc6-deficient mice develop ectopic calcifications similar to both the human PXE and mouse DCC phenotypes. The precise molecular and cellular mechanism linking deficient hepatic ABCC6 function to distal ectopic mineral deposition is not understood and has captured the attention of many research groups. Our previously published work along with that of others show that ABCC6 influences other modulators of calcification and that it plays a much greater physiological role than originally thought. PMID:23248644

  17. Data supporting the role of enzymes and polysaccharides during cassava postharvest physiological deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; da Costa Nunes, Eduardo; de Oliveira Neubert, Enilto; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    This data article is referred to the research article entitled The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration by Uarrota et al. (2015). Food Chemistry 197, Part A, 737–746. The stress duo to PPD of cassava roots leads to the formation of ROS which are extremely harmful and accelerates cassava spoiling. To prevent or alleviate injuries from ROS, plants have evolved antioxidant systems that include non-enzymatic and enzymatic defence systems such as ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase and polysaccharides. In this data article can be found a dataset called “newdata”, in RData format, with 60 observations and 06 variables. The first 02 variables (Samples and Cultivars) and the last 04, spectrophotometric data of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, tocopherol, total proteins and arcsined data of cassava PPD scoring. For further interpretation and analysis in R software, a report is also provided. Means of all variables and standard deviations are also provided in the Supplementary tables (“data.long3.RData, data.long4.RData and meansEnzymes.RData”), raw data of PPD scoring without transformation (PPDmeans.RData) and days of storage (days.RData) are also provided for data analysis reproducibility in R software. PMID:26900596

  18. Role of Circadian Neuroendocrine Rhythms in the Control of Behavior and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Urbanski, Henryk F.

    2011-01-01

    Hormones play a major role in regulating behavior and physiology, and their efficacy is often dependent on the temporal pattern in which they are secreted. Significant insights into the mechanisms underlying rhythmic hormone secretion have been gained from transgenic rodent models, suggesting that many of the body's rhythmic functions are regulated by a coordinated network of central and peripheral circadian pacemakers. Some neuroendocrine rhythms are driven by transcriptional-posttranslational feedback circuits comprising ‘core clock genes’, while others represent a cyclic cascade of neuroendocrine events. This review focuses on recent data from the rhesus macaque, a non-human primate model with high clinical translation potential. With primary emphasis on adrenal and gonadal steroids, it illustrates the rhythmic nature of hormone secretion, and discusses the impact that fluctuating hormone levels have on the accuracy of clinical diagnoses and on the design of effective hormone replacement therapies in the elderly. In addition, this minireview raises awareness of the rhythmic expression patterns shown by many genes, and discusses how this could impact interpretation of data obtained from gene profiling studies, especially from nocturnal rodents. PMID:21508622

  19. Biochemistry and physiological roles of enzymes that 'cut and paste' plant cell-wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Franková, Lenka; Fry, Stephen C

    2013-09-01

    The plant cell-wall matrix is equipped with more than 20 glycosylhydrolase activities, including both glycosidases and glycanases (exo- and endo-hydrolases, respectively), which between them are in principle capable of hydrolysing most of the major glycosidic bonds in wall polysaccharides. Some of these enzymes also participate in the 'cutting and pasting' (transglycosylation) of sugar residues-enzyme activities known as transglycosidases and transglycanases. Their action and biological functions differ from those of the UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases (polysaccharide synthases) that catalyse irreversible glycosyl transfer. Based on the nature of the substrates, two types of reaction can be distinguished: homo-transglycosylation (occurring between chemically similar polymers) and hetero-transglycosylation (between chemically different polymers). This review focuses on plant cell-wall-localized glycosylhydrolases and the transglycosylase activities exhibited by some of these enzymes and considers the physiological need for wall polysaccharide modification in vivo. It describes the mechanism of transglycosylase action and the classification and phylogenetic variation of the enzymes. It discusses the modulation of their expression in plants at the transcriptional and translational levels, and methods for their detection. It also critically evaluates the evidence that the enzyme proteins under consideration exhibit their predicted activity in vitro and their predicted action in vivo. Finally, this review suggests that wall-localized glycosylhydrolases with transglycosidase and transglycanase abilities are widespread in plants and play important roles in the mechanism and control of plant cell expansion, differentiation, maturation, and wall repair.

  20. Acylcarnitines--old actors auditioning for new roles in metabolic physiology.

    PubMed

    McCoin, Colin S; Knotts, Trina A; Adams, Sean H

    2015-10-01

    Perturbations in metabolic pathways can cause substantial increases in plasma and tissue concentrations of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs). For example, the levels of LCACs and other acylcarnitines rise in the blood and muscle during exercise, as changes in tissue pools of acyl-coenzyme A reflect accelerated fuel flux that is incompletely coupled to mitochondrial energy demand and capacity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This natural ebb and flow of acylcarnitine generation and accumulation contrasts with that of inherited fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAODs), cardiac ischaemia or type 2 diabetes mellitus. These conditions are characterized by very high (FAODs, ischaemia) or modestly increased (type 2 diabetes mellitus) tissue and blood levels of LCACs. Although specific plasma concentrations of LCACs and chain-lengths are widely used as diagnostic markers of FAODs, research into the potential effects of excessive LCAC accumulation or the roles of acylcarnitines as physiological modulators of cell metabolism is lacking. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence has highlighted possible effects of LCACs on disparate aspects of pathophysiology, such as cardiac ischaemia outcomes, insulin sensitivity and inflammation. This Review, therefore, aims to provide a theoretical framework for the potential consequences of tissue build-up of LCACs among individuals with metabolic disorders.

  1. Acylcarnitines—old actors auditioning for new roles in metabolic physiology

    PubMed Central

    McCoin, Colin S.; Knotts, Trina A.; Adams, Sean H.

    2016-01-01

    Perturbations in metabolic pathways can cause substantial increases in plasma and tissue concentrations of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs). For example, the levels of LCACs and other acylcarnitines rise in the blood and muscle during exercise, as changes in tissue pools of acylcoenzyme A reflect accelerated fuel flux that is incompletely coupled to mitochondrial energy demand and capacity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This natural ebb and flow of acylcarnitine generation and accumulation contrasts with that of inherited fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAODs), cardiac ischaemia or type 2 diabetes mellitus. These conditions are characterized by very high (FAODs, ischaemia) or modestly increased (type 2 diabetes mellitus) tissue and blood levels of LCACs. Although specific plasma LCAC concentrations and chain-lengths are widely used as diagnostic markers of FAODs, research into the potential effects of excessive LCAC accumulation or the roles of acylcarnitines as physiological modulators of cell metabolism is lacking. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence has highlighted possible effects of LCACs on disparate aspects of pathophysiology, such as cardiac ischaemia outcomes, insulin sensitivity and inflammation. This Review, therefore, aims to provide a theoretical framework for the potential consequences of tissue build-up of LCACs among persons with metabolic disorders. PMID:26303601

  2. Beyond cellular detoxification: a plethora of physiological roles for MDR transporter homologs in plants

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Estelle; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants possess a multitude of Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR) transporter homologs that group into three distinct and ubiquitous families—the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily, the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS), and the Multidrug And Toxic compound Extrusion (MATE) family. As in other organisms, such as fungi, mammals, and bacteria, MDR transporters make a primary contribution to cellular detoxification processes in plants, mainly through the extrusion of toxic compounds from the cell or their sequestration in the central vacuole. This review aims at summarizing the currently available information on the in vivo roles of MDR transporters in plant systems. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that the biological functions of ABC, MFS, and MATE carriers are not restricted to xenobiotic and metal detoxification. Importantly, the activity of plant MDR transporters also mediates biotic stress resistance and is instrumental in numerous physiological processes essential for optimal plant growth and development, including the regulation of ion homeostasis and polar transport of the phytohormone auxin. PMID:24910617

  3. Biological underpinnings of breastfeeding challenges: the role of genetics, diet, and environment on lactation physiology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon

    2016-01-01

    Lactation is a dynamic process that has evolved to produce a complex biological fluid that provides nutritive and nonnutritive factors to the nursing offspring. It has long been assumed that once lactation is successfully initiated, the primary factor regulating milk production is infant demand. Thus, most interventions have focused on improving breastfeeding education and early lactation support. However, in addition to infant demand, increasing evidence from studies conducted in experimental animal models, production animals, and breastfeeding women suggests that a diverse array of maternal factors may also affect milk production and composition. In this review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of the role of maternal genetics and modifiable factors, such as diet and environmental exposures, on reproductive endocrinology, lactation physiology, and the ability to successfully produce milk. To identify factors that may affect lactation in women, we highlight some information gleaned from studies in experimental animal models and production animals. Finally, we highlight the gaps in current knowledge and provide commentary on future research opportunities aimed at improving lactation outcomes in breastfeeding women to improve the health of mothers and their infants. PMID:27354238

  4. Vagal afferents sense meal-associated gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones: mechanism and physiological role.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusaku; Yada, Toshihiko

    2012-12-01

    Some gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones are potently secreted by meal intake and reduce food intake, therefore these hormones play a role in the meal-evoked satiety peptides. Previous reports have demonstrated that peripheral administration of these gastrointestinal or pancreatic hormones decrease feeding and the anorectic effects are abolished by lesions of vagal afferent nerves using surgical or chemical protocols, indicative of the involvement of the vagal afferents. Vagal afferent nerves link between several peripheral organs and the nucleus tractus solitarius of the brainstem. The present review focuses on cholecystokinin, peptide YY(3-36), pancreatic polypeptide, and nesfatin-1 released from endocrine cells of the gut and pancreas. These hormonal peptides directly act on and increase cytosolic Ca(2+) in vagal afferent nodose ganglion neurons and finally suppress food intake via vagal afferents. Therefore, peripheral terminals of vagal afferents could sense gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones and regulate food intake. Here, we review how the vagal afferent neurons sense a variety of gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones and discuss its physiological significance in regulation of feeding.

  5. Physiology and pathophysiology of the epithelial barrier of the female reproductive tract: role of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsiao Chang; Chen, Hui; Ruan, Yechun; Sun, Tingting

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium lining the female reproductive tract forms a selectively permeable barrier that is responsible for creating an optimal luminal fluid microenvironment essential to the success of various reproductive events. The selective permeability of the epithelial barrier to various ions is provided by the gating of epithelial ion channels, which work together with an array of other ion transporters to drive fluid movement across the epithelium. Thus, the luminal fluid is fine-tuned by the selective barrier with tight regulation of the epithelial ion channels. This chapter discusses the role of epithelial ion channels in regulating the epithelial barrier function and thus the fluid volume and ionic composition of the female reproductive tract; physiological factors regulating the ion channels and the importance of the regulation in various reproductive events such as sperm transport and capacitation, embryo development and implantation. Disturbance of the fluid microenvironment due to defects or abnormal regulation of these ion channels and dysregulated epithelial barrier function in a number of pathological conditions, such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hydrosalpinx and infertility, are also discussed.

  6. From discovery to function: the expanding roles of long noncoding RNAs in physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Kraus, W Lee

    2015-02-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a relatively poorly understood class of RNAs with little or no coding capacity transcribed from a set of incompletely annotated genes. They have received considerable attention in the past few years and are emerging as potentially important players in biological regulation. Here we discuss the evolving understanding of this new class of molecular regulators that has emerged from ongoing research, which continues to expand our databases of annotated lncRNAs and provide new insights into their physical properties, molecular mechanisms of action, and biological functions. We outline the current strategies and approaches that have been employed to identify and characterize lncRNAs, which have been instrumental in revealing their multifaceted roles ranging from cis- to trans-regulation of gene expression and from epigenetic modulation in the nucleus to posttranscriptional control in the cytoplasm. In addition, we highlight the molecular and biological functions of some of the best characterized lncRNAs in physiology and disease, especially those relevant to endocrinology, reproduction, metabolism, immunology, neurobiology, muscle biology, and cancer. Finally, we discuss the tremendous diagnostic and therapeutic potential of lncRNAs in cancer and other diseases.

  7. Clocks underneath: the role of peripheral clocks in the timing of female reproductive physiology.

    PubMed

    Sellix, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    The central circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a critical component of the neuroendocrine circuit controlling gonadotropin secretion from the pituitary gland. The SCN conveys photic information to hypothalamic targets including the gonadotropin releasing hormone neurons. Many of these target cells are also cell autonomous clocks. It has been suggested that, rather then being singularly driven by the SCN, the timing of gonadotropin secretion depends on the activity of multiple hypothalamic oscillators. While this view provides a novel twist to an old story, it does little to diminish the central role of rhythmic hypothalamic output in this system. It is now clear that the pituitary, ovary, uterus, and oviduct have functional molecular clocks. Evidence supports the notion that the clocks in these tissues contribute to the timing of events in reproductive physiology. The aim of this review is to highlight the current evidence for molecular clock function in the peripheral components of the female hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis as it relates to the timing of gonadotropin secretion, ovulation, and parturition.

  8. The physiological and pharmacological role of presynaptic alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors in man.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M J; Struthers, A D; Burrin, J M; Di Silvio, L; Brown, D C

    1985-01-01

    Two studies were performed each in six normal volunteers in order to find evidence of either a physiological or pharmacological role of presynaptic alpha- and presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in man. In Study 1 subjects received a 60 min infusion of guanfacine 3 mg (alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist) preceded by either idazoxan (alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist) or vehicle. Guanfacine reduced plasma noradrenaline concentration by approximately 30% and this fall was not antagonised by the alpha 2-receptor antagonist. The 30-fold increase in plasma growth hormone, measured as a marker of the central action of guanfacine, was almost completely blocked by idazoxan. A comparison of the drug concentrations of idazoxan and guanfacine, together with their relative affinities for alpha 2-adrenoceptors, suggested that the idazoxan could not block the peripheral actions of guanfacine and that these were responsible for the fall in plasma noradrenaline concentration. In Study 2 adrenaline 0.05 micrograms kg-1 min-1 was infused for 80 min preceded by either idazoxan or vehicle. After vehicle, adrenaline caused no change in plasma noradrenaline concentration whereas it rose approximately 25% after administration of idazoxan. This was probably due to unmasking of presynaptic beta-adrenoceptor stimulation by adrenaline when the opposing inhibitory autoreceptor was blocked. PMID:2868743

  9. Physiological role of FGF signaling in growth and remodeling of developing cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Krejci, E; Pesevski, Z; Nanka, O; Sedmera, D

    2016-07-18

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling plays an important role during embryonic induction and patterning, as well as in modulating proliferative and hypertrophic growth in fetal and adult organs. Hemodynamically induced stretching is a powerful physiological stimulus for embryonic myocyte proliferation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of FGF2 signaling on growth and vascularization of chick embryonic ventricular wall and its involvement in transmission of mechanical stretch-induced signaling to myocyte growth in vivo. Myocyte proliferation was significantly higher at the 48 h sampling interval in pressure-overloaded hearts. Neither Western blotting, nor immunohistochemistry performed on serial paraffin sections revealed any changes in the amount of myocardial FGF2 at that time point. ELISA showed a significant increase of FGF2 in the serum. Increased amount of FGF2 mRNA in the heart was confirmed by real time PCR. Blocking of FGF signaling by SU5402 led to decreased myocyte proliferation, hemorrhages in the areas of developing vasculature in epicardium and digit tips. FGF2 synthesis is increased in embryonic ventricular cardiomyocytes in response to increased stretch due to pressure overload. Inhibition of FGF signaling impacts also vasculogenesis, pointing to partial functional redundancy in paracrine control of cell proliferation in the developing heart.

  10. Physiological and therapeutical roles of ginger and turmeric on endocrine functions.

    PubMed

    Al-Suhaimi, Ebtesam A; Al-Riziza, Noorah A; Al-Essa, Reham A

    2011-01-01

    The natural product ginger (Zingiber officinale) has active constituents gingerol, Shogaol and Zerumbone, while turmeric (Curcuma longa) contains three active major curcuminoids, namely, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin. They have the same scientific classification and are reported to have anti-inflammatory and many therapeutic effects. This article reviews the physiological and therapeutic effects of ginger and turmeric on some endocrine gland functions, and signal pathways involved to mediate their actions. With some systems and adipose tissue, ginger and turmeric exert their actions through some/all of the following signals or molecular mechanisms: (1) through reduction of high levels of some hormones (as: T4, leptin) or interaction with hormone receptors; (2) by inhibition of cytokines/adipokine expression; (3) acting as a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating enzymes, which play an essential role between inflammation and progression of diseases; (4) mediation of their effects through the inhibition of signaling transcription factors; and/or (5) decrease the proliferative potent by down-regulation of antiapoptotic genes, which may suppress tumor promotion by blocking signal transduction pathways in the target cells. These multiple mechanisms of protection against inflammation and oxidative damage make ginger and curcumin particularly promising natural agents in fighting the ravages of aging and degenerative diseases, and need to be paid more attention by studies.

  11. Drug Insight: the role of leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology--emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Aoife M; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2006-06-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with a key role in energy homeostasis. Studies in animal models, in humans with congenital complete leptin deficiency, and observational and interventional studies in humans with relative leptin deficiency (lower than normal leptin levels) have all indicated that leptin regulates multiple physiological functions, primarily in states of energy deficiency. This information led to proof-of-concept clinical trials involving leptin administration to individuals with relative or complete leptin deficiency. These conditions include congenital complete leptin deficiency, due to mutations in the leptin gene, and states of relative leptin deficiency including lipoatrophy and some forms of hypothalamic amenorrhea. Leptin, in replacement doses, normalizes neuroendocrine, metabolic and immune function in patients with these conditions, but further clinical studies are required to determine its long-term efficacy and safety. Management of leptin-deficient states with replacement doses of leptin holds promise as a therapeutic option. In addition, elucidation of the mechanisms underlying leptin resistance, which characterizes hyperleptinemic states such as human obesity and diabetes, might provide novel therapeutic targets for these prevalent clinical problems.

  12. Genetic and pharmacological analysis identifies a physiological role for the AHR in epidermal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Ellen; Podolsky, Michael; Smits, Jos; Cui, Xiao; John, Christian; Gowda, Krishne; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Schalkwijk, Joost; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) by xenobiotics is known to affect epidermal differentiation and skin barrier formation. The physiological role of endogenous AHR signaling in keratinocyte differentiation is not known. We used murine and human skin models to address the hypothesis that AHR activation is required for normal keratinocyte differentiation. Using transcriptome analysis of Ahr-/- and Ahr+/+ murine keratinocytes, we found significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes linked to epidermal differentiation. Primary Ahr-/- keratinocytes showed a significant reduction in terminal differentiation gene and protein expression, similar to Ahr+/+ keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists GNF351 and CH223191, or the selective AHR modulator (SAhRM), SGA360. In vitro keratinocyte differentiation led to increased AHR levels and subsequent nuclear translocation, followed by induced CYP1A1 gene expression. Monolayer cultured primary human keratinocytes treated with AHR antagonists also showed an impaired terminal differentiation program. Inactivation of AHR activity during human skin equivalent development severely impaired epidermal stratification, terminal differentiation protein expression and stratum corneum formation. As disturbed epidermal differentiation is a main feature of many skin diseases, pharmacological agents targeting AHR signaling or future identification of endogenous keratinocyte-derived AHR ligands should be considered as potential new drugs in dermatology. PMID:25602157

  13. Dominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation processes: role of physiological fitness and microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Winemaking, brewing and baking are some of the oldest biotechnological processes. In all of them, alcoholic fermentation is the main biotransformation and Saccharomyces cerevisiae the primary microorganism. Although a wide variety of microbial species may participate in alcoholic fermentation and contribute to the sensory properties of end-products, the yeast S. cerevisiae invariably dominates the final stages of fermentation. The ability of S. cerevisiae to outcompete other microbial species during alcoholic fermentation processes, such as winemaking, has traditionally been ascribed to its high fermentative power and capacity to withstand the harsh environmental conditions, i.e. high levels of ethanol and organic acids, low pH values, scarce oxygen availability and depletion of certain nutrients. However, in recent years, several studies have raised evidence that S. cerevisiae, beyond its remarkable fitness for alcoholic fermentation, also uses defensive strategies mediated by different mechanisms, such as cell-to-cell contact and secretion of antimicrobial peptides, to combat other microorganisms. In this paper, we review the main physiological features underlying the special aptitude of S. cerevisiae for alcoholic fermentation and discuss the role of microbial interactions in its dominance during alcoholic fermentation, as well as its relevance for winemaking.

  14. Invariance in current dipole moment density across brain structures and species: physiological constraint for neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shingo; Okada, Yoshio

    2015-05-01

    Although anatomical constraints have been shown to be effective for MEG and EEG inverse solutions, there are still no effective physiological constraints. Strength of the current generator is normally described by the moment of an equivalent current dipole Q. This value is quite variable since it depends on size of active tissue. In contrast, the current dipole moment density q, defined as Q per surface area of active cortex, is independent of size of active tissue. Here we studied whether the value of q has a maximum in physiological conditions across brain structures and species. We determined the value due to the primary neuronal current (q primary) alone, correcting for distortions due to measurement conditions and secondary current sources at boundaries separating regions of differing electrical conductivities. The values were in the same range for turtle cerebellum (0.56-1.48 nAm/mm(2)), guinea pig hippocampus (0.30-1.34 nAm/mm(2)), and swine neocortex (0.18-1.63 nAm/mm(2)), rat neocortex (~2.2 nAm/mm(2)), monkey neocortex (~0.40 nAm/mm(2)) and human neocortex (0.16-0.77 nAm/mm(2)). Thus, there appears to be a maximum value across the brain structures and species (1-2 nAm/mm(2)). The empirical values closely matched the theoretical values obtained with our independently validated neural network model (1.6-2.8 nAm/mm(2) for initial spike and 0.7-3.1 nAm/mm(2) for burst), indicating that the apparent invariance is not coincidental. Our model study shows that a single maximum value may exist across a wide range of brain structures and species, varying in neuron density, due to fundamental electrical properties of neurons. The maximum value of q primary may serve as an effective physiological constraint for MEG/EEG inverse solutions.

  15. Cytochrome c Maturation and the Physiological Role of c-Type Cytochromes in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Martin; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae lives in different habitats, varying from aquatic ecosystems to the human intestinal tract. The organism has acquired a set of electron transport pathways for aerobic and anaerobic respiration that enable adaptation to the various environmental conditions. We have inactivated the V. cholerae ccmE gene, which is required for cytochrome c biogenesis. The resulting strain is deficient of all c-type cytochromes and allows us to characterize the physiological role of these proteins. Under aerobic conditions in rich medium, V. cholerae produces at least six c-type cytochromes, none of which is required for growth. Wild-type V. cholerae produces active fumarate reductase, trimethylamine N-oxide reductase, cbb3 oxidase, and nitrate reductase, of which only the fumarate reductase does not require maturation of c-type cytochromes. The reduction of nitrate in the medium resulted in the accumulation of nitrite, which is toxic for the cells. This suggests that V. cholerae is able to scavenge nitrate from the environment only in the presence of other nitrite-reducing organisms. The phenotypes of cytochrome c-deficient V. cholerae were used in a transposon mutagenesis screening to search for additional genes required for cytochrome c maturation. Over 55,000 mutants were analyzed for nitrate reductase and cbb3 oxidase activity. No transposon insertions other than those within the ccm genes for cytochrome c maturation and the dsbD gene, which encodes a disulphide bond reductase, were found. In addition, the role of a novel CcdA-like protein in cbb3 oxidase assembly is discussed. PMID:16109941

  16. Thiamine triphosphate: a ubiquitous molecule in search of a physiological role.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, Lucien; Lakaye, Bernard; Kohn, Gregory; Wins, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) was discovered over 60 years ago and it was long thought to be a specifically neuroactive compound. Its presence in most cell types, from bacteria to mammals, would suggest a more general role but this remains undefined. In contrast to thiamine diphosphate (ThDP), ThTP is not a coenzyme. In E. coli cells, ThTP is transiently produced in response to amino acid starvation, while in mammalian cells, it is constitutively produced at a low rate. Though it was long thought that ThTP was synthesized by a ThDP:ATP phosphotransferase, more recent studies indicate that it can be synthesized by two different enzymes: (1) adenylate kinase 1 in the cytosol and (2) FoF1-ATP synthase in brain mitochondria. Both mechanisms are conserved from bacteria to mammals. Thus ThTP synthesis does not seem to require a specific enzyme. In contrast, its hydrolysis is catalyzed, at least in mammalian tissues, by a very specific cytosolic thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase), controlling the steady-state cellular concentration of ThTP. In some tissues where adenylate kinase activity is high and ThTPase is absent, ThTP accumulates, reaching ≥ 70% of total thiamine, with no obvious physiological consequences. In some animal tissues, ThTP was able to phosphorylate proteins, and activate a high-conductance anion channel in vitro. These observations raise the possibility that ThTP is part of a still uncharacterized cellular signaling pathway. On the other hand, its synthesis by a chemiosmotic mechanism in mitochondria and respiring bacteria might suggest a role in cellular energetics.

  17. A Physiologically Based, Multi-Scale Model of Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Röhrle, O.; Davidson, J. B.; Pullan, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle’s response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modeling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle’s response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modeling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibers and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor-unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behavior of single muscle fibers within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenization. The effect of homogenization has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibers and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the tibialis anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modeling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behavior ranging from motor-unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue. PMID:22993509

  18. ROLE OF ANTHROPOGENIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLE ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF OYSTERS IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of freshwater alterations and seasonal changes on the ecological and physiological responses of oysters were investigated in the Caloosahatchee River, Estero Bay and Faka-Union estuaries in SW Florida. Condition index, oyster density, and disease incidence of Perkinsus m...

  19. ROLE OF ANTHROPOGENIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLE ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF OYSTERS IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of freshwater alterations and seasonal changes on the ecological and physiological responses of oysters were investigated in the Caloosahatchee River, Estero Bay and Faka-Union estuaries in SW Florida. Condition index, oyster density, and disease incidence of Perkinsus m...

  20. Arterial calcification and bone physiology: role of the bone-vascular axis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Bithika; Towler, Dwight A.

    2012-01-01

    Bone never forms without vascular interactions. This simple statement of fact does not adequately reflect the physiological and pharmacological implications of the relationship. The vasculature is the conduit for nutrient exchange between bone and the rest of the body. The vasculature provides the sustentacular niche for development of osteoblast progenitors, and is the conduit for egress of bone marrow cell products arising, in turn, from the osteoblast-dependent hematopoietic niche. Importantly, the second most calcified structure in humans after the skeleton is the vasculature. Once considered a passive process of dead and dying cells, vascular calcification has emerged as an actively regulated form of tissue biomineralization. Skeletal morphogens and osteochondrogenic transcription factors are elaborated by cells within the vessel wall, regulating the deposition of vascular calcium. Osteotropic hormones including parathyroid hormone regulate both vascular and skeletal mineralization. Cellular, endocrine, and metabolic signals flow bidirectionally between the vasculature and bone that are necessary for both bone health and vascular health. Dysmetabolic states including diabetes, uremia, and hyperlipidemia perturb the bone-vascular axis, giving rise to devastating vascular and skeletal disease. A detailed understanding of bone-vascular interactions is needed to address the unmet clinical needs of our increasingly aged and dysmetabolic population. PMID:22473330

  1. The role of VEGF pathways in human physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In pre-clinical models VEGF is a potent stimulant of both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. Conversely, anti-VEGF regimens have successfully inhibited angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that VEGF would stimulate both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis in a human-ba...

  2. The Role of Flipped Learning in Managing the Cognitive Load of a Threshold Concept in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkaraju, Shylaja

    2016-01-01

    To help students master challenging, threshold concepts in physiology, I used the flipped learning model in a human anatomy and physiology course with very encouraging results in terms of student motivation, preparedness, engagement, and performance. The flipped learning model was enhanced by pre-training and formative assessments that provided…

  3. Drug Sensitivity in Older Adults: The Role of Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Katie E.; Morton, Mark R.

    1989-01-01

    Notes that age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics (how drugs are used in the body) lead to increased drug sensitivity and potentially harmful drug effects. Addresses heightened sensitivity to drug effects seen in older adults. Presents three examples of physiologic decline and discusses some broad considerations for geriatric…

  4. Use of Wikiversity and Role Play to Increase Student Engagement during Student-Led Physiology Seminars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Satendra

    2013-01-01

    The Undergraduate Medical Program (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) at University College of Medical Sciences (Delhi, India) is a 4.5-yr, intense academic program where physiology is taught in the first year. To make the learning experience enriching, the Department of Physiology organizes four student seminars (two seminars/semester)…

  5. From bowel to kidneys: the role of cubilin in physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Erik I; Nielsen, Rikke; Birn, Henrik

    2013-02-01

    Cubilin is a large endocytic receptor serving such diverse functions as the intestinal absorption of the intrinsic factor-B(12) complex and the renal proximal tubule reabsorption of filtered proteins including albumin, transferrin, vitamin D-binding protein and other important plasma carriers. Cubilin is a structurally unique, peripheral membrane protein, which depends on the membrane protein amnionless (AMN) for correct apical translocation. In addition, AMN appears important for efficient internalization of intrinsic factor-B(12) in the intestine, whereas in the proximal tubule cubilin interacts with another endocytic receptor, megalin, for effective reabsorption. The importance of cubilin has been demonstrated in several animal models of cubilin deficiency as well as in a variety of human diseases. Recent demonstration of cubilin in podocytes from various species awaits further clarification with respect to the functional role as well as its role in pathology.

  6. Role of oxytocin on prolactin secretion during proestrus and in different physiological or pharmacological paradigms.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C A; Negro-Vilar, A

    1988-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the possible physiological role of oxytocin (OXY) on PRL release by examining the effect of administration of potent pharmacological antagonists of OXY on the stimulation of PRL secretion observed in vitro from anterior pituitary (AP) cells in response to OXY administration or in a number of in vivo paradigms. OXY caused a dose-related increase in PRL release from dispersed AP cells and short term AP cell cultures which was blocked by administration of the OXY antagonists [1-deaminopenicillamine, 2-O-methyltyrosine, 8-ornithine]vasotocin (dPOMeOVT) or [1-(beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopentamethylene propanoic acid)2-O-methyltyrosine, 8-ornithine]vasotocin (MPOMeOVT), respectively. The antagonists were given in vivo in a dose that completely blocked suckling-induced milk let-down for up to 90 min. Injection of the antagonists did not alter the 5-hydroxytryptophan-induced increase in plasma PRL or the increase associated with acute ether stress or acute suckling stimuli, suggesting that OXY is not a major component involved in the neuroendocrine mechanisms responsible for those particular increases. On the other hand, iv administration of dPOMeOVT or MPOMeOVT prevented the increase in plasma PRL normally observed on the afternoon of proestrus in the cycling female rat. The characteristic surge of LH was also blocked by high doses of these antagonists. These data demonstrate that PRL secretion undergoes a differential regulation, in that OXY appears to play a major role in regulating the increase in plasma PRL observed on the afternoon of proestrus, but apparently provides little, if any, contribution toward the neuroendocrine regulation of the increases in PRL associated with 5-hydroxytryptophan administration, acute ether stress stimulus, or acute suckling stimulus. The data also suggest that OXY receptors located in the AP that are involved in the OXY-induced increase in PRL release may be similar to those OXY receptors

  7. Impact of physiology, structure and BRDF in hyperspectral time series of a Citrus orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckens, J.; Dzikiti, S.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Verreynne, J. S.; Swinnen, R.; Coppin, P.

    2010-05-01

    Monitoring of plant production systems using remote sensing requires an understanding of the mechanisms in which physiological and structural changes as well as the quality and direction of incident light alter the measured canopy reflectance. Due to the evergreen nature of Citrus, the benefits of year-round monitoring of spectral changes are counterweighted by more subtle changes and seasonal trends than in other perennials. This study presents the results of a 14 months field measurement campaign in a commercial Citrus sinensis ‘Midknight Valencia' orchard in Wellington, Western Cape Province, South-Africa. Hyperspectral data were collected of canopy and leaf reflectance (350 - 2500 nm) of 16 representative trees at monthly intervals and supplemented with local climatology, orchard management records, sap stream, water potential and leaf and soil nutrient analysis. The aim of this research is to translate spectral changes and trends at the leaf and at canopy levels into physiological processes such as plant nutrient and carbohydrate balances and stress responses. Specific research questions include the spectral detection of flowering (date of anthesis, flowering intensity), fruit drop, fruit number and coloration, vegetative flushes, leaf senescence and drop and pruning. Attention is paid to the detection and the impact of sunburn (photo-damage). In order to separate physiological and structural changes from changes caused by seasonal changes in solar elevation during measurement time (bidirectional reflectance) a normalization function is constructed using simulated and measured data. Additional research is done to up-scale measurements from tree level to orchard level, which includes the tree variability, the influence of soil and weeds and different amounts of shading.

  8. Physiological time structure of the tibialis anterior motor activity during sleep in mice, rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Silvani, Alessandro; Lo Martire, Viviana; Salvadè, Agnese; Bastianini, Stefano; Ferri, Raffaele; Berteotti, Chiara; Baracchi, Francesca; Pace, Marta; Bassetti, Claudio L; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Manconi, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    The validation of rodent models for restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease) and periodic limb movements during sleep requires knowledge of physiological limb motor activity during sleep in rodents. This study aimed to determine the physiological time structure of tibialis anterior activity during sleep in mice and rats, and compare it with that of healthy humans. Wild-type mice (n = 9) and rats (n = 8) were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram of neck muscles and both tibialis anterior muscles. Healthy human subjects (31 ± 1 years, n = 21) underwent overnight polysomnography. An algorithm for automatic scoring of tibialis anterior electromyogram events of mice and rats during non-rapid eye movement sleep was developed and validated. Visual scoring assisted by this algorithm had inter-rater sensitivity of 92-95% and false-positive rates of 13-19% in mice and rats. The distribution of the time intervals between consecutive tibialis anterior electromyogram events during non-rapid eye movement sleep had a single peak extending up to 10 s in mice, rats and human subjects. The tibialis anterior electromyogram events separated by intervals <10 s mainly occurred in series of two-three events, their occurrence rate in humans being lower than in mice and similar to that in rats. In conclusion, this study proposes reliable rules for scoring tibialis anterior electromyogram events during non-rapid eye movement sleep in mice and rats, demonstrating that their physiological time structure is similar to that of healthy young human subjects. These results strengthen the basis for translational rodent models of periodic limb movements during sleep and restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease.

  9. Physiological vagility: correlations with dispersal and population genetic structure of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Hedrick, Michael S; Hancock, Thomas V

    2014-01-01

    Physiological vagility represents the capacity to move sustainably and is central to fully explaining the processes involved in creating fine-scale genetic structure of amphibian populations, because movement (vagility) and the duration of movement determine the dispersal distance individuals can move to interbreed. The tendency for amphibians to maintain genetic differentiation over relatively short distances (isolation by distance) has been attributed to their limited dispersal capacity (low vagility) compared with other vertebrates. Earlier studies analyzing genetic isolation and population differentiation with distance treat all amphibians as equally vagile and attempt to explain genetic differentiation only in terms of physical environmental characteristics. We introduce a new quantitative metric for vagility that incorporates aerobic capacity, body size, body temperature, and the cost of transport and is independent of the physical characteristics of the environment. We test our metric for vagility with data for dispersal distance and body mass in amphibians and correlate vagility with data for genetic differentiation (F'(ST)). Both dispersal distance and vagility increase with body size. Differentiation (F'(ST)) of neutral microsatellite markers with distance was inversely and significantly (R2=0.61) related to ln vagility. Genetic differentiation with distance was not significantly related to body mass alone. Generalized observations are validated with several specific amphibian studies. These results suggest that interspecific differences in physiological capacity for movement (vagility) can contribute to genetic differentiation and metapopulation structure in amphibians.

  10. Characterization of a flatworm inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate receptor (IP₃R) reveals a role in reproductive physiology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Liu, Xiaolong; Chan, John D; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2013-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP₃Rs) are intracellular Ca²⁺ channels that elevate cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ in response to the second messenger IP3. Here, we describe the identification and in vivo functional characterization of the planarian IP₃R, the first intracellular Ca²⁺ channel to be defined in flatworms. A single IP₃R gene in Dugesia japonica encoded a 2666 amino acid protein (Dj.IP₃R) that shared well conserved structural features with vertebrate IP₃R counterparts. Expression of an NH₂-terminal Dj.IP₃R region (amino acid residues 223-585) recovered high affinity ³H-IP₃ binding (0.9±0.1 nM) which was abolished by a single point mutation of an arginine residue (R495L) important for IP₃ coordination. In situ hybridization revealed that Dj.IP₃R mRNA was most strongly expressed in the pharynx and optical nerve system as well as the reproductive system in sexualized planarians. Consistent with this observed tissue distribution, in vivo RNAi of Dj.IP₃R resulted in a decreased egg-laying behavior suggesting Dj.IP₃R plays an upstream role in planarian reproductive physiology.

  11. Protein and nucleotide damage by glyoxal and methylglyoxal in physiological systems--role in ageing and disease.

    PubMed

    Thornalley, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    Glycation of proteins, nucleotides and basic phospholipids by glyoxal and methylglyoxal--physiological substrates of glyoxalase 1--is potentially damaging to the proteome, genome and lipidome. Glyoxalase 1 suppresses glycation by these alpha-oxoaldehyde metabolites and thereby represents part of the enzymatic defence against glycation. Albert Szent-Györgyi pioneered and struggled to understand the physiological function of methylglyoxal and the glyoxalase system. We now appreciate that glyoxalase 1 protects against dicarbonyl modifications of the proteome, genome and lipome. Latest research suggests there are functional modifications of this process--implying a role in cell signalling, ageing and disease.

  12. Modelling targets for anticancer drug control optimization in physiologically structured cell population models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, Frédérique; Clairambault, Jean; Fercoq, Olivier; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Perthame, Benoît

    2012-09-01

    The main two pitfalls of therapeutics in clinical oncology, that limit increasing drug doses, are unwanted toxic side effects on healthy cell populations and occurrence of resistance to drugs in cancer cell populations. Depending on the constraint considered in the control problem at stake, toxicity or drug resistance, we present two different ways to model the evolution of proliferating cell populations, healthy and cancer, under the control of anti-cancer drugs. In the first case, we use a McKendrick age-structured model of the cell cycle, whereas in the second case, we use a model of evolutionary dynamics, physiologically structured according to a continuous phenotype standing for drug resistance. In both cases, we mention how drug targets may be chosen so as to accurately represent the effects of cytotoxic and of cytostatic drugs, separately, and how one may consider the problem of optimisation of combined therapies.

  13. The Role of CO2 Physiological Forcing in Driving Future Precipitation Variability and Precipitation Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. B.; Poulsen, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Transpired water contributes roughly 25% to total precipitation over the Earth's land surface. In addition to transpiration's impact on climatological mean precipitation, recent work suggests that transpiration reduces daily and intraseasonal precipitation variability in tropical forest regions. Projected increases in the concentration of CO2 are expected to reduce transpiration through changes in plant physiology (termed the CO2 physiological effect). Here, we use an ensemble of climate model experiments to assess the potential contribution of the CO2 physiological effect to future changes in precipitation variability and extreme precipitation events. Within our model simulations, precipitation responses to the physiological effects of increased CO2 concentrations are greatest throughout the tropics. In most tropical forest regions CO2 physiological forcing increases the annual number of dry (less than 0.1 mm/day) and extremely wet (rainfall exceeds 95th percentile) days. Changes in precipitation are primarily driven by an increase in surface temperature and subsequent changes in atmospheric stability and moisture convergence over vegetated tropical land regions. Our results suggest that the plant physiological response to CO2 forcing may serve as an important contributor to future precipitation variability in the tropics, and that future work should aim to reduce uncertainty in the response of plant physiology to changes in climate.

  14. Role of the Streptococcus mutans CRISPR-Cas systems in immunity and cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Serbanescu, M A; Cordova, M; Krastel, K; Flick, R; Beloglazova, N; Latos, A; Yakunin, A F; Senadheera, D B; Cvitkovitch, D G

    2015-02-15

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive microbial immunity against invading viruses and plasmids. The cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans UA159 has two CRISPR-Cas systems: CRISPR1 (type II-A) and CRISPR2 (type I-C) with several spacers from both CRISPR cassettes matching sequences of phage M102 or genomic sequences of other S. mutans. The deletion of the cas genes of CRISPR1 (ΔC1S), CRISPR2 (ΔC2E), or both CRISPR1+2 (ΔC1SC2E) or the removal of spacers 2 and 3 (ΔCR1SP13E) in S. mutans UA159 did not affect phage sensitivity when challenged with virulent phage M102. Using plasmid transformation experiments, we demonstrated that the CRISPR1-Cas system inhibits transformation of S. mutans by the plasmids matching the spacers 2 and 3. Functional analysis of the cas deletion mutants revealed that in addition to a role in plasmid targeting, both CRISPR systems also contribute to the regulation of bacterial physiology in S. mutans. Compared to wild-type cells, the ΔC1S strain displayed diminished growth under cell membrane and oxidative stress, enhanced growth under low pH, and had reduced survival under heat shock and DNA-damaging conditions, whereas the ΔC2E strain exhibited increased sensitivity to heat shock. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the two-component signal transduction system VicR/K differentially modulates expression of cas genes within CRISPR-Cas systems, suggesting that VicR/K might coordinate the expression of two CRISPR-Cas systems. Collectively, we provide in vivo evidence that the type II-A CRISPR-Cas system of S. mutans may be targeted to manipulate its stress response and to influence the host to control the uptake and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes.

  15. Physiological role for nitrate-reducing oral bacteria in blood pressure control

    PubMed Central

    Kapil, Vikas; Haydar, Syed M.A.; Pearl, Vanessa; Lundberg, Jon O.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2013-01-01

    Circulating nitrate (NO3−), derived from dietary sources or endogenous nitric oxide production, is extracted from blood by the salivary glands, accumulates in saliva, and is then reduced to nitrite (NO2−) by the oral microflora. This process has historically been viewed as harmful, because nitrite can promote formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. More recent research, however, suggests that nitrite can also serve as a precursor for systemic generation of vasodilatory nitric oxide, and exogenous administration of nitrate reduces blood pressure in humans. However, whether oral nitrate-reducing bacteria participate in “setting” blood pressure is unknown. We investigated whether suppression of the oral microflora affects systemic nitrite levels and hence blood pressure in healthy individuals. We measured blood pressure (clinic, home, and 24-h ambulatory) in 19 healthy volunteers during an initial 7-day control period followed by a 7-day treatment period with a chlorhexidine-based antiseptic mouthwash. Oral nitrate-reducing capacity and nitrite levels were measured after each study period. Antiseptic mouthwash treatment reduced oral nitrite production by 90% (p < 0.001) and plasma nitrite levels by 25% (p = 0.001) compared to the control period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 2–3 .5 mm Hg, increases correlated to a decrease in circulating nitrite concentrations (r2 = 0.56, p = 0.002). The blood pressure effect appeared within 1 day of disruption of the oral microflora and was sustained during the 7-day mouthwash intervention. These results suggest that the recycling of endogenous nitrate by oral bacteria plays an important role in determination of plasma nitrite levels and thereby in the physiological control of blood pressure. PMID:23183324

  16. Physiological role for nitrate-reducing oral bacteria in blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Vikas; Haydar, Syed M A; Pearl, Vanessa; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2013-02-01

    Circulating nitrate (NO(3)(-)), derived from dietary sources or endogenous nitric oxide production, is extracted from blood by the salivary glands, accumulates in saliva, and is then reduced to nitrite (NO(2)(-)) by the oral microflora. This process has historically been viewed as harmful, because nitrite can promote formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. More recent research, however, suggests that nitrite can also serve as a precursor for systemic generation of vasodilatory nitric oxide, and exogenous administration of nitrate reduces blood pressure in humans. However, whether oral nitrate-reducing bacteria participate in "setting" blood pressure is unknown. We investigated whether suppression of the oral microflora affects systemic nitrite levels and hence blood pressure in healthy individuals. We measured blood pressure (clinic, home, and 24-h ambulatory) in 19 healthy volunteers during an initial 7-day control period followed by a 7-day treatment period with a chlorhexidine-based antiseptic mouthwash. Oral nitrate-reducing capacity and nitrite levels were measured after each study period. Antiseptic mouthwash treatment reduced oral nitrite production by 90% (p < 0.001) and plasma nitrite levels by 25% (p = 0.001) compared to the control period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 2-3 .5mmHg, increases correlated to a decrease in circulating nitrite concentrations (r(2) = 0.56, p = 0.002). The blood pressure effect appeared within 1 day of disruption of the oral microflora and was sustained during the 7-day mouthwash intervention. These results suggest that the recycling of endogenous nitrate by oral bacteria plays an important role in determination of plasma nitrite levels and thereby in the physiological control of blood pressure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic (patho-) physiology: An up to date review

    PubMed Central

    Klieser, Eckhard; Swierczynski, Stefan; Mayr, Christian; Jäger, Tarkan; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias; Illig, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in drosophila melanogaster, our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development, inflammation, and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades. This is the case especially concerning the pancreas, however, real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now. In general, Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis, development, and tissue maturation. In the case of acute pancreatitis, Hh has a protective role, whereas in chronic pancreatitis, Hh interacts with pancreatic stellate cells, leading to destructive parenchym fibrosis and atrophy, as well as to irregular tissue remodeling with potency of initiating cancerogenesis. In vitro and in situ analysis of Hh in pancreatic cancer revealed that the Hh pathway participates in the development of pancreatic precursor lesions and ductal adenocarcinoma including critical interactions with the tumor microenvironment. The application of specific inhibitors of components of the Hh pathway is currently subject of ongoing clinical trials (phases 1 and 2). Furthermore, a combination of Hh pathway inhibitors and established chemotherapeutic drugs could also represent a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we give a structured survey of the role of the Hh pathway in pancreatic development, pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinogenesis and pancreatic cancer as well as an overview of current clinical trials concerning Hh pathway inhibitors and pancreas cancer. PMID:27190692

  18. Molecular Analysis of Atypical Family 18 Chitinase from Fujian Oyster Crassostrea angulata and Its Physiological Role in the Digestive System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bingye; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Lingling; Pu, Fei; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    Chitinolytic enzymes have an important physiological significance in immune and digestive systems in plants and animals, but chitinase has not been identified as having a role in the digestive system in molluscan. In our study, a novel chitinase homologue, named Ca-Chit, has been cloned and characterized as the oyster Crassostrea angulate. The 3998bp full-length cDNA of Ca-Chit consisted of 23bp 5-UTR, 3288 ORF and 688bp 3-UTR. The deduced amino acids sequence shares homologue with the chitinase of family 18. The molecular weight of the protein was predicted to be 119.389 kDa, with a pI of 6.74. The Ca-Chit protein was a modular enzyme composed of a glycosyl hydrolase family 18 domain, threonine-rich region profile and a putative membrane anchor domain. Gene expression profiles monitored by quantitative RT-PCR in different adult tissues showed that the mRNA of Ca-Chit expressed markedly higher visceral mass than any other tissues. The results of the whole mount in-situ hybridization displayed that Ca-Chit starts to express the visceral mass of D-veliger larvae and then the digestive gland forms a crystalline structure during larval development. Furthermore, the adult oysters challenged by starvation indicated that the Ca-Chit expression would be regulated by feed. All the observations made suggest that Ca-Chit plays an important role in the digestive system of the oyster, Crassostrea angulate. PMID:26046992

  19. The UV-B Photoreceptor UVR8: From Structure to Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Gareth I.

    2014-01-01

    Low doses of UV-B light (280 to 315 nm) elicit photomorphogenic responses in plants that modify biochemical composition, photosynthetic competence, morphogenesis, and defense. UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) mediates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B by regulating transcription of a set of target genes. UVR8 differs from other known photoreceptors in that it uses specific Trp amino acids instead of a prosthetic chromophore for light absorption during UV-B photoreception. Absorption of UV-B dissociates the UVR8 dimer into monomers, initiating signal transduction through interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of UVR8 and its interaction with other signaling pathways, the molecular mechanism of UVR8 photoreception, how the UVR8 protein initiates signaling, how it is regulated, and how UVR8 regulates transcription of its target genes. PMID:24481075

  20. [The formative role of the laboratory in teaching the science of physiology].

    PubMed

    Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda; Urrutia Aguilar, María Esther

    2014-12-01

    Physiology teaching began with Claudius Galenus (c. 126-199 AD), known as Galen, who is considered the initiator of experimental physiology. This discipline was consolidated in the XIX century with the discoveries of Claude Bernard, which influenced the way of teaching this discipline in universities, independently from Anatomy. In Mexico, physiology teaching started in 1580. It was at the beginning of the XIX century when Valentín Gómez Farías created the professorship in Medical Sciences and Daniel Vergara Lope carried out its consolidation when he implemented a lab course. Doctor José Joaquín Izquierdo established that this subject ought to be taught by teachers with experience in research. Undoubtedly, formative physiology teaching carried out in labs must strengthen the application of method and scientific methodology in students. In this symposium, we put forward that the change in physiology teaching must promote multidisciplinary research in students, who will formulate a research question and develop an experimental model that will let them integrate their basic knowledge of physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, and functional anatomy under the supervision of a research teacher.

  1. Invariance in current dipole moment density across brain structures and species: Physiological constraint for neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shingo; Okada, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Although anatomical constraints have been shown to be effective for MEG and EEG inverse solutions, there are still no effective physiological constraints. Strength of the current generator is normally described by the moment of an equivalent current dipole Q. This value is quite variable since it depends on size of active tissue. In contrast, the current dipole moment density q, defined as Q per surface area of active cortex, is independent of size of active tissue. Here we studied whether the value of q has a maximum in physiological conditions across brain structures and species. We determined the value due to the primary neuronal current (qprimary) alone, correcting for distortions due to measurement conditions and secondary current sources at boundaries separating regions of differing electrical conductivity. The values were in the same range for turtle cerebellum (0.56–1.48 nAm/mm2), guinea pig hippocampus (0.30–1.34 nAm/mm2), and swine neocortex (0.18–1.63 nAm/mm2), rat neocortex (~2.2 nAm/mm2), monkey neocortex (~0.40 nAm/mm2) and human neocortex (0.16–0.77 nAm/mm2). Thus, there appears to be a maximum value across the brain structures and species (1–2 nAm/mm2). The empirical values closely matched the theoretical values obtained with our independently validated neural network model (1.6–2.8 nAm/mm2 for initial spike and 0.7–3.1 nAm/mm2 for burst), indicating that the apparent invariance is not coincidental. Our model study shows that a single maximum value may exist across a wide range of brain structures and species, varying in neuron density, due to fundamental electrical properties of neurons. The maximum value of qprimary may serve as an effective physiological constraint for MEG/EEG inverse solutions. PMID:25680520

  2. Climate, physiological tolerance and sex-biased dispersal shape genetic structure of Neotropical orchid bees.

    PubMed

    López-Uribe, Margarita M; Zamudio, Kelly R; Cardoso, Carolina F; Danforth, Bryan N

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the impact of past climatic events on the demographic history of extant species is critical for predicting species' responses to future climate change. Palaeoclimatic instability is a major mechanism of lineage diversification in taxa with low dispersal and small geographical ranges in tropical ecosystems. However, the impact of these climatic events remains questionable for the diversification of species with high levels of gene flow and large geographical distributions. In this study, we investigate the impact of Pleistocene climate change on three Neotropical orchid bee species (Eulaema bombiformis, E. meriana and E. cingulata) with transcontinental distributions and different physiological tolerances. We first generated ecological niche models to identify species-specific climatically stable areas during Pleistocene climatic oscillations. Using a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear markers, we inferred calibrated phylogenies and estimated historical demographic parameters to reconstruct the phylogeographical history of each species. Our results indicate species with narrower physiological tolerance experienced less suitable habitat during glaciations and currently exhibit strong population structure in the mitochondrial genome. However, nuclear markers with low and high mutation rates show lack of association with geography. These results combined with lower migration rate estimates from the mitochondrial than the nuclear genome suggest male-biased dispersal. We conclude that despite large effective population sizes and capacity for long-distance dispersal, climatic instability is an important mechanism of maternal lineage diversification in orchid bees. Thus, these Neotropical pollinators are susceptible to disruption of genetic connectivity in the event of large-scale climatic changes.

  3. A trial of the objective structured practical examination in physiology at Melaka Manipal Medical College, India.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Raghavendra, Rao; Surekha, Kamath; Asha, Kamath

    2009-03-01

    A single examination does not fulfill all the functions of assessment. The present study was undertaken to determine the reliability and student satisfaction regarding the objective structured practical examination (OSPE) as a method of assessment of laboratory exercises in physiology before implementing it in the forthcoming university examination. The present study was undertaken in the Department of Physiology of Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal Campus, India. During the OSPE, students were made to rotate through 11 stations, of which 8 stations were composed of questions that tested their knowledge and critical thinking and 2 stations were composed of skills that students had to perform before the examiner. One station was kept as the rest station. Performance of the students was assessed by comparing the students' scores in the traditional practical examination (TPE) and OSPE using "Bland-Altman technique." Student perspectives regarding the OSPE were obtained by asking them to respond to a questionnaire. The Bland-Altman plot showed that approximately 63% of the students showed a performance in the scores obtained using the OSPE and TPE within the acceptable limit of 8; 32% of the students scored much above the anticipated difference in the scores, and the rest scored below the anticipated difference in the scores on the OSPE and TPE. Feedback indicated that students were in favor of the OSPE compared with the TPE. Feedback from the students provided scope for improvement before the OSPE was administered for the first time in the forthcoming university examination.

  4. Recent functional insights into the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hauryliuk, Vasili; Atkinson, Gemma C.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Tenson, Tanel; Gerdes, Kenn

    2015-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is involved in regulating growth and several different stress responses in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of (p)ppGpp metabolism and (p)ppGpp-mediated regulation. In this Review, we summarize these recent insights, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms governing the activity of the RelA/SpoT Homologue (RSH) proteins, which are key players that regulate the cellular leves of (p)ppGpp, the structural basis of transcriptional regulation by (p)ppGpp and the role of (p)ppGpp in GTP metabolism and in the emergence of bacterial persisters. PMID:25853779

  5. Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase Mps1 Has a Role in Normal Physiology which Impacts Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ricardo; Blasina, Alessandra; Hallin, Jill F.; Hu, Wenyue; Rymer, Isha; Fan, Jeffery; Hoffman, Robert L.; Murphy, Sean; Marx, Matthew; Yanochko, Gina; Trajkovic, Dusko; Dinh, Dac; Timofeevski, Sergei; Zhu, Zhou; Sun, Peiquing; Lappin, Patrick B.; Murray, Brion W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint intervention is an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer when applied to patients predisposed to respond and the treatment is well-tolerated. A critical cell cycle process that could be targeted is the mitotic checkpoint (spindle assembly checkpoint) which governs the metaphase-to-anaphase transition and insures proper chromosomal segregation. The mitotic checkpoint kinase Mps1 was selected to explore whether enhancement in genomic instability is a viable therapeutic strategy. The basal-a subset of triple-negative breast cancer was chosen as a model system because it has a higher incidence of chromosomal instability and Mps1 expression is up-regulated. Depletion of Mps1 reduces tumor cell viability relative to normal cells. Highly selective, extremely potent Mps1 kinase inhibitors were created to investigate the roles of Mps1 catalytic activity in tumor cells and normal physiology (PF-7006, PF-3837; Ki<0.5 nM; cellular IC50 2–6 nM). Treatment of tumor cells in vitro with PF-7006 modulates expected Mps1-dependent biology as demonstrated by molecular and phenotypic measures (reduced pHH3-Ser10 levels, shorter duration of mitosis, micro-nucleation, and apoptosis). Tumor-bearing mice treated with PF-7006 exhibit tumor growth inhibition concomitant with pharmacodynamic modulation of a downstream biomarker (pHH3-Ser10). Unfortunately, efficacy only occurs at drug exposures that cause dose-limiting body weight loss, gastrointestinal toxicities, and neutropenia. Mps1 inhibitor toxicities may be mitigated by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest in Rb1-competent cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Using an isogenic cellular model system, PF-7006 is shown to be selectively cytotoxic to Rb1-deficient cells relative to Rb1-competent cells (also a measure of kinase selectivity). Human bone marrow cells pretreated with palbociclib have decreased PF-7006-dependent apoptosis relative to cells without palbociclib pretreatment

  6. [Effect of mechanical grinding of Sphagnum on the structure and physiological state of bacterial communities].

    PubMed

    Dobrovol'skaya, T G; Golovchenko, A V; Yakushev, A V; Manucharova, N A; Yurchenko, E N

    2014-01-01

    The microcosm method was used to demonstrate an increase in bacterial numbers and drastic changes in the taxonomic structure of saprotrophic bacteria as a result of mechanical grinding of Sphagnum moss. Ekkrisotrophic agrobacteria predominant in untreated moss were replaced by hydrolytic bacteria. Molecular biological approaches revealed such specific hydrolytic bacteria as Janthinobacterium agaricum and Streptomyces purpurascens among the dominant taxa. The application of kinetic technique for determination of the physiological state of bacteria in situ revealed higher functional diversity of hydrolytic bacteria in ground moss than in untreated samples. A considerable decrease of the C/N ratio in ground samples of living Sphagnum incubated using the microcosm technique indicated decomposition of this substrate.

  7. 3'nucleotidase/nuclease in protozoan parasites: Molecular and biochemical properties and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Freitas-Mesquita, Anita Leocadio; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2017-08-01

    3'-nucleotidase/nuclease (3'NT/NU) is a bi-functional enzyme that is able to hydrolyze 3'-monophosphorylated nucleotides and nucleic acids. This review summarizes the major molecular and biochemical properties of this enzyme in different trypanosomatid species. Sequence analysis of the gene encoding 3'NT/NU in Leishmania and Crithidia species showed that the protein possesses five highly conserved regions that are characteristic of members of the class I nuclease family. 3'NT/NU presents a molecular weight of approximately 40 kDa, which is conserved among the studied species. Throughout the review, we discuss inhibitors and substrate specificity, relating them to the putative structure of the enzyme. Finally, we present the major biological roles performed by 3'NT/NU. The involvement of 3'NT/NU in the purine salvage pathway was confirmed by the increase of activity and expression of the enzyme when the parasites were submitted to purine starvation. The generation of extracellular adenosine is also important to the modulation of the host immune response. Interaction assays involving Leishmania parasites and macrophages indicated that 3'-nucleotidase activity increases the association index between them. Recently, it was shown that 3'NT/NU plays a role in parasite escape from neutrophil extracellular traps, one of the first mechanisms of the host immune system for preventing infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacterial Community Structure and Physiological State within an Industrial Phenol Bioremediation System

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Andrew S.; Bailey, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of bacterial populations in specific compartments of an operational industrial phenol remediation system was assessed to examine bacterial community diversity, distribution, and physiological state with respect to the remediation of phenolic polluted wastewater. Rapid community fingerprinting by PCR-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA indicated highly structured bacterial communities residing in all nine compartments of the treatment plant and not exclusively within the Vitox biological reactor. Whole-cell targeting by fluorescent in situ hybridization with specific oligonucleotides (directed to the α, β and γ subclasses of the class Proteobacteria [α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria, respectively], the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group, and the Pseudomonas group) tended to mirror gross changes in bacterial community composition when compared with DGGE community fingerprinting. At the whole-cell level, the treatment compartments were numerically dominated by cells assigned to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group and to the γ-Proteobacteria. The α subclass Proteobacteria were of low relative abundance throughout the treatment system whilst the β subclass of the Proteobacteria exhibited local dominance in several of the processing compartments. Quantitative image analyses of cellular fluorescence was used as an indicator of physiological state within the populations probed with rDNA. For cells hybridized with EUB338, the mean fluorescence per cell decreased with increasing phenolic concentration, indicating the strong influence of the primary pollutant upon cellular rRNA content. The γ subclass of the Proteobacteria had a ribosome content which correlated positively with total phenolics and thiocyanate. While members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group were numerically dominant in the processing system, their abundance and ribosome content data for individual populations did not correlate with any of the measured chemical

  9. Physiological Networks: towards systems physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate new dimensions to the field of systems physiology.

  10. The Role of Odor-Evoked Memory in Psychological and Physiological Health

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the special features of odor-evoked memory and the current state-of-the-art in odor-evoked memory research to show how these unique experiences may be able to influence and benefit psychological and physiological health. A review of the literature leads to the conclusion that odors that evoke positive autobiographical memories have the potential to increase positive emotions, decrease negative mood states, disrupt cravings, and reduce physiological indices of stress, including systemic markers of inflammation. Olfactory perception factors and individual difference characteristics that would need to be considered in therapeutic applications of odor-evoked-memory are also discussed. This article illustrates how through the experimentally validated mechanisms of odor-associative learning and the privileged neuroanatomical relationship that exists between olfaction and the neural substrates of emotion, odors can be harnessed to induce emotional and physiological responses that can improve human health and wellbeing. PMID:27447673

  11. MBBS Student Perceptions about Physiology Subject Teaching and Objective Structured Practical Examination Based Formative Assessment for Improving Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakshmipathy, K.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to 1) assess student attitudes to physiology, 2) evaluate student opinions about the influence of an objective structured practical examination (OSPE) on competence, and 3) assess the validity and reliability of an indigenously designed feedback questionnaire. A structured questionnaire containing 16 item…

  12. MBBS Student Perceptions about Physiology Subject Teaching and Objective Structured Practical Examination Based Formative Assessment for Improving Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakshmipathy, K.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to 1) assess student attitudes to physiology, 2) evaluate student opinions about the influence of an objective structured practical examination (OSPE) on competence, and 3) assess the validity and reliability of an indigenously designed feedback questionnaire. A structured questionnaire containing 16 item…

  13. Recombinant GABAA receptor desensitization: the role of the gamma 2 subunit and its physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Perrot, C; Feltz, P; Poulter, M O

    1996-11-15

    gamma 2 than for alpha 1 beta 3 subunit receptors (0.13 vs. 0.03 s-1, respectively). The second phase of recovery for the two receptors were the same (approximately 0.003 s-1). 7. There was only a poor correlation between agonist potency and the degree or time course of desensitization. Isoguvacine (EC50 approximately to 10 microM) induced biphasic relaxation for both alpha 1 beta 3 and alpha 1 beta 3 gamma 2 subunit receptors (tau 1 = 288.6 +/- 43.3 and 167 +/- 15 ms, and tau 2 = 8.0 +/- 1.9 and 4.4 +/- 0.4 S, respectively, for each subunit combination). Taurine (EC50 approximately 7 mM) usually induced monophasic relaxation for both subunit combinations (tau 2 = 7.1 +/- 1.6 and 23.0 +/- 6.6 s, respectively). 8. A computer model was developed to examine the effect of the gamma 2 subunit on the time course of a synaptic potential. It was found that the gamma 2 subunit theoretically prolongs the time course of a synaptic potential by inducing desensitization more rapidly. The subsequent relaxation of the desensitized receptors through the open state increases Popen (the probability that the GABAA receptor is in an open conducting state) altering the time course of the modelled potential. alpha 1 beta 3 subunit receptors do not desensitize sufficiently rapidly to induce this desensitized state and, therefore, are shorter in time course. These data imply that the physiological role of the gamma 2 subunit is to increase synaptic efficacy by prolonging Popen.

  14. The effect of physiological conditions on the surface structure of proteins: setting the scene for human digestion of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Valderrama, J; Gunning, A P; Ridout, M J; Wilde, P J; Morris, V J

    2009-10-01

    Understanding and manipulating the interfacial mechanisms that control human digestion of food emulsions is a crucial step towards improved control of dietary intake. This article reports initial studies on the effects of the physiological conditions within the stomach on the properties of the film formed by the milk protein (β-lactoglobulin) at the air-water interface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface tension and surface rheology techniques were used to visualize and examine the effect of gastric conditions on the network structure. The effects of changes in temperature, pH and ionic strength on a preformed interfacial structure were characterized in order to simulate the actual digestion process. Changes in ionic strength had little effect on the surface properties. In isolation, acidification reduced both the dilatational and the surface shear modulus, mainly due to strong repulsive electrostatic interactions within the surface layer and raising the temperature to body temperature accelerated the rearrangements within the surface layer, resulting in a decrease of the dilatational response and an increase of surface pressure. Together pH and temperature display an unexpected synergism, independent of the ionic strength. Thus, exposure of a pre-formed interfacial β-lactoglobulin film to simulated gastric conditions reduced the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear moduli. This is attributed to a weakening of the surface network in which the surface rearrangements of the protein prior to exposure to gastric conditions might play a crucial role.

  15. A worldwide analysis of within-canopy variations in leaf structural, chemical and physiological traits across plant functional types.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor F; Hallik, Lea

    2015-02-01

    Extensive within-canopy light gradients importantly affect the photosynthetic productivity of leaves in different canopy positions and lead to light-dependent increases in foliage photosynthetic capacity per area (AA). However, the controls on AA variations by changes in underlying traits are poorly known. We constructed an unprecedented worldwide database including 831 within-canopy gradients with standardized light estimates for 304 species belonging to major vascular plant functional types, and analyzed within-canopy variations in 12 key foliage structural, chemical and physiological traits by quantitative separation of the contributions of different traits to photosynthetic acclimation. Although the light-dependent increase in AA is surprisingly similar in different plant functional types, they differ fundamentally in the share of the controls on AA by constituent traits. Species with high rates of canopy development and leaf turnover, exhibiting highly dynamic light environments, actively change AA by nitrogen reallocation among and partitioning within leaves. By contrast, species with slow leaf turnover exhibit a passive AA acclimation response, primarily determined by the acclimation of leaf structure to growth light. This review emphasizes that different combinations of traits are responsible for within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation in different plant functional types, and solves an old enigma of the role of mass- vs area-based traits in vegetation acclimation.

  16. The effect of physiological conditions on the surface structure of proteins: Setting the scene for human digestion of emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Valderrama, J.; Gunning, A. P.; Ridout, M. J.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding and manipulating the interfacial mechanisms that control human digestion of food emulsions is a crucial step towards improved control of dietary intake. This article reports initial studies on the effects of the physiological conditions within the stomach on the properties of the film formed by the milk protein ( β -lactoglobulin) at the air-water interface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface tension and surface rheology techniques were used to visualize and examine the effect of gastric conditions on the network structure. The effects of changes in temperature, pH and ionic strength on a pre-formed interfacial structure were characterized in order to simulate the actual digestion process. Changes in ionic strength had little effect on the surface properties. In isolation, acidification reduced both the dilatational and the surface shear modulus, mainly due to strong repulsive electrostatic interactions within the surface layer and raising the temperature to body temperature accelerated the rearrangements within the surface layer, resulting in a decrease of the dilatational response and an increase of surface pressure. Together pH and temperature display an unexpected synergism, independent of the ionic strength. Thus, exposure of a pre-formed interfacial β -lactoglobulin film to simulated gastric conditions reduced the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear moduli. This is attributed to a weakening of the surface network in which the surface rearrangements of the protein prior to exposure to gastric conditions might play a crucial role.

  17. The Role of Emotional Responses and Physiological Reactivity in the Marital Conflict-Child Functioning Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Sheikh, Mona

    2005-01-01

    Background: Children's emotional responses and physiological reactivity to conflict were examined as mediators and moderators in the associations between exposure to parental marital conflict and child adjustment and cognitive problems. Method: One hundred and eighty elementary school children participated. In response to a simulated argument,…

  18. The Role of Physiological Arousal in Time Perception: Psychophysiological Evidence from an Emotion Regulation Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mella, N.; Conty, L.; Pouthas, V.

    2011-01-01

    Time perception, crucial for adaptive behavior, has been shown to be altered by emotion. An arousal-dependent mechanism is proposed to account for such an effect. Yet, physiological measure of arousal related with emotional timing is still lacking. We addressed this question using skin conductance response (SCR) in an emotion regulation paradigm.…

  19. The role of reduced oxygen in the developmental physiology of growth and metamorphosis initiation in Drosophila

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rearing oxygen level is known to affect final body size in a variety of insects, but the physiological mechanisms by which oxygen affects size are incompletely understood. In Manduca and Drosophila, the larval size at which metamorphosis is initiated largely determines adult size, and metamorphosis ...

  20. The Role of Physiological Arousal in Time Perception: Psychophysiological Evidence from an Emotion Regulation Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mella, N.; Conty, L.; Pouthas, V.

    2011-01-01

    Time perception, crucial for adaptive behavior, has been shown to be altered by emotion. An arousal-dependent mechanism is proposed to account for such an effect. Yet, physiological measure of arousal related with emotional timing is still lacking. We addressed this question using skin conductance response (SCR) in an emotion regulation paradigm.…

  1. Dissociating Motivational From Physiological Withdrawal in Alcohol Dependence: Role of Central Amygdala κ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kissler, Jessica L; Walker, Brendan M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent alcohol vapor exposure leads to increased dynorphin (DYN) A-like peptide expression and heightened kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and these neuroadaptive responses differentiate alcohol-dependent from non-dependent phenotypes. Important for therapeutic development efforts is understanding the nature of the stimulus that drives dependence-like phenotypes such as escalated alcohol self-administration. Accordingly, the present study examined the impact of intra-CeA KOR antagonism on escalated operant alcohol self-administration and physiological withdrawal symptoms during acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence in rats previously exposed to chronic intermittent alcohol vapor. Following operant training, rats were implanted with intra-CeA guide cannula and exposed to long-term intermittent alcohol vapor exposure that resulted in escalated alcohol self-administration and elevated physiological withdrawal signs during acute withdrawal. Animals received intra-CeA infusions of the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 0, 2, 4, or 6 μg) prior to operant alcohol self-administration sessions and physiological withdrawal assessment during acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence. The results indicated that site-specific KOR antagonism in the CeA ameliorated escalated alcohol self-administration during both acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence test sessions, whereas KOR antagonism had no effect on physiological withdrawal scores at either time point. These results dissociate escalated alcohol self-administration from physiological withdrawal symptoms in relation to KOR signaling in the CeA and help clarify the nature of the stimulus that drives escalated alcohol self-administration during acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence. PMID:26105136

  2. Dissociating Motivational From Physiological Withdrawal in Alcohol Dependence: Role of Central Amygdala κ-Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kissler, Jessica L; Walker, Brendan M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent alcohol vapor exposure leads to increased dynorphin (DYN) A-like peptide expression and heightened kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and these neuroadaptive responses differentiate alcohol-dependent from non-dependent phenotypes. Important for therapeutic development efforts is understanding the nature of the stimulus that drives dependence-like phenotypes such as escalated alcohol self-administration. Accordingly, the present study examined the impact of intra-CeA KOR antagonism on escalated operant alcohol self-administration and physiological withdrawal symptoms during acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence in rats previously exposed to chronic intermittent alcohol vapor. Following operant training, rats were implanted with intra-CeA guide cannula and exposed to long-term intermittent alcohol vapor exposure that resulted in escalated alcohol self-administration and elevated physiological withdrawal signs during acute withdrawal. Animals received intra-CeA infusions of the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 0, 2, 4, or 6 μg) prior to operant alcohol self-administration sessions and physiological withdrawal assessment during acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence. The results indicated that site-specific KOR antagonism in the CeA ameliorated escalated alcohol self-administration during both acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence test sessions, whereas KOR antagonism had no effect on physiological withdrawal scores at either time point. These results dissociate escalated alcohol self-administration from physiological withdrawal symptoms in relation to KOR signaling in the CeA and help clarify the nature of the stimulus that drives escalated alcohol self-administration during acute withdrawal and protracted abstinence.

  3. ClC Channels and Transporters: Structure, Physiological Functions, and Implications in Human Chloride Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Poroca, Diogo R.; Pelis, Ryan M.; Chappe, Valérie M.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of ClC proteins at the beginning of the 1990s was important for the development of the Cl- transport research field. ClCs form a large family of proteins that mediate voltage-dependent transport of Cl- ions across cell membranes. They are expressed in both plasma and intracellular membranes of cells from almost all living organisms. ClC proteins form transmembrane dimers, in which each monomer displays independent ion conductance. Eukaryotic members also possess a large cytoplasmic domain containing two CBS domains, which are involved in transport modulation. ClC proteins function as either Cl- channels or Cl-/H+ exchangers, although all ClC proteins share the same basic architecture. ClC channels have two gating mechanisms: a relatively well-studied fast gating mechanism, and a slow gating mechanism, which is poorly defined. ClCs are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including regulation of resting membrane potential in skeletal muscle, facilitation of transepithelial Cl- reabsorption in kidneys, and control of pH and Cl- concentration in intracellular compartments through coupled Cl-/H+ exchange mechanisms. Several inherited diseases result from C1C gene mutations, including myotonia congenita, Bartter’s syndrome (types 3 and 4), Dent’s disease, osteopetrosis, retinal degeneration, and lysosomal storage diseases. This review summarizes general features, known or suspected, of ClC structure, gating and physiological functions. We also discuss biophysical properties of mammalian ClCs that are directly involved in the pathophysiology of several human inherited disorders, or that induce interesting phenotypes in animal models. PMID:28386229

  4. ClC Channels and Transporters: Structure, Physiological Functions, and Implications in Human Chloride Channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Poroca, Diogo R; Pelis, Ryan M; Chappe, Valérie M

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of ClC proteins at the beginning of the 1990s was important for the development of the Cl(-) transport research field. ClCs form a large family of proteins that mediate voltage-dependent transport of Cl(-) ions across cell membranes. They are expressed in both plasma and intracellular membranes of cells from almost all living organisms. ClC proteins form transmembrane dimers, in which each monomer displays independent ion conductance. Eukaryotic members also possess a large cytoplasmic domain containing two CBS domains, which are involved in transport modulation. ClC proteins function as either Cl(-) channels or Cl(-)/H(+) exchangers, although all ClC proteins share the same basic architecture. ClC channels have two gating mechanisms: a relatively well-studied fast gating mechanism, and a slow gating mechanism, which is poorly defined. ClCs are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including regulation of resting membrane potential in skeletal muscle, facilitation of transepithelial Cl(-) reabsorption in kidneys, and control of pH and Cl(-) concentration in intracellular compartments through coupled Cl(-)/H(+) exchange mechanisms. Several inherited diseases result from C1C gene mutations, including myotonia congenita, Bartter's syndrome (types 3 and 4), Dent's disease, osteopetrosis, retinal degeneration, and lysosomal storage diseases. This review summarizes general features, known or suspected, of ClC structure, gating and physiological functions. We also discuss biophysical properties of mammalian ClCs that are directly involved in the pathophysiology of several human inherited disorders, or that induce interesting phenotypes in animal models.

  5. Innervation of the gallbladder: structure, neurochemical coding, and physiological properties of guinea pig gallbladder ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mawe, G M; Talmage, E K; Cornbrooks, E B; Gokin, A P; Zhang, L; Jennings, L J

    1997-10-01

    The muscle and epithelial tissues of the gallbladder are regulated by a ganglionated plexus that lies within the wall of the organ. Although these ganglia are derived from the same set of precursor neural crest cells that colonize the gut, they exhibit structural, neurochemical and physiological characteristics that are distinct from the myenteric and submucous plexuses of the enteric nervous system. Structurally, the ganglionated plexus of the guinea pig gallbladder is comprised of small clusters of neurons that are located in the outer wall of the organ, between the serosa and underlying smooth muscle. The ganglia are encapsulated by a shell of fibroblasts and a basal lamina, and are devoid of collagen. Gallbladder neurons are rather simple in structure, consisting of a soma, a few short dendritic processes and one or two long axons. Results reported here indicate that all gallbladder neurons are probably cholinergic since they all express immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase. The majority of these neurons also express substance P, neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin, and a small remaining population of neurons express vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunoreactivity and NADPH-diaphorase enzymatic activity. We report here that NADPH-diaphorase activity, nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity, and VIP immunoreactivity are expressed by the same neurons in the gallbladder. Physiological studies indicate that the ganglia of the gallbladder are the site of action of the following neurohumoral inputs: 1) all neurons receive nicotinic input from vagal preganglionic fibers; 2) norepinephrine released from sympathetic postganglionic fibers acts presynaptically on vagal terminals within gallbladder ganglia to decrease the release of acetylcholine from vagal terminals; 3) substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are co-expressed in sensory fibers, cause prolonged depolarizations of gallbladder neurons that resemble slow EPSPs; and 4) cholecystokinin

  6. The role of glucagon-like peptide 1 in glucose homeostasis and in other aspects of human physiology.

    PubMed

    Franek, Edward; Gajos, Grzegorz; Gumprecht, Janusz; Kretowski, Adam; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Małecki, Maciej T

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews the structure, function, and pathophysiology of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). It describes the physiology and pathophysiology of the incretin axis, of which GLP-1 is a component, as well as the biosynthesis, secretion, activity, and degradation of this intestinal hormone. Effects of GLP-1 on the endocrine function of the pancreas, cardiovascular system, central nervous system, and on water-electrolyte balance have been also presented.

  7. Modeling spruce budworm population revisited: impact of physiological structure on outbreak control.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Naveen K; Wu, Jianhong

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of spruce budworm population is very important for the protection of spruce and balsam fir trees of North American forests, and a full understanding of the dynamics requires careful consideration of the individual physiological structures that is essential for outbreak control. A model as a delay differential equation is derived from structured population system, and is validated by comparing simulation results with real data from the Green River area of New Brunswick (Canada) and with the periodic outbreaks widely observed. Analysis of the equilibrium stability and examination of the amplitudes and frequencies of periodic oscillations are conducted, and the effect of budworm control strategies such as mature population control, immature population control and predation by birds are assessed. Analysis and simulation results suggest that killing only budworm larvae might not be enough for the long-term control of the budworm population. Since the time required for development during the inactive stage (from egg to second instar caterpillar) causes periodic outbreak, a strategy of reducing budworms in the inactive stage, such as removing egg biomass, should also be implemented for successful control.

  8. Unconventional neurotrophic factors CDNF and MANF: Structure, physiological functions and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Maria; Saarma, Mart; Lindholm, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) and mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) promote the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons which degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, CDNF and MANF are structurally and functionally clearly distinct from the classical, target-derived neurotrophic factors (NTFs) that are solely secreted proteins. In cells, CDNF and MANF localize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and evidence suggests that MANF, and possibly CDNF, is important for the maintenance of ER homeostasis. MANF expression is particularly high in secretory tissues with extensive protein production and thus a high ER protein folding load. Deletion of MANF in mice results in a diabetic phenotype and the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) in the pancreatic islets. However, information about the intracellular and extracellular mechanisms of MANF and CDNF action is still limited. Here we will discuss the structural motifs and physiological functions of CDNF and MANF as well as their therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. Currently available knockout models of MANF and CDNF in mice, zebrafish and fruit fly will increase information about the biology of these interesting proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Overview of Platelet Physiology: Its Hemostatic and Nonhemostatic Role in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Maitree

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate cell fragments that circulate in blood playing crucial role in managing vascular integrity and regulating hemostasis. Platelets are also involved in the fundamental biological process of chronic inflammation associated with disease pathology. Platelet indices like mean platelets volume (MPV), platelets distributed width (PDW), and platelet crit (PCT) are useful as cheap noninvasive biomarkers for assessing the diseased states. Dynamic platelets bear distinct morphology, where α and dense granule are actively involved in secretion of molecules like GPIIb , IIIa, fibrinogen, vWf, catecholamines, serotonin, calcium, ATP, ADP, and so forth, which are involved in aggregation. Differential expressions of surface receptors like CD36, CD41, CD61 and so forth have also been quantitated in several diseases. Platelet clinical research faces challenges due to the vulnerable nature of platelet structure functions and lack of accurate assay techniques. But recent advancement in flow cytometry inputs huge progress in the field of platelets study. Platelets activation and dysfunction have been implicated in diabetes, renal diseases, tumorigenesis, Alzheimer's, and CVD. In conclusion, this paper elucidates that platelets are not that innocent as they keep showing and thus numerous novel platelet biomarkers are upcoming very soon in the field of clinical research which can be important for predicting and diagnosing disease state. PMID:24729754

  10. Mapping physiological G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways reveals a role for receptor phosphorylation in airway contraction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sophie J.; Iglesias, Max Maza; Kong, Kok Choi; Butcher, Adrian J.; Plouffe, Bianca; Goupil, Eugénie; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; LeGouill, Christian; Russell, Kirsty; Laporte, Stéphane A.; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Bouvier, Michel; Chung, Kian Fan; Amrani, Yassine; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to initiate a plethora of signaling pathways in vitro. However, it is unclear which of these pathways are engaged to mediate physiological responses. Here, we examine the distinct roles of Gq/11-dependent signaling and receptor phosphorylation-dependent signaling in bronchial airway contraction and lung function regulated through the M3-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR). By using a genetically engineered mouse expressing a G protein-biased M3-mAChR mutant, we reveal the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a role for M3-mAChR phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle contraction in health and in a disease state with relevance to human asthma. Furthermore, this mouse model can be used to distinguish the physiological responses that are regulated by M3-mAChR phosphorylation (which include control of lung function) from those responses that are downstream of G protein signaling. In this way, we present an approach by which to predict the physiological/therapeutic outcome of M3-mAChR–biased ligands with important implications for drug discovery. PMID:27071102

  11. Mapping physiological G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways reveals a role for receptor phosphorylation in airway contraction.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sophie J; Wiegman, Coen H; Iglesias, Max Maza; Kong, Kok Choi; Butcher, Adrian J; Plouffe, Bianca; Goupil, Eugénie; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; LeGouill, Christian; Russell, Kirsty; Laporte, Stéphane A; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Bouvier, Michel; Chung, Kian Fan; Amrani, Yassine; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-19

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to initiate a plethora of signaling pathways in vitro. However, it is unclear which of these pathways are engaged to mediate physiological responses. Here, we examine the distinct roles of Gq/11-dependent signaling and receptor phosphorylation-dependent signaling in bronchial airway contraction and lung function regulated through the M3-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR). By using a genetically engineered mouse expressing a G protein-biased M3-mAChR mutant, we reveal the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a role for M3-mAChR phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle contraction in health and in a disease state with relevance to human asthma. Furthermore, this mouse model can be used to distinguish the physiological responses that are regulated by M3-mAChR phosphorylation (which include control of lung function) from those responses that are downstream of G protein signaling. In this way, we present an approach by which to predict the physiological/therapeutic outcome of M3-mAChR-biased ligands with important implications for drug discovery.

  12. Physiological reactivity during autobiographical narratives in older adults: the roles of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sarah M C; Swickert, Rhonda J; Connelly, Kathryn; Galizio, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Physiological reactivity (PR) describes the change in physiological functioning (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, pulse pressure) that occurs after the induction of a stressful task. This study aims to understand the influence of mental health symptoms on patterns of PR during autobiographical narratives in an older adult sample. Eighty older adults completed self-report measures regarding their symptoms of depression and anxiety. Next, their blood pressure was recorded while they completed two verbal autobiographical narratives. During the positive narrative, anxiety was positively associated with increased PR while depression was negatively associated with PR. During the negative narrative, a significant interaction occurred whereby anxiety was significantly positively associated with PR for those participants low in depression. The above results are explained in the context of the Tripartite Model of Depression and Anxiety, which predicts different patterns of PR as a function of mental health symptoms. Limitations and future directions are also discussed.

  13. Molecular aspects of structure, gating, and physiology of pH-sensitive background K2P and Kir K+-transport channels.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Francisco V; Pablo Cid, L; Teulon, Jacques; Niemeyer, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    K(+) channels fulfill roles spanning from the control of excitability to the regulation of transepithelial transport. Here we review two groups of K(+) channels, pH-regulated K2P channels and the transport group of Kir channels. After considering advances in the molecular aspects of their gating based on structural and functional studies, we examine their participation in certain chosen physiological and pathophysiological scenarios. Crystal structures of K2P and Kir channels reveal rather unique features with important consequences for the gating mechanisms. Important tasks of these channels are discussed in kidney physiology and disease, K(+) homeostasis in the brain by Kir channel-equipped glia, and central functions in the hearing mechanism in the inner ear and in acid secretion by parietal cells in the stomach. K2P channels fulfill a crucial part in central chemoreception probably by virtue of their pH sensitivity and are central to adrenal secretion of aldosterone. Finally, some unorthodox behaviors of the selectivity filters of K2P channels might explain their normal and pathological functions. Although a great deal has been learned about structure, molecular details of gating, and physiological functions of K2P and Kir K(+)-transport channels, this has been only scratching at the surface. More molecular and animal studies are clearly needed to deepen our knowledge.

  14. Molecular Aspects of Structure, Gating, and Physiology of pH-Sensitive Background K2P and Kir K+-Transport Channels

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Francisco V.; Pablo Cid, L.; Teulon, Jacques; Niemeyer, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    K+ channels fulfill roles spanning from the control of excitability to the regulation of transepithelial transport. Here we review two groups of K+ channels, pH-regulated K2P channels and the transport group of Kir channels. After considering advances in the molecular aspects of their gating based on structural and functional studies, we examine their participation in certain chosen physiological and pathophysiological scenarios. Crystal structures of K2P and Kir channels reveal rather unique features with important consequences for the gating mechanisms. Important tasks of these channels are discussed in kidney physiology and disease, K+ homeostasis in the brain by Kir channel-equipped glia, and central functions in the hearing mechanism in the inner ear and in acid secretion by parietal cells in the stomach. K2P channels fulfill a crucial part in central chemoreception probably by virtue of their pH sensitivity and are central to adrenal secretion of aldosterone. Finally, some unorthodox behaviors of the selectivity filters of K2P channels might explain their normal and pathological functions. Although a great deal has been learned about structure, molecular details of gating, and physiological functions of K2P and Kir K+-transport channels, this has been only scratching at the surface. More molecular and animal studies are clearly needed to deepen our knowledge. PMID:25540142

  15. The role of thermal physiology in recent declines of birds in a biodiversity hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Robyn; Cunningham, Susan J.; Lee, Alan T. K.; Smit, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether observed avian range contractions and population declines in the Fynbos biome of South Africa were mechanistically linked to recent climate warming. We aimed to determine whether there were correlations between preferred temperature envelope, or changes in temperature within species' ranges, and recent changes in range and population size, for 12 Fynbos-resident bird species, including six that are endemic to the biome. We then measured the physiological responses of each species at air temperatures ranging from 24 to 42°C to determine whether physiological thermal thresholds could provide a mechanistic explanation for observed population trends. Our data show that Fynbos-endemic species occupying the coolest regions experienced the greatest recent reductions in range and population size (>30% range reduction between 1991 and the present). In addition, species experiencing the largest increases in air temperature within their ranges showed the greatest declines. However, evidence for a physiological mechanistic link between warming and population declines was equivocal, with only the larger species showing low thermal thresholds for their body mass, compared with other birds globally. In addition, some species appear more vulnerable than others to air temperatures in their ranges above physiological thermal thresholds. Of these, the high-altitude specialist Cape rockjumper (Chaetops frenatus) seems most at risk from climate warming. This species showed: (i) the lowest threshold for increasing evaporative water loss at high temperatures; and (ii) population declines specifically in those regions of its range recording significant warming trends. Our findings suggest that caution must be taken when attributing causality explicitly to thermal stress, even when population trends are clearly correlated with rates of warming. Studies explicitly investigating the mechanisms underlying such correlations will be key to appropriate conservation

  16. The myths and physiology surrounding intrapartum decelerations: the critical role of the peripheral chemoreflex.

    PubMed

    Lear, Christopher A; Galinsky, Robert; Wassink, Guido; Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Davidson, Joanne O; Westgate, Jenny A; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J

    2016-09-01

    A distinctive pattern of recurrent rapid falls in fetal heart rate, called decelerations, are commonly associated with uterine contractions during labour. These brief decelerations are mediated by vagal activation. The reflex triggering this vagal response has been variably attributed to a mechanoreceptor response to fetal head compression, to baroreflex activation following increased blood pressure during umbilical cord compression, and/or a Bezold-Jarisch reflex response to reduced venous return from the placenta. Although these complex explanations are still widespread today, there is no consistent evidence that they are common during labour. Instead, the only mechanism that has been systematically investigated, proven to be reliably active during labour and, crucially, capable of producing rapid decelerations is the peripheral chemoreflex. The peripheral chemoreflex is triggered by transient periods of asphyxia that are a normal phenomenon associated with all uterine contractions. This should not cause concern as the healthy fetus has a remarkable ability to adapt to these repeated but short periods of asphyxia. This means that the healthy fetus is typically not at risk of hypotension and injury during uncomplicated labour even during repeated brief decelerations. The physiologically incorrect theories surrounding decelerations that ignore the natural occurrence of repeated asphyxia probably gained widespread support to help explain why many babies are born healthy despite repeated decelerations during labour. We propose that a unified and physiological understanding of intrapartum decelerations that accepts the true nature of labour is critical to improve interpretation of intrapartum fetal heart rate patterns. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  17. The role of thermal physiology in recent declines of birds in a biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Milne, Robyn; Cunningham, Susan J; Lee, Alan T K; Smit, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether observed avian range contractions and population declines in the Fynbos biome of South Africa were mechanistically linked to recent climate warming. We aimed to determine whether there were correlations between preferred temperature envelope, or changes in temperature within species' ranges, and recent changes in range and population size, for 12 Fynbos-resident bird species, including six that are endemic to the biome. We then measured the physiological responses of each species at air temperatures ranging from 24 to 42°C to determine whether physiological thermal thresholds could provide a mechanistic explanation for observed population trends. Our data show that Fynbos-endemic species occupying the coolest regions experienced the greatest recent reductions in range and population size (>30% range reduction between 1991 and the present). In addition, species experiencing the largest increases in air temperature within their ranges showed the greatest declines. However, evidence for a physiological mechanistic link between warming and population declines was equivocal, with only the larger species showing low thermal thresholds for their body mass, compared with other birds globally. In addition, some species appear more vulnerable than others to air temperatures in their ranges above physiological thermal thresholds. Of these, the high-altitude specialist Cape rockjumper (Chaetops frenatus) seems most at risk from climate warming. This species showed: (i) the lowest threshold for increasing evaporative water loss at high temperatures; and (ii) population declines specifically in those regions of its range recording significant warming trends. Our findings suggest that caution must be taken when attributing causality explicitly to thermal stress, even when population trends are clearly correlated with rates of warming. Studies explicitly investigating the mechanisms underlying such correlations will be key to appropriate conservation

  18. Distribution, function and physiological role of melatonin in the lower gut

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Qiu; Fichna, Jakub; Bashashati, Mohammad; Li, Yong-Yu; Storr, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is a hormone with endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions. It is involved in the regulation of multiple functions, including the control of the gastrointestinal (GI) system under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Since the gut contains at least 400 times more melatonin than the pineal gland, a review of the functional importance of melatonin in the gut seems useful, especially in the context of recent clinical trials. Melatonin exerts its physiological effects through specific membrane receptors, named melatonin-1 receptor (MT1), MT2 and MT3. These receptors can be found in the gut and their involvement in the regulation of GI motility, inflammation and pain has been reported in numerous basic and clinical studies. Stable levels of melatonin in the lower gut that are unchanged following a pinealectomy suggest local synthesis and, furthermore, implicate physiological importance of endogenous melatonin in the GI tract. Presently, only a small number of human studies report possible beneficial and also possible harmful effects of melatonin in case reports and clinical trials. These human studies include patients with lower GI diseases, especially patients with irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. In this review, we summarize the presently available information on melatonin effects in the lower gut and discuss available in vitro and in vivo data. We furthermore aim to evaluate whether melatonin may be useful in future treatment of symptoms or diseases involving the lower gut. PMID:22025877

  19. Distribution, function and physiological role of melatonin in the lower gut.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Qiu; Fichna, Jakub; Bashashati, Mohammad; Li, Yong-Yu; Storr, Martin

    2011-09-14

    Melatonin is a hormone with endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions. It is involved in the regulation of multiple functions, including the control of the gastrointestinal (GI) system under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Since the gut contains at least 400 times more melatonin than the pineal gland, a review of the functional importance of melatonin in the gut seems useful, especially in the context of recent clinical trials. Melatonin exerts its physiological effects through specific membrane receptors, named melatonin-1 receptor (MT1), MT2 and MT3. These receptors can be found in the gut and their involvement in the regulation of GI motility, inflammation and pain has been reported in numerous basic and clinical studies. Stable levels of melatonin in the lower gut that are unchanged following a pinealectomy suggest local synthesis and, furthermore, implicate physiological importance of endogenous melatonin in the GI tract. Presently, only a small number of human studies report possible beneficial and also possible harmful effects of melatonin in case reports and clinical trials. These human studies include patients with lower GI diseases, especially patients with irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. In this review, we summarize the presently available information on melatonin effects in the lower gut and discuss available in vitro and in vivo data. We furthermore aim to evaluate whether melatonin may be useful in future treatment of symptoms or diseases involving the lower gut.

  20. GI stem cells - new insights into roles in physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Henning, Susan J; von Furstenberg, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    This overview gives a brief historical summary of key discoveries regarding stem cells of the small intestine. The current concept is that there are two pools of intestinal stem cells (ISCs): an actively cycling pool that is marked by Lgr5, is relatively homogeneous and is responsible for daily turnover of the epithelium; and a slowly cycling or quiescent pool that functions as reserve ISCs. The latter pool appears to be quite heterogeneous and may include partially differentiated epithelial lineages that can reacquire stem cell characteristics following injury to the intestine. Markers and methods of isolation for active and quiescent ISC populations are described as well as the numerous important advances that have been made in approaches to the in vitro culture of ISCs and crypts. Factors regulating ISC biology are briefly summarized and both known and unknown aspects of the ISC niche are discussed. Although most of our current knowledge regarding ISC physiology and pathophysiology has come from studies with mice, recent work with human tissue highlights the potential translational applications arising from this field of research. Many of these topics are further elaborated in the following articles. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  1. Concise review: the role of oxygen in hematopoietic stem cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Jež, Mojca; Rožman, Primož; Ivanović, Zoran; Bas, Tuba

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dioxygen, O(2), is an important element in cellular microenvironment in vivo, and often overlooked in standard in vitro and ex vivo cell culture systems. Molecular oxygen is the ultimate electron acceptor in oxidative cellular respiration, and also a signal that regulates cell fate through concentration gradients. Recent advances in physiology of oxygen and adult stem cell research have shown that apart from being important for oxidative phosphorylation, thus energy metabolism, oxygen is also important as a signaling molecule and an integral part of the stem cell niche. This review article covers the influence of physiologically relevant oxygen levels on adult stem cells through highlighting the research on the effect of oxygen concentration on hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. This is important particularly to understand the embryonic and adult stem cell biology and physiology. The new discoveries in this field will help to further improve current tissue engineering and clinical applications. In addition, understanding the relationship between oxygen and stemness is invaluable for the advanced treatments of neoplastic diseases. Authors believe that in the future, active and programmed dynamic of oxygen levels will be routinely used for the programmed in vitro and ex vivo expansion of different adult stem cell types and tissue regeneration purposes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Predicting organismal vulnerability to climate warming: roles of behaviour, physiology and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Huey, Raymond B.; Kearney, Michael R.; Krockenberger, Andrew; Holtum, Joseph A. M.; Jess, Mellissa; Williams, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    A recently developed integrative framework proposes that the vulnerability of a species to environmental change depends on the species' exposure and sensitivity to environmental change, its resilience to perturbations and its potential to adapt to change. These vulnerability criteria require behavioural, physiological and genetic data. With this information in hand, biologists can predict organisms most at risk from environmental change. Biologists and managers can then target organisms and habitats most at risk. Unfortunately, the required data (e.g. optimal physiological temperatures) are rarely available. Here, we evaluate the reliability of potential proxies (e.g. critical temperatures) that are often available for some groups. Several proxies for ectotherms are promising, but analogous ones for endotherms are lacking. We also develop a simple graphical model of how behavioural thermoregulation, acclimation and adaptation may interact to influence vulnerability over time. After considering this model together with the proxies available for physiological sensitivity to climate change, we conclude that ectotherms sharing vulnerability traits seem concentrated in lowland tropical forests. Their vulnerability may be exacerbated by negative biotic interactions. Whether tropical forest (or other) species can adapt to warming environments is unclear, as genetic and selective data are scant. Nevertheless, the prospects for tropical forest ectotherms appear grim. PMID:22566674

  3. A novel role of h2-calponin in regulating whole blood thrombosis and platelet adhesion during physiologic flow.

    PubMed

    Hines, Patrick C; Gao, Xiufeng; White, Jennell C; D'Agostino, Ashley; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated protein reported in platelets, although the specific isoform expressed and functional role were not identified. The h2-calponin isoform is expressed in myeloid-derived peripheral blood monocytes, where it regulates adhesion. Our objective was to characterize the presence and function of the h2 isoform of calponin in platelets. H2-calponin was detected in human and mouse platelets via Western blotting. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated h2-calponin and actin colocalized in both human and wild-type mouse platelets at rest and following collagen activation. The kinetics of platelet adhesion and whole blood thrombosis during physiologic flow was evaluated in a microfluidic flow-based thrombosis assay. The time to initiation of rapid platelet/thrombus accumulation (lag time) was significantly longer in h2-calponin knockout versus wild-type mouse blood (130.02 ± 3.74 sec and 72.95 ± 16.23 sec, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the rate of platelet/thrombus accumulation during the rapid phase or the maximum platelet/thrombus accumulation. H2-calponin knockout mice also had prolonged bleeding time and blood loss. H2-calponin in platelets facilitates early interactions between platelets and collagen during physiologic flow, but does not significantly affect the rate or magnitude of platelet/thrombus accumulation. H2-calponin knockout mice take 2.3 times longer to achieve hemostasis compared to wild-type controls in a tail bleeding model. The ability to delay platelet accumulation without inhibiting downstream thrombotic potential would be of significant therapeutic value, thus h2-calponin may be a novel target for therapeutic platelet inhibition. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  4. PEDF and its roles in physiological and pathological conditions: implication in diabetic and hypoxia-induced angiogenic diseases.

    PubMed

    He, Xuemin; Cheng, Rui; Benyajati, Siribhinya; Ma, Jian-xing

    2015-06-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a broadly expressed multifunctional member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) family. This widely studied protein plays critical roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroprotection, angiogenesis, fibrogenesis and inflammation. The present review summarizes the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of PEDF in a variety of developing and adult organs, and discusses its functions in maintaining physiological homoeostasis. The major focus of the present review is to discuss the implication of PEDF in diabetic and hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, and the pathways mediating PEDF's effects under these conditions. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanisms of PEDF expression, function and degradation are also reviewed. Finally, the therapeutic potential of PEDF as an anti-angiogenic drug is briefly summarized.

  5. Physiological Mechanisms of Eccentric Contraction and Its Applications: A Role for the Giant Titin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Anthony L.; Lindstedt, Stan L.; Nishikawa, Kiisa C.

    2017-01-01

    When active muscles are stretched, our understanding of muscle function is stretched as well. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of concentric contraction has advanced considerably since the advent of the sliding filament theory, whereas mechanisms for increased force production during eccentric contraction are only now becoming clearer. Eccentric contractions play an important role in everyday human movements, including mobility, stability, and muscle strength. Shortly after the sliding filament theory of muscle contraction was introduced, there was a reluctant recognition that muscle behaved as if it contained an “elastic” filament. Jean Hanson and Hugh Huxley referred to this structure as the “S-filament,” though their concept gained little traction. This additional filament, the giant titin protein, was identified several decades later, and its roles in muscle contraction are still being discovered. Recent research has demonstrated that, like activation of thin filaments by calcium, titin is also activated in muscle sarcomeres by mechanisms only now being elucidated. The mdm mutation in mice appears to prevent activation of titin, and is a promising model system for investigating mechanisms of titin activation. Titin stiffness appears to increase with muscle force production, providing a mechanism that explains two fundamental properties of eccentric contractions: their high force and low energetic cost. The high force and low energy cost of eccentric contractions makes them particularly well suited for athletic training and rehabilitation. Eccentric exercise is commonly prescribed for treatment of a variety of conditions including sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and tendinosis. Use of eccentric exercise in rehabilitation and athletic training has exploded to include treatment for the elderly, as well as muscle and bone density maintenance for astronauts during long-term space travel. For exercise intolerance and many types of sports injuries

  6. Physiological Mechanisms of Eccentric Contraction and Its Applications: A Role for the Giant Titin Protein.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Anthony L; Lindstedt, Stan L; Nishikawa, Kiisa C

    2017-01-01

    When active muscles are stretched, our understanding of muscle function is stretched as well. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of concentric contraction has advanced considerably since the advent of the sliding filament theory, whereas mechanisms for increased force production during eccentric contraction are only now becoming clearer. Eccentric contractions play an important role in everyday human movements, including mobility, stability, and muscle strength. Shortly after the sliding filament theory of muscle contraction was introduced, there was a reluctant recognition that muscle behaved as if it contained an "elastic" filament. Jean Hanson and Hugh Huxley referred to this structure as the "S-filament," though their concept gained little traction. This additional filament, the giant titin protein, was identified several decades later, and its roles in muscle contraction are still being discovered. Recent research has demonstrated that, like activation of thin filaments by calcium, titin is also activated in muscle sarcomeres by mechanisms only now being elucidated. The mdm mutation in mice appears to prevent activation of titin, and is a promising model system for investigating mechanisms of titin activation. Titin stiffness appears to increase with muscle force production, providing a mechanism that explains two fundamental properties of eccentric contractions: their high force and low energetic cost. The high force and low energy cost of eccentric contractions makes them particularly well suited for athletic training and rehabilitation. Eccentric exercise is commonly prescribed for treatment of a variety of conditions including sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and tendinosis. Use of eccentric exercise in rehabilitation and athletic training has exploded to include treatment for the elderly, as well as muscle and bone density maintenance for astronauts during long-term space travel. For exercise intolerance and many types of sports injuries, experimental

  7. The causes of physiological suppression among female meerkats: a role for subordinate restraint due to the threat of infanticide?

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew J; Monfort, Steven L; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2008-01-01

    In many animal societies, subordinates exhibit down-regulated reproductive endocrine axes relative to those of dominants, but whether this 'physiological suppression' arises from active interference by dominants or subordinate self-restraint is a matter of debate. Here we investigate the roles that these processes play in precipitating physiological suppression among subordinate female meerkats, Suricata suricatta. We show that, while subordinate females are known to suffer stress-related physiological suppression during periodic temporary evictions by the dominant female, their low estrogen levels while within their groups cannot be readily attributed to chronic stress, as their fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels during this time are comparable to those of dominants. The low estrogen levels of subordinate females also cannot be explained simply by self-restraint due to factors that could reduce their payoff from maintaining their fertility regardless of the presence of the dominant female (young age, a lack of unrelated mates, poor body condition and limited breeding experience), as substantial rank-related differences in fecal total-estrogen metabolite levels remain when such factors are controlled. We suggest that this residual difference in estrogen levels may reflect a degree of subordinate restraint due in part to the dominant female's ability to kill their young. Accordingly, subordinate female estrogen levels vary in association with temporal variation in the likelihood of infanticide by the dominant. Attempts to identify the causes of physiological suppression should be cautious if rejecting any role for dominant interference in favor of subordinate restraint, as the dominant's capacity to interfere may often be the reason why subordinates exercise restraint.

  8. Effects of simulated microgravity on Streptococcus mutans physiology and biofilm structure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingqun; Xu, Xin; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Wang, Renke; Jia, Wenxiang; Li, Yu-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Long-term spaceflights will eventually become an inevitable occurrence. Previous studies have indicated that oral infectious diseases, including dental caries, were more prevalent in astronauts due to the effect of microgravity. However, the impact of the space environment, especially the microgravity environment, on the virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major caries-associated bacterium, is yet to be explored. In the present study, we investigated the impact of simulated microgravity on the physiology and biofilm structure of S. mutans. We also explored the dual-species interaction between S. mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis under a simulated microgravity condition. Results indicated that the simulated microgravity condition can enhance the acid tolerance ability, modify the biofilm architecture and extracellular polysaccharide distribution of S. mutans, and increase the proportion of S. mutans within a dual-species biofilm, probably through the regulation of various gene expressions. We hypothesize that the enhanced competitiveness of S. mutans under simulated microgravity may cause a multispecies micro-ecological imbalance, which would result in the initiation of dental caries. Our current findings are consistent with previous studies, which revealed a higher astronaut-associated incidence of caries. Further research is required to explore the detailed mechanisms.

  9. Cardiac structure and function in humans: a new cardiovascular physiology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another “hands-on” experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle, we developed protocols to illustrate the changes in cardiac and vascular function that occur with changes in posture, venous return, and graded exercise. We use medical student volunteers and a professional echocardiographer to generate and acquire data, respectively. In small-group sessions, we developed an interactive approach to discuss the data and to make a large number of calculations from a limited number of measurements. The sequence of cardiac events and cardiac structure in vivo were illustrated with the volunteers lying down, standing, and then with their legs raised passively above the heart to increase venous return. Volunteers were then asked to peddle the bicycle to achieve steady-state heart rates of 110 and 150 beats/min. Data were collected in all these states, and calculations were performed and used as the basis of a small-group discussion to illustrate physiological principles. Information related to a surprisingly large number of cardiovascular control mechanisms was derived, and its relevance to cardiovascular dysfunction was explored. This communication describes our experience in developing a new cardiovascular control laboratory to reinforce didactic material presented in lectures and small-group sessions. PMID:19745049

  10. Numerical Bifurcation Analysis of Physiologically Structured Populations: Consumer-Resource, Cannibalistic and Trophic Models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Sanz, Julia; Getto, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of applying numerical methods, we develop a formalism for physiologically structured population models in a new generality that includes consumer-resource, cannibalism and trophic models. The dynamics at the population level are formulated as a system of Volterra functional equations coupled to ODE. For this general class, we develop numerical methods to continue equilibria with respect to a parameter, detect transcritical and saddle-node bifurcations and compute curves in parameter planes along which these bifurcations occur. The methods combine curve continuation, ODE solvers and test functions. Finally, we apply the methods to the above models using existing data for Daphnia magna consuming Algae and for Perca fluviatilis feeding on Daphnia magna. In particular, we validate the methods by deriving expressions for equilibria and bifurcations with respect to which we compute errors, and by comparing the obtained curves with curves that were computed earlier with other methods. We also present new curves to show how the methods can easily be applied to derive new biological insight. Schemes of algorithms are included.

  11. Fitting C2 Continuous Parametric Surfaces to Frontiers Delimiting Physiologic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique to fit C2 continuous parametric surfaces to scattered geometric data points forming frontiers delimiting physiologic structures in segmented images. Such mathematical representation is interesting because it facilitates a large number of operations in modeling. While the fitting of C2 continuous parametric curves to scattered geometric data points is quite trivial, the fitting of C2 continuous parametric surfaces is not. The difficulty comes from the fact that each scattered data point should be assigned a unique parametric coordinate, and the fit is quite sensitive to their distribution on the parametric plane. We present a new approach where a polygonal (quadrilateral or triangular) surface is extracted from the segmented image. This surface is subsequently projected onto a parametric plane in a manner to ensure a one-to-one mapping. The resulting polygonal mesh is then regularized for area and edge length. Finally, from this point, surface fitting is relatively trivial. The novelty of our approach lies in the regularization of the polygonal mesh. Process performance is assessed with the reconstruction of a geometric model of mouse heart ventricles from a computerized tomography scan. Our results show an excellent reproduction of the geometric data with surfaces that are C2 continuous. PMID:24782911

  12. Involuntary Attention and Physiological Arousal Evoked by Structural Features and Emotional Content in TV Commercials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Annie

    1990-01-01

    Examines how emotional content in televised messages intensifies physiological attentional responses. Explains that heart rate data indicating both shorter-term responses and longer-term arousal were collected from 10 female and 4 male advertising students. Finds that emotional content increases physiological arousal in viewers and that heart…

  13. Use of antiserum to neurotensin reveals a physiological role for the peptide in rat prolactin release.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, E; Carraway, R; Leeman, S E; McCann, S M

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the brain peptide neurotensin can stimulate prolactin release by direct action on the pituitary gland, whereas its action within the hypothalamus is inhibitory. The inhibitory action is mediated by the release of dopamine into the hypophyseal portal veins, which deliver the neurotransmitter to the anterior pituitary gland to inhibit prolactin release. Our experiments were done to evaluate the physiologic significance of these neurotensin actions by injecting the globulin fraction of highly specific neurotensin antiserum either intravenously or intraventricularly. Injection into the third ventricle of either 1 or 3 microliter of neurotensin antiserum significantly increased plasma prolactin concentrations in (i) ovariectomized and (ii) ovariectomized estrogen- and progesterone-primed rats within 1 hr of injection. The response was more pronounced in the ovariectomized than in the ovariectomized estrogen- and progesterone-treated animals and was dose related. Intraventricular injection of these doses of neurotensin antiserum also evoked elevations in plasma prolactin in intact males, which were significant but smaller in magnitude than those seen in female rats. To evaluate the effect of the antiserum on the pituitary directly, the antiserum was injected intravenously at a dose of 40 microliter, which was sufficient to block the blood pressure-lowering effect of neurotensin. After the intravenous injection of antiserum, a highly significant suppression of plasma prolactin occurred, detectable when first measured at 1 hr after injection in both ovariectomized and ovariectomized estrogen- and progesterone-treated animals; however, the intravenous injection of antiserum had no significant effect on the prolactin release in males. These data indicate the physiological significance of the hypothalamic inhibitory actions of neurotensin on prolactin release, which are probably mediated by its stimulation of dopamine release that in turn

  14. Tipping points, thresholds and the keystone role of physiology in marine climate change research.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cristián J; Helmuth, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing and future effects of global climate change on natural and human-managed ecosystems have led to a renewed interest in the concept of ecological thresholds or tipping points. While generalizations such as poleward range shifts serve as a useful heuristic framework to understand the overall ecological impacts of climate change, sophisticated approaches to management require spatially and temporally explicit predictions that move beyond these oversimplified models. Most approaches to studying ecological thresholds in marine ecosystems tend to focus on populations, or on non-linearities in physical drivers. Here we argue that many of the observed thresholds observed at community and ecosystem levels can potentially be explained as the product of non-linearities that occur at three scales: (a) the mechanisms by which individual organisms interact with their ambient habitat, (b) the non-linear relationship between organismal physiological performance and variables such as body temperature and (c) the indirect effects of physiological stress on species interactions such as competition and predation. We explore examples at each of these scales in detail and explain why a failure to consider these non-linearities - many of which can be counterintuitive - can lead to Type II errors (a failure to predict significant ecological responses to climate change). Specifically, we examine why ecological thresholds can occur well before concomitant thresholds in physical drivers are observed, i.e. how even small linear changes in the physical environment can lead to ecological tipping points. We advocate for an integrated framework that combines biophysical, ecological and physiological methods to generate hypotheses that can be tested using experimental manipulation as well as hindcasting and nowcasting of observed change, on a spatially and temporally explicit basis. 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pentraxins: Structure, Function, and Role in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Du Clos, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    The pentraxins are an ancient family of proteins with a unique architecture found as far back in evolution as the Horseshoe crab. In humans the two members of this family are C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P. Pentraxins are defined by their sequence homology, their pentameric structure and their calcium-dependent binding to their ligands. Pentraxins function as soluble pattern recognition molecules and one of the earliest and most important roles for these proteins is host defense primarily against pathogenic bacteria. They function as opsonins for pathogens through activation of the complement pathway and through binding to Fc gamma receptors. Pentraxins also recognize membrane phospholipids and nuclear components exposed on or released by damaged cells. CRP has a specific interaction with small nuclear ribonucleoproteins whereas SAP is a major recognition molecule for DNA, two nuclear autoantigens. Studies in autoimmune and inflammatory disease models suggest that pentraxins interact with macrophage Fc receptors to regulate the inflammatory response. Because CRP is a strong acute phase reactant it is widely used as a marker of inflammation and infection. PMID:24167754

  16. The Role of Efflux and Physiological Adaptation in Biofilm Tolerance and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Heleen; Coenye, Tom

    2016-06-10

    Microbial biofilms demonstrate a decreased susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Various mechanisms have been proposed to be involved in this recalcitrance. We focus on two of these factors. Firstly, the ability of sessile cells to actively mediate efflux of antimicrobial compounds has a profound impact on resistance and tolerance, and several studies point to the existence of biofilm-specific efflux systems. Secondly, biofilm-specific stress responses have a marked influence on cellular physiology, and contribute to the occurrence of persister cells. We provide an overview of the data that demonstrate that both processes are important for survival following exposure to antimicrobial agents.

  17. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzyme (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.

  18. Responses of photosynthetic assemblage structure and physiology to variations in nitrogen substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rii, Y. M.; Bidigare, R.; Church, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Picophytoplankton (<3 μm) are major contributors to productivity and biomass in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Due to the persistent dearth of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the well-lit region, nitrogen availability is central to structuring planktonic communities through competition for this limiting resource. We examined changes in phytoplankton assemblage structure and physiology in response to nitrogen enrichments in five experiments conducted between 2011-2013 (two summer, two spring, and one winter). Natural seawater planktonic communities from the surface water at Station ALOHA were enriched with nitrate (NO3-) or ammonium (NH4+) and incubated over 120 to 144 hours. During summer experiments, picophytoplankton exhibited a rapid increase in 14C-based primary production, with phytoplankton >3 µm becoming increasingly more productive later in the experiment (120 h). Chlorophyll a concentrations increased gradually over the experiment period. During spring experiments, phytoplankton displayed the opposite pattern; chlorophyll a concentrations increased rapidly (48 h, 3-fold) but rates of photosynthetic carbon fixation did not increase until after 96 h. For the winter experiment, both primary productivity and chlorophyll a increased gradually over the experimental period. HPLC pigment analyses and high-throughput sequencing of 18S rRNA genes revealed that pennate diatoms, haptophytes, and dictyochophytes thrived in both N enrichments, but chrysophytes flourished in the NH4+ additions. Overall, our results indicate that responses in biomass and productivity differed in both time scale and magnitude between experiments conducted during different seasons, shedding insight into the potential controls of phytoplankton nutrient acquisition and growth in the euphotic zone.

  19. Investigations of Protein Structure and Function Using the Scientific Literature: An Assignment for an Undergraduate Cell Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduate biology curricula are being modified to model and teach the activities of scientists better. The assignment described here, one that investigates protein structure and function, was designed for use in a sophomore-level cell physiology course at Earlham College. Students work in small groups to read and present in poster format on…

  20. Investigations of Protein Structure and Function Using the Scientific Literature: An Assignment for an Undergraduate Cell Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduate biology curricula are being modified to model and teach the activities of scientists better. The assignment described here, one that investigates protein structure and function, was designed for use in a sophomore-level cell physiology course at Earlham College. Students work in small groups to read and present in poster format on…

  1. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    PubMed

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (<1.6 and 1.6-1.8 g cm(-3) ) and bulk soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for

  2. The roles of physical and physiological simultaneity in audiovisual multisensory facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Lynnette M.; McCourt, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments measured the audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony (SOAAV), yielding facilitative multisensory integration. We evaluated (1) the range of SOAAV over which facilitation occurred when unisensory stimuli were weak; (2) whether the range of SOAAV producing facilitation supported the hypothesis that physiological simultaneity of unisensory activity governs multisensory facilitation; and (3) whether AV multisensory facilitation depended on relative stimulus intensity. We compared response-time distributions to unisensory auditory (A) and visual (V) stimuli with those to AV stimuli over a wide range (300 and 20 ms increments) of SOAAV, across four conditions of varying stimulus intensity. In condition 1, the intensity of unisensory stimuli was adjusted such that d′ ≈ 2. In condition 2, V stimulus intensity was increased (d′ > 4), while A stimulus intensity was as in condition 1. In condition 3, A stimulus intensity was increased (d′ > 4) while V stimulus intensity was as in condition 1. In condition 4, both A and V stimulus intensities were increased to clearly suprathreshold levels (d′ > 4). Across all conditions of stimulus intensity, significant multisensory facilitation occurred exclusively for simultaneously presented A and V stimuli. In addition, facilitation increased as stimulus intensity increased, in disagreement with inverse effectiveness. These results indicate that the requirements for facilitative multisensory integration include both physical and physiological simultaneity. PMID:24349682

  3. The roles of physical and physiological simultaneity in audiovisual multisensory facilitation.

    PubMed

    Leone, Lynnette M; McCourt, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments measured the audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony (SOAAV), yielding facilitative multisensory integration. We evaluated (1) the range of SOAAV over which facilitation occurred when unisensory stimuli were weak; (2) whether the range of SOAAV producing facilitation supported the hypothesis that physiological simultaneity of unisensory activity governs multisensory facilitation; and (3) whether AV multisensory facilitation depended on relative stimulus intensity. We compared response-time distributions to unisensory auditory (A) and visual (V) stimuli with those to AV stimuli over a wide range (300 and 20 ms increments) of SOAAV, across four conditions of varying stimulus intensity. In condition 1, the intensity of unisensory stimuli was adjusted such that d' ≈ 2. In condition 2, V stimulus intensity was increased (d' > 4), while A stimulus intensity was as in condition 1. In condition 3, A stimulus intensity was increased (d' > 4) while V stimulus intensity was as in condition 1. In condition 4, both A and V stimulus intensities were increased to clearly suprathreshold levels (d' > 4). Across all conditions of stimulus intensity, significant multisensory facilitation occurred exclusively for simultaneously presented A and V stimuli. In addition, facilitation increased as stimulus intensity increased, in disagreement with inverse effectiveness. These results indicate that the requirements for facilitative multisensory integration include both physical and physiological simultaneity.

  4. The myths and physiology surrounding intrapartum decelerations: the critical role of the peripheral chemoreflex

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Christopher A.; Galinsky, Robert; Wassink, Guido; Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Davidson, Joanne O.; Westgate, Jenny A.; Bennet, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A distinctive pattern of recurrent rapid falls in fetal heart rate, called decelerations, are commonly associated with uterine contractions during labour. These brief decelerations are mediated by vagal activation. The reflex triggering this vagal response has been variably attributed to a mechanoreceptor response to fetal head compression, to baroreflex activation following increased blood pressure during umbilical cord compression, and/or a Bezold–Jarisch reflex response to reduced venous return from the placenta. Although these complex explanations are still widespread today, there is no consistent evidence that they are common during labour. Instead, the only mechanism that has been systematically investigated, proven to be reliably active during labour and, crucially, capable of producing rapid decelerations is the peripheral chemoreflex. The peripheral chemoreflex is triggered by transient periods of asphyxia that are a normal phenomenon associated with all uterine contractions. This should not cause concern as the healthy fetus has a remarkable ability to adapt to these repeated but short periods of asphyxia. This means that the healthy fetus is typically not at risk of hypotension and injury during uncomplicated labour even during repeated brief decelerations. The physiologically incorrect theories surrounding decelerations that ignore the natural occurrence of repeated asphyxia probably gained widespread support to help explain why many babies are born healthy despite repeated decelerations during labour. We propose that a unified and physiological understanding of intrapartum decelerations that accepts the true nature of labour is critical to improve interpretation of intrapartum fetal heart rate patterns. PMID:27328617

  5. Predictability of physiological testing and the role of maturation in talent identification for adolescent team sports.

    PubMed

    Pearson, D T; Naughton, G A; Torode, M

    2006-08-01

    Entrepreneurial marketing of sport increases demands on sport development officers to identify talented individuals for specialist development at the youngest possible age. Talent identification results in the streamlining of resources to produce optimal returns from a sports investment. However, the process of talent identification for team sports is complex and success prediction is imperfect. The aim of this review is to describe existing practices in physiological tests used for talent identification in team sports and discuss the impact of maturity-related differences on the long term outcomes particularly for male participants. Maturation is a major confounding variable in talent identification during adolescence. A myriad of hormonal changes during puberty results in physical and physiological characteristics important for sporting performance. Significant changes during puberty make the prediction of adult performance difficult from adolescent data. Furthermore, for talent identification programs to succeed, valid and reliable testing procedures must be accepted and implemented in a range of performance-related categories. Limited success in scientifically based talent identification is evident in a range of team sports. Genetic advances challenge the ethics of talent identification in adolescent sport. However, the environment remains a significant component of success prediction in sport. Considerations for supporting talented young male athletes are discussed.

  6. Untangling the roles of microclimate, behaviour and physiological polymorphism in governing vulnerability of intertidal snails to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yun-Wei; Li, Xiao-Xu; Choi, Francis M P; Williams, Gray A; Somero, George N; Helmuth, Brian

    2017-05-17

    Biogeographic distributions are driven by cumulative effects of smaller scale processes. Thus, vulnerability of animals to thermal stress is the result of physiological sensitivities to body temperature (Tb), microclimatic conditions, and behavioural thermoregulation. To understand interactions among these variables, we analysed the thermal tolerances of three species of intertidal snails from different latitudes along the Chinese coast, and estimated potential Tb in different microhabitats at each site. We then empirically determined the temperatures at which heart rate decreased sharply with rising temperature (Arrhenius breakpoint temperature, ABT) and at which it fell to zero (flat line temperature, FLT) to calculate thermal safety margins (TSM). Regular exceedance of FLT in sun-exposed microhabitats, a lethal effect, was predicted for only one mid-latitude site. However, ABTs of some individuals were exceeded at sun-exposed microhabitats in most sites, suggesting physiological impairment for snails with poor behavioural thermoregulation and revealing inter-individual variations (physiological polymorphism) of thermal limits. An autocorrelation analysis of Tb showed that predictability of extreme temperatures was lowest at the hottest sites, indicating that the effectiveness of behavioural thermoregulation is potentially lowest at these sites. These results illustrate the critical roles of mechanistic studies at small spatial scales when predicting effects of climate change. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Studying Multisensory Processing and Its Role in the Representation of Space through Pathological and Physiological Crossmodal Extinction.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stéphane; Brozzoli, Claudio; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Meunier, Martine; Farnè, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The study of crossmodal extinction has brought a considerable contribution to our understanding of how the integration of stimuli perceived in multiple sensory modalities is used by the nervous system to build coherent representations of the space that directly surrounds us. Indeed, by revealing interferences between stimuli in a disturbed system, extinction provides an invaluable opportunity to investigate the interactions that normally exist between those stimuli in an intact system. Here, we first review studies on pathological crossmodal extinction, from the original demonstration of its existence, to its role in the exploration of the multisensory neural representation of space and the current theoretical accounts proposed to explain the mechanisms involved in extinction and multisensory competition. Then, in the second part of this paper, we report recent findings showing that physiological multisensory competition phenomena resembling clinical crossmodal extinction exist in the healthy brain. We propose that the development of a physiological model of sensory competition is fundamental to deepen our understanding of the cerebral mechanisms of multisensory perception and integration. In addition, a similar approach to develop a model of physiological sensory competition in non-human primates should allow combining functional neuroimaging with more invasive techniques, such as transient focal lesions, in order to bridge the gap between works done in the two species and at different levels of analysis.

  8. Studying Multisensory Processing and Its Role in the Representation of Space through Pathological and Physiological Crossmodal Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Stéphane; Brozzoli, Claudio; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Meunier, Martine; Farnè, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The study of crossmodal extinction has brought a considerable contribution to our understanding of how the integration of stimuli perceived in multiple sensory modalities is used by the nervous system to build coherent representations of the space that directly surrounds us. Indeed, by revealing interferences between stimuli in a disturbed system, extinction provides an invaluable opportunity to investigate the interactions that normally exist between those stimuli in an intact system. Here, we first review studies on pathological crossmodal extinction, from the original demonstration of its existence, to its role in the exploration of the multisensory neural representation of space and the current theoretical accounts proposed to explain the mechanisms involved in extinction and multisensory competition. Then, in the second part of this paper, we report recent findings showing that physiological multisensory competition phenomena resembling clinical crossmodal extinction exist in the healthy brain. We propose that the development of a physiological model of sensory competition is fundamental to deepen our understanding of the cerebral mechanisms of multisensory perception and integration. In addition, a similar approach to develop a model of physiological sensory competition in non-human primates should allow combining functional neuroimaging with more invasive techniques, such as transient focal lesions, in order to bridge the gap between works done in the two species and at different levels of analysis. PMID:21687458

  9. Role of motor unit structure in defining function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monti, R. J.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Motor units, defined as a motoneuron and all of its associated muscle fibers, are the basic functional units of skeletal muscle. Their activity represents the final output of the central nervous system, and their role in motor control has been widely studied. However, there has been relatively little work focused on the mechanical significance of recruiting variable numbers of motor units during different motor tasks. This review focuses on factors ranging from molecular to macroanatomical components that influence the mechanical output of a motor unit in the context of the whole muscle. These factors range from the mechanical properties of different muscle fiber types to the unique morphology of the muscle fibers constituting a motor unit of a given type and to the arrangement of those motor unit fibers in three dimensions within the muscle. We suggest that as a result of the integration of multiple levels of structural and physiological levels of organization, unique mechanical properties of motor units are likely to emerge. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Phylogenomic Analysis and Predicted Physiological Role of the Proton-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I) Across Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a multisubunit integral membrane enzyme found in the respiratory chains of both bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Although much research has focused on the enzyme’s central role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, comparatively little is known about its role in the diverse energetic lifestyles of different bacteria. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to better understand the distribution of complex I across bacteria, the evolution of this enzyme, and its potential roles in shaping the physiology of different bacterial groups. By surveying 970 representative bacterial genomes, we predict complex I to be present in ~50% of bacteria. While this includes bacteria with a wide range of energetic schemes, the presence of complex I is associated with specific lifestyles, including aerobic respiration and specific types of phototrophy (bacteria with only a type II reaction center). A phylogeny of bacterial complex I revealed five main clades of enzymes whose evolution is largely congruent with the evolution of the bacterial groups that encode complex I. A notable exception includes the gammaproteobacteria, whose members encode one of two distantly related complex I enzymes predicted to participate in different types of respiratory chains (aerobic versus anaerobic). Comparative genomic analyses suggest a broad role for complex I in reoxidizing NADH produced from various catabolic reactions, including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Together, these findings suggest diverse roles for complex I across bacteria and highlight the importance of this enzyme in shaping diverse physiologies across the bacterial domain. PMID:25873378

  11. The Physiology and Biochemistry of Receptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Judy A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The syllabus for a refresher course on the physiology and biochemistry of receptors (presented at the 1983 American Physiological Society meeting) is provided. Topics considered include receptor regulation, structural/functional aspects of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factors, calcium channel inhibitors, and role of lipoprotein…

  12. The Physiology and Biochemistry of Receptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Judy A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The syllabus for a refresher course on the physiology and biochemistry of receptors (presented at the 1983 American Physiological Society meeting) is provided. Topics considered include receptor regulation, structural/functional aspects of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factors, calcium channel inhibitors, and role of lipoprotein…

  13. Structural and Physiological Analyses of the Alkanesulphonate-Binding Protein (SsuA) of the Citrus Pathogen Xanthomonas citri

    PubMed Central

    Tófoli de Araújo, Fabiano; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Pereira, Cristiane T.; Sanches, Mario; Oshiro, Elisa E.; Ferreira, Rita C. C.; Chigardze, Dimitri Y.; Barbosa, João Alexandre Gonçalves; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos; Benedetti, Celso E.; Blundell, Tom L.; Balan, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background The uptake of sulphur-containing compounds plays a pivotal role in the physiology of bacteria that live in aerobic soils where organosulfur compounds such as sulphonates and sulphate esters represent more than 95% of the available sulphur. Until now, no information has been available on the uptake of sulphonates by bacterial plant pathogens, particularly those of the Xanthomonas genus, which encompasses several pathogenic species. In the present study, we characterised the alkanesulphonate uptake system (Ssu) of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306 strain (X. citri), the etiological agent of citrus canker. Methodology/Principal Findings A single operon-like gene cluster (ssuEDACB) that encodes both the sulphur uptake system and enzymes involved in desulphurisation was detected in the genomes of X. citri and of the closely related species. We characterised X. citri SsuA protein, a periplasmic alkanesulphonate-binding protein that, together with SsuC and SsuB, defines the alkanesulphonate uptake system. The crystal structure of SsuA bound to MOPS, MES and HEPES, which is herein described for the first time, provides evidence for the importance of a conserved dipole in sulphate group coordination, identifies specific amino acids interacting with the sulphate group and shows the presence of a rather large binding pocket that explains the rather wide range of molecules recognised by the protein. Isolation of an isogenic ssuA-knockout derivative of the X. citri 306 strain showed that disruption of alkanesulphonate uptake affects both xanthan gum production and generation of canker lesions in sweet orange leaves. Conclusions/Significance The present study unravels unique structural and functional features of the X. citri SsuA protein and provides the first experimental evidence that an ABC uptake system affects the virulence of this phytopathogen. PMID:24282519

  14. Evolving Lessons on the Complex Role of AMPK in Normal Physiology and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Biplab; Chhipa, Rishi Raj

    2015-01-01

    AMP kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme required for adaptive responses to various physiological and pathological conditions. AMPK executes numerous cellular functions, some of which are often perceived at odds with each other. While AMPK is essential for embryonic growth and development, its full impact in adult tissues is revealed under stressful situations that organisms face in the real world. Conflicting reports about its cellular functions, particularly in cancer, are intriguing and a growing number of AMPK activators are being developed to treat human diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Whether these drugs will have only context-specific benefits or detrimental effects in the treatment of human cancer will be a subject of intense research. Here we review the current state of AMPK research with an emphasis on cancer and discuss the yet unresolved context-dependent functions of AMPK in human cancer. PMID:26711141

  15. Diverse functional roles of monosaccharide transporters and their homologs in vascular plants: a physiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Slewinski, Thomas L

    2011-07-01

    Vascular plants contain two gene families that encode monosaccharide transporter proteins. The classical monosaccharide transporter(-like) gene superfamily is large and functionally diverse, while the recently identified SWEET transporter family is smaller and, thus far, only found to transport glucose. These transporters play essential roles at many levels, ranging from organelles to the whole plant. Many family members are essential for cellular homeostasis and reproductive success. Although most transporters do not directly participate in long-distance transport, their indirect roles greatly impact carbon allocation and transport flux to the heterotrophic tissues of the plant. Functional characterization of some members from both gene families has revealed their diverse roles in carbohydrate partitioning, phloem function, resource allocation, plant defense, and sugar signaling. This review highlights the broad impacts and implications of monosaccharide transport by describing some of the functional roles of the monosaccharide transporter(-like) superfamily and the SWEET transporter family.

  16. Role of central vagal 5-HT3 receptors in gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kirsteen N.

    2015-01-01

    Vagal neurocircuits are vitally important in the co-ordination and modulation of GI reflexes and homeostatic functions. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is critically important in the regulation of several of these autonomic gastrointestinal (GI) functions including motility, secretion and visceral sensitivity. While several 5-HT receptors are involved in these physiological responses, the ligand-gated 5-HT3 receptor appears intimately involved in gut-brain signaling, particularly via the afferent (sensory) vagus nerve. 5-HT is released from enterochromaffin cells in response to mechanical or chemical stimulation of the GI tract which leads to activation of 5-HT3 receptors on the terminals of vagal afferents. 5-HT3 receptors are also present on the soma of vagal afferent neurons, including GI vagal afferent neurons, where they can be activated by circulating 5-HT. The central terminals of vagal afferents also exhibit 5-HT3 receptors that function to increase glutamatergic synaptic transmission to second order neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius within the brainstem. While activation of central brainstem 5-HT3 receptors modulates visceral functions, it is still unclear whether central vagal neurons, i.e., nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurons themselves also display functional 5-HT3 receptors. Thus, activation of 5-HT3 receptors may modulate the excitability and activity of gastrointestinal vagal afferents at multiple sites and may be involved in several physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including distention- and chemical-evoked vagal reflexes, nausea, and vomiting, as well as visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26578870

  17. Role of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase in renal physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Hallows, Kenneth R; Mount, Peter F; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Power, David A

    2010-05-01

    The ultrasensitive energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) orchestrates the regulation of energy-generating and energy-consuming pathways. AMPK is highly expressed in the kidney where it is reported to be involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including ion transport, podocyte function, and diabetic renal hypertrophy. Sodium transport is the major energy-consuming process in the kidney, and AMPK has been proposed to contribute to the coupling of ion transport with cellular energy metabolism. Specifically, AMPK has been identified as a regulator of several ion transporters of significance in renal physiology, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC), and the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Identified regulators of AMPK in the kidney include dietary salt, diabetes, adiponectin, and ischemia. Activation of AMPK in response to adiponectin is described in podocytes, where it reduces albuminuria, and in tubular cells, where it reduces glycogen accumulation. Reduced AMPK activity in the diabetic kidney is associated with renal accumulation of triglyceride and glycogen and the pathogenesis of diabetic renal hypertrophy. Acute renal ischemia causes a rapid and powerful activation of AMPK, but the functional significance of this observation remains unclear. Despite the recent advances, there remain significant gaps in the present understanding of both the upstream regulating pathways and the downstream substrates for AMPK in the kidney. A more complete understanding of the AMPK pathway in the kidney offers potential for improved therapies for several renal diseases including diabetic nephropathy, polycystic kidney disease, and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  18. Role of Coronary Calcium Scoring in the Assessment of Physiological Ischemia in Patients with Intermediate Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Kazunori; Kikuchi, Yuichi; Takizawa, Kaname; Inoue, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Although coronary artery calcium (CAC) is an established marker of coronary atherosclerosis, whether it also reflects the physiological significance is unknown. This study aims to evaluate if CAC could indicate physiological ischemia in intermediate stenosis defined by an invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). CAC score (CACS) derived from either whole coronary arteries or individual arteries was measured by computed tomography among patients with intermediate de novo lesions (percent diameter stenosis from 30% to less than 70%). All stenoses were evaluated by invasive FFR; lesions with an FFR ≤ 0.80 were considered significant. We enrolled 119 patients with 143 lesions. Of these, 42 lesions (29.4%) demonstrated significant ischemia by FFR measurement. FFR values had modest but significant correlations with CACS in individual arteries with intermediate stenosis (r = − 0.290; p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that CACS of individual arteries with intermediate stenosis had 71.4% sensitivity and 67.3% specificity as a predictor of significant ischemia at a cut off value of 145.9. Multivariable analysis showed that percent diameter stenosis and CACS in individual arteries with intermediate stenosis were independent predictors for significant ischemia. By net reclassification improvement analysis, CACS in individual arteries with intermediate stenosis provided incremental prediction for significant ischemia over minimum lumen diameter, percent diameter stenosis, and lesion length. CACS measured in each artery, but not the total CACS, provides additional information as to whether an angiographically intermediate stenosis within the artery is significant enough to cause myocardial ischemia. PMID:26648671

  19. Establishment of procedures for studying mPR-interacting agents and physiological roles of mPR.

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Toshinobu; Hossain, Md Babul; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    More than 10years have passed since the discovery of membrane progestin receptors (mPRs). Although the identification of mPR genes in various organisms and mPR expression patterns have been described since then, the precise physiological roles of mPRs are still unclear, except their function as a receptor for maturation-inducing steroid in fish. The wide distribution of mPRs suggests variable actions for progestins through mPRs in the tissues. Information about the physiological roles of mPRs, such as roles in the progression of breast cancer and T-cell proliferation, has gradually accumulated recently. These results suggest that mPRs are possible targets for new pharmaceuticals. We established a cell line that was transformed with cDNAs for mPRα and a recombinant luciferase gene named GloSensor. The cells can be used for monitoring the effects of ligands on mPRα based on intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. Studies using these cell lines indicated that the cAMP concentration is decreased by ligands for mPRα. The results provide support for previous results suggesting that mPRα is coupled to inhibitory G protein (Gi). We also established screening methods that make it possible to screen ligands for mPR. Recently, we succeeded in expressing and purifying recombinant mPR protein in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Relatively large amounts of mPR protein with hormonal binding activity can be purified by our method. The recombinant protein will be applicable to establishing a molecular probe to detect mPR-interacting agents. To obtain decisive evidence for the roles of mPRs, we are establishing strains of medaka fish that are deficient in mPRs. In medaka, four subtypes of mPR genes (α, β, γ, and α2) have been identified. By reverse genetic screening, we have selected three to four strains in which a point mutation has been induced in the coding sequence of the mPR subtypes. However, homozygous mutants of each mPR gene showed no phenotype. The

  20. Identification and Characterization of the Corazonin Receptor and Possible Physiological Roles of the Corazonin-Signaling Pathway in Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Hamoudi, Zina; Lange, Angela B.; Orchard, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides control many physiological and endocrinological processes in animals, acting as neuroactive chemicals within the central and peripheral nervous systems. Corazonin (CRZ) is one such neuropeptide that has a variety of physiological roles associated with control of heartbeat, ecdysis behavior initiation, and cuticle coloration. These physiological effects are mediated by the CRZ receptor (CRZR). In order to understand the role of the CRZ-signaling pathway in Rhodnius prolixus, the cDNA sequence encoding the Rhopr-CRZR was isolated and cloned revealing two splice variants (Rhopr-CRZR-α and β). Sequence analysis revealed characteristics of rhodopsin-like GPCRs. Rhopr-CRZR-α and β were dose-dependently activated by Rhopr-CRZ with EC50 values of 2.7 and 1 nM, respectively, when tested in a functional receptor assay using CHOKI-aeq cells. Neither receptors were activated by the evolutionarily-related peptides, Rhopr-AKH, or Rhopr-ACP. For 5th instars, qPCR revealed expression of Rhopr-CRZR transcript in the CNS, the dorsal vessel, abdominal dorsal epidermis, and prothoracic glands with associated fat body. Interestingly, transcript expression was also found in the female and male reproductive tissues. Rhopr-CRZR transcript was reduced after injection of dsCRZR into adult R. prolixus. In these insects, the basal heartbeat rate was reduced in vivo, and the increase in heartbeat frequency normally produced by CRZ on dorsal vessel in vitro was much reduced. No effect of dsCRZR injection was seen on ecdysis or coloration of the cuticle. PMID:27536213

  1. The physiologic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory role of heparins and their utility in the prevention of pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Mazor, Moshe; Holcberg, Gershon; Leron, Elad; Beharier, Ofer; Loverro, Giuseppe; Erez, Offer

    2015-06-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the concept of increased thrombin generation, placental vascular lesions, and inflammation as crucial points in the development of the great obstetrical syndromes [preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), preterm labor (PTL), preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PROM), fetal demise and recurrent abortions]. In light of this, the role of heparins for primary or secondary prevention of these syndromes is becoming more and more apparent, mainly due to the antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects of heparins. There is agreement regarding the use of heparin in the prevention of gestational complications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, while its use for other obstetrical complications is under debate. In the present review we will describe the physiologic role of heparins on coagulation and inflammation and we will discuss current evidence regarding the use of heparins for the prevention/treatment of obstetrical syndromes.

  2. The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the role of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), polysaccharides, and protein contents associated with the early events of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava roots. Increases in APX and GPX activity, as well as total protein contents occurred from 3 to 5 days of storage and were correlated with the delay of PPD. Cassava samples stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) highlighted the presence of starch and cellulose. Degradation of starch granules during PPD was also detected. Slight metachromatic reaction with toluidine blue is indicative of increasing of acidic polysaccharides and may play an important role in PPD delay. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified samples according to their levels of enzymatic activity based on the decision tree model which showed GPX and total protein amounts to be correlated with PPD. The Oriental (ORI) cultivar was more susceptible to PPD.

  3. Future Roles of Structural Sensing for Aerospace Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Future Roles of Structural Sensing for Aerospace Applications Mark M. Derriso Air Vehicles Directorate Air Force Research Laboratory 2790 D...Multi-Role Mobility. New weapon RTO-MP-AVT-141 5 - 1 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Derriso , M.M.; Chang, F.-K. (2006) Future Roles...F.K. Chang, and M. Derriso , “Structural Health Monitoring Technology for Thermal Protection Panels,” Proceedings of the First European Structural

  4. The Role of Gap Junction Channels During Physiologic and Pathologic Conditions of the Human Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Basilio, Daniel; Sáez, Juan C.; Orellana, Juan A.; Raine, Cedric S.; Bukauskas, Feliksas; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are expressed in most cell types of the nervous system, including neuronal stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, cells of the blood brain barrier (endothelial cells and astrocytes) and under inflammatory conditions in microglia/macrophages. GJs connect cells by the docking of two hemichannels, one from each cell with each hemichannel being formed by 6 proteins named connexins (Cx). Unapposed hemichannels (uHC) also can be open on the surface of the cells allowing the release of different intracellular factors to the extracellular space. GJs provide a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication between adjacent cells that enables the direct exchange of intracellular messengers, such as calcium, nucleotides, IP3, and diverse metabolites, as well as electrical signals that ultimately coordinate tissue homeostasis, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, cell survival and death. Despite their essential functions in physiological conditions, relatively little is known about the role of GJs and uHC in human diseases, especially within the nervous system. The focus of this review is to summarize recent findings related to the role of GJs and uHC in physiologic and pathologic conditions of the central nervous system. PMID:22438035

  5. Novel bone metabolism-associated hormones: the importance of the pre-analytical phase for understanding their physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Giovanni; Barbaro, Mosè; Locatelli, Massimo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    The endocrine function of bone is now a recognized feature of this tissue. Bone-derived hormones that modulate whole-body homeostasis, are being discovered as for the effects on bone of novel and classic hormones produced by other tissues become known. Often, however, the data regarding these last generation bone-derived or bone-targeting hormones do not give about a clear picture of their physiological roles or concentration ranges. A certain degree of uncertainty could stem from differences in the pre-analytical management of biological samples. The pre-analytical phase comprises a series of decisions and actions (i.e., choice of sample matrix, methods of collection, transportation, treatment and storage) preceding analysis. Errors arising in this phase will inevitably be carried over to the analytical phase where they can reduce the measurement accuracy, ultimately, leading discrepant results. While the pre-analytical phase is all important, in routine laboratory medicine, it is often not given due consideration in research and clinical trials. This is particularly true for novel molecules, such as the hormones regulating the endocrine function of bone. In this review we discuss the importance of the pre-analytical variables affecting the measurement of last generation bone-associated hormones and describe their, often debated and rarely clear physiological roles.

  6. Interactional Structure: The Role of Role. Melanges Pedagogiques, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gremmo, M. J.; And Others

    The concept of communicative competence, which has recently become so influential in language teaching, has resulted in a new emphasis on the nature of interaction. Questions concerning the communicative needs of language learners are raised with regard to the types of interaction they will participate in, the roles they will have, and the…

  7. The application of mass and energy conservation laws in physiologically structured population models of heterotrophic organisms

    PubMed

    Kooijman; Kooi; Hallam

    1999-04-07

    Rules for energy uptake, and subsequent utilization, form the basis of population dynamics and, therefore, explain the dynamics of the ecosystem structure in terms of changes in standing crops and size distributions of individuals. Mass fluxes are concomitant with energy flows and delineate functional aspects of ecosystems by defining the roles of individuals and populations. The assumption of homeostasis of body components, and an assumption about the general structure of energy budgets, imply that mass fluxes can be written as weighted sums of three organizing energy fluxes with the weight coefficients determined by the conservation law of mass. These energy fluxes are assimilation, maintenance and growth, and provide a theoretical underpinning of the widely applied empirical method of indirect calorimetry, which relates dissipating heat linearly to three mass fluxes: carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption and N-waste production. A generic approach to the stoichiometry of population energetics from the perspective of the individual organism is proposed and illustrated for heterotrophic organisms. This approach indicates that mass transformations can be identified by accounting for maintenance requirements and overhead costs for the various metabolic processes at the population level. The theoretical background for coupling the dynamics of the structure of communities to nutrient cycles, including the water balance, as well as explicit expressions for the dissipating heat at the population level are obtained based on the conservation law of energy. Specifications of the general theory employ the Dynamic Energy Budget model for individuals. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. Desiccation tolerance in the moss Polytrichum formosum: physiological and fine-structural changes during desiccation and recovery.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Michael C F; Ligrone, Roberto; Duckett, Jeffrey G

    2007-06-01

    This study explores basic physiological features and time relations of recovery of photosynthetic activity and CO2 uptake following rehydration of a desiccation-tolerant moss in relation to the full temporal sequence of cytological changes associated with recovery to the normal hydrated state. It seeks reconciliation of the apparently conflicting published physiological and cytological evidence on recovery from desiccation in bryophytes. Observations were made of water-stress responses and recovery using infrared gas analysis and modulated chlorophyll fluorescence, and of structural and ultrastructural changes by light and transmission electron microscopy. Net CO2 uptake fell to zero at approx. 40 % RWC, paralleling the fluorescence parameter PhiPSII at 200 micromol m(-2) s(-1) PPFD. On re-wetting the moss after 9-18 d desiccation, the initially negative net CO2 uptake became positive 10-30 min after re-wetting, restoring a net carbon balance after approx. 0.3-1 h. The parameter Fv/Fm reached approx. 80 % of its pre-desiccation value within approx. 10 min of re-wetting. In the presence of the protein-synthesis inhibitors chloramphenicol and cycloheximide, recovery of Fv/Fm (and CO2 exchange) proceeded normally in the dark, but declined rapidly in the light. Though initial recovery was rapid, both net CO2 uptake and Fv/Fm required approx. 24 h to recover completely to pre-desiccation values. The fixation protocols produced neither swelling of tissues nor plasmolysis. Thylakoids, grana and mitochondrial cristae remained intact throughout the drying-re-wetting cycle, but there were striking changes in the form of the organelles, especially the chloroplasts, which had prominent lobes and lamellar extensions in the normally hydrated state, but rounded off when desiccated, returning slowly to their normal state within approx. 24 h of re-wetting. Sub-cellular events during desiccation and re-wetting were generally similar to those seen in published data from the

  9. Desiccation tolerance in the moss Polytrichum formosum: physiological and fine-structural changes during desiccation and recovery.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Michael C F; Ligrone, Roberto; Duckett, Jeffrey G

    2007-01-01

    This study explores basic physiological features and time relations of recovery of photosynthetic activity and CO(2) uptake following rehydration of a desiccation-tolerant moss in relation to the full temporal sequence of cytological changes associated with recovery to the normal hydrated state. It seeks reconciliation of the apparently conflicting published physiological and cytological evidence on recovery from desiccation in bryophytes. Observations were made of water-stress responses and recovery using infrared gas analysis and modulated chlorophyll fluorescence, and of structural and ultrastructural changes by light and transmission electron microscopy. Net CO(2) uptake fell to zero at approx. 40 % RWC, paralleling the fluorescence parameter PhiPSII at 200 micromol m(-2) s(-1) PPFD. On re-wetting the moss after 9-18 d desiccation, the initially negative net CO(2) uptake became positive 10-30 min after re-wetting, restoring a net carbon balance after approx. 0.3-1 h. The parameter F(v)/F(m) reached approx. 80 % of its pre-desiccation value within approx. 10 min of re-wetting. In the presence of the protein-synthesis inhibitors chloramphenicol and cycloheximide, recovery of F(v)/F(m) (and CO(2) exchange) proceeded normally in the dark, but declined rapidly in the light. Though initial recovery was rapid, both net CO(2) uptake and F(v)/F(m) required approx. 24 h to recover completely to pre-desiccation values. The fixation protocols produced neither swelling of tissues nor plasmolysis. Thylakoids, grana and mitochondrial cristae remained intact throughout the drying-re-wetting cycle, but there were striking changes in the form of the organelles, especially the chloroplasts, which had prominent lobes and lamellar extensions in the normally hydrated state, but rounded off when desiccated, returning slowly to their normal state within approx. 24 h of re-wetting. Sub-cellular events during desiccation and re-wetting were generally similar to those seen in published

  10. An exceptional role for flowering plant physiology in the expansion of tropical rainforests and biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, C. Kevin; Lee, Jung-Eun

    2010-01-01

    Movement of water from soil to atmosphere by plant transpiration can feed precipitation, but is limited by the hydraulic capacities of plants, which have not been uniform through time. The flowering plants that dominate modern vegetation possess transpiration capacities that are dramatically higher than any other plants, living or extinct. Transpiration operates at the level of the leaf, however, and how the impact of this physiological revolution scales up to the landscape and larger environment remains unclear. Here, climate modelling demonstrates that angiosperms help ensure aseasonally high levels of precipitation in the modern tropics. Most strikingly, replacement of angiosperm with non-angiosperm vegetation would result in a hotter, drier and more seasonal Amazon basin, decreasing the overall area of ever-wet rainforest by 80 per cent. Thus, flowering plant ecological dominance has strongly altered climate and the global hydrological cycle. Because tropical biodiversity is closely tied to precipitation and rainforest area, angiosperm climate modification may have promoted diversification of the angiosperms themselves, as well as radiations of diverse vertebrate and invertebrate animal lineages and of epiphytic plants. Their exceptional potential for environmental modification may have contributed to divergent responses to similar climates and global perturbations, like mass extinctions, before and after angiosperm evolution. PMID:20554551

  11. Human uterine stem/progenitor cells: their possible role in uterine physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tetsuo; Masuda, Hirotaka; Ono, Masanori; Kajitani, Takashi; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2010-07-01

    The human uterus mainly consists of the endometrium and the outer smooth muscle layer termed the myometrium. The uterus harbours the exceptional and remarkable regenerative ability responsible for cyclical regeneration and remodelling throughout the reproductive life. The uterus must swiftly and cooperatively enlarge to hold the growing foetus during pregnancy. Furthermore, the endometrium, in particular the functionalis layer, must also regenerate, differentiate and regress with each menstrual cycle under hormonal control. Endometrial regeneration from the basal layer is thought to contribute to replacement of the functionalis layer followed by its slough off during menses and parturition. These morphological and functional features of human endometrium can be reproduced in murine models in which severely immunodeficient mice are xenotransplanted with dispersed human endometrial cells under the kidney capsule. The uterine myometrium possesses the similar plasticity of the endometrium. This is demonstrated by multiple cycles of pregnancy-induced enlargement and regression after parturition. It is likely that regeneration and remodelling in the female reproductive tract are achieved presumably through endometrial and myometrial stem cell systems. Recent evidence now supports the existence of these stem cell systems in humans. Here, we will review our current understanding of uterine stem/progenitor cells. We also propose a novel hypothetical model in which stem cell activities explain the physiological remodelling and regeneration of the human uterus and the pathogenesis of gynaecological diseases such as endometriosis.

  12. Gender Differences in Subjective and Physiological Responses to Caffeine and the Role of Steroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amanda M.

    2011-01-01

    Background We have shown previously that male and female adolescents differ in their responses to caffeine, but to date, the mechanisms underlying these gender differences are unknown. Objective The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that differences in circulating steroid hormones mediate gender differences in response to caffeine. Methods Subjective and physiological responses to caffeine were tested in adolescents using a double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover design. Participants were tested every 2 weeks for 8 weeks and received placebo and caffeine (2 mg/kg) twice each. Females were tested with placebo and caffeine in each phase of their menstrual cycle. Salivary concentrations of testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone were also measured. Results Males showed greater positive subjective effects than females. In females, higher levels of estradiol were associated with little or no subjective responses to caffeine, but lower levels of estradiol were associated with negative subjective responses to caffeine relative to placebo. There were gender differences in cardiovascular responses to caffeine, with males showing greater decreases in heart rate after caffeine administration than females, but females showing greater increases in diastolic blood pressure than males after caffeine administration. These gender differences may be related to steroid hormone concentrations. Blood pressure responses to caffeine were lower in males when estradiol was high, but higher in females when estradiol was high. Conclusions When taken together, these findings suggest that males and females differ in their responses to caffeine and that these differences may be mediated by changes in circulating steroid hormones. PMID:24761262

  13. GI stem cells – new insights into roles in physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    von Furstenberg, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This overview gives a brief historical summary of key discoveries regarding stem cells of the small intestine. The current concept is that there are two pools of intestinal stem cells (ISCs): an actively cycling pool that is marked by Lgr5, is relatively homogeneous and is responsible for daily turnover of the epithelium; and a slowly cycling or quiescent pool that functions as reserve ISCs. The latter pool appears to be quite heterogeneous and may include partially differentiated epithelial lineages that can reacquire stem cell characteristics following injury to the intestine. Markers and methods of isolation for active and quiescent ISC populations are described as well as the numerous important advances that have been made in approaches to the in vitro culture of ISCs and crypts. Factors regulating ISC biology are briefly summarized and both known and unknown aspects of the ISC niche are discussed. Although most of our current knowledge regarding ISC physiology and pathophysiology has come from studies with mice, recent work with human tissue highlights the potential translational applications arising from this field of research. Many of these topics are further elaborated in the following articles. PMID:27107928

  14. Deciphering physiological role of the mechanosensitive TRPV4 channel in the distal nephron

    PubMed Central

    Mamenko, M.; Zaika, O.; Boukelmoune, N.; O'Neil, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Long-standing experimental evidence suggests that epithelial cells in the renal tubule are able to sense osmotic and pressure gradients caused by alterations in ultrafiltrate flow by elevating intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These responses are viewed as critical regulators of a variety of processes ranging from transport of water and solutes to cellular growth and differentiation. A loss in the ability to sense mechanical stimuli has been implicated in numerous pathologies associated with systemic imbalance of electrolytes and to the development of polycystic kidney disease. The molecular mechanisms conferring mechanosensitive properties to epithelial tubular cells involve activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, such as TRPV4, allowing direct Ca2+ influx to increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In this review, we critically analyze the current evidence about signaling determinants of TRPV4 activation by luminal flow in the distal nephron and discuss how dysfunction of this mechanism contributes to the progression of polycystic kidney disease. We also review the physiological relevance of TRPV4-based mechanosensitivity in controlling flow-dependent K+ secretion in the distal renal tubule. PMID:25503733

  15. Negative peer status and relational victimization in children and adolescents: the role of stress physiology.

    PubMed

    Lafko, Nicole; Murray-Close, Dianna; Shoulberg, Erin K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to determine the unique associations between two subtypes of low peer status, peer rejection and unpopularity, and changes in relational victimization over time. This study also investigated if these associations were moderated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) reactivity to peer stress. Sixty-one girls attending (M(age) = 11.91 years, SD = 1.62; predominantly Caucasian) a residential summer camp were followed across 1 calendar year. Participants' skin conductance and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were assessed during a laboratory stress protocol. Peer rejection and unpopularity were measured using peer nomination techniques and counselors reported on relational victimization. Both unpopularity and rejection were associated with increased relational victimization over time among girls who exhibited reciprocal SNS activation (i.e., high SNS reactivity coupled with PNS withdrawal). Rejection was also associated with subsequent victimization among girls exhibiting reciprocal PNS activation (i.e., low SNS reactivity, PNS activation). Findings underscore the biosocial interactions between low peer status and physiological reactivity in the prediction of peer maltreatment over time.

  16. Role of physiological mechanisms and EPSPS gene expression in glyphosate resistance in wild soybeans (Glycine soja).

    PubMed

    Gao, Yue; Tao, Bo; Qiu, Lijuan; Jin, Longguo; Wu, Jing

    2014-02-01

    The physiological mechanisms underlying glyphosate resistance in wild soybean germplasm and relevant EPSPS gene expression were evaluated. These germplasms were selected by gradually increasing glyphosate selection pressure started from 2010. As indicated by a whole-plant dose response bioassay, ZYD-254 plants were resistant to glyphosate at concentrations of 1230gaeha(-1), but the susceptible plants (ZYD-16) were unable to survive in the presence of 300gaeha(-1) glyphosate. The ED50 values of resistant germplasm were approximately 8.8 times of the susceptible germplasm. Chlorophyll content was significantly decreased in ZYD-16 plants in comparison with ZYD-254 plants. ZYD-16 plants accumulated 10.1 times more shikimate in leaves at 5days after glyphosate treatment at 1230gaeha(-1) than ZYD-254 did. GST activity differed between ZYD-254 and ZYD-16 in three tissues. It was highest in leaves. There were no significant differences in EPSPS1 or EPSPS3 expression between two germplasms before exposure to glyphosate treatment. After glyphosate treatment, there was a 2- to 4-fold increase in EPSPS1 mRNA levels in ZYD-254, but there was no change in EPSPS3 mRNA levels in ZYD-254 or ZYD-16.

  17. Neurosteroidogenesis is required for the physiological response to stress: role of neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jhimly; Wakefield, Seth; MacKenzie, Georgina; Moss, Stephen J.; Maguire, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which mediates the body's response to stress, is largely under GABAergic control. Here we demonstrate that corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) neurons are modulated by the stress-derived neurosteroid, THDOC, acting on δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors (GABAARs). Under normal conditions, THDOC potentiates the inhibitory effects of GABA on CRH neurons, decreasing the activity of the HPA axis. Counter-intuitively, following stress, THDOC activates the HPA axis due to dephosphorylation of KCC2 residue Ser940, resulting in a collapse of the chloride gradient and excitatory GABAergic transmission. The effects of THDOC on CRH neurons are mediated by actions on GABAAR δ subunit-containing receptors since these effects are abolished in Gabrd−/− mice under both control and stress conditions. Interestingly, blocking neurosteroidogenesis with finasteride is sufficient to block the stress-induced elevations in corticosterone and prevent stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors in mice. These data demonstrate that positive feedback of neurosteroids onto CRH neurons is required to mount the physiological response to stress. Further, GABAAR δ subunit-containing receptors and phosphorylation of KCC2 residue Ser940 may be novel targets for control of the stress response, which has therapeutic potential for numerous disorders associated with hyperexcitability of the HPA axis, including Cushing's syndrome, epilepsy, and major depression. PMID:22171026

  18. Structural-functional characterization and physiological significance of ferredoxin-NADP reductase from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Tondo, María Laura; Musumeci, Matías A; Delprato, María Laura; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Orellano, Elena G

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a phytopathogen bacterium that causes severe citrus canker disease. Similar to other phytopathogens, after infection by this bacterium, plants trigger a defense mechanism that produces reactive oxygen species. Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) are redox flavoenzymes that participate in several metabolic functions, including the response to reactive oxygen species. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri has a gene (fpr) that encodes for a FNR (Xac-FNR) that belongs to the subclass I bacterial FNRs. The aim of this work was to search for the physiological role of this enzyme and to characterize its structural and functional properties. The functionality of Xac-FNR was tested by cross-complementation of a FNR knockout Escherichia coli strain, which exhibit high susceptibility to agents that produce an abnormal accumulation of (•)O(2)(-). Xac-FNR was able to substitute for the FNR in E. coli in its antioxidant role. The expression of fpr in X. axonopodis pv. citri was assessed using semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A 2.2-fold induction was observed in the presence of the superoxide-generating agents methyl viologen and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. Structural and functional studies showed that Xac-FNR displayed different functional features from other subclass I bacterial FNRs. Our analyses suggest that these differences may be due to the unusual carboxy-terminal region. We propose a further classification of subclass I bacterial FNRs, which is useful to determine the nature of their ferredoxin redox partners. Using sequence analysis, we identified a ferredoxin (XAC1762) as a potential substrate of Xac-FNR. The purified ferredoxin protein displayed the typical broad UV-visible spectrum of [4Fe-4S] clusters and was able to function as substrate of Xac-FNR in the cytochrome c reductase activity. Our results suggest that Xac-FNR is involved in the oxidative stress response of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri and

  19. Role of electronic structure in magnetic tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuising; Zhang, Shufeng; Levy, Peter M.; Szunyogh, Laszlo; Weinberger, Peter

    1998-11-01

    To assess the effect of electronic structure of magnetic electrodes on the magnetoresistance of tunnel junctions (JMR) we made ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of BCC(1 0 0) Fe, and FCC(1 0 0) Co and Ni electrodes. We treat hopping to and propagation in the barrier as adjustable parameters and discuss features of the JMR attributable to the electronic structure of the electrodes.

  20. Acclimation of isoprene emission and photosynthesis to growth temperature in hybrid aspen: resolving structural and physiological controls.

    PubMed

    Rasulov, Bahtijor; Bichele, Irina; Hüve, Katja; Vislap, Vivian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-04-01

    Acclimation of foliage to growth temperature involves both structural and physiological modifications, but the relative importance of these two mechanisms of acclimation is poorly known, especially for isoprene emission responses. We grew hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) under control (day/night temperature of 25/20 °C) and high temperature conditions (35/27 °C) to gain insight into the structural and physiological acclimation controls. Growth at high temperature resulted in larger and thinner leaves with smaller and more densely packed chloroplasts and with lower leaf dry mass per area (MA). High growth temperature also led to lower photosynthetic and respiration rates, isoprene emission rate and leaf pigment content and isoprene substrate dimethylallyl diphosphate pool size per unit area, but to greater stomatal conductance. However, all physiological characteristics were similar when expressed per unit dry mass, indicating that the area-based differences were primarily driven by MA. Acclimation to high temperature further increased heat stability of photosynthesis and increased activation energies for isoprene emission and isoprene synthase rate constant. This study demonstrates that temperature acclimation of photosynthetic and isoprene emission characteristics per unit leaf area were primarily driven by structural modifications, and we argue that future studies investigating acclimation to growth temperature must consider structural modifications.

  1. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; ...

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzymemore » (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.« less

  2. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Atack, John M; Beacham, Ifor R; Jennings, Michael P

    2013-07-05

    Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen.

  3. [Physiologic and pathologic role of iron in the human body. Iron deficiency anemia in newborn babies].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Béla; Szentmihályi, Klára; Vinkler, Péter; Balla, György; Balla, József

    2004-09-05

    Iron is one of the most important essential metal ions of which significance is well known for ages. This element is a key moiety of several enzymes in iron containing heme or nonheme form and transfer and storage protein, hemoglobin and myoglobin. Several membrane carriers of iron have already been identified. The redox state of iron is determined by xanthine oxidase, cytochromes and Hp or ceruloplasmin and ferroxidase activity of apo-ferritin, respectively. Some vitamins (C, B2-, B3-, B6-, B12) play also a role in the metabolism of iron. The iron content of cells of the organs is well regulated by the iron homeostasis. Iron has a significant role in the immune system by producing oxygen containing free radicals. Anaemia induced by iron deficiency may cause a challenge concerns for pregnant women, babies and adolescent, primarily.

  4. Physiological and structural differences in spatially distinct subpopulations of cardiac mitochondria: influence of cardiac pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharendra; Shepherd, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue contains discrete pools of mitochondria that are characterized by their subcellular spatial arrangement. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) exist below the cell membrane, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) reside in rows between the myofibrils, and perinuclear mitochondria are situated at the nuclear poles. Microstructural imaging of heart tissue coupled with the development of differential isolation techniques designed to sequentially separate spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations have revealed differences in morphological features including shape, absolute size, and internal cristae arrangement. These findings have been complemented by functional studies indicating differences in biochemical parameters and, potentially, functional roles for the ATP generated, based upon subcellular location. Consequently, mitochondrial subpopulations appear to be influenced differently during cardiac pathologies including ischemia/reperfusion, heart failure, aging, exercise, and diabetes mellitus. These influences may be the result of specific structural and functional disparities between mitochondrial subpopulations such that the stress elicited by a given cardiac insult differentially impacts subcellular locales and the mitochondria contained within. The goal of this review is to highlight some of the inherent structural and functional differences that exist between spatially distinct cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations as well as provide an overview of the differential impact of various cardiac pathologies on spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations. As an outcome, we will instill a basis for incorporating subcellular spatial location when evaluating the impact of cardiac pathologies on the mitochondrion. Incorporation of subcellular spatial location may offer the greatest potential for delineating the influence of cardiac pathology on this critical organelle. PMID:24778166

  5. Role of Stro1+/CD44+ stem cells in myometrial physiology and uterine remodeling during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mas, Aymara; Prusinski, Lauren; Yang, Qiwei; Diaz-Gimeno, Patricia; Stone, Lelyand; Diamond, Michael P; Simón, Carlos; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of myometrial functions during pregnancy has been considered the result of the integration of endocrine and mechanical signals. Nevertheless, uterine regeneration is poorly understood, and the cellular source within the gravid uterus is largely unexplored.In this study, we isolated and quantified the myometrial stem cells (MSC) population from pregnant female Eker rat uteri, by using Stro1/CD44 surface markers. We demonstrated that prior parity significantly increased the percentage of Stro1+/CD44+ MSC because of injured tissue response. Interestingly, we established that Stro1+/CD44+ MSC respond efficiently to physiological cues when they were treated in vitro under different dose-dependent pregnant rat serum.Previous studies reveal strong regulatory links between O2 availability and stem cell function. Based on these premises, cell proliferation assays showed that isolated Stro1+/CD44+ MSC possess a higher proliferative rate under hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. We also detected a total of 37 upregulated and 44 downregulated hypoxia-related genes, which were differentially expressed in Stro1+/CD44+ MSC, providing an alternative approach to infer into complex molecular mechanisms such as energy metabolism, inflammatory response, uterine expansion, and/or remodeling.Since these cells preferentially grow under low oxygen conditions, we propose that the increase of the rat uterus during pregnancy involves myometrial oxygen consumption, thereby enhancing MSC proliferation. Moreover, pregnancy-induced mechanical stretching results in hypoxic conditions, ultimately creating an environment that promotes stem cell proliferation and further uterine enlargement, which is essential for a successful pregnancy. In summary, all of these data support that rat Stro1+/CD44+ MSC contribute to uterine enlargement during pregnancy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction.

  6. Biomechanical testing of distal femur osteotomy plate fixation techniques: the role of simulated physiological loading.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Justus-Martijn; Hurschler, Christof; Agneskirchner, Jens; Lobenhoffer, Philip; Castelein, René M; van Heerwaarden, Ronald J

    2014-12-01

    Implants for fracture and/or osteotomy fixation are often tested according to basic mechanical test models such as open gap tests or 4-point-bending tests. These may be suitable to test and compare different implants for safety and clinical approval, but are not always representative of the post-operative situation, which is decisive when it comes to bone healing. In the current study the Knee Expert Group of the Association for the Study of Internal Fixation has compared the available open gap test results of the latest version of the TomoFix Medial Distal Femoral Plate and the antecedent plate design, with the test results of a more physiological and life-like test model. In the open gap test model the antecedent plate design was found to have superior stiffness and fatigue strength. In the current study simulated postoperative conditions for medial closing wedge supracondylar osteotomies were used. The constructs were subjected to cyclical axial and torsional loading and were subsequently tested to failure. The more life-like tests in this study showed that the latest version was either more or equally stable and stiff than the antecedent version of the plate, in all of the tests. It is argued that the difference in results between the two loading models is due to differences in test design. These test results stress the importance of not only using standard open gap and 4-point-bending tests, but also to use as life-like as possible test conditions for any form of biomechanical testing of new implants.

  7. Physiological role of phenolic biostimulants isolated from brown seaweed Ecklonia maxima on plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Aremu, Adeyemi O; Masondo, Nqobile A; Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Amoo, Stephen O; Gruz, Jiří; Bíba, Ondřej; Šubrtová, Michaela; Pěnčík, Aleš; Novák, Ondřej; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    Eckol, a major phenolic compound isolated from brown seaweed significantly enhanced the bulb size and bioactive compounds in greenhouse-grown Eucomis autumnalis. We investigated the effect of eckol and phloroglucinol (PG) (phenolic compounds) isolated from the brown seaweed, Ecklonia maxima (Osbeck) Papenfuss on the growth, phytochemical and auxin content in Eucomis autumnalis (Mill.) Chitt. The model plant is a popular medicinal species with increasing conservation concern. Eckol and PG were tested at 10(-5), 10(-6) and 10(-7) M using soil drench applications. After 4 months, growth parameters, phytochemical and auxin content were recorded. When compared to the control, eckol (10(-6) M) significantly improved bulb size, fresh weight and root production while the application of PG (10(-6) M) significantly increased the bulb numbers. However, both compounds had no significant stimulatory effect on aerial organs. Bioactive phytochemicals such as p-hydroxybenzoic and ferulic acids were significantly increased in eckol (10(-5) M) and PG (10(-6) M) treatments, compared to the control. Aerial (1,357 pmol/g DW) and underground (1,474 pmol/g DW) parts of eckol-treated (10(-5) M) plants yielded the highest concentration of indole-3-acetic acid. Overall, eckol and PG elicited a significant influence on the growth and physiological response in E. autumnalis. Considering the medicinal importance of E. autumnalis and the increasing strains on its wild populations, these compounds are potential tools to enhance their cultivation and growth.

  8. The acute physiological and mood effects of tea and coffee: the role of caffeine level.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, P T; Lane, J; Moore, K L; Aspen, J; Rycroft, J A; O'Brien, D C

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine level in tea and coffee on acute physiological responses and mood. Randomised full crossover design in subjects after overnight caffeine abstention was studied. In study 1 (n = 17) the caffeine level was manipulated naturalistically by preparing tea and coffee at different strengths (1 or 2 cups equivalent). Caffeine levels were 37.5 and 75 mg in tea, 75 and 150 mg in coffee, with water and no-drink controls. In study 2 (n = 15) caffeine level alone was manipulated (water, decaffeinated tea, plus 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg caffeine). Beverage volume and temperature (55 degrees C) were constant. SBP, DBP, heart rate, skin temperature, skin conductance, and mood were monitored over each 3-h study session. In study 1, tea and coffee produced mild autonomic stimulation and an elevation in mood. There were no effects of tea vs. coffee or caffeine dose, despite a fourfold variation in the latter. Increasing beverage strength was associated with greater increases in DBP and energetic arousal. In study 2, caffeinated beverages increased SBP, DBP, and skin conductance and lowered heart rate and skin temperature compared to water. Significant dose-response relationships to caffeine were seen only for SBP, heart rate, and skin temperature. There were significant effects of caffeine on energetic arousal but no consistent dose-response effects. Caffeinated beverages acutely stimulate the autonomic nervous system and increase alertness. Although caffeine can exert dose-dependent effects on a number of acute autonomic responses, caffeine level is not an important factor. Factors besides caffeine may contribute to these acute effects.

  9. Role of serine/threonine phosphatase (SP-STP) in Streptococcus pyogenes physiology and virulence.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shivani; Agarwal, Shivangi; Pancholi, Preeti; Pancholi, Vijay

    2011-12-02

    Reversible phosphorylation is the key mechanism regulating several cellular events in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, signal transduction is perceived to occur primarily via the two-component signaling system involving histidine kinases and cognate response regulators. Although an alternative regulatory pathway controlled by the eukaryote-type serine/threonine kinase (Streptococcus pyogenes serine/threonine kinase; SP-STK) has been shown to modulate bacterial growth, division, adherence, invasion, and virulence in group A Streptococcus (GAS; S. pyogenes), the precise role of the co-transcribing serine/threonine phosphatase (SP-STP) has remained enigmatic. In this context, this is the first report describing the construction and characterization of non-polar SP-STP mutants in two different strains of Type M1 GAS. The STP knock-out mutants displayed increased bacterial chain lengths in conjunction with thickened cell walls, significantly reduced capsule and hemolysin production, and restoration of the phenotypes postcomplementation. The present study also reveals important contribution of cognately regulated-reversible phosphorylation by SP-STK/SP-STP on two major response regulators of two-component systems, WalRK and CovRS. We also demonstrate a distinct role of SP-STP in terms of expression of surface proteins and SpeB in a strain-specific manner. Further, the attenuation of virulence in the absence of STP and its restoration only in the complemented strains that were generated by the use of a low copy plasmid and not by a high copy one emphasize not only the essential role of STP in virulence but also highlight the tightly regulated SP-STP/SP-STK-mediated cognate functions. SP-STP thus is an important regulator of GAS virulence and plays a critical role in GAS pathogenesis.

  10. Role of Serine/Threonine Phosphatase (SP-STP) in Streptococcus pyogenes Physiology and Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shivani; Agarwal, Shivangi; Pancholi, Preeti; Pancholi, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is the key mechanism regulating several cellular events in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, signal transduction is perceived to occur primarily via the two-component signaling system involving histidine kinases and cognate response regulators. Although an alternative regulatory pathway controlled by the eukaryote-type serine/threonine kinase (Streptococcus pyogenes serine/threonine kinase; SP-STK) has been shown to modulate bacterial growth, division, adherence, invasion, and virulence in group A Streptococcus (GAS; S. pyogenes), the precise role of the co-transcribing serine/threonine phosphatase (SP-STP) has remained enigmatic. In this context, this is the first report describing the construction and characterization of non-polar SP-STP mutants in two different strains of Type M1 GAS. The STP knock-out mutants displayed increased bacterial chain lengths in conjunction with thickened cell walls, significantly reduced capsule and hemolysin production, and restoration of the phenotypes postcomplementation. The present study also reveals important contribution of cognately regulated-reversible phosphorylation by SP-STK/SP-STP on two major response regulators of two-component systems, WalRK and CovRS. We also demonstrate a distinct role of SP-STP in terms of expression of surface proteins and SpeB in a strain-specific manner. Further, the attenuation of virulence in the absence of STP and its restoration only in the complemented strains that were generated by the use of a low copy plasmid and not by a high copy one emphasize not only the essential role of STP in virulence but also highlight the tightly regulated SP-STP/SP-STK-mediated cognate functions. SP-STP thus is an important regulator of GAS virulence and plays a critical role in GAS pathogenesis. PMID:21917918

  11. Identification of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 DNA Methyltransferase, Its Targets, and Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Doberenz, Sebastian; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Reichert, Olga; Jensen, Vanessa; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Kordes, Adrian; Frangipani, Emanuela; Luong, Khai; Korlach, Jonas; Heeb, Stephan; Overmann, Jörg; Kaever, Volkhard

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA methylation is widespread among prokaryotes, and most DNA methylation reactions are catalyzed by adenine DNA methyltransferases, which are part of restriction-modification (R-M) systems. R-M systems are known for their role in the defense against foreign DNA; however, DNA methyltransferases also play functional roles in gene regulation. In this study, we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing to uncover the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We identified a conserved sequence motif targeted by an adenine methyltransferase of a type I R-M system and quantified the presence of N6-methyladenine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Changes in the PAO1 methylation status were dependent on growth conditions and affected P. aeruginosa pathogenicity in a Galleria mellonella infection model. Furthermore, we found that methylated motifs in promoter regions led to shifts in sense and antisense gene expression, emphasizing the role of enzymatic DNA methylation as an epigenetic control of phenotypic traits in P. aeruginosa. Since the DNA methylation enzymes are not encoded in the core genome, our findings illustrate how the acquisition of accessory genes can shape the global P. aeruginosa transcriptome and thus may facilitate adaptation to new and challenging habitats. PMID:28223461

  12. Role of ROS and RNS Sources in Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Victor Manuel

    2016-01-01

    There is significant evidence that, in living systems, free radicals and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play a double role, because they can cause oxidative damage and tissue dysfunction and serve as molecular signals activating stress responses that are beneficial to the organism. Mitochondria have been thought to both play a major role in tissue oxidative damage and dysfunction and provide protection against excessive tissue dysfunction through several mechanisms, including stimulation of opening of permeability transition pores. Until recently, the functional significance of ROS sources different from mitochondria has received lesser attention. However, the most recent data, besides confirming the mitochondrial role in tissue oxidative stress and protection, show interplay between mitochondria and other ROS cellular sources, so that activation of one can lead to activation of other sources. Thus, it is currently accepted that in various conditions all cellular sources of ROS provide significant contribution to processes that oxidatively damage tissues and assure their survival, through mechanisms such as autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:27478531

  13. Distinct physiological roles for the two L-asparaginase isozymes of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Atack, John M.; Beacham, Ifor R.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Escherichia coli contains two L-asparaginase isozymes with distinct localization, kinetics and regulation. •Mutant strains were used to examine the roles of these enzymes in L-asparagine utilization. •We report that L-asparaginase II permits growth on asparagine and glycerol under anaerobic conditions. •We propose that this enzyme is the first step in a co-regulated pathway leading to fumarate. •The pathway is regulated by anaerobiosis and cAMP and provides a terminal elector acceptor. -- Abstract: Escherichia coli expresses two L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) isozymes: L-asparaginse I, which is a low affinity, cytoplasmic enzyme that is expressed constitutively, and L-asparaginase II, a high affinity periplasmic enzyme that is under complex co-transcriptional regulation by both Fnr and Crp. The distinct localisation and regulation of these enzymes suggest different roles. To define these roles, a set of isogenic mutants was constructed that lacked either or both enzymes. Evidence is provided that L-asparaginase II, in contrast to L-asparaginase I, can be used in the provision of an anaerobic electron acceptor when using a non-fermentable carbon source in the presence of excess nitrogen.

  14. Photosystem I cyclic electron flow via chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex performs a physiological role for photosynthesis at low light

    PubMed Central

    Yamori, Wataru; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Makino, Amane

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (PS I) was discovered more than a half-century ago and two pathways have been identified in angiosperms. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the structure of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex, which mediates one route of the cyclic electron transport pathways, its physiological function is not well understood. Most studies focused on the role of the NDH-dependent PS I cyclic electron transport in alleviation of oxidative damage in strong light. In contrast, here it is shown that impairment of NDH-dependent cyclic electron flow in rice specifically causes a reduction in the electron transport rate through PS I (ETR I) at low light intensity with a concomitant reduction in CO2 assimilation rate, plant biomass and importantly, grain production. There was no effect on PS II function at low or high light intensity. We propose a significant physiological function for the chloroplast NDH at low light intensities commonly experienced during the reproductive and ripening stages of rice cultivation that have adverse effects crop yield. PMID:26358849

  15. Photosystem I cyclic electron flow via chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex performs a physiological role for photosynthesis at low light.

    PubMed

    Yamori, Wataru; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Makino, Amane

    2015-09-11

    Cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (PS I) was discovered more than a half-century ago and two pathways have been identified in angiosperms. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the structure of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex, which mediates one route of the cyclic electron transport pathways, its physiological function is not well understood. Most studies focused on the role of the NDH-dependent PS I cyclic electron transport in alleviation of oxidative damage in strong light. In contrast, here it is shown that impairment of NDH-dependent cyclic electron flow in rice specifically causes a reduction in the electron transport rate through PS I (ETR I) at low light intensity with a concomitant reduction in CO2 assimilation rate, plant biomass and importantly, grain production. There was no effect on PS II function at low or high light intensity. We propose a significant physiological function for the chloroplast NDH at low light intensities commonly experienced during the reproductive and ripening stages of rice cultivation that have adverse effects crop yield.

  16. Role of magnesium in patho-physiological processes and the clinical utility of magnesium ion selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Altura, B M; Altura, B T

    1996-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are pivotal in the transfer, storage and utilization of energy; Mg2+ regulates and catalyzes some 300-odd enzyme systems in mammals. The intracellular level of free Mg2+ ([Mg2+]i) regulates intermediary metabolism, DNA and RNA synthesis and structure, cell growth, reproduction, and membrane structure. Mg2+ has numerous physiological roles among which are control of neuronal activity, cardiac excitability, neuromuscular transmission, muscular contraction, vasomotor tone, blood pressure and peripheral blood flow. Mg2+ modulates and controls cell Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticular membranes. Since the turn of this century, there has been a steady and progressive decline of dietary Mg intake to where much of the Western World population is ingesting less than an optimum RDA. Geographic regions low in soil and water Mg demonstrate increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Dietary deficiency of Mg2+ results in loss of cellular K+ and gain of cellular Na+ and calcium ions (Ca2+). Blood normally contains Mg2+ bound to proteins, Mg2+ complexed to small anion ligands and free ionized Mg2+ (IMg2+). Most clinical laboratories only now assess the total Mg, which consists of all three Mg fractions. Estimation of the IMg2+ level in serum or plasma by analysis of ultrafiltrates (complexed Mg + IMg2+) is somewhat unsatisfactory, as the methods employed do not distinguish the truly ionized form from Mg2+ bound to organic and inorganic anions. Because the levels of these ligands can vary significantly in numerous pathological states, it is desirable to directly measure the levels of IMg2+ in complex matrices such as whole blood, plasma and serum. Using novel ion selective electrodes (ISE's), we have found that there is virtually no difference in IMg2+, irrespective of whether one samples whole blood, plasma or serum. These data demonstrate that the mean concentration of IMg2+ in blood is about 600 mumoles/litre (0

  17. Managing Brain Extracellular K(+) during Neuronal Activity: The Physiological Role of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Subunit Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    During neuronal activity in the brain, extracellular K(+) rises and is subsequently removed to prevent a widespread depolarization. One of the key players in regulating extracellular K(+) is the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, although the relative involvement and physiological impact of the different subunit isoform compositions of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K(+) from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K(+) absorbers as activity ends. The kinetic characteristics of the catalytic α subunit isoforms of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are, partly, determined by the accessory β subunit with which they combine. The isoform combinations expressed by astrocytes and neurons, respectively, appear to be in line with the kinetic characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K(+) from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity. Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform combinations in K(+) management in the central nervous system might reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2) and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood). This review addresses aspects of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K(+) in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better understanding of the pathological events occurring during disease.

  18. Managing Brain Extracellular K+ during Neuronal Activity: The Physiological Role of the Na+/K+-ATPase Subunit Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    During neuronal activity in the brain, extracellular K+ rises and is subsequently removed to prevent a widespread depolarization. One of the key players in regulating extracellular K+ is the Na+/K+-ATPase, although the relative involvement and physiological impact of the different subunit isoform compositions of the Na+/K+-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K+ from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K+ absorbers as activity ends. The kinetic characteristics of the catalytic α subunit isoforms of the Na+/K+-ATPase are, partly, determined by the accessory β subunit with which they combine. The isoform combinations expressed by astrocytes and neurons, respectively, appear to be in line with the kinetic characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K+ from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity. Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na+/K+-ATPase isoform combinations in K+ management in the central nervous system might reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2) and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood). This review addresses aspects of the Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K+ in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better understanding of the pathological events occurring during disease. PMID:27148079

  19. Functional Characterization and Determination of the Physiological Role of a Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channel from Cyanobacteria1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Formentin, Elide; Carraretto, Luca; Segalla, Anna; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Szabo, Ildiko; Bergantino, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Despite the important achievement of the high-resolution structures of several prokaryotic channels, current understanding of their physiological roles in bacteria themselves is still far from complete. We have identified a putative two transmembrane domain-containing channel, SynCaK, in the genome of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model photosynthetic organism. SynCaK displays significant sequence homology to MthK, a calcium-dependent potassium channel isolated from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Expression of SynCaK in fusion with enhanced GFP in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells’ plasma membrane gave rise to a calcium-activated, potassium-selective activity in patch clamp experiments. In cyanobacteria, Western blotting of isolated membrane fractions located SynCaK mainly to the plasma membrane. To understand its physiological function, a SynCaK-deficient mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, ΔSynCaK, has been obtained. Although the potassium content in the mutant organisms was comparable to that observed in the wild type, ΔSynCaK was characterized by a depolarized resting membrane potential, as determined by a potential-sensitive fluorescent probe. Growth of the mutant under various conditions revealed that lack of SynCaK does not impair growth under osmotic or salt stress and that SynCaK is not involved in the regulation of photosynthesis. Instead, its lack conferred an increased resistance to the heavy metal zinc, an environmental pollutant. A similar result was obtained using barium, a general potassium channel inhibitor that also caused depolarization. Our findings thus indicate that SynCaK is a functional channel and identify the physiological consequences of its deletion in cyanobacteria. PMID:23640756

  20. Perceived Social Structure, Role, and Communication Patterns in an Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaman, Vicki; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This study finds partial support for the association between a member's role in an organization, his perception of the structure of the organization and self-reported communications within the organization. Functional role as opposed to status role emerged as being of primary importance in understanding the relation between communications and…

  1. The augmenting role of biofeedback: effects of autogenic, imagery and music training on physiological indices and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, B; Bar-Eli, M; Tenenbaum, G

    1995-08-01

    In this study, three psychoregulative procedures of relaxation and excitation were provided in combination with biofeedback to examine their role on physiological and athletic performance variables. Thirty-nine college students were randomly assigned to three groups of psychoregulatory treatment (autogenic and imagery training, AT+IT; music and imagery training, M+IT; autogenic, music and imagery training, AT+M+IT), one placebo group and the control group. Imagery was related to a 100-m run. The treatment and control conditions lasted 13 sessions of 20 min each. During the first seven sessions, the subjects in the treatment groups underwent 10 min of relaxation followed by 10 min of excitation. During the last six sessions, similar treatment was provided accompanied by frontalis EMG biofeedback. Heart rate, the galvanic skin response, EMG and breathing frequency (fb) were recorded three times during each session. In addition, an athletic task (100-m run) was examined at the outset, after seven sessions (no biofeedback) and after an additional six sessions (with biofeedback). Biofeedback was found to have a significant augmenting effect on physiological components and athletic performance when accompanied by autogenic, imagery and music training. Soft music was found to be as beneficial as other relaxation techniques. The results are compared with similar studies applying mental techniques with biofeedback, and new directions of investigation in the psychophysiological domain are suggested.

  2. Physiological role of receptor activator nuclear factor-kB (RANK) in denervation-induced muscle atrophy and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Sébastien S.; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Bossé, Sabrina; Frenette, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The bone remodeling and homeostasis are mainly controlled by the receptor-activator of nuclear factor kB (RANK), its ligand RANKL, and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) pathway. While there is a strong association between osteoporosis and skeletal muscle dysfunction, the functional relevance of a particular biological pathway that synchronously regulates bone and skeletal muscle physiopathology remains elusive. Our recent article published in the American Journal of Physiology (Cell Physiology) showed that RANK is also expressed in fully differentiated C2C12 myotubes and skeletal muscles. We used the Cre-Lox approach to inactivate muscle RANK (RANKmko) and showed that RANK deletion preserves the force of denervated fast-twitch EDL muscles. However, RANK deletion had no positive impact on slow-twitch Sol muscles. In addition, denervating RANKmko EDL muscles induced an increase in the total calcium concentration ([CaT]), which was associated with a surprising decrease in SERCA activity. Interestingly, the levels of STIM-1, which mediates Ca2+ influx following the depletion of SR Ca2+ stores, were markedly higher in denervated RANKmko EDL muscles. We speculated that extracellular Ca2+ influx mediated by STIM-1 may be important for the increase in [CaT] and the gain of force in denervated RANKmko EDL muscles. Overall, these findings showed for the first time that the RANKL/RANK interaction plays a role in denervation-induced muscle atrophy and dysfunction. PMID:27547781

  3. Physiological Roles of Group X-secreted Phospholipase A2 in Reproduction, Gastrointestinal Phospholipid Digestion, and Neuronal Function*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Isogai, Yuki; Masuda, Seiko; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Miki, Yoshimi; Kamei, Daisuke; Hara, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Ishimoto, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Noriko; Yokota, Yasunori; Hanasaki, Kohji; Suzuki-Yamamoto, Toshiko; Yamamoto, Kei; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Although the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) family has been generally thought to participate in pathologic events such as inflammation and atherosclerosis, relatively high and constitutive expression of group X sPLA2 (sPLA2-X) in restricted sites such as reproductive organs, the gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral neurons raises a question as to the roles played by this enzyme in the physiology of reproduction, digestion, and the nervous system. Herein we used mice with gene disruption or transgenic overexpression of sPLA2-X to clarify the homeostatic functions of this enzyme at these locations. Our results suggest that sPLA2-X regulates 1) the fertility of spermatozoa, not oocytes, beyond the step of flagellar motility, 2) gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion, perturbation of which is eventually linked to delayed onset of a lean phenotype with reduced adiposity, decreased plasma leptin, and improved muscle insulin tolerance, and 3) neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and the duration of peripheral pain nociception. Thus, besides its inflammatory action proposed previously, sPLA2-X participates in physiologic processes including male fertility, gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion linked to adiposity, and neuronal outgrowth and sensing. PMID:21266581

  4. Physiological roles of group X-secreted phospholipase A2 in reproduction, gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion, and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Isogai, Yuki; Masuda, Seiko; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Miki, Yoshimi; Kamei, Daisuke; Hara, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Ishimoto, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Noriko; Yokota, Yasunori; Hanasaki, Kohji; Suzuki-Yamamoto, Toshiko; Yamamoto, Kei; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    Although the secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) family has been generally thought to participate in pathologic events such as inflammation and atherosclerosis, relatively high and constitutive expression of group X sPLA(2) (sPLA(2)-X) in restricted sites such as reproductive organs, the gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral neurons raises a question as to the roles played by this enzyme in the physiology of reproduction, digestion, and the nervous system. Herein we used mice with gene disruption or transgenic overexpression of sPLA(2)-X to clarify the homeostatic functions of this enzyme at these locations. Our results suggest that sPLA(2)-X regulates 1) the fertility of spermatozoa, not oocytes, beyond the step of flagellar motility, 2) gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion, perturbation of which is eventually linked to delayed onset of a lean phenotype with reduced adiposity, decreased plasma leptin, and improved muscle insulin tolerance, and 3) neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and the duration of peripheral pain nociception. Thus, besides its inflammatory action proposed previously, sPLA(2)-X participates in physiologic processes including male fertility, gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion linked to adiposity, and neuronal outgrowth and sensing.

  5. The physiological role of the amyloid precursor protein as an adhesion molecule in the developing nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Lucas J; Cáceres, Alfredo; Dupraz, Sebastián; Oksdath, Mariana; Quiroga, Santiago; Lorenzo, Alfredo

    2017-07-05

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein better known for its participation in the physiopathology of Alzheimer disease as the source of the beta amyloid fragment. However, the physiological functions of the full length protein and its proteolytic fragments have remained elusive. APP was first described as a cell-surface receptor; nevertheless, increasing evidence highlighted APP as a cell adhesion molecule. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of the physiological role of APP as a cell adhesion molecule and its involvement in key events of neuronal development, such as migration, neurite outgrowth, growth cone pathfinding, and synaptogenesis. Finally, since APP is over-expressed in Down syndrome individuals because of the extra copy of chromosome 21, in the last section of the review, we discuss the potential contribution of APP to the neuronal and synaptic defects described in this genetic condition. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on doi: 10.1111/jnc.14115. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. [Physiological changes in the morphology of the main structural enamel unit - hydroxyapatite crystal - during its life span (in vitro study)].

    PubMed

    Shumilovich, B R; Sadovsky, V V; Sushchenko, A V; Kharitonov, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro study by means of complex laboratory techniques including X-ray faze analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy defined age-related physiological mineralization process as a shift of the structural enamel unit - nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite crystals - TO microcrystal phase. Relevant anatomical sites with age-dependent enamel optical characteristics corresponding to certain ratio of hydroxyapatite phases and the compliance of their color characteristics to composites enamel layers were revealed.

  7. Modulation of physiological reflexes by pain: role of the locus coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2012-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) is activated by noxious stimuli, and this activation leads to inhibition of perceived pain. As two physiological reflexes, the acoustic startle reflex and the pupillary light reflex, are sensitive to noxious stimuli, this review considers evidence that this sensitivity, at least to some extent, is mediated by the LC. The acoustic startle reflex, contraction of a large body of skeletal muscles in response to a sudden loud acoustic stimulus, can be enhanced by both directly (“sensitization”) and indirectly (“fear conditioning”) applied noxious stimuli. Fear-conditioning involves the association of a noxious (unconditioned) stimulus with a neutral (conditioned) stimulus (e.g., light), leading to the ability of the conditioned stimulus to evoke the “pain response”. The enhancement of the startle response by conditioned fear (“fear-potentiated startle”) involves the activation of the amygdala. The LC may also be involved in both sensitization and fear potentiation: pain signals activate the LC both directly and indirectly via the amygdala, which results in enhanced motoneurone activity, leading to an enhanced muscular response. Pupil diameter is under dual sympathetic/parasympathetic control, the sympathetic (noradrenergic) output dilating, and the parasympathetic (cholinergic) output constricting the pupil. The light reflex (constriction of the pupil in response to a light stimulus) operates via the parasympathetic output. The LC exerts a dual influence on pupillary control: it contributes to the sympathetic outflow and attenuates the parasympathetic output by inhibiting the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, the preganglionic cholinergic nucleus in the light reflex pathway. Noxious stimulation results in pupil dilation (“reflex dilation”), without any change in the light reflex response, consistent with sympathetic activation via the LC. Conditioned fear, on the other hand, results in the attenuation of the light reflex response (

  8. A physiologic role for serotonergic transmission in adult rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Luc; Zhao, Fang-li; Kolli, Tamara; Herness, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Of the multiple neurotransmitters and neuropeptides expressed in the mammalian taste bud, serotonin remains both the most studied and least understood. Serotonin is expressed in a subset of taste receptor cells that form synapses with afferent nerve fibers (type III cells) and was once thought to be essential to neurotransmission (now understood as purinergic). However, the discovery of the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor in a subset of taste receptor cells paracrine to type III cell suggested a role in cell-to-cell communication during the processing of taste information. Functional data describing this role are lacking. Using anatomical and neurophysiological techniques, this study proposes a modulatory role for serotonin during the processing of taste information. Double labeling immunocytochemical and single cell RT-PCR technique experiments documented that 5-HT1A-expressing cells co-expressed markers for type II cells, cells which express T1R or T2R receptors and release ATP. These cells did not co-express type III cells markers. Neurophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani nerve, which innervates anterior taste buds, were performed prior to and during intravenous injection of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. These experiments revealed that serotonin facilitates processing of taste information for tastants representing sweet, sour, salty, and bitter taste qualities. On the other hand, injection of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was without effect. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that serotonin is a crucial element in a finely-tuned feedback loop involving the 5-HT1A receptor, ATP, and purinoceptors. It is hypothesized that serotonin facilitates gustatory signals by regulating the release of ATP through ATP-release channels possibly through phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate resynthesis. By doing so, 5-HT1A activation prevents desensitization of post-synaptic purinergic receptors expressed on afferent nerve fibers and enhances the

  9. A Physiologic Role for Serotonergic Transmission in Adult Rat Taste Buds

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Luc; Zhao, Fang-li; Kolli, Tamara; Herness, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Of the multiple neurotransmitters and neuropeptides expressed in the mammalian taste bud, serotonin remains both the most studied and least understood. Serotonin is expressed in a subset of taste receptor cells that form synapses with afferent nerve fibers (type III cells) and was once thought to be essential to neurotransmission (now understood as purinergic). However, the discovery of the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor in a subset of taste receptor cells paracrine to type III cell suggested a role in cell-to-cell communication during the processing of taste information. Functional data describing this role are lacking. Using anatomical and neurophysiological techniques, this study proposes a modulatory role for serotonin during the processing of taste information. Double labeling immunocytochemical and single cell RT-PCR technique experiments documented that 5-HT1A-expressing cells co-expressed markers for type II cells, cells which express T1R or T2R receptors and release ATP. These cells did not co-express type III cells markers. Neurophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani nerve, which innervates anterior taste buds, were performed prior to and during intravenous injection of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. These experiments revealed that serotonin facilitates processing of taste information for tastants representing sweet, sour, salty, and bitter taste qualities. On the other hand, injection of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was without effect. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that serotonin is a crucial element in a finely-tuned feedback loop involving the 5-HT1A receptor, ATP, and purinoceptors. It is hypothesized that serotonin facilitates gustatory signals by regulating the release of ATP through ATP-release channels possibly through phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate resynthesis. By doing so, 5-HT1A activation prevents desensitization of post-synaptic purinergic receptors expressed on afferent nerve fibers and enhances the

  10. Small Subunits of Serine Palmitoyltransferase (ssSPTs) and Their Physiological Roles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-12

    Bittman R, London E. 2007. Effect of ceramide N- acyl chain and polar headgroup structure on the properties of ordered lipid domains ( lipid rafts...1   Figure 1.2. Sphingolipid rheostat: Ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate dictate the balance between pro and anti-apoptotic...predominantly C15/17 mono-methylated branched chain synthesized from a ISO branched precursor, whereas the fatty acids in ceramides are generally

  11. Surface Glycans of Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Fungi: Physiological Roles, Clinical Uses, and Experimental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, James

    2004-01-01

    Although fungi have always been with us as commensals and pathogens, fungal infections have been increasing in frequency over the past few decades. There is a growing body of literature describing the involvement of carbohydrate groups in various aspects of fungal disease. Carbohydrates comprising the cell wall or capsule, or as a component of glycoproteins, are the fungal cell surface entities most likely to be exposed to the surrounding environment. Thus, the fungus-host interaction is likely to involve carbohydrates before DNA, RNA, or even protein. The interaction between fungal and host cells is also complex, and early studies using whole cells or crude cell fractions often produced seemingly conflicting results. What was needed, and what has been developing, is the ability to identify specific glycan structures and determine how they interact with immune system components. Carbohydrate analysis is complicated by the complexity of glycan structures and by the challenges of separating and detecting carbohydrates experimentally. Advances in carbohydrate chemistry have enabled us to move from the foundation of composition analysis to more rapid characterization of specific structures. This, in turn, will lead to a greater understanding of how fungi coexist with their hosts as commensals or exist in conflict as pathogens. PMID:15084502

  12. Developing an Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Work-Integrated Learning in Exercise Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naumann, Fiona; Moore, Keri; Mildon, Sally; Jones, Philip

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a valid method to assess the key competencies of the exercise physiology profession acquired through work-integrated learning (WIL). In order to develop a competency-based assessment, the key professional tasks needed to be identified and the test designed so students' competency in different tasks and settings could be…

  13. STRUCTURED LEARNING AND TRAINING ENVIRONMENTS--A PREPARATION LABORATORY FOR ADVANCED MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FIEL, NICHOLAS J.; JOHNSTON, RAYMOND F.

    A PREPARATION LABORATORY WAS DESIGNED TO FAMILIARIZE STUDENTS IN ADVANCED MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES AND THUS SHORTEN THE TIME THEY SPEND IN SETTING UP ACTUAL EXPERIMENTS. THE LABORATORY LASTS 30 MINUTES, IS FLEXIBLE AND SIMPLE OF OPERATION, AND DOES NOT REQUIRE A PROFESSOR'S PRESENCE. THE BASIC TRAINING UNIT IS THE…

  14. A physiologic signaling role for the γ-secretase-derived intracellular fragment of APP

    PubMed Central

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Murphy, M. Paul; Mead, Tonya R.; Akbari, Yama; Sugarman, Michael C.; Jannatipour, Mehrdad; Anliker, Brigitte; Müller, Ulrike; Saftig, Paul; De Strooper, Bart; Wolfe, Michael S.; Golde, Todd E.; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2002-01-01