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Sample records for physiologically similar sulfate-reducing

  1. Sulfate-reducing bacteria: Microbiology and physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The sulfate reducing bacteria, the first nonphotosynthetic anaerobic bacteria demonstrated to contain c type cytochromes, perform electron transfer coupled to phosphorylation. A new bioenergetic scheme for the formation of a proton gradient for growth of Desulfovibrio on organic substrates and sulfate involving vectors electron transfer and consistent with the cellular localization of enzymes and electron transfer components was proposed. Hydrogen is produced in the cytoplasm from organic substrates and, as a permease molecule diffuses rapidly across the cytoplasmic membrane, it is oxidized to protons and electrons by the periplasmic hydrogenase. The electrons only are transferred across the cytoplasmic membrane to the cytoplasm where they are used to reduce sulfate to sulfide. The protons are used for transport or to drive a reversible ATPOSE. The net effect is the transfer of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane with the intervention of a proton pump. This type of H2 cycling is relevant to the bioenergetics of other types of anaerobic microorganisms.

  2. Co-existence of physiologically similar sulfate-reducing bacteria in a full-scale sulfidogenic bioreactor fed with a single organic electron donor

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Shabir A.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Kuenen, J. Gijs

    2007-01-01

    A combination of culture-dependent and independent methods was used to study the co-existence of different sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor treating sulfate-rich wastewater. The wastewater was fed with ethanol as an external electron donor. Twenty six strains of SRB were randomly picked and isolated from the highest serial dilution that showed growth (i.e. 108). Repetitive enterobacterial palindromic polymerase chain reaction and whole cell protein profiling revealed a low genetic diversity, with only two genotypes among the 26 strains obtained in the pure culture. The low genetic diversity suggests the absence of micro-niches within the reactor, which might be due to a low spatial and temporal micro-heterogeneity. The total 16S rDNA sequencing of two representative strains L3 and L7 indicated a close relatedness to the genus Desulfovibrio. The two strains differed in as many as five physiological traits, which might allow them to occupy distinct niches and thus co-exist within the same habitat. Whole cell hybridisation with fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes was performed to characterise the SRB community in the reactor. The isolated strains Desulfovibrio L3 and Desulfovibrio L7 were the most dominant SRB, representing 30–35% and 25–35%, respectively, of the total SRB community. Desulfobulbus-like bacteria contributed for 20–25%, and the Desulfobacca acetoxidans-specific probe targeted approximately 15–20% of the total SRB. The whole cell hybridisation results thus revealed a consortium of four different species of SRB that can be enriched and maintained on a single energy source in a full-scale sulfidogenic reactor. PMID:17440719

  3. Methods for Engineering Sulfate Reducing Bacteria of the Genus Desulfovibrio

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, Swapnil R; Keller, Kimberly L.; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-03-15

    Sulfate reducing bacteria are physiologically important given their nearly ubiquitous presence and have important applications in the areas of bioremediation and bioenergy. This chapter provides details on the steps used for homologous-recombination mediated chromosomal manipulation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a well-studied sulfate reducer. More specifically, we focus on the implementation of a 'parts' based approach for suicide vector assembly, important aspects of anaerobic culturing, choices for antibiotic selection, electroporation-based DNA transformation, as well as tools for screening and verifying genetically modified constructs. These methods, which in principle may be extended to other sulfate-reducing bacteria, are applicable for functional genomics investigations, as well as metabolic engineering manipulations.

  4. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  5. Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity

    SciTech Connect

    McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A.; Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D.

    1996-12-09

    Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

  6. [Biodiversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria growing on objects of heating systems].

    PubMed

    Purish, L M; Asaulenko, L G; Abdulina, D R; Iutinskaia, G A

    2014-01-01

    It was shown that sulfate-reducing bacteria developed on the sections of Kyiv municipal heating systems, which are exploited in conditions of different temperatures. The bacteria were different as to their morphological and physiological properties. The bacteria of Desulfovibrio genus were revealed on the sections, which were exploited at a temperature of 35-40 degrees C and bacteria of Desulfomicrobium and Desulfotomaculum genera were revealed on the sections with a higher temperature such as 60 degrees C. Based on of the 16S rRNA gene analysis data, it was demonstrated that sequences of TC2, TC3 and TC4 clones related to Desulfovibrio sp. DSM 12803 (100% sequence similarity), Desulfotomaculum sp. ECP-C-5 (92% sequence similarity) and Desulfomicrobium baculatum strain DSM 2555 (99% sequence similarity), respectively. The identified bacteria are potentially dangerous for heating systems and can be the agents of microbial corrosion.

  7. Mechanisms and Effectivity of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mining-influenced water (MIW) is the main environmental challenges associated with the mining industry. Passive MIW remediation can be achieved through microbial activity in sulfate-reducing bioreactors (SRBRs), but their actual removal rates depend on different factors, one of which is the substrate composition. Chitinous materials have demonstrated high metal removal rates, particularly for the two recalcitrant MIW contaminants Zn and Mn, but their removal mechanisms need further study. We studied Cd, Fe, Zn, and Mn removal in bioactive and abiotic SRBRs to elucidate the metal removal mechanisms and the differences in metal and sulfate removal rates using a chitinous material as substrate. We found that sulfate-reducing bacteria are effective in increasing metal and sulfate removal rates and duration of operation in SRBRs, and that the main mechanism involved was metal precipitation as sulfides. The solid residues provided evidence of the presence of sulfides in the bioactive column, more specifically ZnS, according to XPS analysis. The feasibility of passive treatments with a chitinous substrate could be an important option for MIW remediation. Mining influenced water (MIW) remediation is still one of the top priorities for the agency because it addresses the most important environmental problem associated with the mining industry and that affects thousands of communities in the U.S. and worldwide. In this paper, the MIW bioremediation mechanisms are studied

  8. Uranium Immobilization by Sulfate-reducing Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyenal, Haluk; Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-04-01

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized using biofilms of the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in flat-plate continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. U(VI) was continuously fed into the reactor for 32 weeks at a concentration of 126 íM. During this time, the soluble U(VI) was removed (between 88 and 96% of feed) from solution and immobilized in the biofilms. The dynamics of U immobilization in the sulfate-reducing biofilms were quantified by estimating: (1) microbial activity in the SRB biofilm, defined as the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production rate and estimated from the H2S concentration profiles measured using microelectrodes across the biofilms; (2) concentration of dissolved U in the solution; and (3) the mass of U precipitated in the biofilm. Results suggest that U was immobilized in the biofilms as a result of two processes: (1) enzymatically and (2) chemically, by reacting with microbially generated H2S. Visual inspection showed that the dissolved sulfide species reacted with U(VI) to produce a black precipitate. Synchrotron-based U L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of U precipitated abiotically by sodium sulfide indicated that U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV). Selected-area electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic analysis of transmission electron microscope lattice-fringe images confirmed the structure of precipitated U as being that of uraninite.

  9. Bioinformatics comparison of sulfate-reducing metabolism nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremberger, G.; Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria can be traced back to 3.5 billion years ago. The thermodynamics details of the sulfur cycle have been well documented. A recent sulfate-reducing bacteria report (Robator, Jungbluth, et al , 2015 Jan, Front. Microbiol) with Genbank nucleotide data has been analyzed in terms of the sulfite reductase (dsrAB) via fractal dimension and entropy values. Comparison to oil field sulfate-reducing sequences was included. The AUCG translational mass fractal dimension versus ATCG transcriptional mass fractal dimension for the low temperature dsrB and dsrA sequences reported in Reference Thirteen shows correlation R-sq ~ 0.79 , with a probably of about 3% in simulation. A recent report of using Cystathionine gamma-lyase sequence to produce CdS quantum dot in a biological method, where the sulfur is reduced just like in the H2S production process, was included for comparison. The AUCG mass fractal dimension versus ATCG mass fractal dimension for the Cystathionine gamma-lyase sequences was found to have R-sq of 0.72, similar to the low temperature dissimilatory sulfite reductase dsr group with 3% probability, in contrary to the oil field group having R-sq ~ 0.94, a high probable outcome in the simulation. The other two simulation histograms, namely, fractal dimension versus entropy R-sq outcome values, and di-nucleotide entropy versus mono-nucleotide entropy R-sq outcome values are also discussed in the data analysis focusing on low probability outcomes.

  10. A phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences from sulfate-reducing bacteria in a sandy marine sediment.

    PubMed Central

    Devereux, R; Mundfrom, G W

    1994-01-01

    The divergence of 16S rDNA sequences in marine sediment was investigated. Twenty unique partial sequences were found among 33 cloned following PCR. Thirteen shared 82 to 91% similarity with sequences of delta subclass sulfate-reducing bacteria. Three contained the target sequence for a sulfate-reducing bacterium-specific oligonucleotide probe designed from pure-culture studies. PMID:7524446

  11. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  12. The physiological diversity and similarity of ten Quercus species

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; M.N. Angelov; R.R. Doong; W.R. Harms; Paul P. Kormanik; C.C. Black

    1994-01-01

    Based on anatomical, photosynthetic, and biochemical data, the range of physiological differences and similarities was defined for ten Quercus species. There were no correlations between species' site adaptability, leaf anatomy and photosynthetic rate (A). It is concluded from these data that each oak species must be treated individually when incorporated into...

  13. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  14. Desulfosporosinus hippei sp. nov., a mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from permafrost.

    PubMed

    Vatsurina, A; Badrutdinova, D; Schumann, P; Spring, S; Vainshtein, M

    2008-05-01

    The sulfate-reducing strain 343T was isolated from ancient permafrost deposits in Siberia, Russia. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, this strain was closely related to Desulfosporosinus species, showing 97.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Desulfosporosinus meridiei DSM 13257T, 97.6 % similarity to Desulfosporosinus auripigmenti DSM 13351T, 97.2 % similarity to Desulfosporosinus lacus DSM 15449T and 96.2 % similarity to Desulfosporosinus orientis DSM 765T. The strain was found to contain b-type cytochromes and to reduce only sulfate and thiosulfate using lactate as an electron donor but not sulfite, elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate or Fe(III). These data, considered in conjunction with DNA-DNA hybridization data, cell-wall chemotaxonomy and data on physiology, support recognition of strain 343T as representing a distinct and novel species within the genus Desulfosporosinus, namely Desulfosporosinus hippei sp. nov., with the type strain 343T (=DSM 8344T =VKM B-2003T).

  15. Characterization of sulfate reducing bacteria isolated from urban soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2017-05-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) was isolated from urban soil and applied for the remediation of heavy metals pollution from acid mine drainage. The morphology and physiological characteristics (e.g. pH and heavy metals tolerance) of SRB was investigated. The SRB was gram-negative bacteria, long rod with slight curve, cell size 0.5× (1.5-2.0) μm. The pH of medium had significant effect on SRB growth and the efficiency of sulfate reduction, and it showed that the suitable pH range was 5-9 and SRB could not survive at pH less than 4. The maximum tolerance of Fe (II), Zn (II), Cd (II), and Cu (II) under acidic condition (pH 5.0) was about 600 mg/L, 150 mg/L, 25 mg/L and 25 mg/L, respectively. The result indicated that SRB isolated in this study could be used for the bioremediation of acid mine drainage (pH>4) within the heavy metals concentrations tolerance.

  16. Oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under sulfate-reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-03-01

    Harbor sediments are commonly contaminated with hydrocarbons from shipping activities, fuel spills, runoff, and inputs from sewage treatment plants. Once in the sediments, PAHs may persist until degraded, resuspened, bioaccummulated, or removed. Microbial metabolism could be expected to have a significant role in removing PAHs from harbor sediments only if PAHs could be degraded under sulfate-reducing or Fe(III)-reducing conditions. This study examines degradation of PAHs under sulfate-reducing conditions. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Linking Microbial Ecology to Geochemistry in Sulfate Reducing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennan, D. M.; Lee, I.; Landkamer, L.; Almstrand, R.; Figueroa, L. A.; Sharp, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfate reducing bioreactors (SRBRs) can serve as passive treatment systems for mining influenced waters (MIW). An enhanced understanding of the biogeochemistry and efficacy of SRBRs can be achieved by combining molecular biological and geochemical techniques in both field and column settings. To this end, a spatial and temporal sequence of eight pilot-scale columns were analyzed employing a multidisciplinary approach using ICP-AES, next-generation sequencing, and SEM-EDX to explore the effects of variable substrate on community structure and performance (measured by Zn removal). All pilot scale reactors contained 30% limestone by mass, 7 of the 8 had variable amounts of woodchips, sawdust, and alfalfa hay, and an 8th column where the only carbon source was walnut shells. High throughput sequencing of DNA extracted from liquid in pilot-scale columns reveals, similarly to an analogous field system in Arizona, a dominance of Proteobacteria. However, after the first pore volume, performance differences between substrate permutations emerged, where columns containing exclusively walnut shells or sawdust exhibited a more effective startup and metal removal than did columns containing exclusively woodchips or alfalfa hay. SEM-EDX analysis revealed the initial formation of gypsum (CaSO4) precipitates regardless of substrate. Zn was observed in the presence of Ca, S, and O in some column samples, suggesting there was co-precipitation of Zn and CaSO4. This is congruent with micro-XAS analysis of field data suggesting iron sulfides were co-precipitating with gypsum. A SEM-EDX analysis from a subsequent sampling event (8 months into operation) indicated that precipitation may be shifting to ZnS and ZnCO3. Biplots employing Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) describe how diversity scales with performance and substrate selection, and how community shifts may result in differential performance and precipitation in response to selective pressure of bioreactor material on

  18. Molecular characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Guaymas Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Teske, Andreas; Dillon, Jesse; Stahl, David A.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2003-01-01

    The Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) is a hydrothermal vent site where thermal alteration of deposited planktonic and terrestrial organic matter forms petroliferous material which supports diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria. We explored the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the sulfate-reducing bacteria by characterizing PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) and 16S rRNA genes from the upper 4 cm of the Guaymas sediment. The dsrAB sequences revealed that there was a major clade closely related to the acetate-oxidizing delta-proteobacterial genus Desulfobacter and a clade of novel, deeply branching dsr sequences related to environmental dsr sequences from marine sediments in Aarhus Bay and Kysing Fjord (Denmark). Other dsr clones were affiliated with gram-positive thermophilic sulfate reducers (genus Desulfotomaculum) and the delta-proteobacterial species Desulforhabdus amnigena and Thermodesulforhabdus norvegica. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNAs from the same environmental samples resulted in identification of four clones affiliated with Desulfobacterium niacini, a member of the acetate-oxidizing, nutritionally versatile genus Desulfobacterium, and one clone related to Desulfobacula toluolica and Desulfotignum balticum. Other bacterial 16S rRNA bacterial phylotypes were represented by non-sulfate reducers and uncultured lineages with unknown physiology, like OP9, OP8, as well as a group with no clear affiliation. In summary, analyses of both 16S rRNA and dsrAB clone libraries resulted in identification of members of the Desulfobacteriales in the Guaymas sediments. In addition, the dsrAB sequencing approach revealed a novel group of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes that could not be identified by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  19. Molecular characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Guaymas Basin.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Ashita; Teske, Andreas; Dillon, Jesse; Stahl, David A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2003-05-01

    The Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) is a hydrothermal vent site where thermal alteration of deposited planktonic and terrestrial organic matter forms petroliferous material which supports diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria. We explored the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the sulfate-reducing bacteria by characterizing PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) and 16S rRNA genes from the upper 4 cm of the Guaymas sediment. The dsrAB sequences revealed that there was a major clade closely related to the acetate-oxidizing delta-proteobacterial genus Desulfobacter and a clade of novel, deeply branching dsr sequences related to environmental dsr sequences from marine sediments in Aarhus Bay and Kysing Fjord (Denmark). Other dsr clones were affiliated with gram-positive thermophilic sulfate reducers (genus Desulfotomaculum) and the delta-proteobacterial species Desulforhabdus amnigena and Thermodesulforhabdus norvegica. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNAs from the same environmental samples resulted in identification of four clones affiliated with Desulfobacterium niacini, a member of the acetate-oxidizing, nutritionally versatile genus Desulfobacterium, and one clone related to Desulfobacula toluolica and Desulfotignum balticum. Other bacterial 16S rRNA bacterial phylotypes were represented by non-sulfate reducers and uncultured lineages with unknown physiology, like OP9, OP8, as well as a group with no clear affiliation. In summary, analyses of both 16S rRNA and dsrAB clone libraries resulted in identification of members of the Desulfobacteriales in the Guaymas sediments. In addition, the dsrAB sequencing approach revealed a novel group of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes that could not be identified by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  20. Molecular characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Guaymas Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Teske, Andreas; Dillon, Jesse; Stahl, David A.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2003-01-01

    The Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) is a hydrothermal vent site where thermal alteration of deposited planktonic and terrestrial organic matter forms petroliferous material which supports diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria. We explored the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the sulfate-reducing bacteria by characterizing PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) and 16S rRNA genes from the upper 4 cm of the Guaymas sediment. The dsrAB sequences revealed that there was a major clade closely related to the acetate-oxidizing delta-proteobacterial genus Desulfobacter and a clade of novel, deeply branching dsr sequences related to environmental dsr sequences from marine sediments in Aarhus Bay and Kysing Fjord (Denmark). Other dsr clones were affiliated with gram-positive thermophilic sulfate reducers (genus Desulfotomaculum) and the delta-proteobacterial species Desulforhabdus amnigena and Thermodesulforhabdus norvegica. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNAs from the same environmental samples resulted in identification of four clones affiliated with Desulfobacterium niacini, a member of the acetate-oxidizing, nutritionally versatile genus Desulfobacterium, and one clone related to Desulfobacula toluolica and Desulfotignum balticum. Other bacterial 16S rRNA bacterial phylotypes were represented by non-sulfate reducers and uncultured lineages with unknown physiology, like OP9, OP8, as well as a group with no clear affiliation. In summary, analyses of both 16S rRNA and dsrAB clone libraries resulted in identification of members of the Desulfobacteriales in the Guaymas sediments. In addition, the dsrAB sequencing approach revealed a novel group of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes that could not be identified by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  1. Enrichment and characterization of sulfate reducing, naphthalene degrading microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Kümmel; Florian-Alexander, Herbst; Márcia, Duarte; Dietmar, Pieper; Jana, Seifert; Bergen Martin, von; Hans-Hermann, Richnow; Carsten, Vogt

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are pollutants of great concern due to their potential toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. PAH are widely distributed in the environment by accidental discharges during the transport, use and disposal of petroleum products, and during forest and grass fires. Caused by their hydrophobic nature, PAH basically accumulate in sediments from where they are slowly released into the groundwater. Although generally limited by the low water solubility of PAH, microbial degradation is one of the major mechanisms leading to the complete clean-up of PAH-contaminated sites. Whereas organisms and biochemical pathways responsible for the aerobic breakdown of PAH are well known, anaerobic PAH biodegradation is less understood; only a few anaerobic PAH degrading cultures have been described. We studied the anaerobic PAH degradation in a microcosm approach to enrich anaerobic PAH degraders. Anoxic groundwater and sediment samples were used as inoculum. Groundwater samples were purchased from the erstwhile gas works facility and a former wood impregnation site. In contrast, sources of sediment samples were a former coal refining area and an old fuel depot. Samples were incubated in anoxic mineral salt medium with naphthalene as sole carbon source and sulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Grown cultures were characterized by feeding with 13C-labeled naphthalene, 16S rRNA gene sequencing using an Illumina® approach, and functional proteome analyses. Finally, six enrichment cultures able to degrade naphthalene under anoxic conditions were established. First results point to a dominance of identified sequences affiliated to the freshwater sulfate-reducing strain N47, which is a known anaerobic naphthalene degrader, in four out of the six enrichments. In those enrichments, peptides related to the pathway of anoxic naphthalene degradation in N47 were abundant. Overall the data underlines the importance of Desulfobacteria for natural

  2. Sulfur isotope fractionation during the evolutionary adaptation of a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pellerin, André; Anderson-Trocmé, Luke; Whyte, Lyle G; Zane, Grant M; Wall, Judy D; Wing, Boswell A

    2015-04-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is a microbial catabolic pathway that preferentially processes less massive sulfur isotopes relative to their heavier counterparts. This sulfur isotope fractionation is recorded in ancient sedimentary rocks and generally is considered to reflect a phenotypic response to environmental variations rather than to evolutionary adaptation. Modern sulfate-reducing microorganisms isolated from similar environments can exhibit a wide range of sulfur isotope fractionations, suggesting that adaptive processes influence the sulfur isotope phenotype. To date, the relationship between evolutionary adaptation and isotopic phenotypes has not been explored. We addressed this by studying the covariation of fitness, sulfur isotope fractionation, and growth characteristics in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough in a microbial evolution experiment. After 560 generations, the mean fitness of the evolved lineages relative to the starting isogenic population had increased by ∼ 17%. After 927 generations, the mean fitness relative to the initial ancestral population had increased by ∼ 20%. Growth rate in exponential phase increased during the course of the experiment, suggesting that this was a primary influence behind the fitness increases. Consistent changes were observed within different selection intervals between fractionation and fitness. Fitness changes were associated with changes in exponential growth rate but changes in fractionation were not. Instead, they appeared to be a response to changes in the parameters that govern growth rate: yield and cell-specific sulfate respiration rate. We hypothesize that cell-specific sulfate respiration rate, in particular, provides a bridge that allows physiological controls on fractionation to cross over to the adaptive realm.

  3. Effects of biocides on gene expression in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Hsin Phoebe; Caffrey, Sean M; Voordouw, Johanna K; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2010-07-01

    Although sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) are often eradicated in oil and gas operations with biocides, such as glutaraldehyde (Glut), tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium sulfate (THPS), and benzalkonium chloride (BAC), their response to these agents is not well known. Whole genome microarrays of D. vulgaris treated with biocides well below the minimum inhibitory concentration showed that 256, 96, and 198 genes were responsive to Glut, THPS, and BAC, respectively, and that these three commonly used biocides affect the physiology of the cell quite differently. Glut induces expression of genes required to degrade or refold proteins inactivated by either chemical modification or heat shock, whereas BAC appears to target ribosomal structure. THPS appears to primarily affect energy metabolism of SRB. Mutants constructed for genes strongly up-regulated by Glut, were killed by Glut to a similar degree as the wild type. Hence, it is difficult to achieve increased sensitivity to this biocide by single gene mutations, because Glut affects so many targets. Our results increase understanding of the biocide's mode of action, allowing a more intelligent combination of mechanistically different agents. This can reduce stress on budgets for chemicals and on the environment.

  4. Similar Odorants Elicit Different Behavioral and Physiological Responses, Some Supersustained

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Shelby A.; Mathew, Dennis; Carlson, John R.

    2011-01-01

    An intriguing question in the field of olfaction is how animals distinguish among structurally similar odorants. We systematically analyzed olfactory responses elicited by a panel of 25 pyrazines. We found that structurally similar pyrazines elicit a wide range of behavioral responses from Drosophila larvae. Each pyrazine was tested against all functional receptors of the larval Odor receptor (Or) repertoire, yielding 525 odorant–receptor combinations. Different pyrazines vary markedly in the responses they elicit from the Or repertoire, with most strong responses deriving from two receptors, Or33b and Or59a. Surprisingly, 2-ethylpyrazine and 2-methylpyrazine, which elicit strikingly similar physiological responses across the receptor repertoire, elicit dramatically different behavioral responses. A small fraction of odorant-receptor combinations elicit remarkably long responses. These responses, which we term “supersustained” responses, are receptor specific and odorant specific, and can last for minutes. Such supersustained responses may prevent olfactory neurons from reporting contemporaneous information about the local odor environment. Odors that elicit such responses could provide a novel means of controlling insect pests and vectors of human disease by impairing the location of human hosts, food sources, and mates. PMID:21613503

  5. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  6. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: a comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; He, Zhili; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin; Price, Morgan N; Yang, Zamin K; Yen, Huei-Che Bill; Hemme, Christopher L; Chen, Wenqiong; Fields, Matthew M; Stahl, David A; Keasling, Jay D; Keller, Martin; Arkin, Adam P; Hazen, Terry C; Wall, Judy D; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-11-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO(3) but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  7. Isolation of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from Human Thoracoabdominal Pus

    PubMed Central

    Loubinoux, Julien; Jaulhac, Benoit; Piemont, Yves; Monteil, Henri; Le Faou, Alain E.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in septic processes, we searched for these bacteria by culture in 100 consecutive abdominal and pleural pus specimens. Twelve isolates were obtained from abdominal samples and were identified by a multiplex PCR as Desulfovibrio piger (formerly Desulfomonas pigra) (seven strains), Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis (four strains), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (one strain). PMID:12624073

  8. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  9. Activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria under simulated reservoir conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosnes, J.T.; Graue, A.; Lien, T. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) that have been isolated from hot oilfield waters from subsea oil reservoirs in the North Sea. Experiments with these bacteria in a reservoir simulator indicate that SRB may maintain their activity in the conditions found in most North Sea reservoirs and, if precautions are not taken, may contribute to souring of the oil and gas.

  10. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  11. Localized sulfate-reducing zones in a coastal plain aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C.J.; Coates, J.D.; Schoonen, M.A.A.

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved iron in ground water of coastal plain or alluvial aquifers contribute to the biofouling of public supply wells for which treatment and remediation is costly. Many of these aquifers, however, contain zones in which microbial sulfate reduction and the associated precipitation of iron-sulfide minerals decreases iron mobility. The principal water-bearing aquifer (Magothy Aquifer of Cretaceous age) in Suffolk County, New York, contains localized sulfate-reducing zones in and near lignite deposits, which generally are associated with clay lenses. Microbial analyses of core samples amended with [14C]-acetate indicate that microbial sulfate reduction is the predominant terminal-electron-accepting process (TEAP) in poorly permeable, lignite-rich sediments at shallow depths and near the ground water divide. The sulfate-reducing zones are characterized by abundant lignite and iron-sulfide minerals, low concentrations of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, and by proximity to clay lenses that contain pore water with relatively high concentrations of sulfate and dissolved organic carbon. The low permeability of these zones and, hence, the long residence time of ground water within them, permit the preservation and (or) allow the formation of iron-sulfide minerals, including pyrite and marcasite. Both sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) are present beneath and beyond the shallow sulfate-reducing zones. A unique Fe(III)-reducing organism, MD-612, was found in core sediments from a depth of 187 m near the southern shore of Long Island. The distribution of poorly permeable, lignite-rich, sulfate-reducing zones with decreased iron concentration is varied within the principal aquifer and accounts for the observed distribution of dissolved sulfate, iron, and iron sulfides in the aquifer. Locating such zones for the placement of production wells would be difficult, however, because these zones are of limited aerial extent.

  12. Radioisotope assay for the quantification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in sediment and water.

    PubMed

    Sand, M D; LaRock, P A; Hodson, R E

    1975-05-01

    A radioisotope enrichment culture method was developed to estimate the physiologically active component of a population of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environmental water and sediment samples. Aliquots of water or sediment were added to 50-ml serum bottles filled with 35-S-sulfate broth incubated for approximately 30 h. After incubation, the disintegration rate per milliliter of spent medium was measured, and the percentage of loss of activity resulting from bacterial sulfate reduction was determined. This loss of sulfate from the medium was then translated to a specific number of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans cells that would reduce an equivalent amount of sulfate in the same incubation time. This comparison was done using a series of growth curves of D. desulfuricans covering a range of inoculum densities between 10-2 and 10-7 cells. The radioassay was used to follow the effects of a pulp mill on a small anoxic river in Florida. The activity of the sulfate-reducing bacteria in the river was greatly suppressed when the mill was closed for annual maintenance. The initiation of waste treatment resulted in improved water quality in 1 week, but the river sediments required a month to show a 10-fold reduction in the population of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  13. Oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under sulfate-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    [14C]naphthalene and phenanthrene were oxidized to 14CO2 without a detectable lag under strict anaerobic conditions in sediments from San Diego Bay, San Diego, Calif., that were heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) but not in less contaminated sediments. Sulfate reduction was necessary for PAH oxidation. These results suggest that the self-purification capacity of PAH-contaminated sulfate-reducing environments may be greater than previously recognized.

  14. Remediation of acid mine drainage with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hauri, J.F.; Schaider, L.A.

    2009-02-15

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed changes in dissolved metal concentrations and pH. Using synthetic acid mine drainage and combinations of inputs, students monitor their bioreactors for decreases in dissolved copper and iron concentrations.

  15. Bioremediation of coal contaminated soil under sulfate-reducing condition.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Y; Shimizu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of coal-derived hydrocarbons, especially high molecular weight (HMW) components, under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose biodegradation experiments were performed, using specifically designed soil column bioreactors. For the experiment, coal-contaminated soil was prepared, which contains high molecular weight hydrocarbons at high concentration (approx. 55.5 mgC g-drysoil(-1)). The experiment was carried out in two different conditions: sulfate reducing (SR) condition (SO4(2-) = 10 mmol l(-1) in the liquid medium) and control condition (SO4(2-)<0.5 mmol l(-1)). Although no degradation was observed under the control condition, the resin fraction decreased to half (from 6,541 to 3,386 mgC g-soil(-1)) under SR condition, with the concomitant increase of two PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene, 9 and 2.5 times, respectively). From these results, we could conclude that high molecular hydrocarbons were biodegradable and transformed to low molecular weight PAHs under the sulfate-reducing condition. Since these PAHs are known to be biologically degraded under aerobic condition, a serial combination of anaerobic (sulfate reducing) and then aerobic bioremediations could be effective and useful for the soil pollution by petroleum and/or coal derived hydrocarbons.

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria using different pathways for the oxidation of acetate.

    PubMed

    Goevert, Dennis; Conrad, Ralf

    2008-11-01

    Acetate is a key intermediate in the anaerobic degradation of organic matter. In anoxic environments, available acetate is a competitive substrate for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane-producing archaea. Little is known about the fractionation of carbon isotopes by sulfate reducers. Therefore, we determined carbon isotope compositions in cultures of three acetate-utilizing SRB, Desulfobacter postgatei, Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, and Desulfobacca acetoxidans. We found that these species showed strong differences in their isotope enrichment factors (epsilon) of acetate. During the consumption of acetate and sulfate, acetate was enriched in 13C by 19.3% per hundred in Desulfobacca acetoxidans. By contrast, both D. postgatei and D. hydrogenophilus showed a slight depletion of 13C resulting in epsilon(ac)-values of 1.8 and 1.5% per hundred, respectively. We suggest that the different isotope fractionation is due to the different metabolic pathways for acetate oxidation. The strongly fractionating Desulfobacca acetoxidans uses the acetyl-CoA/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway, which is also used by acetoclastic methanogens that show a similar fractionation of acetate (epsilon(ac) = -21 to -27% per hundred). In contrast, Desulfobacter spp. oxidize acetate to CO2 via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and apparently did not discriminate against 13C. Our results suggestthat carbon isotope fractionation in environments with sulfate reduction will strongly depend on the composition of the sulfate-reducing bacterial community oxidizing acetate.

  17. Characterization of cytochrome c3 from the thermophilic sulfate reducer Thermodesulfobacterium commune.

    PubMed Central

    Hatchikian, E C; Papavassiliou, P; Bianco, P; Haladjian, J

    1984-01-01

    A c3 type cytochrome has been purified from the thermophilic, non-spore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacterium Thermodesulfobacterium commune. The purified protein was homogeneous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and isoelectric focusing. A pI of 6.83 was observed. The molecular weight of the cytochrome was estimated to be ca. 13,000 from both gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The hemoprotein exhibited absorption maxima at 530, 408.5, and 351 nm in the oxidized form and 551.5 (alpha band), 522.5 (beta band), and 418.5 nm (gamma band) in the reduced form. The extinction coefficients of T. commune cytochrome c3 were 130,000, 74,120, and 975,000 M-1 cm-1 at 551.5, 522.5, and 418.5 nm, respectively. It contains four hemes per molecule, on the basis of both the iron estimation and the extinction coefficient value of its pyridine hemochrome. The amino acid composition showed the presence of eight cysteine residues involved in heme binding. T. commune cytochrome c3 had low threonine, serine, and glycine contents and high glutamic acid and hydrophobic residue contents. The electrochemical study of T. commune cytochrome c3 by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse polarography has shown that the cytochrome system behaves like a reversible system. Four redox potential values at Eh1 = -0.140 +/- 0.010 V, Eh2 = Eh3 = Eh4 = -0.280 +/- 0.010 V have been determined. T. commune cytochrome c3, which acts as the physiological electron carrier of hydrogenase, is similar in most respects to the multiheme low-potential cytochrome c3 which is characteristic of the genus Desulfovibrio. PMID:6090384

  18. Desulfovibrio senegalensis sp. nov., a mesophilic sulfate reducer isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Thioye, Abdoulaye; Gam, Zouhaier Ben Ali; Mbengue, Malick; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Joseph-Bartoli, Manon; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Labat, Marc

    2017-09-01

    Several strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria were isolated from marine sediments recovered from Hann Bay (Senegal). All were related to members of the genus Desulfovibrio. A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic and moderately halophilic strain designated BLaC1T was further characterized. Cells of strain BLaC1T stained Gram-negative and were 0.5 µm wide and 2-4 µm long, motile, rod-shaped and non-spore-forming. The four major fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0. Growth was observed from 15 to 45 °C (optimum 40 °C) and at pH 5.5-8 (optimum pH 7.5). The salinity range for growth was 5-65 g NaCl l-1 (optimum 30 g l-1). Yeast extract was required for growth. Strain BLaC1T was able to grow on lactate and acetate in the presence of sulfate as an electron acceptor. Sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite could serve as terminal electron acceptors, but not fumarate, nitrate or elemental sulfur. The DNA G+C content was 55.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis assigned strain BLaC1T to the family Desulfovibrionaceae; its closest relative was Desulfovibrio oxyclinae DSM 19275T (93.7 % similarity). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons and physiological characteristics, strain BLaC1T is proposed as representing a novel species of Desulfovibrio, with the name Desulfovibrio senegalensis sp. nov. The type strain is BLaC1T (=DSM 101509T=JCM 31063T).

  19. Anaerobic degradation of citrate under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Victor M; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Waltz, Rebecca J; Field, James A

    2009-07-01

    Citrate is an important component of metal processing effluents such as chemical mechanical planarization wastewaters of the semiconductor industry. Citrate can serve as an electron donor for sulfate reduction applied to promote the removal of metals, and it can also potentially be used by methanogens that coexist in anaerobic biofilms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the degradation of citrate with sulfate-reducing and methanogenic biofilms. During batch bioassays, the citrate, acetate, methane and sulfide concentrations were monitored. The results indicate that independent of the biofilm or incubation conditions used, citrate was rapidly fermented with specific rates ranging from 566 to 720 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD) consumed per gram volatile suspended solids per day. Acetate was found to be the main fermentation product of citrate degradation, which was later degraded completely under either methanogenic or sulfate reducing conditions. However, if either sulfate reduction or methanogenesis was infeasible due to specific inhibitors (2-bromoethane sulfonate), absence of sulfate or lack of adequate microorganisms in the biofilm, acetate accumulated to levels accounting for 90-100% of the citrate-COD consumed. Based on carbon balances measured in phosphate buffered bioassays, acetate, CO(2) and hydrogen are the main products of citrate fermentation, with a molar ratio of 2:2:1 per mol of citrate, respectively. In bicarbonate buffered bioassays, acetogenesis of H(2) and CO(2) increased the yield of acetate. The results taken as a whole suggest that in anaerobic biofilm systems, citrate is metabolized via the formation of acetate as the main metabolic intermediate prior to methanogenesis or sulfate reduction. Sulfate reducing consortia must be enriched to utilize acetate as an electron donor in order to utilize the majority of the electron-equivalents in citrate.

  20. Quantifying sulfate reducing bacteria in microbiologically influenced corrosion. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.; Wagner, P.

    1992-11-01

    Iron-oxidizing, sulfur-oxidizing, iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing, acid producing, slime-producing, ammonium-producing, and hydrogen-producing bacteria in addition to other physiological groups have been implicated in the corrosion of metals and alloys. However, the most widely recognized and most easily detected bacteria in most corrosion processes are the bacteria that reduce sulfate to sulfide that are collectively called sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB constitute a physiological-ecological assemblage of morphologically very different types of anaerobic bacteria that have in common the capacity to reduce sulfate to hydrogen sulfide in dissimilatory energy-conserving reactions. Hydrogen sulfide can react with metals to produce metal sulfides as corrosion products. Most techniques for the evaluation of SRB populations are related to their potential to cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Standard practices for evaluating the contribution of SRB to corrosion processes depend on the detection and quantification of SRB using culturing techniques that enumerate organisms or quantify intrinsic characteristics of SRB including enzymes and antibodies. Mineralogy of metal sulfides and sulfur isotope fractionation can also be used to verify the involvement of SRB in corrosion. This paper will review standard practices and innovative techniques for detecting and quantifying SRB.

  1. Distinguishing iron-reducing from sulfate-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Thomas, M.A.; McMahon, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground water systems dominated by iron- or sulfate-reducing conditions may be distinguished by observing concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe2+) and sulfide (sum of H2S, HS-, and S= species and denoted here as "H2S"). This approach is based on the observation that concentrations of Fe2+ and H2S in ground water systems tend to be inversely related according to a hyperbolic function. That is, when Fe2+ concentrations are high, H2S concentrations tend to be low and vice versa. This relation partly reflects the rapid reaction kinetics of Fe2+ with H2S to produce relatively insoluble ferrous sulfides (FeS). This relation also reflects competition for organic substrates between the iron- and the sulfate-reducing microorganisms that catalyze the production of Fe2+ and H 2S. These solubility and microbial constraints operate in tandem, resulting in the observed hyperbolic relation between Fe2+ and H 2S concentrations. Concentrations of redox indicators, including dissolved hydrogen (H2) measured in a shallow aquifer in Hanahan, South Carolina, suggest that if the Fe2+/H2S mass ratio (units of mg/L) exceeded 10, the screened interval being tapped was consistently iron reducing (H2 ???0.2 to 0.8 nM). Conversely, if the Fe 2+/H2S ratio was less than 0.30, consistent sulfate-reducing (H2 ???1 to 5 nM) conditions were observed over time. Concomitantly high Fe2+ and H2S concentrations were associated with H2 concentrations that varied between 0.2 and 5.0 nM over time, suggesting mixing of water from adjacent iron- and sulfate-reducing zones or concomitant iron and sulfate reduction under nonelectron donor-limited conditions. These observations suggest that Fe2+/H2S mass ratios may provide useful information concerning the occurrence and distribution of iron and sulfate reduction in ground water systems. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  2. Isolation and characterization of aggregate-forming sulfate-reducing and purple sulfur bacteria from the chemocline of meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Peduzzi, Sandro; Tonolla, Mauro; Hahn, Dittmar

    2003-07-01

    Abstract In situ hybridization with specific oligonucleotide probes was used to monitor enrichment cultures of yet uncultured populations of sulfate-reducing and small-celled purple sulfur bacteria found to associate into aggregates in the chemocline of meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, and to select potential isolates. Enrichment and isolation conditions resembled those of their nearest cultured relatives, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes and small-celled purple sulfur bacteria belonging to the genus Lamprocystis, respectively. Based on comparative 16S rRNA analysis and physiological characterization, isolate Cad626 was found to resemble D. thiozymogenes although it differed from the type strain by its ability to grow on lactate and pyruvate. Like D. thiozymogenes, isolate Cad626 was able to disproportionate inorganic sulfur compounds (sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite) and to grow, although growth on sulfur required a sulfide scavenger (FeOOH). Isolate Cad16 represented small-celled purple sulfur bacteria that belonged to a previously detected, but uncultured population designated F and was related to Lamprocystis purpurea as evidenced by comparative 16S rRNA analysis and the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a and the carotenoid okenone. Mixed cultures of isolates Cad626 and Cad16 resulted in their association in aggregates similar to those observed in the chemocline of Lake Cadagno. Concomitant growth enhancement of both isolates in mixed culture suggested synergistic interactions that presumably resemble a source-sink relationship for sulfide between the sulfate-reducing bacterium growing by sulfur disproportionation and the purple sulfur bacteria acting as biotic scavenger.

  3. Isolation and identification of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) from the sediment pond after a coal mine in Samarinda, East Kalimantan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumawati, Eko; Sudrajat, Putri, Junita Susilaning

    2017-02-01

    Title isolation and identification of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) of sediment pond former coal mine in Samarinda, East Kalimantan. Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is a group of microbes that can be used to improve the quality of sediment former coal mine. In the metabolic activities, the SRB can reduce sulfate to H2S which immediately binds to metals that are widely available on mined lands and precipitated in the form of metal sulfides reductive. Isolation and identification of sulfate reducing bacteria carried out in the Laboratory of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Mulawarman, Samarinda. Postgate B is a liquid medium used for isolation through serial dilution. Physiological and biochemical characterization was done by Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Six isolates of sulfate reducing bacteria were isolated from the sediment pond former coal mine in Samarinda. Several groups of bacteria can grow at 14 days of incubation, however, another group of bacteria which takes 21 days to grow. The identification results showed that two isolates belong to the genus Desulfotomaculum sp., and each of the other isolates belong to the genus Desulfococcus sp., Desulfobacter sp., Desulfobulbus sp. and Desulfobacterium sp.

  4. Spore-Forming Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Isolated from North Sea Oil Field Waters

    PubMed Central

    Rosnes, Jan Thomas; Torsvik, Terje; Lien, Torleiv

    1991-01-01

    Thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were isolated from oil field waters from oil production platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. Spore-forming rods dominated in the enrichments when lactate, propionate, butyrate, or a mixture of aliphatic fatty acids (C4 through C6) was added as a carbon source and electron donor. Representative strains were isolated and characterized. The isolates grew autotrophically on H2-CO2 and heterotrophically on fatty acids such as formate, propionate, butyrate, caproate, valerate, pyruvate, and lactate and on alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate but not nitrate could be used as an electron acceptor. The temperature range for growth was 43 to 78°C; the spores were extremely heat resistant and survived 131°C for 20 min. The optimum pH was 7.0. The isolates grew well in salt concentrations ranging from 0 to 800 mmol of NaCl per liter. Sulfite reductase P582 was present, but cytochrome c and desulfoviridin were not found. Electron micrographs revealed a gram-positive cell organization. The isolates were classified as a Desulfotomaculum sp. on the basis of spore formation, general physiological characteristics, and submicroscopic organization. To detect thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil field water, polyvalent antisera raised against antigens from two isolates were used. These bacteria were shown to be widespread in oil field water from different platforms. The origin of thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria in the pore water of oil reservoirs is discussed. Images PMID:16348538

  5. Commensal symbiosis between agglutinated polychaetes and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guido, A; Mastandrea, A; Rosso, A; Sanfilippo, R; Tosti, F; Riding, R; Russo, F

    2014-05-01

    Pendant bioconstructions occur within submerged caves in the Plemmirio Marine Protected Area in SE Sicily, Italy. These rigid structures, here termed biostalactites, were synsedimentarily lithified by clotted-peloidal microbial carbonate that has a high bacterial lipid biomarker content with abundant compounds derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria. The main framework builders are polychaete serpulid worms, mainly Protula with subordinate Semivermilia and Josephella. These polychaetes have lamellar and/or fibrillar wall structure. In contrast, small agglutinated terebellid tubes, which are a minor component of the biostalactites, are discontinuous and irregular with a peloidal micritic microfabric. The peloids, formed by bacterial sulfate reduction, appear to have been utilized by terebellids to construct tubes in an environment where other particulate sediment is scarce. We suggest that the bacteria obtained food from the worms in the form of fecal material and/or from the decaying tissue of surrounding organisms and that the worms obtained peloidal micrite with which to construct their tubes, either as grains and/or as tube encompassing biofilm. Peloidal worm tubes have rarely been reported in the recent but closely resemble examples in the geological record that extend back at least to the early Carboniferous. This suggests a long-lived commensal relationship between some polychaete worms and heterotrophic, especially sulfate-reducing, bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Pathway of Fermentative Hydrogen Production by Sulfate-reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-16

    Biofuels are a promising source of sustainable energy. Such biofuels are intermediate products of microbial metabolism of renewable substrates, in particular, plant biomass. Not only are alcohols and solvents produced in this degradative process but energy-rich hydrogen as well. Non photosynthetic microbial hydrogen generation from compounds other than sugars has not been fully explored. We propose to examine the capacity of the abundant soil anaerobes, sulfate-reducing bacteria, for hydrogen generation from organic acids. These apparently simple pathways have yet to be clearly established. Information obtained may facilitate the exploitation of other microbes not yet readily examined by molecular tools. Identification of the flexibility of the metabolic processes to channel reductant to hydrogen will be useful in consideration of practical applications. Because the tools for genetic and molecular manipulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are developed, our efforts will focus on two strains, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio G20.Therefore total metabolism, flux through the pathways, and regulation are likely to be limiting factors which we can elucidate in the following experiments.

  7. Desulfovibrio brasiliensis sp. nov., a moderate halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from Lagoa Vermelha (Brazil) mediating dolomite formation.

    PubMed

    Warthmann, Rolf; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Sass, Henrik; McKenzie, Judith A

    2005-06-01

    A novel halotolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis strain LVform1, was isolated from sediments of a dolomite-forming hypersaline coastal lagoon, Lagoa Vermelha, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The cells are vibrio-shaped and 0.30 to 0.45 microm by 1.0 to 3.5 microm in size. These bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] in culture experiments. The strain was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio in the delta-subclass of the Proteobacteria on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, its physiological and morphological properties. Strain LVform1 is obligate sodium-dependent and grows at NaCl concentrations of up to 15%. The 16S rRNA sequence revealed that this strain is closely related to Desulfovibrio halophilus (96.2% similarity) and to Desulfovibrio oxyclinae (96.8% similarity), which were both isolated from Solar Lake, a hypersaline coastal lake in the Sinai, Egypt. Strain LVform1 is barotolerant, growing under pressures of up to 370 bar (37 MPa). We propose strain LVform1 to be the type strain of a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis (type strain LVform1 = DSMZ No. 15816 and JCM No. 12178). The GenBank/EMBL accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain LVform1 is AJ544687.

  8. Distribution of Thermophilic Marine Sulfate Reducers in North Sea Oil Field Waters and Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, R. K.; Beeder, J.; Thorstenson, T.; Torsvik, T.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of thermophilic marine sulfate reducers in produced oil reservoir waters from the Gullfaks oil field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea was investigated by using enrichment cultures and genus-specific fluorescent antibodies produced against the genera Archaeoglobus, Desulfotomaculum, and Thermodesulforhabdus. The thermophilic marine sulfate reducers in this environment could mainly be classified as species belonging to the genera Archaeoglobus and Thermodesulforhabdus. In addition, some unidentified sulfate reducers were present. Culturable thermophilic Desulfotomaculum strains were not detected. Specific strains of thermophilic sulfate reducers inhabited different parts of the oil reservoir. No correlation between the duration of seawater injection and the numbers of thermophilic sulfate reducers in the produced waters was observed. Neither was there any correlation between the concentration of hydrogen sulfide and the numbers of thermophilic sulfate reducers. The results indicate that thermophilic and hyperthermophilic sulfate reducers are indigenous to North Sea oil field reservoirs and that they belong to a deep subterranean biosphere. PMID:16535321

  9. Distribution of Methanogenic and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Near-Shore Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Mark E.; Buck, John D.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria was examined in sediments from three sites off the coast of eastern Connecticut and five sites in Long Island Sound. Both bacterial groups were detected at all sites. Three distributional patterns were observed: (i) four sites exhibited methanogenic and sulfate-reducing populations which were restricted to the upper 10 to 20 cm, with a predominance of sulfate reducers; (ii) three sites in western Long Island Sound exhibited a methanogenic population most abundant in sediments deeper than those occupied by sulfate reducers; (iii) at one site that was influenced by fresh groundwater, methanogens and sulfate reducers were numerous within the same depths; however, the number of sulfate reducers varied vertically and temporally with sulfate concentrations. It was concluded that the distributions of abundant methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria were mutually exclusive. Methanogenic enrichments yielded all genera of methanogens except Methanosarcina, with the methanobacteria predominating. PMID:16345950

  10. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Florin; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Niculina; Kuypers, Marcel; Widdel, Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Benzene, the archetypal aromatic hydrocarbon is a common constituent of crude oil and oil-refined products. As such, it can enter the biosphere through natural oil seeps or as a consequence of exploitation of fossil fuel reservoirs. Benzene is chemically very stable, due to the stabilizing aromatic electron system and to the lack of functional groups. Although the anaerobic degradation of benzene has been reported under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions, the microorganisms involved and the initial biochemical steps of degradation remain insufficiently understood. Using marine sediment from a Mediterranean lagoon a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture with benzene as the sole organic substrate was obtained. Application of 16S rRNA gene-based methods showed that the enrichment was dominated (more than 85% of total cells) by a distinct phylotype affiliated with a clade of Deltaproteobacteria that include degraders of other aromatic hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene. Using benzoate as a soluble substrate in agar dilution series, several pure cultures closely related to Desulfotignum spp. and Desulfosarcina spp. were isolated. None of these strains was able to utilize benzene as a substrate and hybridizations with specific oligonucleotide probes showed that they accounted for as much as 6% of the total cells. Incubations with 13C-labeled benzene followed by Halogen in situ Hybridization - Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (HISH-SIMS) analysis showed that cells of the dominant phylotype were highly enriched in 13C, while the accompanying bacteria had little or no 13C incorporation. These results demonstrate that the dominant phylotype was indeed the apparent benzene degrader. Dense-cell suspensions of the enrichment culture did not show metabolic activity toward added phenol or toluene, suggesting that benzene degradation did not proceed through anaerobic hydroxylation or methylation. Instead, benzoate was identified in

  11. New Family of Tungstate-Responsive Transcriptional Regulators in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G.; Zane, Grant M.; Siddartha, Kavya; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2013-01-01

    The trace elements molybdenum and tungsten are essential components of cofactors of many metalloenzymes. However, in sulfate-reducing bacteria, high concentrations of molybdate and tungstate oxyanions inhibit growth, thus requiring the tight regulation of their homeostasis. By a combination of bioinformatic and experimental techniques, we identified a novel regulator family, tungstate-responsive regulator (TunR), controlling the homeostasis of tungstate and molybdate in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. The effector-sensing domains of these regulators are similar to those of the known molybdate-responsive regulator ModE, while their DNA-binding domains are homologous to XerC/XerD site-specific recombinases. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 40 TunR family members. Positional analysis of TunR sites and putative promoters allowed us to classify most TunR proteins into two groups: (i) activators of modABC genes encoding a high-affinity molybdenum and tungsten transporting system and (ii) repressors of genes for toluene sulfonate uptake (TSUP) family transporters. The activation of modA and modBC genes by TunR in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was confirmed in vivo, and we discovered that the activation was diminished in the presence of tungstate. A predicted 30-bp TunR-binding motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays. A novel TunR family of bacterial transcriptional factors controls tungstate and molybdate homeostasis in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. We proposed that TunR proteins participate in protection of the cells from the inhibition by these oxyanions. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a family of bacterial transcriptional factors evolved from site-specific recombinases. PMID:23913324

  12. New family of tungstate-responsive transcriptional regulators in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Alexey E; Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Zane, Grant M; Siddartha, Kavya; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Novichkov, Pavel S

    2013-10-01

    The trace elements molybdenum and tungsten are essential components of cofactors of many metalloenzymes. However, in sulfate-reducing bacteria, high concentrations of molybdate and tungstate oxyanions inhibit growth, thus requiring the tight regulation of their homeostasis. By a combination of bioinformatic and experimental techniques, we identified a novel regulator family, tungstate-responsive regulator (TunR), controlling the homeostasis of tungstate and molybdate in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. The effector-sensing domains of these regulators are similar to those of the known molybdate-responsive regulator ModE, while their DNA-binding domains are homologous to XerC/XerD site-specific recombinases. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 40 TunR family members. Positional analysis of TunR sites and putative promoters allowed us to classify most TunR proteins into two groups: (i) activators of modABC genes encoding a high-affinity molybdenum and tungsten transporting system and (ii) repressors of genes for toluene sulfonate uptake (TSUP) family transporters. The activation of modA and modBC genes by TunR in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was confirmed in vivo, and we discovered that the activation was diminished in the presence of tungstate. A predicted 30-bp TunR-binding motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays. A novel TunR family of bacterial transcriptional factors controls tungstate and molybdate homeostasis in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. We proposed that TunR proteins participate in protection of the cells from the inhibition by these oxyanions. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a family of bacterial transcriptional factors evolved from site-specific recombinases.

  13. Desulfosporosinus burensis sp. nov., a spore-forming, mesophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a deep clay environment.

    PubMed

    Mayeux, Bruno; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Bartoli-Joseph, Manon; Casalot, Laurie; Vinsot, Agnès; Labat, Marc

    2013-02-01

    A novel anaerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming, curved rod-shaped, mesophilic and sulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from pore water collected in a borehole at -490 m in Bure (France). This strain, designated BSREI1(T), grew at temperatures between 5 °C and 30 °C (optimum 25 °C) and at a pH between 6 and 8 (optimum 7). It did not require NaCl for growth, but tolerated it up to 1.5 % NaCl. Sulfate, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain BSREI1(T) used crotonate, formate, lactate, pyruvate, fructose, glycerol and yeast extract as electron donors in the presence of sulfate. The sole quinone was MK-7. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 43.3 mol%. Strain BSREI1(T) had the type strains of Desulfosporosinus lacus (16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.83 %), Desulfosporosinus meridiei (96.31 %) and Desulfosporosinus hippei (96.16 %) as its closest phylogenetic relatives. On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological properties, strain BSREI1(T) is proposed as a representative of a novel species of the genus Desulfosporosinus, Desulfosporosinus burensis sp. nov.; the type strain is BSREI1(T) ( = DSM 24089(T) = JCM 17380(T)).

  14. Genomic insights into the metabolic potential of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degrading sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium N47.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Franz; Selesi, Draženka; Weinmaier, Thomas; Tischler, Patrick; Rattei, Thomas; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2011-05-01

    Anaerobic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is an important process during natural attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbon spills. However, knowledge about metabolic potential and physiology of organisms involved in anaerobic degradation of PAHs is scarce. Therefore, we introduce the first genome of the sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium N47 able to catabolize naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, or 2-naphthoic acid as sole carbon source. Based on proteomics, we analysed metabolic pathways during growth on PAHs to gain physiological insights on anaerobic PAH degradation. The genomic assembly and taxonomic binning resulted in 17 contigs covering most of the sulfate reducer N47 genome according to general cluster of orthologous groups (COGs) analyses. According to the genes present, the Deltaproteobacterium N47 can potentially grow with the following sugars including d-mannose, d-fructose, d-galactose, α-d-glucose-1P, starch, glycogen, peptidoglycan and possesses the prerequisites for butanoic acid fermentation. Despite the inability for culture N47 to utilize NO(3) (-) as terminal electron acceptor, genes for nitrate ammonification are present. Furthermore, it is the first sequenced genome containing a complete TCA cycle along with the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. The genome contained a significant percentage of repetitive sequences and transposase-related protein domains enhancing the ability of genome evolution. Likewise, the sulfate reducer N47 genome contained many unique putative genes with unknown function, which are candidates for yet-unknown metabolic pathways. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. A marine sulfate-reducing bacterium producing multiple antibiotics: biological and chemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Gu, Xiaojie; Zhao, Chenyan; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xie, Zeping

    2009-07-21

    A marine sulfate-reducing bacterium SRB-22 was isolated by means of the agar shake dilution method and identified as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans by morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA analysis. In the bioassay, its extract showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity using the paper disc agar diffusion method. This isolate showed a different antimicrobial profile than either ampicillin or nystatin and was found to produce at least eight antimicrobial components by bioautography. Suitable fermentation conditions for production of the active constituents were determined to be 28 day cultivation at 25 degrees C to 30 degrees C with a 10% inoculation ratio. Under these conditions, the SRB-22 was fermented, extracted and chemically investigated. So far an antimicrobial compound, mono-n-butyl phthalate, and an inactive compound, thymine, have been isolated and characterized.

  16. In situ analysis of sulfate-reducing bacteria related to Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes in the chemocline of meromictic Lake Cadagno (Switzerland)

    SciTech Connect

    Tonolla, M.; Demarta, A.; Peduzzi, S.; Hahn, D.; Peduzzi, R.

    2000-02-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of a 16S rRNA gene clone library from the chemocline of the meromictic Lake Cadagno (Switzerland) retrieved two clusters of sequences resembling sulfate-reducing bacteria within the family Desulfovibrionaceae. In situ hybridization showed that, similar to sulfate-reducing bacteria of the family Desulfobacteriaceae, bacteria of one cluster with similarity values to the closest cultured relatives of between 92.6 and 93.1% resembled free cells or cells loosely attached to other cells or debris. Bacteria of the second cluster closely related to Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes DSM7269 with similarity values between 97.9 and 98.4% were generally associated with aggregates of different small-celled phototrophic sulfur bacteria, suggesting a potential interaction between the two groups of bacteria.

  17. Impact of clay minerals on sulfate-reducing activity in aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, D.; Suflita, J.M.; McKinley, J.P.; Krumholz, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sulfate-reduction activity occurs in a heterogeneous manner throughout the terrestrial subsurface. Low-activity regions are often observed in the presence of clay minerals. Here we report that clays inhibit sulfate reduction activity in sediments and in a pure culture of Desulfovibriovulgaris. Clay minerals including bentonite and kaolinite inhibited sulfate reduction by 70–90% in sediments. Intact clays and clay colloids or soluble components, capable of passing through a 0.2-µm filter, were also inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Other adsorbent materials, including anion or cation exchangers and a zeolite, did not inhibit sulfate reduction in sediments, suggesting that the effect of clays was not due to their cation-exchange capacity. We observed a strong correlation between the Al2O3content of clays and their relative ability to inhibit sulfate reduction in sediments (r2 = 0.82). This suggested that inhibition might be a direct effect of Al3+ (aq) on the bacteria. We then tested pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and showed it to act in a similar manner to clay. As dissolved aluminum is known to be toxic to a variety of organisms at low concentrations, our results suggest that the effects of clay on sulfate-reducing bacteria may be directly due to aluminum. Thus, our experiments provide an explanation for the lack of sulfate-reduction activity in clay-rich regions and presents a mechanism for the effect.

  18. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil.

  19. Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by sulfate-reducing Desulfobacteraceae from various anoxic aquifers.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Steffen; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Bahr, Arne; Duarte, Márcia; Pieper, Dietmar H; Jehmlich, Nico; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Bombach, Petra; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are widespread and persistent environmental contaminants, especially in oxygen-free environments. The occurrence of anaerobic PAH-degrading bacteria and their underlying metabolic pathways are rarely known. In this study, PAH degraders were enriched in laboratory microcosms under sulfate-reducing conditions using groundwater and sediment samples from four PAH-contaminated aquifers. Five enrichment cultures were obtained showing sulfate-dependent naphthalene degradation. Mineralization of naphthalene was demonstrated by the formation of sulfide concomitant with the depletion of naphthalene and the development of (13)C-labeled CO2 from [(13)C6]-naphthalene. 16S rRNA gene and metaproteome analyses revealed that organisms related to Desulfobacterium str. N47 were the main naphthalene degraders in four enrichment cultures. Protein sequences highly similar to enzymes of the naphthalene degradation pathway of N47 were identified, suggesting that naphthalene was activated by a carboxylase, and that the central metabolite 2-naphthoyl-CoA was further reduced by two reductases. The data indicate an importance of members of the family Desulfobacteraceae for naphthalene degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in freshwater environments. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Hydrogenases in sulfate-reducing bacteria function as chromium reductase.

    PubMed

    Chardin, B; Giudici-Orticoni, M-T; De Luca, G; Guigliarelli, B; Bruschi, M

    2003-12-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to reduce chromate VI has been studied for possible application to the decontamination of polluted environments. Metal reduction can be achieved both chemically, by H(2)S produced by the bacteria, and enzymatically, by polyhemic cytochromes c(3). We demonstrate that, in addition to low potential polyheme c-type cytochromes, the ability to reduce chromate is widespread among [Fe], [NiFe], and [NiFeSe] hydrogenases isolated from SRB of the genera Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium. Among them, the [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough reduces Cr(VI) with the highest rate. Both [Fe] and [NiFeSe] enzymes exhibit the same K(m) towards Cr(VI), suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction rates are directly correlated with hydrogen consumption rates. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy enabled us to probe the oxidation by Cr(VI) of the various metal centers in both [NiFe] and [Fe] hydrogenases. These experiments showed that Cr(VI) is reduced to paramagnetic Cr(III), and revealed inhibition of the enzyme at high Cr(VI) concentrations. The significant decrease of both hydrogenase and Cr(VI)-reductase activities in a mutant lacking [Fe] hydrogenase demonstrated the involvement of this enzyme in Cr(VI) reduction in vivo. Experiments with [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin from Desulfovibrio gigas demonstrated that the low redox [Fe-S] (non-heme iron) clusters are involved in the mechanism of metal reduction by hydrogenases.

  1. Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, R U; Annweiler, E; Michaelis, W; Richnow, H H; Schink, B

    2000-07-01

    Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture was studied by substrate utilization tests and identification of metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In substrate utilization tests, the culture was able to oxidize naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-naphthoic acids, phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, and cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylic acid with sulfate as the electron acceptor. Neither hydroxylated 1- or 2-naphthoic acid derivatives and 1- or 2-naphthol nor the monoaromatic compounds ortho-phthalic acid, 2-carboxy-1-phenylacetic acid, and salicylic acid were utilized by the culture within 100 days. 2-Naphthoic acid accumulated in all naphthalene-grown cultures. Reduced 2-naphthoic acid derivatives could be identified by comparison of mass spectra and coelution with commercial reference compounds such as 1,2,3, 4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and chemically synthesized decahydro-2-naphthoic acid. 5,6,7,8-Tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and octahydro-2-naphthoic acid were tentatively identified by their mass spectra. The metabolites identified suggest a stepwise reduction of the aromatic ring system before ring cleavage. In degradation experiments with [1-(13)C]naphthalene or deuterated D(8)-naphthalene, all metabolites mentioned derived from the introduced labeled naphthalene. When a [(13)C]bicarbonate-buffered growth medium was used in conjunction with unlabeled naphthalene, (13)C incorporation into the carboxylic group of 2-naphthoic acid was shown, indicating that activation of naphthalene by carboxylation was the initial degradation step. No ring fission products were identified.

  2. Biogeography of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains.

    PubMed

    Miletto, Marzia; Loy, Alexander; Antheunisse, A Martijn; Loeb, Roos; Bodelier, Paul L E; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2008-06-01

    In this study, a large-scale field survey was conducted to describe the biogeography of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) in river floodplains. Fingerprints obtained with three methods, i.e. 16S rRNA gene-based oligonucleotide microarray, dsrB-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and polar lipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analyses, were used as a proxy to describe the SRPs community diversity. Each set of profiles was subjected to a combined multivariate/correlation analysis in order to compare SRP community profiles and to highlight the environmental variables influencing the SRPs distribution along environmental gradients. Floodplain soils harbored distinct SRP communities displaying biogeographic patterns. Nearly all profiles from the tidal sites consistently separated from the nontidal sites, independently from the screening method and the multivariate statistics used. The distribution of the microarray/DGGE/PLFA-based fingerprints in the principal component plots could be correlated to eight soil variables, i.e. soil organic matter, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and total potassium, and extractable ammonium, nitrate, phosphate and sulfate, as well as seven pore water variables, i.e. phosphate, sulfate, sulfide, chloride, sodium, potassium and magnesium ions. Indication of a salinity- and plant nutrient-dependent distribution of SRPs related to Desulfosarcina, Desulfomonile and Desulfobacter was suggested by microarray, DGGE and PLFA analyses.

  3. Anaerobic Naphthalene Degradation by a Sulfate-Reducing Enrichment Culture†

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Annweiler, Eva; Michaelis, Walter; Richnow, Hans H.; Schink, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture was studied by substrate utilization tests and identification of metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In substrate utilization tests, the culture was able to oxidize naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-naphthoic acids, phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, and cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylic acid with sulfate as the electron acceptor. Neither hydroxylated 1- or 2-naphthoic acid derivatives and 1- or 2-naphthol nor the monoaromatic compounds ortho-phthalic acid, 2-carboxy-1-phenylacetic acid, and salicylic acid were utilized by the culture within 100 days. 2-Naphthoic acid accumulated in all naphthalene-grown cultures. Reduced 2-naphthoic acid derivatives could be identified by comparison of mass spectra and coelution with commercial reference compounds such as 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and chemically synthesized decahydro-2-naphthoic acid. 5,6,7,8-Tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid and octahydro-2-naphthoic acid were tentatively identified by their mass spectra. The metabolites identified suggest a stepwise reduction of the aromatic ring system before ring cleavage. In degradation experiments with [1-13C]naphthalene or deuterated D8-naphthalene, all metabolites mentioned derived from the introduced labeled naphthalene. When a [13C]bicarbonate-buffered growth medium was used in conjunction with unlabeled naphthalene, 13C incorporation into the carboxylic group of 2-naphthoic acid was shown, indicating that activation of naphthalene by carboxylation was the initial degradation step. No ring fission products were identified. PMID:10877763

  4. Revisiting Modes of energy generation in sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, Marcin; Chakraborty, Romy; Zhou, Aifen; Fortney, Julian; Geller, Jil; Wall, Judy; Zhou, Jizhong; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Keasling, Jay; Chhabra, Swapnil

    2010-05-17

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in global sulfur and carbon cycling through their ability to completely mineralize organic matter while respiring sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. They are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments and have the ability to reduce toxic metals like Cr(VI) and U(VI). While SRB have been studied for over three decades, bioenergetic modes of this group of microbes are poorly understood. Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) has served as a model SRB over the last decade with the accumulation of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic data under a wide variety of stressors. To further investigate the three hypothesized modes of energy generation in this anaerobe we conducted a systematic study involving multiple electron donor and acceptor combinations for growth. DvH was grown at 37oC in a defined medium with (a) lactate + thiosulfate, (b) lactate + sulfite (c) lactate + sulfate, (d) pyruvate + sulfate, (e) H2 + acetate + sulfate, (f) formate + acetate + sulfate, g) formate + sulfate and (h) pyruvate fermentation. Cells were harvested at mid-log phase of growth for all conditions for transcriptomics, when the optical density at 600nm was in the range 0.42-0.5. Initial results indicate that cells grown on lactate do not appear to significantly differentiate their gene expression profiles when presented with different electron acceptors. These profiles however differ significantly from those observed during growth with other electron donors such as H2 and formate, as well as during fermentative growth. Together the gene expression changes in the presence of different electron donors provide insights into the ability of DvH to differentially reduce metals such as Cr(VI). Here we present revised modes of energy generation in DvH in light of this new transcriptomic evidence.

  5. Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Roden, E.E.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Woodward, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to enzymatically reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated. Five species of Desulfovibrio as well as Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobulbus propionicus reduced Fe(III) chelated with nitrilotriacetic acid as well as insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Fe(III) oxide reduction resulted in the accumulation of magnetite and siderite. Desulfobacter postgatei reduced the chelated Fe(III) but not Fe(III) oxide. Desulfobacter curvatus, Desulfomonile tiedjei, and Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans did not reduce Fe(III). Only Desulfovibrio species reduced U(VI). U(VI) reduction resulted in the precipitation of uraninite. None of the SRB that reduced Fe(III) or U(VI) appeared to conserve enough energy to support growth from this reaction. However, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans metabolized H2 down to lower concentrations with Fe(III) or U(VI) as the electron acceptor than with sulfate, suggesting that these metals may be preferred electron acceptors at the low H2 concentrations present in most marine sediments. Molybdate did not inhibit Fe(III) reduction by D. desulfuricans. This indicates that the inability of molybdate to inhibit Fe(III) reduction in marine sediments does not rule out the possibility that SRB are important catalysts for Fe(III) reduction. The results demonstrate that although SRB were previously considered to reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) indirectly through the production of sulfide, they may also directly reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) through enzymatic mechanisms. These findings, as well as our recent discovery that the So-reducing microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans can reduce Fe(III), demonstrate that there are close links between the microbial sulfur, iron, and uranium cycles in anaerobic marine sediments. ?? 1993.

  6. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Des Marais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations occurring in the anoxic zones of stratified sedimentary microbial communities can profoundly influence the isotopic and organic signatures preserved in the fossil record. Accordingly, we have determined carbon isotope discrimination that is associated with both heterotrophic and lithotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). For heterotrophic-growth experiments, substrate consumption was monitored to completion. Sealed vessels containing SRB cultures were harvested at different time intervals, and delta(13)C values were determined for gaseous CO(2), organic substrates, and products such as biomass. For three of the four SRB, carbon isotope effects between the substrates, acetate or lactate and CO(2), and the cell biomass were small, ranging from 0 to 2 per thousand. However, for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the carbon incorporated into biomass was isotopically heavier than the available substrates by 8 to 9 per thousand. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of the available CO(2) and exhibited substantial discrimination (calculated as isotope fractionation factors [alpha]), as follows: for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, alpha values ranged from 1.0100 to 1.0123; for Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, the alpha value was 0.0138, and for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the alpha value was 1.0310. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO(2) resulted in biomass with a delta(13)C composition intermediate to that of the substrates. The extent of fractionation depended on which enzymatic pathways were used, the direction in which the pathways operated, and the growth rate, but fractionation was not dependent on the growth phase. To the extent that environmental conditions affect the availability of organic substrates (e.g., acetate) and reducing power (e.g., H(2)), ecological forces can also influence carbon isotope discrimination by SRB.

  7. Electrical potential source mechanisms in microbial induced sulfate reducing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Slater, L.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Singh, K.; Doherty, R.

    2007-12-01

    In order to compare self-potential (SP) signals resulting from possible 'geobattery' effects with electrodic potential signals based on a known galvanic cell (GC) effect in the presence of sulfide, we designed a column experiment using dual sensor Ag-AgCl electrodes. Water from the Langan River (Belfast, UK), known to contain a sulfate reducing microbial community, was obtained. Two experimental columns were packed with fine-grained glass beads. One column continuously circulated (closed loop) with autoclaved river water as a control, while the other retained biologically active natural river water. Six Ag-AgCl electrodes equally spaced along one side of each column, and three Ag-AgCl self potential electrodes (where the metal is in electrolytic contact with the column via a sterilized 1M KCl agar gel), were placed on the other side of each column. Electrical potential signals were continuously recorded with both sensor types. Induced polarization, electrical resistivity, temperature and aqueous geochemistry measurements (pH, Eh, and conductivity) were taken once daily. Over the 20 day experiment duration, darkening of the circulating fluid, biofilm formation and a sulfurous smell were observed in the biologically active column whereas no such color change (or smell) was observed for the control column. In the active column electrodic potential readings approached 570 mV whereas stable and small electrodic potential values (~8 mV) were detected in the control column.. Self potential signals were consistently only 1-8 mV in both columns. The experiment shows although electrodic potentials (at the electrode) are diagnostic of microbial driven sulfate reduction there is no measurable self potential (geobattery) effect associated with this microbial process.

  8. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Des Marais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations occurring in the anoxic zones of stratified sedimentary microbial communities can profoundly influence the isotopic and organic signatures preserved in the fossil record. Accordingly, we have determined carbon isotope discrimination that is associated with both heterotrophic and lithotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). For heterotrophic-growth experiments, substrate consumption was monitored to completion. Sealed vessels containing SRB cultures were harvested at different time intervals, and delta(13)C values were determined for gaseous CO(2), organic substrates, and products such as biomass. For three of the four SRB, carbon isotope effects between the substrates, acetate or lactate and CO(2), and the cell biomass were small, ranging from 0 to 2 per thousand. However, for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the carbon incorporated into biomass was isotopically heavier than the available substrates by 8 to 9 per thousand. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of the available CO(2) and exhibited substantial discrimination (calculated as isotope fractionation factors [alpha]), as follows: for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, alpha values ranged from 1.0100 to 1.0123; for Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, the alpha value was 0.0138, and for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the alpha value was 1.0310. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO(2) resulted in biomass with a delta(13)C composition intermediate to that of the substrates. The extent of fractionation depended on which enzymatic pathways were used, the direction in which the pathways operated, and the growth rate, but fractionation was not dependent on the growth phase. To the extent that environmental conditions affect the availability of organic substrates (e.g., acetate) and reducing power (e.g., H(2)), ecological forces can also influence carbon isotope discrimination by SRB.

  9. Isolation of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from Sediments Above the Deep-Subseafloor Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Fichtel, Katja; Mathes, Falko; Könneke, Martin; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2011-01-01

    On a global scale, crustal fluids fuel a large part of the deep-subseafloor biosphere by providing electron acceptors for microbial respiration. In this study, we examined bacterial cultures from sediments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific (IODP Site U1301). The sediments comprise three distinctive compartments: an upper sulfate-containing zone, formed by bottom-seawater diffusion, a sulfate-depleted zone, and a second (∼140 m thick) sulfate-containing zone influenced by fluid diffusion from the basaltic aquifer. In order to identify and characterize sulfate-reducing bacteria, enrichment cultures from different sediment layers were set up, analyzed by molecular screening, and used for isolating pure cultures. The initial enrichments harbored specific communities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Strains affiliated to Desulfosporosinus lacus, Desulfotomaculum sp., and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis were isolated only from the top layers (1.3–9.1 meters below seafloor, mbsf), while several strains of Desulfovibrio indonesiensis and a relative of Desulfotignum balticum were obtained from near-basement sediments (240–262 mbsf). Physiological tests on three selected strains affiliated to Dv. aespoeensis, Dv. indonesiensis, and Desulfotignum balticum indicated that all reduce sulfate with a limited number of short-chain n-alcohols or fatty acids and were able to ferment either ethanol, pyruvate, or betaine. All three isolates shared the capacity of growing chemolithotrophically with H2 as sole electron donor. Strain P23, affiliating with Dv. indonesiensis, even grew autotrophically in the absence of any organic compounds. Thus, H2 might be an essential electron donor in the deep-subseafloor where the availability of organic substrates is limited. The isolation of non-sporeforming sulfate reducers from fluid-influenced layers indicates that they have survived the long-term burial as active populations even after the separation from the seafloor hundreds

  10. Isolation of sulfate-reducing bacteria from sediments above the deep-subseafloor aquifer.

    PubMed

    Fichtel, Katja; Mathes, Falko; Könneke, Martin; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2012-01-01

    On a global scale, crustal fluids fuel a large part of the deep-subseafloor biosphere by providing electron acceptors for microbial respiration. In this study, we examined bacterial cultures from sediments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific (IODP Site U1301). The sediments comprise three distinctive compartments: an upper sulfate-containing zone, formed by bottom-seawater diffusion, a sulfate-depleted zone, and a second (∼140 m thick) sulfate-containing zone influenced by fluid diffusion from the basaltic aquifer. In order to identify and characterize sulfate-reducing bacteria, enrichment cultures from different sediment layers were set up, analyzed by molecular screening, and used for isolating pure cultures. The initial enrichments harbored specific communities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Strains affiliated to Desulfosporosinus lacus, Desulfotomaculum sp., and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis were isolated only from the top layers (1.3-9.1 meters below seafloor, mbsf), while several strains of Desulfovibrio indonesiensis and a relative of Desulfotignum balticum were obtained from near-basement sediments (240-262 mbsf). Physiological tests on three selected strains affiliated to Dv. aespoeensis, Dv. indonesiensis, and Desulfotignum balticum indicated that all reduce sulfate with a limited number of short-chain n-alcohols or fatty acids and were able to ferment either ethanol, pyruvate, or betaine. All three isolates shared the capacity of growing chemolithotrophically with H(2) as sole electron donor. Strain P23, affiliating with Dv. indonesiensis, even grew autotrophically in the absence of any organic compounds. Thus, H(2) might be an essential electron donor in the deep-subseafloor where the availability of organic substrates is limited. The isolation of non-sporeforming sulfate reducers from fluid-influenced layers indicates that they have survived the long-term burial as active populations even after the separation from the seafloor hundreds

  11. Anaerobic Oxidation of o-Xylene, m-Xylene, and Homologous Alkylbenzenes by New Types of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Gerda; Zengler, Karsten; Rabus, Ralf; Aeckersberg, Frank; Minz, Dror; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon; Widdel, Friedrich

    1999-01-01

    Various alkylbenzenes were depleted during growth of an anaerobic, sulfate-reducing enrichment culture with crude oil as the only source of organic substrates. From this culture, two new types of mesophilic, rod-shaped sulfate-reducing bacteria, strains oXyS1 and mXyS1, were isolated with o-xylene and m-xylene, respectively, as organic substrates. Sequence analyses of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the isolates affiliated with known completely oxidizing sulfate-reducing bacteria of the δ subclass of the class Proteobacteria. Strain oXyS1 showed the highest similarities to Desulfobacterium cetonicum and Desulfosarcina variabilis (similarity values, 98.4 and 98.7%, respectively). Strain mXyS1 was less closely related to known species, the closest relative being Desulfococcus multivorans (similarity value, 86.9%). Complete mineralization of o-xylene and m-xylene was demonstrated in quantitative growth experiments. Strain oXyS1 was able to utilize toluene, o-ethyltoluene, benzoate, and o-methylbenzoate in addition to o-xylene. Strain mXyS1 oxidized toluene, m-ethyltoluene, m-isoproyltoluene, benzoate, and m-methylbenzoate in addition to m-xylene. Strain oXyS1 did not utilize m-alkyltoluenes, whereas strain mXyS1 did not utilize o-alkyltoluenes. Like the enrichment culture, both isolates grew anaerobically on crude oil with concomitant reduction of sulfate to sulfide. PMID:10049854

  12. A cultured greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium in a novel group of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Menguy, Nicolas; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Pósfai, Mihály; Prozorov, Tanya; Pignol, David; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2011-12-23

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain magnetosomes--intracellular, membrane-bounded, magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) or greigite (Fe(3)S(4))--that cause the bacteria to swim along geomagnetic field lines. We isolated a greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium from a brackish spring in Death Valley National Park, California, USA, strain BW-1, that is able to biomineralize greigite and magnetite depending on culture conditions. A phylogenetic comparison of BW-1 and similar uncultured greigite- and/or magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria from freshwater to hypersaline habitats shows that these organisms represent a previously unknown group of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Deltaproteobacteria. Genomic analysis of BW-1 reveals the presence of two different magnetosome gene clusters, suggesting that one may be responsible for greigite biomineralization and the other for magnetite.

  13. A Cultured Greigite-Producing Magnetotactic Bacterium in a Novel Group of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Menguy, Nicolas; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Pósfai, Mihály; Prozorov, Tanya; Pignol, David; Frankel, Richard B.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain magnetosomes—intracellular, membrane-bounded, magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)—that cause the bacteria to swim along geomagnetic field lines. We isolated a greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium from a brackish spring in Death Valley National Park, California, USA, strain BW-1, that is able to biomineralize greigite and magnetite depending on culture conditions. A phylogenetic comparison of BW-1 and similar uncultured greigite- and/or magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria from freshwater to hypersaline habitats shows that these organisms represent a previously unknown group of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Deltaproteobacteria. Genomic analysis of BW-1 reveals the presence of two different magnetosome gene clusters, suggesting that one may be responsible for greigite biomineralization and the other for magnetite.

  14. Biodegradation of an Alicyclic Hydrocarbon by a Sulfate-Reducing Enrichment from a Gas Condensate-Contaminated Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Hernandez, Luis A.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2003-01-01

    We used ethylcyclopentane (ECP) as a model alicyclic hydrocarbon and investigated its metabolism by a sulfate-reducing bacterial enrichment obtained from a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer. The enrichment coupled the consumption of ECP with the stoichiometrically expected amount of sulfate reduced. During ECP biodegradation, we observed the transient accumulation of metabolite peaks by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, three of which had identical mass spectrometry profiles. Mass-spectral similarities to analogous authentic standards allowed us to identify these metabolites as ethylcyclopentylsuccinic acids, ethylcyclopentylpropionic acid, ethylcyclopentylcarboxylic acid, and ethylsuccinic acid. Based on these findings, we propose a pathway for the degradation of this alicyclic hydrocarbon. Furthermore, a putative metabolite similar to ethylcyclopentylsuccinic acid was also found in samples of contaminated groundwater from the aquifer. However, no such finding was evident for samples collected from wells located upgradient of the gas condensate spill. Microbial community analysis of the ECP-degrading enrichment by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of at least three different organisms using universal eubacterial primers targeting 550 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Based on sequence analysis, these organisms are phylogenetically related to the genera Syntrophobacter and Desulfotomaculum as well as a member of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group. The evidence suggests that alicyclic hydrocarbons such as ECP can be anaerobically activated by the addition to the double bond of fumarate to form alkylsuccinate derivatives under sulfate-reducing conditions and that the reaction occurs in the laboratory and in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. PMID:12514025

  15. Desulfoconvexum algidum gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Kuever, Jan; Galushko, Alexander; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-03-01

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated JHA1(T), was isolated from a permanently cold marine sediment sampled in an Artic fjord on the north-west coast of Svalbard. The isolate was originally enriched at 4 °C in a highly diluted liquid culture amended with hydrogen and sulfate. Strain JHA1(T) was a psychrophile, growing fastest between 14 and 16 °C and not growing above 20 °C. Fastest growth was found at neutral pH (pH 7.2-7.4) and at marine concentrations of NaCl (20-30 g l(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain JHA1(T) was a member of the family Desulfobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The isolate shared 99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with an environmental sequence obtained from permanently cold Antarctic sediment. The closest recognized relatives were Desulfobacula phenolica DSM 3384(T) and Desulfobacula toluolica DSM 7467(T) (both <95 % sequence similarity). In contrast to its closest phylogenetic relatives, strain JHA1(T) grew chemolithoautotrophically with hydrogen as an electron donor. CO dehydrogenase activity indicated the operation of the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway for inorganic carbon assimilation. Beside differences in physiology and morphology, strain JHA1(T) could be distinguished chemotaxonomically from the genus Desulfobacula by the absence of the cellular fatty acid C16 : 0 10-methyl. Phylogenetic differentiation from other genera was further supported by DsrAB and AprBA sequence analysis. Based on the described phylogenetic and phenotypic differences between strain JHA1(T) and its closest relatives, the establishment of a novel genus and a novel species, Desulfoconvexum algidum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JHA1(T) ( = DSM 21856(T)  = JCM 16085(T)).

  16. Use of sulfate reducing bacteria in acid mine drainage treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    The environmental impacts caused by Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) were first recorded in 1556 by Georgius Agricola. In the United States 10,000 miles of streams and 29,000 surface acres of impoundments are estimated to be seriously affected by AMD. Abandoned surface mines are estimated to contribute about 15% of the drainage, while active mines (40%) and shaft and drift mines (45%) contribute the remainder. AMD results when metal sulfide minerals, particularly pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), come in contact with oxygen and water. Acid generation occurs when metal sulfide minerals are oxidized according to the Initiator Reaction: FeS{sub 2}(pyrite) + 3 1/2O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {yields} Fe{sup 2+} + 2SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} + 2H{sup +}. This reaction is one of many that results in increased metal mobility and increased acidity (lowered pH) of the mine water. The oxidation of ferrous sulfate is accelerated by bacterial action of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, a naturally occurring bacterium that at pH 3.5 or less, can rapidly accelerate the conversion of dissolved Fe{sup 2+} (ferrous iron) to Fe{sup 3+} (ferric iron), and can act as an oxidant for the oxidation of pyrite. Ferric ions, as well as other metal ions, and the sulfuric acid have a deleterious influence on the biota of streams receiving AMD. The Lilly/Orphan Boy Mine, located in the Elliston Mining District of Powell County, Montana, was selected as the Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) technology demonstration site. The mine is situated on a patented claim on Deerlodge National Forest Land about 11 miles south of Elliston, Montana. This abandoned mining operation consists of a 250-foot shaft, four horizontal workings, and some stopping. The shaft is flooded with AMD to the 74-foot level and is discharging about 3 gallons per minute (gpm) at a pH of 3.0 from the adit associated with this level.

  17. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Methylate Mercury at Variable Rates in Pure Culture and in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    King, Jeffrey K.; Kostka, Joel E.; Frischer, Marc E.; Saunders, F. Michael

    2000-01-01

    Differences in methylmercury (CH3Hg) production normalized to the sulfate reduction rate (SRR) in various species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were quantified in pure cultures and in marine sediment slurries in order to determine if SRB strains which differ phylogenetically methylate mercury (Hg) at similar rates. Cultures representing five genera of the SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfobulbus propionicus, Desulfococcus multivorans, Desulfobacter sp. strain BG-8, and Desulfobacterium sp. strain BG-33) were grown in a strictly anoxic, minimal medium that received a dose of inorganic Hg 120 h after inoculation. The mercury methylation rates (MMR) normalized per cell were up to 3 orders of magnitude higher in pure cultures of members of SRB groups capable of acetate utilization (e.g., the family Desulfobacteriaceae) than in pure cultures of members of groups that are not able to use acetate (e.g., the family Desulfovibrionaceae). Little or no Hg methylation was observed in cultures of Desulfobacterium or Desulfovibrio strains in the absence of sulfate, indicating that Hg methylation was coupled to respiration in these strains. Mercury methylation, sulfate reduction, and the identities of sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine sediment slurries were also studied. Sulfate-reducing consortia were identified by using group-specific oligonucleotide probes that targeted the 16S rRNA molecule. Acetate-amended slurries, which were dominated by members of the Desulfobacterium and Desulfobacter groups, exhibited a pronounced ability to methylate Hg when the MMR were normalized to the SRR, while lactate-amended and control slurries had normalized MMR that were not statistically different. Collectively, the results of pure-culture and amended-sediment experiments suggest that members of the family Desulfobacteriaceae have a greater potential to methylate Hg than members of the family Desulfovibrionaceae have when the MMR are normalized to the SRR. Hg methylation

  18. The Distribution of Thermophilic Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Along an Estuarine Gradient Reveals Multiple Origins of Endospores in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cold marine sediments harbour inactive spores of thermophilic bacteria. These misplaced thermophiles are genetically similar to microorganisms detected in deep biosphere environments, leading to the hypothesis that seabed fluid flow transports thermophiles out of warm subsurface environments and into the ocean. Estuaries form the transition between the marine and the terrestrial biosphere and are influenced by tidal currents, surface run-off and groundwater seepage. Endospores from thermophilic bacteria present in estuarine sediments could therefore originate from a number of sources that may influence the estuary differently. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that this will lead to a gradient in the composition of thermophilic endospore populations in estuarine sediments. The distribution of thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria along an estuarine gradient from freshwater (River Tyne, UK) to marine (North Sea) was investigated. Microbial community analysis by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed changes in the thermophilic population enriched at different locations within the estuary. Certain species were only detected at the marine end, highlighting possible links to deep marine biosphere habitats such as oil reservoirs that harbour closely related Desulfotomaculum spp. Conversely, other taxa were predominantly observed in the freshwater reaches of the estuary indicating dispersal from an upstream or terrestrial source. Different endospore populations were enriched dependent on incubation temperature and spore heat-resistance. Microcosms incubated at 50, 60 or 70°C showed a shift in the dominant species of Desulfotomaculum enriched as the temperature increased. Microcosms triple-autoclaved at 121°C prior to incubation still showed rapid and reproducible sulfate-reduction and some Desulfotomaculum spp. remained active after autoclaving at 130°C. These results show that temperature physiology and biogeographic patterns can be used to

  19. The ecophysiology of sulfur isotope fractionation by sulfate reducing bacteria in response to variable environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Bradley, A. S.; Johnston, D. T.; Pereira, I. A. C.; Venceslau, S.; Wallace, C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reducers (MSR) drive the Earth's biogeochemical sulfur cycle. At the heart of this energy metabolism is a cascade of redox transformations coupling organic carbon and/or hydrogen oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate to sulfide. The sulfide produced is depleted in the heavier isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. The magnitude of discrimination (fractionation) depends on: i) the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (csSRR, Kaplan & Rittenberg (1964) Can. J. Microbio.; Chambers et al. (1975) Can. J. Microbio; Sim et al. (2011) GCA; Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS), ii) the ambient sulfate concentration (Harrison & Thode (1958) Research; Habicht et al. (2002) Science; Bradley et al. in review), iii) both sulfate and electron donor availability, or iv) an intrinsic physiological limitation (e.g. cellular division rate). When neither sulfate nor electron donor limits csSRR a more complex function relates the magnitude of isotope fractionation to cell physiology and environmental conditions. In recent and on-going work we have examined the importance of enzyme-specific fractionation factors, as well as the influence of electron donor or electron acceptor availability under carefully controlled culture conditions (e.g. Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS). In light of recent advances in MSR genetics and biochemistry we utilize well-characterized mutant strains, along with a continuous-culture methodology (Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS) to further probe the fractionation capacity of this metabolism under controlled physiological conditions. We present our latest findings on the magnitude of S and D/H isotope fractionation in both wild type and mutant strains. We will discuss these in light of recent theoretical advances (Wing & Halevy (2014) PNAS), examining the mode and relevance of MSR isotope fractionation in the laboratory to modern and ancient environmental settings, particularly anoxic marine sediments.

  20. Biomarkers of sulfate reducing bacteria from a variety of different aged samples including a modern microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pages, A.; Grice, K.; Lockhart, R.; Holman, A.; Melendez, I.; Van Kranendonk, M.; Jaraula, C.

    2011-12-01

    of the n-alkanes. Stable carbon isotope values were highly depleted and were concordant with the values obtained in the modern mat for sulfate reducing bacteria. The general similarity in the n-alkane distributions of these samples point to a sulfate reducing bacteria consortia.

  1. Phylogenetic Characteristics of Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Having Ability to Reduce Polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yui; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi

    2006-05-15

    To find an efficient bacterium, which has the strong capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide from polysulfide as the waste of process generating hydrogen from hydrogen sulfide by photocatalytic reaction using sun light, is very important for constructing hydrogen producing system. 10 strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which can reduce polysulfide directly, have been isolated from various natural samples such as TCE contaminated soil, soil and sludge around hot spring environment, and the cooling tower of a geothermal plant. This study describes physiological and phylogenetic characterization of SRB which can reduce polysulfide. All of isolates had the ability to reduce polusulfide but these reduction rates were difference depend on isolates. Phylogetetically, all of isolates located difference position for general SRB including Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, which is used standard strain in this study, so they do not belong to Proteobacteria. These have close relation to the genus Desulfotomaculum which can reduce elemental sulfur. It suggests that the ability of reducing elemental sulfur is important for reducing polysulfide to hydrogen sulfide.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfotomaculum copahuensis Strain CINDEFI1 Isolated from the Geothermal Copahue System, Neuquén, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Urbieta, M. Sofía; Ee, Robson; Tan-Guan-Sheng, Adrian; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum copahuensis strain CINDEFI1 is a novel spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Copahue volcano area, Argentina. Here, we present its draft genome in which we found genes related with the anaerobic respiration of sulfur compounds similar to those present in the Copahue environment. PMID:27540078

  3. Effect of Hydrogenase and Mixed Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Populations on the Corrosion of Steel

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Richard D.; Jansen, Wayne; Boivin, Joe; Laishley, Edward J.; Costerton, J. William

    1991-01-01

    The importance of hydrogenase activity to corrosion of steel was assessed by using mixed populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from corroded and noncorroded oil pipelines. Biofilms which developed on the steel studs contained detectable numbers of sulfate-reducing bacteria (104 increasing to 107/0.5 cm2). However, the biofilm with active hydrogenase activity (i.e., corrosion pipeline organisms), as measured by a semiquantitative commercial kit, was associated with a significantly higher corrosion rate (7.79 mm/year) relative to noncorrosive biofilm (0.48 mm/year) with 105 sulfate-reducing bacteria per 0.5 cm2 but no measurable hydrogenase activity. The importance of hydrogenase and the microbial sulfate-reducing bacterial population making up the biofilm are discussed relative to biocorrosion. Images PMID:16348560

  4. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF SPARTINA ALTERNIFLORA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The population composition and biogeochemistry of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the rhizosphere of the marsh grass Spartina alterniflora was investigated over two growing seasons using molecular probing, enumerations of culturable SRB, and measurements of SO42- reduction rat...

  5. MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETIC AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF SPARTINA ALTERNIFLORA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The population composition and biogeochemistry of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the rhizosphere of the marsh grass Spartina alterniflora was investigated over two growing seasons using molecular probing, enumerations of culturable SRB, and measurements of SO42- reduction rat...

  6. Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers

    SciTech Connect

    Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

    2011-04-01

    Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to

  7. Enrichment and isolation of acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria from Tinto River sediments.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Stams, Alfons J M; Amils, Ricardo; Sanz, José Luis

    2013-10-01

    Although some acidophilic and alkaliphilic species have been described recently, most of the known sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow optimally at neutral pH. In this study, sulfate reduction was studied with sediment samples from the extremely acidic Tinto River basin. Stable enrichments of SRB were obtained at pH 4 with glycerol, methanol and hydrogen; at pH 4.5 with lactate and at pH 5.5 with succinate as substrates. Inhibition of sulfate reduction by organic acids below their pKa was observed. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed that fermentative bacteria (Paludibacter spp., Oscillibacter spp.) and SRB (Thermodesulfobium spp., Desulfosporosinus spp., Desulfitobacterium spp., Desulfotomaculum spp.) were co-enriched. By repeated serial dilutions and streaking on agar plates, four strains of SRB belonging to the Firmicutes phylum were obtained. Two of them show 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Desulfosporosinus acidophilus, and a third one with Desulfosporosinus orientis. Another isolate has just 93% rRNA gene sequence similarity with the Desulfosporosinus/Desulfitobacterium cluster and might represent a novel species within a novel genus. One of the Desulfosporosinus strains was further investigated showing maximum growth at pH 5.5, and a pH-dependent inhibitory effect of organic acids and sulfide. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Immunomagnetically Captured Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from North Sea Oil Field Waters

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Bjørn; Torsvik, Terje; Lien, Torleiv

    1992-01-01

    Immunomagnetic beads (IMB) were used to recover thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria from oil field waters from oil production platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. IMB coated with polyclonal antibodies against whole-cell antigens of the thermophilic Thermodesulfobacterium mobile captured strains GFA1, GFA2, and GFA3. GFA1 was serologically and morphologically identical to T. mobile. GFA2 and GFA3 were spore forming and similar to the Desulfotomaculum strains T90A and T93B previously isolated from North Sea oil field waters by a classical enrichment procedure. Western blots (immunoblots) of whole cells showed that GFA2, GFA3, T90A, and T93B are different serotypes of the same Desulfotomaculum species. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against T. mobile type strain cells were produced and used as capture agents on IMB. These MAb, named A4F4, were immunoglobulin M; they were specific to T. mobile and directed against lipopolysaccharides. The prevailing cells immunocaptured with MAb A4F4 were morphologically and serologically similar to T. mobile type strain cells. T. mobile was not detected in these oil field waters by classical enrichment procedures. Furthermore, extraction with antibody-coated IMB allowed pure strains to be isolated directly from primary enrichment cultures without prior time-consuming subculturing and consecutive transfers to selective media. Images PMID:16348693

  9. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, A.-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-01

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds.

  10. Wound healing and antibacterial activities of chondroitin sulfate- and acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-10-04

    For topical applications in wound healing, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antibacterial agents. Herein, we describe a green-synthetic route for the production of biocompatible and crystalline AgNPs using two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and acharan sulfate (AS), as reducing agents. The synthetic approach avoids the use of toxic chemicals, and the yield of AgNPs formation is found to be 98.1% and 91.1% for the chondroitin sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and the acharan sulfate-reduced silver nanoparticles (AS-AgNPs), respectively. Nanoparticles with mostly spherical and amorphous shapes were observed, with an average diameter of 6.16 ± 2.26 nm for CS-AgNPs and 5.79 ± 3.10 nm for AS-AgNPs. Images of the CS-AgNPs obtained from atomic force microscopy revealed the self-assembled structure of CS was similar to a densely packed woven mat with AgNPs sprinkled on the CS. These nanoparticles were stable under cell culture conditions without any noticeable aggregation. An approximately 128-fold enhancement of the antibacterial activities of the AgNPs was observed against Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli when compared to CS and AS alone. In addition, an in vivo animal model of wound healing activity was tested using mice that were subjected to deep incision wounds. In comparison to the controls, the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs stimulated wound closure under histological examination and accelerated the deposition of granulation tissue and collagen in the wound area. The wound healing activity of the ointments containing CS-AgNPs and AS-AgNPs are comparable to that of a commercial formulation of silver sulfadiazine even though the newly prepared ointments contain a lower silver concentration. Therefore, the newly prepared AgNPs demonstrate potential for use as an attractive biocompatible nanocomposite for topical applications in the treatment of wounds.

  11. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  12. Both sulfate-reducing bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae take part in marine biocorrosion of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Bermont-Bouis, D; Janvier, M; Grimont, P A D; Dupont, I; Vallaeys, T

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the part played in biocorrosion by microbial groups other than sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), we characterized the phylogenetic diversity of a corrosive marine biofilm attached to a harbour pile structure as well as to carbon steel surfaces (coupons) immersed in seawater for increasing time periods (1 and 8 months). We thus experimentally checked corroding abilities of defined species mixtures. Microbial community analysis was performed using both traditional cultivation techniques and polymerase chain reaction cloning-sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Community structure of biofilms developing with time on immersed coupons tended to reach after 8 months, a steady state similar to the one observed on a harbour pile structure. Phylogenetic affiliations of isolates and cloned 16S rRNA genes (rrs) indicated that native biofilms (developing after 1-month immersion) were mainly colonized by gamma-proteobacteria. Among these, Vibrio species were detected in majority with molecular methods while cultivation techniques revealed dominance of Enterobacteriaceae such as Citrobacter, Klebsiella and Proteus species. Conversely, in mature biofilms (8-month immersion and pile structure), SRB, and to a lesser extent, spirochaetes were dominant. Corroding activity detection assays confirmed that Enterobacteriaceae (members of the gamma-proteobacteria) were involved in biocorrosion of metallic material in marine conditions. In marine biofilms, metal corrosion may be initiated by Enterobacteriaceae.

  13. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; ...

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly,more » during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.« less

  14. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy. PMID:25400629

  15. Methylation is the initial reaction in anaerobic naphthalene degradation by a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Safinowski, Michael; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2006-02-01

    The sulfate-reducing culture N47 can utilize naphthalene or 2-methylnaphthalene as the sole carbon source and electron donor. Here we show that the initial reaction in the naphthalene degradation pathway is a methylation to 2-methylnaphthalene which then undergoes the subsequent oxidation to the central metabolite 2-naphthoic acid, ring reduction and cleavage. Specific metabolites occurring exclusively during anaerobic degradation of 2-methylnaphthalene were detected during growth on naphthalene, i.e. naphthyl-2-methyl-succinate and naphthyl-2-methylene-succinate. Additionally, all three enzymes involved in anaerobic degradation of 2-methylnaphthalene to 2-naphthoic acid that could be measured in vitro so far, i.e. naphthyl-2-methyl-succinate synthase, succinyl-CoA:naphthyl-2-methyl-succinate CoA-transferase and naphthyl-2-methyl-succinyl-CoA dehydrogenase were also detected in naphthalene-grown cells with similar activities. Induction experiments were performed to study the growth behaviour of the cell when transferred from naphthalene to 2-methylnaphthalene or vice versa. When the cells were transferred from naphthalene to 2-methylnaphthalene they grew immediately, indicating that no new enzymes had to be induced. On the contrary, the transfer of cells from 2-methylnaphthalene to naphthalene caused a lag-phase of almost 100 days demonstrating that an additional catabolic enzyme has to be activated in this case. We propose the methylation as a novel general mechanism of activation reactions in anaerobic degradation of unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons.

  16. Desulfocucumis palustris gen. nov., sp. nov., a mesophilic sulfate reducer belonging to Desulfotomaculum subcluster Ig.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miho; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2017-08-01

    A mesophilic, endospore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain NAW-5T, was isolated from marsh soil. Cells of strain NAW-5T were Gram-stain-negative, curved rods that were motile. Strain NAW-5T grew at 18-48 °C (optimum 32-37 °C) and pH 5.8-8.4 (optimum pH 6.2-7.3). Electron donors utilized were various organic acids and H2 which support autotrophic growth. Fermentative growth occurred on carboxylic acids, but not on sugar. Sulfate, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were used as electron acceptors. The respiratory isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. The genomic DNA G+C content of this strain was 46.6 mol%. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strain NAW-5T was affiliated to the family 'Desulfotomaculaceae' but the strain shared very low sequence similarity with any representatives of this family (≥89 %). Strain NAW-5T belongs to Desulfotomaculum subcluster Ig which does not include any species with validly published names. On the basis of significant differences in the phylogenetic and phenotypic properties between strain NAW-5T and related species, strain NAW-5T represents a novel species of a new genus for which the name Desulfocucumis palustris gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is NAW-5T (=DSM 102911T=NBRC 112242T).

  17. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  18. Desulfonatronum Thiodismutans sp. nov., a Novel Alkaliphilic, Sulfate-reducing Bacterium Capable of Lithoautotrophic Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain MLF1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrio-shaped cells were observed, which were 0.6-0.7 x 1.2-2.7 microns in size, motile by a single polar flagellum and occurred singly, in pairs or as short spirilla. Growth was observed at 15-48 C (optimum, 37 C), > 1-7 % NaCI, w/v (optimum, 3%) and pH 8.0-10.0 (optimum, 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires a high concentration of carbonate in the growth medium and is obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. As electron donors, strain MLF1(sup T) uses hydrogen, formate and ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The novel isolate is a lithoheterotroph and a facultative lithoautotroph that is able to grow on hydrogen without an organic source of carbon. Strain MLF1(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamicin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The DNA G+C content is 63.0 mol% (HPLC). DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(sup T), exhibited 51 % homology. Also, the genome size (1.6 x 10(exp 9) Da) and T(sub m) value of the genomic DNA (71 +/- 2 C) for strain MLF1(sup T) were significantly different from the genome size (2.1 x 10(exp 9) Da) and T(sub m) value (63 +/- 2 C) for Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(sup T). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered to be a novel species of the genus Desulfonatronum, for which the name Desulfonatronum thiodismutans sp. nov. is proposed (the type strain is MLF1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-395(sup T) = DSM 14708(sup T)).

  19. Sulfur isotopic and proteomic profiles of sulfate reducers grown under differential steady-states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Venceslau, S.; Waldbauer, J.; Smith, D. A.; Boidi, F. J.; Bradley, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reducers (MSR) drive the Earth's biogeochemical sulfur cycle. At the heart of this energy metabolism is a cascade of redox transformations coupling organic carbon and/or hydrogen oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate to sulfide. The product sulfide is depleted in the heavier isotopes of sulfur, relative to the reactant sulfate, consistent with a normal kinetic isotope effect. However, the magnitude of the net fractionation during MSR can range over a range of 70 permil, consistent with a multi-step set of reactions. This range in MSR fractionation has been shown to mainly depend on: i) the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (csSRR), and ii) the ambient sulfate concentration. However, the fractionation under identical conditions differs among strains (Bradley et al. 2016. Geobio), and so must also be mediated by strain-specific processes, such as the nature and quantity of individual proteins involved in sulfate reduction, electron transport, and growth. In recent work we have examined the influence of electron donor, electron acceptor, and co-limitation under controlled steady-state culture conditions in order better inform models of MSR isotope fractionation, and the physiological and isotopic response to differential environmental forcings (e.g. Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS). Recent models of the fractionation response to MSR rate (c.f. Bradley 2016; Wing & Halevy, 2016) make specific predictions for the responses of the cellular metabolome and proteome. Here we compare the steady-state S-isotopic fractionation and proteome of `fast' versus `slow' grown D. vulgaris, using replicate chemostats under electron donor limitation. We observe clear and statistically robust changes in some key central MSR and C-metabolism enzymes, though a host of the critical energy-transfer enzymes show no statistically discernable change. We discuss these results in light of recent theoretical advances and their relevance to modern and ancient

  20. Corrosion of iron by sulfate-reducing bacteria: new views of an old problem.

    PubMed

    Enning, Dennis; Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-02-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen ("chemical microbially influenced corrosion"; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons ("electrical microbially influenced corrosion"; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments.

  1. Desulfonatronum Thiodismutans sp. nov., a Novel Alkaliphilic, Sulfate-reducing Bacterium Capable of Lithoautotrophic Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain MLF1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrio-shaped cells were observed, which were 0.6-0.7 x 1.2-2.7 microns in size, motile by a single polar flagellum and occurred singly, in pairs or as short spirilla. Growth was observed at 15-48 C (optimum, 37 C), > 1-7 % NaCI, w/v (optimum, 3%) and pH 8.0-10.0 (optimum, 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires a high concentration of carbonate in the growth medium and is obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. As electron donors, strain MLF1(sup T) uses hydrogen, formate and ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The novel isolate is a lithoheterotroph and a facultative lithoautotroph that is able to grow on hydrogen without an organic source of carbon. Strain MLF1(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamicin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The DNA G+C content is 63.0 mol% (HPLC). DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(sup T), exhibited 51 % homology. Also, the genome size (1.6 x 10(exp 9) Da) and T(sub m) value of the genomic DNA (71 +/- 2 C) for strain MLF1(sup T) were significantly different from the genome size (2.1 x 10(exp 9) Da) and T(sub m) value (63 +/- 2 C) for Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(sup T). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered to be a novel species of the genus Desulfonatronum, for which the name Desulfonatronum thiodismutans sp. nov. is proposed (the type strain is MLF1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-395(sup T) = DSM 14708(sup T)).

  2. Corrosion of Iron by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: New Views of an Old Problem

    PubMed Central

    Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-01-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen (“chemical microbially influenced corrosion”; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons (“electrical microbially influenced corrosion”; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments. PMID:24317078

  3. Desulfosporosinus acididurans sp. nov.: an acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Stams, Alfons J M; Hedrich, Sabrina; Ňancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (M1(T), D, and E) were isolated from acidic sediments (White river and Tinto river) and characterized phylogenetically and physiologically. All three strains were obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, spore-forming straight rods, stained Gram-negative and displayed variable motility during active growth. The pH range for growth was 3.8-7.0, with an optimum at pH 5.5. The temperature range for growth was 15-40 °C, with an optimum at 30 °C. Strains M1(T), D, and E used a wide range of electron donors and acceptors, with certain variability within the different strains. The nominated type strain (M1(T)) used ferric iron, nitrate, sulfate, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate (but not arsenate, sulfite, or fumarate) as electron acceptors, and organic acids (formate, lactate, butyrate, fumarate, malate, and pyruvate), alcohols (glycerol, methanol, and ethanol), yeast extract, and sugars (xylose, glucose, and fructose) as electron donors. It also fermented some substrates such as pyruvate and formate. Strain M1(T) tolerated up to 50 mM ferrous iron and 10 mM aluminum, but was inhibited by 1 mM copper. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic characteristics, strains M1(T), D, and E represent a novel species within the genus Desulfosporosinus, for which the name Desulfosporosinus acididurans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M1(T) (=DSM 27692(T) = JCM 19471(T)). Strain M1(T) was the first acidophilic SRB isolated, and it is the third described species of acidophilic SRB besides Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus and Thermodesulfobium narugense.

  4. Disguised as a Sulfate Reducer: Growth of the Deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus by Sulfide Oxidation with Nitrate.

    PubMed

    Thorup, Casper; Schramm, Andreas; Findlay, Alyssa J; Finster, Kai W; Schreiber, Lars

    2017-07-18

    This study demonstrates that the deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus can grow chemolithotrophically by coupling sulfide oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium. Key genes of known sulfide oxidation pathways are absent from the genome of D. alkaliphilus Instead, the genome contains all of the genes necessary for sulfate reduction, including a gene for a reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductase (DSR). Despite this, growth by sulfate reduction was not observed. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a very high expression level of sulfate-reduction genes during growth by sulfide oxidation, while inhibition experiments with molybdate pointed to elemental sulfur/polysulfides as intermediates. Consequently, we propose that D. alkaliphilus initially oxidizes sulfide to elemental sulfur, which is then either disproportionated, or oxidized by a reversal of the sulfate reduction pathway. This is the first study providing evidence that a reductive-type DSR is involved in a sulfide oxidation pathway. Transcriptome sequencing further suggests that nitrate reduction to ammonium is performed by a novel type of periplasmic nitrate reductase and an unusual membrane-anchored nitrite reductase.IMPORTANCE Sulfide oxidation and sulfate reduction, the two major branches of the sulfur cycle, are usually ascribed to distinct sets of microbes with distinct diagnostic genes. Here we show a more complex picture, as D. alkaliphilus, with the genomic setup of a sulfate reducer, grows by sulfide oxidation. The high expression of genes typically involved in the sulfate reduction pathway suggests that these genes, including the reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductases, are also involved in as-yet-unresolved sulfide oxidation pathways. Finally, D. alkaliphilus is closely related to cable bacteria, which grow by electrogenic sulfide oxidation. Since there are no pure cultures of cable bacteria, D. alkaliphilus may represent an

  5. Desulfonatronum thiodismutans sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of lithoautotrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul

    2003-09-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain MLF1(T), was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrio-shaped cells were observed, which were 0.6-0.7x1.2-2.7 micro m in size, motile by a single polar flagellum and occurred singly, in pairs or as short spirilla. Growth was observed at 15-48 degrees C (optimum, 37 degrees C), >1-7 % NaCl, w/v (optimum, 3 %) and pH 8.0-10.0 (optimum, 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires a high concentration of carbonate in the growth medium and is obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. As electron donors, strain MLF1(T) uses hydrogen, formate and ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The novel isolate is a lithoheterotroph and a facultative lithoautotroph that is able to grow on hydrogen without an organic source of carbon. Strain MLF1(T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamicin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The DNA G+C content is 63.0 mol% (HPLC). DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(T), exhibited 51 % homology. Also, the genome size (1.6x10(9) Da) and T(m) value of the genomic DNA (71+/-2 degrees C) for strain MLF1(T) were significantly different from the genome size (2.1x10(9) Da) and T(m) value (63+/-2 degrees C) for Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(T). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered to be a novel species of the genus Desulfonatronum, for which the name Desulfonatronum thiodismutans sp. nov. is proposed (the type strain is MLF1(T)=ATCC BAA-395(T)=DSM 14708(T)).

  6. Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus sp. nov., a thermophilic and facultatively lithoautotrophic sulfate-reducer isolated from black rust exposed to hot ridge flank crustal fluids.

    PubMed

    Steinsbu, Bjørn O; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Inagaki, Fumio; Lever, Mark A; Engelen, Bert; Øvreås, Lise; Pedersen, Rolf B

    2010-12-01

    A novel thermophilic and lithoautotrophic sulfate-reducing archaeon was isolated from black rust formed on the steel surface of a borehole observatory (CORK 1026B) retrieved during IODP Expedition 301 on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge, eastern Pacific Ocean. Cells of the strain were lobe-shaped or triangular. The optimum temperature, pH and NaCl concentration for growth were 75°C, pH 7 and 2 % (w/v), respectively. The isolate was strictly anaerobic, growing lithoautotrophically on H(2) and CO(2) using sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate as electron acceptors. Lactate and pyruvate could serve as alternative energy and carbon sources. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 42 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the isolate was closely related to members of the family Archaeoglobaceae, with sequence similarities of 90.3-94.4 %. Physiological and molecular properties showed that the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Archaeoglobus. The name Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is PM70-1(T) (=DSM 19444(T)=JCM 14716(T)).

  7. Streptomyces lunalinharesii 235 prevents the formation of a sulfate-reducing bacterial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Juliana Pacheco da; Tibúrcio, Samyra Raquel Gonçalves; Marques, Joana Montezano; Seldin, Lucy; Coelho, Rosalie Reed Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces lunalinharesii strain 235 produces an antimicrobial substance that is active against sulfate reducing bacteria, the major bacterial group responsible for biofilm formation and biocorrosion in petroleum reservoirs. The use of this antimicrobial substance for sulfate reducing bacteria control is therefore a promising alternative to chemical biocides. In this study the antimicrobial substance did not interfere with the biofilm stability, but the sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation was six-fold smaller in carbon steel coupons treated with the antimicrobial substance when compared to the untreated control. A reduction in the most probable number counts of planktonic cells of sulfate reducing bacteria was observed after treatments with the sub-minimal inhibitory concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance. Additionally, when the treated coupons were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, the biofilm formation was found to be substantially reduced when the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance was used. The coupons used for the biofilm formation had a small weight loss after antimicrobial substance treatment, but corrosion damage was not observed by scanning electron microscopy. The absence of the dsrA gene fragment in the scraped cell suspension after treatment with the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance suggests that Desulfovibrio alaskensis was not able to adhere to the coupons. This is the first report on an antimicrobial substance produced by Streptomyces active against sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation. The application of antimicrobial substance as a potential biocide for sulfate reducing bacteria growth control could be of great interest to the petroleum industry. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Distribution of Sulfate-Reducing Communities from Estuarine to Marine Bay Waters.

    PubMed

    Colin, Yannick; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol; Gassie, Claire; Carlier, Elisabeth; Monperrus, Mathilde; Guyoneaud, Rémy

    2017-01-01

    Estuaries are highly dynamic ecosystems in which freshwater and seawater mix together. Depending on tide and river inflows, particles originating from rivers or from the remobilization of sediments accumulate in the water column. Due to the salinity gradient and the high heterotrophic activity in the estuarine plume, hypoxic and anoxic microniches may form in oxygenated waters, sustaining favorable conditions for resuspended anaerobic microorganisms. In this context, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobic sulfate-reducing prokaryotes may occur in the water column of the Adour River. Using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and dsrAB-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) techniques, we characterized total prokaryotic and sulfate-reducing communities along a gradient from estuarine to marine bay waters. Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes were further characterized by the description of dsrB genes and the cultivation of sulfidogenic anaerobic microorganisms. As a result, physical-chemical parameters had a significant effect on water bacterial diversity and community structure along the studied gradient. The concentration of cultured sulfidogenic microorganisms ranged from 1 to 60 × 10(3) cells l(-1) in the water column. Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes occurring in estuarine waters were closely related to microorganisms previously detected in freshwater sediments, suggesting an estuarine origin, mainly by the remobilization of the sediments. In the marine bay station, sediment-derived sulfate-reducing prokaryotes were not cultured anymore, probably due to freshwater dilution, increasing salinity and extended oxic stress. Nevertheless, isolates related to the type strain Desulfovibrio oceani were cultured from the diluted plume and deep marine waters, indicating the occurrence of autochthonous sulfate-reducing bacteria offshore.

  9. Desulfosoma caldarium gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from a terrestrial hot spring.

    PubMed

    Baena, Sandra; Perdomo, Natalia; Carvajal, Catalina; Díaz, Carolina; Patel, Bharat K C

    2011-04-01

    A thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain USBA-053(T), was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring located at a height of 2500 m in the Colombian Andes (5° 45' 33.29″ N 73° 6' 49.89″ W), Colombia. Cells of strain USBA-053(T) were oval- to rod-shaped, Gram-negative and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. The strain grew autotrophically with H(2) as the electron donor and heterotrophically on formate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, isovalerate, lactate, pyruvate, ethanol, glycerol, serine and hexadecanoic acid in the presence of sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. The main end products from lactate degradation, in the presence of sulfate, were acetate, CO(2) and H(2)S. Strain USBA-053(T) fermented pyruvate in the absence of sulfate and grew optimally at 57 °C (growth temperature ranged from 50 °C to 62 °C) and pH 6.8 (growth pH ranged from 5.7 to 7.7). The novel strain was slightly halophilic and grew in NaCl concentrations ranging from 5 to 30 g l(-1), with an optimum at 25 g l(-1) NaCl. Sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite were used as electron acceptors, but not elemental sulfur, nitrate or nitrite. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 56±1 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA-053(T) was a member of the class Deltaproteobacteria, with Desulfacinum hydrothermale MT-96(T) as the closest relative (93 % gene sequence similarity). On the basis of physiological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis, it is suggested that strain USBA-053(T) represents a new genus and novel species for which the name Desulfosoma caldarium gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is USBA-053(T) ( = KCTC 5670(T) = DSM 22027(T)).

  10. Biogeochemistry. Sulfate reducers--dominant players in a low-oxygen world?

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, C; McKenzie, J A

    2000-12-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria can adapt to extreme physical and chemical conditions and play an important role in global geochemical cycles, but their role in the formation of ore deposits has remained controversial. Strong support for such a role is provided by Labrenz et al., who have discovered sulfate-reducing bacteria that can tolerate low levels of oxygen and can precipitate zinc sulfide minerals. The results may have implications for bioremediation and may provide clues to processes that may have been more widespread in the geologic past.

  11. Benzylsuccinate Formation as a Means of Anaerobic Toluene Activation by Sulfate-Reducing Strain PRTOL1

    PubMed Central

    Beller, H. R.; Spormann, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Permeabilized cells of toluene-mineralizing, sulfate-reducing strain PRTOL1 catalyzed the addition of toluene to fumarate to form benzylsuccinate under anaerobic conditions. Recent in vitro studies with two toluene-mineralizing, denitrifying bacteria demonstrated the same fumarate addition reaction and indicated that it may be the first step of anaerobic toluene degradation. This study with strain PRTOL1 shows that anaerobic toluene activation by fumarate addition occurs in bacteria as disparate as sulfate-reducing and denitrifying species (members of the delta and beta subclasses of the Proteobacteria, respectively). PMID:16535701

  12. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  13. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  14. Sulfate Reducing Bacteria and Mycobacteria Dominate the Biofilm Communities in a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Smith, C Kimloi; LaPara, Timothy M; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2015-07-21

    The quantity and composition of bacterial biofilms growing on 10 water mains from a full-scale chloraminated water distribution system were analyzed using real-time PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene and next-generation, high-throughput Illumina sequencing. Water mains with corrosion tubercles supported the greatest amount of bacterial biomass (n = 25; geometric mean = 2.5 × 10(7) copies cm(-2)), which was significantly higher (P = 0.04) than cement-lined cast-iron mains (n = 6; geometric mean = 2.0 × 10(6) copies cm(-2)). Despite spatial variation of community composition and bacterial abundance in water main biofilms, the communities on the interior main surfaces were surprisingly similar, containing a core group of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assigned to only 17 different genera. Bacteria from the genus Mycobacterium dominated all communities at the main wall-bulk water interface (25-78% of the community), regardless of main age, estimated water age, main material, and the presence of corrosion products. Further sequencing of the mycobacterial heat shock protein gene (hsp65) provided species-level taxonomic resolution of mycobacteria. The two dominant Mycobacteria present, M. frederiksbergense (arithmetic mean = 85.7% of hsp65 sequences) and M. aurum (arithmetic mean = 6.5% of hsp65 sequences), are generally considered to be nonpathogenic. Two opportunistic pathogens, however, were detected at low numbers: M. hemophilum (arithmetic mean = 1.5% of hsp65 sequences) and M. abscessus (arithmetic mean = 0.006% of hsp65 sequences). Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfovibrio, which have been implicated in microbially influenced corrosion, dominated all communities located underneath corrosion tubercules (arithmetic mean = 67.5% of the community). This research provides novel insights into the quantity and composition of biofilms in full-scale drinking water distribution systems, which is critical for assessing the risks to public health and to the

  15. Mo enrichment in black shale and reduction of molybdate by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Barton, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Lower Cambrian Black shale in Zunyi area of Guizhou Province, Southern China contains significant amount of Mo, As, and sulfide minerals. Additionally, Mo and sulfides are closely associated with organic matter of kerogen. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show pyrite micro-crystals and Mo-As-S-bearing carbon (kerogen). High-resolution TEM image shows that Mo-rich areas are Mo-sulfide (molybdenite) layers that form poorly crystalline structures in organic carbon matrix. X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) indicate composition from the pyrite and the Mo-rich area. The black shale is very unique because of its high Mo concentration. One possible mechanism for enriching Mo from paleo-seawater is the involvement of SRB. Molybdate is an essential trace element required by biological systems including the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB); however, detrimental consequences may occur if molybdate is present in high concentrations in the environment. We followed the growth of Desulfovibrio gigas ATCC 19364, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, D. desulfuricans DSM 642, and D. desulfuricans DSM 27774 in media containing sub-lethal levels of molybdate and observed a red-brown color in the culture fluid. Spectral analysis of the culture fluid revealed absorption peaks at 467 nm, 395 nm and 314 nm and this color is proposed to be a molybdate-sulfide complex. Reduction of molybdate with the formation of molybdate disulfide occurs in the periplasm D. gigas and D. desulfuricans DSM 642. From these results we suggest that the occurrence of poorly crystalline Mo-sulfides in black shale may be a result from SRB reduction and selective enrichment of Mo in paleo-seawater. We suggest that similar SRB mechanism could cause the Mo enrichment in a ~ 2.5 billion years old late Archean McRae Shale, which is related to the great oxidation event of early earth atmosphere.

  16. Reoxidation of Reduced Uranium with Iron(III) (Hydr)Oxides under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.

    2005-03-04

    In cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricansG20 the effects of iron(III) (hydr)oxides (hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite) on microbial reduction and reoxidation of uranium (U) were evaluated under lactate-limited sulfate-reducing conditions. With lactate present, G20 reduced U(VI) in both 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonate (PIPES) and bicarbonate buffer. Once lactate was depleted, however, microbially reduced U served as an electron donor to reduce Fe(III) present in iron(III) (hydr)oxides. With the same initial amount of Fe(III) (10 mmol/L) for each iron(III) (hydr)oxide,reoxidation of U(IV) was greater with hematite than with goethite or ferrihydrite. As the initial mass loading of hematite increased from 0 to 20 mmol of Fe(III)/L, the rate and extent of U(IV) reoxidation increased. Subsequent addition of hematite [15 mmol of Fe(III)/L] to stationary-phase cultures containing microbially reduced U(IV) also resulted in rapid reoxidation to U(VI). Analysis by U L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of microbially reduced U particles yielded spectra similar to that of natural uraninite. Observations by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis confirmed that precipitated U associated with cells was uraninite with particle diameters of 3-5 nm. By the same techniques, iron sulfide precipitates were found to have a variable Fe and S stoichiometry and were not associated with cells.

  17. Changing microspatial patterns of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) during cycling of marine stromatolite mats.

    PubMed

    Petrisor, Alexandru I; Szyjka, Sandra; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Visscher, Pieter T; Norman, Robert Sean; Decho, Alan W

    2014-01-09

    Microspatial arrangements of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in surface microbial mats (~1.5 mm) forming open marine stromatolites were investigated. Previous research revealed three different mat types associated with these stromatolites, each with a unique petrographic signature. Here we focused on comparing "non-lithifying" (Type-1) and "lithifying" (Type-2) mats. Our results revealed three major trends: (1) Molecular typing using the dsrA probe revealed a shift in the SRM community composition between Type-1 and Type-2 mats. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) coupled to confocal scanning-laser microscopy (CSLM)-based image analyses, and 35SO4(2-)-silver foil patterns showed that SRM were present in surfaces of both mat types, but in significantly (p < 0.05) higher abundances in Type-2 mats. Over 85% of SRM cells in the top 0.5 mm of Type-2 mats were contained in a dense 130 µm thick horizontal layer comprised of clusters of varying sizes; (2) Microspatial mapping revealed that locations of SRM and CaCO3 precipitation were significantly correlated (p < 0.05); (3) Extracts from Type-2 mats contained acylhomoserine-lactones (C4- ,C6- ,oxo-C6,C7- ,C8- ,C10- ,C12- , C14-AHLs) involved in cell-cell communication. Similar AHLs were produced by SRM mat-isolates. These trends suggest that development of a microspatially-organized SRM community is closely-associated with the hallmark transition of stromatolite surface mats from a non-lithifying to a lithifying state.

  18. Changing Microspatial Patterns of Sulfate-Reducing Microorganisms (SRM) during Cycling of Marine Stromatolite Mats

    PubMed Central

    Petrisor, Alexandru I.; Szyjka, Sandra; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Visscher, Pieter T.; Norman, Robert Sean; Decho, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Microspatial arrangements of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in surface microbial mats (~1.5 mm) forming open marine stromatolites were investigated. Previous research revealed three different mat types associated with these stromatolites, each with a unique petrographic signature. Here we focused on comparing “non-lithifying” (Type-1) and “lithifying” (Type-2) mats. Our results revealed three major trends: (1) Molecular typing using the dsrA probe revealed a shift in the SRM community composition between Type-1 and Type-2 mats. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) coupled to confocal scanning-laser microscopy (CSLM)-based image analyses, and 35SO4 2−-silver foil patterns showed that SRM were present in surfaces of both mat types, but in significantly (p < 0.05) higher abundances in Type-2 mats. Over 85% of SRM cells in the top 0.5 mm of Type-2 mats were contained in a dense 130 μm thick horizontal layer comprised of clusters of varying sizes; (2) Microspatial mapping revealed that locations of SRM and CaCO3 precipitation were significantly correlated (p < 0.05); (3) Extracts from Type-2 mats contained acylhomoserine-lactones (C4-, C6-, oxo-C6 C7-, C8-, C10-, C12-, C14-AHLs) involved in cell-cell communication. Similar AHLs were produced by SRM mat-isolates. These trends suggest that development of a microspatially-organized SRM community is closely-associated with the hallmark transition of stromatolite surface mats from a non-lithifying to a lithifying state. PMID:24413754

  19. Integrative analysis of Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlett, M.; Zhuang, K.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D.

    2012-03-01

    Enhancing microbial U(VI) reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI)-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI) was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) predominated and U(VI) reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III) was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30-40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III) would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III) availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  20. Integrative analysis of the interactions between Geobacter spp. and sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlett, M.; Zhuang, K.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D. R.

    2011-11-01

    Enhancing microbial U(VI) reduction with the addition of organic electron donors is a promising strategy for immobilizing uranium in contaminated groundwaters, but has yet to be optimized because of a poor understanding of the factors controlling the growth of various microbial communities during bioremediation. In previous field trials in which acetate was added to the subsurface, there were two distinct phases: an initial phase in which acetate-oxidizing, U(VI)-reducing Geobacter predominated and U(VI) was effectively reduced and a second phase in which acetate-oxidizing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) predominated and U(VI) reduction was poor. The interaction of Geobacter and SRB was investigated both in sediment incubations that mimicked in situ bioremediation and with in silico metabolic modeling. In sediment incubations, Geobacter grew quickly but then declined in numbers as the microbially reducible Fe(III) was depleted whereas the SRB grow more slowly and reached dominance after 30-40 days. Modeling predicted a similar outcome. Additional modeling in which the relative initial percentages of the Geobacter and SRB were varied indicated that there was little to no competitive interaction between Geobacter and SRB when acetate was abundant. Further simulations suggested that the addition of Fe(III) would revive the Geobacter, but have little to no effect on the SRB. This result was confirmed experimentally. The results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the impact of amendments on important components of the subsurface microbial community during groundwater bioremediation. The finding that Fe(III) availability, rather than competition with SRB, is the key factor limiting the activity of Geobacter during in situ uranium bioremediation will aid in the design of improved uranium bioremediation strategies.

  1. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  2. Seasonal composition and activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotic communities in seagrass bed sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) play a key role in the carbon and nutrient cycles of coastal marine, vegetated ecosystems, but the interactions of SRP communities with aquatic plants remain little studied. The abundance, activity, and community composition of SRP was studied i...

  3. Organoheterotrophic Bacterial Abundance Associates with Zinc Removal in Lignocellulose-Based Sulfate-Reducing Systems.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Dina M; Almstrand, Robert; Lee, Ilsu; Landkamer, Lee; Figueroa, Linda; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2016-01-05

    Syntrophic relationships between fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria are essential to lignocellulose-based systems applied to the passive remediation of mining-influenced waters. In this study, seven pilot-scale sulfate-reducing bioreactor columns containing varying ratios of alfalfa hay, pine woodchips, and sawdust were analyzed over ∼500 days to investigate the influence of substrate composition on zinc removal and microbial community structure. Columns amended with >10% alfalfa removed significantly more sulfate and zinc than did wood-based columns. Enumeration of sulfate reducers by functional signatures (dsrA) and their putative identification from 16S rRNA genes did not reveal significant correlations with zinc removal, suggesting limitations in this directed approach. In contrast, a strong indicator of zinc removal was discerned in comparing the relative abundance of core microorganisms shared by all reactors (>80% of total community), many of which had little direct involvement in metal or sulfate respiration. The relative abundance of Desulfosporosinus, the dominant putative sulfate reducer within these reactors, correlated to representatives of this core microbiome. A subset of these clades, including Treponema, Weissella, and Anaerolinea, was associated with alfalfa and zinc removal, and the inverse was found for a second subset whose abundance was associated with wood-based columns, including Ruminococcus, Dysgonomonas, and Azospira. The construction of a putative metabolic flowchart delineated syntrophic interactions supporting sulfate reduction and suggests that the production of and competition for secondary fermentation byproducts, such as lactate scavenging, influence bacterial community composition and reactor efficacy.

  4. Vertical distribution of major sulfate-reducing bacteria in a shallow eutrophic meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kyoko; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2014-10-01

    The vertical distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated in a shallow, eutrophic, meromictic lake, Lake Harutori, located in a residential area of Kushiro, Japan. A steep chemocline, characterized by gradients of oxygen, sulfide and salinity, was found at a depth of 3.5-4.0 m. The sulfide concentration at the bottom of the lake was high (up to a concentration of 10.7 mM). Clone libraries were constructed using the aprA gene, which encodes adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase subunit A, in order to monitor sulfate-reducing bacteria. In the aprA clone libraries, the most abundant sequences were those from the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus (DSS) group. A primer set for a DSS group-specific 16S rRNA gene was used to construct another clone library, analysis of which revealed that the uncultured group of sulfate-reducing bacteria, SEEP SRB-1, accounted for nearly half of the obtained sequences. Quantification of the major bacterial groups by catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that the DSS group accounted for 3.2-4.8% of the total bacterial community below the chemocline. The results suggested that the DSS group was one of the major groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria and that these presumably metabolically versatile bacteria might play an important role in sulfur cycling in Lake Harutori. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Seasonal composition and activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotic communities in seagrass bed sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) play a key role in the carbon and nutrient cycles of coastal marine, vegetated ecosystems, but the interactions of SRP communities with aquatic plants remain little studied. The abundance, activity, and community composition of SRP was studied i...

  6. DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    BEST (bioreactor economics, size and time of operation) is a spreadsheet-based model that is used in conjunction with a public domain computer software package, PHREEQCI. BEST is intended to be used in the design process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB)field bioreactors to pas...

  7. DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    Marek H. Zaluski1,3, Brian T. Park1, Diana R. Bless2

    1 MSE Technology Applications; 200 Technology Way, Butte, Montana 59701, USA
    2 U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinna...

  8. COMPUTER SIMULATOR (BEST) FOR DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    BEST (bioreactor economics, size and time of operation) is a spreadsheet-based model that is used in conjunction with public domain software, PhreeqcI. BEST is used in the design process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) field bioreactors to passively treat acid mine drainage (A...

  9. In situ BTEX biotransformation under enhanced nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, M.; Shang, S.; Kitanidis, P.K.; Orwin, E.; Hopkins, G.D.; LeBron, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    In situ anaerobic biotransformation of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, and m-xylene) was investigated under enhanced nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions. Controlled amounts of BTEX compounds added to slugs of treated groundwater were released into a gasoline-contaminated aquifer at Seal Beach, CA. In a series of studies, the slugs, 470-1700 L in volume, were released into the aquifer through a multi-port injection/extraction well and were subsequently withdrawn over a 2-3 month period. To evaluate unamended in situ conditions, the injectate was treated with granular activated carbon (GAC) and augmented with bromide as a tracer. To evaluate nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions, the injectate was also deionized and augmented with 200-300 {mu}g/L BTEX, nitrate or sulfate, and background electrolytes. Under unamended conditions, transformation appeared to be limited to the slow removal of toluene and m,p-xylene (i.e. sum of m+p-xylene). Under nitrate-reducing conditions, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene were transformed without a lag phase in less than 10 days, and o-xylene was transformed in 72 days. Under sulfate-reducing conditions, toluene, m-xylene and o-xylene were completely transformed in less then 50 days, and ethylbenzene was removed in 60 days. Benzene appeared to be removed under sulfate-reducing conditions, but the trend was pronounced only at some levels. 47 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Variations in Sulfate-Reducing Communities Associated with a Terrestrial Hydrocarbon Seep

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ting-Wen; Lin, Li-Hung; Lin, Yue-Ting; Song, Sheng-Rong; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial hydrocarbon seeps are an important source of naturally emitted methane over geological time. The exact community compositions responsible for carbon cycling beneath these surface features remain obscure. As sulfate reduction represents an essential process for anoxic organic mineralization, this study collected muddy fluids from a high-temperature hydrocarbon seep in Taiwan and analyzed community structures of sulfate-supplemented sediment slurries incubated anoxically at elevated temperatures. The results obtained demonstrated that sulfate consumption occurred between 40°C and 80°C. Dominant potential sulfate reducers included Desulfovibrio spp., Desulfonatronum spp., Desulforhabdus spp., and Desulfotomaculum spp. at 40°C, Thermodesulfovibrio spp. at 50°C, Thermodesulfovibrio spp. and Thermacetogenium spp. at 60°C, Thermacetogenium spp. and Archaeoglobus spp. at 70°C, and Archaeoglobus spp. at 80°C. None of these potential sulfate reducers exceeded 7% of the community in the untreated sample. Since no exogenous electron donor was provided during incubation, these sulfate reducers appeared to rely on the degradation of organic matter inherited from porewater and sediments. Aqueous chemistry indicated that fluids discharged in the region represented a mixture of saline formation water and low-salinity surface water; therefore, these lines of evidence suggest that deeply-sourced, thermophilic and surface-input, mesophilic sulfate-reducing populations entrapped along the subsurface fluid transport could respond rapidly once the ambient temperature is adjusted to a range close to their individual optima. PMID:25273230

  11. Uranium reduction and resistance to reoxidation under iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Nayak, Dipti; Du, Xin; Criddle, Craig S

    2009-10-01

    Oxidation and mobilization of microbially-generated U(IV) is of great concern for in situ uranium bioremediation. This study investigated the reoxidation of uranium by oxygen and nitrate in a sulfate-reducing enrichment and an iron-reducing enrichment derived from sediment and groundwater from the Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Both enrichments were capable of reducing U(VI) rapidly. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries of the two enrichments revealed that Desulfovibrio spp. are dominant in the sulfate-reducing enrichment, and Clostridium spp. are dominant in the iron-reducing enrichment. In both the sulfate-reducing enrichment and the iron-reducing enrichment, oxygen reoxidized the previously reduced uranium but to a lesser extent in the iron-reducing enrichment. Moreover, in the iron-reducing enrichment, the reoxidized U(VI) was eventually re-reduced to its previous level. In both, the sulfate-reducing enrichment and the iron-reducing enrichment, uranium reoxidation did not occur in the presence of nitrate. The results indicate that the Clostridium-dominated iron-reducing communities created conditions that were more favorable for uranium stability with respect to reoxidation despite the fact that fewer electron equivalents were added to these systems. The likely reason is that more of the added electrons are present in a form that can reduce oxygen to water and U(VI) back to U(IV).

  12. Microbial Activity In The Peerless Jenny King Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Peerless Jenny King treatment system is a series of four sulfate reducing bioreactor cells installed to treat acid mine drainage in the Upper Tenmile Creek Superfund Site located in the Rimini Mining District, near Helena, MT. The system consists of a wetland pretreatment fo...

  13. Microbial Activity In The Peerless Jenny King Sulfate Reducing Bioreactor System (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Peerless Jenny King treatment system is a series of four sulfate reducing bioreactor cells installed to treat acid mine drainage in the Upper Tenmile Creek Superfund Site located in the Rimini Mining District, near Helena MT. The system consists of a wetland pretreatment fol...

  14. Sulfate-Reducing Ammonium Oxidation: A Thermodynamically Feasible Metabolic Pathway in Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrum, H. N.; Spivack, A. J.; Kastner, M.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Sulfate-reducing ammonium oxidation, a process that has not been previously inferred in natural environments, is indicated based on dissolved chemical fluxes and Gibbs energies of reaction in sedimentary porewaters. Bay of Bengal (Indian Ocean) porewater profiles demonstrate that significant ammonium is consumed in the interface between ammonium and sulfate containing waters. Loss of ammonium in this interval greatly exceeds possible nitrogen demand by biomass production. In situ Gibbs energies of reaction (ΔG) for the reaction, 8NH4+ +3SO42- = 4N2 + 3HS- + 12 H2O + 5H+) in Bay of Bengal sediment and Greenwich Bay (Rhode Island) sediment indicate that sulfate-reducing ammonium oxidation is energy yielding. Relatively small and constant but consistently negative in-situ Gibbs energies in both locations suggest that microorganisms can derive energy from this reaction. In combination, the Gibbs energies and the substantial ammonium loss suggest that sulfate-reducing ammonium oxidation occurs in Bay of Bengal sediments. The Greenwich Bay DG results suggest that the process may also occur in anoxic sediment where the ammonium concentration profile shows no net loss of ammonium These sites are not geochemically unique; large areas of the ocean floor have conditions favorable for sulfate-reducing ammonium oxidation. If this reaction occurs globally, it may be a significant sink for fixed nitrogen.

  15. Response And Recovery Of Sulfate-Reducing Biochemical Reactors From Aerobic Stress Events

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbially-mediated treatment of mining-influenced water (MIW) through the implementation of sulfate-reducing biochemical reactors (BCRs) is an attractive option for passive, in situ remediation with low operating costs and reduced maintenance requirements. However, BCRs can be...

  16. Response And Recovery Of Sulfate-Reducing Biochemical Reactors From Aerobic Stress Events (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbially-mediated treatment of mining-influenced water (MIW) through the implementation of sulfate-reducing biochemical reactors (BCR) is an attractive option for passive, in situ remediation with low operating costs and reduced maintenance requirements. However, BCRs can be ...

  17. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, A.; Ramsing, N.B.; Habicht, K.; Kuever, J.; Joergensen, B.B.; Fukui, Manabu; Cohen, Y.

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 7} cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} cells ml{sup {minus}1}. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO{sub 2} from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO{sub 2} demand of the mat.

  18. Response And Recovery Of Sulfate-Reducing Biochemical Reactors From Aerobic Stress Events

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbially-mediated treatment of mining-influenced water (MIW) through the implementation of sulfate-reducing biochemical reactors (BCRs) is an attractive option for passive, in situ remediation with low operating costs and reduced maintenance requirements. However, BCRs can be...

  19. Response And Recovery Of Sulfate-Reducing Biochemical Reactors From Aerobic Stress Events (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbially-mediated treatment of mining-influenced water (MIW) through the implementation of sulfate-reducing biochemical reactors (BCR) is an attractive option for passive, in situ remediation with low operating costs and reduced maintenance requirements. However, BCRs can be ...

  20. DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    BEST (bioreactor economics, size and time of operation) is a spreadsheet-based model that is used in conjunction with a public domain computer software package, PHREEQCI. BEST is intended to be used in the design process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB)field bioreactors to pas...

  1. DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    Marek H. Zaluski1,3, Brian T. Park1, Diana R. Bless2

    1 MSE Technology Applications; 200 Technology Way, Butte, Montana 59701, USA
    2 U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinna...

  2. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activities in Cyanobacterial Mats of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt)

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; Ramsing, Niels B.; Habicht, Kirsten; Fukui, Manabu; Küver, Jan; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Cohen, Yehuda

    1998-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 106 and 107 cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml−1 and showed sulfate reduction rates between 1,000 and 2,200 nmol ml−1 day−1, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 104 to 106 cells ml−1. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat. PMID:9687455

  3. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  4. Structural and Functional Dynamics of Sulfate-Reducing Populations in Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Santegoeds, Cecilia M.; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Muyzer, Gerard; de Beer, Dirk

    1998-01-01

    We describe the combined application of microsensors and molecular techniques to investigate the development of sulfate reduction and of sulfate-reducing bacterial populations in an aerobic bacterial biofilm. Microsensor measurements for oxygen showed that anaerobic zones developed in the biofilm within 1 week and that oxygen was depleted in the top 200 to 400 μm during all stages of biofilm development. Sulfate reduction was first detected after 6 weeks of growth, although favorable conditions for growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were present from the first week. In situ hybridization with a 16S rRNA probe for SRB revealed that sulfate reducers were present in high numbers (approximately 108 SRB/ml) in all stages of development, both in the oxic and anoxic zones of the biofilm. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the genetic diversity of the microbial community increased during the development of the biofilm. Hybridization analysis of the DGGE profiles with taxon-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio were the main sulfate-reducing bacteria in all biofilm samples as well as in the bulk activated sludge. However, different Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio species were found in the 6th and 8th weeks of incubation, respectively, coinciding with the development of sulfate reduction. Our data indicate that not all SRB detected by molecular analysis were sulfidogenically active in the biofilm. PMID:9758792

  5. Microbial Activity In The Peerless Jenny King Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Peerless Jenny King treatment system is a series of four sulfate reducing bioreactor cells installed to treat acid mine drainage in the Upper Tenmile Creek Superfund Site located in the Rimini Mining District, near Helena, MT. The system consists of a wetland pretreatment fo...

  6. Microbial Activity In The Peerless Jenny King Sulfate Reducing Bioreactor System (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Peerless Jenny King treatment system is a series of four sulfate reducing bioreactor cells installed to treat acid mine drainage in the Upper Tenmile Creek Superfund Site located in the Rimini Mining District, near Helena MT. The system consists of a wetland pretreatment fol...

  7. COMPUTER SIMULATOR (BEST) FOR DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    BEST (bioreactor economics, size and time of operation) is a spreadsheet-based model that is used in conjunction with public domain software, PhreeqcI. BEST is used in the design process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) field bioreactors to passively treat acid mine drainage (A...

  8. Mechanisms and Effectivity of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors Using a Chitinous Substrate in Treating Mining Influenced Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mining-influenced water (MIW) is the main environmental challenges associated with the mining industry. Passive MIW remediation can be achieved through microbial activity in sulfate-reducing bioreactors (SRBRs), but their actual removal rates depend on different factors, one of w...

  9. Anaerobic Biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and ...

  10. Specific 16S rDNA sequences associated with naphthalene degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Hayes, L A; Lovley, Derek R

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that naphthalene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be anaerobically oxidized with the reduction of sulfate in PAH-contaminated marine harbor sediments, including those in San Diego Bay. In order to learn more about the microorganisms that might be involved in anaerobic naphthalene degradation, the microorganisms associated with naphthalene degradation in San Diego Bay sediments were evaluated. A dilution-to-extinction enrichment culture strategy, designed to recover the most numerous culturable naphthalene-degrading sulfate reducers, resulted in the enrichment of microorganisms with 16S rDNA sequences in the d-Proteobacteria, which were closely related to a previously described pure culture of a naphthalene-degrading sulfate reducer, NaphS2, isolated from sediments in Germany. A more traditional enrichment culture approach, expected to enrich for the fastest-growing naphthalene-degrading sulfate reducers, yielded 16S rDNA sequences closely related to those found in the dilution-to-extinction enrichments and NaphS2. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences in sediments from two sites in San Diego Bay that had been adapted for rapid naphthalene degradation by continual amendment with low levels of naphthalene suggested that the microbial community composition in the amended sediments differed from that present in the unamended sediments from the same sites. Most significantly, 6-8% of the sequences recovered from 100 clones of each of the naphthalene-amended sediments were closely related to the 16S rDNA sequences in the enrichment cultures as well as the sequence of the pure culture, NaphS2. No sequences in this NaphS2 phylotype were recovered from the sediments that were not continually exposed to naphthalene. A PCR primer, which was designed based on these phylotype sequences, was used to amplify additional 16S rDNA sequences belonging to the NaphS2 phylotype from PAH-degrading sediments from Island End River (Boston

  11. Desulfosporomusa polytropa gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium from sediments of an oligotrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Sass, Henrik; Overmann, Jörg; Rütters, Heike; Babenzien, Hans-Dietrich; Cypionka, Heribert

    2004-10-01

    Five strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria were isolated from the highest positive dilutions of a most probable number (MPN) series supplemented with lactate and inoculated with sediments from the oligotrophic Lake Stechlin. The isolates were endospore-forming and were motile by means of laterally inserted flagella. They stained Gram-negative and contained b-type cytochromes. CO difference spectra indicated the presence of P582 as a sulfite reductase. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the isolates were very closely affiliated with the genus Sporomusa. However, sulfate and amorphous Fe(OH)(3), but not sulfite, elemental sulfur, MnO(2), or nitrate were used as terminal electron acceptors. Homoacetogenic growth was found with H(2)/CO(2) gas mixture, formate, methanol, ethanol, and methoxylated aromatic compounds. The strains grew autotrophically with H(2) plus CO(2) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Formate, butyrate, several alcohols, organic acids, carbohydrates, some amino acids, choline, and betaine were also utilized as substrates. The growth yield with lactate and sulfate as substrate was 7.0 g dry mass/mol lactate and thus two times higher than in sulfate-free fermenting cultures. All isolates were able to grow in a temperature range of 4-37 degrees C. Physiologically and by the presence of a Gram-negative cell wall, the new isolates resemble known Desulfosporosinus species. However, phylogenetically they are affiliated with the Gram-negative genus Sporomusa belonging to the Selenomonas subgroup of the Firmicutes. Therefore, the new isolates reveal a new phylogenetic lineage of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A new genus and species, Desulfosporomusa polytropa gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed.

  12. Growth of Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a High-Pressure Membrane Capsule Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H. C. Aura; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lens, Piet N. L.; Meulepas, Roel J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-μm-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure. PMID:25501484

  13. Growth of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in a high-pressure membrane capsule bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Peer H A; Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H C Aura; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Lens, Piet N L; Meulepas, Roel J W

    2015-02-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-m-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure.

  14. Physiological response is similar in overweight and normoweight boys during cycling: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Maciejczyk, M; Szymura, J; Gradek, J; Cempla, J; Więcek, M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether metabolic cost is similar in overweight and normoweight children when workload during exercise on a cycle-ergometer is adjusted relative to an objectively determined second ventilatory threshold (VT2) or the maximal workload (Pmax). The tests were conducted every 2 years: first at the age of 10 years and the third test at around the age of 14 years. The levels of maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)max), Pmax, and the VT2 were determined by means of graded tests on a cycle ergometer. The main test consisted of two 6-minute exercises of submaximal constant intensity (below and above VT2) performed on a cycle ergometer, with a 4-minute recovery between efforts. The workload during cycling was adjusted individually for each participant and adjusted to the values determined in the graded test: workload at VT2 and Pmax. Physiological response (absolute and relative to free-fat mass oxygen uptake, heart rate, pulmonary ventilation, tidal volume, and breathing frequency) is similar in overweight and normoweight boys when workload on a cycle ergometer is adjusted to VT2. The only significant intergroup difference was seen in relative to body mass oxygen intake.

  15. Gli-Similar (Glis) Proteins: Their Mechanisms of Action, Physiological Functions, and Roles in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lichti-Kaiser, Kristin; ZeRuth, Gary; Kang, Hong Soon; Vasanth, Shivakumar; Jetten, Anton M.

    2013-01-01

    Gli-similar (Glis) 1–3 proteins constitute a sub-family of Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins that are closely related to members of the Gli family. Glis proteins have been implicated in several pathologies, including cystic kidney disease, diabetes, hypothyroidism, fibrosis, osteoporosis, psoriasis, and cancer. In humans, a mutation in the Glis2 gene has been linked to the development of nephronophthisis (NPHP), a recessive cystic kidney disease, while mutations in Glis3 lead to an extended multi-system phenotype that includes the development of neonatal diabetes, polycystic kidneys, congenital hypothyroidism, and facial dysmorphism. Glis3 has also been identified as a risk locus for type-1 and type-2 diabetes and additional studies have revealed a role for Glis3 in pancreatic endocrine development, β-cell maintenance, and insulin regulation. Similar to Gli1-3, Glis2 and 3 have been reported to localize to the primary cilium. These studies appear to suggest that Glis proteins are part of a primary cilium-associated signaling pathway(s). It has been hypothesized that Glis proteins are activated through post-translational modifications and subsequently translocate to the nucleus where they regulate transcription by interacting with Glis binding sites in the promoter regions of target genes. This chapter will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of the Glis family of proteins, their physiological functions, as well as their roles in disease. PMID:22391303

  16. Gli-similar proteins: their mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease.

    PubMed

    Lichti-Kaiser, Kristin; ZeRuth, Gary; Kang, Hong Soon; Vasanth, Shivakumar; Jetten, Anton M

    2012-01-01

    Gli-similar (Glis) 1-3 proteins constitute a subfamily of Krüppel-like zinc-finger proteins that are closely related to members of the Gli family. Glis proteins have been implicated in several pathologies, including cystic kidney disease, diabetes, hypothyroidism, fibrosis, osteoporosis, psoriasis, and cancer. In humans, a mutation in the Glis2 gene has been linked to the development of nephronophthisis (NPHP), a recessive cystic kidney disease, while mutations in Glis3 lead to an extended multisystem phenotype that includes the development of neonatal diabetes, polycystic kidneys, congenital hypothyroidism, and facial dysmorphism. Glis3 has also been identified as a risk locus for type-1 and type-2 diabetes and additional studies have revealed a role for Glis3 in pancreatic endocrine development, β-cell maintenance, and insulin regulation. Similar to Gli1-3, Glis2 and 3 have been reported to localize to the primary cilium. These studies appear to suggest that Glis proteins are part of a primary cilium-associated signaling pathway(s). It has been hypothesized that Glis proteins are activated through posttranslational modifications and subsequently translocate to the nucleus where they regulate transcription by interacting with Glis-binding sites in the promoter regions of target genes. This chapter summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of the Glis family of proteins, their physiological functions, as well as their roles in disease.

  17. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-10-01

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal.

  18. Complete genome sequence of the acetate-degrading sulfate reducer Desulfobacca acetoxidans type strain (ASRB2).

    PubMed

    Göker, Markus; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Desulfobacca acetoxidans Elferink et al. 1999 is the type species of the genus Desulfobacca, which belongs to the family Syntrophaceae in the class Deltaproteobacteria. The species was first observed in a study on the competition of sulfate-reducers and acetoclastic methanogens for acetate in sludge. D. acetoxidans is considered to be the most abundant acetate-degrading sulfate reducer in sludge. It is of interest due to its isolated phylogenetic location in the 16S rRNA-based tree of life. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the family Syntrophaceae to be published and only the third genome sequence from a member of the order Syntrophobacterales. The 3,282,536 bp long genome with its 2,969 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite.

    SciTech Connect

    Marsili, E.; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, L.; Merli, C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2007-12-15

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 wereused to reduce dissolved U(VI)and subsequently immobilize U(IV) in the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing mineral(hematite) and two carbonate-bearing minerals (calcite and dolomite). The source of carbonates in the reactors filled with calcite and dolomite were the minerals, while in the reactor filled with hematite it was a 10 mM carbonate buffer, pH 7.2, which we added to the growth medium. Our five-month study demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing biofilms grown in all reactors were able to immobilize/reduce uranium efficiently, despite the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates.

  20. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite.

    PubMed

    Marsili, Enrico; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, Luca; Merli, Carlo; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2007-12-15

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 were used to reduce dissolved U(VI) and subsequently immobilize U(IV) in the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing mineral (hematite) and two carbonate-bearing minerals (calcite and dolomite). The source of carbonates in the reactors filled with calcite and dolomite were the minerals, while in the reactor filled with hematite it was a 10 mM carbonate buffer, pH 7.2, which we added to the growth medium. Our five-month study demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing biofilms grown in all reactors were able to immobilize/reduce uranium efficiently, despite the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates.

  1. Characterization of sulfate-reducing granular sludge in the SANI(®) process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tianwei; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chui, Hokwong; Mackey, Hamish R; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guanghao

    2013-12-01

    Hong Kong practices seawater toilet flushing covering 80% of the population. A sulfur cycle-based biological nitrogen removal process, the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process, had been developed to close the loop between the hybrid water supply and saline sewage treatment. To enhance this novel process, granulation of a Sulfate-Reducing Up-flow Sludge Bed (SRUSB) reactor has recently been conducted for organic removal and provision of electron donors (sulfide) for subsequent autotrophic denitrification, with a view to minimizing footprint and maximizing operation resilience. This further study was focused on the biological and physicochemical characteristics of the granular sulfate-reducing sludge. A lab-scale SRUSB reactor seeded with anaerobic digester sludge was operated with synthetic saline sewage for 368 days. At 1 h nominal hydraulic retention time (HRT) and 6.4 kg COD/m(3)-d organic loading rate, the SRUSB reactor achieved 90% COD and 75% sulfate removal efficiencies. Granular sludge was observed within 30 days, and became stable after 4 months of operation with diameters of 400-500 μm, SVI5 of 30 ml/g, and extracellular polymeric substances of 23 mg carbohydrate/g VSS. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that the granules were enriched with abundant sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as compared with the seeding sludge. Pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene in the sulfate-reducing granules on day 90 indicated that the microbial community consisted of a diverse SRB genera, namely Desulfobulbus (18.1%), Desulfobacter (13.6%), Desulfomicrobium (5.6%), Desulfosarcina (0.73%) and Desulfovibrio (0.6%), accounting for 38.6% of total operational taxonomic units at genera level, with no methanogens detected. The microbial population and physicochemical properties of the granules well explained the excellent performance of the granular SRUSB reactor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  2. Penetration of sulfate reducers through a porous North Sea oil reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Beeder, J.; Nilsen, R.K.; Thorstenson, T.; Torsvik, T.

    1996-09-01

    During offshore oil production, seawater is often injected into the reservoir to maintain pressure. Sulfate reducers have been reported from water samples in Norwegian oil fields. However in order to demonstrate penetration, a suitable indicator microorganism is required. This paper reports the isolation of one such indicator bacterium from injection water followed by isolation of the same bacterium from water from oil field production system. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Development of Microarrays-Based Metagenomics Technology for Monitoring Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Subsurface Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cindy, Shi

    2015-07-17

    At the contaminated DOE sites, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are a significant population and play an important role in the microbial community during biostimulation for metal reduction. However, the diversity, structure and dynamics of SRB communities are poorly understood. Therefore, this project aims to use high throughput sequencing-based metagenomics technologies for characterizing the diversity, structure, functions, and activities of SRB communities by developing genomic and bioinformatics tools to link the SRB biodiversity with ecosystem functioning.

  4. Evidence of the activity of dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in nonsulfidogenic tropical mobile muds.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Vanessa M; Aller, Robert C; Aller, Josephine Y; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2006-08-01

    In spite of the nonsulfidic conditions and abundant reactive iron(III) commonly found in mobile tropical deltaic muds, genes encoding dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) were successfully amplified from the upper approximately 1 m of coastal deposits sampled along French Guiana and in the Gulf of Papua. The dsr sequences retrieved were highly diverse, were generally represented in both study regions and fell into six large phylogenetic groupings: Deltaproteobacteria, Thermodesulfovibrio groups, Firmicutes and three groups without known cultured representatives. The spatial and temporal distribution of dsr sequences strongly supports the contention that the sulfate-reducing prokaryote communities in mobile mud environments are cosmopolitan and stable over a period of years. The decrease in the (35)SO(4) (2-) tracer demonstrates that, despite abundant reactive sedimentary iron(III) ( approximately 350-400 mumol g(-1)), the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes present are active, with the highest levels of sulfide being generated in the upper zones of the cores (0-30 cm). Both the time course of the (35)S-sulfide tracer activity and the lack of reduced sulfur in sediments demonstrate virtually complete anaerobic loss of solid phase sulfides. We propose a pathway of organic matter oxidation involving at least 5-25% of the remineralized carbon, wherein sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes is cyclically oxidized biotically or abiotically by metal oxides.

  5. Simultaneous sulfate reduction and copper removal by a PVA-immobilized sulfate reducing bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiu-Feng; Jhuo, Yu-Sheng; Kumar, Mathava; Ma, Ying-Shih; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2010-06-01

    The effect of a sulfate reducing bacteria immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) on simultaneous sulfate reduction and copper removal was investigated. Batch experiments were designed using central composite design (CCD) with two parameters, i.e. the copper concentration (10-100mg/L), and the quantity of immobilized SRB in culture solution (19-235 mg of VSS/L). Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to model the experimental data, and to identify optimal conditions for the maximum sulfate reduction and copper removal. Under optimum condition, i.e. approximately 138.5mg VSS/L of sulfate reducing bacteria immobilized in PVA, and approximately 51.5mg/L of copper, the maximum sulfate reduction rate was 1.57 d(-1) as based on the first-order kinetic equation. The data demonstrate that immobilizing sulfate reducing bacteria in PVA can enhance copper removal and the resistance of the bacteria towards copper toxicity. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate thionation of diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ling; Shiiya, Ayaka; Hisatomi, Shihoko; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is often found as a toxic intermediate metabolite of diphenylchloroarsine or diphenylcyanoarsine that were produced as chemical warfare agents and were buried in soil after the World Wars. In our previous study Guan et al. (J Hazard Mater 241-242:355-362, 2012), after application of sulfate and carbon sources, anaerobic transformation of DPAA in soil was enhanced with the production of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTAA) as a main metabolite. This study aimed to isolate and characterize anaerobic soil microorganisms responsible for the metabolism of DPAA. First, we obtained four microbial consortia capable of transforming DPAA to DPTAA at a high transformation rate of more than 80% after 4 weeks of incubation. Sequencing for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from the consortia revealed that all the positive consortia contained Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans species. In contrast, the absence of dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrAB) which is unique to sulfate-reducing bacteria was confirmed in the negative consortia showing no DPAA reduction. Finally, strain DEA14 showing transformation of DPAA to DPTAA was isolated from one of the positive consortia. The isolate was assigned to D. acetoxidans based on the partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Thionation of DPAA was also carried out in a pure culture of a known sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, Desulfovibrio aerotolerans JCM 12613(T). These facts indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria are microorganisms responsible for the transformation of DPAA to DPTAA under anaerobic conditions.

  7. Evaluation of redox indicators for determining sulfate-reducing and dechlorinating conditions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian D; Ingle, James D

    2005-11-01

    An in situ methodology based on covalently bonded redox indicators has been developed for determining when sulfate-reducing conditions exist in environmental samples. Three immobilized redox indicators [thionine (Thi, formal potential at pH 7 (E(0')7) equals 52 mV), cresyl violet (CV, E(0')7 = -81 mV), and phenosafranine (PSaf, E(0')7 = -267 mV)] were tested for their response to sulfide in synthetic solutions and under sulfate-reducing conditions in wastewater slurries. The byproduct of the sulfate-reducing process, sulfide, was found to couple well to CV in the concentration range of 1-100 microM total sulfide ([S(-II)]) and the pH range of 6-8. Thi, the indicator with the highest formal potential, reacts rapidly with sulfide at levels well below 1 microM while PSaf, the indicator with the lowest formal potential, does not couple to sulfide at levels in excess of 100 microM [S(-II)]. The degree of reduction of the indicators (i.e., the fraction of cresyl violet oxidized) in contact with a given level of sulfide can be modeled qualitatively with an equilibrium expression for [S(-II)]-indicator based on the Nernst equation assuming that rhombic sulfur is the product of sulfide oxidation. In a groundwater sample with dechlorinating microbes, reduction of Thi and partial reduction of CV correlated with dechlorination of TCE to cis-DCE.

  8. Inorganic carbon fixation by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Black Sea water column.

    PubMed

    Neretin, Lev N; Abed, Raeid M M; Schippers, Axel; Schubert, Carsten J; Kohls, Katharina; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2007-12-01

    The Black Sea is the largest anoxic water basin on Earth and its stratified water column comprises an upper oxic, middle suboxic and a lower permanently anoxic, sulfidic zone. The abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in water samples was determined by quantifying the copy number of the dsrA gene coding for the alpha subunit of the dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The dsrA gene was detected throughout the whole suboxic and anoxic zones. The maximum dsrA copy numbers were 5 x 10(2) and 6.3 x 10(2) copies ml(-1) at 95 m in the suboxic and at 150 m in the upper anoxic zone, respectively. The proportion of SRB to total Bacteria was 0.1% in the oxic, 0.8-1.9% in the suboxic and 1.2-4.7% in the anoxic zone. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA clones showed that most clones from the anoxic zone formed a coherent cluster within the Desulfonema-Desulfosarcina group. A similar depth profile as for dsrA copy numbers was obtained for the concentration of non-isoprenoidal dialkyl glycerol diethers (DGDs), which are most likely SRB-specific lipid biomarkers. Three different DGDs were found to be major components of the total lipid fractions from the anoxic zone. The DGDs were depleted in (13)C relative to the delta(13)C values of dissolved CO(2) (delta(13)C(CO2)) by 14-19 per thousand. Their delta(13)C values [delta(13)C(DGD(II-III))] co-varied with depth showing the least (13)C-depleted values in the top of the sulfidic, anoxic zone and the most (13)C-depleted values in the deep anoxic waters at 1500 m. This co-variation provides evidence for CO(2) incorporation by the DGD(II-III)-producing SRB, while the 1:2 relationship between delta(13)C(CO2) and delta(13)C(DGD(II-III)) indicates the use of an additional organic carbon source.

  9. Electron microscopic characterization of the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris: biofilms and clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, M.; Remis, J.; Jorgens, D.; Zemla, M.; Singer, M.; Schmitt, J.; Gorby, Y.; Hazen, T.; Wall, J.; Elias, D.; Torok, T.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous studies have helped characterize the stress response of the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). Yet all of these techniques represent bulk analyses of cells grown mostly under liquid culture conditions in large reactors. Such results represent an average over a large variety of individual cellular responses, hence assuming a homogeneous distribution of physiological traits. Moreover, only recently are those techniques applied to the environmentally more relevant condition of microbial communities (biofilms). What is missing is a detailed ultrastructural analysis of such biofilms in order to determine biofilm organization and its extracellular metal deposition distribution. Using sophisticated sample cryo-preparation approaches such as high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution or microwave- assisted processing, followed serial section TEM imaging, we have found a large heterogeneity with respect to metal precipitation with some cells being surrounded by metal precipitates whereas neighboring cells, being genetically identical and seeing virtually the exact same microenvironment, completely lack extracellular metal deposits. Interestingly, apart from metal deposits near cell surfaces, we also found string- and sheet- like metal deposits in between neighboring cells that in mature biofilms can extend for hundreds of micrometers. In mature DvH biofilms such deposits were predominantly associated with areas of intact cells in biofilms, with areas devoid of such metal deposits displayed predominantly cell debris, suggesting a role of such deposits for cell survival, which may be of high significance to biofilms at DOE sites. Upon tomographic imaging we found that extracellular metal deposits were often associated with thin filaments and vesicle-like features. To complement our serial section 2D analysis of resin-embedded samples and the resulting limitation of sampling 3D biofilm as thin sections of arbitrary orientation, we

  10. Activation of the habenula complex evokes autonomic physiological responses similar to those associated with emotional stress

    PubMed Central

    Ootsuka, Youichirou; Mohammed, Mazher

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the lateral habenula (LHb) discharge when an animal anticipates an aversive outcome or when an expected reward is not forthcoming, contributing to the behavioral response to aversive situations. So far, there is little information as to whether the LHb also contributes to autonomic physiological responses, including increases in body temperature (emotional hyperthermia) that are integrated with defensive behaviors. Vasoconstriction in cutaneous vascular bed and heat production in brown adipose tissue (BAT) both contribute to emotional hyperthermia. Our present study determines whether stimulation of the LHb elicits constriction of the tail artery and BAT thermogenesis in anesthetized Sprague–Dawley rats. Disinhibition of neurons in LHb with focal microinjections of bicuculline (1 nmol in 100 nl, bilaterally) acutely increased BAT temperature (+0.6 ± 0.1°C, n = 9 rats, P < 0.01) and reduced tail artery blood flow (by 88 ± 4%, n = 9 rats, P < 0.01). Falls in mesenteric blood flow, simultaneously recorded, were much less intense. The pattern of BAT thermogenesis and cutaneous vasoconstriction elicited by stimulating the habenula is similar to the pattern observed during stress-induced emotional hyperthermia, suggesting that the habenula may be important in this response. PMID:25677551

  11. Learning Similar Actions by Reinforcement or Sensory-Prediction Errors Rely on Distinct Physiological Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shintaro; Mawase, Firas; Celnik, Pablo

    2017-09-14

    Humans can acquire knowledge of new motor behavior via different forms of learning. The two forms most commonly studied have been the development of internal models based on sensory-prediction errors (error-based learning) and success-based feedback (reinforcement learning). Human behavioral studies suggest these are distinct learning processes, though the neurophysiological mechanisms that are involved have not been characterized. Here, we evaluated physiological markers from the cerebellum and the primary motor cortex (M1) using noninvasive brain stimulations while healthy participants trained finger-reaching tasks. We manipulated the extent to which subjects rely on error-based or reinforcement by providing either vector or binary feedback about task performance. Our results demonstrated a double dissociation where learning the task mainly via error-based mechanisms leads to cerebellar plasticity modifications but not long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity changes in M1; while learning a similar action via reinforcement mechanisms elicited M1 LTP-like plasticity but not cerebellar plasticity changes. Our findings indicate that learning complex motor behavior is mediated by the interplay of different forms of learning, weighing distinct neural mechanisms in M1 and the cerebellum. Our study provides insights for designing effective interventions to enhance human motor learning. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Iron sulfides and sulfur species produced at hematite surfaces in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Andrew L.; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Dohnalkova, Alice; McCready, David; Peyton, Brent M.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2001-01-01

    In the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria ( Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) dissolution is affected potentially by a combination of enzymatic (hydrogenase) reduction and hydrogen sulfide oxidation. As a consequence, ferrous ions are free to react with excess H 2S to form insoluble ferrous sulfides. X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate binding energies similar to ferrous sulfides having pyrrhotite-like structures (Fe2 p3/2 708.4 eV; S2 p3/2 161.5 eV). Other sulfur species identified at the surface include sulfate, sulfite and polysulfides. Thin film X-ray diffraction identifies a limited number of peaks, the principal one of which may be assigned to the hexagonal pyrrhotite (102) peak (d = 2.09 Å; 2θ = 43.22°), at the hematite surface within 3 months exposure to sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy identifies the presence of a hexagonal structure associated with observed crystallites. Although none of the analytical techniques employed provide unequivocal evidence as to the nature of the ferrous sulfide formed in the presence of SRB at hematite surfaces, we conclude from the available evidence that a pyrrhotite stiochiometry and structure is the best description of the sulfides we observe. Such ferrous sulfide production is inconsistent with previous reports in which mackinawite and greigite were products of biological sulfate reduction (Rickard 1969a; Herbert et al., 1998; Benning et al., 1999). The apparent differences in stoichiometry may be related to sulfide activity at the mineral surface, controlled in part by H 2S autooxidation in the presence of iron oxides. Due to the relative stability of pyrrhotite at low temperatures, ferrous sulfide dissolution is likely to be reduced compared to the more commonly observed products of SRB activity. Additionally, biogenic pyrrhotite formation will also have implications for geomagnetic field behavior of sediments.

  13. Genome sequence of Desulfobacterium autotrophicum HRM2, a marine sulfate reducer oxidizing organic carbon completely to carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, Axel W; Liesegang, Heiko; Rabus, Ralf; Decker, Iwona; Amann, Judith; Andres, Sönke; Henne, Anke; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Martinez-Arias, Rosa; Bartels, Daniela; Goesmann, Alexander; Krause, Lutz; Pühler, Alfred; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Richter, Michael; Schüler, Margarete; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Meyerdierks, Anke; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Amann, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) belonging to the metabolically versatile Desulfobacteriaceae are abundant in marine sediments and contribute to the global carbon cycle by complete oxidation of organic compounds. Desulfobacterium autotrophicum HRM2 is the first member of this ecophysiologically important group with a now available genome sequence. With 5.6 megabasepairs (Mbp) the genome of Db. autotrophicum HRM2 is about 2 Mbp larger than the sequenced genomes of other sulfate reducers (SRB). A high number of genome plasticity elements (> 100 transposon-related genes), several regions of GC discontinuity and a high number of repetitive elements (132 paralogous genes Mbp−1) point to a different genome evolution when comparing with Desulfovibrio spp. The metabolic versatility of Db. autotrophicum HRM2 is reflected in the presence of genes for the degradation of a variety of organic compounds including long-chain fatty acids and for the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway, which enables the organism to completely oxidize acetyl-CoA to CO2 but also to grow chemolithoautotrophically. The presence of more than 250 proteins of the sensory/regulatory protein families should enable Db. autotrophicum HRM2 to efficiently adapt to changing environmental conditions. Genes encoding periplasmic or cytoplasmic hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases have been detected as well as genes for the transmembrane TpII-c3, Hme and Rnf complexes. Genes for subunits A, B, C and D as well as for the proposed novel subunits L and F of the heterodisulfide reductases are present. This enzyme is involved in energy conservation in methanoarchaea and it is speculated that it exhibits a similar function in the process of dissimilatory sulfate reduction in Db. autotrophicum HRM2. PMID:19187283

  14. A novel lineage of sulfate-reducing microorganisms: Thermodesulfobiaceae fam. nov., Thermodesulfobium narugense, gen. nov., sp. nov., a new thermophilic isolate from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Kim, Hongik; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Hanada, Satoshi

    2003-08-01

    A novel type of a sulfate-reducing microorganism, represented by strain Na82T, was isolated from a hot spring in Narugo, Japan. The isolate was a moderate thermophilic autotroph that was able to grow on H2/CO2 by sulfate respiration. The isolate could grow with nitrate in place of sulfate, and possessed menaquinone-7 and menaquinone-7(H2) as respiratory quinones. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain Na82T was a member of the domain Bacteria and distant from any known bacteria, as well as from other sulfate-reducing bacteria (sequence similarities less than 80%). The phylogenetic analysis of the dsrAB gene (alpha and beta subunits of dissimilatory sulfite reductase) sequence also suggested that strain Na82T was not closely related to other sulfate reducers. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, a new taxon is established for the isolate. We proposed the name Thermodesulfobium narugense gen. nov., sp. nov. with strain Na82T (=DSM 14796T=JCM 11510T) as the type strain. Furthermore, a new family, Thermodesulfobiaceae fam. nov., is proposed for the genus.

  15. Identical Hg isotope mass dependent fractionation signature during methylation by sulfate-reducing bacteria in sulfate and sulfate-free environment.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Vincent; Bridou, Romain; Pedrero, Zoyne; Guyoneaud, Remy; Monperrus, Mathilde; Amouroux, David

    2015-02-03

    Inorganic mercury (iHg) methylation in aquatic environments is the first step leading to monomethylmercury (MMHg) bioaccumulation in food webs and might play a role in the Hg isotopic composition measured in sediments and organisms. Methylation by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) under sulfate-reducing conditions is probably one of the most important sources of MMHg in natural aquatic environments, but its influence on natural Hg isotopic composition remains to be ascertained. In this context, the methylating SRB Desulfovibrio dechloracetivorans (strain BerOc1) was incubated under sulfate reducing and fumarate respiration conditions (SR and FR, respectively) to determine Hg species specific (MMHg and IHg) isotopic composition associated with methylation and demethylation kinetics. Our results clearly establish Hg isotope mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) during biotic methylation (-1.20 to +0.58‰ for δ(202)Hg), but insignificant mass-independent fractionation (MIF) (-0.12 to +0.15‰ for Δ(201)Hg). During the 24h of the time-course experiments Hg isotopic composition in the produced MMHg becomes significantly lighter than the residual IHg after 1.5h and shows similar δ(202)Hg values under both FR and SR conditions at the end of the experiments. This suggests a unique pathway responsible for the MDF of Hg isotopes during methylation by this strain regardless the metabolism of the cells. After 9 h of experiment, significant simultaneous demethylation is occurring in the culture and demethylates preferentially the lighter Hg isotopes of MMHg. Therefore, depending on their methylation/demethylation capacities, SRB communities in natural sulfate reducing conditions likely have a significant and specific influence on the Hg isotope composition of MMHg (MDF) in sediments and aquatic organisms.

  16. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus sp. obtained from an Algerian oilfield and chemical biocide THPS against sulfate-reducing bacteria consortium inducing corrosion in the oil industry.

    PubMed

    Gana, Mohamed Lamine; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Touzi, Abdelkader; Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Pauss, André; Lounici, Hakim; Mameri, Nabil

    2011-03-01

    The present study enlightens the role of the antagonistic potential of nonpathogenic strain B21 against sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium. The inhibitor effects of strain B21 were compared with those of the chemical biocide tetrakishydroxymethylphosphonium sulfate (THPS), generally used in the petroleum industry. The biological inhibitor exhibited much better and effective performance. Growth of SRB in coculture with bacteria strain B21 antagonist exhibited decline in SRB growth, reduction in production of sulfides, with consumption of sulfate. The observed effect seems more important in comparison with the effect caused by the tested biocide (THPS). Strain B21, a dominant facultative aerobic species, has salt growth requirement always above 5% (w/v) salts with optimal concentration of 10-15%. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain B21 is a member of the genus Bacillus, being most closely related to Bacillus qingdaonensis DQ115802 (94.0% sequence similarity), Bacillus aidingensis DQ504377 (94.0%), and Bacillus salarius AY667494 (92.2%). Comparative analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequence data plus physiological, biochemical, and phenotypic features of the novel isolate and related species of Bacillus indicated that strain B21 may represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, named Bacillus sp. (EMBL, FR671419). The results of this study indicate the application potential of Bacillus strain B21 as a biocontrol agent to fight corrosion in the oil industry.

  17. Comparative analysis of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in anoxic marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Orphan, V J; Hinrichs, K U; Ussler, W; Paull, C K; Taylor, L T; Sylva, S P; Hayes, J M; Delong, E F

    2001-04-01

    The oxidation of methane in anoxic marine sediments is thought to be mediated by a consortium of methane-consuming archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this study, we compared results of rRNA gene (rDNA) surveys and lipid analyses of archaea and bacteria associated with methane seep sediments from several different sites on the Californian continental margin. Two distinct archaeal lineages (ANME-1 and ANME-2), peripherally related to the order Methanosarcinales, were consistently associated with methane seep marine sediments. The same sediments contained abundant (13)C-depleted archaeal lipids, indicating that one or both of these archaeal groups are members of anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia. (13)C-depleted lipids and the signature 16S rDNAs for these archaeal groups were absent in nearby control sediments. Concurrent surveys of bacterial rDNAs revealed a predominance of delta-proteobacteria, in particular, close relatives of Desulfosarcina variabilis. Biomarker analyses of the same sediments showed bacterial fatty acids with strong (13)C depletion that are likely products of these sulfate-reducing bacteria. Consistent with these observations, whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed aggregations of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate-reducing Desulfosarcina and Desulfococcus species. Additionally, the presence of abundant (13)C-depleted ether lipids, presumed to be of bacterial origin but unrelated to ether lipids of members of the order Desulfosarcinales, suggests the participation of additional bacterial groups in the methane-oxidizing process. Although the Desulfosarcinales and ANME-2 consortia appear to participate in the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments, our data suggest that other bacteria and archaea are also involved in methane oxidation in these environments.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Methane-Oxidizing Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Anoxic Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Orphan, V. J.; Hinrichs, K.-U.; Ussler, W.; Paull, C. K.; Taylor, L. T.; Sylva, S. P.; Hayes, J. M.; Delong, E. F.

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of methane in anoxic marine sediments is thought to be mediated by a consortium of methane-consuming archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this study, we compared results of rRNA gene (rDNA) surveys and lipid analyses of archaea and bacteria associated with methane seep sediments from several different sites on the Californian continental margin. Two distinct archaeal lineages (ANME-1 and ANME-2), peripherally related to the order Methanosarcinales, were consistently associated with methane seep marine sediments. The same sediments contained abundant 13C-depleted archaeal lipids, indicating that one or both of these archaeal groups are members of anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia. 13C-depleted lipids and the signature 16S rDNAs for these archaeal groups were absent in nearby control sediments. Concurrent surveys of bacterial rDNAs revealed a predominance of δ-proteobacteria, in particular, close relatives of Desulfosarcina variabilis. Biomarker analyses of the same sediments showed bacterial fatty acids with strong 13C depletion that are likely products of these sulfate-reducing bacteria. Consistent with these observations, whole-cell fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed aggregations of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate-reducing Desulfosarcina and Desulfococcus species. Additionally, the presence of abundant 13C-depleted ether lipids, presumed to be of bacterial origin but unrelated to ether lipids of members of the order Desulfosarcinales, suggests the participation of additional bacterial groups in the methane-oxidizing process. Although the Desulfosarcinales and ANME-2 consortia appear to participate in the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments, our data suggest that other bacteria and archaea are also involved in methane oxidation in these environments. PMID:11282650

  19. Desulfotomaculum spp. and related gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacteria in deep subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Aüllo, Thomas; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Ollivier, Bernard; Magot, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Gram-positive spore-forming sulfate reducers and particularly members of the genus Desulfotomaculum are commonly found in the subsurface biosphere by culture based and molecular approaches. Due to their metabolic versatility and their ability to persist as endospores. Desulfotomaculum spp. are well-adapted for colonizing environments through a slow sedimentation process. Because of their ability to grow autotrophically (H2/CO2) and produce sulfide or acetate, these microorganisms may play key roles in deep lithoautotrophic microbial communities. Available data about Desulfotomaculum spp. and related species from studies carried out from deep freshwater lakes, marine sediments, oligotrophic and organic rich deep geological settings are discussed in this review. PMID:24348471

  20. Mutualistic growth of the sulfate-reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough with different carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Santana, M M; Portillo, M C; Gonzalez, J M

    2012-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome presents a phosphotransferase system putatively involved in the transport of carbohydrates. However, utilization of sugars by this sulfate-reducing bacterium has never been reported. Herein, we have observed proliferation of D. vulgaris Hildenborough with some carbohydrates, in mutualism with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a non-fermentative, gram-negative gammaproteobacterium, or Microbacterium, a gram-positive actinobacterium. These results suggest the importance of feedback interactions between different heterotrophic bacterial species including the alternative for D. vulgaris of exploiting additional organic resources and novel habitats. Thus, D. vulgaris strongly participates in the mineralization of carbohydrates both in complex natural and artificial systems.

  1. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    1999-06-01

    Objective A: Electron transfer components necessary for uranium reduction. Objective B: Possible FNR-analog in the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Attempts to isolate FNR or FIKJ analogs from Desuflovibrio through the design of degenerate primers for amplification of portions of the genes has not been successful. In contrast, several amplicons have been generated for the genes encoding the regulators of two-component signal sequences. Since several global regulators fall into this class, we are attempting to obtain sufficient sequence information to indicate what metabolic pathways are affected by the regulators. Cloning and sequencing of two such amplicons has revealed that bona fide two-component regulators are present in Desulfovibrio.

  2. Penetration of Sulfate Reducers through a Porous North Sea Oil Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Beeder, J.; Nilsen, R. K.; Thorstenson, T.; Torsvik, T.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of mesophilic benzoate-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria in the water systems of three Norwegian oil platforms was investigated. Strain 4502 was isolated from the injection water system, and specific antibodies were produced against this isolate. It was present in the injection water system during a period of 3 years, but not in the in situ reservoir water. Later it was found in water samples collected from the oil field production system. This showed that strain 4502 had penetrated the reservoir together with the injection water and eventually reached the production well. PMID:16535415

  3. Treatment of acid mine drainage by sulfate reducing bacteria with iron in bench scale runs.

    PubMed

    Bai, He; Kang, Yong; Quan, Hongen; Han, Yang; Sun, Jiao; Feng, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In order to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) effectively using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at high concentration of sulfate and heavy metals, Fe(0) was added to enhance the activity of SRB. When AMD was treated by SRB and Fe(0) at 25 °C, more than 61% of sulfate was removed and the effluent pH was improved from 2.75 to 6.20 during the operation. Cu(2+) was removed effectively with the removal efficiency at 99%, while only 86% of Fe(2+) was removed during the AMD treatment, without conspicuous change of Mn(2+) in the effluent in the process.

  4. Immobilizing U from solution by immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria of desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hulfang; Barton, Larry L.

    2000-07-01

    As determined by transmission electron microscopy, the reduction of uranyl accetate by immobilized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans results in the production of black uraninite nanocrystals precipitated outside the cell. Some nanocrystals are associated with outer membranes of the cell as revealed from cross sections of these metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria. The nanocrystals have an average diameter of 5 nm and have anhedral shape. It is proposed that cytochrome in these cells has an important role in the reduction of uranyl through transferring electron from molecular hydrogen or lactic acid to uranyl ions.

  5. Roles of HynAB and Ech, the only two hydrogenases found in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Santos, Catia I; Rodrigues, Rute; Pereira, Inês A C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-10-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria are characterized by a high number of hydrogenases, which have been proposed to contribute to the overall energy metabolism of the cell, but exactly in what role is not clear. Desulfovibrio spp. can produce or consume H2 when growing on organic or inorganic substrates in the presence or absence of sulfate. Because of the presence of only two hydrogenases encoded in its genome, the periplasmic HynAB and cytoplasmic Ech hydrogenases, Desulfovibrio gigas is an excellent model organism for investigation of the specific function of each of these enzymes during growth. In this study, we analyzed the physiological response to the deletion of the genes that encode the two hydrogenases in D. gigas, through the generation of ΔechBC and ΔhynAB single mutant strains. These strains were analyzed for the ability to grow on different substrates, such as lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen, under respiratory and fermentative conditions. Furthermore, the expression of both hydrogenase genes in the three strains studied was assessed through quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. The results demonstrate that neither hydrogenase is essential for growth on lactate-sulfate, indicating that hydrogen cycling is not indispensable. In addition, the periplasmic HynAB enzyme has a bifunctional activity and is required for growth on H2 or by fermentation of pyruvate. Therefore, this enzyme seems to play a dominant role in D. gigas hydrogen metabolism.

  6. Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov.: A New Alkaliphilic, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium, Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate reducing bacterium strain MLF1(sup T) was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrion cells, motile by singular polar flagellum, with sizes 0.5 - 0.6x 1.2 - 2.0 micron occurred singly, in pairs or short spirilla. Growth was observed over the temperature range of +15 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range is greater than 1 - 7 %, wt/vol (optimum 3 %, wt/vol) and pH range 7.8 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.0 - 9.4). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high carbonate concentration in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase negative. As electron donors strain MLF1(sup T) uses hydrogen, formate, ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The sole end product of growth on formate was H2S. Strain MLF1(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Na2MoO4 inhibits growth of strain MLF1(sup T). The sum of G+C in DNA is 63.1 mol% (by HPLC method). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Desulfonatronum; and the name Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov., is proposed (type strain MLF1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-395(sup T) = DSMZ 14708(sup T).

  7. Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov.: A New Alkaliphilic, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium, Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate reducing bacterium strain MLF1(sup T) was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrion cells, motile by singular polar flagellum, with sizes 0.5 - 0.6x 1.2 - 2.0 micron occurred singly, in pairs or short spirilla. Growth was observed over the temperature range of +15 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range is greater than 1 - 7 %, wt/vol (optimum 3 %, wt/vol) and pH range 7.8 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.0 - 9.4). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high carbonate concentration in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase negative. As electron donors strain MLF1(sup T) uses hydrogen, formate, ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The sole end product of growth on formate was H2S. Strain MLF1(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Na2MoO4 inhibits growth of strain MLF1(sup T). The sum of G+C in DNA is 63.1 mol% (by HPLC method). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Desulfonatronum; and the name Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov., is proposed (type strain MLF1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-395(sup T) = DSMZ 14708(sup T).

  8. Salt-tolerant and high-pH-resistant hydrogenase from the haloalkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for the consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins, most of which contain either nickel and iron or iron alone in their active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, sulfate-reducing, photosynthetic bacteria, and algae that use the hydrogen as an energy source or as an electron sink. Hydrogenases are the subject of wide physiological, biochemical, physico-chemical and genetic studies due to their abilities to produce molecular hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. Despite the large quantity of work dealing with the intracellular and extracellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about the response of hydrogenases to salts are practically absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium arabaticum showed a dramatic increase in the activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCl (near saturated solutions). Here we present data about hydrogenase in a free-cell extract from the new halo-alkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grows on a highly mineralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in the salinity range from 1 to 7 % NaCl and at pH 8.0-10.0. The studied enzyme was active in concentration range from 0.0 to 4.3 M NaCl with the optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme expressed 20 % additional activity, with NaCl concentration changing from 2.1 M to 3.4 M, and then the activity decreased and reached a constant level. Although sodium bicarbonate decreases the hydrogenase activity, the enzyme still showed activity at 60 % of the maximum level at concentration in a near saturated solution (1.2 M NaHCO3). The maximum enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits of 7.5 and 11.5, which is practically

  9. Halotolerant and Resistant to High pH Hydrogenase from Haloalkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, it catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins containing either Nickel and Iron, or the only Iron in theirs active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as Methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, photosynthetic and sulfate-reducing bacteria that could utilize the hydrogen as energy source or use it as electron sink. Hydrogenases are subject for wide physiological, biochemical, physicochemical and genetic studies due to theirs abilities produce the molecular hydrogen as alternative source of pure energy. Notwithstanding on enough large quantity of works that deal with intracellular and extrasellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about hydrogenases and theirs functions of salts practically are absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium mabaticum showed dramatic increasing activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCI (close to saturated solution). Here we present the data of free-cells extracted hydrogenase from new haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grow on highly miniralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in salinity range 1 to 7 % and at pH 7.8 - 10.5. Studied enzyme was active in Concentration range from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl with optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme activity was increased on 20 %, but with changing concentration from 2.1 M to 3.4 M the activity decreased and was kept on constant level. NaHCO3 inhibited hydrogenase activity on more then 30 %. The maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits 7.5 and 11.5 that practically equal to pH optimum of bacterial growth. Therefore the hydrogenase of Desulfanatronum thiodismutans is tolerant to high concentrations of sodium salts and it also resistant to

  10. Halotolerant and Resistant to High pH Hydrogenase from Haloalkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, it catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins containing either Nickel and Iron, or the only Iron in theirs active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as Methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, photosynthetic and sulfate-reducing bacteria that could utilize the hydrogen as energy source or use it as electron sink. Hydrogenases are subject for wide physiological, biochemical, physicochemical and genetic studies due to theirs abilities produce the molecular hydrogen as alternative source of pure energy. Notwithstanding on enough large quantity of works that deal with intracellular and extrasellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about hydrogenases and theirs functions of salts practically are absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium mabaticum showed dramatic increasing activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCI (close to saturated solution). Here we present the data of free-cells extracted hydrogenase from new haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grow on highly miniralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in salinity range 1 to 7 % and at pH 7.8 - 10.5. Studied enzyme was active in Concentration range from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl with optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme activity was increased on 20 %, but with changing concentration from 2.1 M to 3.4 M the activity decreased and was kept on constant level. NaHCO3 inhibited hydrogenase activity on more then 30 %. The maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits 7.5 and 11.5 that practically equal to pH optimum of bacterial growth. Therefore the hydrogenase of Desulfanatronum thiodismutans is tolerant to high concentrations of sodium salts and it also resistant to

  11. Analyses of spatial distributions of sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activity in aerobic wastewater biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    1999-11-01

    The vertical distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in aerobic wastewater biofilms grown on rotating disk reactors was investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. To correlate the vertical distribution of SRB populations with their activity, the microprofiles of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, NO{sub 2}{minus}, NH{sub 2}{sup +}, and pH were measured with microelectrodes. In addition, a cross-evaluation of the FISH and microelectrode analyses was performed by comparing them with culture-based approaches and biogeochemical measurements. In situ hybridization revealed that a relatively high abundance of the probe SRB385-stained cells were evenly distributed throughout the biofilm, even in the toxic surface. The probe SRB660-stained Desulfobulbus spp. were found to be numerically important members of SRB populations. The result of microelectrode measurements showed that a high sulfate-reducing activity was found in a narrow anaerobic zone located about 150 to 300 {micro}m below the biofilm surface and above which an intensive sulfide oxidation zone was found. The biogeochemical measurements showed that elemental sulfur (S{degree}) was an important intermediate of the sulfide reoxidation in such thin wastewater biofilms, which accounted for about 75% of the total S pool in the biofilm. The contribution of an internal Fe-sulfur cycle to the overall sulfur cycle in aerobic wastewater biofilms was insignificant (less than 1%) due to the relatively high sulfate reduction rate.

  12. Inhibition of sulfate-reducing bacteria by metal sulfide formation in bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Utgikar, Vivek P; Harmon, Stephen M; Chaudhary, Navendu; Tabak, Henry H; Govind, Rakesh; Haines, John R

    2002-02-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of sulfate and heavy metal ions can be treated by biological sulfate reduction. It has been reported that the effect of heavy metals on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can be stimulatory at lower concentrations and toxic/inhibitory at higher concentrations. The quantification of the toxic/inhibitory effect of dissolved heavy metals is critical for the design and operation of an effective AMD bioremediation process. Serum bottle and batch reactor studies on metal toxicity to SRB indicate that insoluble metal sulfides can inhibit the SRB activity as well. The mechanism of inhibition is postulated to be external to the bacterial cell. The experimental data indicate that the metal sulfides formed due to the reaction between the dissolved metal and biogenic sulfide act as barriers preventing the access of the reactants (sulfate, organic matter) to the necessary enzymes. Scanning electron micrographs of the SRB cultures exposed to copper and zinc provide supporting evidence for this hypothesis. The SRB cultures retained their ability to effect sulfate reduction indicating that the metal sulfides were not lethally toxic to the SRB. This phenomenon of metal sulfide inhibition of the SRB has to be taken into account while designing a sulfate-reducing bioreator, and subsequently an efficient biotreatment strategy for AMD. Any metal sulfide formed in the bioreactor needs to be removed immediately from the system to maintain the efficiency of the process of sulfate reduction.

  13. Biologically-Induced Precipitation of Minerals in a Medium with Zinc Under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej; Jankiewicz, Urszula; Stępień, Wojciech; Kowalczyk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing microbial communities were enriched from soils collected in areas with crude-oil exploitation. Cultures were grown in modified Postgate C medium and minimal medium, with ethanol or lactate as an electron donor. The batch cultures were grown with addition of zinc in concentrations of 100-700 mg/l. A lack of increased protein concentration in the solutions compared with the control batch, was noted in cultures containing over 200 mg Zn2+/l. The 16S rRNA method was applied to determine the specific composition of the selected microorganism communities. The analysis indicated the presence of Desulfovibrio spp., Desulfobulbus spp. and Desulfotomaculum spp. in the communities. Diffractometric analysis indicated the presence of biogenic sphalerite in cultures with 100 and 200 mg Zn2+/l and elemental sulfur in cultures with 200 mg Zn2+/l. Other post culture sediments (300-700 mg Zn2+/l) contained only hopeite [Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O] formed abiotically during the experiment, which was confirmed by studies of the activity of sulfate-reducing microbial communities.

  14. Mine wastewater treatment using Phalaris arundinacea plant material hydrolyzate as substrate for sulfate-reducing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Nevatalo, Laura M; Kaksonen, Anna H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2010-06-01

    A low-cost substrate, Phalaris arundinacea was acid hydrolyzed (Reed Canary Grass hydrolyzate, RCGH) and used to support sulfate reduction. The experiments included batch bottle assays (35 degrees C) and a fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) experiment (35 degrees C) treating synthetic mine wastewater. Dry plant material was also tested as substrate in batch bottle assays. The batch assays showed sulfate reduction with the studied substrates, producing 540 and 350mgL(-1) dissolved sulfide with RCGH and dry plant material, respectively. The soluble sugars of the RCGH presumably fermented into volatile fatty acids and hydrogen, which served as electron donors for sulfate reducing bacteria. A sulfate reduction rate of 2.2-3.3gL(-1)d(-1) was obtained in the FBR experiment. The acidic influent was neutralized and the highest metal precipitation rates were 0.84g FeL(-1)d(-1) and 15mg ZnL(-1)d(-1). The sulfate reduction rate in the FBR was limited by the acetate oxidation rate of the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria from two different continental margin habitats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueduan; Bagwell, Christopher E; Wu, Liyou; Devol, Allan H; Zhou, Jizhong

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the natural diversity and distributions of sulfate-reducing bacteria along a natural carbon gradient extending down the shelf-slope transition zone of the eastern Pacific continental margin. Dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene sequences (dsrAB) were PCR amplified and cloned from five different sampling sites, each at a discrete depth, from two different margin systems, one off the Pacific coast of Mexico and another off the coast of Washington State. A total of 1,762 clones were recovered and evaluated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The majority of the gene sequences recovered showed site and depth restricted distributions; however, a limited number of gene sequences were widely distributed within and between the margin systems. Cluster analysis identified 175 unique RFLP patterns, and nucleotide sequences were determined for corresponding clones. Several different continental margin DsrA sequences clustered with those from formally characterized taxa belonging to the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria (Desulfobulbus propionicus, Desulfosarcina variabilis) and the Bacillus-Clostridium (Desulfotomaculum putei) divisions, although the majority of the recovered sequences were phylogenetically divergent relative to all of the other DsrA sequences available for comparison. This study revealed extensive new genetic diversity among sulfate-reducing bacteria in continental margin sedimentary habitats, which appears to be tightly coupled to slope depth, specifically carbon bioavailability.

  16. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Villa-Gomez, D K; Cassidy, J; Keesman, K J; Sampaio, R; Lens, P N L

    2014-03-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4(2-) ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing bioreactors. The sulfide was measured using a sulfide ion selective electrode (pS) and the values obtained were used to calculate proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller parameters. The experiments were performed in an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with automated operation using the LabVIEW software version 2009(®). A rapid response and high sulfide increment was obtained through a stepwise increase in the CODin concentration, while a stepwise decrease to the HRT exhibited a slower response with smaller sulfide increment. Irrespective of the way the OLR was decreased, the pS response showed a time-varying behavior due to sulfide accumulation (HRT change) or utilization of substrate sources that were not accounted for (CODin change). The pS electrode response, however, showed to be informative for applications in sulfate reducing bioreactors. Nevertheless, the recorded pS values need to be corrected for pH variations and high sulfide concentrations (>200 mg/L). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. BASE COMPOSITION OF THE DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA.

    PubMed

    SIGAL, N; SENEZ, J C; LEGALL, J; SEBALD, M

    1963-06-01

    Sigal, Nicole (Laboratoire de Chimie Bactérienne du CNRS, Marseille, France), Jacques C. Senez, Jean Le Gall, and Madeleine Sebald. Base composition of the deoxyribonucleic acid of sulfate-reducing bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 85:1315-1318. 1963-The deoxyribonucleic acid constitution of several strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria has been analytically determined. The results of these studies show that this group of microorganisms includes at least four subgroups characterized by significantly different values of the adenine plus thymine to guanine plus cytosine ratio. The nonsporulated forms with polar flagellation, containing both cytochrome c(3) and desulfoviridin, are divided into two subgroups. One includes the fresh-water, nonhalophilic strains with base ratio from 0.54 to 0.59, and the other includes the halophilic or halotolerant strains with base ratio from 0.74 to 0.77. The sporulated, peritrichous strains without cytochrome and desulfoviridin ("nigrificans" and "orientis") are distinct from the above two types and differ from each other, having base ratios of 1.20 and 1.43, respectively.

  18. Molecular Diversity of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from Two Different Continental Margin Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueduan; Bagwell, Christopher E.; Wu, Liyou; Devol, Allan H.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the natural diversity and distributions of sulfate-reducing bacteria along a natural carbon gradient extending down the shelf-slope transition zone of the eastern Pacific continental margin. Dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene sequences (dsrAB) were PCR amplified and cloned from five different sampling sites, each at a discrete depth, from two different margin systems, one off the Pacific coast of Mexico and another off the coast of Washington State. A total of 1,762 clones were recovered and evaluated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The majority of the gene sequences recovered showed site and depth restricted distributions; however, a limited number of gene sequences were widely distributed within and between the margin systems. Cluster analysis identified 175 unique RFLP patterns, and nucleotide sequences were determined for corresponding clones. Several different continental margin DsrA sequences clustered with those from formally characterized taxa belonging to the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria (Desulfobulbus propionicus, Desulfosarcina variabilis) and the Bacillus-Clostridium (Desulfotomaculum putei) divisions, although the majority of the recovered sequences were phylogenetically divergent relative to all of the other DsrA sequences available for comparison. This study revealed extensive new genetic diversity among sulfate-reducing bacteria in continental margin sedimentary habitats, which appears to be tightly coupled to slope depth, specifically carbon bioavailability. PMID:14532064

  19. Anaerobic consortia of fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria in deep granite fractures.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Ivarsson, Magnus; Bengtson, Stefan; Heim, Christine; Siljeström, Sandra; Whitehouse, Martin J; Broman, Curt; Belivanova, Veneta; Åström, Mats E

    2017-07-04

    The deep biosphere is one of the least understood ecosystems on Earth. Although most microbiological studies in this system have focused on prokaryotes and neglected microeukaryotes, recent discoveries have revealed existence of fossil and active fungi in marine sediments and sub-seafloor basalts, with proposed importance for the subsurface energy cycle. However, studies of fungi in deep continental crystalline rocks are surprisingly few. Consequently, the characteristics and processes of fungi and fungus-prokaryote interactions in this vast environment remain enigmatic. Here we report the first findings of partly organically preserved and partly mineralized fungi at great depth in fractured crystalline rock (-740 m). Based on environmental parameters and mineralogy the fungi are interpreted as anaerobic. Synchrotron-based techniques and stable isotope microanalysis confirm a coupling between the fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria. The cryptoendolithic fungi have significantly weathered neighboring zeolite crystals and thus have implications for storage of toxic wastes using zeolite barriers.Deep subsurface microorganisms play an important role in nutrient cycling, yet little is known about deep continental fungal communities. Here, the authors show organically preserved and partly mineralized fungi at 740 m depth, and find evidence of an anaerobic fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria consortium.

  20. Monofluorophosphate is a selective inhibitor of respiratory sulfate-reducing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Justice, Nicholas B; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Mosqueda, Lorraine A; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-03-17

    Despite the environmental and economic cost of microbial sulfidogenesis in industrial operations, few compounds are known as selective inhibitors of respiratory sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM), and no study has systematically and quantitatively evaluated the selectivity and potency of SRM inhibitors. Using general, high-throughput assays to quantitatively evaluate inhibitor potency and selectivity in a model sulfate-reducing microbial ecosystem as well as inhibitor specificity for the sulfate reduction pathway in a model SRM, we screened a panel of inorganic oxyanions. We identified several SRM selective inhibitors including selenate, selenite, tellurate, tellurite, nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, chlorate, monofluorophosphate, vanadate, molydate, and tungstate. Monofluorophosphate (MFP) was not known previously as a selective SRM inhibitor, but has promising characteristics including low toxicity to eukaryotic organisms, high stability at circumneutral pH, utility as an abiotic corrosion inhibitor, and low cost. MFP remains a potent inhibitor of SRM growing by fermentation, and MFP is tolerated by nitrate and perchlorate reducing microorganisms. For SRM inhibition, MFP is synergistic with nitrite and chlorite, and could enhance the efficacy of nitrate or perchlorate treatments. Finally, MFP inhibition is multifaceted. Both inhibition of the central sulfate reduction pathway and release of cytoplasmic fluoride ion are implicated in the mechanism of MFP toxicity.

  1. Stable Isotopic Studies of n-Alkane Metabolism by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Enrichment Culture

    PubMed Central

    Davidova, Irene A.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Nanny, Mark; Kropp, Kevin G.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to study the metabolism of deuterated n-alkanes (C6 to C12) and 1-13C-labeled n-hexane by a highly enriched sulfate-reducing bacterial culture. All substrates were activated via fumarate addition to form the corresponding alkylsuccinic acid derivatives as transient metabolites. Formation of d14-hexylsuccinic acid in cell extracts from exogenously added, fully deuterated n-hexane confirmed that this reaction was the initial step in anaerobic alkane metabolism. Analysis of resting cell suspensions amended with 1-13C-labeled n-hexane confirmed that addition of the fumarate occurred at the C-2 carbon of the parent substrate. Subsequent metabolism of hexylsuccinic acid resulted in the formation of 4-methyloctanoic acid, and 3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoic acid was tentatively identified. We also found that 13C nuclei from 1-13C-labeled n-hexane became incorporated into the succinyl portion of the initial metabolite in a manner that indicated that 13C-labeled fumarate was formed and recycled during alkane metabolism. Collectively, the findings obtained with a sulfate-reducing culture using isotopically labeled alkanes augment and support the previously proposed pathway (H. Wilkes, R. Rabus, T. Fischer, A. Armstroff, A. Behrends, and F. Widdel, Arch. Microbiol. 177:235-243, 2002) for metabolism of deuterated n-hexane by a denitrifying bacterium. PMID:16332800

  2. Stable isotopic studies of n-alkane metabolism by a sulfate-reducing bacterial enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Davidova, Irene A; Gieg, Lisa M; Nanny, Mark; Kropp, Kevin G; Suflita, Joseph M

    2005-12-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to study the metabolism of deuterated n-alkanes (C6 to C12) and 1-13C-labeled n-hexane by a highly enriched sulfate-reducing bacterial culture. All substrates were activated via fumarate addition to form the corresponding alkylsuccinic acid derivatives as transient metabolites. Formation of d14-hexylsuccinic acid in cell extracts from exogenously added, fully deuterated n-hexane confirmed that this reaction was the initial step in anaerobic alkane metabolism. Analysis of resting cell suspensions amended with 1-13C-labeled n-hexane confirmed that addition of the fumarate occurred at the C-2 carbon of the parent substrate. Subsequent metabolism of hexylsuccinic acid resulted in the formation of 4-methyloctanoic acid, and 3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoic acid was tentatively identified. We also found that 13C nuclei from 1-13C-labeled n-hexane became incorporated into the succinyl portion of the initial metabolite in a manner that indicated that 13C-labeled fumarate was formed and recycled during alkane metabolism. Collectively, the findings obtained with a sulfate-reducing culture using isotopically labeled alkanes augment and support the previously proposed pathway (H. Wilkes, R. Rabus, T. Fischer, A. Armstroff, A. Behrends, and F. Widdel, Arch. Microbiol. 177:235-243, 2002) for metabolism of deuterated n-hexane by a denitrifying bacterium.

  3. Promotion of Ni2+ Removal by Masking Toxicity to Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: Addition of Citrate

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Junwei; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Tao, Yong; Zhou, Yan; He, Xiaohong; Li, Daping

    2015-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bioprocess is a promising technology for the treatment of heavy metal-containing wastewater. This work was conducted to investigate the possibility of promoting heavy metal removal by the addition of citrate to mask Ni2+ toxicity to sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in batch reactors. SRB growth was completely inhibited in Ni2+-containing medium (1 mM) when lactate served as the sole carbon resource, leading to no sulfate reduction and Ni2+ removal. However, after the addition of citrate, SRB grew well, and sulfate was quickly reduced to sulfide. Simultaneously, the Ni-citrate complex was biodegraded to Ni2+ and acetate. The NiS precipitate was then formed, and Ni2+ was completely removed from the solution. It was suggested that the addition of citrate greatly alleviates Ni2+ toxicity to SRB and improves the removal of Ni2+, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR targeting dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes. Analysis of the carbon metabolism indicated that lactate instead of acetate served as the electron donor for sulfate reduction. This study offers a potential approach to increase the removal of heavy metals from wastewater in the single stage SRB-based bioprocess. PMID:25860948

  4. Cultivation of high-rate sulfate reducing sludge by pH-based electron donor dosage.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Paula L; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Lettinga, Gatze; Lens, Piet N L

    2005-07-21

    A novel self-regulating bioreactor concept for sulfate reduction is proposed aiming for high biomass concentrations and treatment capacities. The system consists of a cell suspension of sulfate reducing bacteria in a continuous stirred tank reactor (30 degrees C) fed with a mixture of both electron donor and electron acceptor (formic acid and sulfuric acid, respectively), nutrients and phosphate buffer via a pH controller. The pH rise due to sulfate reduction is balanced with dosage of the sulfate reducing substrates as acids. The reactor concept was shown to be capable of full sulfate reduction without competition for the electron donor by methanogens and acetogens. Activity assays revealed that hardly any methanogenic activity on formate was left in the suspension by the end of the continuous run (130 days). In addition, the sulfidogenic activity with formate and H2/CO2 had increased, respectively, 3.9 and 11.6 times at the end of the experimental run. The evolution of the particle size distribution of the cell suspension over time indicated that newly grown cells have the tendency to attach together in flocs or to the existing agglomerates.

  5. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Alters Physiology but Has Similar Mortality to Pulmonary Fibrosis Without Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Rounds, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Studies have described individuals with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), with preserved lung volumes, significant reductions in gas exchange, and high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. While physiologic changes in CPFE are well documented, there is little mortality data in the CPFE population compared to appropriate controls. A study was performed to determine the features and outcomes of a group of individuals with imaging and/or pathologic evidence of CPFE to determine if individuals with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema have different features and survival than individuals with pulmonary fibrosis alone. We conducted a retrospective study at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Included in the study were individuals hospitalized over a 5-year period who were given a clinical diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis. Individuals with confirmed imaging or pathologic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis were divided into a study group with concomitant emphysema (CPFE group, n = 20) and a control group without emphysema (isolated pulmonary fibrosis (PF) group, n = 24). The CPFE group, all current or former cigarette smokers, had significantly larger lung volumes, more expiratory airflow obstruction, and worse gas exchange than the isolated pulmonary fibrosis group. Mortality did not differ between the groups. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema results in unique physiologic features but no difference in survival compared with a group with pulmonary fibrosis alone. PMID:20614219

  6. Molecular characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria community in surface sediments from the adjacent area of Changjiang Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhen, Yu; Mi, Tiezhu; He, Hui; Yu, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which obtain energy from dissimilatory sulfate reduction, play a vital role in the carbon and sulfur cycles. The dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr), catalyzing the last step in the sulfate reduction pathway, has been found in all known SRB that have been tested so far. In this study, the diversity of SRB was investigated in the surface sediments from the adjacent area of Changjiang Estuary by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase beta subunit gene ( dsrB). Based on dsrB clone libraries constructed in this study, diversified SRB were found, represented by 173 unique OTUs. Certain cloned sequences were associated with Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and a large fraction (60%) of novel sequences that have deeply branched groups in the dsrB tree, indicating that novel SRB inhabit the surface sediments. In addition, correlations of the SRB assemblages with environmental factors were analyzed by the linear model-based redundancy analysis (RDA). The result revealed that temperature, salinity and the content of TOC were most closely correlated with the SRB communities. More information on SRB community was obtained by applying the utility of UniFrac to published dsrB gene sequences from this study and other 9 different kinds of marine environments. The results demonstrated that there were highly similar SRB genotypes in the marine and estuarine sediments, and that geographic positions and environmental factors influenced the SRB community distribution.

  7. Purification and characterization of homo- and hetero-dimeric acetate kinases from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Ishida, T; Ozawa, K; Akutsu, H; Horiike, K

    2001-03-01

    Two distinct forms of acetate kinase were purified to homogeneity from a sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F. The enzymes were separated from the soluble fraction of the cells on anion exchange columns. One acetate kinase (AK-I) was a homodimer (alpha(S)(2)) and the other (AK-II) was a heterodimer (alpha(S)alpha(L)). On SDS-PAGE, alpha(L) and alpha(S) subunits migrated as bands of 49.3 and 47.8 kDa, respectively, but they had an identical N-terminal amino acid sequence. A rapid HPLC method was developed to directly measure ADP and ATP in assay mixtures. Initial velocity data for AK-I and AK-II were collected by this method and analyzed based on a random sequential mechanism, assuming rapid equilibrium for the substrate binding steps. All kinetic parameters for both the forward acetyl phosphate formation and the reverse ATP formation catalyzed by AK-I and AK-II were successfully determined. The two enzymes showed similar kinetic properties in Mg(2+) requirement, pH-dependence and magnitude of kinetic parameters. These results suggest that two forms of acetate kinase are produced to finely regulate the enzyme function by post-translational modifications of a primary gene product in Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

  8. Vertical distribution and diversity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in the Pearl River estuarine sediments, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lijing; Zheng, Yanping; Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Zhang, Chuanlun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Fengping

    2009-11-01

    The vertical distribution and diversity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) in a sediment core from the Pearl River Estuary was reported for the first time. The profiles of methane and sulfate concentrations along the sediment core indicated processes of methane production/oxidation and sulfate reduction. Phospholipid fatty acids analysis suggested that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) might be abundant in the upper layers, while SRPs might be distributed throughout the sediment core. Quantitative competitive-PCR analysis indicated that the ratios of SRPs to total bacteria in the sediment core varied from around 2-20%. Four dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) gene libraries were constructed and analyzed for the top layer (0-6 cm), middle layer (18-24 cm), bottom layer (44-50 cm) and the sulfate-methane transition zone (32-42 cm) sediments. Most of the retrieved dsrAB sequences (80.9%) had low sequence similarity with known SRP sequences and formed deeply branching dsrAB lineages. Meanwhile, bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that members of the Proteobacteria were predominant in these sediments. Putative SRPs within Desulfobacteriaceae, Syntrophaceae and Desulfobulbaceae of Deltaproteobacteria, and putative SOB within Epsilonproteobacteria were detected by the 16S rRNA gene analysis. Results of this study suggested a variety of novel SRPs in the Pearl River Estuary sediments.

  9. Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii, a hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium involved in the thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    PubMed

    Krukenberg, Viola; Harding, Katie; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Adam, Birgit; Berg, Jasmine S; Knittel, Katrin; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2016-09-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and their specific partner bacteria. In thermophilic AOM consortia enriched from Guaymas Basin, members of the ANME-1 clade are associated with bacteria of the HotSeep-1 cluster, which likely perform direct electron exchange via nanowires. The partner bacterium was enriched with hydrogen as sole electron donor and sulfate as electron acceptor. Based on phylogenetic, genomic and metabolic characteristics we propose to name this chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii. Ca. D. auxilii grows on hydrogen at temperatures between 50°C and 70°C with an activity optimum at 60°C and doubling time of 4-6 days. Its genome draft encodes for canonical sulfate reduction, periplasmic and soluble hydrogenases and autotrophic carbon fixation via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. The presence of genes for pili formation and cytochromes, and their similarity to genes of Geobacter spp., indicate a potential for syntrophic growth via direct interspecies electron transfer when the organism grows in consortia with ANME. This first ANME-free enrichment of an AOM partner bacterium and its characterization opens the perspective for a deeper understanding of syntrophy in anaerobic methane oxidation.

  10. Desulfovibrio idahonensis sp. nov., sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from a metal(loid)-contaminated freshwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Sass, H; Ramamoorthy, S; Yarwood, C; Langner, H; Schumann, P; Kroppenstedt, R M; Spring, S; Rosenzweig, R F

    2009-09-01

    Two novel sulfate-reducing bacteria, strains CY1T and CY2, were isolated from heavy-metal-contaminated sediments of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA. Strains CY1T and CY2 were found to contain c-type cytochromes and to reduce sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, DMSO, anthraquinone disulfonate and fumarate using lactate as an electron donor. In a comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences, CY1T and CY2 were found to be 100% identical, but only 97 and 92.4% similar, respectively, to the type strains of Desulfovibrio mexicanus and Desulfovibrio aminophilus. Unlike these species, however, CY1T was neither able to disproportionate thiosulfate nor able to use yeast extract or amino acids as electron donors. These data, considered in conjunction with differences among strain CY1T and the two related type strains in chemotaxonomy, riboprint patterns, temperature and pH optima, support recognition of a distinct and novel species within the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio idahonensis sp. nov., with the type strain CY1T (=DSM 15450T=JCM 14124T).

  11. Identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in methylmercury-contaminated mine tailings by analysis of SSU rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Winch, Susan; Mills, Heath J; Kostka, Joel E; Fortin, Danielle; Lean, David R S

    2009-04-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are often used in bioremediation of acid mine drainage because microbial sulfate reduction increases pH and produces sulfide that binds with metals. Mercury methylation has also been linked with sulfate reduction. Previous geochemical analysis indicated the occurrence of sulfate reduction in mine tailings, but no molecular characterization of the mine tailings-associated microbial community has determined which SRB are present. This study characterizes the bacterial communities of two geochemically contrasting, high-methylmercury mine tailing environments, with emphasis on SRB, by analyzing small subunit (SSU) rRNA genes present in the tailings sediments and in enrichment cultures inoculated with tailings. Novel Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes-related sequences were detected in both the pH-neutral gold mine tailings and the acidic high-sulfide base-metal tailings. At the subphylum level, the SRB communities differed between sites, suggesting that the community structure was dependent on local geochemistry. Clones obtained from the gold tailings and enrichment cultures were more similar to previously cultured isolates whereas clones from acidic tailings were more closely related to uncultured lineages identified from other acidic sediments worldwide. This study provides new insights into the novelty and diversity of bacteria colonizing mine tailings, and identifies specific organisms that warrant further investigation with regard to their roles in mercury methylation and sulfur cycling in these environments.

  12. Corrosion inhibition of stainless steel by a sulfate-reducing bacteria biofilm in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fu-shao; An, Mao-zhong; Duan, Dong-xia

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion inhibition of stainless steel due to a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilm in seawater was studied. By atomic force microscopy, a layer of fish-scale-like biofilm was found to form as stainless steel coupons were exposed to the culture media with SRB, and this biofilm grew more and more compact. As a result, coupons' surface under the biofilm turned irregular less slowly than that exposed to the sterilized culture media. Then, physicoelectric characteristics of the electrode/biofilm/solution interface were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and the coverage of the biofilm as well as the relative irregularity of coupons' surface was also recorded by EIS spectra. Finally, anodic cyclic polarization results further demonstrated the protective property of the biofilm. Therefore, in estimation of SRB-implicated corrosion of stainless steel, not only the detrimental SRB metabolites but also the protective SRB biofilm as well should be taken into account.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide production by sulfate-reducing bacteria utilizing additives eluted from plastic resins.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Kajihara, Yusuke; Shimidzu, Nobuhiro; Hamamura, Kengo; Nagase, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    In the present study it was demonstrated that organic additives eluted from plastic resins could be utilized as substrates by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Two laboratory-scale experiments, a microcosm experiment and a leaching experiment, were conducted using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as a model plastic resin. In the former experiment, the conversion of sulfate to sulfide was evident in microcosms that received plasticized PVC as the sole carbon source, but not in those that received PVC homopolymer. Additionally, dissolved organic carbon accumulated only in microcosms that received plasticized PVC, indicating that the dissolved organic carbon originated from additives. In the leaching experiment, phenol and bisphenol A were found in the leached solutions. These results suggest that the disposal of waste plastics in inert waste landfills may result in the production of H(2)S.

  14. Formation sphalerite (ZnS) deposits in natural biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Labrenz, M.; Druschel, G. K.; Thomsen-Ebert, T.; Gilbert, B.; Welch, S. A.; Kemner, K. M.; Logan, G. A.; Summons, R. E.; De Stasio, G.; Bond, P. L.; Lai, B.; Kelly, S. D.; Banfield, J. F.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Australian Geological Survey Organisation; Diversions Scuba

    2000-12-01

    Abundant, micrometer-scale, spherical aggregates of 2- to 5-nanometer-diameter sphalerite (ZnS) particles formed within natural biofilms dominated by relatively aerotolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria of the family Desulfobacteriaceae. The biofilm zinc concentration is about 106 times that of associated groundwater (0.09 to 1.1 parts per million zinc). Sphalerite also concentrates arsenic (0.01 weight %) and selenium (0.004 weight %). The almost monomineralic product results from buffering of sulfide concentrations at low values by sphalerite precipitation. These results show how microbes control metal concentrations in groundwater- and wetland-based remediation systems and suggest biological routes for formation of some low-temperature ZnS deposits.

  15. Complete genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing firmicute Desulfotomaculum ruminis type strain (DLT)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Visser, Michael; Lu, Megan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Larimer, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Schaap, Peter J.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuever, Jan; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Parshina, Sofiya N.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-12-11

    Desulfotomaculum ruminis Campbell and Postgate 1965 is a member of the large genus Desulfotomaculum which contains 30 species and is contained in the family Peptococcaceae. This species is of interest because it represents one of the few sulfate- reducing bacteria that have been isolated from the rumen. Here we describe the features of D. ruminis together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,969,014 bp long chromosome with a total of 3,901 protein-coding and 85 RNA genes is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Desulfotomaculum to be pub- lished, and was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program 2009.

  16. Complete genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing firmicute Desulfotomaculum ruminis type strain (DLT)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Visser, Michael; Lu, Megan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Larimer, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Schaap, Peter J.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuever, Jan; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Parshina, Sofiya N.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stams, Alfons J.M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum ruminis Campbell and Postgate 1965 is a member of the large genus Desulfotomaculum which contains 30 species and is contained in the family Peptococcaceae. This species is of interest because it represents one of the few sulfate-reducing bacteria that have been isolated from the rumen. Here we describe the features of D. ruminis together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,969,014 bp long chromosome with a total of 3,901 protein-coding and 85 RNA genes is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Desulfotomaculum to be published, and was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program 2009. PMID:23408247

  17. Suitability of different growth substrates as source of nitrogen for sulfate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2015-11-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) mediated treatment of acid mine drainage is considered as a globally accepted technology. However, inadequate information on the role of nitrogen source in the augmentation of SRB significantly affects the overall treatment process. Sustenance of SRB depends on suitable nitrogen source which is considered as an important nutrient. This review focuses on the different nitrogen rich growth substrates for their effectiveness to support SRB growth and sulfate reduction in passive bioreactors. Compounds like NH4Cl, NH4HCO3, NO3 (-), aniline, tri-nitrotoluene, cornsteep liquor, peptone, urea, and chitin are reported to have served as nitrogen source for SRB. In association with fermentative bacteria, SRB can metabolize these complex compounds to NH4 (+), amines, and amino acids. After incorporation into cells, these compounds take part in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids and enzyme co-factor. This work describes the status of current and the probable directions of the future research.

  18. Styrene N-vinylpyrrolidone metal-nanocomposites as antibacterial coatings against Sulfate Reducing Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fathy, M; Badawi, A; Mazrouaa, A M; Mansour, N A; Ghazy, E A; Elsabee, M Z

    2013-10-01

    Copolymer of styrene, and vinylpyrrolidone was prepared by various techniques. Different nanometals and nanometal oxides were added into the copolymer as antimicrobial agents against Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). The nanocomposite chemical structure was confirmed by using FTIR, (1)H NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The biocidal action of these nanocomposites against the SRB was detected using sulfide determination method in Postgate medium B. The data indicated that the nanocomposites had an inhibitory effect on the growth of SRB and reduced the bacterial corrosion rate of mild steel coupons. The prepared nanocomposites have high inhibition efficiency when applied as coatings and show less efficiency when applied as solids or solution into SRB medium. The copolymer and its nanocomposites effectively reduced the total corrosion rate as determined by total weight loss method.

  19. Application Of Immobilized Sulfate Reducing Bacteria For Permeable Reactive Barriers In Abandoned Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Hur, W.; Choi, S.; Min, K.; Baek, H.

    2006-05-01

    The decline of the Korean coal industry has been drastic in production and consumption. This has been resulted mainly from the environmental concern and the collapse of commercial viability, which has eventually necessitated the government to implement the coal industry rationalization policies to reduce coal production and close down uneconomical mines. The overall drainage rates from abandoned coal mines reaches up to 80,000 ton/day. As a measure of controlling the acid mine drainage from abandoned coal mines, reactive materials in the pathways of drainage, designed to intercept and to transform the contaminants into environmentally acceptable forms can be applied at mines with small drainage rates. The main objective of this study is to design a permeable reactive barrier(PRB) to treat low flow and/or low contaminant loads of acid mine drainage. The PRB is comprised of immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria in hard beads and limestone to remove heavy metals and to raise the pH of AMD. A laboratory reactor was used to prepare a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria. The microbes were separated and mixed with biodegradable matrix to form spherical beads. In order to maintain the viability of micro-organisms for a prolonged period, substrates such as saw dust, polysaccharide or glycerol was supplemented for the beads preparation. The strength of beads fortified by powered limestone to control the permeability of PRB. Different mixtures of limestone and the immobilized beads were tested to determine hydraulic conductivity and AMD treatment capacities. The characteristics of the spherical beads at various pH of AMD was investigated.

  20. The use of magnesium peroxide for the inhibition of sulfate-reducing bacteria under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Jie; Chang, Yi-Tang; Hung, Chun-Hsiung

    2008-11-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which cause microbiologically influenced material corrosion under anoxic conditions, form one of the major groups of microorganisms responsible for the generation of hydrogen sulfide. In this study, which is aimed at reducing the presence of SRB, a novel alternative approach involving the addition of magnesium peroxide (MgO2) compounds involving the use of reagent-grade MgO2 and a commercial product (ORC) was evaluated as a means of inhibiting SRB in laboratory batch columns. Different concentrations of MgO2 were added in the columns when black sulfide sediment had appeared in the columns. The experimental results showed that MgO2 is able to inhibit biogenic sulfide. The number of SRB, the sulfide concentration and the sulfate reducing rate (SRR) were decreased. ORCtrade mark as an additive was able to decrease more effectively the concentration of sulfide in water and the SRB-control effect was maintained over a longer time period when ORCtrade mark was used. The level of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), which has a linear relationship to the sulfide/sulfate ratio, is a good indicator of SRB activity. As determined by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), most SRB growth was inhibited under increasing amounts of added MgO2. The concentration of sulfide reflected the abundance of the SRB. Utilization of organic matter greater than the theoretical SRB utilization rate indicated that facultative heterotrophs became dominant after MgO2 was added. The results of this study could supply the useful information for further study on evaluating the solution to biocorrosion problems in practical situations.

  1. Acetate Production from Oil under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions in Bioreactors Injected with Sulfate and Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Callbeck, Cameron M.; Agrawal, Akhil

    2013-01-01

    Oil production by water injection can cause souring in which sulfate in the injection water is reduced to sulfide by resident sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Sulfate (2 mM) in medium injected at a rate of 1 pore volume per day into upflow bioreactors containing residual heavy oil from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field was nearly completely reduced to sulfide, and this was associated with the generation of 3 to 4 mM acetate. Inclusion of 4 mM nitrate inhibited souring for 60 days, after which complete sulfate reduction and associated acetate production were once again observed. Sulfate reduction was permanently inhibited when 100 mM nitrate was injected by the nitrite formed under these conditions. Pulsed injection of 4 or 100 mM nitrate inhibited sulfate reduction temporarily. Sulfate reduction resumed once nitrate injection was stopped and was associated with the production of acetate in all cases. The stoichiometry of acetate formation (3 to 4 mM formed per 2 mM sulfate reduced) is consistent with a mechanism in which oil alkanes and water are metabolized to acetate and hydrogen by fermentative and syntrophic bacteria (K. Zengler et al., Nature 401:266–269, 1999), with the hydrogen being used by SRB to reduce sulfate to sulfide. In support of this model, microbial community analyses by pyrosequencing indicated SRB of the genus Desulfovibrio, which use hydrogen but not acetate as an electron donor for sulfate reduction, to be a major community component. The model explains the high concentrations of acetate that are sometimes found in waters produced from water-injected oil fields. PMID:23770914

  2. Novel processes for anaerobic sulfate production from elemental sulfur by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfate reducers and related organisms which had previously been found to reduce Fe(III) with H2 or organic electron donors oxidized S0 to sulfate when Mn(IV) was provided as an electron acceptor. Organisms catalyzing this reaction in washed cell suspensions included Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfomicrobium baculatum. Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and Geobacter metallireducens. These organisms produced little or no sulfate from S0 with Fe(III) as a potential electron acceptor or in the absence of an electron acceptor. In detailed studies with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, the stoichiometry of sulfate and Mn(II) production was consistent with the reaction S0 + 3 MnO2 + 4H+ ???SO42- + 3Mn(II) + 2H2O. None of the organisms evaluated could be grown with S0 as the sole electron donor and Mn(IV) as the electron acceptor. In contrast to the other sulfate reducers evaluated, Desulfobulbus propionicus produced sulfate from S0 in the absence of an electron acceptor and Fe(III) oxide stimulated sulfate production. Sulfide also accumulated in the absence of Mn(IV) or Fe(III). The stoichiometry of sulfate and sulfide production indicated that Desulfobulbus propionicus disproportionates S0 as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O???SO42- + 3HS- + 5 H+. Growth of Desulfobulbus propionicus with S0 as the electron donor and Fe(III) as a sulfide sink and/or electron acceptor was very slow. The S0 oxidation coupled to Mn(IV) reduction described here provides a potential explanation for the Mn(IV)-dependent sulfate production that previous studies have observed in anoxic marine sediments. Desulfobulbus propionicus is the first example of a pure culture known to disproportionate S0.

  3. Analyses of Spatial Distributions of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activity in Aerobic Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    1999-01-01

    The vertical distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in aerobic wastewater biofilms grown on rotating disk reactors was investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. To correlate the vertical distribution of SRB populations with their activity, the microprofiles of O2, H2S, NO2−, NO3−, NH4+, and pH were measured with microelectrodes. In addition, a cross-evaluation of the FISH and microelectrode analyses was performed by comparing them with culture-based approaches and biogeochemical measurements. In situ hybridization revealed that a relatively high abundance of the probe SRB385-stained cells (approximately 109 to 1010 cells per cm3 of biofilm) were evenly distributed throughout the biofilm, even in the oxic surface. The probe SRB660-stained Desulfobulbus spp. were found to be numerically important members of SRB populations (approximately 108 to 109 cells per cm3). The result of microelectrode measurements showed that a high sulfate-reducing activity was found in a narrow anaerobic zone located about 150 to 300 μm below the biofilm surface and above which an intensive sulfide oxidation zone was found. The biogeochemical measurements showed that elemental sulfur (S0) was an important intermediate of the sulfide reoxidation in such thin wastewater biofilms (approximately 1,500 μm), which accounted for about 75% of the total S pool in the biofilm. The contribution of an internal Fe-sulfur cycle to the overall sulfur cycle in aerobic wastewater biofilms was insignificant (less than 1%) due to the relatively high sulfate reduction rate. PMID:10543829

  4. Acetate production from oil under sulfate-reducing conditions in bioreactors injected with sulfate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Callbeck, Cameron M; Agrawal, Akhil; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2013-08-01

    Oil production by water injection can cause souring in which sulfate in the injection water is reduced to sulfide by resident sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Sulfate (2 mM) in medium injected at a rate of 1 pore volume per day into upflow bioreactors containing residual heavy oil from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field was nearly completely reduced to sulfide, and this was associated with the generation of 3 to 4 mM acetate. Inclusion of 4 mM nitrate inhibited souring for 60 days, after which complete sulfate reduction and associated acetate production were once again observed. Sulfate reduction was permanently inhibited when 100 mM nitrate was injected by the nitrite formed under these conditions. Pulsed injection of 4 or 100 mM nitrate inhibited sulfate reduction temporarily. Sulfate reduction resumed once nitrate injection was stopped and was associated with the production of acetate in all cases. The stoichiometry of acetate formation (3 to 4 mM formed per 2 mM sulfate reduced) is consistent with a mechanism in which oil alkanes and water are metabolized to acetate and hydrogen by fermentative and syntrophic bacteria (K. Zengler et al., Nature 401:266-269, 1999), with the hydrogen being used by SRB to reduce sulfate to sulfide. In support of this model, microbial community analyses by pyrosequencing indicated SRB of the genus Desulfovibrio, which use hydrogen but not acetate as an electron donor for sulfate reduction, to be a major community component. The model explains the high concentrations of acetate that are sometimes found in waters produced from water-injected oil fields.

  5. Immobilization of cobalt by sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumholz, Lee R.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the impact of sulfate-reduction on immobilization of metals in subsurface aquifers. Co 2+ was used as a model for heavy metals. Factors limiting sulfate-reduction dependent Co 2+ immobilization were tested on pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria, and in sediment columns from a landfill leachate contaminated aquifer. In the presence of 1 mM Co 2+ , the growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria was not impacted. Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfotomaculum gibsoniae , and Desulfomicrobium hypogeia removed greater than 99.99% of the soluble Co 2+ when CoCl 2 was used with no chelators. The above cultures and Desulfoarcula baarsi removed 98-99.94% of the soluble Co(II) when the metal was complexed with the model ligand nitrilotriacetate (Co-NTA). Factors controlling the rate of sulfate-reduction based Co 2+ precipitation were investigated in sediment-cobalt mixtures. Several electron donors were tested and all but toluene accelerated soluble Co 2+ loss. Ethanol and formate showed the greatest stimulation. All complex nitrogen sources tested slowed and decreased the extent of Co 2+ removal from solution relative to formate-amended sediment incubations. A range of pH values were tested (6.35-7.81), with the more alkaline incubations exhibiting the largest precipitation of Co 2+ . The immobilization of Co 2+ in sediments was also investigated with cores to monitor the flow of Co 2+ through undisturbed sediments. An increase in the amount of Co 2+ immobilized as CoS was observed as sulfate reduction activity was stimulated in flow through columns. Both pure culture and sediment incubation data indicate that stimulation of sulfate reduction is a viable strategy in the immobilization of contaminating metals in subsurface systems.

  6. Quantification of Tinto River Sediment Microbial Communities: Importance of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Role in Attenuating Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Amils, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Tinto River (Huelva, Spain) is a natural acidic rock drainage (ARD) environment produced by the bio-oxidation of metallic sulfides from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. This study quantified the abundance of diverse microbial populations inhabiting ARD-related sediments from two physicochemically contrasting sampling sites (SN and JL dams). Depth profiles of total cell numbers differed greatly between the two sites yet were consistent in decreasing sharply at greater depths. Although catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization with domain-specific probes showed that Bacteria (>98%) dominated over Archaea (<2%) at both sites, important differences were detected at the class and genus levels, reflecting differences in pH, redox potential, and heavy metal concentrations. At SN, where the pH and redox potential are similar to that of the water column (pH 2.5 and +400 mV), the most abundant organisms were identified as iron-reducing bacteria: Acidithiobacillus spp. and Acidiphilium spp., probably related to the higher iron solubility at low pH. At the JL dam, characterized by a banded sediment with higher pH (4.2 to 6.2), more reducing redox potential (−210 mV to 50 mV), and a lower solubility of iron, members of sulfate-reducing genera Syntrophobacter, Desulfosporosinus, and Desulfurella were dominant. The latter was quantified with a newly designed CARD-FISH probe. In layers where sulfate-reducing bacteria were abundant, pH was higher and redox potential and levels of dissolved metals and iron were lower. These results suggest that the attenuation of ARD characteristics is biologically driven by sulfate reducers and the consequent precipitation of metals and iron as sulfides. PMID:22544246

  7. Quantification of Tinto River sediment microbial communities: importance of sulfate-reducing bacteria and their role in attenuating acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Amils, Ricardo; Sanz, José Luis

    2012-07-01

    Tinto River (Huelva, Spain) is a natural acidic rock drainage (ARD) environment produced by the bio-oxidation of metallic sulfides from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. This study quantified the abundance of diverse microbial populations inhabiting ARD-related sediments from two physicochemically contrasting sampling sites (SN and JL dams). Depth profiles of total cell numbers differed greatly between the two sites yet were consistent in decreasing sharply at greater depths. Although catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization with domain-specific probes showed that Bacteria (>98%) dominated over Archaea (<2%) at both sites, important differences were detected at the class and genus levels, reflecting differences in pH, redox potential, and heavy metal concentrations. At SN, where the pH and redox potential are similar to that of the water column (pH 2.5 and +400 mV), the most abundant organisms were identified as iron-reducing bacteria: Acidithiobacillus spp. and Acidiphilium spp., probably related to the higher iron solubility at low pH. At the JL dam, characterized by a banded sediment with higher pH (4.2 to 6.2), more reducing redox potential (-210 mV to 50 mV), and a lower solubility of iron, members of sulfate-reducing genera Syntrophobacter, Desulfosporosinus, and Desulfurella were dominant. The latter was quantified with a newly designed CARD-FISH probe. In layers where sulfate-reducing bacteria were abundant, pH was higher and redox potential and levels of dissolved metals and iron were lower. These results suggest that the attenuation of ARD characteristics is biologically driven by sulfate reducers and the consequent precipitation of metals and iron as sulfides.

  8. Treatment of antimony mine drainage: challenges and opportunities with special emphasis on mineral adsorption and sulfate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongchao; Hu, Xiaoxian; Ren, Bozhi

    2016-01-01

    The present article summarizes antimony mine distribution, antimony mine drainage generation and environmental impacts, and critically analyses the remediation approach with special emphasis on iron oxidizing bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria. Most recent research focuses on readily available low-cost adsorbents, such as minerals, wastes, and biosorbents. It is found that iron oxides prepared by chemical methods present superior adsorption ability for Sb(III) and Sb(V). However, this process is more costly and iron oxide activity can be inhibited by plenty of sulfate in antimony mine drainage. In the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria, sulfate can be reduced to sulfide and form Sb(2)S(3) precipitates. However, dissolved oxygen and lack of nutrient source in antimony mine drainage inhibit sulfate reducing bacteria activity. Biogenetic iron oxide minerals from iron corrosion by iron-oxidizing bacteria may prove promising for antimony adsorption, while the micro-environment generated from iron corrosion by iron oxidizing bacteria may provide better growth conditions for symbiotic sulfate reducing bacteria. Finally, based on biogenetic iron oxide adsorption and sulfate reducing bacteria followed by precipitation, the paper suggests an alternative treatment for antimony mine drainage that deserves exploration.

  9. Acid-Tolerant Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Play a Major Role in Iron Cycling in Acidic Iron Rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, K. A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change drives drying and acidification of many rivers and lakes. Abundant sedimentary iron in these systems oxidizes chemically and biologically to form iron-ox(yhydrox)ide crusts and "hardpans". Given generally high sulfate concentrations, the mobilization and cycling of iron in these environments can be strongly influenced by bacterial sulfate reduction. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) induce reductive dissolution of oxidized iron phases by producing the reductant bisulfide as a metabolic product. These environmentally ubiquitous microbes also recycle much of the fixed carbon in sediment-hosted microbial mat communities. With prevalent drying, the buffering capacity for protons liberated from iron oxidation is exceeded, and the activity of sulfate-reducers is restricted to those species capable of tolerating low pH (and generally highly saline, i.e. sulfate-rich) conditions. These species will sustain the recycling of iron from more crystalline phases to more bioavailable species, as well as act as the only source of bisulfide for photosynthesizing microbial communities. The phylogeny and physiology of acid-tolerant SRB is therefore important to Fe, S and C cycling in iron-rich sedimentary environments, particularly those on a geochemical trajectory towards acidification. Previous studies have shown that these SRB species tend to be highly novel. We studied two distinct environments along a geochemical continuum towards acidification. In both settings, iron redox transformations exert a major, if not controlling, influence on reduction potential. An acidified, iron- rich tidal marsh receiving acid-mine drainage (San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) contained abundant textural evidence for reductive dissolution of Fe(III) in sediments with pH values varying from 2.4 - 3.8. From these sediments, full-length novel dsrAB gene sequences from acid-tolerant SRB were recovered, and sulfur isotope profiles reflected biological fractionation of sulfur under even the most

  10. Nitrate-based niche differentiation by distinct sulfate-reducing bacteria involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane

    PubMed Central

    Green-Saxena, A; Dekas, A E; Dalleska, N F; Orphan, V J

    2014-01-01

    Diverse associations between methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacterial groups (SRB) often co-occur in marine methane seeps; however, the ecophysiology of these different symbiotic associations has not been examined. Here, we applied a combination of molecular, geochemical and Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) coupled to nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (FISH-NanoSIMS) analyses of in situ seep sediments and methane-amended sediment incubations from diverse locations (Eel River Basin, Hydrate Ridge and Costa Rican Margin seeps) to investigate the distribution and physiology of a newly identified subgroup of the Desulfobulbaceae (seepDBB) found in consortia with ANME-2c archaea, and compared these with the more commonly observed associations between the same ANME partner and the Desulfobacteraceae (DSS). FISH analyses revealed aggregates of seepDBB cells in association with ANME-2 from both environmental samples and laboratory incubations that are distinct in their structure relative to co-occurring ANME/DSS consortia. ANME/seepDBB aggregates were most abundant in shallow sediment depths below sulfide-oxidizing microbial mats. Depth profiles of ANME/seepDBB aggregate abundance revealed a positive correlation with elevated porewater nitrate relative to ANME/DSS aggregates in all seep sites examined. This relationship with nitrate was supported by sediment microcosm experiments, in which the abundance of ANME/seepDBB was greater in nitrate-amended incubations relative to the unamended control. FISH-NanoSIMS additionally revealed significantly higher 15N-nitrate incorporation levels in individual aggregates of ANME/seepDBB relative to ANME/DSS aggregates from the same incubation. These combined results suggest that nitrate is a geochemical effector of ANME/seepDBB aggregate distribution, and provides a unique niche for these consortia through their utilization of a greater range of nitrogen substrates than the ANME/DSS. PMID:24008326

  11. Sulfate-reducing bacteria release barium and radium from naturally occurring radioactive material in oil-field barite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, E.J.P.; Landa, E.R.; Kraemer, T.; Zielinski, R.

    2001-01-01

    Scale and sludge deposits formed during oil production can contain elevated levels of Ra, often coprecipitated with barium sulfate (barite). The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria to release 226 Ra and Ba (a Ra analog) from oil-field barite was evaluated. The concentration of dissolved Ba increased when samples containing pipe scale, tank sludge, or oil-field brine pond sediment were incubated with sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio sp., Str LZKI, isolated from an oil-field brine pond. However, Ba release was not stoichiometric with sulfide production in oil-field samples, and <0.1% of the Ba was released. Potential for the release of 226Ra was demonstrated, and the 226 Ra release associated with sulfate-reducing activity was predictable from the amount of Ba released. As with Ba, only a fraction of the 226Ra expected from the amount of sulfide produced was released, and most of the Ra remained associated with the solid material.

  12. Selective cathodic microbial biofilm retention allows a high current-to-sulfide efficiency in sulfate-reducing microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Guillermo; Lu, Yang; Pongy, Sebastien; Keller, Jürg; Ledezma, Pablo; Freguia, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Selective microbial retention is of paramount importance for the long-term performance of cathodic sulfate reduction in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) due to the slow growth rate of autotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this work, we investigate the biofilm retention and current-to-sulfide conversion efficiency using carbon granules (CG) or multi-wall carbon nanotubes deposited on reticulated vitreous carbon (MWCNT-RVC) as electrode materials. For ~2months, the MECs were operated at sulfate loading rates of 21 to 309gSO4 -S/m(2)/d. Although MWCNT-RVC achieved a current density of 57±11A/m(2), greater than the 32±9A/m(2) observed using CG, both materials exhibited similar sulfate reduction rates (SRR), with MWCNT-RVC reaching 104±16gSO4 -S/m(2)/d while 110±13gSO4 -S/m(2)/d were achieved with CG. Pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA at the end of experimentation revealed a core community dominated by Desulfovibrio (28%), Methanobacterium (19%) and Desulfomicrobium (14%), on the MWCNT-RVC electrodes. While a similar Desulfovibrio relative abundance of 29% was found in CG-biofilms, Desulfomicrobium was found to be significantly less abundant (4%) and Methanobacterium practically absent (0.2%) on CG electrodes. Surprisingly, our results show that CG can achieve higher current-to-sulfide efficiencies at lower power consumption than the nano-modified three-dimensional MWCNT-RVC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Desulfonatronum zhilinae sp. nov., a novel haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from soda Lake Alginskoe, Trans-Baikal Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Zakharyuk, Anastasiya G; Kozyreva, Ludmila P; Khijniak, Tatyana V; Namsaraev, Bair B; Shcherbakova, Victoria A

    2015-05-01

    A novel haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated Al915-01(T), was isolated from benthic sediments of the Lake Alginskoe, a soda lake located in the Trans-Baikal Region, Russia. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain negative, motile, non-spore-forming vibrion (0.4-0.5 × 1.2-2.3 µm). Strain Al915-01(T) grew in the pH range from 8.0 to 10.5 (optimum pH 9.0) and required NaCl for growth (5-100 g l(-1) NaCl, optimum 40 g l(-1)). The bacterium grew at 10-40 °C (optimally at 36 °C) and used lactate, formate and pyruvate as electron donors in the presence of sulfate. It was able to reduce sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and nitrate with lactate as an electron donor. The isolate was able to grow lithoheterotrophically with sulfate and molecular hydrogen if acetate was added as a carbon source. The predominant fatty acids were anteisoC15:0, isoC17:1, C18:1ω7 and C16:1ω7. The G+C content in the DNA was 58.3 ± 1 mol %. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the new bacterium belongs to the genus Desulfonatronum. The closest relatives were Desulfonatronum buryatense Ki5(T) (99.9 % similarity) and Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(T) (99.2 % similarity). On the basis of the genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, the isolate is proposed as a representative of a novel species Desulfonatronum zhilinae with the type strain Al915-01(T) (=VKM B-2744(T) = DSM 26338(T)).

  14. 34S/ 32S fractionation by sulfate-reducing microbial communities in estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Marjolijn C.; Mason, Paul R. D.; Laverman, Anniet M.; Pallud, Céline; van Cappellen, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    versus SRR relationship include the structure and size of the sulfate-reducing community, and the nature and accessibility of organic substrates. Whole-sediment data such as those presented here provide a link between isotopic fractionations measured with pure cultures of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes and sulfur isotopic signatures recorded in sedimentary deposits.

  15. Factors Governing the Germination of Sulfate-Reducing Desulfotomaculum Endospores Involved in Oil Reservoir Souring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, A.; Bell, E.; Cueto, G.; Suarez-Suarez, A.; Pilloni, G.; Hubert, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoir souring is caused by the activity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in subsurface oil reservoirs, and is often induced by seawater injection during secondary oil recovery. Souring can potentially contribute to corrosion of infrastructure, health and safety hazards to the workforce, and reduction in value by increasing refining costs associated with producing the oil resource. Souring causes annual losses in the billions of dollars to the oil industry. Endospore-forming SRM, such as Desulfotomaculum spp., are often suspected culprits in reservoir souring. Endospores can survive unfavourable conditions for long periods, yet remain poised to germinate and become active if conditions become more favourable. Factors governing endospore germination are poorly understood, but are thought to include availability of nutrients, possibly metabolic by products of other anaerobic bioprocesses, and/or variations in temperature. Most research has focused on aerobic Bacillus spp., with very few studies dedicated to spore germination among anaerobes (order Clostridiales) including the sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum found in anoxic subsurface petroleum reservoirs. For Desulfotomaculum spores in deep hot oil reservoirs, cold seawater introduction during secondary oil recovery may create thermal viability zones for sulfate reduction near the injection wellbore. To evaluate these processes, sulfate-containing microcosms were prepared with different marine sediments as a source of spores, and amended with organic substrates in the presence or absence of oil. Incubation at 80°C for six days was followed by a down-shift in temperature to 60°C to mimic cold seawater injection into a hot reservoir. Souring did not occur at 80°C, but commenced within hours at 60°C. Microcosms were monitored for sulfate reduction and organic acids in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA genes (Ion Torrent, Illumina MiSeq). Through a combination of high

  16. Emotional contagion: dogs and humans show a similar physiological response to human infant crying.

    PubMed

    Yong, Min Hooi; Ruffman, Ted

    2014-10-01

    Humans respond to an infant crying with an increase in cortisol level and heightened alertness, a response interpreted as emotional contagion, a primitive form of empathy. Previous results are mixed when examining whether dogs might respond similarly to human distress. We examined whether domestic dogs, which have a long history of affiliation with humans, show signs of emotional contagion, testing canine (n=75) and human (n=74) responses to one of three auditory stimuli: a human infant crying, a human infant babbling, and computer-generated "white noise", with the latter two stimuli acting as controls. Cortisol levels in both humans and dogs increased significantly from baseline only after listening to crying. In addition, dogs showed a unique behavioral response to crying, combining submissiveness with alertness. These findings suggest that dogs experience emotional contagion in response to human infant crying and provide the first clear evidence of a primitive form of cross-species empathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of population dynamics in sulfate-reducing consortia on exposure to sulfate.

    PubMed

    Icgen, Bulent; Harrison, Sue

    2006-12-01

    The microbial population structure and function of a mixed culture of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) maintained in anaerobic continuous bioreactors were tracked before and after a major perturbation, which involved the addition of sulfate to the influent of a bioreactor when operated at steady state at 35 degrees C, pH 7.8 and a 2.5 day residence time with feed stream containing 10 and 15 kg m(-3) sulfate as terminal electron acceptor and 19.6 and 29.4 kg m(-3) ethanol as carbon source and electron donor, respectively. The population structure determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), by using 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes, was linked to the functional performance of the SRB in the reactor. Hybridization analysis using these 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes revealed that a high concentration of sulfate was toxic for Desulfobacterium and Desulfobulbus. On the other hand, the Desulfococcus group was found to be the most dominant group of SRB in the feed stream containing 15 kg m(-3) sulfate as terminal electron acceptor and 29.4 kg m(-3) ethanol as carbon source and electron donor.

  18. Improved method for enumerating sulfate-reducing bacteria using optical density

    PubMed Central

    Bernardez, L.A.; de Andrade Lima, L.R.P.

    2015-01-01

    The photometric determination of bacterial concentration can be affected by secondary scattering and other interferences. The conventional growth medium for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has iron that precipitates as iron sulfides, a dark precipitate which is useful to indicate bacterial activity. However, iron hydroxides also precipitate at high pH values and the presence of these precipitates interferes considerably in the optical density of the solution affecting estimates of the cell population thus seriously limiting the use of the conventional method. In this method a modification of the current method improves the measurement of the optical density of a solution with SRB cells. • The method consists of an acidification with hydrochloric acid of a sample of a mixed culture of SRB enriched from the produced water from oil fields to pH below 2. • The results show that the relationship between the bacterial dry mass and absorbance is exponential in the observed range. It was observed a large slope in the linearized fit equation, and the acidified solution does not change the integrity of the SRB cells after the treatment. • The results of the kinetic experiments, including the bacterial growth time evolution, demonstrate the applicability of the method. PMID:26150995

  19. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in a plant using deep geothermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawi, Mashal; Lerm, Stephanie; Vetter, Alexandra; Wolfgramm, Markus; Seibt, Andrea; Würdemann, Hilke

    2011-06-01

    Enhanced process understanding of engineered geothermal systems is a prerequisite to optimize plant reliability and economy. We investigated microbial, geochemical and mineralogical aspects of a geothermal groundwater system located in the Molasse Basin by fluid analysis. Fluids are characterized by temperatures ranging from 61°C to 103°C, salinities from 600 to 900 mg/l and a dissolved organic carbon content (DOC) between 6.4 to 19.3 mg C/l. The microbial population of fluid samples was analyzed by genetic fingerprinting techniques based on PCR-amplified 16S rRNA- and dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes. Despite of the high temperatures, microbes were detected in all investigated fluids. Fingerprinting and DNA sequencing enabled a correlation to metabolic classes and biogeochemical processes. The analysis revealed a broad diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Overall, the detection of microbes known to be involved in biocorrosion and mineral precipitation indicates that microorganisms could play an important role for the understanding of processes in engineered geothermal systems.

  20. Sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting natural corrosion deposits from marine steel structures.

    PubMed

    Païssé, Sandrine; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Marty, Florence; Abbas, Ben; Gueuné, Hervé; Amaya, José Maria Sanchez; Muyzer, Gerard; Quillet, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, investigations were conducted on natural corrosion deposits to better understand the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the accelerated corrosion process of carbon steel sheet piles in port environments. We describe the abundance and diversity of total and metabolically active SRB within five natural corrosion deposits located within tidal or low water zone and showing either normal or accelerated corrosion. By using molecular techniques, such as quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis, and sequence cloning based on 16S rRNA, dsrB genes, and their transcripts, we demonstrated a clear distinction between SRB population structure inhabiting normal or accelerated low-water corrosion deposits. Although SRB were present in both normal and accelerated low-water corrosion deposits, they dominated and were exclusively active in the inner and intermediate layers of accelerated corrosion deposits. We also highlighted that some of these SRB populations are specific to the accelerated low-water corrosion deposit environment in which they probably play a dominant role in the sulfured corrosion product enrichment.

  1. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2014-12-23

    The degradation of our environment and the depletion of fossil fuels make the exploration of alternative fuels evermore imperative. Among the alternatives is biohydrogen which has high energy content by weight and produces only water when combusted. Considerable effort is being expended to develop photosynthetic systems -- algae, cyanobacteria, and anaerobic phototrophs -- for sustainable H2 production. While promising, this approach also has hurdles such as the harvesting of light in densely pigmented cultures that requires costly constant mixing and large areas for exposure to sunlight. Little attention is given to fermentative H2 generation. Thus understanding the microbial pathways to H2 evolution and metabolic processes competing for electrons is an essential foundation that may expand the variety of fuels that can be generated or provide alternative substrates for fine chemical production. We studied a widely found soil anaerobe of the class Deltaproteobacteria, a sulfate-reducing bacterium to determine the electron pathways used during the oxidation of substrates and the potential for hydrogen production.

  2. Monitoring microbial populations of sulfate-reducing bacteria using an impedimetric immunosensor based on agglutination assay.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Hou, Baorong

    2009-11-15

    An impedimetric immunosensor was fabricated for rapid and non-labeled detection of sulfate-reducing bacteria, Desulforibrio caledoiensis (SRB) by immobilizing lectin-Concanavalin A using an agglutination assay. The immobilization of lectin was conducted using amine coupling on the surface of a gold (Au) electrode assembled with 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to verify the stepwise assembly of the sensor system. The work conditions of the impedimetric immunosensor, such as pH of the buffer solutions and the incubation time of lectin, were optimized. Faradic impedance spectra for charge transfer for the redox probe Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-)were measured to determine SRB concentrations. The diameter of the Nyquist diagram that is equal to the charge-transfer resistance (R(ct)) increased with increasing SRB concentration. A linear relationship between R(ct) and SRB concentration was obtained in SRB concentration range of 1.8 to 1.8 x 10(7)cfu/ml. The variation of the SRB population during the growth process was also monitored using the impedimetric immunosensor. This approach has great potential for simple, low-cost, and time-saving monitoring of microbial populations.

  3. Bioremediation of copper-containing wastewater by sulfate reducing bacteria coupled with iron.

    PubMed

    Bai, He; Kang, Yong; Quan, Hongen; Han, Yang; Sun, Jiao; Feng, Ying

    2013-11-15

    In order to treat copper-containing wastewater effectively using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), iron (Fe(0)) was added to enhance the activity of SRB. The SRB system and the SRB + Fe(0) system were operated under continuous operation. The sulfate reduction efficiency of the SRB + Fe(0) system was twice as much as that of the SRB system with the sulfate loading rate at 125  mg L(-1) h(-1). The effect of COD/SO4(2-) on sulfate reduction indicates an enhanced activity of SRB by adding Fe(0). 99% of total sulfate was deducted in both systems at pH 4.0-7.0, and temperature slightly influenced the removal of sulfate in the SRB + Fe(0) system. In the copper-containing wastewater treatment, the SRB + Fe(0) system shows a better performance since sulfate removal in this system was higher than the SRB system, and the removal ratio of Cu(2+) was held above 95% in SRB + Fe(0) system at all influent Cu(2+) concentrations. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Zedelius, Johannes; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5 × 0.8 μm. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkane n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes. PMID:25806023

  6. Evaluation of organic substrates to enhance the sulfate-reducing activity in phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Julio; Pérez-López, Rafael; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Nieto, José M

    2012-11-15

    Several experiments were conducted to evaluate the activity and growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in a metal-rich culture medium (approx. 250 mg/L Fe, 75 mg/L Zn and Cu, 10mg/L Cd) with phosphogypsum as bacterial inoculum. Phosphogypsum was collected from the stack covering the salt-marshes of the Tinto river (SW Spain). Three organic amendments were used as carbon sources, two low-cost wastes (horse manure and legume compost) and one sample of natural soil (vegetal cover). In the experiments, sulfate was reduced to sulfide during the growth of SRB populations, and concentrations were decreased in the solution. Metal concentrations also decreased to values below the detection limit. Metal removal took place by precipitation of newly-formed sulfides. Pyrite-S was the main sulfide component (approx. 200 μmol/g and 80% of pyritization) and occurred mainly as framboidal grains and rarely as isolated polyhedral crystals. Horse manure was the most successful organic substrate to promote SRB activity (sulfate removal of 61%), followed by vegetal cover (49%) and legume compost (31%). These findings propose the possibility of using naturally-occurring SRB in the phosphogypsum for bioremediation strategies based on natural soil covers with organic amendments.

  7. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., an alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhilina, T N; Zavarzin, G A; Rainey, F A; Pikuta, E N; Osipov, G A; Kostrikina, N A

    1997-01-01

    A new alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain Z-7935T (T = type strain), was isolated from a soda-depositing lake, Lake Magadi in Kenya. This organism is a motile vibrio which utilizes only hydrogen and formate as electron donors and sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate, but not sulfur, as electron acceptors. Thiosulfate is dismutated. Strain Z-7935T is an obligately sodium-dependent alkaliphile which grows in sodium carbonate medium and does not grow at pH 7; the maximum pH for growth is more than pH 10, and the optimum pH is 9.5 to 9.7. The optimum NaCl concentration for growth is 3% (wt/vol). The optimum temperature for growth is 37 degrees C. The G + C content of the DNA is 48.6 mol%. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis revealed that strain Z-7935T represents a new lineage with genus status in the delta subclass of the Proteobacteria. The name Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this organism; the type strain of D. hydrogenovorans is strain Z-7935 (= DSM 9292).

  9. Potential for beneficial application of sulfate reducing bacteria in sulfate containing domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, T P H; Roest, K; Chen, G H; Brdjanovic, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-11-01

    The activity of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in domestic wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is often considered as a problem due to H2S formation and potential related odour and corrosion of materials. However, when controlled well, these bacteria can be effectively used in a positive manner for the treatment of wastewater. The main advantages of using SRB in wastewater treatment are: (1) minimal sludge production, (2) reduction of potential pathogens presence, (3) removal of heavy metals and (4) as pre-treatment of anaerobic digestion. These advantages are accessory to efficient and stable COD removal by SRB. Though only a few studies have been conducted on SRB treatment of domestic wastewater, the many studies performed on industrial wastewater provide information on the potential of SRB in domestic wastewater treatment. A key-parameter analyses literature study comprising pH, organic substrates, sulfate, salt, temperature and oxygen revealed that the conditions are well suited for the application of SRB in domestic wastewater treatment. Since the application of SRB in WWTP has environmental benefits its application is worth considering for wastewater treatment, when sulfate is present in the influent.

  10. Comparative study of cellulose waste versus organic waste as substrate in a sulfate reducing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, R P; Sheoran, A S

    2011-03-01

    The biodegradability and comparative effectiveness in treatment of acid mine drainage of ten locally available organic waste materials were examined. pH of AMD increased from 2.70 to 6.25, 7.10 and 7.50 with buffalo, cow and goat manures whereas cellulosic wastes increased the pH within the range of 4.83-5.32 in laboratory scale single substrate bioreactors. Significant reduction was observed in Eh, acidity and sulfate with manures in treated AMD. Maximum metal removal efficiency was 99.3%, 99.9%, 99.8%, 99.1%, 99.1%, and 73.8% for Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co and Mn in maximum retention period of 10 days. The highest efficiency of metal removal was observed in bioreactors with manures as single substrate. The effectiveness of substrate depends on its biodegradation ability, the results with cellulosic waste indicates it may need more than 10 days to biodegrade. Biodegradability of organic waste was evaluated according to COD/SO(4)(2-) and C/N ratio and the ratios of 0.48-0.57 and 22.22-23.00 respectively were adequate parameters for activity of sulfate reducing bacteria and pollutant removal efficiency.

  11. Polysulfide reduction using sulfate-reducing bacteria in a photocatalytic hydrogen generation system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yui; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi

    2008-09-01

    A hydrogen generation process using photocatalytic reactions has been proposed. In this process, hydrogen sulfide is a source of hydrogen and is turned into polysulfide. In order to establish the cyclic operation of a photocatalytic hydrogen generation system, it is necessary to convert polysulfide back into hydrogen sulfide with a small energy input. This paper proposes the use of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for the regeneration of hydrogen sulfide. Batch cultivation of natural source SRB samples were carried out using a culture medium containing polysulfide as the only sulfur compound source. SRB produced hydrogen sulfide from several kinds of polysulfide sources, including a photocatalytic hydrogen generation-produces solution. Production lag phase and production rate of hydrogen sulfide were affected by initial polysulfide concentration. SRB activity was inhibited at high initial polysulfide concentrations. SRB enrichment culture T2, exhibited the highest hydrogen sulfide production rate, and was able to utilize several kinds of organic matter as the electron donor. The results suggest the possibility of using large biomass sources, such as sewage sludge and the raw garbage in a hydrogen generation system. We developed speculative estimates that an SRB based hydrogen generation system is feasible.

  12. Reduction and precipitation of neptunium(V) by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.; Rittmann, B. E.; Reed, D. T.

    1999-10-21

    Migration of neptunium, as NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, has been identified as a potentially important pathway for actinide release at nuclear waste repositories and existing sites of subsurface contamination. Reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) will likely reduce its volubility, resulting in lowered subsurface migration. The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to utilize Np(V) as an electron acceptor was investigated, because these bacteria are active in many anaerobic aquifers and are known to facilitate the reduction of metals and radionuclides. Pure and mixed cultures of SRB were able to precipitate neptunium during utilization of pyruvate, lactate, and hydrogen as electron donors in the presence and absence of sulfate. The neptunium in the precipitate was identified as Np(IV) using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. In mixed-culture studies, the addition of hydrogen to consortia grown by pyruvate fermentation stimulated neptunium reduction and precipitation. Experiments with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, growing by lactate fermentation in the absence of sulfate or by sulfate reduction, confirm that the organism is active in neptunium reduction and precipitation. Based on our results, the activity of SRB in the subsurface may have a significant, and potentially beneficial, impact on actinide mobility by reducing neptunium volubility.

  13. Treatment of acid rock drainage using a sulfate-reducing bioreactor with zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2016-05-05

    This study assessed the bioremediation of acid rock drainage (ARD) in flow-through columns testing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the first time as the sole exogenous electron donor to drive sulfate-reducing bacteria in permeable reactive barriers. Columns containing ZVI, limestone or a mixture of both materials were inoculated with an anaerobic mixed culture and fed a synthetic ARD containing sulfuric acid and heavy metals (initially copper, and later also cadmium and lead). ZVI significantly enhanced sulfate reduction and the heavy metals were extensively removed (>99.7%). Solid-phase analyses showed that heavy metals were precipitated with biogenic sulfide in the columns packed with ZVI. Excess sulfide was sequestered by iron, preventing the discharge of dissolved sulfide. In the absence of ZVI, heavy metals were also significantly removed (>99.8%) due to precipitation with hydroxide and carbonate ions released from the limestone. Vertical-profiles of heavy metals in the columns packing, at the end of the experiment, demonstrated that the ZVI columns still had excess capacity to remove heavy metals, while the capacity of the limestone control column was approaching saturation. The ZVI provided conditions that enhanced sulfate reduction and generated alkalinity. Collectively, the results demonstrate an innovative passive ARD remediation process using ZVI as sole electron-donor.

  14. Uranium removal by sulfate reducing biofilms in the presence of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Marsili, E.; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, L.; Merli, C.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-12-01

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized in biofilms composed of the sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in two flat-plate, continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. The growth medium contained uranium U(VI) and the pH was maintained constant using bicarbonate buffer. The reactors were operated for 5 months, and during that time biofilm activity and uranium removal were evaluated. The efficiency of uranium removal strongly depended on the concentration of uranium in the influent, and was estimated to be 30.4% in the reactor supplied with 3 mg/L of U(VI) and 73.9% in the reactor supplied with 30 mg/L of U(VI). TEM and SAED analysis showed that uranium in both reactors accumulated mostly on microbial cell membranes and in the periplasmic space. The deposits had amorphous or poor nanocrystalline structures.

  15. Inhibitory concentrations of 2,4D and its possible intermediates in sulfate reducing biofilms.

    PubMed

    García-Cruz, Ulises; Celis, Lourdes B; Poggi, Héctor; Meraz, Mónica

    2010-07-15

    Different concentrations of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D) and its possible intermediates such as 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4DCP), 4-chlorophenol (4CP), 2-chlorophenol (2CP) and phenol, were assayed to evaluate the inhibitory effect on sulfate and ethanol utilization in a sulfate reducing biofilm. Increasing concentrations of the chlorophenolic compounds showed an adverse effect on sulfate reduction rate and ethanol conversion to acetate, being the intermediate 2,4DCP most toxic than the herbicide. The monochlorophenol 4CP (600 ppm) caused the complete cessation of sulfate reduction and ethanol conversion. The ratio of the electron acceptor to the electron donor utilized as well as the sulfate utilization volumetric rates, diminished when chlorophenols and phenol concentrations were increased, pointing out to the inhibition of the respiratory process and electrons transfer. The difference found in the IC(50) values obtained was due to the chemical structure complexity of the phenolic compounds, the number of chlorine atoms as much as the chlorine atom position in the phenol ring. The IC(50) values (ppm) indicated that the acute inhibition on the biofilm was caused by 2,4DCP (17.4) followed by 2,4D (29.0), 2CP (99.8), 4CP (108.0) and phenol (143.8). 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Linked Redox Precipitation of Sulfur and Selenium under Anaerobic Conditions by Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hockin, Simon L.; Gadd, Geoffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    A biofilm-forming strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), isolated from a naturally occurring mixed biofilm and identified by 16S rDNA analysis as a strain of Desulfomicrobium norvegicum, rapidly removed 200 μM selenite from solution during growth on lactate and sulfate. Elemental selenium and elemental sulfur were precipitated outside SRB cells. Precipitation occurred by an abiotic reaction with bacterially generated sulfide. This appears to be a generalized ability among SRB, arising from dissimilatory sulfide biogenesis, and can take place under low redox conditions and in the dark. The reaction represents a new means for the deposition of elemental sulfur by SRB under such conditions. A combination of transmission electron microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, and cryostage field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to reveal the hydrated nature of SRB biofilms and to investigate the location of deposited sulfur-selenium in relation to biofilm elements. When pregrown SRB biofilms were exposed to a selenite-containing medium, nanometer-sized selenium-sulfur granules were precipitated within the biofilm matrix. Selenite was therefore shown to pass through the biofilm matrix before reacting with bacterially generated sulfide. This constitutes an efficient method for the removal of toxic concentrations of selenite from solution. Implications for environmental cycling and the fate of sulfur and selenium are discussed, and a general model for the potential action of SRB in selenium transformations is presented. PMID:14660350

  17. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in a denitrification reactor packed with wood as a carbon source.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Yamamoto-Ikemoto, Ryoko; Zhu, Jianqing

    2011-02-01

    A denitrification reactor packed with wood as a carbon source was operated using synthetic inorganic wastewater. The maximum denitrification rate was 62.4 g-NO(3)(-)/m(3)/day at HRT of 24 h. The nitrate removal continued after 1500 days. The denitrification efficiency was assumed to enhance sulfur denitrification via wood degradation by sulfate reduction. The achieved sulfate reduction rate was 468 mg-SO(4)(2-)/kg-dry weight wood/day after 419 days of operation. The sulfate reduction rate in the deep-layer biofilm inside the wood was higher than that in the total biofilm inside the wood. The sulfate-reducing bacteria segregated inside the wood. This study suggested that Desulfobulbus spp. and Desulfomicrobium spp. grown in the deep-layer degraded the wood incompletely, and the produced organic acids were utilized by the heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria, Desulfobacter spp. and Desulfonema spp., grown in the surface layer, and that these surface bacteria complete the degradation of the organic acids from the wood.

  18. Sulfate-reducing bacteria stimulate gut immune responses and contribute to inflammation in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Figliuolo, Vanessa Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Liliane Martins; Abalo, Alessandra; Nanini, Hayandra; Santos, Angela; Brittes, Nilda M; Bernardazzi, Claudio; de Souza, Heitor Siffert Pereira; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo

    2017-11-15

    The intestinal microbiota is critical for mammalian immune system development and homeostasis. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are part of the normal gut microbiota, but their increased levels may contribute to colitis development, likely in association with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production. Here, we investigated the effects of SRB in the gut immune response in germ-free mice, and in experimental colitis. After 7days of colonization with Desulfovibrio indonesiensis or with a human SRB consortium (from patients with colitis), germ-free mice exhibited alterations in the colonic architecture, with increased cell infiltration in the lamina propria. SRB colonization upregulated the Th17 and Treg profiles of cytokine production/cell activation, in T cells from mesenteric lymph nodes. These alterations were more pronounced in mice colonized with the human SRB consortium, although D. indonesiensis colonization produced higher levels of H2S. Importantly, the colon of C57BL/6 mice with colitis induced by TNBS or oxazolone had increased SRB colonization, and the administration of D. indonesiensis to mice with TNBS-induced colitis clearly exacerbated the alterations in colonic architecture observed in the established disease, and also increased mouse weight loss. We conclude that SRB contribute to immune response activation in the gut and play an important role in colitis development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Leaching of 226Ra from U mill tailings by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Landa, E R; Miller, C L; Updegraff, D M

    1986-10-01

    Relatively insoluble sulfate precipitates appear to be a major host for Ra in sulfuric acid-treated, U mill tailings. The dissolution of such precipitates by natural processes, such as metabolism by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), creates the potential for release of Ra to contacting waters. Significant leaching of Ra by SRB was achieved in the laboratory during the anaerobic incubation (1 to 119 days) of U mill tailings with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and mixed cultures containing SRB isolated from the tailings, all grown on a lactate medium at room temperature. While the maximum 226Ra concentration reached in a sterile media control was 0.44 Bq/L (12 pCi/L), that in the SRB systems was 61 Bq/L (1640 pCi/L) or about 20% of the total Ra inventory in the original tailings sample. The leaching of Ra in SRB systems was accompanied by a decrease in soluble sulfate concentration, an increase in total sulfide concentration, and an increase in the number of SRB. The observed leaching effect does not appear to be due to the action of microbial chelates or to binding to cell walls. Potential implications of these findings to the management of U mill tailings and other radioactive wastes are discussed.

  1. Selective and specific detection of sulfate-reducing bacteria using potentiometric stripping analysis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Hou, Baorong

    2010-09-15

    A fast, sensitive and reliable potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) is described for the selective detection of the marine pathogenic sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB), Desulforibrio caledoiensis. The chemical and electrochemical parameters that exert influence on the deposition and stripping of lead ion, such as deposition potential, deposition time and pH value were carefully studied. The concentration of SRB was determined in acetate buffer solution (pH 5.2) under the optimized condition (deposition potential of -1.3V, deposition time of 250s, ionic strength of 0.2 mol L(-1) and oxidant mercury (II) concentration of 40 mg L(-1)). A linear relationship between the stripping response and the logarithm of the bacterial concentration was observed in the range of 2.3 x 10 to 2.3 x 10(7) cfu mL(-1). In addition, the potentiometric stripping technique gave a distinct response to the SRB, but had no obvious response to Escherichia coli. The measurement system has a potential for further applications and provides a facile and sample method for detection of pathogenic bacteria. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Diversity of functional genes of methanogens, methanotrophs and sulfate reducers in deep-sea hydrothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Nercessian, Olivier; Bienvenu, Nadège; Moreira, David; Prieur, Daniel; Jeanthon, Christian

    2005-01-01

    To contribute to the identification of methanogens, methanotrophs and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in microbial communities from the 13 degrees N (East Pacific Rise) and Rainbow (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) hydrothermal vent fields, we investigated the diversity of mcrA, pmoA and dsrAB genes sequences. Clone libraries were obtained using DNA isolated from fragments of diffuse vents, sediment and in situ samplers. The clones were categorized by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and representatives of each group were sequenced. Sequences were related to that of hyperthermophilic (order Methanopyrales and family Methanocaldococcaceae), thermophilic and mesophilic (family Methanococcaceae) methanogens, thermophilic (proposed genus 'Methylothermus') and mesophilic type I methanotrophs, and hyperthermophilic (order Archaeoglobales), thermophilic (order Thermodesulfobacteriales) and mesophilic (family Desulfobulbaceae) SRB. Several of the obtained sequences were distantly related to the genes of cultivated organisms, providing evidence of the existence of novel lineages in the three functional groups. This study provides for the first time an insight into the diversity of several functional genes of deep-sea hydrothermal system microorganisms.

  3. Biodegradation of munitions compounds by a sulfate reducing bacterial enrichment culture

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1997-08-01

    The degradation of several munitions compounds was studied. The compounds included 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocine, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene. All of the compounds studied were degraded by the sulfate reducing bacterial (SRB) enrichment culture. The SRB culture did not use the munitions compounds as their sole source of carbon. However, all the munitions compounds tested served as the sole source of nitrogen for the SRB culture. Degradation of munitions compounds was achieved by a co-metabolic process. The SRB culture used a variety of carbon sources including pyruvate, ethanol, formate, lactate, and H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}. The SRB culture was an incomplete oxidizer, unable to carry out the terminal oxidation of organic substrates to CO{sub 2} as the sole product, and it did not use acetate or methanol as a carbon source. In addition to serving as nitrogen sources, the munitions compounds also served as electron acceptors in the absence of sulfate. A soil slurry experiment with 5% and 10% munitions compounds-contaminated soil showed that the contaminant TNT was metabolized by the SRB culture in the presence of pyruvate as electron donor. This culture may be useful in decontaminating munitions compounds-contaminated soil and water under anaerobic conditions.

  4. Ecology of sulfate-reducing bacteria in an iron-dominated, mining-impacted freshwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Srividhya; Piotrowski, Jeffrey S; Langner, Heiko W; Holben, William E; Morra, Matthew J; Rosenzweig, R Frank

    2009-01-01

    A legacy of lead and silver mining in its headwaters left Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho with a sediment body that is highly reduced and contains up to 100 g kg(-1) iron and a smaller fraction of chemically active sulfide phases. The dynamic character of these sulfides and their importance for the sequestering of contaminating trace elements prompted this study of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) involved in their production. We estimated parameters indicative of the distribution and activity of SRB in relation to season, site, and depth. Most probable number estimates and quantitative PCR assays of an SRB-specific functional gene, alpha-adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, indicated 10(3) to 10(6) cultivable cells and 10(5) to 10(7) gene copy numbers g(-1) dry wt sediment, respectively. Although culture-based estimates of SRB abundance correlated poorly with site, season, depth, total S, or pore water SO(4), non-culture-based estimates of SRB abundance were markedly higher at contaminated sites and positively correlated with pore water SO(4). Ex situ estimates of (35)SO(4) respiration and acid volatile sulfides abundance also showed strong among-site effects, indicating elevated sulfidogenesis at contaminated sites. These observations support the view that biogenic sulfides may act in concert with reduced iron to retain soluble metal(loid)s in the solid phase.

  5. Linkage between community diversity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms and methylmercury concentration in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Rong; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) have been thought to play a key role in mercury (Hg) methylation in anoxic environments. The current study examined the linkage between SRM abundance and diversity and contents of methylmercury (MeHg) in paddy soils collected from a historical Hg mining area in China. Soil profile samples were collected from four sites over a distance gradient downstream the Hg mining operation. Results showed that MeHg content in the soil of each site significantly decreased with the extending distance away from Hg mine. Soil MeHg content was correlated positively with abundance of SRM and the contents of organic matter (OM), NH4(+), SO4(2-), and Hg. The abundances of SRM based on dissimilatory (bi) sulfite reductase (dsrAB) gene at 0-40 cm depths were higher than those at 40-80 cm depth at all sites. The SRM community composition varied in the soils of different sampling sites following terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and phylogenetic analyses, which appeared to be correlated with contents of MeHg, OM, NH4(+), and SO4(2-) through canonical correspondence analysis. The dominant groups of SRM in the soils examined belonged to Deltaproteobacteria and some unknown SRM clusters that could have potential for Hg methylation. These results advance our understanding of the relationship between SRM and methylmercury concentration in paddy soil.

  6. Visualization of Mercury Methylating Pure-Culture Sulfate-Reducing Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Reyes, C.; Mendez, C.; Jay, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that can accumulate in food chains posing a serious ecological problem in certain aquatic systems. Relatively less toxic inorganic mercury (Hg) is converted to methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by bacteria, and it has been shown that sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are the major mediators of this process in many aquatic systems. To date, all laboratory studies on bacterial mercury methylation by SRB have been conducted using planktonic, free floating, bacterial cultures, yet bacteria exist mostly as attached communities or biofilms in the environment. We hypothesized that biofilms composed of different SRB would differ in their ability to bind and methylate mercury compared to planktonic cultures. To test our hypothesis ten SRB isolates capable of producing biofilms in the laboratory were enriched from a marine sediment. We identified the isolates by 16S rDNA sequence analysis, compared pure-culture biofilm structure using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal microscopy, and measured mercury methylation in biofilms of these SRB.

  7. Alkaline textile wastewater biotreatment: A sulfate-reducing granular sludge based lab-scale study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qian; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Guo, Gang; Chen, Guanghao

    2017-03-06

    In this study the feasibility of treating dyeing wastewater with sulfate reducing granular sludge was explored, focusing on decolorization/degradation of azo dye (Procion Red HE-7B) and the performance of microbial consortia under alkaline conditions (pH=11). Efficiency of HE-7B degradation was influenced strongly by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration which was examined in the range of 500-3000mg/L. COD removal efficiency was reduced at high COD concentration, while specific removal rate was enhanced to 17.5 mg-COD/gVSSh(-1). HE-7B removal was also improved at higher organic strength with more than 90% removal efficiency and a first-rate removal constant of 5.57h(-1) for dye degradation. Three dye-degradation metabolites were identified by HPLC-MS. The granular structure provided enhanced removal performance for HE-7B and COD in comparison to a near-identical floc SRB system and the key functional organisms were identified by high throughput sequencing. This study demonstrates an example of a niche application where SRB granules can be applied for high efficient and cost-effective treatment of a wastewater under adverse environmental conditions.

  8. Linked redox precipitation of sulfur and selenium under anaerobic conditions by sulfate-reducing bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hockin, Simon L; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2003-12-01

    A biofilm-forming strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), isolated from a naturally occurring mixed biofilm and identified by 16S rDNA analysis as a strain of Desulfomicrobium norvegicum, rapidly removed 200 micro M selenite from solution during growth on lactate and sulfate. Elemental selenium and elemental sulfur were precipitated outside SRB cells. Precipitation occurred by an abiotic reaction with bacterially generated sulfide. This appears to be a generalized ability among SRB, arising from dissimilatory sulfide biogenesis, and can take place under low redox conditions and in the dark. The reaction represents a new means for the deposition of elemental sulfur by SRB under such conditions. A combination of transmission electron microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, and cryostage field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to reveal the hydrated nature of SRB biofilms and to investigate the location of deposited sulfur-selenium in relation to biofilm elements. When pregrown SRB biofilms were exposed to a selenite-containing medium, nanometer-sized selenium-sulfur granules were precipitated within the biofilm matrix. Selenite was therefore shown to pass through the biofilm matrix before reacting with bacterially generated sulfide. This constitutes an efficient method for the removal of toxic concentrations of selenite from solution. Implications for environmental cycling and the fate of sulfur and selenium are discussed, and a general model for the potential action of SRB in selenium transformations is presented.

  9. Modeling in-situ uranium(VI) bioreduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Weber, Frank-Andreas; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Wu, Wei-Min; Nyman, Jennifer L.; Carley, Jack; Jardine, Philip M.; Criddle, Craig S.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2007-06-01

    We present a travel-time based reactive transport model to simulate an in-situ bioremediation experiment for demonstrating enhanced bioreduction of uranium(VI). The model considers aquatic equilibrium chemistry of uranium and other groundwater constituents, uranium sorption and precipitation, and the microbial reduction of nitrate, sulfate and U(VI). Kinetic sorption/desorption of U(VI) is characterized by mass transfer between stagnant micro-pores and mobile flow zones. The model describes the succession of terminal electron accepting processes and the growth and decay of sulfate-reducing bacteria, concurrent with the enzymatic reduction of aqueous U(VI) species. The effective U(VI) reduction rate and sorption site distributions are determined by fitting the model simulation to an in-situ experiment at Oak Ridge, TN. Results show that (1) the presence of nitrate inhibits U(VI) reduction at the site; (2) the fitted effective rate of in-situ U(VI) reduction is much smaller than the values reported for laboratory experiments; (3) U(VI) sorption/desorption, which affects U(VI) bioavailability at the site, is strongly controlled by kinetics; (4) both pH and bicarbonate concentration significantly influence the sorption/desorption of U(VI), which therefore cannot be characterized by empirical isotherms; and (5) calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes significantly influence the model performance of U(VI) reduction.

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of dimethylsulfide and methanethiol in mangrove sediments is dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lyimo, Thomas J; Pol, Arjan; Harhangi, Harry R; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2009-12-01

    The oxidation of dimethylsulfide and methanethiol by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was investigated in Tanzanian mangrove sediments. The rate of dimethylsulfide and methanethiol accumulation in nonamended sediment slurry (control) incubations was very low while in the presence of the inhibitors tungstate and bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES), the accumulation rates ranged from 0.02-0.34 to 0.2-0.4 nmol g FW sediment(-1) h(-1), respectively. Degradation rates of methanethiol and dimethylsulfide added were 2-10-fold higher. These results point to a balance of production and degradation. Degradation was inhibited much stronger by tungstate than by BES, which implied that SRB were more important. In addition, a new species of SRB, designated strain SD1, was isolated. The isolate was a short rod able to utilize a narrow range of substrates including dimethylsulfide, methanethiol, pyruvate and butyrate. Strain SD1 oxidized dimethylsulfide and methanethiol to carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide with sulfate as the electron acceptor and exhibited a low specific growth rate of 0.010 +/- 0.002 h(-1), but a high affinity for its substrates. The isolated microorganism could be placed in the genus Desulfosarcina (the most closely related cultured species was Desulfosarcina variabilis, 97% identity). Strain SD1 represents a member of the dimethylsulfide/methanethiol-consuming SRB population in mangrove sediments.

  11. Treatment of acid rock drainage using a sulfate-reducing bioreactor with zero-valent iron

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the bioremediation of acid rock drainage (ARD) in flow-through columns testing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the first time as the sole exogenous electron donor to drive sulfate-reducing bacteria in permeable reactive barriers. Columns containing ZVI, limestone or a mixture of both materials were inoculated with an anaerobic mixed culture and fed a synthetic ARD containing sulfuric acid and heavy metals (initially copper, and later also cadmium and lead). ZVI significantly enhanced sulfate reduction and the heavy metals were extensively removed (> 99.7%). Solid-phase analyses showed that heavy metals were precipitated with biogenic sulfide in the columns packed with ZVI. Excess sulfide was sequestered by iron, preventing the discharge of dissolved sulfide. In the absence of ZVI, heavy metals were also significantly removed (> 99.8%) due to precipitation with hydroxide and carbonate ions released from the limestone. Vertical-profiles of heavy metals in the columns packing, at the end of the experiment, demonstrated that the ZVI columns still had excess capacity to remove heavy metals, while the capacity of the limestone control column was approaching saturation. The ZVI provided conditions that enhanced sulfate reduction and generated alkalinity. Collectively, the results demonstrate an innovative passive ARD remediation using ZVI as sole electron-donor. PMID:26808248

  12. Desulfosporosinus meridiei sp. nov., a spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from gasolene-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Robertson, W J; Bowman, J P; Franzmann, P D; Mee, B J

    2001-01-01

    Eight strains of spore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacteria, isolated from groundwater contaminated with motor fuel [mostly benzene, toluene ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) compounds] in sandy soil near Perth, Australia, were closely related to Desulfosporosinus (previously Desulfotomaculum) orientis DSM 765T (95.3-97.3% 16S rDNA sequence similarity). Whole-cell fatty acids were dominated by even-carbon, straight-chain saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids, in particular 16:0, 16:1cis9, 14:0 and 18:1cis11. The strains grew at temperatures between 4 and 42 degrees C and in medium containing up to 4% NaCl. The eight strains clustered into two main groups based on phylogeny, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR patterns and nutritional characteristics. Representatives of the two groups, strain S5 (group A) and strain S10T (group B) had 81% DNA-DNA homology with each other and therefore should be accommodated in the same species. Strain S10T had less than 38% homology with Desulfosporosinus orientis DSM 765T, the most closely phylogenetically related type strain available. The new strains were distinguished from Desulfosporosinus orientis DSM 765T by different banding patterns in a RAPD-PCR, and phenotypically by their inability to utilize fumarate as a carbon and energy source with sulfate as the electron acceptor and by their lower tolerance to NaCl. The DNA G+C contents were 46.8 and 46.9 mol% for strains S5 and S10T, respectively (Desulfosporosinus orientis DSM 765T 45.9 mol%). It is proposed that these new strains be placed in a new species of the genus Desulfosporosinus. The name Desulfosporosinus meridiei is proposed, with strain S10T as the type strain (= DSM 13257T = NCIMB 13706T).

  13. Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a Model for Understanding Bacterial Mercury Methylation▿†

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, Cynthia C.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Kucken, Amy M.; Brown, Steven D.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-01-01

    We propose the use of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a model species for understanding the mechanism of microbial Hg methylation. Strain ND132 is an anaerobic dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium (DSRB), isolated from estuarine mid-Chesapeake Bay sediments. It was chosen for study because of its exceptionally high rates of Hg methylation in culture and its metabolic similarity to the lost strain D. desulfuricans LS, the only organism for which methylation pathways have been partially defined. Strain ND132 is an incomplete oxidizer of short-chain fatty acids. It is capable of respiratory growth using fumarate as an electron acceptor, supporting growth without sulfide production. We used enriched stable Hg isotopes to show that ND132 simultaneously produces and degrades methylmercury (MeHg) during growth but does not produce elemental Hg. MeHg produced by cells is mainly excreted, and no MeHg is produced in spent medium. Mass balances for Hg and MeHg during the growth of cultures, including the distribution between filterable and particulate phases, illustrate how medium chemistry and growth phase dramatically affect Hg solubility and availability for methylation. The available information on Hg methylation among strains in the genus Desulfovibrio is summarized, and we present methylation rates for several previously untested species. About 50% of Desulfovibrio strains tested to date have the ability to produce MeHg. Importantly, the ability to produce MeHg is constitutive and does not confer Hg resistance. A 16S rRNA-based alignment of the genus Desulfovibrio allows the very preliminary assessment that there may be some evolutionary basis for the ability to produce MeHg within this genus. PMID:21515733

  14. Thermodesulfatator atlanticus sp. nov., a thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Alain, Karine; Postec, Anne; Grinsard, Elodie; Lesongeur, Françoise; Prieur, Daniel; Godfroy, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A novel, strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain AT1325(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent at the Rainbow site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This strain was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. Cells were Gram-negative motile rods (approximately 2.4 x 0.6 microm) with a single polar flagellum. Strain AT1325(T) grew at 55-75 degrees C (optimum, 65-70 degrees C), at pH 5.5-8.0 (optimum, 6.5-7.5) and in the presence of 1.5-4.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.5 %). Cells grew chemolithoautotrophically with H2 as an energy source and SO4(2-) as an electron acceptor. Alternatively, the novel isolate was able to use methylamine, peptone or yeast extract as carbon sources. The dominant fatty acids (>5 % of the total) were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(18 : 0) and C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain AT1325(T) was 45.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain AT1325(T) within the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, in the bacterial domain. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain AT1325(T) belonged to the genus Thermodesulfatator, sharing 97.8 % similarity with the type strain of Thermodesulfatator indicus, the unique representative species of this genus. On the basis of the data presented, it is suggested that strain AT1325(T) represents a novel species of the genus Thermodesulfatator, for which the name Thermodesulfatator atlanticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AT1325(T) (=DSM 21156(T)=JCM 15391(T)).

  15. Desulfotomaculum thermosubterraneum sp. nov., a thermophilic sulfate-reducer isolated from an underground mine located in a geothermally active area.

    PubMed

    Kaksonen, Anna H; Spring, Stefan; Schumann, Peter; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2006-11-01

    A thermophilic, Gram-positive, endospore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from an underground mine in a geothermally active area in Japan. Cells of this strain, designated RL50JIIIT, were rod-shaped and motile. The temperature range for growth was 50-72 degrees C (optimum growth at 61-66 degrees C) and the pH range was 6.4-7.8 (optimum at pH 7.2-7.4). Strain RL50JIIIT tolerated up to 1.5% NaCl, but optimum growth occurred in the presence of 0-1% NaCl. Electron acceptors utilized were sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur. Electron donors utilized were H2 in the presence of CO2, alanine, various carboxylic acids and alcohols. Fermentative growth occurred on lactate and pyruvate. The cell wall contained mesodiaminopimelic acid and the major respiratory isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). Major whole-cell fatty acids were iso-C15:0, iso-C17:0 DMA (dimethyl acetal), iso-C15:0 DMA and iso-C17:0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed 98.7% similarity with Desulfotomaculum solfataricum DSM 14956T. However, DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, Desulfotomaculum luciae and D. solfataricum and the G+C content of the DNA (54.4 mol%) allowed the differentiation of strain RL50JIIIT from the recognized species of the genus Desulfotomaculum. Strain RL50JIIIT therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Desulfotomaculum thermosubterraneum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RL50JIIIT (=DSM 16057T=JCM 13837T).

  16. Desulfobulbus aggregans sp. nov., a Novel Sulfate Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Marine Sediment from the Gulf of Gabes.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, Hanen; Karray, Fatma; Bartoli, Manon; Ben Hnia, Wajdi; Mhiri, Najla; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Bennour, Feten; Kamoun, Lotfi; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2017-04-01

    Three sulfate-reducing bacterial strains designated SM40(T), SM41, and SM43 were isolated from marine sediment in the region of Skhira located in the Gulf of Gabes (Tunisia). These strains grew in anaerobic media with phosphogypsum as a sulfate source and sodium lactate as an electron and carbon source. One of them, strain SM40(T), was characterized by phenotypic and phylogenetic methods. Cells were ovoid, Gram-stain-negative and non-motile. The temperature limits for growth were 10 and 55 °C with an optimum at 35 °C and the pH range was 6.5-8.1 with an optimum at pH 7.5. Growth was observed at salinities ranging from 10 to 80 g NaCl l(-1) with an optimum at 30 g NaCl l(-1). Strain SM40(T) was able to utilize butanol, ethanol, formate, L-glucose, glycerol, lactate, propanol, propionate, and pyruvate as electron donors for the reduction of sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate to H2S. Without electron acceptors, strain SM40(T) fermented butanol and pyruvate. The DNA G+C content of strain SM40(T) was 52.6 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate revealed that strain SM40(T) was closely related to the species in the genus Desulfobulbus of the family Desulfobulbaceae. The sequence similarity between strain SM40 and Desulfobulbus marinus was 95.4%. The phylogenetic analysis, DNA G+C content, and differences in substrate utilization suggested that strain SM40 represents a new species of the genus Desulfobulbus, D. aggregans sp. nov. The type strain is strain SM40(T) (=DSM 28693(T) = JCM 19994(T)).

  17. Application of Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography for Monitoring Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Oil Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Bomberg, Malin; Laitila, Arja; Simell, Jaakko; Kapanen, Anu; Juvonen, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) participate in microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of equipment and H2S-driven reservoir souring in oil field sites. Successful management of industrial processes requires methods that allow robust monitoring of microbial communities. This study investigated the applicability of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) targeting the dissimilatory sulfite reductase ß-subunit (dsrB) gene for monitoring SRB communities in oil field samples from the North Sea, the United States, and Brazil. Fifteen of the 28 screened samples gave a positive result in real-time PCR assays, containing 9 × 101 to 6 × 105 dsrB gene copies ml−1. DHPLC and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) community profiles of the PCR-positive samples shared an overall similarity; both methods revealed the same samples to have the lowest and highest diversity. The SRB communities were diverse, and different dsrB compositions were detected at different geographical locations. The identified dsrB gene sequences belonged to several phylogenetic groups, such as Desulfovibrio, Desulfococcus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfobulbus, Desulfotignum, Desulfonatronovibrio, and Desulfonauticus. DHPLC showed an advantage over DGGE in that the community profiles were very reproducible from run to run, and the resolved gene fragments could be collected using an automated fraction collector and sequenced without a further purification step. DGGE, on the other hand, included casting of gradient gels, and several rounds of rerunning, excising, and reamplification of bands were needed for successful sequencing. In summary, DHPLC proved to be a suitable tool for routine monitoring of the diversity of SRB communities in oil field samples. PMID:23793633

  18. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a model for understanding bacterial mercury methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, C C; Elias, Dwayne A; Kucken, A M; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-01-01

    We propose the use of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a model species for understanding the mechanism of microbial Hg methylation. Strain ND132 is an anaerobic dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium (DSRB), isolated from estuarine mid-Chesapeake Bay sediments. It was chosen for study because of its exceptionally high rates of Hg methylation in culture and its metabolic similarity to the lost strain D. desulfuricans LS, the only organism for which methylation pathways have been partially defined. Strain ND132 is an incomplete oxidizer of short-chain fatty acids. It is capable of respiratory growth using fumarate as an electron acceptor, supporting growth without sulfide production. We used enriched stable Hg isotopes to show that ND132 simultaneously produces and degrades methylmercury (MeHg) during growth but does not produce elemental Hg. MeHg produced by cells is mainly excreted, and no MeHg is produced in spent medium. Mass balances for Hg and MeHg during the growth of cultures, including the distribution between filterable and particulate phases, illustrate how medium chemistry and growth phase dramatically affect Hg solubility and availability for methylation. The available information on Hg methylation among strains in the genus Desulfovibrio is summarized, and we present methylation rates for several previously untested species. About 50% of Desulfovibrio strains tested to date have the ability to produce MeHg. Importantly, the ability to produce MeHg is constitutive and does not confer Hg resistance. A 16S rRNA-based alignment of the genus Desulfovibrio allows the very preliminary assessment that there may be some evolutionary basis for the ability to produce MeHg within this genus.

  19. Application of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil fields.

    PubMed

    Priha, Outi; Nyyssönen, Mari; Bomberg, Malin; Laitila, Arja; Simell, Jaakko; Kapanen, Anu; Juvonen, Riikka

    2013-09-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) participate in microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of equipment and H2S-driven reservoir souring in oil field sites. Successful management of industrial processes requires methods that allow robust monitoring of microbial communities. This study investigated the applicability of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) targeting the dissimilatory sulfite reductase ß-subunit (dsrB) gene for monitoring SRB communities in oil field samples from the North Sea, the United States, and Brazil. Fifteen of the 28 screened samples gave a positive result in real-time PCR assays, containing 9 × 10(1) to 6 × 10(5) dsrB gene copies ml(-1). DHPLC and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) community profiles of the PCR-positive samples shared an overall similarity; both methods revealed the same samples to have the lowest and highest diversity. The SRB communities were diverse, and different dsrB compositions were detected at different geographical locations. The identified dsrB gene sequences belonged to several phylogenetic groups, such as Desulfovibrio, Desulfococcus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfobulbus, Desulfotignum, Desulfonatronovibrio, and Desulfonauticus. DHPLC showed an advantage over DGGE in that the community profiles were very reproducible from run to run, and the resolved gene fragments could be collected using an automated fraction collector and sequenced without a further purification step. DGGE, on the other hand, included casting of gradient gels, and several rounds of rerunning, excising, and reamplification of bands were needed for successful sequencing. In summary, DHPLC proved to be a suitable tool for routine monitoring of the diversity of SRB communities in oil field samples.

  20. Field Tests of “In-Situ” Remediation of Groundwater From Dissolved Mercury Utilizing Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field tests of biologically active filters have been conducted at groundwater mercury pollution site in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan. The biofilters represented cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) immobilized on claydite imbedded in wells drilled down to basalt clay layer (14-17 ...

  1. Genome Sequence of Desulfosporosinus sp. OT, an Acidophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium from Copper Mining Waste in Norilsk, Northern Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Abicht, Helge K.; Mancini, Stefano; Karnachuk, Olga V.; Solioz, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We have sequenced the genome of Desulfosporosinus sp. OT, a Gram-positive, acidophilic sulfate-reducing Firmicute isolated from copper tailing sediment in the Norilsk mining-smelting area in Northern Siberia, Russia. This represents the first sequenced genome of a Desulfosporosinus species. The genome has a size of 5.7 Mb and encodes 6,222 putative proteins. PMID:21994931

  2. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Lipid Biomarkers and Biomass for Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Grown with Different Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, K. L.; Jahnke, L. L.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have determined isotope ratios of biomass and Fatty Acids Methyl Esters (FAME) for four Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB) grown lithotrophically and heterotrophically, and are investigating whether these biomarker signatures can reveal the ecological role and distribution of SRB within microbial mats. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Field Tests of “In-Situ” Remediation of Groundwater From Dissolved Mercury Utilizing Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field tests of biologically active filters have been conducted at groundwater mercury pollution site in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan. The biofilters represented cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) immobilized on claydite imbedded in wells drilled down to basalt clay layer (14-17 ...

  4. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Residual Strength of an AZ91D Magnesium Alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianyong; Liu, Yaohui; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jiaan

    2014-10-21

    In this paper, the corrosion residual strength of the AZ91D magnesium alloy in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria is studied. In the experiments, the chemical composition of corrosion film was analyzed by a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, a series of instruments, such as scanning electronic microscope, pH-meter and an AG-10TA materials test machine, were applied to test and record the morphology of the corrosion product, fracture texture and mechanical properties of the AZ91D magnesium alloy. The experiments show that the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in the corrosion process of the AZ91D magnesium alloy. Pitting corrosion was enhanced by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Corrosion pits are important defects that could lead to a significant stress concentration in the tensile process. As a result, sulfate-reducing bacteria influence the corrosion residual strength of the AZ91D magnesium alloy by accelerating pitting corrosion.

  5. BIOREACTOR ECONOMICS, SIZE AND TIME OF OPERATION (BEST) COMPUTER SIMULATOR FOR DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    BEST (bioreactor economics, size and time of operation) is an Excel™ spreadsheet-based model that is used in conjunction with the public domain geochemical modeling software, PHREEQCI. The BEST model is used in the design process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) field bioreacto...

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic and Facultatively Chemolithoautotrophic Sulfate Reducer Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus Strain PM70-1T

    PubMed Central

    Stokke, Runar; Hocking, William Peter; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav

    2013-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing archaea of the genus Archaeoglobus display divergent preferences in the use of energy sources and electron acceptors. Here we present the complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus strain PM70-1T, which distinctly couples chemolithoautotrophic growth on H2/CO2 to sulfate reduction in addition to heterotrophic growth. PMID:23833130

  7. Genome sequence of Desulfosporosinus sp. OT, an acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from copper mining waste in Norilsk, Northern Siberia.

    PubMed

    Abicht, Helge K; Mancini, Stefano; Karnachuk, Olga V; Solioz, Marc

    2011-11-01

    We have sequenced the genome of Desulfosporosinus sp. OT, a Gram-positive, acidophilic sulfate-reducing Firmicute isolated from copper tailing sediment in the Norilsk mining-smelting area in Northern Siberia, Russia. This represents the first sequenced genome of a Desulfosporosinus species. The genome has a size of 5.7 Mb and encodes 6,222 putative proteins.

  8. USING RESPIROMETRY TO MEASURE HYDROGEN UTILIZATION IN SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE PRESENCE OF COPPER AND ZINC

    EPA Science Inventory

    A respirometric method has been developed to measure hydrogen utilization by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). One application of this method has been to test inhibitory metals effects on the SRB culture used in a novel acid mine drainage treatment technology. As a control param...

  9. BIOREACTOR ECONOMICS, SIZE AND TIME OF OPERATION (BEST) COMPUTER SIMULATOR FOR DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    BEST (bioreactor economics, size and time of operation) is an Excel™ spreadsheet-based model that is used in conjunction with the public domain geochemical modeling software, PHREEQCI. The BEST model is used in the design process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) field bioreacto...

  10. Identification of Distinct Communities of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Oil Fields by Reverse Sample Genome Probing

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Voordouw, Johanna K.; Jack, Thomas R.; Foght, Julia; Fedorak, Phillip M.; Westlake, Donald W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-five different standards of sulfate-reducing bacteria, identified by reverse sample genome probing and defined as bacteria with genomes showing little or no cross-hybridization, were in part characterized by Southern blotting, using 16S rRNA and hydrogenase gene probes. Samples from 56 sites in seven different western Canadian oil field locations were collected and enriched for sulfate-reducing bacteria by using different liquid media containing one of the following carbon sources: lactate, ethanol, benzoate, decanoate, propionate, or acetate. DNA was isolated from the enrichments and probed by reverse sample genome probing using master filters containing denatured chromosomal DNAs from the 35 sulfate-reducing bacterial standards. Statistical analysis of the microbial compositions at 44 of the 56 sites indicated the presence of two distinct communities of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The discriminating factor between the two communities was the salt concentration of the production waters, which were either fresh water or saline. Of 34 standards detected, 10 were unique to the fresh water and 18 were unique to the saline oil field environment, while only 6 organisms were cultured from both communities. Images PMID:16348801

  11. USING RESPIROMETRY TO MEASURE HYDROGEN UTILIZATION IN SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE PRESENCE OF COPPER AND ZINC

    EPA Science Inventory

    A respirometric method has been developed to measure hydrogen utilization by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). One application of this method has been to test inhibitory metals effects on the SRB culture used in a novel acid mine drainage treatment technology. As a control param...

  12. BASE COMPOSITION OF DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID OF SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA DEDUCED FROM BUOYANT DENSITY MEASUREMENTS IN CESIUM CHLORIDE

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Grady F.; Campbell, L. Leon; Postgate, John R.

    1964-01-01

    Saunders, Grady F. (University of Illinois, Urbana), L. Leon Campbell, and John R. Postgate. Base composition of deoxyribonucleic acid of sulfate-reducing bacteria deduced from buoyant density measurements in cesium chloride. J. Bacteriol. 87:1073–1078. 1964.—The base composition of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of sulfate-reducing bacteria was calculated from buoyant density measurements in CsCl. The sporulating sulfate-reducing bacteria fell into two groups: Desulfovibrio orientis with a DNA base composition of 42% guanine plus cytosine (G + C), and Clostridium nigrificans with a DNA base composition of 45% G + C. The mesophilic relative of C. nigrificans had a DNA base composition of 46% G + C. Thirty strains of nonsporulating sulfate-reducing bacteria called D. desulfuricans were studied. They fell into three groups as judged by DNA base composition: group I (11 strains), 60 to 62% G + C; group II (13 strains), 54 to 56% G + C; and group III (6 strains), 46 to 47% G + C. These data underline the need for a taxonomic revision of this group of microorganisms. PMID:5874533

  13. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Residual Strength of an AZ91D Magnesium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xianyong; Liu, Yaohui; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jiaan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the corrosion residual strength of the AZ91D magnesium alloy in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria is studied. In the experiments, the chemical composition of corrosion film was analyzed by a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, a series of instruments, such as scanning electronic microscope, pH-meter and an AG-10TA materials test machine, were applied to test and record the morphology of the corrosion product, fracture texture and mechanical properties of the AZ91D magnesium alloy. The experiments show that the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in the corrosion process of the AZ91D magnesium alloy. Pitting corrosion was enhanced by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Corrosion pits are important defects that could lead to a significant stress concentration in the tensile process. As a result, sulfate-reducing bacteria influence the corrosion residual strength of the AZ91D magnesium alloy by accelerating pitting corrosion. PMID:28788236

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Strain DH, a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Paddy Soils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Li, Guo-Xiang; Chen, Song-Can; Jia, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Kun; Cao, Chang-Li

    2016-01-01

    Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain DH is a sulfate-reducing species. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain DH, with a size of 5,368,588 bp, average G+C content of 47.48%, and 5,296 predicted protein-coding sequences. PMID:26868389

  15. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Lipid Biomarkers and Biomass for Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Grown with Different Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, K. L.; Jahnke, L. L.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have determined isotope ratios of biomass and Fatty Acids Methyl Esters (FAME) for four Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB) grown lithotrophically and heterotrophically, and are investigating whether these biomarker signatures can reveal the ecological role and distribution of SRB within microbial mats. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Distribution of Sulfate-Reducing and Methanogenic Bacteria in Anaerobic Aggregates Determined by Microsensor and Molecular Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Santegoeds, Cecilia M.; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Hesselink, Gijs; Zopfi, Jakob; Lens, Piet; Muyzer, Gerard; de Beer, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    Using molecular techniques and microsensors for H2S and CH4, we studied the population structure of and the activity distribution in anaerobic aggregates. The aggregates originated from three different types of reactors: a methanogenic reactor, a methanogenic-sulfidogenic reactor, and a sulfidogenic reactor. Microsensor measurements in methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates revealed that the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (2 to 3 mmol of S2− m−3 s−1 or 2 × 10−9 mmol s−1 per aggregate) was located in a surface layer of 50 to 100 μm thick. The sulfidogenic aggregates contained a wider sulfate-reducing zone (the first 200 to 300 μm from the aggregate surface) with a higher activity (1 to 6 mmol of S2− m−3 s−1 or 7 × 10−9 mol s−1 per aggregate). The methanogenic aggregates did not show significant sulfate-reducing activity. Methanogenic activity in the methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates (1 to 2 mmol of CH4 m−3 s−1 or 10−9 mmol s−1 per aggregate) and the methanogenic aggregates (2 to 4 mmol of CH4 m−3 s−1 or 5 × 10−9 mmol s−1 per aggregate) was located more inward, starting at ca. 100 μm from the aggregate surface. The methanogenic activity was not affected by 10 mM sulfate during a 1-day incubation. The sulfidogenic and methanogenic activities were independent of the type of electron donor (acetate, propionate, ethanol, or H2), but the substrates were metabolized in different zones. The localization of the populations corresponded to the microsensor data. A distinct layered structure was found in the methanogenic-sulfidogenic aggregates, with sulfate-reducing bacteria in the outer 50 to 100 μm, methanogens in the inner part, and Eubacteria spp. (partly syntrophic bacteria) filling the gap between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria. In methanogenic aggregates, few sulfate-reducing bacteria were detected, while methanogens were found in the core. In the sulfidogenic aggregates, sulfate-reducing bacteria were

  17. Community structure of a sulfate-reducing consortium in lead-contaminated wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yen T; Kieu, Hoa T Q; West, Stephanie; Dang, Yen T; Horn, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the capacity to remove lead by an indigenous consortium of five sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB): Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, Desulfomicrobium salsugmis, Desulfomicrobium escambiense, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and Desulfovibrio carbinolicus, using continuous moving bed biofilm reactor systems. Four continuous moving bed biofilm reactors (referred as R1-R4) were run in parallel for 40 days at lead loading rates of 0, 20, 30 and 40 mg l(-1) day(-1), respectively. The impact of lead on community structure of the SRB consortium was investigated by dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (dsrB-based DGGE), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and chemical analysis. These results indicated that D. escambiense and D. carbinolicus were dominant in all analyzed samples and played a key role in lead removal in R2 (20 mg l(-1) day(-1)) and R3 (30 mg l(-1) day(-)(1)). However, in R4 (40 mg l(-1) day(-1)), these two strains were barely detected by FISH and dsrB-based DGGE. As a result, SRB activity was severely affected by lead toxicity. High lead removal efficiencies of lead (99-100%) were observed in R2 and R3 throughout the operation, whereas that in R4 was significantly decreased (91%) after 40 days of operation. This data strongly implied that the investigated SRB consortium might have potential application for lead removal. Moreover, to improve the efficiency of the lead treatment process, the lead loading rates below the inhibitory level to SRB activity should be selected.

  18. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R. Craig; Kubo, Mike D.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico$-$ permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)$-$were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.

  19. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust.

    PubMed

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-07-01

    Iron (Fe(0) ) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H(2) S, and scavenge of 'cathodic' H(2) from chemical reaction of Fe(0) with H(2) O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe(0) year(-1) ), while conventional H(2) -scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO(3) , Mg/CaCO(3) ) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m(-1) ). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe(0)  → 4Fe(2+)  + 8e(-) ) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e(-)  + SO(4) (2-)  + 9H(+)  → HS(-)  + 4H(2) O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H(2) rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments.

  20. Sulfur isotope enrichment during maintenance metabolism in the thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum putei.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Mark M; Bisher, M E; Pratt, Lisa M; Fong, Jon; Southam, Gordon; Pfiffner, Susan M; Reches, Z; Onstott, Tullis C

    2009-09-01

    Values of Delta(34)S (=delta(34)S(HS)-delta(34)S(SO(4)), where delta(34)S(HS) and delta(34)S(SO(4)) indicate the differences in the isotopic compositions of the HS(-) and SO(4)(2-) in the eluent, respectively) for many modern marine sediments are in the range of -55 to -75 per thousand, much greater than the -2 to -46 per thousand epsilon(34)S (kinetic isotope enrichment) values commonly observed for microbial sulfate reduction in laboratory batch culture and chemostat experiments. It has been proposed that at extremely low sulfate reduction rates under hypersulfidic conditions with a nonlimited supply of sulfate, isotopic enrichment in laboratory culture experiments should increase to the levels recorded in nature. We examined the effect of extremely low sulfate reduction rates and electron donor limitation on S isotope fractionation by culturing a thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfotomaculum putei, in a biomass-recycling culture vessel, or "retentostat." The cell-specific rate of sulfate reduction and the specific growth rate decreased progressively from the exponential phase to the maintenance phase, yielding average maintenance coefficients of 10(-16) to 10(-18) mol of SO(4) cell(-1) h(-1) toward the end of the experiments. Overall S mass and isotopic balance were conserved during the experiment. The differences in the delta(34)S values of the sulfate and sulfide eluting from the retentostat were significantly larger, attaining a maximum Delta(34)S of -20.9 per thousand, than the -9.7 per thousand observed during the batch culture experiment, but differences did not attain the values observed in marine sediments.

  1. Molecular Phylogenetic and Biogeochemical Studies of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Spartina alterniflora

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Mark E.; Evans, Robert S.; Sharak Genthner, Barbara R.; Willis, Stephanie G.; Friedman, Stephanie; Rooney-Varga, Juliette N.; Devereux, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The population composition and biogeochemistry of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the rhizosphere of the marsh grass Spartina alterniflora was investigated over two growing seasons by molecular probing, enumerations of culturable SRB, and measurements of SO42− reduction rates and geochemical parameters. SO42− reduction was rapid in marsh sediments with rates up to 3.5 μmol ml−1 day−1. Rates increased greatly when plant growth began in April and decreased again when plants flowered in late July. Results with nucleic acid probes revealed that SRB rRNA accounted for up to 43% of the rRNA from members of the domain Bacteria in marsh sediments, with the highest percentages occurring in bacteria physically associated with root surfaces. The relative abundance (RA) of SRB rRNA in whole-sediment samples compared to that of Bacteria rRNA did not vary greatly throughout the year, despite large temporal changes in SO42− reduction activity. However, the RA of root-associated SRB did increase from <10 to >30% when plants were actively growing. rRNA from members of the family Desulfobacteriaceae comprised the majority of the SRB rRNA at 3 to 34% of Bacteria rRNA, with Desulfobulbus spp. accounting for 1 to 16%. The RA of Desulfovibrio rRNA generally comprised from <1 to 3% of the Bacteria rRNA. The highest Desulfobacteriaceae RA in whole sediments was 26% and was found in the deepest sediment samples (6 to 8 cm). Culturable SRB abundance, determined by most-probable-number analyses, was high at >107 ml−1. Ethanol utilizers were most abundant, followed by acetate utilizers. The high numbers of culturable SRB and the high RA of SRB rRNA compared to that of Bacteria rRNA may be due to the release of SRB substrates in plant root exudates, creating a microbial food web that circumvents fermentation. PMID:10224021

  2. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust

    PubMed Central

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe0) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H2S, and scavenge of ‘cathodic’ H2 from chemical reaction of Fe0 with H2O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe0 year−1), while conventional H2-scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO3, Mg/CaCO3) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m−1). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe0 → 4Fe2+ + 8e−) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e− + SO42− + 9H+ → HS− + 4H2O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H2 rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments. PMID:22616633

  3. Distribution, activities, and interactions of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Holmes, M Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Reddy, K Ramesh; Ogram, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling methanogenic pathways in the Florida Everglades, the distribution and functional activities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) were investigated in soils (0 to 2 or 0 to 4 cm depth) across the well-documented nutrient gradient in the water conservation areas (WCAs) caused by runoff from the adjacent Everglades Agricultural Area. The methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) sequences that were retrieved from WCA-2A, an area with relatively high concentrations of SO4 (2-) (≥39 μM), indicated that methanogens inhabiting this area were broadly distributed within the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomassiliicoccales. In more than 3 years of monitoring, quantitative PCR (qPCR) using newly designed group-specific primers revealed that the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were more numerous than the Methanosaetaceae obligatory acetotrophs in SO4 (2-)-rich areas of WCA-2A, while the Methanosaetaceae were dominant over the Methanomicrobiales in WCA-3A (with relatively low SO4 (2-) concentrations; ≤4 μM). qPCR of dsrB sequences also indicated that SRPs are present at greater numbers than methanogens in the WCAs. In an incubation study with WCA-2A soils, addition of MoO4 (2-) (a specific inhibitor of SRP activity) resulted in increased methane production rates, lower apparent fractionation factors [αapp; defined as (amount of δ(13)CO2 + 1,000)/(amount of δ(13)CH4 + 1,000)], and higher Methanosaetaceae mcrA transcript levels compared to those for the controls without MoO4 (2-). These results indicate that SRPs play crucial roles in controlling methanogenic pathways and in shaping the structures of methanogen assemblages as a function of position along the nutrient gradient.

  4. A comparative genomic analysis of energy metabolism in sulfate reducing bacteria and archaea.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Inês A Cardoso; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Grein, Fabian; Marques, Marta Coimbra; da Silva, Sofia Marques; Venceslau, Sofia Santos

    2011-01-01

    The number of sequenced genomes of sulfate reducing organisms (SRO) has increased significantly in the recent years, providing an opportunity for a broader perspective into their energy metabolism. In this work we carried out a comparative survey of energy metabolism genes found in 25 available genomes of SRO. This analysis revealed a higher diversity of possible energy conserving pathways than classically considered to be present in these organisms, and permitted the identification of new proteins not known to be present in this group. The Deltaproteobacteria (and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii) are characterized by a large number of cytochromes c and cytochrome c-associated membrane redox complexes, indicating that periplasmic electron transfer pathways are important in these bacteria. The Archaea and Clostridia groups contain practically no cytochromes c or associated membrane complexes. However, despite the absence of a periplasmic space, a few extracytoplasmic membrane redox proteins were detected in the Gram-positive bacteria. Several ion-translocating complexes were detected in SRO including H(+)-pyrophosphatases, complex I homologs, Rnf, and Ech/Coo hydrogenases. Furthermore, we found evidence that cytoplasmic electron bifurcating mechanisms, recently described for other anaerobes, are also likely to play an important role in energy metabolism of SRO. A number of cytoplasmic [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, formate dehydrogenases, and heterodisulfide reductase-related proteins are likely candidates to be involved in energy coupling through electron bifurcation, from diverse electron donors such as H(2), formate, pyruvate, NAD(P)H, β-oxidation, and others. In conclusion, this analysis indicates that energy metabolism of SRO is far more versatile than previously considered, and that both chemiosmotic and flavin-based electron bifurcating mechanisms provide alternative strategies for energy conservation.

  5. A Comparative Genomic Analysis of Energy Metabolism in Sulfate Reducing Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Inês A. Cardoso; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Grein, Fabian; Marques, Marta Coimbra; da Silva, Sofia Marques; Venceslau, Sofia Santos

    2011-01-01

    The number of sequenced genomes of sulfate reducing organisms (SRO) has increased significantly in the recent years, providing an opportunity for a broader perspective into their energy metabolism. In this work we carried out a comparative survey of energy metabolism genes found in 25 available genomes of SRO. This analysis revealed a higher diversity of possible energy conserving pathways than classically considered to be present in these organisms, and permitted the identification of new proteins not known to be present in this group. The Deltaproteobacteria (and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii) are characterized by a large number of cytochromes c and cytochrome c-associated membrane redox complexes, indicating that periplasmic electron transfer pathways are important in these bacteria. The Archaea and Clostridia groups contain practically no cytochromes c or associated membrane complexes. However, despite the absence of a periplasmic space, a few extracytoplasmic membrane redox proteins were detected in the Gram-positive bacteria. Several ion-translocating complexes were detected in SRO including H+-pyrophosphatases, complex I homologs, Rnf, and Ech/Coo hydrogenases. Furthermore, we found evidence that cytoplasmic electron bifurcating mechanisms, recently described for other anaerobes, are also likely to play an important role in energy metabolism of SRO. A number of cytoplasmic [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, formate dehydrogenases, and heterodisulfide reductase-related proteins are likely candidates to be involved in energy coupling through electron bifurcation, from diverse electron donors such as H2, formate, pyruvate, NAD(P)H, β-oxidation, and others. In conclusion, this analysis indicates that energy metabolism of SRO is far more versatile than previously considered, and that both chemiosmotic and flavin-based electron bifurcating mechanisms provide alternative strategies for energy conservation. PMID:21747791

  6. Mercury Methylation Independent of the Acetyl-Coenzyme A Pathway in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrom, Eileen B.; Morel, François M. M.; Benoit, Janina M.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic waters and sediments are the major producers of methylmercury in aquatic systems. Although a considerable amount of work has addressed the environmental factors that control methylmercury formation and the conditions that control bioavailability of inorganic mercury to SRB, little work has been undertaken analyzing the biochemical mechanism of methylmercury production. The acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pathway has been implicated as being key to mercury methylation in one SRB strain, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS, but this result has not been extended to other SRB species. To probe whether the acetyl-CoA pathway is the controlling biochemical process for methylmercury production in SRB, five incomplete-oxidizing SRB strains and two Desulfobacter strains that do not use the acetyl-CoA pathway for major carbon metabolism were assayed for methylmercury formation and acetyl-CoA pathway enzyme activities. Three of the SRB strains were also incubated with chloroform to inhibit the acetyl-CoA pathway. So far, all species that have been found to have acetyl-CoA activity are complete oxidizers that require the acetyl-CoA pathway for basic metabolism, as well as methylate mercury. Chloroform inhibits Hg methylation in these species either by blocking the methylating enzyme or by indirect effects on metabolism and growth. However, we have identified four incomplete-oxidizing strains that clearly do not utilize the acetyl-CoA pathway either for metabolism or mercury methylation (as confirmed by the absence of chloroform inhibition). Hg methylation is thus independent of the acetyl-CoA pathway and may not require vitamin B12 in some and perhaps many incomplete-oxidizing SRB strains. PMID:12957930

  7. Competitive reaction kinetics of sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic bacteria in anaerobic filters.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Hsien; Huang, Ju-Sheng; Chen, Wen-Guang; Ohara, Reiko

    2008-11-01

    A kinetic model for the anaerobic filter (AF) that takes into account the mass fractions of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (fSRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) (fMB) and an inhibiting effect of H2S on bacterial groups is proposed. When the acetate-fed AFs were maintained at the low organic loading rate of 2.5kg COD/m3d, variations of the influent COD/SO4(2-) ratio (0.5-3.0) does not materially affect the acetate removal efficiency (all varying between 98.1% and 99.7%). With an increase in influent COD/SO4(2-) ratio, both the biofilm thickness and the specific substrate utilization rate decreased slightly but f(SRB) decreased markedly. The estimated results of fSRB and fMB showed that SRB out-competed MB for bacterial growth if the influent COD/SO4(2-) ratio was maintained at less than 1.3, whereas MB out-competed SRB for bacterial growth if the influent COD/SO4(2-) ratio was maintained at greater than 2.0. The specific substrate utilization rate of SRB (0.19-0.24mg acetate/mg VSSd) was lower than that of MB (0.31-0.59mg acetate/mg VSSd). The estimated kinetic parameters disclosed that the affinity of acetate to MB was higher and unionized H2S imposed a greater inhibiting effect on MB. The model simulation results (acetate and sulfate removal) agreed well with the experimental results.

  8. Methylmercury decomposition in sediments and bacterial cultures: Involvement of methanogens and sulfate reducers in oxidative demethylation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Winfrey, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Demethylation of monomethylmercury in freshwater and estuarine sediments and in bacterial cultures was investigated with 14CH3HgI. Under anaerobiosis, results with inhibitors indicated partial involvement of both sulfate reducers and methanogens, the former dominating estuarine sediments, while both were active in freshwaters. Aerobes were the most significant demethylators in estuarine sediments, but were unimportant in freshwater sediments. Products of anaerobic demethylation were mainly 14CO2 as well as lesser amounts of 14CH4. Acetogenic activity resulted in fixation of some 14CO2 produced from 14CH3HgI into acetate. Aerobic demethylation in estuarine sediments produced only 14CH4, while aerobic demethylation in freshwater sediments produced small amounts of both 14CH4 and 14CO2. Two species of Desulfovibrio produced only traces of 14CH4 from 14CH3HgI, while a culture of a methylotrophic methanogen formed traces of 14CO2 and 14CH4 when grown on trimethylamine in the presence of the 14CH3HgI. These results indicate that both aerobes and anaerobes demethylate mercury in sediments, but that either group may dominate in a particular sediment type. Aerobic demethylation in the estuarine sediments appeared to proceed by the previously characterized organomercurial-lyase pathway, because methane was the sole product. However, aerobic demethylation in freshwater sediments as well as anaerobic demethylation in all sediments studied produced primarily carbon dioxide. This indicates the presence of an oxidative pathway, possibly one in which methylmercury serves as an analog of one-carbon substrates.

  9. Genome sequence of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas: a comparative analysis within the Desulfovibrio genus*

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Pimentel, Catarina; Santos, Catia I; Clemente, Carla; Varela–Raposo, Ana; Resende, Daniela M; da Silva, Sofia M; de Oliveira, Luciana Márcia; Matos, Marcia; Costa, Daniela A; Flores, Orfeu; Ruiz, Jerónimo C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2014-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas is a model organism of sulfate-reducing bacteria of which energy metabolism and stress response have been extensively studied. The complete genomic context of this organism was however, not yet available. The sequencing of the D. gigas genome provides insights into the integrated network of energy conserving complexes and structures present in this bacterium. Comparison with genomes of other Desulfovibrio spp. reveals the presence of two different CRISPR/Cas systems in D. gigas. Phylogenetic analysis using conserved protein sequences (encoded by rpoB and gyrB) indicates two main groups of Desulfovibrio spp, being D. gigas more closely related to D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans strains. Gene duplications were found such as those encoding fumarate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. Complexes not yet described within Desulfovibrio genus were identified: Mnh complex, a v-type ATP-synthase as well as genes encoding the MinCDE system that could be responsible for the larger size of D. gigas when compared to other members of the genus. A low number of hydrogenases and the absence of the codh/acs and pfl genes, both present in D. vulgaris strains, indicate that intermediate cycling mechanisms may contribute substantially less to the energy gain in D. gigas compared to other Desulfovibrio spp. This might be compensated by the presence of other unique genomic arrangements of complexes such as the Rnf and the Hdr/Flox, or by the presence of NAD(P)H related complexes, like the Nuo, NfnAB or Mnh. PMID:25055974

  10. Metabolic niche of a prominent sulfate-reducing human gut bacterium.

    PubMed

    Rey, Federico E; Gonzalez, Mark D; Cheng, Jiye; Wu, Meng; Ahern, Philip P; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2013-08-13

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) colonize the guts of ∼50% of humans. We used genome-wide transposon mutagenesis and insertion-site sequencing, RNA-Seq, plus mass spectrometry to characterize genetic and environmental factors that impact the niche of Desulfovibrio piger, the most common SRB in a surveyed cohort of healthy US adults. Gnotobiotic mice were colonized with an assemblage of sequenced human gut bacterial species with or without D. piger and fed diets with different levels and types of carbohydrates and sulfur sources. Diet was a major determinant of functions expressed by this artificial nine-member community and of the genes that impact D. piger fitness; the latter includes high- and low-affinity systems for using ammonia, a limiting resource for D. piger in mice consuming a polysaccharide-rich diet. Although genes involved in hydrogen consumption and sulfate reduction are necessary for its colonization, varying dietary-free sulfate levels did not significantly alter levels of D. piger, which can obtain sulfate from the host in part via cross-feeding mediated by Bacteroides-encoded sulfatases. Chondroitin sulfate, a common dietary supplement, increased D. piger and H2S levels without compromising gut barrier integrity. A chondroitin sulfate-supplemented diet together with D. piger impacted the assemblage's substrate utilization preferences, allowing consumption of more reduced carbon sources and increasing the abundance of the H2-producing Actinobacterium, Collinsella aerofaciens. Our findings provide genetic and metabolic details of how this H2-consuming SRB shapes the responses of a microbiota to diet ingredients and a framework for examining how individuals lacking D. piger differ from those who harbor it.

  11. Genome sequence of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas: a comparative analysis within the Desulfovibrio genus.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Pimentel, Catarina; Santos, Catia I; Clemente, Carla; Varela-Raposo, Ana; Resende, Daniela M; da Silva, Sofia M; de Oliveira, Luciana Márcia; Matos, Marcia; Costa, Daniela A; Flores, Orfeu; Ruiz, Jerónimo C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2014-08-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas is a model organism of sulfate-reducing bacteria of which energy metabolism and stress response have been extensively studied. The complete genomic context of this organism was however, not yet available. The sequencing of the D. gigas genome provides insights into the integrated network of energy conserving complexes and structures present in this bacterium. Comparison with genomes of other Desulfovibrio spp. reveals the presence of two different CRISPR/Cas systems in D. gigas. Phylogenetic analysis using conserved protein sequences (encoded by rpoB and gyrB) indicates two main groups of Desulfovibrio spp, being D. gigas more closely related to D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans strains. Gene duplications were found such as those encoding fumarate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. Complexes not yet described within Desulfovibrio genus were identified: Mnh complex, a v-type ATP-synthase as well as genes encoding the MinCDE system that could be responsible for the larger size of D. gigas when compared to other members of the genus. A low number of hydrogenases and the absence of the codh/acs and pfl genes, both present in D. vulgaris strains, indicate that intermediate cycling mechanisms may contribute substantially less to the energy gain in D. gigas compared to other Desulfovibrio spp. This might be compensated by the presence of other unique genomic arrangements of complexes such as the Rnf and the Hdr/Flox, or by the presence of NAD(P)H related complexes, like the Nuo, NfnAB or Mnh.

  12. Function of periplasmic hydrogenases in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Sean M; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate the oxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe] hydrogenase, an [NiFeSe] hydrogenase, and two [NiFe] hydrogenases encoded by the hyd, hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand their cellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hyd and hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those of the wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5 or 50% (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfate reduction. Only strains missing the [Fe] hydrogenase were significantly affected during growth with lactate or with 50% (vol/vol) hydrogen as the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5% [vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate data correlated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarray hybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grown under the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed the order 5% hydrogen>50% hydrogen>lactate, whereas expression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These results suggest that growth with lactate and 50% hydrogen is associated with high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best captured by the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe] hydrogenase. In contrast, growth with 5% hydrogen is associated with a low intracellular hydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity [NiFeSe] hydrogenase.

  13. Diversity and Characterization of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Groundwater at a Uranium Mill Tailings Site

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.; Stephen, John R.; McKinley, James P.; Macnaughton, Sarah J.; Hussain, A. K. M. Anwar; Saxton, Arnold M.; White, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of U(VI) to U(IV) plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex., was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from δ-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least 52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0. Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within δ-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (≤302 ppb) samples. One Desulfotomaculum-like sequence cluster overwhelmingly dominated high-U (>1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P = 0.0001). This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable tolerance and adaptation to high levels of uranium and suggests the organism's possible involvement in natural attenuation of uranium. The in situ activity level of Desulfotomaculum in uranium-contaminated environments and its comparison to the activities of other SRB and other functional groups should be an important area for future research. PMID:11425735

  14. Distribution, Activities, and Interactions of Methanogens and Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Holmes, M. Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling methanogenic pathways in the Florida Everglades, the distribution and functional activities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) were investigated in soils (0 to 2 or 0 to 4 cm depth) across the well-documented nutrient gradient in the water conservation areas (WCAs) caused by runoff from the adjacent Everglades Agricultural Area. The methyl coenzyme M reductase gene (mcrA) sequences that were retrieved from WCA-2A, an area with relatively high concentrations of SO42− (≥39 μM), indicated that methanogens inhabiting this area were broadly distributed within the orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomassiliicoccales. In more than 3 years of monitoring, quantitative PCR (qPCR) using newly designed group-specific primers revealed that the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were more numerous than the Methanosaetaceae obligatory acetotrophs in SO42−-rich areas of WCA-2A, while the Methanosaetaceae were dominant over the Methanomicrobiales in WCA-3A (with relatively low SO42− concentrations; ≤4 μM). qPCR of dsrB sequences also indicated that SRPs are present at greater numbers than methanogens in the WCAs. In an incubation study with WCA-2A soils, addition of MoO42− (a specific inhibitor of SRP activity) resulted in increased methane production rates, lower apparent fractionation factors [αapp; defined as (amount of δ13CO2 + 1,000)/(amount of δ13CH4 + 1,000)], and higher Methanosaetaceae mcrA transcript levels compared to those for the controls without MoO42−. These results indicate that SRPs play crucial roles in controlling methanogenic pathways and in shaping the structures of methanogen assemblages as a function of position along the nutrient gradient. PMID:26276115

  15. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R. Craig; Kubo, Mike D.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.

    2013-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico—permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)—were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi. PMID:24616716

  16. Temperature-Dependent Alkyl Glycerol Ether Lipid Composition of Mesophilic and Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vinçon-Laugier, Arnauld; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Mitteau, Isabelle; Grossi, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of non-isoprenoid alkyl glycerol ether lipids in Bacteria and natural environments is increasingly being reported and the specificity and diagenetic stability of these lipids make them powerful biomarkers for biogeochemical and environmental studies. Yet the environmental controls on the biosynthesis of these peculiar membrane lipids remain poorly documented. Here, the lipid content of two mesophilic (Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans and Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans) and one thermophilic (Thermodesulfobacterium commune) sulfate-reducing bacteria—whose membranes are mostly composed of ether lipids—was investigated as a function of growth temperature (20–40°C and 54–84°C, respectively). For all strains, the cellular lipid content was lower at sub- or supra-optimal growth temperature, but the relative proportions of dialkyl glycerols, monoalkyl glycerols and fatty acids remained remarkably stable whatever the growth temperature. Rather than changing the proportions of the different lipid classes, the three strains responded to temperature changes by modifying the average structural composition of the alkyl and acyl chains constitutive of their membrane lipids. Major adaptive mechanisms concerned modifications of the level of branching and of the proportions of the different methyl branched lipids. Specifically, an increase in temperature induced mesophilic strains to produce less dimethyl branched dialkyl glycerols and 10-methyl branched lipids relative to linear structures, and the thermophilic strain to decrease the proportion of anteiso relative to iso methyl branched compounds. These modifications were in agreement with a regulation of the membrane fluidity. In one mesophilic and the thermophilic strains, a modification of the growth temperature further induced changes in the relative proportions of sn-2 vs sn-1 monoalkyl glycerols, suggesting an unprecedented mechanism of homeoviscous adaptation in Bacteria. Strong linear correlations

  17. Tackling the minority: sulfate-reducing bacteria in an archaea-dominated subsurface biofilm.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; DeSantis, Todd Z; Andersen, Gary L; Birarda, Giovanni; Bechtel, Hans A; Piceno, Yvette M; Sonnleitner, Maria; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Archaea are usually minor components of a microbial community and dominated by a large and diverse bacterial population. In contrast, the SM1 Euryarchaeon dominates a sulfidic aquifer by forming subsurface biofilms that contain a very minor bacterial fraction (5%). These unique biofilms are delivered in high biomass to the spring outflow that provides an outstanding window to the subsurface. Despite previous attempts to understand its natural role, the metabolic capacities of the SM1 Euryarchaeon remain mysterious to date. In this study, we focused on the minor bacterial fraction in order to obtain insights into the ecological function of the biofilm. We link phylogenetic diversity information with the spatial distribution of chemical and metabolic compounds by combining three different state-of-the-art methods: PhyloChip G3 DNA microarray technology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy. The results of PhyloChip and FISH technologies provide evidence for selective enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which was confirmed by the detection of bacterial dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B (dsrB) genes via quantitative PCR and sequence-based analyses. We further established a differentiation of archaeal and bacterial cells by SR-FTIR based on typical lipid and carbohydrate signatures, which demonstrated a co-localization of organic sulfate, carbonated mineral and bacterial signatures in the biofilm. All these results strongly indicate an involvement of the SM1 euryarchaeal biofilm in the global cycles of sulfur and carbon and support the hypothesis that sulfidic springs are important habitats for Earth's energy cycles. Moreover, these investigations of a bacterial minority in an Archaea-dominated environment are a remarkable example of the great power of combining highly sensitive microarrays with label-free infrared imaging.

  18. Inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria in aquifer sediment by iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Omoregie, Enoma O; Rose, Jerome; Masion, Armand; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Diels, Ludo; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-03-15

    Batch microcosms were setup to determine the impact of different sized zero valent iron (Fe(0)) particles on microbial sulfate reduction during the in situ bio-precipitation of metals. The microcosms were constructed with aquifer sediment and groundwater from a low pH (3.1), heavy-metal contaminated aquifer. Nano (nFe(0)), micro (mFe(0)) and granular (gFe(0)) sized Fe(0) particles were added to separate microcosms. Additionally, selected microcosms were also amended with glycerol as a C-source for sulfate-reducing bacteria. In addition to metal removal, Fe(0) in microcosms also raised the pH from 3.1 to 6.5, and decreased the oxidation redox potential from initial values of 249 to -226 mV, providing more favorable conditions for microbial sulfate reduction. mFe(0) and gFe(0) in combination with glycerol were found to enhance microbial sulfate reduction. However, no sulfate reduction occurred in the controls without Fe(0) or in the microcosm amended with nFe(0). A separate dose test confirmed the inhibition for sulfate reduction in presence of nFe(0). Hydrogen produced by Fe(0) was not capable of supporting microbial sulfate reduction as a lone electron donor in this study. Microbial analysis revealed that the addition of Fe(0) and glycerol shifted the microbial community towards Desulfosporosinus sp. from a population initially dominated by low pH and metal-resisting Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sulfate-Reducing Microorganisms in Wetlands – Fameless Actors in Carbon Cycling and Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Pester, Michael; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Friedrich, Michael W.; Wagner, Michael; Loy, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater wetlands are a major source of the greenhouse gas methane but at the same time can function as carbon sink. Their response to global warming and environmental pollution is one of the largest unknowns in the upcoming decades to centuries. In this review, we highlight the role of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in the intertwined element cycles of wetlands. Although regarded primarily as methanogenic environments, biogeochemical studies have revealed a previously hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands that can sustain rapid renewal of the small standing pools of sulfate. Thus, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, which frequently occurs at rates comparable to marine surface sediments, can contribute up to 36–50% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in these ecosystems. Since sulfate reduction is thermodynamically favored relative to fermentative processes and methanogenesis, it effectively decreases gross methane production thereby mitigating the flux of methane to the atmosphere. However, very little is known about wetland SRM. Molecular analyses using dsrAB [encoding subunit A and B of the dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase] as marker genes demonstrated that members of novel phylogenetic lineages, which are unrelated to recognized SRM, dominate dsrAB richness and, if tested, are also abundant among the dsrAB-containing wetland microbiota. These discoveries point toward the existence of so far unknown SRM that are an important part of the autochthonous wetland microbiota. In addition to these numerically dominant microorganisms, a recent stable isotope probing study of SRM in a German peatland indicated that rare biosphere members might be highly active in situ and have a considerable stake in wetland sulfate reduction. The hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands and the fact that wetland SRM are not well represented by described SRM species explains their so far neglected role as important actors in carbon cycling and climate change. PMID:22403575

  20. Tackling the minority: sulfate-reducing bacteria in an archaea-dominated subsurface biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; DeSantis, Todd Z; Andersen, Gary L; Birarda, Giovanni; Bechtel, Hans A; Piceno, Yvette M; Sonnleitner, Maria; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Archaea are usually minor components of a microbial community and dominated by a large and diverse bacterial population. In contrast, the SM1 Euryarchaeon dominates a sulfidic aquifer by forming subsurface biofilms that contain a very minor bacterial fraction (5%). These unique biofilms are delivered in high biomass to the spring outflow that provides an outstanding window to the subsurface. Despite previous attempts to understand its natural role, the metabolic capacities of the SM1 Euryarchaeon remain mysterious to date. In this study, we focused on the minor bacterial fraction in order to obtain insights into the ecological function of the biofilm. We link phylogenetic diversity information with the spatial distribution of chemical and metabolic compounds by combining three different state-of-the-art methods: PhyloChip G3 DNA microarray technology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy. The results of PhyloChip and FISH technologies provide evidence for selective enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which was confirmed by the detection of bacterial dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B (dsrB) genes via quantitative PCR and sequence-based analyses. We further established a differentiation of archaeal and bacterial cells by SR-FTIR based on typical lipid and carbohydrate signatures, which demonstrated a co-localization of organic sulfate, carbonated mineral and bacterial signatures in the biofilm. All these results strongly indicate an involvement of the SM1 euryarchaeal biofilm in the global cycles of sulfur and carbon and support the hypothesis that sulfidic springs are important habitats for Earth's energy cycles. Moreover, these investigations of a bacterial minority in an Archaea-dominated environment are a remarkable example of the great power of combining highly sensitive microarrays with label-free infrared imaging. PMID:23178669

  1. Methylmercury decomposition in sediments and bacterial cultures: Involvement of methanogens and sulfate reducers in oxidative demethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W. ); Winfrey, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of mercury has received considerable attention because of the toxicity of methylmercury, its bioaccumulation in biota, and its biomagnification in aquatic food chains. The formation of methylmercury is mediated primarily by microorganisms. Demethylation of monomethylmercury in freshwater and estuarine sediments and in bacterial cultures was investigated with {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI. Under anaerobiosis, results with inhibitors indicated partial involvement of both sulfate reducers and methanogens, the former dominated estuarine sediments, while both were active in freshwaters. Aerobes were the most significant demethylators in estuarine sediments, but were unimportant in freshwater sediments. Products of anaerobic demthylation were mainly {sup 14}CO{sub 2} as well as lesser amounts of {sup 14}CH{sub 4}. Acetogenic activity resulted in fixation of some {sup 14}CO{sub 2} produced from {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI into acetate. Aerobic demethylation in estuarine sediments produced only {sup 14}CH{sub 4}, while aerobic demethylation in freshwater sediments produced small amounts of both {sup 14}CH{sub 4} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Two species of Desulfovibrio produced only traces of {sup 14}CH{sub 4} from {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI, while a culture of a methylotrophic methanogen formed traces of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CH{sub 4} when grown on trimethylamine in the presence of the {sup 14}CH{sub 3}HgI. These results indicate that both aerobes and anaerobes demethylate mercury in sediments, but that either group may dominate in a particular sediment type. Aerobic demethylation in the estuarine sediments appeared to proceed by the previously characterized organomercurial-lyase pathway, because methane was the sole product. This indicates the presence of an oxidative pathway, possibly one in which methylmercury serves as an analog of one-carbon substrates.

  2. Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y J; Peacock, A D; Long, P E; Stephen, J R; McKinley, J P; Macnaughton, S J; Hussain, A K; Saxton, A M; White, D C

    2001-07-01

    Microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of U(VI) to U(IV) plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex., was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from delta-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least 52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0. Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within delta-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (< or =302 ppb) samples. One Desulfotomaculum-like sequence cluster overwhelmingly dominated high-U (>1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P = 0.0001). This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable tolerance and adaptation to high levels of uranium and suggests the organism's possible involvement in natural attenuation of uranium. The in situ activity level of Desulfotomaculum in uranium-contaminated environments and its comparison to the activities of other SRB and other functional groups should be an important area for future research.

  3. The effects of sulfate reducing bacteria on stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo alloy weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, T.A.; Taylor, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Previous research in this laboratory demonstrated a direct correlation between alloy composition and corrosion susceptibility of stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo alloy weldments exposed to lake water augmented with sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). It was shown that lake water containing an active SRB population reduced the polarization resistance (R{sub p}) on all alloys studied including those with 9% Mo. In addition, preliminary evidence indicated that edge preparation and weld heat input were also important parameters in determining corrosion performance. This prior research, however, looked at ``doctored`` weldments in which the thermal oxide in the heat affected zone was removed. The objectives of the research presented here are to further confirm these observations using as-received welds. The materials examined (listed in increasing alloy content) are 1/4 inch thick plates of 316L, 317L, AL6XN (6% Mo), alloy 625 clad steel, alloy 625, and alloy 686. Materials were welded using the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process in an argon purged environment. In addition, 317L was welded in air to test oxide effects. All samples were prepared for welding by grinding to a V-edge, except the 625 clad steel samples which were prepared using a J-edge. Electrochemical performance of welded samples was monitored in four glass cells which could each allow exposure of 8 samples to the same environment. Two cells contained lake water inoculated with SRS, and two cells contained sterilized lake water. The open circuit potential (E{sub oc}) and R{sub p} was used to correlate corrosion susceptibility and bacterial activity with alloy composition and welding parameters.

  4. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-ReducingBacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He,Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-24

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate theoxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe]hydrogenase, an[NiFeSe]hydrogenase, and two [NiFe]hydrogenases encoded by the hyd,hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand theircellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hydand hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those ofthe wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5or 50 percent (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfatereduction. Only strains missing the [Fe]hydrogenase were significantlyaffected during growth with lactate or with 50 percent (vol/vol) hydrogenas the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5 percent[vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate datacorrelated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarrayhybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grownunder the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed theorder 5 percent hydrogen>50 percent hydrogen>lactate, whereasexpression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These resultssuggest that growth with lactate and 50 percent hydrogen is associatedwith high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best capturedby the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe]hydrogenase. In contrast,growth with 5 percent hydrogen is associated with a low intracellularhydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity[NiFeSe]hydrogenase.

  5. Diversity and characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in groundwater at a uranium mill tailings site

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Peacock, A D.; Long, Philip E. ); Stephen, John R.; McKinley, James P. ); Mcnaughton, Sarah J.; Hussain, A K M A.; Saxton, A M.; White, D C.

    2000-12-01

    Microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of U(VI) to U(TV) plays a role in both natural attenuation and accelerated bioremediation of uranium contaminated sites. To realize bioremediation potential and accurately predict natural attenuation, it is important to first understand the microbial diversity of such sites. In this paper, the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated groundwater associated with a uranium mill tailings disposal site at Shiprock, N.Mex,, was investigated. Two culture-independent analyses were employed: sequencing of clone libraries of PCR-amplified dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene fragments and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarker analysis. A remarkable diversity among the DSR sequences was revealed, including sequences from F-Proteobacteria, gram-positive organisms, and the Nitrospira division. PLFA analysis detected at least,52 different mid-chain-branched saturate PLFA and included a high proportion of 10me16:0, Desulfotomaculum and Desulfotomaculum-like sequences were the most dominant DSR genes detected. Those belonging to SRB within F-Proteobacteria were mainly recovered from low-uranium (less than or equal to 302 ppb) samples. One Desulfotomaculum like sequence cluster overwhelmingly dominated high-U (> 1,500 ppb) sites. Logistic regression showed a significant influence of uranium concentration over the dominance of this cluster of sequences (P= 0.0001), This strong association indicates that Desulfotomaculum has remarkable tolerance and adaptation to high levels of uranium and suggests the organism's possible involvement in natural attenuation of uranium. The in situ activity level of Desulfotomaculum in uranium-contaminated environments and its comparison to the activities of other SRB and other functional groups should be an important area for future research.

  6. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate the oxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe] hydrogenase, an [NiFeSe] hydrogenase, and two [NiFe] hydrogenases encoded by the hyd, hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand their cellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hyd and hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those of the wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5 or 50% (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfate reduction. Only strains missing the [Fe] hydrogenase were significantly affected during growth with lactate or with 50% (vol/vol) hydrogen as the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5% [vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate data correlated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarray hybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grown under the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed the order 5% hydrogen > 50% hydrogen > lactate, whereas expression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These results suggest that growth with lactate and 50% hydrogen is associated with high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best captured by the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe] hydrogenase. In contrast, growth with 5% hydrogen is associated with a low intracellular hydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. PMID:17601789

  7. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; ...

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico$-$ permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)$-$were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite ofmore » organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.« less

  8. DMSP: tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase from the marine sulfate-reducing bacterium strain WN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M.; Hansen, T. A.

    2000-08-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an important compatible solute of many marine algae, can be metabolised by bacteria via cleavage to dimethylsulfide and acrylate or via an initial demethylation. This is the first report on the purification of an enzyme that specifically catalyses the demethylation of DMSP. The enzyme was isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium strain WN, which grows on DMSP and demethylates it to methylthiopropionate. DMSP:tetrahydrofolate (THF) methyltransferase from strain WN was purified 76-fold [to a specific activity of 40.5 μmol min -1 (mg protein) -1]. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed two bands of approximately 10 and 35 kDa; in particular the 35 kDa polypeptide became significantly enriched during the purification. Storage of the purified fraction at -20°C under nitrogen resulted in a 99% loss of activity in two days. The activity could be partially restored by addition of 200 μM cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin or coenzyme B 12. ATP did not have any positive effect on activity. Reduction of the assay mixture by titanium(III)nitrilotriacetic acid slightly stimulated the activity. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a native molecular mass between 45 and 60 kDa for the DMSP:THF methyltransferase. The enzyme was most active at 35°C and pH 7.8. Glycine betaine, which can be considered an N-containing structural analogue of DMSP, did not serve as a methyl donor for DMSP:THF methyltransferase. Various sulfur-containing DMSP-analogues were tested but only methylethylsulfoniopropionate served as methyl donor. None of these compounds inhibited methyl transfer from DMSP to THF. Strain WN did not grow on any of the sulfur-containing DMSP-analogues.

  9. Microarray and Functional Gene Analyses of Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes in Low-Sulfate, Acidic Fens Reveal Cooccurrence of Recognized Genera and Novel Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Alexander; Küsel, Kirsten; Lehner, Angelika; Drake, Harold L.; Wagner, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Low-sulfate, acidic (approximately pH 4) fens in the Lehstenbach catchment in the Fichtelgebirge mountains in Germany are unusual habitats for sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) that have been postulated to facilitate the retention of sulfur and protons in these ecosystems. Despite the low in situ availability of sulfate (concentration in the soil solution, 20 to 200 μM) and the acidic conditions (soil and soil solution pHs, approximately 4 and 5, respectively), the upper peat layers of the soils from two fens (Schlöppnerbrunnen I and II) of this catchment displayed significant sulfate-reducing capacities. 16S rRNA gene-based oligonucleotide microarray analyses revealed stable diversity patterns for recognized SRPs in the upper 30 cm of both fens. Members of the family “Syntrophobacteraceae” were detected in both fens, while signals specific for the genus Desulfomonile were observed only in soils from Schlöppnerbrunnen I. These results were confirmed and extended by comparative analyses of environmentally retrieved 16S rRNA and dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase (dsrAB) gene sequences; dsrAB sequences from Desulfobacca-like SRPs, which were not identified by microarray analysis, were obtained from both fens. Hypotheses concerning the ecophysiological role of these three SRP groups in the fens were formulated based on the known physiological properties of their cultured relatives. In addition to these recognized SRP lineages, six novel dsrAB types that were phylogenetically unrelated to all known SRPs were detected in the fens. These dsrAB sequences had no features indicative of pseudogenes and likely represent novel, deeply branching, sulfate- or sulfite-reducing prokaryotes that are specialized colonists of low-sulfate habitats. PMID:15574893

  10. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  11. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  12. Homology modeling of dissimilatory APS reductases (AprBA) of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2008-01-30

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, and two [4Fe-4S] centers) catalyzes the transformation of APS to sulfite and AMP in sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP); in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) it has been suggested to operate in the reverse direction. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme has been determined in different catalytically relevant states providing insights into its reaction cycle. Full-length AprBA sequences from 20 phylogenetically distinct SRP and SOB species were used for homology modeling. In general, the average accuracy of the calculated models was sufficiently good to allow a structural and functional comparison between the beta- and alpha-subunit structures (78.8-99.3% and 89.5-96.8% of the AprB and AprA main chain atoms, respectively, had root mean square deviations below 1 A with respect to the template structures). Besides their overall conformity, the SRP- and SOB-derived models revealed the existence of individual adaptations at the electron-transferring AprB protein surface presumably resulting from docking to different electron donor/acceptor proteins. These structural alterations correlated with the protein phylogeny (three major phylogenetic lineages: (1) SRP including LGT-affected Archaeoglobi and SOB of Apr lineage II, (2) crenarchaeal SRP Caldivirga and Pyrobaculum, and (3) SOB of the distinct Apr lineage I) and the presence of potential APS reductase-interacting redox complexes. The almost identical protein matrices surrounding both [4Fe-4S] clusters, the FAD cofactor, the active site channel and center within the AprB/A models of SRP and SOB point to a highly similar catalytic process of APS reduction/sulfite oxidation independent of the metabolism type the APS reductase is involved in and the species it has been originated from. Based on the comparative models, there are no significant structural differences between

  13. Homology Modeling of Dissimilatory APS Reductases (AprBA) of Sulfur-Oxidizing and Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background The dissimilatory adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, and two [4Fe-4S] centers) catalyzes the transformation of APS to sulfite and AMP in sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP); in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) it has been suggested to operate in the reverse direction. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme has been determined in different catalytically relevant states providing insights into its reaction cycle. Methodology/Principal Findings Full-length AprBA sequences from 20 phylogenetically distinct SRP and SOB species were used for homology modeling. In general, the average accuracy of the calculated models was sufficiently good to allow a structural and functional comparison between the beta- and alpha-subunit structures (78.8–99.3% and 89.5–96.8% of the AprB and AprA main chain atoms, respectively, had root mean square deviations below 1 Å with respect to the template structures). Besides their overall conformity, the SRP- and SOB-derived models revealed the existence of individual adaptations at the electron-transferring AprB protein surface presumably resulting from docking to different electron donor/acceptor proteins. These structural alterations correlated with the protein phylogeny (three major phylogenetic lineages: (1) SRP including LGT-affected Archaeoglobi and SOB of Apr lineage II, (2) crenarchaeal SRP Caldivirga and Pyrobaculum, and (3) SOB of the distinct Apr lineage I) and the presence of potential APS reductase-interacting redox complexes. The almost identical protein matrices surrounding both [4Fe-4S] clusters, the FAD cofactor, the active site channel and center within the AprB/A models of SRP and SOB point to a highly similar catalytic process of APS reduction/sulfite oxidation independent of the metabolism type the APS reductase is involved in and the species it has been originated from. Conclusions Based on the comparative models

  14. Desulfosarcina widdelii sp. nov. and Desulfosarcina alkanivorans sp. nov., hydrocarbon-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from marine sediment and emended description of the genus Desulfosarcina.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miho; Higashioka, Yuriko; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2017-08-01

    In previous studies, two hydrocarbon-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria, strains PP31T and PL12T, were obtained from oil-polluted marine sediments of Shuaiba, Kuwait. They had been reported as organisms capable of anaerobic degradation of p-xylene and n-alkanes, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain PP31T showed 98.8 % sequence similarities to that of Desulfosarcina variabilis'Montpellier'T. Strains PL12T had 97.8 % of sequence similarity to Desulfosarcina ovata oXys1T. They both have been partially characterized, but not been validly published as new species of the genus Desulfosarcina. In this study, additional characterizations of these strains were made to describe them as two new species of the genus Desulfosarcina. Major cellular fatty acids of strain PP31T were C15 : 0 (25.9 %) and anteiso-C15 : 0 (22.3 %), whereas those of strain PL12T were C15 : 0 (21.3 %), C16 : 0 (17.8 %) and anteiso-15 : 0 (11.6 %). The phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene revealed that these isolates should not be classified as any of the known species in the genus Desulfosarcina. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses, these two sulfate reducers are proposed to form two novel species of the genus Desulfosarcina : Desulfosarcina widdelii sp. nov. (PP31T=JCM 31729T=DSM 103921T) and Desulfosarcina alkanivorans sp. nov. (PL12T=JCM 31728T=DSM 103901T). In addition, emended description of the genus Desulfosarcina is presented in this study.

  15. Enzymatic catalysis of mercury methylation by planktonic and biofilm cultures of sulfate- reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Kampalath, R.; Jay, J.

    2007-12-01

    While biofilms are now known to be the predominant form of microbial growth in nature, little is known about their role in environmental mercury (Hg) methylation. Due to its long-range atmospheric transport, Hg contamination of food chains is a worldwide problem, impacting even pristine areas. Among different forms of mercury species, methylmercury (MeHg) is an extremely neurotoxic and biomagnification-prone compound that can lead to severely adverse health effects on wildlife and humans. Considerable studies have shown that in the aquatic environment the external supply of MeHg is not sufficient to account for MeHg accumulation in biota and in situ biological MeHg formation plays a critical role in determining the amount of MeHg in food webs; moreover, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has been identified as the principal Hg-methylating organisms in nature. In a wide range of aquatic systems wetlands are considered important sites for Hg methylation mostly because of the environmental factors that promote microbial activity within, and biofilms are especially important in wetland ecosystems due to large amount of submerged surfaces. Although recent work has focused on the environmental factors that control MeHg production and the conditions that affect the availability of inorganic Hg to SRB, much remains to be understood about the biochemical mechanism of the Hg methylation process in SRB, especially in the biofilm-growth of these microbes. Data from our previous study with SRB strains isolated from a coastal wetland suggested that the specific Hg methylation rate found was approximately an order of magnitude higher in biofilm cells than in planktonic cells. In order to investigate possible reasons for this observed difference, and to test if this phenomenon is observed in other strains, we conducted chloroform, fluroacetate and molybdate inhibition assays in both complete and incomplete-oxidizing SRB species (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans M8, Desulfococcus sp

  16. Modeling Reduction of Uranium U(VI) under Variable Sulfate Concentrations by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spear, John R.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics for the reduction of sulfate alone and for concurrent uranium [U(VI)] and sulfate reduction, by mixed and pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at 21 ± 3°C were studied. The mixed culture contained the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris along with a Clostridium sp. determined via 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. The pure culture was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 7757). A zero-order model best fit the data for the reduction of sulfate from 0.1 to 10 mM. A lag time occurred below cell concentrations of 0.1 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml. For the mixed culture, average values for the maximum specific reaction rate, Vmax, ranged from 2.4 ± 0.2 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1) at 0.25 mM sulfate to 5.0 ± 1.1 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1 at 10 mM sulfate (average cell concentration, 0.52 mg [dry weight]/ml). For the pure culture, Vmax was 1.6 ± 0.2 μmol of sulfate/mg (dry weight) of SRB · h−1 at 1 mM sulfate (0.29 mg [dry weight] of cells/ml). When both electron acceptors were present, sulfate reduction remained zero order for both cultures, while uranium reduction was first order, with rate constants of 0.071 ± 0.003 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml · min−1 for the mixed culture and 0.137 ± 0.016 mg (dry weight) of cells/ml · min−1 (U0 = 1 mM) for the D. desulfuricans culture. Both cultures exhibited a faster rate of uranium reduction in the presence of sulfate and no lag time until the onset of U reduction in contrast to U alone. This kinetics information can be used to design an SRB-dominated biotreatment scheme for the removal of U(VI) from an aqueous source. PMID:10966381

  17. The Importance of Sulfate Adenylyl Transferase in S and O Fractionation by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Johnston, D. T.; Bradley, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is critical to the oxidation of organic matter in modern and ancient oceans, and plays an important role in regulating the redox state of the Earth's surface. The sulfur and oxygen isotopic composition of seawater sulfate and of sulfate minerals reflect the biogeochemical processes that cycle sulfur, of which MSR is among the most important. MSR is a multi-enzymatic reaction network that partitions the isotopes of sulfur and oxygen as a consequence of both the flux of sulfate through this biochemical network and the fractionation imposed by each individual enzyme. MSR affects the δ18O of residual, extracellular sulfate mainly by the equilibration of the MSR intermediate sulfite with extracellular water (Antler et al., 2013 GCA, Wankel et al., 2013 Geobiol). A series of oxidative and exchange reactions catalyzed by APS reductase (APSr), sulfate adenylyl transferase (Sat), and sulfate transporters promote the conversion of water-equilibrated intracellular sulfite to extracellular sulfate. The flux of sulfoxy anions via these proteins will be, at least in part, dependent on the activity of these enzymes. To test this, we examined sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation in genetically engineered mutants of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). In these mutants, the activity of Sat has been artificially increased by perturbing the (i) transcriptional repressor Rex and (ii) its binding site upstream of the gene encoding Sat (Christensen et al., 2015 J. Bacteriol). It was predicted that this would minimize the back reaction of Sat, enhance the intracellular pool of APS, and minimize the equilibration between sulfite and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Both mutants, along with the wild type DvH were grown in batch culture made with water enriched in 18O. Samples were collected throughout batch growth, and we report the evolution of the S and O isotopic composition of sulfate, and of the S isotopic

  18. Biogeochemistry of a Field-Scale Sulfate Reducing Bioreactor Treating Mining Influenced Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennan, D.; Lee, I.; Landkamer, L.; Figueroa, L. A.; Webb, S.; Sharp, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    Acidity, metal release, and toxicity may be environmental health concerns in areas influenced by mining. Mining influenced waters (MIW) can be remediated through the establishment of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors (SRBRs) as part of engineered passive treatment systems. The objective of our research is an enhanced understanding of the biogeochemistry in SRBRs by combining molecular biological and geochemical techniques. Bioreactor reactive substrate, settling pond water, and effluent (from the SRBR) were collected from a field scale SRBR in Arizona, which has been in operation for approximately 3 years. Schematically, the water passes through the SRBR; combines with flow that bypasses the SRBR into the and goes into the mixing pond, and finally is released as effluent to aerobic polishing cells. High throughput sequencing of extracted DNA revealed that Proteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (61%), settling pond (93%), and effluent (50%), with the next most abundant phylum in all samples (excluding uncultured organisms) being Bacteriodes (1-17%). However, at the superclass level, the three samples were more variable. Gammaproteobacteria dominated the reactive substrate (35%), Betaproteobacteria in the settling pond (63%) and finally the effluent was dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (Helicobacteraceae) (43%). Diversity was most pronounced in association with the reactor matrix, and least diverse in the settling pond. Putative functional analysis revealed a modest presence of sulfate/sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB) (>5%) in both the matrix and settling pond but a much higher abundance (43%) of sulfur reducing bacteria in the effluent. Interestingly this effluent population was composed entirely of the family Helicobacteraceae (sulfur reduction II via polysulfide pathway). Other putative functions of interest include metal reduction in the matrix (3%) and effluent (3%), as well as polysaccharide degradation, which was largely abundant in all samples (21

  19. Sulfate-reducing bacteria slow intestinal transit in a bismuth-reversible fashion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ritz, N L; Lin, D M; Wilson, M R; Barton, L L; Lin, H C

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) serves as a mammalian cell-derived gaseous neurotransmitter. The intestines are exposed to a second source of this gas by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Bismuth subsalicylate binds H2 S rendering it insoluble. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that SRB may slow intestinal transit in a bismuth-reversible fashion. Eighty mice were randomized to five groups consisting of Live SRB, Killed SRB, SRB+Bismuth, Bismuth, and Saline. Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a common strain of SRB, was administered by gavage at the dose of 1.0 × 10(9) cells along with rhodamine, a fluorescent dye. Intestinal transit was measured 50 minutes after gavage by euthanizing the animals, removing the small intestine between the pyloric sphincter and the ileocecal valve and visualizing the distribution of rhodamine across the intestine using an imaging system (IVIS, Perkin-Elmer). Intestinal transit (n=50) was compared using geometric center (1=minimal movement, 100=maximal movement). H2 S concentration (n=30) was also measured when small intestinal luminal content was allowed to generate this gas. The Live SRB group had slower intestinal transit as represented by a geometric center score of 40.2 ± 5.7 when compared to Saline: 73.6 ± 5.7, Killed SRB: 77.9 ± 6.9, SRB+Bismuth: 81.0 ± 2.0, and Bismuth: 73.3 ± 4.2 (P<.0001). Correspondingly, the Live SRB group had the highest luminal H2 S concentration of 4181.0 ± 968.0 ppb compared to 0 ± 0 ppb for the SRB+Bismuth group (P<.0001). Live SRB slow intestinal transit in a bismuth-reversible fashion in mice. Our results demonstrate that intestinal transit is slowed by SRB and this effect could be abolished by H2 S-binding bismuth. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sulfur isotope fractionation during growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria on various carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleikemper, Jutta; Schroth, Martin H.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Brunner, Benjamin; Zeyer, Josef

    2004-12-01

    help us assess some of the general parameters that govern the magnitude of ɛ in sulfate-reducing environments.

  1. Hydrocarbon activation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions proceeds by different mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Ian; Gray, Neil; Aitken, Caroline; Sherry, Angela; Jones, Martin; Larter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Microbial degradation of alkanes typically involves their conversion to fatty acids which are then catabolised by beta-oxidation. The critical step in this process is activation of the hydrocarbon. Under oxic conditions this is catalyzed by monooxygenase enzymes with the formation of long chain alcohols. In the absence of oxygen alternative alkane activation mechanisms have been observed or proposed. Fumarate addition to alkanes to form alkyl succinates is considered a central process in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. Comparative studies of crude oil degradation under sulphate-reducing and methanogenic conditions revealed distinctive patterns of compound class removal and metabolite formation. Alkyl succinates derived from C7 to C26 n-alkanes and branched chain alkanes were found in abundance in sulfate-reducing systems but these were not detected during methanogenic crude oil degradation. Only one other mechanism of alkane activation has been elucidated to date. This involves addition of carbon derived from bicarbonate/CO2 to C-3 of an alkane chain to form a 2-ethylalkane with subsequent removal of the ethyl group leading to the formation of a fatty acid 1 carbon shorter than the original alkane. 2-ethylalkanes have never been detected as metabolites of anaerobic alkane degradation and were not detected in crude oil-degrading methanogenic systems. Due to the range of alkanes present in crude oil it was not possible to infer the generation of C-odd acids from C-even alkanes which is characteristic of the C-3 carboxylation mechanism. Furthermore genes homologous to alkysuccinate synthetases were not detected in the methanogenic hydrocarbon degrading community by pyrosequencing of total DNA extracted from methanogenic enrichments cultures. beta-oxidation genes were detected and intriguingly, alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase genes were present. This offers the possibility that alkane activation in the methanogenic system does not proceed via acid metabolites

  2. Complete genome sequence of the acetate-degrading sulfate reducer Desulfobacca acetoxidans type strain (ASRB2T)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Desulfobacca acetoxidans Elferink et al. 1999 is the type species of the genus Desulfobacca, which belongs to the family Syntrophaceae in the class Deltaproteobacteria. The species was first observed in a study on the competition of sulfate-reducers and acetoclastic methanogens for acetate in sludge. D. acetoxidans is considered to be the most abundant acetate-degrading sulfate reducer in sludge. It is of interest due to its isolated phylogenetic location in the 16S rRNA-based tree of life. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the family Syntrophaceae to be published and only the third genome sequence from a member of the order Syntrophobacterales. The 3,282,536 bp long genome with its 2,969 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Microbial community of sulfate-reducing up-flow sludge bed in the SANI® process for saline sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Shi, Manyuan; Lu, Hui; Wu, Di; Shao, Ming-Fei; Zhang, Tong; Ekama, George A; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the microbial community of the sulfate-reducing up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) of a novel sulfate reduction, autotrophic denitrification, and nitrification integrated (SANI®) process for saline sewage treatment. The investigation involved a lab-scale SANI® system treating synthetic saline sewage and a pilot-scale SANI® plant treating 10 m(3)/day of screened saline sewage. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were the dominant population, responsible for more than 80% of the chemical oxygen demand removal, and no methane-producing archaea were detected in both SRUSBs. Thermotogales-like bacteria were the dominant SRB in the pilot-scale SRUSB while Desulforhopalus-like bacteria were the major species in the lab-scale SRUSB.

  4. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of U by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Rittman, Bruce; Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender

    2013-12-31

    This four-year project’s overarching aim was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. As stated in this final report, significant progress was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM).

  5. Resilience of sulfate-reducing granular sludge against temperature, pH, oxygen, nitrite, and free nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish R; Guo, Gang; Liu, Rulong; Chen, Guanghao

    2016-10-01

    Sulfate-reducing granular sludge has recently been developed and characterized in detail as part of the development of the sulfate reduction, autotrophic denitrification, nitrification integrated (SANI) process. However, information regarding temperature of granules to environmental fluctuation is lacking, an aspect that is important in dealing with real wastewater. A comprehensive assessment of sulfate-reducing granular sludge performance under various environmental conditions was thus conducted in this study, including temperature, pH, oxygen, nitrite, and free nitrous acid (FNA) as possible encountering conditions in the removal of organics and/or nitrate. Specific chemical oxygen demand removal rate of the granules was determined to be reduced by 65 % when the temperature varied between 10-15 °C, reduced by 70 % when dissolved oxygen (DO) was 0.5 mg/L or greater, and at least, reduced by 75 % when nitrite was 30 mg N/L or above. Nevertheless, the sludge activity recovered by 82, 100, and 86 % from exposure to high oxygen and nitrite and low temperature levels, respectively. Combined inhibition of nitrite and FNA on the sludge is strong and complex, while FNA alone reduced cell viability from 60 to 40 % when its concentration increased to 2.3 mg N/L. The present study demonstrates that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) granules possess high resilience against varying environmental conditions, showing the high application potential of sulfate-reducing granular sludge in dealing with brackish and saline industrial or domestic wastewaters.

  6. Isolation of sulfate-reducing bacteria from the terrestrial deep subsurface and description of Desulfovibrio cavernae sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sass, Henrik; Cypionka, Heribert

    2004-09-01

    Deep subsurface sandstones in the area of Berlin (Germany) located 600 to 1060 m below the surface were examined for the presence of viable microorganisms. The in situ temperatures at the sampling sites ranged from 37 to 45 degrees C. Investigations focussed on sulfate-reducing bacteria able to grow on methanol and triethylene glycol, which are added as chemicals to facilitate the long-term underground storage of natural gas. Seven strains were isolated from porewater brines in the porous sandstone. Three of them were obtained with methanol (strains H1M, H3M, and B1M), three strains with triethylene glycol (strains H1T, B1T, and B2T) and one strain with a mixture of lactate, acetate and butyrate (strain H1-13). Due to phenotypic properties six isolates could be identified as members of the genus Desulfovibrio, and strain B2T as a Desulfotomaculum. The salt tolerance and temperature range for growth indicated that the isolates originated from the indigenous deep subsurface sandstones. They grew in mineral media reflecting the in situ ionic composition of the different brines, which contained 1.5 to 190 g NaCl x l(-1) and high calcium and magnesium concentrations. The Desulfovibrio strains grew at temperatures between 20 and 50 degrees C, while the Desulfotomaculum strain was thermophilic and grew between 30 and 65 degrees C. The strains utilized a broad spectrum of electron donors and acceptors. They grew with carbon compounds like lactate, pyruvate, formate, n-alcohols (C1-C5), glycerol, ethylene glycol, malate, succinate, and fumarate. Some strains even utilized glucose as electron donor and carbon source. All strains were able to use sulfate, sulfite and nitrate as electron acceptors. Additionally, three Desulfovibrio strains reduced manganese oxide, the Desulfotomaculum strain reduced manganese oxide, iron oxide, and elemental sulfur. The 16S rRNA analysis revealed that the isolates belong to three different species. The strains H1T, H3M and B1M could be

  7. Transformation of 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone in sediments under nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Mashtare, Michael L; Lee, Linda S; Nies, Loring F; Turco, Ronald F

    2013-07-02

    The natural manure-borne hormones, 17α-estradiol (17α-E2), 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), and estrone (E1), are routinely detected in surface water near agricultural land and wastewater treatment facilities. Once in the stream network, hormones may enter the sediment bed where they are subject to anaerobic conditions. This study focuses on the difference in anaerobic transformation rates and formation of metabolites from 17α-E2, 17β-E2, and E1 (applied at ∼3.66 μmol kg(-1) of sediment on a dry weight basis) under nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions. Sediment extracts were analyzed using negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Under both redox conditions, degradation was stereospecific and followed similar trends in half-lives, 17β-E2 < 17α-E2 < E1, with degradation considerably slower under sulfate-reducing conditions. Both E2 isomers were predominantly converted to E1; however, isomeric conversion also occurred with peak concentrations of ∼1.7 mol % of 17β-E2 formed in 17α-E2 amended sediments and peak concentrations of ∼2.4 mol % of 17α-E2 formed from 17β-E2. In E1-amended systems, E1 transformed to E2 with preferential formation of the more potent 17β isomer up to ∼30 mol % suggesting that isomer interconversion is through E1. Sediments, therefore, may serve as both a sink and a source of the more estrogenic compound E2. Transformation of amended hormones in autoclaved sediments was markedly slower than in nonautoclaved sediments. Results support the inclusion of isomer-specific behavior and the potential for reversible transformation and interconversion in anaerobic sediments in modeling fate in stream networks and developing risk management strategies.

  8. Life-extending dietary restriction and ovariectomy result in similar feeding rates but different physiologic responses in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Drewry, M D; Williams, J M; Hatle, J D

    2011-10-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) and reduced reproduction each extend life span in many species. Females undergoing DR typically experience a reduction in their fecundity, which raises the question of whether the two treatments are actually extending life span in overlapping ways. Life span in lubber grasshoppers has been shown to be increased by DR, and separately by ovariectomy (OVX). Here, we test the combination of these on life span. If life extension by the two treatments are additive, it would suggest that they likely act through separate pathways. The experimental groups were: fully reproductive and fully fed (ShamFD); ovariectomized and fully fed (OVXFD); fully reproductive and restricted diet (ShamDR); and ovariectomized and restricted diet (OVXDR). The median life spans of these groups were: ShamFD=245 d, OVXFD=285 d, ShamDR=286 d, and OVXDR=322 d. Feeding rate for the OVXFD group was 64% of ad libitum, similar to the 70% of ad libitum that was used for ShamDR. We also measured hemolymph parameters of physiology in these same individuals. Hemolymph levels of vitellogenin (the egg yolk-precursor protein) were increased 5-fold by OVX, but were not affected by DR. In addition, hemolymph total anti-oxidant activity (per μg protein) was significantly reduced by OVX, but was not affected by DR. We show that OVX and DR produce different physiological responses in grasshoppers, despite life extensions and feeding levels that were not significantly different. These data suggest that OVX and DR might extend life span via distinct pathways.

  9. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor, cmbsf) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 770 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor, creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cmbsf of multicorer cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cmbsf, 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cmbsf, were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates, i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decline of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m). Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon degradation (DIC production

  10. Microbial methanogenesis in the sulfate-reducing zone of surface sediments traversing the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, J.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Treude, T.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the concurrence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in surface sediments (0-25 cm below sea floor) at six stations (70, 145, 253, 407, 990 and 1024 m) along the Peruvian margin (12° S). This oceanographic region is characterized by high carbon export to the seafloor creating an extensive oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the shelf, both factors that could favor surface methanogenesis. Sediments sampled along the depth transect traversed areas of anoxic and oxic conditions in the bottom-near water. Net methane production (batch incubations) and sulfate reduction (35S-sulfate radiotracer incubation) were determined in the upper 0-25 cm b.s.f. of multiple cores from all stations, while deep hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (> 30 cm b.s.f., 14C-bicarbonate radiotracer incubation) was determined in two gravity cores at selected sites (78 and 407 m). Furthermore, stimulation (methanol addition) and inhibition (molybdate addition) experiments were carried out to investigate the relationship between sulfate reduction and methanogenesis.

    Highest rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in the surface sediments, integrated over 0-25 cm b.s.f., were observed on the shelf (70-253 m, 0.06-0.1 and 0.5-4.7 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively), while lowest rates were discovered at the deepest site (1024 m, 0.03 and 0.2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively). The addition of methanol resulted in significantly higher surface methanogenesis activity, suggesting that the process was mostly based on non-competitive substrates - i.e., substrates not used by sulfate reducers. In the deeper sediment horizons, where competition was probably relieved due to the decrease of sulfate, the usage of competitive substrates was confirmed by the detection of hydrogenotrophic activity in the sulfate-depleted zone at the shallow shelf station (70 m).

    Surface methanogenesis appeared to be correlated to the availability of labile organic matter (C / N ratio) and organic carbon

  11. [NO3-/NO2- inhibits sulfate-reducing activity of the enrichment culture of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes from an off-shore oil reservoir at Bohai Bay, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Yu; Shi, Rong-Jiu; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ying-Yue; Yu, Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Tan, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Long-term injection of sulfate-rich water into oil reservoirs stimulates the proliferation of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) therein and results in production of a great amount of H2S, leading to souring in oil reservoirs and related environmental problems. In this study, we first, using modified API RP 38 medium, enriched SRP present in production water from a producing well at Bohai Bay, China, and then examined the inhibitory effects of nitrate or nitrite on sulfate reduction activity of the SRP. Results showed that the enriched SRP culture exhibited a high sulfate reduction activity as indicated by a sulfate-reducing rate of 10.4 mmol SO4(2-) x d(-1) x g(-1) dry cell. In presence of 0.4, 0.8, 1.8, and 4.2 mmol x L(-1) nitrate, sulfate reduction was inhibited for 5, 9, 20, and over 35 days, respectively. With the addition of 0.6, 0.9, 1.4, 2.6 and 4.6 mmol x L(-1) of nitrite, the inhibitory period lasted 3, 12, 22, and over 39 days, respectively. The SRP enrichment culture could dissimilatorily reduce nitrate to ammonium. When sulfate, nitrate and nitrite coexisted, nitrate or nitrite was preferentially used over sulfate as electron acceptor by the enriched SRP. This competitive use of electron acceptor and the strong inhibitory effect of nitrite possibly accounted for the suppression of nitrate and nitrite on the sulfate-reducing activity of the enriched SRP cultures from offshore oil reservoir at Bohai Bay.

  12. Performance and microbial community dynamics of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor treating coal generated acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Burns, Andrew S; Pugh, Charles W; Segid, Yosief T; Behum, Paul T; Lefticariu, Liliana; Bender, Kelly S

    2012-06-01

    The effectiveness of a passive flow sulfate-reducing bioreactor processing acid mine drainage (AMD) generated from an abandoned coal mine in Southern Illinois was evaluated using geochemical and microbial community analysis 10 months post bioreactor construction. The results indicated that the treatment system was successful in both raising the pH of the AMD from 3.09 to 6.56 and in lowering the total iron level by 95.9%. While sulfate levels did decrease by 67.4%, the level post treatment (1153 mg/l) remained above recommended drinking water levels. Stimulation of biological sulfate reduction was indicated by a +2.60‰ increase in δ(34)S content of the remaining sulfate in the water post-treatment. Bacterial community analysis targeting 16S rRNA and dsrAB genes indicated that the pre-treated samples were dominated by bacteria related to iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, while the post-treated water directly from the reactor outflow was dominated by sequences related to sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and complex carbon degrading Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phylums. Analysis of the post-treated water, prior to environmental release, revealed that the community shifted back to predominantly iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria. DsrA analysis implied limited diversity in the sulfate-reducing population present in both the bioreactor outflow and oxidation pond samples. These results support the use of passive flow bioreactors to lower the acidity, metal, and sulfate levels present in the AMD at the Tab-Simco mine, but suggest modifications of the system are necessary to both stimulate sulfate-reducing bacteria and inhibit sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

  13. Acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting the rhizoplane and deep cortex cells of the sea grass Halodule wrightii.

    PubMed

    Küsel, K; Pinkart, H C; Drake, H L; Devereux, R

    1999-11-01

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizospheres that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria and clostridia were enriched in sediments colonized by the sea grasses Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum compared to an adjacent unvegetated sediment. Most-probable-number analyses found that in contrast to butyrate-producing clostridia, acetogens and acetate-utilizing sulfate reducers were enriched by an order of magnitude in rhizosphere sediments. Although sea grass roots are oxygenated in the daytime, colorimetric root incubation studies demonstrated that acetogenic O-demethylation and sulfidogenic iron precipitation activities were tightly associated with washed, sediment-free H. wrightii roots. This suggests that the associated anaerobes are able to tolerate exposure to oxygen. To localize and quantify the anaerobic microbial colonization, root thin sections were hybridized with newly developed (33)P-labeled probes that targeted (i) low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) cluster I species of clostridia, (iii) species of Acetobacterium, and (iv) species of Desulfovibrio. Microautoradiography revealed intercellular colonization of the roots by Acetobacterium and Desulfovibrio species. Acetogenic bacteria occurred mostly in the rhizoplane and outermost cortex cell layers, and high numbers of sulfate reducers were detected on all epidermal cells and inward, colonizing some 60% of the deepest cortex cells. Approximately 30% of epidermal cells were colonized by bacteria that hybridized with an archaeal probe, strongly suggesting the presence of methanogens. Obligate anaerobes within the roots might contribute to the vitality of sea grasses and other aquatic plants and to the biogeochemistry of the surrounding sediment.

  14. Acetogenic and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Inhabiting the Rhizoplane and Deep Cortex Cells of the Sea Grass Halodule wrightii†

    PubMed Central

    Küsel, Kirsten; Pinkart, Holly C.; Drake, Harold L.; Devereux, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizospheres that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria and clostridia were enriched in sediments colonized by the sea grasses Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum compared to an adjacent unvegetated sediment. Most-probable-number analyses found that in contrast to butyrate-producing clostridia, acetogens and acetate-utilizing sulfate reducers were enriched by an order of magnitude in rhizosphere sediments. Although sea grass roots are oxygenated in the daytime, colorimetric root incubation studies demonstrated that acetogenic O-demethylation and sulfidogenic iron precipitation activities were tightly associated with washed, sediment-free H. wrightii roots. This suggests that the associated anaerobes are able to tolerate exposure to oxygen. To localize and quantify the anaerobic microbial colonization, root thin sections were hybridized with newly developed 33P-labeled probes that targeted (i) low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) cluster I species of clostridia, (iii) species of Acetobacterium, and (iv) species of Desulfovibrio. Microautoradiography revealed intercellular colonization of the roots by Acetobacterium and Desulfovibrio species. Acetogenic bacteria occurred mostly in the rhizoplane and outermost cortex cell layers, and high numbers of sulfate reducers were detected on all epidermal cells and inward, colonizing some 60% of the deepest cortex cells. Approximately 30% of epidermal cells were colonized by bacteria that hybridized with an archaeal probe, strongly suggesting the presence of methanogens. Obligate anaerobes within the roots might contribute to the vitality of sea grasses and other aquatic plants and to the biogeochemistry of the surrounding sediment. PMID:10543830

  15. Coexistence and competition of sulfate-reducing and methanogenic populations in an anaerobic hexadecane-degrading culture.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting-Ting; Liu, Lai-Yan; Rui, Jun-Peng; Yuan, Quan; Feng, Ding-Shan; Zhou, Zheng; Dai, Li-Rong; Zeng, Wan-Qiu; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Over three-fifths of the world's known crude oil cannot be recovered using state-of-the-art techniques, but microbial conversion of petroleum hydrocarbons trapped in oil reservoirs to methane is one promising path to increase the recovery of fossil fuels. The process requires cooperation between syntrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea, which can be affected by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs). However, the effects of sulfate on hydrocarbon degradation and methane production remain elusive, and the microbial communities involved are not well understood. In this study, a methanogenic hexadecane-degrading enrichment culture was treated with six different concentrations of sulfate ranging from 0.5 to 25 mM. Methane production and maximum specific methane production rate gradually decreased to 44 and 56% with sulfate concentrations up to 25 mM, respectively. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the sulfate reduction/methane production ratio and initial sulfate concentration, which remained constant during the methane production phase. The apparent methanogenesis fractionation factor (αapp) gradually increased during the methane production phase in each treatment, the αapp for the treatments with lower sulfate (0.5-4 mM) eventually plateaued at ~1.047, but that for the treatment with 10-25 mM sulfate only reached ~1.029. The relative abundance levels of Smithella and Methanoculleus increased almost in parallel with the increasing sulfate concentrations. Furthermore, the predominant sulfate reducer communities shifted from Desulfobacteraceae in the low-sulfate cultures to Desulfomonile in the high-sulfate cultures. The distribution of hexadecane carbon between methane-producing and sulfate-reducing populations is dependent on the initial sulfate added, and not affected during the methane production period. There was a relative increase in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis activity over time for all sulfate treatments, whereas the total

  16. Genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chang, Yun-Juan; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the genomically so far poorly characterized family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812T)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-juan; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, a family in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria that is currently poorly characterized at the genome level. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22768359

  18. Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus sp. nov.: a moderately acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from acid mining drainage sediments : New taxa: Firmicutes (Class Clostridia, Order Clostridiales, Family Peptococcaceae).

    PubMed

    Alazard, Didier; Joseph, Manon; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    An obligately anaerobic, spore-forming, acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain SJ4(T), was isolated from an acid mining effluent decantation pond sediment sample (pH around 3.0). Cells were Gram negative, non-motile, curved rods occurring singly. Strain SJ4(T) grew at pH 3.6-5.5 with an optimum at pH 5.2. Strain SJ4(T) utilized H(2), lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, glucose, and fructose as electron donors. Lactate and glucose were weakly used. Sulfate was used as electron acceptors, but not sulfite, elemental sulfur, arsenate (V), and fumarate. The G + C content of genomic DNA was 42.3 mol% (HPLC). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain SJ4(T) belonged to the genus Desulfosporosinus within the family Peptococcaceae in the phylum Firmicutes. The level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with other Desulfosporosinus species was 94.7-96.2%, D. orientis DSM 765(T) (similarity of 96.2%) and D. auripigmenti DSM 13351(T) (similarity of 95%) being its closest relatives. DNA-DNA relatedness values with D. orientis and D. auripigmenti were 16.5 and 31.8%, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic characteristics, strain SJ4(T) represents a novel species within the genus Desulfosporosinus, for which the name Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SJ4(T) (=DSM 22704(T) = JCM 16185(T)).

  19. Subcellular localization of proteins in the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris via SNAP-tag labeling and photoconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, A.; Leung, C. M.; Jorgens, D.; Tauscher, A.; Remis, J. P.; Ball, D. A.; Chhabra, S.; Fok, V.; Geller, J. T.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Juba, T.; Elias, D.; Wall, J.; Biggin, M.; Downing, K. H.; Auer, M.

    2010-06-01

    Systems Biology studies the temporal and spatial 3D distribution of macromolecular complexes with the aim that such knowledge will allow more accurate modeling of biological function and will allow mathematical prediction of cellular behavior. However, in order to accomplish accurate modeling precise knowledge of spatial 3D organization and distribution inside cells is necessary. And while a number of macromolecular complexes may be identified by its 3D structure and molecular characteristics alone, the overwhelming number of proteins will need to be localized using a reporter tag. GFP and its derivatives (XFPs) have been traditionally employed for subcelllar localization using photoconversion approaches, but this approach cannot be taken for obligate anaerobic bacteria, where the intolerance towards oxygen prevents XFP approaches. As part of the GTL-funded PCAP project (now ENIGMA) genetic tools have been developed for the anaerobe sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris that allow the high-throughput generation of tagged-protein mutant strains, with a focus on the commercially available SNAP-tag cell system (New England Biolabs, Ipswich, MA), which is based on a modified O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) tag, that has a dead-end reaction with a modified O6-benzylguanine (BG) derivative and has been shown to function under anaerobic conditions. After initial challenges with respect to variability, robustness and specificity of the labeling signal we have optimized the labeling. Over the last year, as a result of the optimized labeling protocol, we now obtain robust labeling of 20 out of 31 SNAP strains. Labeling for 13 strains were confirmed at least five times. We have also successfully performed photoconversion on 5 of these 13 strains, with distinct labeling patterns for different strains. For example, DsrC robustly localizes to the periplasmic portion of the inner membrane, where as a DNA-binding protein localizes to the center of the cell, where the

  20. Toward a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, S.R.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Petzold, C.J.; Zane, G.M.; Price, M.N.; Gaucher, S.; Reveco, S.A.; Fok, V.; Johanson, A.R.; Batth, T.S.; Singer, M.; Chandonia, J.M.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Singh, A.K.; Keasling, J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study E. coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio 5 vulgaris Hildenborough, a model anaerobe and sulfate reducer. In this paper we present the first attempt to identify protein-protein interactions in an obligate anaerobic bacterium. We used suicide vector-assisted chromosomal modification of 12 open reading frames encoded by this sulfate reducer to append an eight amino acid affinity tag to the carboxy-terminus of the chosen proteins. Three biological replicates of the 10 ‘pulled-down’ proteins were separated and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Replicate agreement ranged between 35% and 69%. An interaction network among 12 bait and 90 prey proteins was reconstructed based on 134 bait-prey interactions computationally identified to be of high confidence. We discuss the biological significance of several unique metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by this protein-protein interaction data 15 and protein modifications that were observed. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction.

  1. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

  2. Sulfur Isotropic Studies of Archean Slate and Graywacke from Northern Minnesota: Evidence for the Existence of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripley, E. M.; Nicol, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Sulfur isotopic studies of pyrite from metasediments in the 2.6 b.y. old Deer Lake greenstone sequence, Minnesota, were conducted in order to evaluate the possible importance of sulfate reducing bacteria in sulfide formation. Pyrite occurs as ovules up to 2 cm in diameter within graphitic slates, and as fine disseminations in metagraywacke units. SEM studies indicate the pyrite is framboidal in morphology. Delta notation values of pyrite from the Deer Lake sediments range from -2.3 to 11.1 0/00, with a peak at approximately +2 o/oo. Isotopic data is consistent with either high temperature inorganic reduction of circulating seawater sulfate, or low temperature bacterial reduction. However, the lack of sulfide bands or massive occurrences in the sediments, the restriction of pyrite mineralization to the sediments, and the absence of evidence for hot spring activity suggest that a diagenetic origin of pyrite is more feasible. Sulfide in such an environment would be produced principally by the action of sulfate reducing bacteria.

  3. Example study for granular bioreactor stratification: Three-dimensional evaluation of a sulfate-reducing granular bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Tian-Wei; Luo, Jing-Hai; Su, Kui-Zu; Wei, Li; Mackey, Hamish R.; Chi, Kun; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-08-01

    Recently, sulfate-reducing granular sludge has been developed for application in sulfate-laden water and wastewater treatment. However, little is known about biomass stratification and its effects on the bioprocesses inside the granular bioreactor. A comprehensive investigation followed by a verification trial was therefore conducted in the present work. The investigation focused on the performance of each sludge layer, the internal hydrodynamics and microbial community structures along the height of the reactor. The reactor substratum (the section below baffle 1) was identified as the main acidification zone based on microbial analysis and reactor performance. Two baffle installations increased mixing intensity but at the same time introduced dead zones. Computational fluid dynamics simulation was employed to visualize the internal hydrodynamics. The 16S rRNA gene of the organisms further revealed that more diverse communities of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and acidogens were detected in the reactor substratum than in the superstratum (the section above baffle 1). The findings of this study shed light on biomass stratification in an SRB granular bioreactor to aid in the design and optimization of such reactors.

  4. Example study for granular bioreactor stratification: Three-dimensional evaluation of a sulfate-reducing granular bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Tian-wei; Luo, Jing-hai; Su, Kui-zu; Wei, Li; Mackey, Hamish R.; Chi, Kun; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Recently, sulfate-reducing granular sludge has been developed for application in sulfate-laden water and wastewater treatment. However, little is known about biomass stratification and its effects on the bioprocesses inside the granular bioreactor. A comprehensive investigation followed by a verification trial was therefore conducted in the present work. The investigation focused on the performance of each sludge layer, the internal hydrodynamics and microbial community structures along the height of the reactor. The reactor substratum (the section below baffle 1) was identified as the main acidification zone based on microbial analysis and reactor performance. Two baffle installations increased mixing intensity but at the same time introduced dead zones. Computational fluid dynamics simulation was employed to visualize the internal hydrodynamics. The 16S rRNA gene of the organisms further revealed that more diverse communities of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and acidogens were detected in the reactor substratum than in the superstratum (the section above baffle 1). The findings of this study shed light on biomass stratification in an SRB granular bioreactor to aid in the design and optimization of such reactors. PMID:27539264

  5. Evaluating zinc isotope fractionation under sulfate reducing conditions using a flow-through cell and in situ XAS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Shrimpton, Heather K.; Veeramani, Harish; Ptacek, Carol J.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew; Blowes, David W.

    2017-04-01

    A flow-through cell experiment was conducted to evaluate Zn isotope fractionation during ZnS precipitation under microbially-mediated sulfate-reducing conditions. Synthetic groundwater containing 0.90 mM Zn was pumped through a cell containing creek sediment that was biostimulated to promote sulfate reducing conditions. Real-time, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied at the Zn K-edge to collect spectra via a Kapton® window in the front of the cell over the course of the experiment. Aqueous effluent samples were collected and analysed to determine concentrations of anions and cations, and Zn isotope ratios. The flow rate was increased step-wise during the experiment to modify the residence time and produce changes in the extent of sulfate reduction, which in turn controlled the extent of ZnS precipitation. Greater enrichment in the heavier isotope in the aqueous phase relative to the input solution was associated with more extensive Zn removal. A Rayleigh curve was fit to the isotope data, where ε = -0.27 ± 0.06‰ (2σ). Evaluation of Zn isotope fractionation under controlled flow conditions is critical to improve the efficacy of this powerful analytical technique when applied to natural systems or remediation projects in the field.

  6. Dechlorination of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) by sulfate-reducing bacteria from an aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Sonier, D N; Duran, N L; Smith, G B

    1994-01-01

    Groundwater samples were obtained from a deep aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds. One-milliliter samples contained 9.2 x 10(5) total bacteria (by acridine orange microscopic counts) and 2.5 x 10(3) sulfate-reducing bacteria (by most probable number analysis). Samples were incubated anaerobically in a basal salts medium with acetate as the electron donor and nitrate and sulfate as the electron acceptors. Residual levels of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) in samples were biotically degraded, while trichloroethylene was not. When successively higher levels of CFC-11 were added, increasingly rapid degradation rates were observed. Concomitant with CFC-11 degradation was the near stoichiometric production of fluorodichloromethane (HCFC-21); the production of HCFC-21 was verified by mass spectrometry. CFC-11 degradation was dependent on the presence of acetate (or butyrate) and sulfate but was independent of nitrate. Other carbon sources such as lactate and isopropanol did not support the degradation. The addition of 1 mM sodium sulfide completely inhibited CFC-11 degradation; however, degradation occurred in the presence of 2 mM 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. These results indicate that the anaerobic dechlorination of CFC-11 is carried out by sulfate-reducing bacteria and not by denitrifying or methanogenic bacteria. Images PMID:7811093

  7. Evidence that crude oil alkane activation proceeds by different mechanisms under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, C. M.; Jones, D. M.; Maguire, M. J.; Gray, N. D.; Sherry, A.; Bowler, B. F. J.; Ditchfield, A. K.; Larter, S. R.; Head, I. M.

    2013-05-01

    Fumarate addition has been widely proposed as an initial step in the anaerobic oxidation of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Alkyl and aryl succinates have been reported as metabolites of hydrocarbon degradation in laboratory studies with both pure and enrichment cultures of sulfate-, nitrate-, and iron-reducing bacteria. In addition these compounds have been reported in samples from environments such as hydrocarbon contaminated aquifers where, in addition to the above redox processes, hydrocarbon degradation linked to methanogenesis was observed. Here we report data from anaerobic crude oil degrading microcosms which revealed significant differences between the acid metabolite profiles of crude oil degraded under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. Under sulfate-reducing conditions fumarate addition and the formation of alkylsuccinate metabolites was the principal mechanism for the anaerobic degradation of n-alkanes and branched chain alkanes. Other than alkyl succinates that represent indigenous metabolites in the sediment inoculum, alkyl succinate metabolites were never detected in sediment microcosms where methane generation was quantitatively linked to n-alkane degradation. This indicates that alternative mechanisms of alkane activation may operate under methanogenic conditions.

  8. Identification of the traditional and non-traditional sulfate-reducing bacteria associated with corroded ship hull.

    PubMed

    Alasvand Zarasvand, Kiana; Ravishankar Rai, V

    2016-12-01

    Pitting corrosion due to microbial activity is the most severe type of corrosion that occurs in ship hull. Since biogenic sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is involved in the acceleration of pitting corrosion of marine vessels, so it is important to collect information about SRB community involved in maritime vessel failure. We investigated the SRB community on corroded hull portion of the ship. With the use of common cultural method and 16S rDNA sequencing, ten bacteria with sulfate reduction ability were isolated and identified. They belonged to both traditional (Desulfovibrio, Desulfotomaculum) and non-traditional (Citrobacter) sulfate-reducing bacteria. All the isolates were able to produce a high amount of sulfide. However, only traditional isolates were showing the amplification for the SRB-specific gene, dsrAB. Further studies on corrosion potential of these two groups of bacteria showed that in spite of high sulfide and biofilm production by non-traditional SRB, they are less aggressive towards the mild steel compare to the traditional group.

  9. [Inhibition of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in produced water from oil reservoir by nitrate].

    PubMed

    Yang, De-Yu; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Rong-Jiu; Han, Si-Qin; Li, Guang-Zhe; Li, Guo-Qiao; Zhao, Jin-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Growth and metabolic activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can result in souring of oil reservoirs, leading to various problems in aspects of environmental pollution and corrosion. Nitrate addition and management of nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) offer potential solutions to controlling souring in oil reservoirs. In this paper, a facultive chemolithotrophic NRB, designated as DNB-8, was isolated from the produced fluid of a water-flooded oil reservoir at Daqing oilfield. Then the efficacies and mechanisms of various concentrations of nitrate in combination with DNB-8 in the inhibition of the activity of SRB enriched culture were compared. Results showed that 1.0 mmol x L(-1) of nitrate or 0.45 mmol x L(-1) of nitrite inhibited the sulfate-reducing activity of SRB enrichments; the competitive reduction of nitrate by DNB-8 and the nitrite produced were responsible for the suppression. Besides, the SRB enrichment cultures showed a metabolic pathway of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) via nitrite. The SRB cultures could possibly alleviate the nitrite inhibition by DNRA when they were subjected to high-strength nitrate.

  10. Expansion of Phragmites australis alters methane dynamics and methanogen, methanotroph, and sulfate reducing bacteria communities in tidal marsh in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, H.; Gauhar, M.; Kang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Plant invasion is known to change substantially methane dynamics in tidal marshes. However, the exact mechanisms related to methane dynamics change due to plant invasion have not been fully understood. In Suncheon Bay, South Korea, Phragmites australis has invaded the habitat of native species, Suaeda japonica, and becomes dominant vegetation in this area. We measured methane fluxes, soil biogeochemistry, and microbial communities from both vegetation sites throughout a growing season and conducted a chronosequence analysis in order to illustrate the effect of plant invasion on methane dynamics and microbial communities. For analyzing microbial communities, we collected 1m intact soil cores and conducted functional gene-targeted real-time qPCR, T-RFLP, and PLFA. P. australis invasion significantly increased methane emission in a summer season, accompanied by greater dissolved organic carbon and soil water content. Methanogen, methanotroph, and sulfate reducing bacterial communities were gradually changed along with the invasion periods. In particular, abundances ratio of mcrA/pmoA and mcrA/dsrA had a positive correlation with methane emission, which indicates that P. australis invasion reduces methane oxidation by methanotroph, and competitive inhibition between methanogen and sulfate reducing bacteria. In conclusion, P. australis invasion on S. japonica significantly increased methane emission in tidal marsh by altering the microbial communities in a way that C decomposition would be dominated by methanogenesis.

  11. Microbial Diversity in Sulfate-Reducing Marine Sediment Enrichment Cultures Associated with Anaerobic Biotransformation of Coastal Stockpiled Phosphogypsum (Sfax, Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Zouch, Hana; Karray, Fatma; Armougom, Fabrice; Chifflet, Sandrine; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Kharrat, Hanen; Kamoun, Lotfi; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Ollivier, Bernard; Sayadi, Sami; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic biotechnology using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a promising alternative for reducing long-term stockpiling of phosphogypsum (PG), an acidic (pH ~3) by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industries containing high amounts of sulfate. The main objective of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the diversity and ability of anaerobic marine microorganisms to convert sulfate from PG into sulfide, in order to look for marine SRB of biotechnological interest. A series of sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures were performed using different electron donors (i.e., acetate, formate, or lactate) and sulfate sources (i.e., sodium sulfate or PG) as electron acceptors. Significant sulfide production was observed from enrichment cultures inoculated with marine sediments, collected near the effluent discharge point of a Tunisian fertilizer industry (Sfax, Tunisia). Sulfate sources impacted sulfide production rates from marine sediments as well as the diversity of SRB species belonging to Deltaproteobacteria. When PG was used as sulfate source, Desulfovibrio species dominated microbial communities of marine sediments, while Desulfobacter species were mainly detected using sodium sulfate. Sulfide production was also affected depending on the electron donor used, with the highest production obtained using formate. In contrast, low sulfide production (acetate-containing cultures) was associated with an increase in the population of Firmicutes. These results suggested that marine Desulfovibrio species, to be further isolated, are potential candidates for bioremediation of PG by immobilizing metals and metalloids thanks to sulfide production by these SRB.

  12. Removal of chromium and lead by a sulfate-reducing consortium using peat moss as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Reyes, Julia Mariana; López-Chuken, Ulrico Javier; Valdez-González, Arcadio; Luna-Olvera, Hugo Alberto

    2013-09-01

    The effect of pre-treated peat moss on the ability of a sulfate-reducing microbial consortium to remove chromium and lead in solution was evaluated. The most active bacterial community (235.7 mmol H2S/g VSS) was selected from among eight consortia. The peat moss was pre-treated with different HCl concentrations and contact times. The best combination of treatments was 20% HCl for 10 min. The constant substrate affinity Ks was 740 mg COD/L and the ratio COD/SO4(2-) was 0.71. At pH 5, higher production of biogenic sulfide was observed. The up-flowpacked bed bioreactor operated at a flow of 8.3 mL/min for 180 h to obtain removal efficiency (by sulfate-reducing activity) of 90% lead and 65% chromium. It is important to consider that peat moss is a natural adsorbent that further influences the removal efficiency of metal ions.

  13. Inhibiting mild steel corrosion from sulfate-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria using gramicidin-S-producing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rongjun; Wood, Thomas K

    2004-11-01

    A gramicidin-S-producing Bacillus brevis 18-3 biofilm was shown to reduce corrosion rates of mild steel by inhibiting both the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfosporosinus orientis and the iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SP-6. When L. discophora SP-6 was introduced along with D. orientis to a non-antimicrobial-producing biofilm control, Paenibacillus polymyxa ATCC 10401, a corrosive synergy was created and mild steel coupons underwent more severe corrosion than when only D. orientis was present, showing a 2.3-fold increase via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a 1.8-fold difference via mass-loss measurements. However, when a gramicidin-S-producing, protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm was established on mild steel, the metal coupons were protected against the simultaneous attack of D. orientis and L. discophora SP-6. EIS data showed that the protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm decreased the corrosion rate about 20-fold compared with the non-gramicidin-producing P. polymyxa ATCC 10401 biofilm control. The mass loss for the protected mild steel coupons was also significantly lower than that for the unprotected ones (4-fold decrease). Scanning electron microscope images corroborated the corrosion inhibition by the gramicidin-S-producing B. brevis biofilm on mild steel by showing that the metal surface remained untarnished, i.e., the polishing grooves were still visible after exposure to the simultaneous attack of the sulfate-reducing bacterium and the iron-oxidizing bacterium.

  14. Enhanced bioremediation of heavy metal from effluent by sulfate-reducing bacteria with copper-iron bimetallic particles support.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Chen, Yongzhe; Yang, Ming; Li, Wenkai; Deng, Le

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of copper-iron bimetallic particles supported sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in enhancing the reduction of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) in effluent. The results showed that the copper-iron bimetallic particles can enhance Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal and the resistance of the sulfate-reducing bacteria towards metals toxicity, the inhibiting concentration of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) for SRB was significantly increased (from 100 to 200 mg/L for Cu(2+) and 300 to 400 mg/L for Zn(2+)). The removal efficiencies of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (initial concentration 100 mg/L) were 98.17% and 99.67% in SRB-Cu/Fe system after 48 h, while only 29.83% Cu(2+), 90.88% Zn(2+) and 63.81% Cu(2+), 72.63% Zn(2+) were removed in the SRB and Cu/Fe system at the same condition.

  15. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had δ18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in δ18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that

  16. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF TOLUENE UNDER SULFATE- REDUCING CONDITIONS AND THE INFLUENCE OF IRON ON THE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene degradation occurred concomitantly with sulfate reduction in anaerobic microcosms inoculated with contaminated subsurface soil from an aviation fuel storage facility near the Patuxent River (Md.). Similar results were obtained for enrichment cultures in which toluene was ...

  17. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF TOLUENE UNDER SULFATE- REDUCING CONDITIONS AND THE INFLUENCE OF IRON ON THE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene degradation occurred concomitantly with sulfate reduction in anaerobic microcosms inoculated with contaminated subsurface soil from an aviation fuel storage facility near the Patuxent River (Md.). Similar results were obtained for enrichment cultures in which toluene was ...

  18. Isolation and characterization of a mesophilic heavy-metals-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfomicrobium sp. from an enrichment culture using phosphogypsum as a sulfate source.

    PubMed

    Azabou, Samia; Mechichi, Tahar; Patel, Bharat K C; Sayadi, Sami

    2007-02-09

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, was isolated from a 6 month trained enrichment culture in an anaerobic media containing phosphogypsum as a sulfate source, and, designated strain SA2. Cells of strain SA2 were rod-shaped, did not form spores and stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate revealed that it was related to members of the genus Desulfomicrobium (average sequence similarity of 98%) with Desulfomicrobium baculatum being the most closely related (sequence similarity of 99%). Strain SA2 used thiosulfate, sulfate, sulfite and elemental sulfur as electron acceptors and produced sulfide. Strain SA2 reduced sulfate contained in 1-20g/L phosphogypsum to sulfide with reduction of sulfate contained in 2g/L phosphogypsum being the optimum concentration. Strain SA2 grew with metalloid, halogenated and non-metal ions present in phosphogypsum and with added high concentrations of heavy metals (125ppm Zn and 100ppm Ni, W, Li and Al). The relative order for the inhibitory metal concentrations, based on the IC(50) values, was Cu, Te>Cd>Fe, Co, Mn>F, Se>Ni, Al, Li>Zn.

  19. Purification and Preliminary Characterization of Tetraheme Cytochrome c3 and Adenylylsulfate Reductase from the Peptidolytic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio aminophilus DSM 12254

    PubMed Central

    Bursakov, Sergey; Figueiredo, Angelo; Thapper, Anders E.; Todorovic, Smilja; Moura, José J. G.; Ollivier, Bernard; Moura, Isabel; Fauque, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Two proteins were purified and preliminarily characterized from the soluble extract of cells (310 g, wet weight) of the aminolytic and peptidolytic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio (D.) aminophilus DSM 12254. The iron-sulfur flavoenzyme adenylylsulfate (adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate, APS) reductase, a key enzyme in the microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction, has been purified in three chromatographic steps (DEAE-Biogel A, Source 15, and Superdex 200 columns). It contains two different subunits with molecular masses of 75 and 18 kDa. The fraction after the last purification step had a purity index (A278nm / A388nm) of 5.34, which was used for further EPR spectroscopic studies. The D. aminophilus APS reductase is very similar to the homologous enzymes isolated from D. gigas and D. desulfuricans ATCC 27774. A tetraheme cytochrome c3 (His-heme iron-His) has been purified in three chromatographic steps (DEAE- Biogel A, Source 15, and Biogel-HTP columns) and preliminarily characterized. It has a purity index ([A553nm - A570nm]red / A280nm) of 2.9 and a molecular mass of around 15 kDa, and its spectroscopic characterization (NMR and EPR) has been carried out. This hemoprotein presents similarities with the tetraheme cytochrome c3 from Desulfomicrobium (Des.) norvegicum (NMR spectra, and N-terminal amino acid sequence). PMID:18365091

  20. Desulfotomaculum alcoholivorax sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic, spore-forming, sulfate-reducer isolated from a fluidized-bed reactor treating acidic metal- and sulfate-containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kaksonen, Anna H; Spring, Stefan; Schumann, Peter; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2008-04-01

    A moderately thermophilic, Gram-positive, endospore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from a fluidized-bed reactor treating acidic water containing metal and sulfate. The strain, designated RE35E1T, was rod-shaped and motile. The temperature range for growth was 33-51 degrees C (optimum 44-46 degrees C) and the pH range was 6.0-7.5 (optimum pH 6.4-7.3). The strain grew optimally without additional NaCl. The electron acceptors were 10 mM sulfate, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur and 1 mM (but not 10 mM) sulfite. Various alcohols and carboxylic acids were utilized as electron donors. Fermentative growth occurred on pyruvate. The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, and the major respiratory isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone MK-7. The major whole-cell fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 1 omega 10c and iso-C17 : 0. Strain RE35E1T was related to representatives of the genera Desulfotomaculum and Sporotomaculum, the closest relatives being Desulfotomaculum arcticum DSM 17038T (96.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Sporotomaculum hydroxybenzoicum DSM 5475T (92.0 % similarity). Strain RE35E1T represents a novel species, for which the name Desulfotomaculum alcoholivorax sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RE35E1T (=DSM 16058T=JCM 14019T).

  1. Compositions and Abundances of Sulfate-Reducing and Sulfur-Oxidizing Microorganisms in Water-Flooded Petroleum Reservoirs with Different Temperatures in China

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Huimei; Gao, Peike; Chen, Zhaohui; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Wang, Yansen; Zhou, Jiefang; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been studied extensively in the petroleum industry due to their role in corrosion, but very little is known about sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB), which drive the oxidization of sulfur-compounds produced by the activity of SRB in petroleum reservoirs. Here, we surveyed the community structure, diversity and abundance of SRB and SOB simultaneously based on 16S rRNA, dsrB and soxB gene sequencing, and quantitative PCR analyses, respectively in petroleum reservoirs with different physicochemical properties. Similar to SRB, SOB were found widely inhabiting the analyzed reservoirs with high diversity and different structures. The dominant SRB belonged to the classes Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridia, and included the Desulfotignum, Desulfotomaculum, Desulfovibrio, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfomicrobium genera. The most frequently detected potential SOB were Sulfurimonas, Thiobacillus, Thioclava, Thiohalomonas and Dechloromonas, and belonged to Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Among them, Desulfovibrio, Desulfomicrobium, Thioclava, and Sulfurimonas were highly abundant in the low-temperature reservoirs, while Desulfotomaculum, Desulfotignum, Thiobacillus, and Dechloromonas were more often present in high-temperature reservoirs. The relative abundances of SRB and SOB varied and were present at higher proportions in the relatively high-temperature reservoirs. Canonical correspondence analysis also revealed that the SRB and SOB communities in reservoirs displayed high niche specificity and were closely related to reservoir temperature, pH of the formation brine, and sulfate concentration. In conclusion, this study extends our knowledge about the distribution of SRB and SOB communities in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:28210252

  2. Desulfoplanes formicivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a blackish meromictic lake, and emended description of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miho; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2015-06-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain Pf12BT, was isolated from sediment of meromictic Lake Harutori in Japan. Cells were vibroid (1.0 × 3.0-4.0 μm), motile and Gram-stain-negative. For growth, the optimum pH was 7.0-7.5 and the optimum temperature was 42-45 °C. Strain Pf12BT used sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite as electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 55.4 mol%. Major cellular fatty acids were C16 : 0 and C18 : 0. The strain was desulfoviridin-positive. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the novel strain belonged to the order Desulfovibrionales in the class Deltaproteobacteria. The closest relative was Desulfomicrobium baculatum DSM 4028T with which it shared 91 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization, a novel species of a new genus belonging to the family Desulfomicrobiaceae is proposed, Desulfoplanes formicivorans gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Desulfoplanes formicivorans is Pf12BT ( = NBRC 110391T = DSM 28890T).

  3. Compositions and Abundances of Sulfate-Reducing and Sulfur-Oxidizing Microorganisms in Water-Flooded Petroleum Reservoirs with Different Temperatures in China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huimei; Gao, Peike; Chen, Zhaohui; Li, Yanshu; Li, Yan; Wang, Yansen; Zhou, Jiefang; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been studied extensively in the petroleum industry due to their role in corrosion, but very little is known about sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB), which drive the oxidization of sulfur-compounds produced by the activity of SRB in petroleum reservoirs. Here, we surveyed the community structure, diversity and abundance of SRB and SOB simultaneously based on 16S rRNA, dsrB and soxB gene sequencing, and quantitative PCR analyses, respectively in petroleum reservoirs with different physicochemical properties. Similar to SRB, SOB were found widely inhabiting the analyzed reservoirs with high diversity and different structures. The dominant SRB belonged to the classes Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridia, and included the Desulfotignum, Desulfotomaculum, Desulfovibrio, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfomicrobium genera. The most frequently detected potential SOB were Sulfurimonas, Thiobacillus, Thioclava, Thiohalomonas and Dechloromonas, and belonged to Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Among them, Desulfovibrio, Desulfomicrobium, Thioclava, and Sulfurimonas were highly abundant in the low-temperature reservoirs, while Desulfotomaculum, Desulfotignum, Thiobacillus, and Dechloromonas were more often present in high-temperature reservoirs. The relative abundances of SRB and SOB varied and were present at higher proportions in the relatively high-temperature reservoirs. Canonical correspondence analysis also revealed that the SRB and SOB communities in reservoirs displayed high niche specificity and were closely related to reservoir temperature, pH of the formation brine, and sulfate concentration. In conclusion, this study extends our knowledge about the distribution of SRB and SOB communities in petroleum reservoirs.

  4. Microbial diversity in polluted harbor sediments II: Sulfate-reducing bacterial community assessment using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library of dsrAB gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Song, Lin-sheng; Ki, Jang-Seu; Lau, Chun-Kwan; Li, Xiang-Dong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important regulators of a variety of processes in coastal marine sediments regarding organic matter turnover, biodegradation of pollutants, and sulfur and carbon cycles. Yet their community compositions have not been investigated in polluted harbor sediments. This study described the diversity and spatial variation of SRB communities in surface sediments in Victoria Harbor, Hong Kong. The spatial variation of SRB communities was described by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The results showed that the most diversified terminal restriction fragments were found at polluted sites. In addition, cluster analysis indicated that although the SRB communities were different at the two polluted sites, they were still more similar to each other than to the two more distant reference sites. Based on a dsrAB clone library constructed at a polluted site, diversified SRB were found, represented by 30 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). Upon comparisons among the SRB sequences detected from this study and those in the GenBank, five clades of SRB were found. Three clades belonged to the known families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophobacteriaceae. The majority of sequenced clones, which distantly related to sequences in the GenBank, constituted the remaining two unclassified groups, suggesting unique SRB members related to the polluted harbor environment. Statistical analyses indicated that estimated SRB richness correlated with environment factors such as sulfur content, acid volatile sulfate, and redox potential.

  5. Desulfotomaculum arcticum sp. nov., a novel spore-forming, moderately thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold fjord sediment of Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Vandieken, Verona; Knoblauch, Christian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2006-04-01

    Strain 15T is a novel spore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold fjord sediment of Svalbard. Sulfate could be replaced by sulfite or thiosulfate. Hydrogen, formate, lactate, propionate, butyrate, hexanoate, methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, pyruvate, malate, succinate, fumarate, proline, alanine and glycine were used as electron donors in the presence of sulfate. Growth occurred with pyruvate as sole substrate. Optimal growth was observed at pH 7.1-7.5 and concentrations of 1-1.5 % NaCl and 0.4 % MgCl2. Strain 15T grew between 26 and 46.5 degrees C and optimal growth occurred at 44 degrees C. Therefore, strain 15T apparently cannot grow at in situ temperatures of Arctic sediments from where it was isolated, and it was proposed that it was present in the sediment in the form of spores. The DNA G+C content was 48.9 mol%. Strain 15T was most closely related to Desulfotomaculum thermosapovorans MLF(T) (93.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Strain 15T represents a novel species, for which the name Desulfotomaculum arcticum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain 15T (=DSM 17038T = JCM 12923T).

  6. Distribution and Stability of Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotic and Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenic Assemblages in Nutrient-Impacted Regions of the Florida Everglades†

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Hector; Newman, Susan; Reddy, K. R.; Ogram, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Although the influence of phosphorus loading on the Everglades ecosystem has received a great deal of attention, most research has targeted macro indicators, such as those based on vegetation or fauna, or chemical and physical parameters involved in biogeochemical cycles. Fewer studies have addressed the role of microorganisms, and these have mainly targeted gross informative parameters such as microbial biomass, enzymatic activities, and microbial enumerations. The objectives of this study were to characterize the dynamics of sulfate-reducing and methanogenic assemblages using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) targeting the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, respectively, and assess the impact of nutrient enrichment on microbial assemblages in the northern Everglades. T-RFLP combined with principal component analysis was a powerful technique to discriminate between soils from sites with eutrophic, transitional, and oligotrophic nutrient concentrations. dsrA T-RFLP provided a higher level of discrimination between the three sites. mcrA was a relatively weaker system to distinguish between sites, since it could not categorically discriminate between eutrophic and transition soil samples, but may be useful as an early indicator of phosphorus loading which is altering hydrogenotrophic methanogenic community in the transition zones, making them more similar to eutrophic zones. Clearly, targeting a combination of different microbial communities provides greater insight into the functioning of this ecosystem and provides useful information for understanding the relationship between eutrophication effects and microbial assemblages. PMID:15870361

  7. Development and comparison of SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR assays for detection and enumeration of sulfate-reducing bacteria in stored swine manure.

    PubMed

    Spence, C; Whitehead, T R; Cotta, M A

    2008-12-01

    To develop and evaluate primer sets targeted to the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) for use in quantitative real-time PCR detection of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in stored swine manure. Degenerate primer sets were developed to detect SRB in stored swine manure. These were compared with a previously reported primer set, DSR1F+ and DSR-R, for their coverage and ability to detect SRB communities in stored swine manure. Sequenced clones were most similar to Desulfovibrio sp. and Desulfobulbus sp., and these SRB populations differed within different manure ecosystems. Sulfur content of swine diets was shown to affect the population of Desulfobulbus-like Group 1 SRB in manure. The newly developed assays were able to enumerate and discern different groups of SRB, and suggest a richly diverse and as yet undescribed population of SRB in swine manure. The PCR assays described here provide improved and efficient molecular tools for quantitative detection of SRB populations. This is the first study to show population shifts of SRB in swine manure, which are a result of either the effects of swine diets or the maturity of the manure ecosystem.

  8. A green triple biocide cocktail consisting of a biocide, EDDS and methanol for the mitigation of planktonic and sessile sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wen, J; Xu, D; Gu, T; Raad, I

    2012-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) cause souring and their biofilms are often the culprit in Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The two most common green biocides for SRB treatment are tetrakis-hydroxymethylphosphonium sulfate (THPS) and glutaraldehyde. It is unlikely that there will be another equally effective green biocide in the market any time soon. This means more effective biocide treatment probably will rely on biocide cocktails. In this work a triple biocide cocktail consisting of glutaraldehyde or THPS, ethylenediaminedisuccinate (EDDS) and methanol was used to treat planktonic SRB and to remove established SRB biofilms. Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757), a corrosive SRB was used as an example in the tests. Laboratory results indicated that with the addition of 10-15% (v/v) methanol to the glutaraldehyde and EDDS double combination, mitigation of planktonic SRB growth in ATCC 1249 medium and a diluted medium turned from inhibition to a kill effect while the chelator dosage was cut from 2,000 to 1,000 ppm. Biofilm removal was achieved when 50 ppm glutaraldehyde combined with 15% methanol and 1,000 ppm EDDS was used. THPS showed similar effects when it was used to replace glutaraldehyde in the triple biocide cocktail to treat planktonic SRB.

  9. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiemin; Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang; Xing, Jianmin

    2015-09-15

    Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of nitrate and nitrite on sulfide production by two thermophilic, sulfate-reducing enrichments from an oil field in the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Krista M; Grigoriyan, Alexander; Jenneman, Gary; Jennneman, Gary; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-05-01

    Thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (tSRB) can be major contributors to the production of H(2)S (souring) in oil reservoirs. Two tSRB enrichments from a North Sea oil field, NS-tSRB1 and NS-tSRB2, were obtained at 58 degrees C with acetate-propionate-butyrate and with lactate as the electron donor, respectively. Analysis by rDNA sequencing indicated the presence of Thermodesulforhabdus norvegicus in NS-tSRB1 and of Archaeoglobus fulgidus in NS-tSRB2. Nitrate (10 mM) had no effect on H(2)S production by mid-log phase cultures of NS-tSRB1 and NS-tSRB2, whereas nitrite (0.25 mM or higher) inhibited sulfate reduction. NS-tSRB1 did not recover from inhibition, whereas sulfate reduction activity of NS-tSRB2 recovered after 500 h. Nitrite was also effective in souring inhibition and H(2)S removal in upflow bioreactors, whereas nitrate was similarly ineffective. Hence, nitrite may be preferable for souring prevention in some high-temperature oil fields because it reacts directly with sulfide and provides long-lasting inhibition of sulfate reduction.

  11. Three-year survey of sulfate-reducing bacteria community structure in Carnoulès acid mine drainage (France), highly contaminated by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Giloteaux, Ludovic; Duran, Robert; Casiot, Corinne; Bruneel, Odile; Elbaz-Poulichet, Françoise; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol

    2013-03-01

    A 3-year survey on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was conducted in the waters of the arsenic-rich acid mine drainage (AMD) located at Carnoulès (France) to determine the influence of environmental parameters on their community structure. The source (S5 station) exhibited most extreme conditions with pH lowering to ~1.2; iron, sulfate, and arsenic concentrations reaching 6843, 29 593, and 638 mg L(-1), respectively. The conditions were less extreme at the downstream stations S1 (pH ~3.7; iron, sulfate, and arsenic concentrations of 1114, 4207, and 167 mg L(-1), respectively) and COWG (pH ~3.4; iron, sulfate, and arsenic concentrations of 854, 3134, and 110 mg L(-1), respectively). SRB community structures were characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and library analyses based on dsrAB genes. The predominant dsrAB sequences detected were most similar to the family Desulfobulbaceae. Additionally, certain phylotypes could be related to spatio-temporal fluctuations of pH, iron, and arsenic species. For example, Desulfohalobiaceae-related sequences were detected at the most acidic sample (pH 1.4) with high iron and arsenic concentrations (6379 and 524 mg L(-1), respectively). New dsrAB sequences, with no isolated representatives, were found exclusively in COWG. This study gives new insights on SRB community dynamics in AMD systems. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sulfonates as Terminal Electron Acceptors for Growth of Sulfite-Reducing Bacteria (Desulfitobacterium spp.) and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: Effects of Inhibitors of Sulfidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Thomas J.; Godchaux, Walter; Leadbetter, Edward R.

    1999-01-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of Desulfitobacterium spp. to utilize aliphatic sulfonates as terminal electron acceptors (TEA) for growth. Isethionate (2-hydroxyethanesulfonate) reduction by Desulfitobacterium hafniense resulted in acetate as well as sulfide accumulation in accordance with the expectation that the carbon portion of isethionate was oxidized to acetate and the sulfur was reduced to sulfide. The presence of a polypeptide, approximately 97 kDa, was evident in isethionate-grown cells of Desulfitobacterium hafniense, Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE 1, and the two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB)—Desulfovibrio desulfuricans IC1 (T. J. Lie, J. R. Leadbetter, and E. R. Leadbetter, Geomicrobiol. J. 15:135–149, 1998) and Desulfomicrobium norvegicum; this polypeptide was not detected when these bacteria were grown on TEA other than isethionate, suggesting involvement in its metabolism. The sulfate analogs molybdate and tungstate, effective in inhibiting sulfate reduction by SRB, were examined for their effects on sulfonate reduction. Molybdate effectively inhibited sulfonate reduction by strain IC1 and selectively inhibited isethionate (but not cysteate) reduction by Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE 1. Desulfitobacterium hafniense, however, grew with both isethionate and cysteate in the presence of molybdate. In contrast, tungstate only partially inhibited sulfonate reduction by both SRB and Desulfitobacterium spp. Similarly, another inhibitor of sulfate reduction, 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone, effectively inhibited sulfate reduction by SRB but only partially inhibited sulfonate reduction by both SRB and Desulfitobacterium hafniense. PMID:10508097

  13. Tailoring partially reduced graphene oxide as redox mediator for enhanced biotransformation of iopromide under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Toral-Sánchez, Eduardo; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Ascacio Valdés, Juan A; Aguilar, Cristóbal N; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-10-22

    This work reports the first successful application of graphene oxide (GO) and partially reduced GO (rGO) as redox mediator (RM) to increase the biotransformation of the recalcitrant iodinated contrast medium, iopromide (IOP). Results showed that GO-based materials promoted up to 5.5 and 2.8-fold faster biotransformation of IOP by anaerobic sludge under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions, respectively. Correlation between the extent of reduction of GO and its redox-mediating capacity was demonstrated, which was reflected in faster removal and greater extent of biotransformation of IOP. Further analysis indicated that the biotransformation pathway of IOP involved multiple reactions including deiodination, decarboxylation, demethylation, dehydration and N-dealkylation. GO-based materials could be strategically tailored and integrated in biological treatment systems to effectively enhance the redox conversion of recalcitrant pollutants commonly found in wastewater treatment systems and industrial effluents.

  14. Dechlorination of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) by sulfate-reducing bacteria from an aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sonier, D.N.; Duran, N.L.; Smith, G.B.

    1994-12-01

    Halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as trichlorofluomethane (CFC-11) have been widely used as solvents, refrigerants, and aerosol and polystyrene propellants. This has relusted in contamination of the environment in the form of volatized gases, industrial waste water contamination or leakage from underground storage tanks. In situ bioremediation of CFC-11 resulting in complete mineralization or production of less harmful intermediates would be more environmentally appropriate. This study examines whether microorganisms present in anaerobic samples obtained from an aquifer contaminated with CFC-11 and TCE were capable of degrading these compounds. CFC-11 biodegradation, but not TCE. The researchers determined that the anaerobic process was dependent on the presence of acetate and sulfate, but independent of nitrate and bromethane sulfonic acid, indicating that sulfate-reducing bacteria are the responsible agents. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Quorum Sensing and the Use of Quorum Quenchers as Natural Biocides to Inhibit Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scarascia, Giantommaso; Wang, Tiannyu; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-12-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are one of the main protagonist groups of biocorrosion in the seawater environment. Given their principal role in biocorrosion, it remains a crucial task to develop strategies to reduce the abundance of SRBs. Conventional approaches include the use of biocides and antibiotics, which can impose health, safety, and environmental concerns. This review examines an alternative approach to this problem. This is achieved by reviewing the role of quorum sensing (QS) in SRB populations and its impact on the biofilm formation process. Genome databases of SRBs are mined to look for putative QS systems and homologous protein sequences representative of autoinducer receptors or synthases. Subsequently, this review puts forward the potential use of quorum quenchers as natural biocides against SRBs and outlines the potential strategies for the implementation of this approach.

  16. Quorum Sensing and the Use of Quorum Quenchers as Natural Biocides to Inhibit Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Scarascia, Giantommaso; Wang, Tiannyu; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are one of the main protagonist groups of biocorrosion in the seawater environment. Given their principal role in biocorrosion, it remains a crucial task to develop strategies to reduce the abundance of SRBs. Conventional approaches include the use of biocides and antibiotics, which can impose health, safety, and environmental concerns. This review examines an alternative approach to this problem. This is achieved by reviewing the role of quorum sensing (QS) in SRB populations and its impact on the biofilm formation process. Genome databases of SRBs are mined to look for putative QS systems and homologous protein sequences representative of autoinducer receptors or synthases. Subsequently, this review puts forward the potential use of quorum quenchers as natural biocides against SRBs and outlines the potential strategies for the implementation of this approach. PMID:27983678

  17. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: Desulfovibrio mutants with altered sensitivity to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rayford B.; Ringbauer, Joseph A., Jr.; Wall, Judy D.

    2006-04-05

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments such as groundwater, sediments, and the gastrointestinal tract of animals. Because of the ability of Desulfovibrio to reduce radionuclides and metals through both enzymatic and chemical means, they have been proposed as a means to bioremediate heavy metal contaminated sites. Although classically thought of as strict anaerobes, Desulfovibrio species are surprisingly aerotolerant. Our objective is to understand the response of Desulfovibrio to oxidative stress so that we may more effectively utilize them in bioremediation of heavy metals in mixed aerobic-anaerobic environments. The enzymes superoxide dismutase, superoxide reductase, catalase, and rubrerythrin have been shown by others to be involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in Desulfovibrio. Some members of the genus Desulfovibrio can even reduce molecular oxygen to water via a membrane bound electron transport chain with the concomitant production of ATP, although their ability to grow with oxygen as the sole electron acceptor is still questioned.

  18. Enhanced performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based biocathode using stainless steel mesh on activated carbon fabric electrode.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohita; Jain, Pratiksha; Varanasi, Jhansi L; Lal, Banwari; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2013-12-01

    An anoxic biocathode was developed using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium on activated carbon fabric (ACF) and the effect of stainless steel (SS) mesh as additional current collector was investigated. Improved performance of biocathode was observed with SS mesh leading to nearly five folds increase in power density (from 4.79 to 23.11 mW/m(2)) and threefolds increase in current density (from 75 to 250 mA/m(2)). Enhanced redox currents and lower Tafel slopes observed from cyclic voltammograms of ACF with SS mesh indicated the positive role of uniform electron collecting points. Differential pulse voltammetry technique was employed as an additional tool to assess the redox carriers involved in bioelectrochemical reactions. SRB biocathode was also tested for reduction of volatile fatty acids (VFA) present in the fermentation effluent stream and the results indicated the possibility of integration of this system with anaerobic fermentation for efficient product recovery.

  19. Understanding the performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based packed bed reactor by growth kinetics study and microbial profiling.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Roy, Shantonu; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2016-07-15

    A novel marine waste extract (MWE) as alternative nitrogen source was explored for the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Variation of sulfate and nitrogen (MWE) showed that SRB growth follows an uncompetitive inhibition model. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of 0.085 and 0.124 h(-1) and inhibition constants (Ki) of 56 and 4.6 g/L were observed under optimized sulfate and MWE concentrations, respectively. The kinetic data shows that MWE improves the microbial growth by 27%. The packed bed bioreactor (PBR) under optimized sulfate and MWE regime showed sulfate removal efficiency of 62-66% and metals removal efficiency of 66-75% on using mine wastewater. The microbial community analysis using DGGE showed dominance of SRB (87-89%). The study indicated the optimum dosing of sulfate and cheap organic nitrogen to promote the growth of SRB over other bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Response of sulfate-reducing bacteria to an artificial oil-spill in a coastal marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Suárez, Ana; López-López, Arantxa; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Yarza, Pablo; Orfila, Alejandro; Terrados, Jorge; Arnds, Julia; Marqués, Silvia; Niemann, Helge; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramón

    2011-06-01

    In situ mesocosm experiments using a calcareous sand flat from a coastal area of the island of Mallorca in the Mediterranean Sea were performed in order to study the response of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to controlled crude oil contamination, or heavy contamination with naphthalene. Changes in the microbial community caused by the contamination were monitored by a combination of comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization, cultivation approaches and metabolic activity rates. Our results showed that crude oil and naphthalene negatively influenced the total microbial community as the natural increase in cell numbers due to the seasonal dynamics was attenuated. However, both contaminants enhanced the sulfate reduction rates, as well as the culturability of SRB. Our results suggested the presence of autochthonous deltaproteobacterial SRBs that were able to degrade crude oil or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as naphthalene in anaerobic sediment layers. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Production of electrically-conductive nanoscale filaments by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Eaktasang, Numfon; Kang, Christina S; Lim, Heejun; Kwean, Oh Sung; Cho, Suyeon; Kim, Yohan; Kim, Han S

    2016-06-01

    This study reports that the obligate anaerobic microorganism, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a predominant sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) in soils and sediments, can produce nanoscale bacterial appendages for extracellular electron transfer. These nanofilaments were electrically-conductive (5.81S·m(-1)) and allowed SRBs to directly colonize the surface of insoluble or solid electron acceptors. Thus, the direct extracellular electron transfer to the insoluble electrode in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) was possible without inorganic electron-shuttling mediators. The production of nanofilaments was stimulated when only insoluble electron acceptors were available for cellular respiration. These results suggest that when availability of a soluble electron acceptor for SRBs (SO4(2-)) is limited, D. desulfuricans initiates the production of conductive nanofilaments as an alternative strategy to transfer electrons to insoluble electron acceptors. The findings of this study contribute to understanding of the role of SRBs in the biotransformation of various substances in soils and sediments and in the MFC.

  2. Effects of iron-reducing bacteria on carbon steel corrosion induced by thermophilic sulfate-reducing consortia.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José

    2014-02-28

    Four thermophilic bacterial species, including the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacillus sp. G2 and the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum sp. SRB-M, were employed to integrate a bacterial consortium. A second consortium was integrated with the same bacteria, except for Geobacillus sp. G2. Carbon steel coupons were subjected to batch cultures of both consortia. The corrosion induced by the complete consortium was 10 times higher than that induced by the second consortium, and the ferrous ion concentration was consistently higher in iron-reducing consortia. Scanning electronic microscopy analysis of the carbon steel surface showed mineral films colonized by bacteria. The complete consortium caused profuse fracturing of the mineral film, whereas the non-iron-reducing consortium did not generate fractures. These data show that the iron-reducing activity of Geobacillus sp. G2 promotes fracturing of mineral films, thereby increasing steel corrosion.

  3. Effects of temperature on anaerobic decomposition of high-molecular weight organic matter under sulfate-reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Takato; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2013-03-01

    Most sedimentary mineralization occurs along coasts under anaerobic conditions. In the absence of oxygen, high-molecular weight organic matter in marine sediments is gradually decomposed by hydrolysis, fermentation and sulfate reduction. Because of the different responses of the respective steps to temperature, degradation may be specifically slowed or stopped in certain step. To evaluate the effect of temperature on cellobiose degradation, culture experiments were performed at six different temperatures (3 °C, 8 °C, 13 °C, 18 °C, 23 °C, and 28 °C) under sulfate-reducing conditions. This study measured the concentrations of sulfide, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and organic acids during that degradation. Degradation patterns were divided into three temperature groups: 3 °C, 8/13 °C, and 18/23/28 °C. The decrease in DOC proceeded in two steps, except at 3 °C. The length of the stagnant phase separating these two steps differed greatly between temperatures of 8/13 °C and 18/23/28 °C. In the first step, organic carbon was consumed by hydrolysis, fermentation and sulfate reduction. In the second step, acetate accumulated during the first step was oxidized by sulfate reduction. Bacterial communities in the cultures were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE); the major differences among the three temperature groups were attributed to shifts in acetate-using sulfate reducers of the genus Desulfobacter. This suggests that temperature characteristics of dominant acetate oxidizers are important factors in determining the response of carbon flow in coastal marine sediments in relation to the changes in temperature.

  4. Diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus clade are the key alkane degraders at marine seeps

    PubMed Central

    Kleindienst, Sara; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Stagars, Marion; von Netzer, Frederick; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana; Peplies, Jörg; Amann, Rudolf; Musat, Florin; Lueders, Tillmann; Knittel, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate that the anaerobic oxidation of non-methane hydrocarbons by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has an important role in carbon and sulfur cycling at marine seeps. Yet, little is known about the bacterial hydrocarbon degraders active in situ. Here, we provide the link between previous biogeochemical measurements and the cultivation of degraders by direct identification of SRB responsible for butane and dodecane degradation in complex on-site microbiota. Two contrasting seep sediments from Mediterranean Amon mud volcano and Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) were incubated with 13C-labeled butane or dodecane under sulfate-reducing conditions and analyzed via complementary stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques. Using DNA- and rRNA-SIP, we identified four specialized clades of alkane oxidizers within Desulfobacteraceae to be distinctively active in oxidation of short- and long-chain alkanes. All clades belong to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus (DSS) clade, substantiating the crucial role of these bacteria in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation at marine seeps. The identification of key enzymes of anaerobic alkane degradation, subsequent β-oxidation and the reverse Wood–Ljungdahl pathway for complete substrate oxidation by protein-SIP further corroborated the importance of the DSS clade and indicated that biochemical pathways, analog to those discovered in the laboratory, are of great relevance for natural settings. The high diversity within identified subclades together with their capability to initiate alkane degradation and growth within days to weeks after substrate amendment suggest an overlooked potential of marine benthic microbiota to react to natural changes in seepage, as well as to massive hydrocarbon input, for example, as encountered during anthropogenic oil spills. PMID:24722631

  5. Identification of key components in the energy metabolism of the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus by transcriptome analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, William P.; Stokke, Runar; Roalkvam, Irene; Steen, Ida H.

    2014-01-01

    Energy conservation via the pathway of dissimilatory sulfate reduction is present in a diverse group of prokaryotes, but is most comprehensively studied in Deltaproteobacteria. In this study, whole-genome microarray analyses were used to provide a model of the energy metabolism of the sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus, based on comparative analysis of litoautotrophic growth with H2/CO2 and thiosulfate, and heterotrophic growth on lactate with sulfate or thiosulfate. Only 72 genes were expressed differentially between the cultures utilizing sulfate or thiosulfate, whereas 269 genes were affected by a shift in energy source. We identified co-located gene cluster encoding putative lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs; lldD, dld, lldEFG), also present in sulfate-reducing bacteria. These enzymes may take part in energy conservation in A. fulgidus by specifically linking lactate oxidation with APS reduction via the Qmo complex. High transcriptional levels of Fqo confirm an important role of F420H2, as well as a menaquinone-mediated electron transport chain, during heterotrophic growth. A putative periplasmic thiosulfate reductase was identified by specific up-regulation. Also, putative genes for transport of sulfate and sulfite are discussed. We present a model for hydrogen metabolism, based on the probable bifurcation reaction of the Mvh:Hdl hydrogenase, which may inhibit the utilization of Fdred for energy conservation. Energy conservation is probably facilitated via menaquinone to multiple membrane-bound heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr) complexes and the DsrC protein—linking periplasmic hydrogenase (Vht) to the cytoplasmic reduction of sulfite. The ambiguous roles of genes corresponding to fatty acid metabolism induced during growth with H2 are discussed. Putative co-assimilation of organic acids is favored over a homologous secondary carbon fixation pathway, although both mechanisms may contribute to conserve the amount of Fdred needed during autotrophic

  6. Diverse sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus clade are the key alkane degraders at marine seeps.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Sara; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Stagars, Marion; von Netzer, Frederick; von Bergen, Martin; Seifert, Jana; Peplies, Jörg; Amann, Rudolf; Musat, Florin; Lueders, Tillmann; Knittel, Katrin

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical and microbiological data indicate that the anaerobic oxidation of non-methane hydrocarbons by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has an important role in carbon and sulfur cycling at marine seeps. Yet, little is known about the bacterial hydrocarbon degraders active in situ. Here, we provide the link between previous biogeochemical measurements and the cultivation of degraders by direct identification of SRB responsible for butane and dodecane degradation in complex on-site microbiota. Two contrasting seep sediments from Mediterranean Amon mud volcano and Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California) were incubated with (13)C-labeled butane or dodecane under sulfate-reducing conditions and analyzed via complementary stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques. Using DNA- and rRNA-SIP, we identified four specialized clades of alkane oxidizers within Desulfobacteraceae to be distinctively active in oxidation of short- and long-chain alkanes. All clades belong to the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus (DSS) clade, substantiating the crucial role of these bacteria in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation at marine seeps. The identification of key enzymes of anaerobic alkane degradation, subsequent β-oxidation and the reverse Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for complete substrate oxidation by protein-SIP further corroborated the importance of the DSS clade and indicated that biochemical pathways, analog to those discovered in the laboratory, are of great relevance for natural settings. The high diversity within identified subclades together with their capability to initiate alkane degradation and growth within days to weeks after substrate amendment suggest an overlooked potential of marine benthic microbiota to react to natural changes in seepage, as well as to massive hydrocarbon input, for example, as encountered during anthropogenic oil spills.

  7. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Boyanov, Maxim I; Brulc, Jennifer M; Johnston, Eric R; Kemner, Kenneth M; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments.

  8. Physicochemical and biological characterization of long-term operated sulfate reducing granular sludge in the SANI® process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tianwei; Luo, Jinghai; Wei, Li; Mackey, Hamish R; Liu, Rulong; Rey Morito, Guillermo; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-03-15

    The SANI(®) process (Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated) is a treatment system with low energy demands. The major bioreactor of this new technology is a sulfate-reducing up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) that converts organics and provides electron donors for subsequent autotrophic denitrification. This research characterizes the granules inside the SRUSB, with the aim of improving its efficiency, maximizing its operational flexibility, and minimizing its footprint. The unique sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) granules serving in the SRUSB were found to increase the resilience and compactness of the SRUSB. The granules, with a compact and porous structure, showed high cohesion resisting breakage with a shear force G > 3400 s(-1). The hydrophobicity of the external surface of the mature granules remained stable at around 70% and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) accumulated at the bottom of the SRUSB. 16s rRNA gene analysis of the microbial communities revealed that Desulfobulbus (42.1%), Prosthecochloris (19%) and Trichococcus (12%) dominated the mature granular sludge. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) further showed that SRB organisms were located internally and then surrounded by non-SRB. According to the FISH results, the spatial distribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) displayed protein and α-polysaccharides in the exterior and β-polysaccharide in the core of the granules. Such biological structure suggests that each SRB granule acts as an efficient and independent unit, capable of achieving both fermentation and organic conversion. The present investigation sheds light on the physicochemical and biological characteristics of the SRB granulate. This information provides valuable information for scaling-up the SANI(®) process to treat real saline sewage in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Man Jae; O’Loughlin, Edward J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Eric R.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  10. Anaerobic degradation pathway of linear Alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) in sulfate-reducing marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Lara-Martín, Pablo A; Gómez-Parra, Abelardo; Sanz, José Luis; González-Mazo, Eduardo

    2010-03-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) are among the principal synthetic surfactants used worldwide. Their presence in the environment has been reported in a significant number of studies, and it has been generally assumed that LAS are not biotransformed in the absence of oxygen. However, laboratory experiments performed by our group using anoxic marine sediments have reported LAS degradation percentages that can reach up to 79% in 165 days. Here, we show for the first time the initial reaction metabolites (generated via fumarate addition to the LAS molecules), their biotransformation into sulfophenyl carboxylic acids (SPC), and the progressive degradation of these by successive beta-oxidation reactions. Advanced mass spectrometry has been used to carry out the identification of these compounds. This is the first time that an anaerobic degradation pathway for LAS is described, and these results represent a significant advance in understanding the final fate of these and other similar compounds in anoxic environments.

  11. Visible implant elastomer (VIE) tagging and simulated predation risk elicit similar physiological stress responses in three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    PubMed

    Fürtbauer, I; King, A J; Heistermann, M

    2015-05-01

    The effect of visible implant elastomer (VIE) tagging on the immediate physiological stress response was tested in female three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus, using non-invasive waterborne cortisol analysis. Post-tagging cortisol levels were significantly higher compared with pretreatment baseline concentrations; however, when comparing post-tagging cortisol levels with cortisol levels after exposure to a simulated aerial predator, no significant differences were found. This study indicates that VIE tagging elicits a physiological stress response similar to those occurring in the everyday lives of this important biological model organism.

  12. Patterns of 15N assimilation and growth of methanotrophic ANME-2 archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria within structured syntrophic consortia revealed by FISH-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Orphan, Victoria J; Turk, Kendra A; Green, Abigail M; House, Christopher H

    2009-07-01

    Methane release from the oceans is controlled in large part by syntrophic interactions between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (DSS), frequently found as organized consortia. An understanding of the specifics of this symbiotic relationship and the metabolic heterogeneity existing between and within individual methane-oxidizing aggregates is currently lacking. Here, we use the microanalytical method FISH-SIMS (fluorescence in situ hybridization-secondary ion mass spectrometry) to describe the physiological traits and anabolic activity of individual methanotrophic consortia, specifically tracking (15)N-labelled protein synthesis to examine the effects of organization and size on the metabolic activity of the syntrophic partners. Patterns of (15)N distribution within individual aggregates showed enhanced (15)N assimilation in ANME-2 cells relative to the co-associated DSS revealing a decoupling in anabolic activity between the partners. Protein synthesis in ANME-2 cells was sustained throughout the core of individual ANME-2/DSS consortia ranging in size range from 4 to 20 μm. This indicates that metabolic activity of the methane-oxidizing archaea is not limited to, or noticeably enhanced at the ANME-2/DSS boundary. Overall, the metabolic activity of both syntrophic partners within consortia was greater than activity measured in representatives of the ANME-2 and DSS observed alone, with smaller ANME-2/DSS aggregates displaying a tendency for greater (15)N uptake and doubling times ranging from 3 to 5 months. The combination of (15)N-labelling and FISH-SIMS provides an important perspective on the extent of heterogeneity within methanotrophic aggregates and may aid in constraining predictive models of activity and growth by these syntrophic consortia.

  13. Isolation and characterization of Desulfocurvus thunnarius sp. nov., a sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating cooking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Olfa; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Bartoli, Manon; Hamdi, Moktar; Bouallagui, Hassib; Fauque, Guy; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-11-01

    A novel anaerobic, chemo-organotrophic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain Olac 40(T), was isolated from a Tunisian wastewater digestor. Cells were curved, motile rods or vibrios (5.0-7.0×0.5 µm). Strain Olac 40(T) grew at temperatures between 15 and 50 °C (optimum 40 °C), and between pH 5.0 and 9.0 (optimum pH 7.1). It did not require NaCl for growth but tolerated it up to 50 g l(-1) (optimum 2 g l(-1)). In the presence of sulfate or thiosulfate, strain Olac 40(T) used lactate, pyruvate and formate as energy sources. Growth was observed on H2 only in the presence of acetate as carbon source. In the presence of sulfate or thiosulfate, the end products of lactate oxidation were acetate, sulfide and CO2. Sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite were used as terminal electron acceptors, but not elemental sulfur, nitrate or nitrite. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Olac 40(T) was 70 mol%. The profile of polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, aminophospholipid and four phospholipids. The main fatty acids were C16 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain Olac 40(T) was affiliated with the family Desulfovibrionaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons and physiological characteristics, strain Olac 40(T) is proposed to be assigned to a novel species of the genus Desulfocurvus, for which the name Desulfocurvus thunnarius is proposed. The type strain is Olac 40(T) ( = DSM 26129(T) = JCM 18546(T)).

  14. Life-extending dietary restriction and ovariectomy result in similar feeding rates but different physiological responses in grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    Drewry, MD; Williams, JM; Hatle, JD

    2011-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) and reduced reproduction each extend life span in many species. Females undergoing DR typically experience a reduction in their fecundity, which raises the question of whether the two treatments are actually extending life span in overlapping ways. Life span in lubber grasshoppers has been shown to be increased by DR, and separately by ovariectomy (OVX). Here, we test the combination of these on life span. If life extension by the two treatments are additive, it would suggest that they likely act through separate pathways. The experimental groups were: fully reproductive and fully fed (ShamFD); ovariectomized and fully fed (OVX FD); fully reproductive and restricted diet (ShamDR); and ovariectomized and restricted diet (OVX DR). The median life spans of these groups were: ShamFD = 245 d, OVX FD = 285 d, ShamDR = 286 d, and OVX DR = 322 d. Feeding rate for the OVX FD group was 64% of ad libitum, not significantly different from the 70% of ad libitum that was used for ShamDR. We also measured hemolymph parameters of physiology in these same individuals. Hemolymph levels of vitellogenin (the egg yolk-precursor protein) were increased 5-fold by OVX, but were not affected by DR. In addition, hemolymph total anti-oxidant activity (per μg protein) was significantly reduced by OVX, but was not affected by DR. We show that OVX and DR produce different physiological responses in grasshoppers, despite life extensions and feeding levels that were not significantly different. These data suggest that OVX and DR might extend life span via distinct pathways. PMID:21742024

  15. Degradative capacities and 16S rRNA-targeted whole-cell hybridization of sulfate-reducing bacteria in an anaerobic enrichment culture utilizing alkylbenzenes from crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rabus, R.; Widdel, F.; Fukui, Manabu

    1996-10-01

    Production of sulfide in oil field waters, a process which is referred to as souring, has been of concern. Hydrogen sulfide may lead to poisoning, contamination of oil and gas, corrosion of pipelines, conversion of iron mineral to ferrous sulfide. This study used a previously established sulfate-reducing enrichment culture on crude oil as a model system of bacterial habitats in which crude oil is the only potential source of organic substrates, and the enrichment culture was studied in detail including substrate preferences and major nutritional types of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the enrichment culture. 74 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Three Hydrogenotrophic Microbial Groups, Methanogenic Archaea, Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, and Acetogenic Bacteria, within Plaque Biofilms Associated with Human Periodontal Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, M. E.; Holtgraewe, S.; Seyfarth, I.; Conrads, G.; Horz, H. P.

    2008-01-01

    Human subgingival plaque biofilms are highly complex microbial ecosystems that may depend on H2-metabolizing processes. Here we investigated the ubiquity and proportions of methanogenic archaea, sulfate reducers, and acetogens in plaque samples from 102 periodontitis patients. In contrast to the case for 65 healthy control subjects, hydrogenotrophic groups were almost consistently detected in periodontal pockets, with the proportions of methanogens and sulfate reducers being significantly elevated in severe cases. In addition, antagonistic interactions among the three microbial groups indicated that they may function as alternative syntrophic partners of secondary fermenting periodontal pathogens. PMID:18326571

  17. Phylogeography of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria among Disturbed Sediments, Disclosed by Analysis of the Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase Genes (dsrAB)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Jiménez, J. R.; Kerkhof, L. J.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment samples were collected worldwide from 16 locations on four continents (in New York, California, New Jersey, Virginia, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Italy, Latvia, and South Korea) to assess the extent of the diversity and the distribution patterns of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in contaminated sediments. The SRB communities were examined by terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes (dsrAB) with NdeII digests. The fingerprints of dsrAB genes contained a total of 369 fluorescent TRFs, of which <20% were present in the GenBank database. The global sulfidogenic communities appeared to be significantly different among the anthropogenically impacted (petroleum-contaminated) sites, but nearly all were less diverse than pristine habitats, such as mangroves. A global SRB indicator species of petroleum pollution was not identified. However, several dsrAB gene sequences corresponding to hydrocarbon-degrading isolates or consortium members were detected in geographically widely separated polluted sites. Finally, a cluster analysis of the TRFLP fingerprints indicated that many SRB microbial communities were most similar on the basis of close geographic proximity (tens of kilometers). Yet, on larger scales (hundreds to thousands of kilometers) SRB communities could cluster with geographically widely separated sites and not necessarily with the site with the closest proximity. These data demonstrate that SRB populations do not adhere to a biogeographic distribution pattern similar to that of larger eukaryotic organisms, with the greatest species diversity radiating from the Indo-Pacific region. Rather, a patchy SRB distribution is encountered, implying an initially uniform SRB community that has differentiated over time. PMID:15691959

  18. Electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase is central to hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis in sulfate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Flynn, T. M.; Suess, M.; Bradley, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A significant range in microbial lipid 2H/1H ratios is observed in modern marine sediments [Li et al. 2009. GCA]. The magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation between microbial lipids and growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O) is hypothesized to relate to the central carbon and energy metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS]. These observations have raised the intriguing possibility for culture independent identification of the dominant metabolic pathways operating in environments critical to the geological record. One such metabolism we would like to track for its global significance in sedimentary carbon cycling is bacterial sulfate reduction [Jørgensen. 1982. Nature]. To-date, heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been observed to produce lipids that are depleted in fatty acid H-isotope composition, relative to growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ -125 to -175 ‰), with experiments on different substrates yielding little variability [Campbell et al. 2009. GCA; Osburn. 2013; Dawson et al. 2015. Geobiology]. In stark contrast, aerobic heterotrophs show a wide range in fractionations (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ +300 to -125‰) which seems to scale with the route cellular carbon metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS; Heinzelmann et al. 2015. Front Microbio]. Recent work in aerobic methylotrophs [Bradley et al. 2014. AGU] implicates transhydrogenase (TH) activity as a critical control on 2ɛlipid-H2O. This work suggests a specific driving mechanism for this range in fractionation is the ratio of intracellular NADPH/NADH, and more fundamentally, the intracellular redox state. In SRB a key component of energy metabolism is the activity of electron-bifurcating TH [Price et al. 2014. Front Microbio], for which a recent transposon mutant library has generated a number of knockouts in the target gene [Kuehl et al. 2014. mBio] in the model organism Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20. In this study we compare growth rates, fatty acid concentrations and 2ɛlipid-H2O from wild type and TH

  19. Volutin granules of Eimeria parasites are acidic compartments and have physiological and structural characteristics similar to acidocalcisomes

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Lia Carolina Soares; Gomes, Fabio; Maciel, Luis Renato Maia; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia; Plattner, Helmut; Hentschel, Joachim; Kawazoe, Urara; Barrabin, Hector; de Souza, Wanderley; DaMatta, Renato Augusto; Miranda, Kildare

    2012-01-01

    The structural organization of parasites has been the subject of investigation by many groups and has lead to the identification of structures and metabolic pathways that may represent targets for anti-parasitic drugs. A specific group of organelles named acidocalcisomes has been identified in a number of organisms, including the apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma and Plasmodium, where they have been shown to be involved in cation homeostasis, polyphosphate metabolism, and osmoregulation. Their structural counterparts in the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria have not been fully characterized. In this work, the ultrastructural and chemical properties of acidocalcisomes in Eimeria were characterized. Electron microscopy analysis of Eimeria parasites showed the dense organelles called volutin granules similar to acidocalcisomes. Immunolocalization of the vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase, considered as a marker for acidocalcisomes, showed labeling in vesicles of size and distribution similar to the dense organelles seen by electron microscopy. Spectrophotometric measurements of the kinetics of proton uptake showed a vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase activity. X-ray mapping revealed significant amounts of Na, Mg, P, K, Ca, and Zn in their matrix. The results suggest that volutin granules of Eimeria parasites are acidic, dense organelles and possess structural and chemical properties analogous to those of other acidocalcisomes, suggesting a similar functional role in these parasites. PMID:21699625

  20. Activity and phylogenetic diversity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms in low-temperature subsurface fluids within the upper oceanic crust

    PubMed Central

    Robador, Alberto; Jungbluth, Sean P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bowers, Robert M.; Rappé, Michael S.; Amend, Jan P.; Cowen, James P.

    2015-01-01

    The basaltic ocean crust is the largest aquifer system on Earth, yet the rates of biological activity in this environment are unknown. Low-temperature (<100°C) fluid samples were investigated from two borehole observatories in the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR) flank, representing a range of upper oceanic basement thermal and geochemical properties. Microbial sulfate reduction rates (SRR) were measured in laboratory incubations with 35S-sulfate over a range of temperatures and the identity of the corresponding sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) was studied by analyzing the sequence diversity of the functional marker dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase (dsrAB) gene. We found that microbial sulfate reduction was limited by the decreasing availability of organic electron donors in higher temperature, more altered fluids. Thermodynamic calculations indicate energetic constraints for metabolism, which together with relatively higher cell-specific SRR reveal increased maintenance requirements, consistent with novel species-level dsrAB phylotypes of thermophilic SRM. Our estimates suggest that microbially-mediated sulfate reduction may account for the removal of organic matter in fluids within the upper oceanic crust and underscore the potential quantitative impact of microbial processes in deep subsurface marine crustal fluids on marine and global biogeochemical carbon cycling. PMID:25642212

  1. Interactions of polyacrylamides used for enhanced oil recovery and reservoir isolates of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The interactions of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides utilized in enhanced oil recovery as mobility control agents and reservoir isolates of Desulfovibrio were examined. Produced waters from reservoirs undergoing polymer flooding were sampled to determine the presence and numbers of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The influence of polyacrylamide on the growth of Desulfovibrio under a number of conditions was studied. Brookfield viscosity and screen factor measurements were used to screen for adverse changes in the rheological properties of polyacrylamide solutions which had been exposed to Desulfovibrio. Partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides stimulated the growth of Desulfovibrio under laboratory conditions. The polymer may act as a nitrogen source or as an incomplete substrate under certain conditions, but is apparently not utilizable as a carbon source. Desulfovibrio caused a loss in screen factor of polyacrylamide solutions under anaerobic conditions, but no significant loss in solution viscosity was observed. No decrease in polymer concentration was detected. Labelled polyacrylamide was not incorporated in Desulfovibrio. The authors conclude that the observed screen factor losses are probably not the result of enzymatic degradation of the polymer, and are most likely a physical/chemical interaction of polymer molecules with some product of Desulfovibrio metabolism.

  2. Experimental study on treating agate dyeing wastewater with sulfate-reducing bacteria strengthening peanut shells and scrap iron.

    PubMed

    Di, Junzhen; Wang, Mingxin

    2017-08-01

    To solve the problems of high concentrations of Cr(6+), SO4(2-) and H(+) in agate dyeing industrial wastewater and heavy pollution and high treating cost, single-factor and orthogonal experiments were conducted to determine the optimum particle size, the ratio of adsorbents dosing and hydraulic retention time based on peanut shells and scrap iron. Experiments, using five dynamic columns filled with the peanut shells, scrap iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), were also conducted to determine the effect and mechanism of treating the wastewater. The results show that the best treatment effect was obtained when the diameter of peanut shells was 3 mesh, scrap iron being 60 mesh size, scrap iron and peanut shells with a ratio of 1:2, and hydraulic retention time being 24 h. By the comprehensive comparison of five groups of columns, the treating effect of column 4 was best, in which the removal rate of SO4(2-) and Cr(6+) was 30.17% and 88.36% respectively before adding the microorganisms, and 25.34% and 99.31% respectively after adding the microorganisms. The average of chemical oxygen demand (COD) release quantity was 62.11 and 513.75 mg·L(-1), and the average effluent pH was 7.09 and 7.93 before and after addition of microorganisms respectively. In conclusion, peanut shells, scrap iron and SRB had a certain synergistic effect on treating agate dyeing wastewater.

  3. Activity and phylogenetic diversity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms in low-temperature subsurface fluids within the upper oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Robador, Alberto; Jungbluth, Sean P; LaRowe, Douglas E; Bowers, Robert M; Rappé, Michael S; Amend, Jan P; Cowen, James P

    2014-01-01

    The basaltic ocean crust is the largest aquifer system on Earth, yet the rates of biological activity in this environment are unknown. Low-temperature (<100°C) fluid samples were investigated from two borehole observatories in the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR) flank, representing a range of upper oceanic basement thermal and geochemical properties. Microbial sulfate reduction rates (SRR) were measured in laboratory incubations with (35)S-sulfate over a range of temperatures and the identity of the corresponding sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) was studied by analyzing the sequence diversity of the functional marker dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase (dsrAB) gene. We found that microbial sulfate reduction was limited by the decreasing availability of organic electron donors in higher temperature, more altered fluids. Thermodynamic calculations indicate energetic constraints for metabolism, which together with relatively higher cell-specific SRR reveal increased maintenance requirements, consistent with novel species-level dsrAB phylotypes of thermophilic SRM. Our estimates suggest that microbially-mediated sulfate reduction may account for the removal of organic matter in fluids within the upper oceanic crust and underscore the potential quantitative impact of microbial processes in deep subsurface marine crustal fluids on marine and global biogeochemical carbon cycling.

  4. Sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene degradation by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Knöller, Kay; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Herrmann; Weise, Stephan M

    2006-06-15

    We examined the oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation of sulfate during anaerobic degradation of toluene by sulfate-reducing bacteria in culture experiments with Desulfobacula toluolica as a type strain and with an enrichment culture Zz5-7 obtained from a benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX)-contaminated aquifer. Sulfur isotope fractionation can show considerable variation upon sulfate reduction and may react extremely sensitively to changes in environmental conditions. In contrast, oxygen isotope fractionation seems to be less sensitive to environmental changes. Our results clearly indicate that oxygen isotope fractionation is dominated by isotope exchange with ambient water. To verify our experimental results and to test the applicability of oxygen and sulfur isotope investigations under realistic field conditions, we evaluated isotope data from two BTEX-contaminated aquifers presented in the recent literature. On a field scale, bacterial sulfate reduction may be superimposed by processes such as dispersion, adsorption, reoxidation, or mixing. The dual isotope approach enables the identification of such sulfur transformation processes. This identification is vital for a general qualitative evaluation of the natural attenuation potential of the contaminated aquifer.

  5. Stable isotope fractionation of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) during reductive dechlorination by two strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Vogt, Carsten; Weber, Stefanie; Danet, Andrei-Florin; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2009-05-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation factors were determined with the dichloro elimination of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH) by the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfococcus multivorans DSM 2059 and Desulfovibrio gigas DSM 1382. Both strains are known for cometabolic HCH dechlorination. Degradation experiments with gamma-HCH in concentrations of 22-25 gammaM were carried out using benzoate (for D. multivorans) and lactate (for D. gigas) as electron donors, respectively. Gamma-HCH was dechlorinated by both bacterial strains within four weeks, and the metabolites gamma-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorocyclohexene (gamma-TCCH), chlorobenzene (CB), and benzene were formed. The carbon isotope fractionation of gamma-HCH dechlorination was quantified by the Rayleigh model, using a bulk enrichment factor (epsilon C) of -3.9 +/- 0.6 for D. gigas and -3.4 +/- 0.5 for D. multivorans, which correspond to apparent kinetic isotope effect (AKIEc) values of 1.023 +/- 0.004 or 1.02 +/- 0.003 for stepwise Cl-C bond cleavage. The extent and range of isotope fractionation suggest that gamma-HCH dechlorination can be monitored in anoxic environments by compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA).

  6. Growth Inhibition of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Produced Water from the Petroleum Industry Using Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Souza, Pamella Macedo de; Goulart, Fátima Regina de Vasconcelos; Marques, Joana Montezano; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Groposo, Claudia; Sousa, Maíra Paula de; Vólaro, Vanessa; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Moreno, Daniela Sales Alviano; Seldin, Lucy

    2017-04-19

    Strategies for the control of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the oil industry involve the use of high concentrations of biocides, but these may induce bacterial resistance and/or be harmful to public health and the environment. Essential oils (EO) produced by plants inhibit the growth of different microorganisms and are a possible alternative for controlling SRB. We aimed to characterize the bacterial community of produced water obtained from a Brazilian petroleum facility using molecular methods, as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EO from different plants and their major components against Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 and against SRB growth directly in the produced water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of the genera Pelobacter and Marinobacterium, Geotoga petraea, and the SRB Desulfoplanes formicivorans in our produced water samples. Sequencing of dsrA insert-containing clones confirmed the presence of sequences related to D. formicivorans. EO obtained from Citrus aurantifolia, Lippia alba LA44 and Cymbopogon citratus, as well as citral, linalool, eugenol and geraniol, greatly inhibited (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 78 µg/mL) the growth of D. alaskensis in a liquid medium. The same MIC was obtained directly in the produced water with EO from L. alba LA44 (containing 82% citral) and with pure citral. These findings may help to control detrimental bacteria in the oil industry.

  7. Corrosion Behavior of Arc-Sprayed Zn-Al Coating in the Presence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Gao, Wenwen; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qin, Yujiao

    2015-11-01

    Zn-Al coatings were prepared by high-velocity arc spraying process and were sealed by the silicone resin to improve their corrosion resistance. The corrosion behavior of the unsealed and sealed Zn-Al coatings in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in seawater was evaluated, and the related mechanism was discussed. The results showed that the charge transfer resistance value of the sealed coating was almost ten times higher than that of the unsealed coating, and the concentration of element S in the covering layer of the former was half lower than that of the latter. The corrosion resistance of the coating was apparently improved by the sealing treatment. The corrosion rate of the coatings first increased and then decreased during the immersion time of 8 days in the seawater with SRB. The removal of the passive films in the initial period was attributed to penetration of the corrosion medium into the coating and the dissolution of the active zones inside the coating. The adhesion of SRB and accumulation of corrosion products on the coating surface would protect the coating from being further damaged.

  8. Anaerobic degradation of propane and butane by sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from marine hydrocarbon cold seeps

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Musat, Niculina; Adam, Birgit; Kuypers, Marcel; Grundmann, Olav; Musat, Florin

    2013-01-01

    The short-chain, non-methane hydrocarbons propane and butane can contribute significantly to the carbon and sulfur cycles in marine environments affected by oil or natural gas seepage. In the present study, we enriched and identified novel propane and butane-degrading sulfate reducers from marine oil and gas cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and Hydrate Ridge. The enrichment cultures obtained were able to degrade simultaneously propane and butane, but not other gaseous alkanes. They were cold-adapted, showing highest sulfate-reduction rates between 16 and 20 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, followed by whole-cell hybridizations with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that each enrichment culture was dominated by a unique phylotype affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster within the Deltaproteobacteria. These phylotypes formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster of propane and butane degraders, including sequences from environments associated with hydrocarbon seeps. Incubations with 13C-labeled substrates, hybridizations with sequence-specific probes and nanoSIMS analyses showed that cells of the dominant phylotypes were the first to become enriched in 13C, demonstrating that they were directly involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, using the nanoSIMS data, carbon assimilation rates were calculated for the dominant cells in each enrichment culture. PMID:23254512

  9. Quantification of toxic and inhibitory impact of copper and zinc on mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Utgikar, Vivek P; Tabak, Henry H; Haines, John R; Govind, Rakesh

    2003-05-05

    The adverse effects of copper and zinc on an acetate-utilizing mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at concentrations below the toxic concentration (minimum metal concentration at which no sulfate reduction is observed) are reported in this paper. Mathematical models were developed to incorporate the toxic and inhibitory effects (defined as the reduction in bacterial population upon exposure to the metal and the decrease in the metabolic rate of sulfate reduction by the SRB, respectively) into the sulfate-reduction biokinetics. The characteristic toxicity and inhibition constants were obtained from the measurements of bacterial populations and dissolved metal concentrations in serum bottle studies conducted at 35 degrees C and pH 6.6. Both copper and zinc had toxic and inhibitory effects on SRB. The toxicity constants for copper and zinc were 10.6 and 2.9 mM(-1), respectively, indicating that exposure to copper resulted in a higher mortality of SRB than did exposure to zinc. The values of the inhibition constants were found to be 17.9 +/- 2.5 and 25.2 +/- 1.0 mM(-1) for copper and zinc, respectively. This implies that dissolved zinc was slightly more inhibitory to SRB than copper. The models presented in the paper can be used to predict the response of a sulfate-reduction bioreactor to heavy metals during acid mine drainage treatment. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Thioarsenate Formation Coupled with Anaerobic Arsenite Oxidation by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Geng; Huang, Liuqin; Jiang, Hongchen; Peng, Yue’e; Guo, Wei; Chen, Ziyu; She, Weiyu; Guo, Qinghai; Dong, Hailiang

    2017-01-01

    Thioarsenates are common arsenic species in sulfidic geothermal waters, yet little is known about their biogeochemical traits. In the present study, a novel sulfate-reducing bacterial strain Desulfotomaculum TC-1 was isolated from a sulfidic hot spring in Tengchong geothermal area, Yunnan Province, China. The arxA gene, encoding anaerobic arsenite oxidase, was successfully amplified from the genome of strain TC-1, indicating it has a potential ability to oxidize arsenite under anaerobic condition. In anaerobic arsenite oxidation experiments inoculated with strain TC-1, a small amount of arsenate was detected in the beginning but became undetectable over longer time. Thioarsenates (AsO4-xSx2- with x = 1–4) formed with mono-, di- and tri-thioarsenates being dominant forms. Tetrathioarsenate was only detectable at the end of the experiment. These results suggest that thermophilic microbes might be involved in the formation of thioarsenates and provide a possible explanation for the widespread distribution of thioarsenates in terrestrial geothermal environments. PMID:28769902

  11. Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated from an Oil Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlAbbas, Faisal M.; Williamson, Charles; Bhola, Shaily M.; Spear, John R.; Olson, David L.; Mishra, Brajendra; Kakpovbia, Anthony E.

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion of API 5L X52 linepipe steel by a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium. The SRB consortium used in this study was cultivated from a sour oil well in Louisiana, USA. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the mixed bacterial consortium contained three phylotypes: members of Proteobacteria ( Desulfomicrobium sp.), Firmicutes ( Clostridium sp.), and Bacteroidetes ( Anaerophaga sp.). The biofilm and the pits that developed with time were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). In addition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) and open circuit potential (OCP) were used to analyze the corrosion behavior. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric interactions between the electrode, biofilm and solution interfaces. The results confirmed that extensive localized corrosion activity of SRB is due to a formed biofilm in conjunction with a porous iron sulfide layer on the metal surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed semiconductive corrosion products predominantly composed of a mixture of siderite (FeCO3), iron sulfide (Fe x S y ), and iron (III) oxide-hydroxide (FeOOH) constituents in the corrosion products for the system exposed to the SRB consortium.

  12. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Behavior of High Strength Steel EQ70 under Cathodic Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fang; Zhai, Xiaofan; Duan, Jizhou; Zhang, Meixia; Hou, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Certain species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) use cathodes as electron donors for metabolism, and this electron transfer process may influence the proper protection potential choice for structures. The interaction between SRB and polarized electrodes had been the focus of numerous investigations. In this paper, the impact of cathodic protection (CP) on Desulfovibrio caledoniens metabolic activity and its influence on highs trength steel EQ70 were studied by bacterial analyses and electrochemical measurements. The results showed that EQ70 under -0.85 VSCE CP had a higher corrosion rate than that without CP, while EQ70 with -1.05 VSCE had a lower corrosion rate. The enhanced SRB metabolic activity at -0.85 VSCE was most probably caused by the direct electron transfer from the electrode polarized at -0.85 VSCE. This direct electron transfer pathway was unavailable in -1.05 VSCE. In addition, the application of cathodic protection led to the transformation of sulfide rusts into carbonates rusts. These observations have been employed to provide updated recommendations for the optimum CP potential for steel structures in the presence of SRB. PMID:27603928

  13. Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Gibson, Robert A; Green, Stefan J; Hopmans, Ellen C; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T J; Shields, John P; Damsté, Jaap S S; Elkins, James G

    2013-03-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium designated OPF15(T) was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The phylogeny of 16S rRNA and functional genes (dsrAB) placed the organism within the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae. The organism displayed hyperthermophilic temperature requirements for growth with a range of 70-90 °C and an optimum of 83 °C. Optimal pH was around 6.5-7.0 and the organism required the presence of H2 or formate as an electron donor and CO2 as a carbon source. Electron acceptors supporting growth included sulfate, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur. Lactate, acetate, pyruvate, benzoate, oleic acid, and ethanol did not serve as electron donors. Membrane lipid analysis revealed diacyl glycerols and acyl/ether glycerols which ranged from C14:0 to C20:0. Alkyl chains present in acyl/ether and diether glycerol lipids ranged from C16:0 to C18:0. Straight, iso- and anteiso-configurations were found for all lipid types. The presence of OPF15(T) was also shown to increase cellulose consumption during co-cultivation with Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, a fermentative, cellulolytic extreme thermophile isolated from the same environment. On the basis of phylogenetic, phenotypic, and structural analyses, Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov. is proposed as a new species with OPF15(T) representing the type strain.

  14. Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Gibson, Robert A.; Green, Stefan J.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Shields, John P.; Damsté, Jaap S. S.; Elkins, James G.

    2013-01-24

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium designated OPF15T was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The phylogeny of 16S rRNA and functional genes (dsrAB) placed the organism within the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae. The organism displayed hyperthermophilic temperature requirements for growth with a range of 70 90 C and an optimum of 83 C. Optimal pH was around 6.5 7.0 and the organism required the presence of H2 or formate as an electron donor and CO2 as a carbon source. Electron acceptors supporting growth included sulfate, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur. Lactate, acetate, pyruvate, benzoate, oleic acid, and ethanol did not serve as electron donors. Membrane lipid analysis revealed diacyl glycerols and acyl/ether glycerols which ranged from C14:0 to C20:0. Alkyl chains present in acyl/ether and diether glycerol lipids ranged from C16:0 to C18:0. Straight, iso- and anteiso-configurations were found for all lipid types. The presence of OPF15T was also shown to increase cellulose consumption during co-cultivation with Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, a fermentative, cellulolytic extreme thermophile isolated from the same environment. On the basis of phylogenetic, phenotypic, and structural analyses, Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis sp. nov. is proposed as a new species with OPF15T representing the type strain.

  15. Distribution of anaerobic methane-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing communities in the G11 Nyegga pockmark, Norwegian Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Dinasquet, Julie; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Pockmarks are seabed geological structures sustaining methane seepage in cold seeps. Based on RNA-derived sequences the active fraction of the archaeal community was analysed in sediments associated with the G11 pockmark, in the Nyegga region of the Norwegian Sea. The anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) communities were studied as well. The vertical distribution of the archaeal community assessed by PCR-DGGE highlighted the presence of ANME-2 in surface sediments, and ANME-1 in deeper sediments. Enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens of the Methanogenium genus in surface sediment layers as well. The active fraction of the archaeal community was uniquely composed of ANME-2 in the shallow sulfate-rich sediments. Functional methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries showed that sequences affiliated with the ANME-1 and ANME-3 groups appeared in the deeper sediments but ANME-2 dominated both surface and deeper layers. Finally, dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene libraries revealed a high SRB diversity (i.e. Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrophobacteraceae and Firmicutes) in the shallow sulfate-rich sediments. The SRB diversity was much lower in the deeper section. Overall, these results show that the microbial community in sediments associated with a pockmark harbour classical cold seep ANME and SRB communities.

  16. Desulfovibrio marrakechensis sp. nov., a 1,4-tyrosol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from olive mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chamkh, Fatima; Spröer, Cathrin; Lemos, Paulo Costa; Besson, Stephane; El Asli, Abdel-Ghani; Bennisse, Rhizlane; Labat, Marc; Reis, Maria; Qatibi, Abdel-Illah

    2009-05-01

    A novel mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, EMSSDQ(4)(T), was isolated from olive mill wastewater in the semi-arid region of Morocco (Marrakech). Cells were Gram-negative, catalase-positive, straight rods that were non-motile and non-spore-forming and contained cytochrome c(3) and desulfoviridin. The DNA G+C content was 65.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was a member of the genus Desulfovibrio with Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus D41(T), Desulfovibrio alcoholivorans SPSN(T), Desulfovibrio fructosivorans JJ(T) and Desulfovibrio carbinolicus EDK82(T) as the most closely related strains with validly published names. In addition to the classical substrates used by Desulfovibrio species, the isolate oxidized 1,4-tyrosol, one of the most abundant phenolic compounds occurring in olive mill wastewater, to 4-hydroxyphenylacetate without ring cleavage. D. alcoholivorans SPSN(T) was also found to carry out this reaction. Under air, strain EMSSDQ(4)(T) exhibited limited growth on lactate and yeast extract in the absence of sulfate. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the isolate represents a novel species, Desulfovibrio marrakechensis sp. nov. The type strain is EMSSDQ(4)(T) (=DSM 19337(T) =ATCC BAA-1562(T)).

  17. Evidence-based annotation of transcripts and proteins in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, H Ewa; Arkin, Adam P

    2011-10-01

    We used high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5' RNA sequencing to identify transcripts in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model sulfate-reducing bacterium. We identified the first nucleotide position for 1,124 transcripts, including 54 proteins with leaderless transcripts and another 72 genes for which a major transcript initiates within the upstream protein-coding gene, which confounds measurements of the upstream gene's expression. Sequence analysis of these promoters showed that D. vulgaris prefers -10 and -35 boxes different from those preferred by Escherichia coli. A total of 549 transcripts ended at intrinsic (rho-independent) terminators, but most of the other transcripts seemed to have variable ends. We found low-level antisense expression of most genes, and the 5' ends of these transcripts mapped to promoter-like sequences. Because antisense expression was reduced for highly expressed genes, we suspect that elongation of nonspecific antisense transcripts is suppressed by transcription of the sense strand. Finally, we combined the transcript results with comparative analysis and proteomics data to make 505 revisions to the original annotation of 3,531 proteins: we removed 255 (7.5%) proteins, changed 123 (3.6%) start codons, and added 127 (3.7%) proteins that had been missed. Tiling data had higher coverage than shotgun proteomics and hence led to most of the corrections, but many errors probably remain. Our data are available at http://genomics.lbl.gov/supplemental/DvHtranscripts2011/.

  18. Towards a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Swapnil R; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Petzold, Christopher J; Zane, Grant M; Price, Morgan N; Reveco, Sonia A; Fok, Veronica; Johanson, Alyssa R; Batth, Tanveer S; Singer, Mary; Chandonia, John-Marc; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam P; Wall, Judy D; Singh, Anup K; Keasling, Jay D

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study Escherichia coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model obligate anaerobe and sulfate reducer and the subject of this study. Here we carried out affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry to reconstruct an interaction network among 12 chromosomally encoded bait and 90 prey proteins based on 134 bait-prey interactions identified to be of high confidence. Protein-protein interaction data are often plagued by the lack of adequate controls and replication analyses necessary to assess confidence in the results, including identification of potential false positives. We addressed these issues through the use of biological replication, exponentially modified protein abundance indices, results from an experimental negative control, and a statistical test to assign confidence to each putative interacting pair applicable to small interaction data studies. We discuss the biological significance of metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by these protein-protein interaction data and the observed protein modifications. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction.

  19. Impact of copper on the abundance and diversity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in two chilean marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Besaury, Ludovic; Ouddane, Baghdad; Pavissich, Juan Pablo; Dubrulle-Brunaud, Carole; González, Bernardo; Quillet, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    We studied the abundance and diversity of the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) in two 30-cm marine chilean sediment cores, one with a long-term exposure to copper-mining residues, the other being a non-exposed reference sediment. The abundance of SRPs was quantified by qPCR of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene β-subunit (dsrB) and showed that SRPs are sensitive to high copper concentrations, as the mean number of SRPs all along the contaminated sediment was two orders of magnitude lower than in the reference sediment. SRP diversity was analyzed by using the dsrB-sequences-based PCR-DGGE method and constructing gene libraries for dsrB-sequences. Surprisingly, the diversity was comparable in both sediments, with dsrB sequences belonging to Desulfobacteraceae, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Desulfobulbaceae, SRP families previously described in marine sediments, and to a deep branching dsrAB lineage. The hypothesis of the presence of horizontal transfer of copper resistance genes in the microbial population of the polluted sediment is discussed.

  20. Bioremediation of chromate: thermodynamic analysis of the effects of Cr(VI) on sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chardin, B; Dolla, A; Chaspoul, F; Fardeau, M L; Gallice, P; Bruschi, M

    2002-11-01

    Developing new bioremediation processes for soils and effluents polluted by Cr(VI) requires the selection of the most efficient and the most heavy-metal-resistant bacteria. The effects of Cr(VI) on bioenergetic metabolism in two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfomicrobium norvegicum, were monitored using isothermal microcalorimetry. The complete reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was studied by spectrophotometry and by speciation using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Results revealed that Cr(VI) induces an inhibition of growth with concomitant production of energy, which can be compared to the reaction of the bacteria to a stress such as oxidative stress. Moreover, the sensitivity of bacteria towards this metal is as a characteristic of the strain, which leads to differences in the kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction. The study by microcalorimetry of heavy metal effects on SRB bioenergetic metabolism thus appears an appropriate tool to identify better strains to be used for industrial bioremediation process development.

  1. Removal of chromium from synthetic plating waste by zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guha, Saumyen; Bhargava, Puja

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for reduction and removal of chromium from synthetic electroplating waste. The zero-valent iron shows promising results as a reductant of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) to trivalent chromium (Cr+3), capable of 100% reduction. The required iron concentration was a function of chromium concentration in the waste stream. Removal of Cr+3 by adsorption or precipitation on iron leads to complete removal of chromium from the waste and was a slower process than the reduction of Cr+6. Presence SRB in a completely mixed batch reactor inhibited the reduction of Cr+6. In a fixed-bed column reactor, SRB enhanced chromium removal and showed promising results for the treatment of wastes with low chromium concentrations. It is proposed that, for waste with high chromium concentration, zero-valent iron is an efficient reductant and can be used for reduction of Cr+6. For low chromium concentrations, a SRB augmented zero-valent iron and sand column is capable of removing chromium completely.

  2. Iron Sulfides and Sulfur Species Produced at (001) Hematite Surfaces in the Presence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Andrew L.; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Dohnalkova, Alice; McCready, David E.; Peyton, Brent M.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2001-01-01

    In the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) hematite (a-Fe2O3) dissolution is affected and hydrogen sulfide, the product of sulfate reduction is released. As a consequence, ferrous ions are free to react with excess H2S to form insoluble iron sulfides. X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate binding energies consistent with the iron sulfides having a pyrrhotite structure (Fe2p3/2 708.4 eV; S2p3/2 161.5 eV). Other sulfur species identified at the surface include sulfate, sulfite and polysulfides. X-ray diffraction suggests an unidentifiable crystal structure at the hematite surface develops within 3 months, HRTEM confirms the presence of a hexagonal structure again suggesting the formation of pyrrhotite. The identification of pyrrhotite is inconsistent with previous reports in which mackinawite and greigite were products of biological sulfate reduction (Rickard 1969; Herbert et al 1998). The apparent differences in stoiciometries may be related to the availability of Fe2+(aq.) at the mineral surface through respiratory iron reduction by subsurface bacteria. The significance of pyrrhotite and polysulfide production in relation to the S- and Fe-cycles and to trace metal bioavailability is discussed.

  3. Influence of four antimicrobials on methane-producing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Du, Jingru; Hu, Yong; Qi, Weikang; Zhang, Yanlong; Jing, Zhaoqian; Norton, Michael; Li, Yu-You

    2015-12-01

    The influence of Cephalexin (CLX), Tetracycline (TC), Erythromycin (ERY) and Sulfathiazole (ST) on methane-producing archaea (MPA) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anaerobic sludge was investigated using acetate or ethanol as substrate. With antimicrobial concentrations below 400mgL(-1), the relative specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was above 50%, so that the antimicrobials exerted slight effects on archaea. However ERY and ST at 400mgL(-1) caused a 74.5% and 57.6% inhibition to specific sulfidogenic activity (SSA) when the sludge granules were disrupted and ethanol used as substrate. After disruption, microbial tolerance to antimicrobials decreased, but the rate at which MPA utilized acetate and ethanol increased from 0.95gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) to 1.45gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) and 0.90gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) to 1.15gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) respectively. The ethanol utilization rate for SRB also increased after disruption from 0.35gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1) to 0.46gCOD·(gVSS⋅d)(-1). Removal rates for CLX approaching 20.0% and 25.0% were obtained used acetate and ethanol respectively. The disintegration of granules improved the CLX removal rate to 65% and 78%, but ST was not removed during this process.

  4. Hybrid soliwave technique for mitigating sulfate-reducing bacteria in controlling biocorrosion: a case study on crude oil sample.

    PubMed

    Mohd Ali, Muhammad Khairool Fahmy Bin; Abu Bakar, Akrima; Md Noor, Norhazilan; Yahaya, Nordin; Ismail, Mardhiah; Rashid, Ahmad Safuan

    2017-10-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is among the common corrosion types for buried and deep-water pipelines that result in costly repair and pipeline failure. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly known as the culprit of MIC. The aim of this work is to investigate the performance of combination of ultrasound (US) irradiation and ultraviolet (UV) radiation (known as Hybrid soliwave technique, HyST) at pilot scale to inactivate SRB. The influence of different reaction times with respect to US irradiation and UV radiation and synergistic effect toward SRB consortium was tested and discussed. In this research, the effect of HyST treatment toward SRB extermination and corrosion studies of carbon steel coupon upon SRB activity before and after the treatment were performed using weight loss method. The carbon steel coupons immersed in SRB sample were exposed to HyST treatment at different time of exposure. Additionally, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy were used to investigate the corrosion morphology in verifying the end product of SRB activity and corrosion formation after treatment. Results have shown that the US irradiation treatment gives a synergistic effect when combined with UV radiation in mitigating the SRB consortium.

  5. Leaching and accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge under concomitant thermophilic and low pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, G; Lopes, S I C; Saikaly, P E; Lens, P N L

    2012-12-01

    The leaching and/or accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge systems was investigated. Two thermophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at pH 5 were fed with sucrose (4 gCOD l(reactor)(-1)d(-1)) and sulfate at different COD/SO(4)(2-) ratios. During the start-up of such acidogenic systems, an initial leaching of trace elements from the inoculum sludge occurred regardless of trace elements supplementation in the reactor influent. The granular sludge maintained the physical structure despite high Fe leaching. After start-up and nonetheless the acidic conditions, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo and Se were retained or accumulated by the sludge when added. Particularly, Ni and Co accumulated in the carbonates and exchangeable fractions ensuring potential bioavailability. Otherwise, the initial stock in the inoculum sludge sufficed to operate the process for nearly 1 year without supplementation of trace elements and no significant sludge wash-out occurred.

  6. Anaerobic oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes by the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    PubMed

    Khelifi, Nadia; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Roche, Philippe; Grossi, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Valette, Odile; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2014-11-01

    The thermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC-16 (DSM 4304), which is known to oxidize fatty acids and n-alkenes, was shown to oxidize saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in the range C10-C21) with thiosulfate or sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The amount of n-hexadecane degradation observed was in stoichiometric agreement with the theoretically expected amount of thiosulfate reduction. One of the pathways used by anaerobic microorganisms to activate alkanes is addition to fumarate that involves alkylsuccinate synthase as a key enzyme. A search for genes encoding homologous enzymes in A. fulgidus identified the pflD gene (locus-tag AF1449) that was previously annotated as a pyruvate formate lyase. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this gene is of bacterial origin and was likely acquired by A. fulgidus from a bacterial donor through a horizontal gene transfer. Based on three-dimensional modeling of the corresponding protein and molecular dynamic simulations, we hypothesize an alkylsuccinate synthase activity for this gene product. The pflD gene expression was upregulated during the growth of A. fulgidus on an n-alkane (C16) compared with growth on a fatty acid. Our results suggest that anaerobic alkane degradation in A. fulgidus may involve the gene pflD in alkane activation through addition to fumarate. These findings highlight the possible importance of hydrocarbon oxidation at high temperatures by A. fulgidus in hydrothermal vents and the deep biosphere.

  7. Control of metal toxicity, effluent COD and regeneration of gel beads by immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Chuanfu; Takasaki, Yasushi; Okura, Takahiko

    2008-07-01

    Over the last few decades, the use of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the treatment of heavy-metal containing wastewaters including acid mine drainage has become a topic of scientific and commercial interest. However, technical difficulties such as the sensitivity of SRB to toxic metals and high effluent COD limit the widespread use of SRB in high heavy-metal containing wastewater. The aim of this study was to clarify the reasons why the immobilized SRB sludge with inner cohesive carbon source (ISIS) process can endure high metal toxicity and decrease effluent COD. The ISIS process can physically set apart SRB and free the system of external influences such as the surrounding toxic metallic ions, as well as form inner carbon sources to avoid high effluent COD. Metal toxicity and bead durability are the two major factors which influence the regeneration and reuse of gel beads. Reuse of suspended SRB sludge and beads crosslinked with boric acid were unsuccessful due to metal toxicity and agglomeration of beads, respectively. However, beads crosslinked with ammonium sulfate prevented agglomeration of beads allowing successful bead regeneration and reuse. The result of four cyclic trials showed that over 99% of zinc was removed in each trial using these beads.

  8. Evidence-Based Annotation of Transcripts and Proteins in the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Arkin, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    We used high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5′ RNA sequencing to identify transcripts in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model sulfate-reducing bacterium. We identified the first nucleotide position for 1,124 transcripts, including 54 proteins with leaderless transcripts and another 72 genes for which a major transcript initiates within the upstream protein-coding gene, which confounds measurements of the upstream gene's expression. Sequence analysis of these promoters showed that D. vulgaris prefers −10 and −35 boxes different from those preferred by Escherichia coli. A total of 549 transcripts ended at intrinsic (rho-independent) terminators, but most of the other transcripts seemed to have variable ends. We found low-level antisense expression of most genes, and the 5′ ends of these transcripts mapped to promoter-like sequences. Because antisense expression was reduced for highly expressed genes, we suspect that elongation of nonspecific antisense transcripts is suppressed by transcription of the sense strand. Finally, we combined the transcript results with comparative analysis and proteomics data to make 505 revisions to the original annotation of 3,531 proteins: we removed 255 (7.5%) proteins, changed 123 (3.6%) start codons, and added 127 (3.7%) proteins that had been missed. Tiling data had higher coverage than shotgun proteomics and hence led to most of the corrections, but many errors probably remain. Our data are available at http://genomics.lbl.gov/supplemental/DvHtranscripts2011/. PMID:21840973

  9. Anaerobic degradation of propane and butane by sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from marine hydrocarbon cold seeps.

    PubMed

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Musat, Niculina; Adam, Birgit; Kuypers, Marcel; Grundmann, Olav; Musat, Florin

    2013-05-01

    The short-chain, non-methane hydrocarbons propane and butane can contribute significantly to the carbon and sulfur cycles in marine environments affected by oil or natural gas seepage. In the present study, we enriched and identified novel propane and butane-degrading sulfate reducers from marine oil and gas cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and Hydrate Ridge. The enrichment cultures obtained were able to degrade simultaneously propane and butane, but not other gaseous alkanes. They were cold-adapted, showing highest sulfate-reduction rates between 16 and 20 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, followed by whole-cell hybridizations with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that each enrichment culture was dominated by a unique phylotype affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster within the Deltaproteobacteria. These phylotypes formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster of propane and butane degraders, including sequences from environments associated with hydrocarbon seeps. Incubations with (13)C-labeled substrates, hybridizations with sequence-specific probes and nanoSIMS analyses showed that cells of the dominant phylotypes were the first to become enriched in (13)C, demonstrating that they were directly involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, using the nanoSIMS data, carbon assimilation rates were calculated for the dominant cells in each enrichment culture.

  10. Enhanced biological stabilization of heavy metals in sediment using immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads with inner cohesive nutrient.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Dai, Lihua; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yunguo; Zhou, Chen; Xu, Weihua; Wu, Youe; Tang, Xinquan; Liu, Wei; Lan, Shiming

    2017-02-15

    A series of experiments were conducted for treating heavy metals contaminated sediments sampled from Xiangjiang River, which combined polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) into beads. The sodium lactate was served as the inner cohesive nutrient. Coupling the activity of the SRB with PVA, along with the porous structure and huge specific surface area, provided a convenient channel for the transmission of matter and protected the cells against the toxicity of metals. This paper systematically investigated the stability of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd and its mechanisms. The results revealed the performance of leaching toxicity was lower and the removal efficiencies of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 76.3%, 95.6%, 100% and 91.2%, respectively. Recycling experiments showed the beads could be reused 5 times with superbly efficiency. These results were also confirmed by continuous extraction at the optimal conditions. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) analysis indicated the heavy metals could be transformed into stable crystal texture. The stabilization of heavy metals was attributed to the carbonyl and acyl amino groups. Results presented that immobilized bacteria with inner nutrient were potentially and practically applied to multi-heavy-metal-contamination sediment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA-SIP identifies sulfate-reducing Clostridia as important toluene degraders in tar-oil-contaminated aquifer sediment.

    PubMed

    Winderl, Christian; Penning, Holger; Netzer, Frederick von; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Lueders, Tillmann

    2010-10-01

    Global groundwater resources are constantly challenged by a multitude of contaminants such as aromatic hydrocarbons. Especially in anaerobic habitats, a large diversity of unrecognized microbial populations may be responsible for their degradation. Still, our present understanding of the respective microbiota and their ecophysiology is almost exclusively based on a small number of cultured organisms, mostly within the Proteobacteria. Here, by DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP), we directly identified the most active sulfate-reducing toluene degraders in a diverse sedimentary microbial community originating from a tar-oil-contaminated aquifer at a former coal gasification plant. On incubation of fresh sediments with (13)C(7)-toluene, the production of both sulfide and (13)CO(2) was clearly coupled to the (13)C-labeling of DNA of microbes related to Desulfosporosinus spp. within the Peptococcaceae (Clostridia). The screening of labeled DNA fractions also suggested a novel benzylsuccinate synthase alpha-subunit (bssA) sequence type previously only detected in the environment to be tentatively affiliated with these degraders. However, carbon flow from the contaminant into degrader DNA was only ∼50%, pointing toward high ratios of heterotrophic CO(2)-fixation during assimilation of acetyl-CoA originating from the contaminant by these degraders. These findings demonstrate that the importance of non-proteobacterial populations in anaerobic aromatics degradation, as well as their specific ecophysiology in the subsurface may still be largely ungrasped.

  12. Recovery of rhodium(III) from solutions and industrial wastewaters by a sulfate-reducing bacteria consortium.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Nonhlanhla; Whiteley, Chris G

    2006-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the rate of removal of rhodium(III) by a resting sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium under different initial rhodium and biomass concentrations, pH, temperature, and electron donor was studied. Rhodium speciation was found to be the main factor controlling the rate of its removal from solution. SRB cells were found to have a higher affinity for anionic rhodium species, as compared to both cationic and neutral species, which become abundant when speciation equilibrium was reached. Consequently, a pH-dependent rate of rhodium removal from solution was observed. The maximum SRB uptake capacity for rhodium was found to be 66 mg of rhodium per gram of resting SRB biomass. Electron microscopy studies revealed a time-dependent localization and distribution of rhodium precipitates, initially intracellularly and then extracellularly, suggesting the involvement of an enzymatic reductive precipitation process. When a purified hydrogenase enzyme was incubated with rhodium chloride solution under hydrogen, 88% of the rhodium was removed within 1 h, whereas with a soluble extract from SRB 77% was removed within 10 min. Due to the low pH of the industrial effluent (1.31), the enzymatic reduction of rhodium by the purified hydrogenase was greatly limited, and it was apparent that an industrial effluent pretreatment was necessary before the application of an enzymatic treatment. In the present study, however, it was established that SRB are good candidates for the enzymatic recovery of rhodium from both aqueous solution and industrial effluent.

  13. Thermodesulfobium acidiphilum sp. nov., a new thermoacidophilic sulfate-reducing chemoautotrophic bacterium from a Kamchatkan thermal site.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Evgenii N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Toshchakov, Stepan V; Samarov, Nazar I; Novikov, Andrei A; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Chernyh, Nikolai A

    2016-12-20

    A new obligately anaerobic sulfate-reducing microorganism, strain 3127-1T, was isolated from geothermally heated soil (Oil Site, Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia). The new isolate was a moderately thermoacidophilic anaerobe able to grow on H2 or formate by sulfate or thiosulfate respiration. The pH range for growth was 3.7 - 6.5, with an optimum at 4.8-5.0. The temperature range for growth was 37 - 65 °C, with an optimum at 55 °C. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 33.7%. The genome of strain 3127-1T contained two almost identical 16S rRNA genes, differing by a single nucleotide substitution. The closest 16S rRNA gene sequence of a validly published species belonged to Thermodesulfobium narugense Na82T (99.5% identity). However, the average nucleotide identity of genomes of strain 3127-1T and T. narugense Na82T and the predicted DNA-DNA hybridization value (GGDC 2.1 BLAST+, formula 2) were as low as 86% and 32.5 ± 2.5%, respectively. This, together with phenotypic data, showed the new isolate to belong to a new species, for which we propose the name Thermodesulfobium acidiphilum sp. nov., with the type strain 3127-1T (=DSM 102892 T =VKM B-3043 T).

  14. Anaerobic oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes by the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    PubMed Central

    Khelifi, Nadia; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Roche, Philippe; Grossi, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Valette, Odile; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    The thermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC-16 (DSM 4304), which is known to oxidize fatty acids and n-alkenes, was shown to oxidize saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in the range C10–C21) with thiosulfate or sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The amount of n-hexadecane degradation observed was in stoichiometric agreement with the theoretically expected amount of thiosulfate reduction. One of the pathways used by anaerobic microorganisms to activate alkanes is addition to fumarate that involves alkylsuccinate synthase as a key enzyme. A search for genes encoding homologous enzymes in A. fulgidus identified the pflD gene (locus-tag AF1449) that was previously annotated as a pyruvate formate lyase. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this gene is of bacterial origin and was likely acquired by A. fulgidus from a bacterial donor through a horizontal gene transfer. Based on three-dimensional modeling of the corresponding protein and molecular dynamic simulations, we hypothesize an alkylsuccinate synthase activity for this gene product. The pflD gene expression was upregulated during the growth of A. fulgidus on an n-alkane (C16) compared with growth on a fatty acid. Our results suggest that anaerobic alkane degradation in A. fulgidus may involve the gene pflD in alkane activation through addition to fumarate. These findings highlight the possible importance of hydrocarbon oxidation at high temperatures by A. fulgidus in hydrothermal vents and the deep biosphere. PMID:24763368

  15. Bioaccumulation of gold by sulfate-reducing bacteria cultured in the presence of gold(I)-thiosulfate complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengke, Maggy; Southam, Gordon

    2006-07-01

    A sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) enrichment, from the Driefontein Consolidated Gold Mine, Witwatersrand Basin, Republic of South Africa, was able to destabilize gold(I)-thiosulfate complex (Au(SO)23-) and precipitate elemental gold. The precipitation of gold was observed in the presence of active (live) SRB due to the formation and release of hydrogen sulfide as an end-product of metabolism, and occurred by three possible mechanisms involving iron sulfide, localized reducing conditions, and metabolism. The presence of biogenic iron sulfide caused significant removal of gold from solutions by adsorption and reduction processes on the iron sulfide surfaces. The presence of gold nanoparticles within and immediately surrounding the bacterial cell envelope highlights the presence of localized reducing conditions produced by the bacterial electron transport chain via energy generating reactions within the cell. Specifically, the decrease in redox conditions caused by the release of hydrogen sulfide from the bacterial cells destabilized the Au(SO)23- solutions. The presence of gold as nanoparticles (<10 nm) inside a sub-population of SRB suggests that the reduction of gold was a part of metabolic process. In late stationary phase or death phase, gold nanoparticles that were initially precipitated inside the bacterial cells, were released from the cells and deposited in the bulk solution as addition of gold nanoparticles that already precipitated in the solution. Ultimately, the formation of micrometer-scale sub-octahedral and octahedral gold and spherical aggregates containing octahedral gold was observed.

  16. Biologically-induced precipitation of sphalerite-wurtzite nanoparticles by sulfate-reducing bacteria: implications for acid mine drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Julio; Pérez-López, Rafael; Caraballo, Manuel A; Nieto, José M; Martins, Mónica; Costa, M Clara; Olías, Manuel; Cerón, Juan C; Tucoulou, Rémi

    2012-04-15

    Several experiments were conducted to evaluate zinc-tolerance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) obtained from three environmental samples, two inocula from sulfide-mining districts and another inoculum from a wastewater treatment plant. The populations of SRB resisted zinc concentrations of 260 mg/L for 42 days in a sulfate-rich medium. During the experiments, sulfate was reduced to sulfide and concentrations in solution decreased. Zinc concentrations also decreased from 260 mg/L to values below detection limit. Both decreases were consistent with the precipitation of newly-formed sphalerite and wurtzite, two polymorphs of ZnS, forming <2.5-μm-diameter spherical aggregates identified by microscopy and synchrotron-μ-XRD. Sulfate and zinc are present in high concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) even after passive treatments based on limestone dissolution. The implementation of a SRB-based zinc removal step in these systems could completely reduce the mobility of all metals, which would improve the quality of stream sediments, water and soils in AMD-affected landscapes.

  17. Antimicrobial activity and determination of bioactive components from marine Alcaligenes faecalis extract against a sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdSharad, Ali; Usup, Gires; Sahrani, Fathul Karim; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-11-01

    Biogenic souring and microbial-influenced corrosion is a common scenario in petroleum reservoir. The serious threat normally comes from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Alcaligenes faecalis was tested in this study for the ability to inhibit the growth of SRB. Ethyl acetate extraction of A. faecalis grown in marine broth was carried out to produce crude ethyl acetate of A. faecalis (CEAF). CEAF was diluted at concentrations 0.2-12.8 mg/mL and was tested for anti-microbial activity by microdilution susceptibility tests in 96-wells plate. CEAF was then analyzed by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The microdilution susceptibility tests showed that the crude have anti- microbial activities on SRB. CEAF showed immediate killing effect against SRB in liquid medium which suggest the presence of active chemical compounds with antimicrobial activity. The GC-MS analysis showed the presence of 20 different chemical compounds in CEAF, The major components in CEAF can be related to antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, pesticide, metabolism, toxicity, anticancer and corrosion inhibition activities. In conclusion, crude ethyl acetate extract of A. faecalis has the ability to inhibit SRB growth.

  18. Towards a Rigorous Network of Protein-Protein Interactions of the Model Sulfate Reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Christopher J.; Zane, Grant M.; Price, Morgan N.; Reveco, Sonia A.; Fok, Veronica; Johanson, Alyssa R.; Batth, Tanveer S.; Singer, Mary; Chandonia, John-Marc; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Singh, Anup K.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2011-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study Escherichia coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model obligate anaerobe and sulfate reducer and the subject of this study. Here we carried out affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry to reconstruct an interaction network among 12 chromosomally encoded bait and 90 prey proteins based on 134 bait-prey interactions identified to be of high confidence. Protein-protein interaction data are often plagued by the lack of adequate controls and replication analyses necessary to assess confidence in the results, including identification of potential false positives. We addressed these issues through the use of biological replication, exponentially modified protein abundance indices, results from an experimental negative control, and a statistical test to assign confidence to each putative interacting pair applicable to small interaction data studies. We discuss the biological significance of metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by these protein-protein interaction data and the observed protein modifications. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction. PMID:21738675

  19. Graphene oxide as electron shuttle for increased redox conversion of contaminants under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Colunga, Alejandra; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Celis, Lourdes B; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is reported for the first time as electron shuttle to increase the redox conversion of the azo compound, reactive red 2 (RR2, 0.5mM), and the nitroaromatic, 3-chloronitrobenzene (3CNB, 0.5mM). GO (5mgL(-1)) increased 10-fold and 7.6-fold the reduction rate of RR2 and 3CNB, respectively, in abiotic incubations with sulfide (2.6mM) as electron donor. GO also increased by 2-fold and 3.6-fold, the microbial reduction rate of RR2 by anaerobic sludge under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions, respectively. Deep characterization of GO showed that it has a proper size distribution (predominantly between 450 and 700nm) and redox potential (+50.8mV) to promote the reduction of RR2 and 3CNB. Further analysis revealed that biogenic sulfide plays a major role on the GO-mediated reduction of RR2. GO is proposed as an electron shuttle to accelerate the redox conversion of recalcitrant pollutants, such as nitro-benzenes and azo dyes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria on the Corrosion Behavior of High Strength Steel EQ70 under Cathodic Polarization.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fang; Zhai, Xiaofan; Duan, Jizhou; Zhang, Meixia; Hou, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Certain species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) use cathodes as electron donors for metabolism, and this electron transfer process may influence the proper protection potential choice for structures. The interaction between SRB and polarized electrodes had been the focus of numerous investigations. In this paper, the impact of cathodic protection (CP) on Desulfovibrio caledoniens metabolic activity and its influence on highs trength steel EQ70 were studied by bacterial analyses and electrochemical measurements. The results showed that EQ70 under -0.85 VSCE CP had a higher corrosion rate than that without CP, while EQ70 with -1.05 VSCE had a lower corrosion rate. The enhanced SRB metabolic activity at -0.85 VSCE was most probably caused by the direct electron transfer from the electrode polarized at -0.85 VSCE. This direct electron transfer pathway was unavailable in -1.05 VSCE. In addition, the application of cathodic protection led to the transformation of sulfide rusts into carbonates rusts. These observations have been employed to provide updated recommendations for the optimum CP potential for steel structures in the presence of SRB.

  1. Pyrrhotite: an Iron Sulfide Mineral Formed During Growth of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria at a Hematite Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geesey, G.; Reardon, C.; Neal, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many bacteria are capable of respiring on sulfate and other oxidized forms of sulfur under anaerobic conditions. The hydrogen sulfide that is formed during dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) readily reacts with metals in the surrounding environment to form insoluble metal sulfides. Iron oxides are common substrata for colonization by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sedimentary aquatic systems as well as in subsurface environments. While numerous studies have characterized iron sulfides formed during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by suspended populations of these bacteria in the presence of soluble iron, not much is known about those formed in the presence of biofilm populations associated with solid phase iron, particularly crystalline forms such as hematite. Under the latter conditions, we have observed the formation of the iron sulfide pyrrhotite, typically present in very low abundance in sediments and ore deposits compared to pyrite. The formation of pyrrhotite over pyrite is favored at low redox potential and sulfide activity, conditions we hypothesize are achieved at an iron oxide surface colonized by biofilm-forming SRB. Higher levels of hydrogenase activity by hematite surface-associated SRB than suspended cell populations likely promotes the low redox potential that favors pyrrhotite formation. The tendency for SRB in nature to associate with mineral particle surfaces, including iron oxides, suggests that some pyrrotite may have originated through biotic reactions. A comparison of the fine structure of pyrrhotite formed through these biotic processes with that formed under abiotic processes may reveal differences that provide a signature for biotically-derived pyrrhotite in the biosphere.

  2. Apparent Minimum Free Energy Requirements for Methanogenic Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in an Anoxic Marine Sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the most fundamental constraints governing the distribution of microorganisms in the environment is the availability of chemical energy at biologically useful levels. To assess the minimum free energy yield that can support microbial metabolism in situ, we examined the thermodynamics of H2-consuming processes in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA. Depth distributions of H2 partial pressure, along with a suite of relevant concentration data, were determined in sediment cores collected in November (at 14.5 C) and August (at 27 C) and used to calculate free energy yields for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. At both times of year, and for both processes, free energy yields gradually decreased (became less negative) with depth before reaching an apparent asymptote. Sulfate reducing bacteria exhibited an asymptote of -19.1 +/- 1.7 kj(mol SO4(2-)(sup -1) while methanogenic archaea were apparently supported by energy yields as small as -10.6 +/- 0.7 kj(mol CH4)(sup -1).

  3. Desulfonauticus autotrophicus sp. nov., a novel thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from oil-production water and emended description of the genus Desulfonauticus.

    PubMed

    Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Tindall, Brian J; Spring, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    A novel moderately thermophilic and halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain TeSt(T), was isolated from production water of an oil field in Northern Germany near Hamburg. The cells were Gram-negative, straight to slightly curved rods and motile by a single polar flagellum. Only hydrogen and formate served as electron donors, whereas a wide variety of organic subst