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Sample records for phytochrome gaf domain

  1. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Zakharova, Natalia I; Emelyanov, Alexander V; Turoverov, Konstantin K; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes. PMID:26679720

  2. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes.

  3. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes. PMID:26679720

  4. A second conserved GAF domain cysteine is required for the blue/green photoreversibility of cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Njuguna, Stephanie Lane; Roberts, Laurel; Castillo, Elenor; Parson, Victoria L.; Dwojak, Sunshine; Lagarias, J. Clark; Spiller, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely occurring red/far-red photoreceptors that utilize a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore covalently bound within a knotted PAS-GAF domain pair. Cyanobacteria also contain more distant relatives of phytochromes that lack this knot, such as the phytochrome-related cyanobacteriochromes implicated to function as blue/green switchable photoreceptors. In this study, we characterize the cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Full-length Tlr0924 exhibits blue/green photoconversion across a broad range of temperatures, including physiologically relevant temperatures for this organism. Spectroscopic characterization of Tlr0924 demonstrates that its green-absorbing state is in equilibrium with a labile, spectrally distinct blue-absorbing species. The photochemically generated blue-absorbing state is in equilibrium with another species absorbing at longer wavelengths, giving a total of 4 states. Cys499 is essential for this behavior, because mutagenesis of this residue results in red-absorbing mutant biliproteins. Characterization of the C499D mutant protein by absorbance and CD spectroscopy supports the conclusion that its bilin chromophore adopts a similar conformation to the red-light-absorbing Pr form of phytochrome. We propose a model photocycle in which Z/E photoisomerization of the 15/16 bond modulates formation of a reversible thioether linkage between Cys499 and C10 of the chromophore, providing the basis for the blue/green switching of cyanobacteriochromes. PMID:18549244

  5. Conformation Changes, N-terminal Involvement, and cGMP Signal Relay in the Phosphodiesterase-5 GAF Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanchen; Robinson, Howard; Ke, Hengming

    2010-01-01

    The activity of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) is specific for cGMP and is regulated by cGMP binding to GAF-A in its regulatory domain. To better understand the regulatory mechanism, x-ray crystallographic and biochemical studies were performed on constructs of human PDE5A1 containing the N-terminal phosphorylation segment, GAF-A, and GAF-B. Superposition of this unliganded GAF-A with the previously reported NMR structure of cGMP-bound PDE5 revealed dramatic conformational differences and suggested that helix H4 and strand B3 probably serve as two lids to gate the cGMP-binding pocket in GAF-A. The structure also identified an interfacial region among GAF-A, GAF-B, and the N-terminal loop, which may serve as a relay of the cGMP signal from GAF-A to GAF-B. N-terminal loop 98–147 was physically associated with GAF-B domains of the dimer. Biochemical analyses showed an inhibitory effect of this loop on cGMP binding and its involvement in the cGMP-induced conformation changes. PMID:20861010

  6. Photoconversion mechanism of the second GAF domain of cyanobacteriochrome AnPixJ and the cofactor structure of its green-absorbing state.

    PubMed

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Utesch, Tillmann; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-07-23

    Cyanobacteriochromes are members of the phytochrome superfamily. In contrast to classical phytochromes, these small photosensors display a considerable variability of electronic absorption maxima. We have studied the light-induced conversions of the second GAF domain of AnPixJ, AnPixJg2, a phycocyanobilin-binding protein from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, using low-temperature resonance Raman spectroscopy combined with molecular dynamics simulations. AnPixJg2 is formed biosynthetically as a red-absorbing form (Pr) and can be photoconverted into a green-absorbing form (Pg). Forward and backward phototransformations involve the same reaction sequences and intermediates of similar cofactor structures as the corresponding processes in canonical phytochromes, including a transient cofactor deprotonation. Whereas the cofactor of the Pr state shows far-reaching similarities to the Pr states of classical phytochromes, the Pg form displays significant upshifts of the methine bridge stretching frequencies concomitant to the hypsochromically shifted absorption maximum. However, the cofactor in Pg is protonated and adopts a conformation very similar to the Pfr state of classical phytochromes. The spectral differences are probably related to an increased solvent accessibility of the chromophore which may reduce the π-electron delocalization in the phycocyanobilin and thus raise the energies of the first electronic transition and the methine bridge stretching modes. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the Z → E photoisomerization of the chromophore at the C-D methine bridge alters the interactions with the nearby Trp90 which in turn may act as a gate, allowing the influx of water molecules into the chromophore pocket. Such a mechanism of color tuning AnPixJg2 is unique among the cyanobacteriochromes studied so far. PMID:23808413

  7. Structure of the cyanobacterial phytochrome 2 photosensor implies a tryptophan switch for phytochrome signaling.

    PubMed

    Anders, Katrin; Daminelli-Widany, Grazia; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; von Stetten, David; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2013-12-13

    Phytochromes are highly versatile photoreceptors, which occur ubiquitously in plants as well as in many light-responsive microorganisms. Here, photosynthetic cyanobacteria utilize up to three different phytochrome architectures, where only the plant-like and the single-domain cyanobacteriochromes are structurally characterized so far. Cph2 represents a third group in Synechocystis species and affects their capability of phototaxis by controlling c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation. The 2.6-Å crystal structure of its red/far-red responsive photosensory module in the Pr state reveals a tandem-GAF bidomain that lacks the figure-of-eight knot of the plant/cph1 subfamily. Its covalently attached phycocyanobilin chromophore adopts a highly tilted ZZZssa conformation with a novel set of interactions between its propionates and the GAF1 domain. The tongue-like protrusion from the GAF2 domain interacts with the GAF1-bound chromophore via its conserved PRXSF, WXE, and W(G/A)G motifs. Mutagenesis showed that the integrity of the tongue is indispensable for Pr → Pfr photoconversion and involves a swap of the motifs' tryptophans within the tongue-GAF1 interface. This "Trp switch" is supposed to be a crucial element for the photochromicity of all multidomain phytochromes. PMID:24174528

  8. Longin and GAF domains: structural evolution and adaptation to the subcellular trafficking machinery.

    PubMed

    De Franceschi, Nicola; Wild, Klemens; Schlacht, Alexander; Dacks, Joel B; Sinning, Irmgard; Filippini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Endomembrane trafficking is one of the most prominent cytological features of eukaryotes. Given their widespread distribution and specialization, coiled-coil domains, coatomer domains, small GTPases and Longin domains are considered primordial 'building blocks' of the membrane trafficking machineries. Longin domains are conserved across eukaryotes and were likely to be present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor. The Longin fold is based on the α-β-α sandwich architecture and a unique topology, possibly accounting for the special adaptation to the eukaryotic trafficking machinery. The ancient Per ARNT Sim (PAS) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterases, Adenylyl cyclases and FhlA (GAF) family domains show a similar architecture, and the identification of prokaryotic counterparts of GAF domains involved in trafficking provides an additional connection for the endomembrane system back into the pre-eukaryotic world. Proteome-wide, comparative bioinformatic analyses of the domains reveal three binding regions (A, B and C) mediating either specific or conserved protein-protein interactions. While the A region mediates intra- and inter-molecular interactions, the B region is involved in binding small GTPases, thus providing an evolutionary connection among major building blocks in the endomembrane system. Finally, we propose that the peculiar interaction surface of the C region of the Longin domain allowed it to extensively integrate into the endomembrane trafficking machinery in the earliest stages of building the eukaryotic cell.

  9. Intramolecular signaling in tandem-GAF domains from PDE5 and PDE10 studied with a cyanobacterial adenylyl cyclase reporter.

    PubMed

    Banjac, Ana; Zimmermann, Markus O; Boeckler, Frank M; Kurz, Ursula; Schultz, Anita; Schultz, Joachim E

    2012-03-01

    The dimeric mammalian phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are regulated by N-terminal domains. In PDE5, the GAF-A subdomain of a GAF-tandem (GAF-A and -B) binds the activator cGMP and in PDE10 GAF-B binds cAMP. GAF-tandem chimeras of PDE5 and 10 in which the 36 aa linker helix between GAF-A and -B was swapped lost allosteric regulation of a reporter adenylyl cyclase. In 16 consecutive constructs we substituted the PDE10 linker with that from PDE5. An initial stretch of 10 amino acids coded for isoform specificity. A C240Y substitution uncoupled cyclase activity from regulation, whereas C240F, L or G did not. The C240Y substitution increased basal activity to stimulated levels. Notably, over the next 12 substitutions basal cyclase activity decreased linearly. Further targeted substitutions were based on homology modeling using the PDE2 structure. No combination of substitutions within the initial 10 linker residues caused loss of regulation. The full 10 aa stretch was required. Modeling indicated a potential interaction of the linker with a loop from GAF-A. To interrupt H-bonding a glycine substitution of the loop segment was generated. Despite reduction of basal activity, loss of regulation was maintained. Possibly, the orientation of the linker helix is determined by formation of the dimer at the initial linker segment. Downstream deflections of the linker helix may have caused loss of regulation.

  10. A rising tide of blue-absorbing biliprotein photoreceptors: characterization of seven such bilin-binding GAF domains in Nostoc sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiong; Hua, Huan-Huan; Chen, Yu; Liu, Bin-Bin; Krämer, Anna Laura; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Zhou, Ming

    2012-11-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are photochromic sensory photoreceptors in cyanobacteria that are related to phytochromes but cover a much broader spectral range. Using a homology search, a group of putative blue-absorbing photoreceptors was identified in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 that, in addition to the canonical chromophore-binding cysteine of cyanobacteriochromes, have a conserved extra cysteine in a DXCF motif. To assess their photochemical activities, putative chromophore-binding GAF domains were expressed in Escherichia coli together with the genes for phycocyanobilin biosynthesis. All except one covalently bound a chromophore and showed photoreversible photochromic responses, with absorption at approximately 420 nm for the 15Z states formed in the dark, and a variety of red-shifted absorption peaks in the 490-600 nm range for the 15E states formed after light activation. Under denaturing conditions, the covalently bound chromophores were identified as phycocyanobilin, phycoviolobilin or mixtures of both. The canonical cysteines and those of the DXCF motifs were mutated, singly or together. The canonical cysteine is responsible for stable covalent attachment of the bilin to the apo-protein at C3(1) . The second linkage from the cysteine in the DXCF motif, probably to C10 of the chromophore, yields blue-absorbing rubin-type 15Z chromophores, but is lost in most cases upon photoconversion to the 15E isomers of the chromophores, and also when denatured with acidic urea. PMID:22958513

  11. A rising tide of blue-absorbing biliprotein photoreceptors: characterization of seven such bilin-binding GAF domains in Nostoc sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiong; Hua, Huan-Huan; Chen, Yu; Liu, Bin-Bin; Krämer, Anna Laura; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Zhou, Ming

    2012-11-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are photochromic sensory photoreceptors in cyanobacteria that are related to phytochromes but cover a much broader spectral range. Using a homology search, a group of putative blue-absorbing photoreceptors was identified in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 that, in addition to the canonical chromophore-binding cysteine of cyanobacteriochromes, have a conserved extra cysteine in a DXCF motif. To assess their photochemical activities, putative chromophore-binding GAF domains were expressed in Escherichia coli together with the genes for phycocyanobilin biosynthesis. All except one covalently bound a chromophore and showed photoreversible photochromic responses, with absorption at approximately 420 nm for the 15Z states formed in the dark, and a variety of red-shifted absorption peaks in the 490-600 nm range for the 15E states formed after light activation. Under denaturing conditions, the covalently bound chromophores were identified as phycocyanobilin, phycoviolobilin or mixtures of both. The canonical cysteines and those of the DXCF motifs were mutated, singly or together. The canonical cysteine is responsible for stable covalent attachment of the bilin to the apo-protein at C3(1) . The second linkage from the cysteine in the DXCF motif, probably to C10 of the chromophore, yields blue-absorbing rubin-type 15Z chromophores, but is lost in most cases upon photoconversion to the 15E isomers of the chromophores, and also when denatured with acidic urea.

  12. Phototransformation of the Red Light Sensor Cyanobacterial Phytochrome 2 from Synechocystis Species Depends on Its Tongue Motifs*

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Katrin; Gutt, Alexander; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors using a bilin tetrapyrrole as chromophore, which switch in canonical phytochromes between red (Pr) and far red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Cph2 from Synechocystis sp., a noncanonical phytochrome, harbors besides a cyanobacteriochrome domain a second photosensory module, a Pr/Pfr-interconverting GAF-GAF bidomain (SynCph2(1-2)). As in the canonical phytochromes, a unique motif of the second GAF domain, the tongue region, seals the bilin-binding site in the GAF1 domain from solvent access. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the SynCph2(1-2) module shows four intermediates during Pr → Pfr phototransformation and three intermediates during Pfr → Pr back-conversion. A mutation in the tongue's conserved PRXSF motif, S385A, affects the formation of late intermediate R3 and of a Pfr-like state but not the back-conversion to Pr via a lumi-F-like state. In contrast, a mutation in the likewise conserved WXE motif, W389A, changes the photocycle at intermediate R2 and causes an alternative red light-adapted state. Here, back-conversion to Pr proceeds via intermediates differing from SynCph2(1-2). Replacement of this tryptophan that is ∼15 Å distant from the chromophore by another aromatic amino acid, W389F, restores native Pr → Pfr phototransformation. These results indicate large scale conformational changes within the tongue region of GAF2 during the final processes of phototransformation. We propose that in early intermediates only the chromophore and its nearest surroundings are altered, whereas late changes during R2 formation depend on the distant WXE motifs of the tongue region. Ser-385 within the PRXSF motif affects only late intermediate R3, when refolding of the tongue and docking to the GAF1 domain are almost completed. PMID:25012656

  13. Phototransformation of the red light sensor cyanobacterial phytochrome 2 from Synechocystis species depends on its tongue motifs.

    PubMed

    Anders, Katrin; Gutt, Alexander; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2014-09-12

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors using a bilin tetrapyrrole as chromophore, which switch in canonical phytochromes between red (Pr) and far red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Cph2 from Synechocystis sp., a noncanonical phytochrome, harbors besides a cyanobacteriochrome domain a second photosensory module, a Pr/Pfr-interconverting GAF-GAF bidomain (SynCph2(1-2)). As in the canonical phytochromes, a unique motif of the second GAF domain, the tongue region, seals the bilin-binding site in the GAF1 domain from solvent access. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the SynCph2(1-2) module shows four intermediates during Pr → Pfr phototransformation and three intermediates during Pfr → Pr back-conversion. A mutation in the tongue's conserved PRXSF motif, S385A, affects the formation of late intermediate R3 and of a Pfr-like state but not the back-conversion to Pr via a lumi-F-like state. In contrast, a mutation in the likewise conserved WXE motif, W389A, changes the photocycle at intermediate R2 and causes an alternative red light-adapted state. Here, back-conversion to Pr proceeds via intermediates differing from SynCph2(1-2). Replacement of this tryptophan that is ∼15 Å distant from the chromophore by another aromatic amino acid, W389F, restores native Pr → Pfr phototransformation. These results indicate large scale conformational changes within the tongue region of GAF2 during the final processes of phototransformation. We propose that in early intermediates only the chromophore and its nearest surroundings are altered, whereas late changes during R2 formation depend on the distant WXE motifs of the tongue region. Ser-385 within the PRXSF motif affects only late intermediate R3, when refolding of the tongue and docking to the GAF1 domain are almost completed.

  14. Redox-dependent Ligand Switching in a Sensory Heme-binding GAF Domain of the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120*

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kun; Knipp, Markus; Liu, Bing-Bing; Cox, Nicholas; Stabel, Robert; He, Qi; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The genome of the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 carries three genes (all4978, all7016, and alr7522) encoding putative heme-binding GAF (cGMP-specific phosphodiesterases, adenylyl cyclases, and FhlA) proteins that were annotated as transcriptional regulators. They are composed of an N-terminal cofactor domain and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix motif. All4978 showed the highest affinity for protoheme binding. The heme binding capability of All7016 was moderate, and Alr7522 did not bind heme at all. The “as isolated” form of All4978, identified by Soret band (λmax = 427 nm), was assigned by electronic absorption, EPR, and resonance Raman spectroscopy as a hexa-coordinated low spin FeIII heme with a distal cysteine ligand (absorption of δ-band around 360 nm). The protoheme cofactor is noncovalently incorporated. Reduction of the heme could be accomplished by chemically using sodium dithionite and electrospectrochemically; this latter method yielded remarkably low midpoint potentials of −445 and −453 mV (following Soret and α-band absorption changes, respectively). The reduced form of the heme (FeII state) binds both NO and CO. Cysteine coordination of the as isolated FeIII protein is unambiguous, but interestingly, the reduced heme instead displays spectral features indicative of histidine coordination. Cys-His ligand switches have been reported as putative signaling mechanisms in other heme-binding proteins; however, these novel cyanobacterial proteins are the first where such a ligand-switch mechanism has been observed in a GAF domain. DNA binding of the helix-turn-helix domain was investigated using a DNA sequence motif from its own promoter region. Formation of a protein-DNA complex preferentially formed in ferric state of the protein. PMID:26063806

  15. Missense Mutation in the PAS2 Domain of Phytochrome A Impairs Subnuclear Localization and a Subset of Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Luppi, Juan Pablo; Kirchbauer, Daniel; Ogorodnikova, Ouliana B.; Sineshchekov, Vitally A.; Adam, Eva; Kircher, Stefan; Staneloni, Roberto J.; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc; Casal, Jorge J.

    2002-01-01

    Phytochrome A signaling shows two photobiologically discrete outputs: so-called very-low-fluence responses (VLFR) and high-irradiance responses (HIR). By modifying previous screening protocols, we isolated two Arabidopsis mutants retaining VLFR and lacking HIR. Phytochrome A negatively or positively regulates phytochrome B signaling, depending on light conditions. These mutants retained the negative but lacked the positive regulation. Both mutants carry the novel phyA-302 allele, in which Glu-777 (a residue conserved in angiosperm phytochromes) changed to Lys in the PAS2 motif of the C-terminal domain. The phyA-302 mutants showed a 50% reduction in phytochrome A levels in darkness, but this difference was compensated for by greater stability under continuous far-red light. phyA-302:green fluorescent protein fusion proteins showed normal translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus under continuous far-red light but failed to produce nuclear spots, suggesting that nuclear speckles could be involved in HIR signaling and phytochrome A degradation. We propose that the PAS2 domain of phytochrome A is necessary to initiate signaling in HIR but not in VLFR, likely via interaction with a specific partner. PMID:12119377

  16. Effect of ATP and 2-oxoglutarate on the in vitro interaction between the NifA GAF domain and the GlnB protein of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Sotomaior, P; Araújo, L M; Nishikawa, C Y; Huergo, L F; Monteiro, R A; Pedrosa, F O; Chubatsu, L S; Souza, E M

    2012-12-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a diazotroph that associates with important agricultural crops and thus has potential to be a nitrogen biofertilizer. The A. brasilense transcription regulator NifA, which seems to be constitutively expressed, activates the transcription of nitrogen fixation genes. It has been suggested that the nitrogen status-signaling protein GlnB regulates NifA activity by direct interaction with the NifA N-terminal GAF domain, preventing the inhibitory effect of this domain under conditions of nitrogen fixation. In the present study, we show that an N-terminal truncated form of NifA no longer required GlnB for activity and lost regulation by ammonium. On the other hand, in trans co-expression of the N-terminal GAF domain inhibited the N-truncated protein in response to fixed nitrogen levels. We also used pull-down assays to show in vitro interaction between the purified N-terminal GAF domain of NifA and the GlnB protein. The results showed that A. brasilense GlnB interacts directly with the NifA N-terminal domain and this interaction is dependent on the presence of ATP and 2-oxoglutarate.

  17. Evidence that phytochrome functions as a protein kinase in plant light signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ah-Young; Han, Yun-Jeong; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Soo Young; Nguyen, Thai Son; Son, Minky; Lee, Keun Woo; Shen, Yu; Song, Pill-Soon; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that plant phytochromes are autophosphorylating serine/threonine kinases. However, the biochemical properties and functional roles of putative phytochrome kinase activity in plant light signalling are largely unknown. Here, we describe the biochemical and functional characterization of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsphyA) as a potential protein kinase. We provide evidence that phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) are phosphorylated by phytochromes in vitro. Domain mapping of AsphyA shows that the photosensory core region consisting of PAS-GAF-PHY domains in the N-terminal is required for the observed kinase activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing mutant versions of AsphyA, which display reduced activity in in vitro kinase assays, show hyposensitive responses to far-red light. Further analysis reveals that far-red light-induced phosphorylation and degradation of PIF3 are significantly reduced in these transgenic plants. Collectively, these results suggest a positive relationship between phytochrome kinase activity and photoresponses in plants. PMID:27173885

  18. Evidence that phytochrome functions as a protein kinase in plant light signalling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ah-Young; Han, Yun-Jeong; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Soo Young; Nguyen, Thai Son; Son, Minky; Lee, Keun Woo; Shen, Yu; Song, Pill-Soon; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that plant phytochromes are autophosphorylating serine/threonine kinases. However, the biochemical properties and functional roles of putative phytochrome kinase activity in plant light signalling are largely unknown. Here, we describe the biochemical and functional characterization of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsphyA) as a potential protein kinase. We provide evidence that phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) are phosphorylated by phytochromes in vitro. Domain mapping of AsphyA shows that the photosensory core region consisting of PAS-GAF-PHY domains in the N-terminal is required for the observed kinase activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing mutant versions of AsphyA, which display reduced activity in in vitro kinase assays, show hyposensitive responses to far-red light. Further analysis reveals that far-red light-induced phosphorylation and degradation of PIF3 are significantly reduced in these transgenic plants. Collectively, these results suggest a positive relationship between phytochrome kinase activity and photoresponses in plants. PMID:27173885

  19. Characterization of tobacco expressing functional oat phytochrome. Domains responsible for the rapid degradation of Pfr are conserved between monocots and dicots

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.R.; Vierstra, R.D. ); Hershey, H.P. )

    1991-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a chimeric oat phytochrome gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) results in the accumulation of a functional 124-kilodalton photoreceptor that markedly alters the phenotype of light-grown tobacco. Here, we provide a detailed phenotypic and biochemical characterization of homozygous tobacco expressing high levels of oat phytochrome. Phenotypic changes include a substantial inhibition of stem elongation, decreased apical dominance, increased leaf chlorophyll content, and delayed leaf senescence. Oat phytochrome synthesized in tobacco is indistinguishable from that present in etiolated oats, having photoreversible difference spectrum maxima at 665 and 730 nanometers, exhibiting negligible dark reversion of phytochrome - far red-absorbing from (Pfr) to phytochrome - red-absorbing form (Pr), and existing as a dimer with an apparent size of approximately 300 kilodaltons. Heterodimers between the oat and tobacco chromoproteins were detected. Endogenous tobacco phytochrome and transgenically expressed oat phytochrome are rapidly degraded in vivo upon photoconversion of Pr to Pfr. Breakdown of both oat and tobacco Pfr is associated with the accumulation of ubiquitin-phytochrome conjugates, suggesting that degradation occurs via the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. This result indicates that the factors responsible for selective recognition of Pfr by the ubiquitin pathway are conserved between monocot and dicot phytochromes. More broadly, it demonstrates that the domains(s) within a plant protein responsible for its selective breakdown can be recognized by the degradation machinery of heterologous species.

  20. Mutant screen distinguishes between residues necessary for light-signal perception and signal transfer by phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yoshito; Matsushita, Tomonao; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Quail, Peter H; Nagatani, Akira

    2008-08-15

    The phytochromes (phyA to phyE) are a major plant photoreceptor family that regulate a diversity of developmental processes in response to light. The N-terminal 651-amino acid domain of phyB (N651), which binds an open tetrapyrrole chromophore, acts to perceive and transduce regulatory light signals in the cell nucleus. The N651 domain comprises several subdomains: the N-terminal extension, the Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS)-like subdomain (PLD), the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA (GAF) subdomain, and the phytochrome (PHY) subdomain. To define functional roles for these subdomains, we mutagenized an Arabidopsis thaliana line expressing N651 fused in tandem to green fluorescent protein, beta-glucuronidase, and a nuclear localization signal. A large-scale screen for long hypocotyl mutants identified 14 novel intragenic missense mutations in the N651 moiety. These new mutations, along with eight previously identified mutations, were distributed throughout N651, indicating that each subdomain has an important function. In vitro analysis of the spectral properties of these mutants enabled them to be classified into two principal classes: light-signal perception mutants (those with defective spectral activity), and signaling mutants (those normal in light perception but defective in intracellular signal transfer). Most spectral mutants were found in the GAF and PHY subdomains. On the other hand, the signaling mutants tend to be located in the N-terminal extension and PLD. These observations indicate that the N-terminal extension and PLD are mainly involved in signal transfer, but that the C-terminal GAF and PHY subdomains are responsible for light perception. Among the signaling mutants, R110Q, G111D, G112D, and R325K were particularly interesting. Alignment with the recently described three-dimensional structure of the PAS-GAF domain of a bacterial phytochrome suggests that these four mutations reside in the vicinity of the phytochrome light-sensing knot.

  1. Combined mutagenesis and kinetics characterization of the bilin-binding GAF domain of the protein Slr1393 from the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-Ling; Gutt, Alexander; Mechelke, Jonas; Raffelberg, Sarah; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Valle, Lorena; Borsarelli, Claudio D; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-26

    The gene slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 encodes a protein composed of three GAF domains, a PAS domain, and a histidine kinase domain. GAF3 is the sole domain able to bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) as chromophore and to accomplish photochemistry: switching between a red-absorbing parental and a green-absorbing photoproduct state (λmax =649 and 536 nm, respectively). Conversions in both directions were followed by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy with the separately expressed GAF3 domain of Slr1393. Global fit analysis of the recorded absorbance changes yielded three lifetimes (3.2 μs, 390 μs, and 1.5 ms) for the red-to-green conversion, and 1.2 μs, 340 μs, and 1 ms for the green-to-red conversion. In addition to the wild-type (WT) protein, 24 mutated proteins were studied spectroscopically. The design of these site-directed mutations was based on sequence alignments with related proteins and by employing the crystal structure of AnPixJg2 (PDB ID: 3W2Z), a Slr1393 orthologous from Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The structure of AnPixJg2 was also used as template for model building, thus confirming the strong structural similarity between the proteins, and for identifying amino acids to target for mutagenesis. Only amino acids in close proximity to the chromophore were exchanged, as these were considered likely to have an impact on the spectral and dynamic properties. Three groups of mutants were found: some showed absorption features similar to the WT protein, a second group showed modified absorbance properties, and the third group had lost the ability to bind the chromophore. The most unexpected result was obtained for the exchange at residue 532 (N532Y). In vivo assembly yielded a red-absorbing, WT-like protein. Irradiation, however, not only converted it into the green-absorbing form, but also produced a 660 nm, further-red-shifted absorbance band. This photoproduct was fully reversible to the parental form upon green light irradiation. PMID:24764310

  2. Combined mutagenesis and kinetics characterization of the bilin-binding GAF domain of the protein Slr1393 from the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-Ling; Gutt, Alexander; Mechelke, Jonas; Raffelberg, Sarah; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Valle, Lorena; Borsarelli, Claudio D; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-26

    The gene slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 encodes a protein composed of three GAF domains, a PAS domain, and a histidine kinase domain. GAF3 is the sole domain able to bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) as chromophore and to accomplish photochemistry: switching between a red-absorbing parental and a green-absorbing photoproduct state (λmax =649 and 536 nm, respectively). Conversions in both directions were followed by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy with the separately expressed GAF3 domain of Slr1393. Global fit analysis of the recorded absorbance changes yielded three lifetimes (3.2 μs, 390 μs, and 1.5 ms) for the red-to-green conversion, and 1.2 μs, 340 μs, and 1 ms for the green-to-red conversion. In addition to the wild-type (WT) protein, 24 mutated proteins were studied spectroscopically. The design of these site-directed mutations was based on sequence alignments with related proteins and by employing the crystal structure of AnPixJg2 (PDB ID: 3W2Z), a Slr1393 orthologous from Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The structure of AnPixJg2 was also used as template for model building, thus confirming the strong structural similarity between the proteins, and for identifying amino acids to target for mutagenesis. Only amino acids in close proximity to the chromophore were exchanged, as these were considered likely to have an impact on the spectral and dynamic properties. Three groups of mutants were found: some showed absorption features similar to the WT protein, a second group showed modified absorbance properties, and the third group had lost the ability to bind the chromophore. The most unexpected result was obtained for the exchange at residue 532 (N532Y). In vivo assembly yielded a red-absorbing, WT-like protein. Irradiation, however, not only converted it into the green-absorbing form, but also produced a 660 nm, further-red-shifted absorbance band. This photoproduct was fully reversible to the parental form upon green light irradiation.

  3. Crystallographic and Electron Microscopic Analyses of a Bacterial Phytochrome Reveal Local and Global Rearrangements during Photoconversion*

    PubMed Central

    Burgie, E. Sethe; Wang, Tong; Bussell, Adam N.; Walker, Joseph M.; Li, Huilin; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Phytochromes are multidomain photoswitches that drive light perception in plants and microorganisms by coupling photoreversible isomerization of their bilin chromophore to various signaling cascades. How changes in bilin conformation affect output by these photoreceptors remains poorly resolved and might include several species-specific routes. Here, we present detailed three-dimensional models of the photosensing module and a picture of an entire dimeric photoreceptor through structural analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome BphP assembled with biliverdin (BV). A 1.16-Å resolution crystal structure of the bilin-binding pocket in the dark-adapted red light-absorbing state illuminated the intricate network of bilin/protein/water interactions and confirmed the protonation and ZZZssa conformation of BV. Structural and spectroscopic comparisons with the photochemically compromised D207A mutant revealed that substitutions of Asp-207 allow inclusion of cyclic porphyrins in addition to BV. A crystal structure of the entire photosensing module showed a head-to-head, twisted dimeric arrangement with bowed helical spines and a hairpin protrusion connecting the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA (GAF) and phytochrome-specific (PHY) domains. A key conserved hairpin feature is its anti-parallel, two β-strand stem, which we show by mutagenesis to be critical for BphP photochemistry. Comparisons of single particle electron microscopic images of the full-length BphP dimer in the red light-absorbing state and the photoactivated far-red light-absorbing state revealed a large scale reorientation of the PHY domain relative to the GAF domain, which alters the position of the downstream histidine kinase output module. Together, our data support a toggle model whereby bilin photoisomerization alters GAF/PHY domain interactions through conformational modification of the hairpin, which regulates signaling by impacting the relationship between sister output modules

  4. Novel Photodynamics in Phytochrome & Cyanobacteriochrome Photosensory Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Delmar

    2015-03-01

    The photodynamics of recently characterized phytochrome and cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors are discussed. Phytochromes are red/far-red photosensory proteins that utilize the photoisomerization of a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore to detect the red to far-red light ratio. Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are distantly related cyanobacterial photosensors with homologous bilin-binding GAF domains, but exhibit greater spectral diversity. The excited-state mechanisms underlying the initial photoisomerization in the forward reactions of the cyanobacterial photoreceptor Cph1 from Synechocystis, the RcaE CBCR from Fremyella diplosiphon, and Npr6012g4 CBCR from Nostoc punctiforme were contrasted via multipulse pump-dump-probe transient spectroscopy. A rich excited-state dynamics are resolved involving a complex interplay of excited-state proton transfer, photoisomerization, multilayered inhomogeneity, and reactive intermediates, and Le Chatelier redistribution. NpR6012g4 exhibits a high quantum yield for its forward photoreaction (40%) that was ascribed to the activity of hidden, productive ground-state intermediates via a ``second chance initiation dynamics'' (SCID) mechanism. This work was supported by a grant from the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy (DOE DE-FG02-09ER16117).

  5. Characterization of regions within the N-terminal 6-kilodalton domain of phytochrome A that modulate its biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, E T; Marita, J M; Clough, R C; Vierstra, R D

    1997-01-01

    Phytochrome A (phyA) is a red/far-red (FR) light photoreceptor responsible for initiating numerous light-mediated plant growth and developmental responses, especially in FR light-enriched environments. We previously showed that the first 70 amino acids of the polypeptide contain at least two regions with potentially opposite functions (E.T. Jordan, J.R. Cherry, J.M. Walker, R.D. Vierstra [1996] Plant J 9: 243-257). One region is required for activity and correct apoprotein/chromophore interactions, whereas the second appears to regulate phytochrome activity. We have further resolved these functional regions by analysis of N-terminal deletion and alanine-scanning mutants of oat (Avena sativa) phyA in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The results indicate that the region involved in chromophore/apoprotein interactions contains two separate segments (residues 25-33 and 50-62) also required for biological activity. The region that regulates phyA activity requires only five adjacent serines (Sers) (residues 8-12). Removal or alteration of these Sers generates a photoreceptor that increases the sensitivity of transgenic seedlings to red and FR light more than intact phyA. Taken together, these data identify three distinct regions in the N-terminal domain necessary for photoreceptor activity, and further define the Ser-rich region as an important site for phyA regulation. PMID:9342873

  6. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jutta C.; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L.; Quail, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5′-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  7. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jutta C; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L; Quail, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5'-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  8. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jutta C; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L; Quail, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5'-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation.

  9. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee-Hong; Jiménez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Price, Dana C.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J. Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2014-01-01

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. Expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae. PMID:25267653

  10. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    DOE PAGES

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; et al

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence ofmore » phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.« less

  11. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Price, Dana C.; Wei, Chia -Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J. Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  12. The Crystal Structures of the N-terminal Photosensory Core Module of Agrobacterium Phytochrome Agp1 as Parallel and Anti-parallel Dimers.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Soshichiro; Scheerer, Patrick; Zubow, Kristina; Michael, Norbert; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman; Krauß, Norbert

    2016-09-23

    Agp1 is a canonical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochrome from the soil bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum that acts as a light-regulated histidine kinase. Crystal structures of the photosensory core modules (PCMs) of homologous phytochromes have provided a consistent picture of the structural changes that these proteins undergo during photoconversion between the parent red light-absorbing state (Pr) and the far-red light-absorbing state (Pfr). These changes include secondary structure rearrangements in the so-called tongue of the phytochrome-specific (PHY) domain and structural rearrangements within the long α-helix that connects the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and FhlA (GAF) and the PHY domains. We present the crystal structures of the PCM of Agp1 at 2.70 Å resolution and of a surface-engineered mutant of this PCM at 1.85 Å resolution in the dark-adapted Pr states. Whereas in the mutant structure the dimer subunits are in anti-parallel orientation, the wild-type structure contains parallel subunits. The relative orientations between the PAS-GAF bidomain and the PHY domain are different in the two structures, due to movement involving two hinge regions in the GAF-PHY connecting α-helix and the tongue, indicating pronounced structural flexibility that may give rise to a dynamic Pr state. The resolution of the mutant structure enabled us to detect a sterically strained conformation of the chromophore at ring A that we attribute to the tight interaction with Pro-461 of the conserved PRXSF motif in the tongue. Based on this observation and on data from mutants where residues in the tongue region were replaced by alanine, we discuss the crucial roles of those residues in Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion. PMID:27466363

  13. Functional analysis of the GAF domain of NifA in Azospirillum brasilense: effects of Tyr-->Phe mutations on NifA and its interaction with GlnB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sanfeng; Liu, Li; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Elmerich, Claudine; Li, Ji-Lun

    2005-06-01

    Regulation of NifA activity in Azospirillum brasilense depends on GlnB (a PII protein), and it was previously reported that the target of GlnB activity is the N-terminal domain of NifA. Furthermore, mutation of the Tyr residue at position 18 in the N-terminal domain resulted in a NifA protein that did not require GlnB for activity under nitrogen fixation conditions. We report here that a NifA double mutant in which the Tyr residues at positions 18 and 53 of NifA N-were simultaneously replaced by Phe (NifA-Y1853F) displays high nitrogenase activity, which is still regulatable by ammonia, but not by GlnB. The yeast two-hybrid technique was used to investigate whether GlnB can physically interact with wild-type and mutant NifA proteins. GlnB was found to interact directly with the N-terminal GAF domain of wild-type NifA, but not with its central or C-terminal domain. GlnB could still bind to the single NifA mutants Y18F and Y53F. In contrast, no interaction was detected between GlnB and the double mutant NifA-Y18/53F or between GlnB and NifA-Y43.

  14. Genomewide analysis of phytochrome proteins in the phylum Basidiomycota.

    PubMed

    Lavín, José L; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A

    2015-09-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptor proteins involved in the detection of the red and far-red regions of the visible light spectrum. Fungal phytochromes are hybrid histidine kinases with a conserved domain architecture composed of an N-terminal photosensory module and a C-terminal regulatory output module that includes the histidine kinase and response regulator receiver domains. In this study, we have analyzed the distribution, domain architecture, and phylogenetic analysis of phytochrome proteins in 47 published genome sequences among the phylum Basidiomycota. Genome analysis revealed that almost every genome of basidiomycetes contained at least one gene encoding a phytochrome protein. Domain architecture of fungal phytochromes was completely conserved in the identified phytochromes of basidiomycetes, and phylogenetic analysis clustered these proteins into clades related with the phylogenetic classification of this fungal phylum. PMID:25847700

  15. Genomewide analysis of phytochrome proteins in the phylum Basidiomycota.

    PubMed

    Lavín, José L; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Oguiza, José A

    2015-09-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptor proteins involved in the detection of the red and far-red regions of the visible light spectrum. Fungal phytochromes are hybrid histidine kinases with a conserved domain architecture composed of an N-terminal photosensory module and a C-terminal regulatory output module that includes the histidine kinase and response regulator receiver domains. In this study, we have analyzed the distribution, domain architecture, and phylogenetic analysis of phytochrome proteins in 47 published genome sequences among the phylum Basidiomycota. Genome analysis revealed that almost every genome of basidiomycetes contained at least one gene encoding a phytochrome protein. Domain architecture of fungal phytochromes was completely conserved in the identified phytochromes of basidiomycetes, and phylogenetic analysis clustered these proteins into clades related with the phylogenetic classification of this fungal phylum.

  16. Phenotypic variation caused by variation in the relative copy number of pDU1-based plasmids expressing the GAF domain of Pkn41 or Pkn42 in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Huang, Xiao-Zhen; Wang, Li; Risoul, Veronique; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. PCC 7120 is a model for cyanobacterial cell differentiation studies. pDU1, an endogenous plasmid in Nostoc sp. PCC 7524, is used as the only cyanobacterial replicon for Anabaena (Nostoc) studies. However, the relative copy numbers of pDU1-based plasmids in Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. PCC 7120 are not well studied. We found that the relative plasmid copy number of one such vector, pRL25T, varied widely, especially when the vector carried a recombinant insert, under different conditions, ranging from 0.53 to 1812 per chromosome in different recombinant strains tested, either in independent clones of the same strain or in the same clone under different growth conditions. The phenotypes caused by pRL25T-driven expression of green fluorescent protein or the GAF domain of Pkn41 or Pkn42 varied depending on the independent clones analyzed. This phenotypic variation correlated with the relative plasmid copy number present in cells.

  17. Dynamic inhomogeneity in the photodynamics of cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter W; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lagarias, J Clark; Larsen, Delmar S

    2014-05-01

    Phytochromes are widespread red/far-red photosensory proteins well known as critical regulators of photomorphogenesis in plants. It is often assumed that natural selection would have optimized the light sensing efficiency of phytochromes to minimize nonproductive photochemical deexcitation pathways. Surprisingly, the quantum efficiency for the forward Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes seldom exceeds 15%, a value very much lower than that of animal rhodopsins. Exploiting ultrafast excitation wavelength- and temperature-dependent transient absorption spectroscopy, we resolve multiple pathways within the ultrafast photodynamics of the N-terminal PAS-GAF-PHY photosensory core module of cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 (termed Cph1Δ) that are primarily responsible for the overall low quantum efficiency. This inhomogeneity primarily reflects a long-lived fluorescent subpopulation that exists in equilibrium with a spectrally distinct, photoactive subpopulation. The fluorescent subpopulation is favored at elevated temperatures, resulting in anomalous excited-state dynamics (slower kinetics at higher temperatures). The spectral and kinetic behavior of the fluorescent subpopulation strongly resembles that of the photochemically compromised and highly fluorescent Y176H variant of Cph1Δ. We present an integrated, heterogeneous model for Cph1Δ that is based on the observed transient and static spectroscopic signals. Understanding the molecular basis for this dynamic inhomogeneity holds potential for rational design of efficient phytochrome-based fluorescent and photoswitchable probes.

  18. The phytochrome red/far-red photoreceptor superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Sharrock, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Proteins of the phytochrome superfamily of red/far-red light receptors have a variety of biological roles in plants, algae, bacteria and fungi and demonstrate a diversity of spectral sensitivities and output signaling mechanisms. Over the past few years the first three-dimensional structures of phytochrome light-sensing domains from bacteria have been determined. PMID:18771590

  19. Crystal structure of the photosensing module from a red/far-red light-absorbing plant phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Burgie, E. Sethe; Bussell, Adam N.; Walker, Joseph M.; Dubiel, Katarzyna; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of plant photomorphogenesis are controlled by the phytochrome (Phy) family of bilin-containing photoreceptors that detect red and far-red light by photointerconversion between a dark-adapted Pr state and a photoactivated Pfr state. Whereas 3D models of prokaryotic Phys are available, models of their plant counterparts have remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the photosensing module (PSM) from a seed plant Phy in the Pr state using the PhyB isoform from Arabidopsis thaliana. The PhyB PSM crystallized as a head-to-head dimer with strong structural homology to its bacterial relatives, including a 5(Z)syn, 10(Z)syn, 15(Z)anti configuration of the phytochromobilin chromophore buried within the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA (GAF) domain, and a well-ordered hairpin protruding from the Phy-specific domain toward the bilin pocket. However, its Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domain, knot region, and helical spine show distinct structural differences potentially important to signaling. Included is an elongated helical spine, an extended β-sheet connecting the GAF domain and hairpin stem, and unique interactions between the region upstream of the PAS domain knot and the bilin A and B pyrrole rings. Comparisons of this structure with those from bacterial Phys combined with mutagenic studies support a toggle model for photoconversion that engages multiple features within the PSM to stabilize the Pr and Pfr end states after rotation of the D pyrrole ring. Taken together, this Arabidopsis PhyB structure should enable molecular insights into plant Phy signaling and provide an essential scaffold to redesign their activities for agricultural benefit and as optogenetic reagents. PMID:24982198

  20. A new type of dual-Cys cyanobacteriochrome GAF domain found in cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which has an unusual red/blue reversible photoconversion cycle.

    PubMed

    Narikawa, Rei; Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Fushimi, Keiji; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2014-08-12

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) form a large, spectrally diverse family of photoreceptors (linear tetrapyrrole covalently bound via a conserved cysteine) that perceive ultraviolet to red light. The underlying mechanisms are reasonably well understood with, in certain cases, reversible formation of an adduct between a second cysteine and the chromophore accounting, in part, for their spectral diversity. These CBCRs are denoted as dual-Cys CBCRs, and most such CBCRs had been shown to reversibly absorb blue and green light. Herein, we report the structural and mechanistic characterization of a new type of dual-Cys CBCR, AM1_1186, which exhibits reversible photoconversion between a red-absorbing dark state (λmax = 641 nm) and a blue-absorbing photoproduct (λmax = 416 nm). The wavelength separation of AM1_1186 photoconversion is the largest found to date for a CBCR. In addition to one well-conserved cysteine responsible for covalent incorporation of the chromophore into the apoprotein, AM1_1186 contains a second cysteine in a unique position of its photosensory domain, which would be more properly classified as a red/green CBCR according to its sequence. Carboxyamidomethylation and mutagenesis of the cysteines revealed that the second cysteine forms an adduct with the tetrapyrrole, the phycocyanobilin, that can be reversed under blue light. The proline immediately upstream of this cysteine appears to determine the rate at which the cysteinylation following photoexcitation of the dark state chromophore can occur. We propose a possible reaction scheme and color-tuning mechanism for AM1_1186 in terms of its structure and its place in a phylogenetic tree. PMID:25029277

  1. Allosteric effects of chromophore interaction with dimeric near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacterial phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Baloban, Mikhail; Bublikov, Grigory S.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes attract attention as probes for in vivo imaging due to their near-infrared (NIR) spectra and use of available in mammalian cells biliverdin (BV) as chromophore. We studied spectral properties of the iRFP670, iRFP682 and iRFP713 proteins and their mutants having Cys residues able to bind BV either in both PAS (Cys15) and GAF (Cys256) domains, in one of these domains, or without these Cys residues. We show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra and the chromophore binding depend on the location of the Cys residues. Compared with NIR FPs in which BV covalently binds to Cys15 or those that incorporate BV noncovalently, the proteins with BV covalently bound to Cys256 have blue-shifted spectra and higher quantum yield. In dimeric NIR FPs without Cys15, the covalent binding of BV to Сys256 in one monomer allosterically inhibits the covalent binding of BV to the other monomer, whereas the presence of Cys15 allosterically promotes BV binding to Cys256 in both monomers. The NIR FPs with both Cys residues have the narrowest blue-shifted spectra and the highest quantum yield. Our analysis resulted in the iRFP713/Val256Cys protein with the highest brightness in mammalian cells among available NIR FPs. PMID:26725513

  2. Photoreversible changes in pH of pea phytochrome solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokutomi, S.; Yamamoto, K.T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Furuya, M.

    1982-02-01

    Phytochrome is a chromoprotein that serves as the photoreceptor for a variety of photomorphogenic responses in plants. Phytochrome was isolated from etiolated pea seedlings. Photoinduced pH changes of an unbuffered solution of the phytochrome were monitored with a semimicrocombination pH electrode at pH 6.5. Red-light irradiation increased the pH of the medium. This alkalinization was reversed by a subsequent far-red-light irradiation. The magnitude and direction of the red-light-induced pH changes was dependent on the pH of the photocrome solution, and the maximum alkalinization was observed at pH 6.0, where the number of protons taken up per phytochrome monomer was 0.18. These results suggest that phytochrome is a multifunctional protein composed of a chromophoric domain and a hydrophobic domain. It is probable that the hydrophobic domain is responsible for the photoinduced change of hydrophobicity of phytochrome and that the ionizable groups responsible for the photoinduced pH changes are localized in the chromophoric domain. (JMT)

  3. Phytochrome in photosynthetically competent plants: characterization by monoclonal antibodies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    New monoclonal antibodies have been prepared to 124-kdalton phytochrome from etiolated oats, to phytochrome from etiolated peas, and to alkaline phosphatase. Simultaneously, progress has been made in improving methodologies for purification of phytochrome from green oats. Mice have been immunized with phytochrome electrophoretically purified from green oats. Methodologies needed to perform immunizations in vitro have been adapted to our purposes and screening protocols needed to identify antibodies to phytochrome from green oats are being refined. Forty-two rabbit antisera to phytochrome have been screened for their ability to immunoprecipitate phytochrome from green oats. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that green-oat phytochrome may be a minor component of the phytochrome isolated from etiolated oats. In addition, our panel of monoclonal antibodies has been screened for their ability to bind to phytochrome from green oats. Two that do so (oat-9 and oat-16) have been identified and characterized. A third (pea-25) has only recently been identified and is presently under intense investigation. Oat-9 and oat-16 apparently bind to the same domain on phytochrome, which is located near the site of chromophore attachment. They bind by ELISA to Pfr with greater affinity than to Pr. Pea-25 binds to phytochrome on immunoblots of sodium dodecyl sulfate, polyacrylamide gels. With this antibody it has been possible to determine that phytochrome from green oats appears to be identical in size to that obtained from etiolated oats. Data have also been obtained to indicate that a relatively small, but highly significant, proportion of the phytochrome obtained from green peas is immunochemically distinct from that obtained from etiolated peas. It thus appears that the observations made with green versus etiolated oats might represent a general phenomenon.

  4. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1991-01-01

    Major improvements have been made in the purification of green-oat phytochrome. An effective protease inhibitor has been incorporated, the scale of preparations has been increased greatly, an immunodominant contaminant has been eliminated, and the extent of purification has been increased by at least a factor of ten. Five new MAbs and rabbit PAbs to green-oat phytochrome, as well as rabbit PAbs to a synthetic, putative green-oat phytochrome peptide, have been produced and characterized, together with two MAbs to green-oat phytochrome that had been identified previously. Our earlier hypothesis that green-oat phytochrome itself consists of two types was found to be true. One type of green-oat phytochrome has an apparent monomer size of 125 kDa while the other is 123 kDa. The latter undergoes a Zn[sup 2+]-induced mobility shift during SDS PAGE and the two phytochromes are immunochemically distinct from one another. Affinity columns prepared with MAbs to green-oat phytochrome have been used to purify 125-kDa green-oat phytochrome to near homogeneity. A proteolytically derived peptide has been isolated from immunopurified green-oat phytochrome and 19 residues have been determined by microsequencing. The results verify that in monocotyledons as well as dicotyledons green- and etiolated-oat phytochromes derive from different genes.

  5. Phytochrome in photosynthetically competent plants characterization by monoclonal antibodies: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1987-03-01

    It is evident that phytochrome in green oats differs more markedly from that in etiolated oats than could have been anticipated. More effort has gone into characterization of green-oat phytochrome, including elimination of likely artifacts that might have been responsible for the observed differences with etiolated-oat phytochrome, and into the generation of new probes for green-oat phytochrome. The liability of green-oat phytochrome has increased the difficulty of this work. Immunochemical differences between etiolated- and green-oat phytochrome have been elucidated. A domain on green-oat phytochrome that undergoes a change upon phototransformation of at least etiolated-oat phytochrome has been discovered. A lambda gt11 cDNA library has been prepared from size-enriched poly(A)/sup +/-mRNA isolated from green oat shoots and has been screened immunochemically. An amplified ELISA protocol suitable for screening hybridoma supernatants against crude green-oat phytochrome preparations has been developed. Monoclonal antibodies directed to green-oat phytochrome have been identified. 5 refs.

  6. Phytochromes: More Than Meets the Eye.

    PubMed

    Rensing, Stefan A; Sheerin, David J; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Phytochromes play a key role in the regulation of plant growth and development. Phytochrome-related proteins also occur in some bacteria, fungi, and algae. We highlight recent findings on the evolution of phytochromes and discuss novel hypotheses on the function of phytochromes in diatoms, a group of mainly pelagic algae. PMID:27270335

  7. Phytochrome diversity in green plants and the origin of canonical plant phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Li, Fay-Wei; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Stevenson, Dennis W; Graham, Sean W; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Pryer, Kathleen M; Mathews, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are red/far-red photoreceptors that play essential roles in diverse plant morphogenetic and physiological responses to light. Despite their functional significance, phytochrome diversity and evolution across photosynthetic eukaryotes remain poorly understood. Using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data we show that canonical plant phytochromes originated in a common ancestor of streptophytes (charophyte algae and land plants). Phytochromes in charophyte algae are structurally diverse, including canonical and non-canonical forms, whereas in land plants, phytochrome structure is highly conserved. Liverworts, hornworts and Selaginella apparently possess a single phytochrome, whereas independent gene duplications occurred within mosses, lycopods, ferns and seed plants, leading to diverse phytochrome families in these clades. Surprisingly, the phytochrome portions of algal and land plant neochromes, a chimera of phytochrome and phototropin, appear to share a common origin. Our results reveal novel phytochrome clades and establish the basis for understanding phytochrome functional evolution in land plants and their algal relatives. PMID:26215968

  8. Phytochrome diversity in green plants and the origin of canonical plant phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fay-Wei; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J.; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Graham, Sean W.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Pryer, Kathleen M.; Mathews, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are red/far-red photoreceptors that play essential roles in diverse plant morphogenetic and physiological responses to light. Despite their functional significance, phytochrome diversity and evolution across photosynthetic eukaryotes remain poorly understood. Using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data we show that canonical plant phytochromes originated in a common ancestor of streptophytes (charophyte algae and land plants). Phytochromes in charophyte algae are structurally diverse, including canonical and non-canonical forms, whereas in land plants, phytochrome structure is highly conserved. Liverworts, hornworts and Selaginella apparently possess a single phytochrome, whereas independent gene duplications occurred within mosses, lycopods, ferns and seed plants, leading to diverse phytochrome families in these clades. Surprisingly, the phytochrome portions of algal and land plant neochromes, a chimera of phytochrome and phototropin, appear to share a common origin. Our results reveal novel phytochrome clades and establish the basis for understanding phytochrome functional evolution in land plants and their algal relatives. PMID:26215968

  9. Phytochrome diversity in green plants and the origin of canonical plant phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Li, Fay-Wei; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Stevenson, Dennis W; Graham, Sean W; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Pryer, Kathleen M; Mathews, Sarah

    2015-07-28

    Phytochromes are red/far-red photoreceptors that play essential roles in diverse plant morphogenetic and physiological responses to light. Despite their functional significance, phytochrome diversity and evolution across photosynthetic eukaryotes remain poorly understood. Using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data we show that canonical plant phytochromes originated in a common ancestor of streptophytes (charophyte algae and land plants). Phytochromes in charophyte algae are structurally diverse, including canonical and non-canonical forms, whereas in land plants, phytochrome structure is highly conserved. Liverworts, hornworts and Selaginella apparently possess a single phytochrome, whereas independent gene duplications occurred within mosses, lycopods, ferns and seed plants, leading to diverse phytochrome families in these clades. Surprisingly, the phytochrome portions of algal and land plant neochromes, a chimera of phytochrome and phototropin, appear to share a common origin. Our results reveal novel phytochrome clades and establish the basis for understanding phytochrome functional evolution in land plants and their algal relatives.

  10. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  11. Temperature Effects on Agrobacterium Phytochrome Agp1

    PubMed Central

    Njimona, Ibrahim; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely distributed biliprotein photoreceptors with a conserved N-terminal chromophore-binding domain. Most phytochromes bear a light-regulated C-terminal His kinase or His kinase-like region. We investigated the effects of light and temperature on the His kinase activity of the phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. As in earlier studies, the phosphorylation activity of the holoprotein after far-red irradiation (where the red-light absorbing Pr form dominates) was stronger than that of the holoprotein after red irradiation (where the far red-absorbing Pfr form dominates). Phosphorylation activities of the apoprotein, far red-irradiated holoprotein, and red-irradiated holoprotein decreased when the temperature increased from 25°C to 35°C; at 40°C, almost no kinase activity was detected. The activity of a holoprotein sample incubated at 40°C was nearly completely restored when the temperature returned to 25°C. UV/visible spectroscopy indicated that the protein was not denatured up to 45°C. At 50°C, however, Pfr denatured faster than the dark-adapted sample containing the Pr form of Agp1. The Pr visible spectrum was unaffected by temperatures of 20–45°C, whereas irradiated samples exhibited a clear temperature effect in the 30–40°C range in which prolonged irradiation resulted in the photoconversion of Pfr into a new spectral species termed Prx. Pfr to Prx photoconversion was dependent on the His-kinase module of Agp1; normal photoconversion occurred at 40°C in the mutant Agp1-M15, which lacks the C-terminal His-kinase module, and in a domain-swap mutant in which the His-kinase module of Agp1 is replaced by the His-kinase/response regulator module of the other A. tumefaciens phytochrome, Agp2. The temperature-dependent kinase activity and spectral properties in the physiological temperature range suggest that Agp1 serves as an integrated light and temperature sensor in A. tumefaciens. PMID:22043299

  12. Ultrafast red light activation of Synechocystis phytochrome Cph1 triggers major structural change to form the Pfr signalling-competent state.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Derren J; Khara, Basile; Sakuma, Michiyo; Hardman, Samantha J O; O'Cualain, Ronan; Rigby, Stephen E J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2012-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric photoreceptors that regulate a range of responses in plants and microorganisms through interconversion of red light-absorbing (Pr) and far-red light-absorbing (Pfr) states. Photoconversion between these states is initiated by light-driven isomerization of a bilin cofactor, which triggers protein structural change. The extent of this change, and how light-driven structural changes in the N-terminal photosensory region are transmitted to the C-terminal regulatory domain to initiate the signalling cascade, is unknown. We have used pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) spectroscopy to identify multiple structural transitions in a phytochrome from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Cph1) by measuring distances between nitroxide labels introduced into the protein. We show that monomers in the Cph1 dimer are aligned in a parallel 'head-to-head' arrangement and that photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr forms involves conformational change in both the N- and C-terminal domains of the protein. Cryo-trapping and kinetic measurements were used to probe the extent and temporal properties of protein motions for individual steps during photoconversion of Cph1. Formation of the primary photoproduct Lumi-R is not affected by changes in solvent viscosity and dielectric constant. Lumi-R formation occurs at cryogenic temperatures, consistent with their being no major structural reorganization of Cph1 during primary photoproduct formation. All remaining steps in the formation of the Pfr state are affected by solvent viscosity and dielectric constant and occur only at elevated temperatures, implying involvement of a series of long-range solvent-coupled conformational changes in Cph1. We show that signalling is achieved through ultrafast photoisomerization where localized structural change in the GAF domain is transmitted and amplified to cause larger-scale and slower conformational change in the PHY and histidine kinase domains. This hierarchy of

  13. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1991-12-31

    Major improvements have been made in the purification of green-oat phytochrome. An effective protease inhibitor has been incorporated, the scale of preparations has been increased greatly, an immunodominant contaminant has been eliminated, and the extent of purification has been increased by at least a factor of ten. Five new MAbs and rabbit PAbs to green-oat phytochrome, as well as rabbit PAbs to a synthetic, putative green-oat phytochrome peptide, have been produced and characterized, together with two MAbs to green-oat phytochrome that had been identified previously. Our earlier hypothesis that green-oat phytochrome itself consists of two types was found to be true. One type of green-oat phytochrome has an apparent monomer size of 125 kDa while the other is 123 kDa. The latter undergoes a Zn{sup 2+}-induced mobility shift during SDS PAGE and the two phytochromes are immunochemically distinct from one another. Affinity columns prepared with MAbs to green-oat phytochrome have been used to purify 125-kDa green-oat phytochrome to near homogeneity. A proteolytically derived peptide has been isolated from immunopurified green-oat phytochrome and 19 residues have been determined by microsequencing. The results verify that in monocotyledons as well as dicotyledons green- and etiolated-oat phytochromes derive from different genes.

  14. Synthetic Studies in Phytochrome Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Peter A.; Adel Odeh, Imad M.; Buddhu, Subhas C.; Cai, Guolin; Rajeswari, Sundaramoorthi; Fry, Douglas; Zheng, Wanjun; DeSimone, Robert W.; Guo, Jiasheng; Coutts, Lisa D.; Hauck, Sheila I.; Leung, Sam H.; Ghosh, Indranath; Pippin., Douglas

    2008-01-01

    An account is given of the author’s several approaches to the synthesis of the parent chromophore of phytochrome (1), a protein-bound linear tetrapyrrole derivative that controls photomorphogenesis in higher plants. These studies culminated in enantioselective syntheses of both 2R- and 2S-phytochromobilin (4), as well as several 13C-labeled derivatives designed to probe the site of Z,E-isomerization during photoexcitation. When reacted in vitro, synthetic 2R-4 and recombinant-derived phytochrome apoprotein N-C produced a protein-bound chromophore with identical difference spectra to naturally occurring 1. PMID:18633455

  15. A brief history of phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2010-01-01

    Photosensory proteins enable living things to detect the quantity and quality of their light environment and to transduce that physical signal into biochemical outputs which entrain their metabolism with the ambient light environment. Phytochromes, which photoconvert between red-absorbing Pr and far-red-absorbing Pfr states, have been the most extensively studied of these interesting proteins. Critical regulators of a number of key adaptive processes in higher plants, including photomorphogenesis and shade avoidance, phytochromes are widespread in photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria and even in fungi. Cyanobacterial genomes also possess a plethora of more distant relatives of phytochromes known as cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs). Biochemical characterization of representative CBCRs has demonstrated that this class of photosensors exhibit a broad range of wavelength sensitivities, spanning the entire visible spectrum. Distinct protein-bilin interactions are responsible for this astonishing array of wavelength sensitivities. Despite this spectral diversity, all members of the extended family of phytochrome photosensors appear to share a common photochemical mechanism for light sensing: photoisomerization of the 15/16 double bond of the bilin chromophore. PMID:20155775

  16. Structural photoactivation of a full-length bacterial phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Björling, Alexander; Berntsson, Oskar; Lehtivuori, Heli; Takala, Heikki; Hughes, Ashley J; Panman, Matthijs; Hoernke, Maria; Niebling, Stephan; Henry, Léocadie; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Chukharev, Vladimir; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Menzel, Andreas; Newby, Gemma; Khakhulin, Dmitry; Wulff, Michael; Ihalainen, Janne A; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Phytochromes are light sensor proteins found in plants, bacteria, and fungi. They function by converting a photon absorption event into a conformational signal that propagates from the chromophore through the entire protein. However, the structure of the photoactivated state and the conformational changes that lead to it are not known. We report time-resolved x-ray scattering of the full-length phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans on micro- and millisecond time scales. We identify a twist of the histidine kinase output domains with respect to the chromophore-binding domains as the dominant change between the photoactivated and resting states. The time-resolved data further show that the structural changes up to the microsecond time scales are small and localized in the chromophore-binding domains. The global structural change occurs within a few milliseconds, coinciding with the formation of the spectroscopic meta-Rc state. Our findings establish key elements of the signaling mechanism of full-length bacterial phytochromes. PMID:27536728

  17. Structural photoactivation of a full-length bacterial phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Björling, Alexander; Berntsson, Oskar; Lehtivuori, Heli; Takala, Heikki; Hughes, Ashley J.; Panman, Matthijs; Hoernke, Maria; Niebling, Stephan; Henry, Léocadie; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Chukharev, Vladimir; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Menzel, Andreas; Newby, Gemma; Khakhulin, Dmitry; Wulff, Michael; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are light sensor proteins found in plants, bacteria, and fungi. They function by converting a photon absorption event into a conformational signal that propagates from the chromophore through the entire protein. However, the structure of the photoactivated state and the conformational changes that lead to it are not known. We report time-resolved x-ray scattering of the full-length phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans on micro- and millisecond time scales. We identify a twist of the histidine kinase output domains with respect to the chromophore-binding domains as the dominant change between the photoactivated and resting states. The time-resolved data further show that the structural changes up to the microsecond time scales are small and localized in the chromophore-binding domains. The global structural change occurs within a few milliseconds, coinciding with the formation of the spectroscopic meta-Rc state. Our findings establish key elements of the signaling mechanism of full-length bacterial phytochromes. PMID:27536728

  18. Eukaryotic algal phytochromes span the visible spectrum.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Duanmu, Deqiang; Martin, Shelley S; Bachy, Charles; Price, Dana C; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Worden, Alexandra Z; Lagarias, J Clark

    2014-03-11

    Plant phytochromes are photoswitchable red/far-red photoreceptors that allow competition with neighboring plants for photosynthetically active red light. In aquatic environments, red and far-red light are rapidly attenuated with depth; therefore, photosynthetic species must use shorter wavelengths of light. Nevertheless, phytochrome-related proteins are found in recently sequenced genomes of many eukaryotic algae from aquatic environments. We examined the photosensory properties of seven phytochromes from diverse algae: four prasinophyte (green algal) species, the heterokont (brown algal) Ectocarpus siliculosus, and two glaucophyte species. We demonstrate that algal phytochromes are not limited to red and far-red responses. Instead, different algal phytochromes can sense orange, green, and even blue light. Characterization of these previously undescribed photosensors using CD spectroscopy supports a structurally heterogeneous chromophore in the far-red-absorbing photostate. Our study thus demonstrates that extensive spectral tuning of phytochromes has evolved in phylogenetically distinct lineages of aquatic photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  19. High Resolution Structure of Deinococcus Bacteriophytochrome Yields New Insights into Phytochrome Architecture and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2010-03-08

    Phytochromes are red/far red light photochromic photoreceptors that direct many photosensory behaviors in the bacterial, fungal, and plant kingdoms. They consist of an N-terminal domain that covalently binds a bilin chromophore and a C-terminal region that transmits the light signal, often through a histidine kinase relay. Using x-ray crystallography, we recently solved the first three-dimensional structure of a phytochrome, using the chromophore-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome assembled with its chromophore, biliverdin IX{alpha}. Now, by engineering the crystallization interface, we have achieved a significantly higher resolution model. This 1.45 {angstrom} resolution structure helps identify an extensive buried surface between crystal symmetry mates that may promote dimerization in vivo. It also reveals that upon ligation of the C3{sup 2} carbon of biliverdin to Cys{sup 24}, the chromophore A-ring assumes a chiral center at C2, thus becoming 2(R),3(E)-phytochromobilin, a chemistry more similar to that proposed for the attached chromophores of cyanobacterial and plant phytochromes than previously appreciated. The evolution of bacterial phytochromes to those found in cyanobacteria and higher plants must have involved greater fitness using more reduced bilins, such as phycocyanobilin, combined with a switch of the attachment site from a cysteine near the N terminus to one conserved within the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA domain. From analysis of site-directed mutants in the D. radiodurans phytochrome, we show that this bilin preference was partially driven by the change in binding site, which ultimately may have helped photosynthetic organisms optimize shade detection. Collectively, these three-dimensional structural results better clarify bilin/protein interactions and help explain how higher plant phytochromes evolved from prokaryotic progenitors.

  20. Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF): properties and frontier of current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) is well known internationally and widely used for scoring the severity of illness in psychiatry. Problems with GAF show a need for its further development (for example validity and reliability problems). The aim of the present study was to identify gaps in current knowledge about properties of GAF that are of interest for further development. Properties of GAF are defined as characteristic traits or attributes that serve to define GAF (or may have a role to define a future updated GAF). Methods A thorough literature search was conducted. Results A number of gaps in knowledge about the properties of GAF were identified: for example, the current GAF has a continuous scale, but is a continuous or categorical scale better? Scoring is not performed by setting a mark directly on a visual scale, but could this improve scoring? Would new anchor points, including key words and examples, improve GAF (anchor points for symptoms, functioning, positive mental health, prognosis, improvement of generic properties, exclusion criteria for scoring in 10-point intervals, and anchor points at the endpoints of the scale)? Is a change in the number of anchor points and their distribution over the total scale important? Could better instructions for scoring within 10-point intervals improve scoring? Internationally, both single and dual scales for GAF are used, but what is the advantage of having separate symptom and functioning scales? Symptom (GAF-S) and functioning (GAF-F) scales should score different dimensions and still be correlated, but what is the best combination of definitions for GAF-S and GAF-F? For GAF with more than two scales there is limited empirical testing, but what is gained or lost by using more than two scales? Conclusions In the history of GAF, its basic properties have undergone limited changes. Problems with GAF may, in part, be due to lack of a research programme testing the effects of different changes in basic

  1. Temperature Effects on Bacterial Phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Njimona, Ibrahim; Yang, Rui; Lamparter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are light-sensing regulatory proteins encoded in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria. This protein class incorporate bilin as their chromophore, with majority of them bearing a light- regulated His kinase or His kinase related module in the C-terminal. We studied the His kinase actives in the temperature range of 5°C to 40°C on two BphPs, Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Cph1 from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. As reported, the phosphorylation activities of the far red (FR) irradiated form of the holoprotein is stronger than that of the red (R) irradiated form in both phytochromes. We observed for the apoprotein and FR irradiated holoprotein of Agp1 an increase in the phosphorylation activities from 5°C to 25°C and a decrease from 25°C to 40°C. At 5°C the activities of the apoprotein were significantly lower than those of the FR irradiated holoprotein, which was opposite at 40°C. A similar temperature pattern was observed for Cph1, but the maximum of the apoprotein was at 20°C while the maximum of the FR irradiated holoprotein was at 10°C. At 40°C, prolonged R irradiation leads to an irreversible bleaching of Cph1, an effect which depends on the C-terminal His kinase module. A more prominent and reversible temperature effect on spectral properties of Agp1, mediated by the His kinase, has been reported before. His kinases in phytochromes could therefore share similar temperature characteristics. We also found that phytochrome B mutants of Arabidopsis have reduced hypocotyl growth at 37°C in darkness, suggesting that this phytochrome senses the temperature or mediates signal transduction of temperature effects. PMID:25289638

  2. Purification of Oat and Rye Phytochrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Harbert V.; Briggs, Winslow R.; Jackson-White, Cecil J.

    1973-01-01

    A purification procedure employing normal chromatographic techniques is outlined for isolating phytochrome from etiolated oat (Avena sativa L.) seedlings. Yields in excess of 20% (25 milligrams or more) of phytochrome in crude extract were obtained from 10- to 15-kilograms lots. The purified oat phytochrome had an absorbance ratio (A280 nm/A665 nm) of 0.78 to 0.85, comparable to reported values, and gave a single major band with an estimated molecular weight of 62,000 on electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A modification of the oat isolation procedure was used to isolate phytochrome from etiolated rye Secale cereale cv. Balbo) seedlings. During isolation rye phytochrome exhibited chromatographic profiles differing from oat phytochrome on diethylaminoethyl cellulose and on molecular sieve gels. It eluted at a higher salt concentration on diethylaminoethyl cellulose and nearer the void volume on molecular sieve gels. Yields of 5 to 10% (7.5-10 milligrams) of phytochrome in crude extract were obtained from 10- to 12-kilogram seedling lots. The purified rye phytochrome had an absorbance ratio of 1.25 to 1.37, significantly lower than values in the literature and gave a single major band with an estimated molecular weight of 120,000 on electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. It is suggested that the absorbance ratio and electrophoretic behavior of rye phytochrome are indices of purified native phytochrome, and that oat phytochrome as it has been described is an artifact which arises as a result of endogenous proteolysis during isolation. A rationale is provided for further modifications of the purification procedure to alleviate presumed protease contaminants. Images PMID:16658440

  3. 42 CFR 414.26 - Determining the GAF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determining the GAF. 414.26 Section 414.26 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other...

  4. Genetics of germination-arrest factor (GAF) production by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6: identification of a gene cluster essential for GAF biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Halgren, Anne; Maselko, Maciej; Azevedo, Mark; Mills, Dallice; Armstrong, Donald; Banowetz, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of the biosynthesis of the germination-arrest factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6, and previously identified as 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, has been investigated here. In addition to inhibiting the germination of a wide range of grassy weeds, GAF exhibits a selective antimicrobial activity against the bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora. We utilized the in vitro response of E. amylovora to GAF as a rapid screen for loss-of-function GAF phenotypes generated by transposon mutagenesis. A Tn5 mutant library consisting of 6364 WH6 transformants was screened in this Erwinia assay, resulting in the identification of 18 non-redundant transposon insertion sites that led to loss of GAF production in WH6, as confirmed by TLC analysis. These insertions mapped to five different genes and four intergenic regions. Three of these genes, including two putative regulatory genes (gntR and iopB homologues), were clustered in a 13 kb chromosomal region containing 13 putative ORFs. A GAF mutation identified previously as affecting an aminotransferase also maps to this region. We suggest that three of the genes in this region (a carbamoyltransferase, an aminotransferase and a formyltransferase) encode the enzymes necessary to synthesize dihydroGAF, the putative immediate precursor of GAF in a proposed GAF biosynthetic pathway. RT-qPCR analyses demonstrated that mutations in the gntR and iopB regulatory genes, as well as in a prtR homologue identified earlier as controlling GAF formation, suppressed transcription of at least two of the putative GAF biosynthetic genes (encoding the aminotransferase and formyltransferase) located in this 13 kb region.

  5. Connection between absorption properties and conformational changes in Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Takala, Heikki; Lehtivuori, Heli; Hammarén, Henrik; Hytönen, Vesa P; Ihalainen, Janne A

    2014-11-18

    Phytochromes consist of several protein domains and a linear tetrapyrrole molecule, which interact as a red-light-sensing system. In this study, size-exclusion chromatography and light-scattering techniques are combined with UV-vis spectroscopy to investigate light-induced changes in dimeric Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome (DrBphP) and its subdomains. The photosensory unit (DrCBD-PHY) shows an unusually stable Pfr state with minimal dark reversion, whereas the histidine kinase (HK) domain facilitates dark reversion to the resting state. Size-exclusion chromatography reveals that all phytochrome fragments remain as dimers in the illuminated state and dark state. Still, the elution profiles of all phytochrome fragments differ between the illuminated and dark states. The differences are observed reliably only when the whole UV-vis spectrum is characterized along the elution profile and show more Pfr-state characteristics at later elution volumes in DrBphP and DrCBD-PHY fragments. This implies that the PHY domain has an important role in amplifying and relaying light-induced conformational changes to the HK domain. In the illuminated state, the HK domain appears partially unfolded and prone to form oligomers. The oligomerization of DrBphP can be diminished by converting the molecule back to the resting Pr state by using far-red light.

  6. Intramolecular co-action of two independent photosensory modules in the fern phytochrome 3.

    PubMed

    Kanegae, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Fern phytochrome3/neochrome1 (phy3/neo1) is a chimeric photoreceptor composed of a phytochrome-chromophore binding domain and an almost full-length phototropin. phy3 thus contains two different light-sensing modules; a red/far-red light receptor phytochrome and a blue light receptor phototropin. phy3 induces both red light- and blue light-dependent phototropism in phototropin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana (phot1 phot2) seedlings. The red-light response is dependent on the phytochrome module of phy3, and the blue-light response is dependent on the phototropin module. We recently showed that both the phototropin-sensing module and the phytochrome-sensing module mediate the blue light-dependent phototropic response. Particularly under low-light conditions, these two light-sensing modules cooperate to induce the blue light-dependent phototropic response. This intramolecular co-action of two independent light-sensing modules in phy3 enhances light sensitivity, and perhaps allowed ferns to adapt to the low-light canopy conditions present in angiosperm forests.

  7. Solid-state NMR spectroscopic study of chromophore-protein interactions in the Pr ground state of plant phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    Despite extensive study, the molecular structure of the chromophore-binding pocket of phytochrome A (phyA), the principal photoreceptor controlling photomorphogenesis in plants, has not yet been successfully resolved. Here, we report a series of two-dimensional (2-D) magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments on the recombinant N-terminal, 65-kDa PAS-GAF-PHY light-sensing module of phytochrome A3 from oat (Avena sativa), assembled with uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (u-[13C,15N]-PCB-As.phyA3). The Pr state of this protein was studied regarding the electronic structure of the chromophore and its interactions with the proximal amino acids. Using 2-D 13C-13C and 1H-15N experiments, a complete set of 13C and 15N assignments for the chromophore were obtained. Also, a large number of 1H-13C distance restraints between the chromophore and its binding pocket were revealed by interfacial heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. 13C doublings of the chromophore A-ring region and the C-ring carboxylate moiety, together with the observation of two Pr isoforms, Pr-I and Pr-II, demonstrate the local mobility of the chromophore and the plasticity of its protein environment. It appears that the interactions and dynamics in the binding pocket of phyA in the Pr state are remarkably similar to those of cyanobacterial phytochrome (Cph1). The N-terminus of the region modeled (residues 56-66 of phyA) is highly mobile. Differences in the regulatory processes involved in plant and Cph1 phytochromes are discussed. PMID:22419823

  8. Kinetically Distinguishable Populations of Phytochrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Purves, William K.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1968-01-01

    Two or more kinetically distinguishable populations of phytochrome molecules were observed in living tissues of oat, pea, maize, and cauliflower, as well as in extracts of oat. At least 3 different populations occurred in cauliflower florets, while 2 were observed in each of the other species. In extracted oat phytochrome, the relative proportions of the 2 forms remained constant during successive stages of purification. The physiological significance of this multiplicity of forms remains unclear. PMID:16656909

  9. Phytochrome Interacting Factors: central players in phytochrome-mediated light signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Castillon, Alicia; Shen, Hui; Huq, Enamul

    2007-11-01

    To adapt to the surrounding environment, plants constantly monitor and respond to changes in the red and far-red regions of the light spectrum through the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. Extensive efforts using genetic, molecular and photobiological techniques have led to the identification of a group of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors called the Phytochrome Interacting Factors, PIFs, which directly bind to the photoactivated phytochromes. Members of the PIF family have been shown to control light-regulated gene expression directly and indirectly. PIF1, PIF3, PIF4 and PIF5 are degraded in response to light signals, and physical interaction of PIF3 with phytochromes is necessary for the light-induced phosphorylation and degradation of PIF3. PIFs constitute an excellent model for the investigation of the biochemical mechanisms of signal transfer from photoactivated phytochromes and the light-regulation of gene expression that controls photomorphogenesis in plants.

  10. A single chromoprotein with triple chromophores acts as both a phytochrome and a phototropin.

    PubMed

    Kanegae, Takeshi; Hayashida, Emi; Kuramoto, Chihiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2006-11-21

    Plants sense their environmental light conditions by using three photoreceptors that absorb in the UV, blue/near UV, and red/far-red spectral ranges. These photoreceptors have specific chromophore components corresponding to their absorption spectra. Phytochrome, a red/far-red light receptor, has phytochromobilin as its chromophore, whereas the blue/near UV photoreceptors cryptochrome and phototropin have a pair of flavin derivatives. Plants use these various photoreceptors to assess the surrounding light environment. Phytochrome 3 (PHY3) is a red light receptor found in some ferns, which preferentially grow under weak light. PHY3 is composed of a phytochrome chromophore-binding domain in its N-terminal portion and an almost full-length phototropin in its C-terminal half. This unusual domain organization implies that two different light-sensing systems coexist in this single photoreceptor, although these light-sensing systems usually reside in independent photoreceptors. Here, we show that PHY3 acts as a dual-channel photoreceptor that possesses both the red light-sensing system of phytochrome and the blue light-sensing system of phototropin. Furthermore, red- and blue-light signals perceived by PHY3 are processed synergistically within this single chromoprotein. These unusual properties might confer an enhanced light sensitivity on PHY3, allowing ferns to grow under a low-light canopy.

  11. Laser cooling of BH and GaF: insights from an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-feng; Gao, Tao

    2015-04-28

    The feasibility of laser cooling BH and GaF is investigated using ab initio quantum chemistry. The ground state X (1)Σ(+) and first two excited states (3)Π and (1)Π of BH and GaF are calculated using the multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) level of theory. For GaF, the spin-orbit coupling effect is also taken into account in the electronic structure calculations at the MRCI level. Calculated spectroscopic constants for BH and GaF show good agreement with available theoretical and experimental results. The highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors (BH: f00 = 0.9992, f11 = 0.9908, f22 = 0.9235; GaF: f00 = 0.997, f11 = 0.989, f22 = 0.958) for the (1)Π (v' = 0-2) → X (1)Σ(+) (v = 0-2) transitions in BH and GaF are determined, which are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical and experimental data. Radiative lifetime calculations of the (1)Π (v' = 0-2) state (BH: 131, 151, and 187 ns; GaF: 2.26, 2.36, and 2.48 ns) are found to be short enough for rapid laser cooling. The proposed laser cooling schemes that drive the (1)Π (v' = 0) → X (1)Σ(+) (v = 0) transition use just one laser wavelength λ00 (BH: 436 nm, GaF: 209 nm). Though the cooling wavelength of GaF is deep in the UVC, a frequency quadrupled Ti:sapphire laser (189-235 nm) could be capable of generating useful quantities of light at this wavelength. The present results indicate that BH and GaF are two good choices of molecules for laser cooling.

  12. Phytochrome, plant growth and flowering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. W.; Bagnall, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to use artificially lit cabinets to grow plants identical to those growing in sunlight have provided compelling evidence of the importance of light quality for plant growth. Changing the balance of red (R) to far-red (FR) radiation, but with a fixed photosynthetic input can shift the phytochrome photoequilibrium in a plant and generate large differences in plant growth. With FR enrichment the plants elongate, and may produce more leaf area and dry matter. Similar morphogenic responses are also obtained when light quality is altered only briefly (15-30 min) at the end-of-the-day. Conversely, for plants grown in natural conditions the response of plant form to selective spectral filtering has again shown that red and far-red wavebands are important as found by Kasperbauer and coworkers. Also, where photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) of sunlight have been held constant, the removal of far-red alone alters plant growth. With FR depletion plants grown in sunlight are small, more branched and darker green. Here we examine the implications for plant growth and flowering when the far-red composition of incident radiation in plant growth chambers is manipulated.

  13. Light-induced import of the chromoprotein, phytochrome, into mitochondria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlin, B. S.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mitochondria extracted from plants that were irradiated with actinic light in vivo have associated with them the chromoprotein, phytochrome. This phytochrome retains its native subunit size of 124 kDa after proteolytic treatment of the mitochondria with trypsin and chymotrypsin. This result suggests that phytochrome is not exposed on the outer surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Phytochrome, so protected, is not found to be associated with mitochondria derived from unirradiated plants. The possibility that the photoactivation of phytochrome induces a conformational change in its structure which facilitates its transport into the mitochondrion is discussed.

  14. Pr-specific phytochrome phosphorylation in vitro by a protein kinase present in anti-phytochrome maize immunoprecipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, B. J.; Pao, L. I.; Feldman, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase activity has repeatedly been found to co-purify with the plant photoreceptor phytochrome, suggesting that light signals received by phytochrome may be transduced or modulated through protein phosphorylation. In this study immunoprecipitation techniques were used to characterize protein kinase activity associated with phytochrome from maize (Zea mays L.). A protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated phytochrome was present in washed anti-phytochrome immunoprecipitates of etiolated coleoptile proteins. No other substrate tested was phosphorylated by this kinase. Adding salts or detergents to disrupt low-affinity protein interactions reduced background phosphorylation in immunoprecipitates without affecting phytochrome phosphorylation, indicating that the protein kinase catalytic activity is either intrinsic to the phytochrome molecule or associated with it by high-affinity interactions. Red irradiation (of coleoptiles or extracts) sufficient to approach photoconversion saturation reduced phosphorylation of immunoprecipitated phytochrome. Subsequent far-red irradiation reversed the red-light effect. Phytochrome phosphorylation was stimulated about 10-fold by a co-immunoprecipitated factor. The stimulatory factor was highest in immunoprecipitates when Mg2+ was present in immunoprecipitation reactions but remained in the supernatant in the absence of Mg2+. These observations provide strong support for the hypothesis that phytochrome-associated protein kinase modulates light responses in vivo. Since only phytochrome was found to be phosphorylated, the co-immunoprecipitated protein kinase may function to regulate receptor activity.

  15. Evaluation of GafChromic EBT prototype B for external beam dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Todorovic, M.; Fischer, M.; Cremers, F.; Thom, E.; Schmidt, R.

    2006-05-15

    The capability of the new GafChromic EBT prototype B for external beam dose verification is investigated in this paper. First the general characteristics of this film (dose response, postirradiation coloration, influence of calibration field size) were derived using a flat-bed scanner. In the dose range from 0.1 to 8 Gy, the sensitivity of the EBT prototype B film is ten times higher than the response of the GafChromic HS, which so far was the GafChromic film with the highest sensitivity. Compared with the Kodak EDR2 film, the response of the EBT is higher by a factor of 3 in the dose range from 0.1 to 8 Gy. The GafChromic EBT almost does not show a temporal growth of the optical density and there is no influence of the chosen calibration field size on the dose response curve obtained from this data. A MatLab program was written to evaluate the two-dimensional dose distributions from treatment planning systems and GafChromic EBT film measurements. Verification of external beam therapy (SRT, IMRT) using the above-mentioned approach resulted in very small differences between the planned and the applied dose. The GafChromic EBT prototype B together with the flat-bed scanner and MatLab is a successful approach for making the advantages of the GafChromic films applicable for verification of external beam therapy.

  16. Mutant Screen Distinguishes between Residues Necessary for Light-Signal Perception and Signal Transfer by Phytochrome B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytochromes (phyA to phyE) are a major plant photoreceptor family that regulate a diversity of developmental processes in response to light. The N-terminal 651–amino acid domain of phyB (N651), which binds an open tetrapyrrole chromophore, acts to perceive and transduce regulatory light signals...

  17. Influence of expression system on chromophore binding and preservation of spectral properties in recombinant phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, W; Hill, C; Worm, K; Braslavsky, S E; Schaffner, K

    1996-03-15

    N-Terminal deletion mutants of the plant photoreceptor phytochrome, additionally truncated at two different positions at their C-terminal ends, were expressed both in Escherichia coli and in yeast (Pichia pastoris) and converted into chromoproteins upon chromophore incorporation. The start and end positions of the cDNA employed (phyA from oat) mimic the positions of tryptic cleavage (deletion of the first 64 amino acids, and stop codons after amino acid positions 425 or 595, generating 39-kDa and 59-kDa peptides, respectively. The absorption properties and photochromicity upon red/far-red irradiation of these mutants were compared with their tryptic counterparts derived from native oat phytochrome and with recombinant products possessing intact N-termini, but C-terminal positions identical to those of the corresponding tryptic fragments (45-kDa and 65-kDa peptides). All recombinant 65-kDa and 59kDa peptides bound the chromophore after expression and showed the appropriate absorption spectra of the Pr and the Pfr forms. The smaller chromopeptides (45-kDa and 39-kDa) behaved differently depending on the expression system employed. E. coli-derived peptides exhibited a phytochrome-like difference spectrum only when the intact N-terminus was present (45-kDa product). The recombinant 39-kDa peptide from E. coli was incapable of chromophore binding whereas the identical peptide sequence expressed by P. pastoris formed a chromoprotein with phycocyanobilin. This recombinant phytochrome fragment exhibited a difference spectrum (Pr-Pfr) with an even larger Pfr absorption band than the comparable tryptic 39-kDa fragment. Selectivity of chromophore incorporation and spectral properties suggest that interactions between protein domains of phytochrome control the protein folding and the Pr/Pfr absorption characteristics. Evidently, trypsin digestion down to the 39-kDa fragment affects protein conformation also in terms of Pfr conservation.

  18. New Constitutively Active Phytochromes Exhibit Light-Independent Signaling Activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, A-Reum; Lee, Si-Seok; Han, Yun-Jeong; Shin, Ah-Young; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Keun Woo; Nagatani, Akira; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-08-01

    Plant phytochromes are photoreceptors that mediate a variety of photomorphogenic responses. There are two spectral photoisomers, the red light-absorbing Pr and far-red light-absorbing Pfr forms, and the photoreversible transformation between the two forms is important for the functioning of phytochromes. In this study, we isolated a Tyr-268-to-Val mutant of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsYVA) that displayed little photoconversion. Interestingly, transgenic plants of AsYVA showed light-independent phytochrome signaling with a constitutive photomorphogenic (cop) phenotype that is characterized by shortened hypocotyls and open cotyledons in the dark. In addition, the corresponding Tyr-303-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phytochrome B (AtYVB) exhibited nuclear localization and interaction with phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3) independently of light, conferring a constitutive photomorphogenic development to its transgenic plants, which is comparable to the first constitutively active version of phytochrome B (YHB; Tyr-276-to-His mutant). We also found that chromophore ligation was required for the light-independent interaction of AtYVB with PIF3. Moreover, we demonstrated that AtYVB did not exhibit phytochrome B activity when it was localized in the cytosol by fusion with the nuclear export signal and that AsYVA exhibited the full activity of phytochrome A when localized in the nucleus by fusion with the nuclear localization signal. Furthermore, the corresponding Tyr-269-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis phytochrome A (AtYVA) exhibited similar cop phenotypes in transgenic plants to AsYVA. Collectively, these results suggest that the conserved Tyr residues in the chromophore-binding pocket play an important role during the Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes, providing new constitutively active alleles of phytochromes by the Tyr-to-Val mutation. PMID:27325667

  19. Role of calcium ions in phytochrome responses: an update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Wayne, R. O.; Datta, N.

    1986-01-01

    Recent findings related to the role of calcium ions in phytochrome responses are reviewed and summarized. Hypotheses tested are the activation of calmodulin by light-regulated Ca2+ transport in cells and the photoinduction of calmodulin-activated enzyme activities. Discussion focuses on evidence that Ca2+ helps to regulate phytochrome responses, calcium requirements for photoinduced spore germination in the fern Onoclea, Ca2+ fluxes and phytochrome function in the alga Mougeotia, calmodulin antagonist blocking of red-light stimulated chloroplast rotation, the role of phosphorylation in calmodulin-regulated responses, and phytochrome regulation of nuclear protein phosphorylation.

  20. Phytochrome from green plants: assay, purification, and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Quail, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Phytochrome from the chlorophyllous cells of light-grown higher plants and green algae has been isolated and characterized. We have developed a simple procedure that separates chlorophyll from phytochrome in crude extracts from green tissue thus permitting spectral measurement of the phytochrome in such extracts for the first time. Spectral and immunochemical analysis of phytochrome from green oat tissue indicates the presence of two distinct species of the molecule: a minority species (approx. 20%) that is recognized by antibodies directed against phytochrome from etiolated tissue and that has an apparent molecular mass of 124 kilodaltons (kD), the same as that of the native molecule from etiolated tissue; and a majority species (approx. 80%) that is not recognized by anti-etiolated tissue phytochrome Ig and has a Pr absorbance maximum some 14 nm shorter than its etiolated tissue counterpart. Mixing experiments have established that these different molecular species preexist in the green cell and are not the results of posthomogenization modifications. Attempts to purify the phytochrome from green tissue by immunoaffinity chromatography have been thwarted by the lack of immunological cross-reactivity referred to. We have begun to identify monoclonal antibodies specific for antigenic sites distributed throughout the length of the etiolated-tissue phytochrome polypeptide. Axenic cultures of the alga Mesotaenium have been established and preliminary spectral analysis of phytochrome isolated from these cells has been carried out.

  1. The room temperature crystal structure of a bacterial phytochrome determined by serial femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Petra; Takala, Heikki; Claesson, Elin; Henry, Léocadie; Dods, Robert; Lehtivuori, Heli; Panman, Matthijs; Pande, Kanupriya; White, Thomas; Nakane, Takanori; Berntsson, Oskar; Gustavsson, Emil; Båth, Petra; Modi, Vaibhav; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Zook, James; Berntsen, Peter; Pandey, Suraj; Poudyal, Ishwor; Tenboer, Jason; Kupitz, Christopher; Barty, Anton; Fromme, Petra; Koralek, Jake D.; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Spence, John; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S.; Boutet, Sebastien; Nango, Eriko; Moffat, Keith; Groenhof, Gerrit; Ihalainen, Janne; Stojković, Emina A.; Schmidt, Marius; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are a family of photoreceptors that control light responses of plants, fungi and bacteria. A sequence of structural changes, which is not yet fully understood, leads to activation of an output domain. Time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) can potentially shine light on these conformational changes. Here we report the room temperature crystal structure of the chromophore-binding domains of the Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure was obtained by serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography from microcrystals at an X-ray free electron laser. We find overall good agreement compared to a crystal structure at 1.35 Å resolution derived from conventional crystallography at cryogenic temperatures, which we also report here. The thioether linkage between chromophore and protein is subject to positional ambiguity at the synchrotron, but is fully resolved with SFX. The study paves the way for time-resolved structural investigations of the phytochrome photocycle with time-resolved SFX. PMID:27756898

  2. Chromopeptides from phytochrome. The structure and linkage of the PR form of the phytochrome chromophore

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarias, J. Clark; Rapoport, Henry

    1980-07-01

    The isolation and chromatographic purification of chromophore-containing peptides from the PR form of phytochrome treated with pepsin and thermolysin are described. From the amino acid sequence and 1H NMR spectral analysis of phytochromobiliundeca peptide (2), the structure of the PR phytochrome chromophore and the nature of the thioether linkage joining pigment to peptide have been established. Furthermore, confirmatory evidence was obtained from similar analysis of phytochromobilioctapeptide (3). The implications of this structural assignment with respect to the mechanism of the PR to PFR phototransformation are considered.

  3. Computer analysis of phytochrome sequences and reevaluation of the phytochrome secondary structure by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sühnel, J; Hermann, G; Dornberger, U; Fritzsche, H

    1997-07-18

    A repertoire of various methods of computer sequence analysis was applied to phytochromes in order to gain new insights into their structure and function. A statistical analysis of 23 complete phytochrome sequences revealed regions of non-random amino acid composition, which are supposed to be of particular structural or functional importance. All phytochromes other than phyD and phyE from Arabidopsis have at least one such region at the N-terminus between residues 2 and 35. A sequence similarity search of current databases indicated striking homologies between all phytochromes and a hypothetical 84.2-kDa protein from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. Furthermore, scanning the phytochrome sequences for the occurrence of patterns defined in the PROSITE database detected the signature of the WD repeats of the beta-transducin family within the functionally important 623-779 region (sequence numbering of phyA from Avena) in a number of phytochromes. A multiple sequence alignment performed with 23 complete phytochrome sequences is made available via the IMB Jena World-Wide Web server (http://www.imb-jena.de/PHYTO.html). It can be used as a working tool for future theoretical and experimental studies. Based on the multiple alignment striking sequence differences between phytochromes A and B were detected directly at the N-terminal end, where all phytochromes B have an additional stretch of 15-42 amino acids. There is also a variety of positions with totally conserved but different amino acids in phytochromes A and B. Most of these changes are found in the sequence segment 150-200. It is, therefore, suggested that this region might be of importance in determining the photosensory specificity of the two phytochromes. The secondary structure prediction based on the multiple alignment resulted in a small but significant beta-sheet content. This finding is confirmed by a reevaluation of the secondary structure using FTIR spectroscopy.

  4. Mechanism for the selective conjugation of ubiquitin to phytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand at the molecular level how phytochrome functions and how intracellular proteins are degraded. Phytochrome is marked for degradation by covalent attachment of ubiquitin. Ubiquitin-phytochrome conjugates (UbP) were characterized with respect to formation kinetics, subcellular localization and site of ubiquitin attachment. UbP appears to be a general phenomenon during phytochrome degradation in a variety of species. UbP was isolated from oat seedlings and characterized. Residues 747-830 of phytochrome have been identified as a possible attachment site for ubiquitin. By placing the gene for etiolated phytochrome in tobacco we have created a transgenic system for over expressing phytochrome. The effects of this over expression are described, and it appears that tobacco degrades this foreign protein through formation of UbP. We have created a series of site-directed mutants of the oat phytochrome gene, and are in the process of characterizing them to determine sequence requirements for ubiquination. 8 refs., 1 fig. (MHB)

  5. Vibrational-rotational spectra of GaF and global multi-isotopologue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Hiromichi; Horiai, Koui; Katsuie, Shunsuke

    2016-07-01

    In total, 521 vibrational-rotational spectral lines of the Δv = 1 transitions of 69GaF and 71GaF up to bands v = 5-4 and 4-3, respectively, were recorded in emission with a Fourier-transform spectrometer at unapodized resolution 0.010 cm-1 in range 625-660 cm-1. The response of a HgCdTe detector enforced the lower limit, 625 cm-1. To calibrate accurately the spectral lines, the absorption spectrum of CO2 was simultaneously recorded, using dual sample cells, to serve as wavenumber standards. A set of 782 spectral lines comprising all present vibrational-rotational spectra of 69GaF and 71GaF, the reported laser-diode measurements of the Δv = 1 band sequence and the reported rotational spectra was subjected to a global multi-isotopologue analysis through fitting with 11 isotopically invariant, irreducible molecular parameters in a single set. Normalized standard deviation 1.093 indicates a satisfactory fit. For the effects of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation on GaF, the values of non-Born-Oppenheimer parameters ΔBGa, ΔωGa and r1qGa(=r1qF) are experimentally determined for the first time. To facilitate the calculations or predictions of spectral frequencies, the values of the Dunham coefficients of 24 Yij and 81 band parameters for both 69GaF and 71GaF were back-calculated with uncertainties using the 11 evaluated molecular parameters. To date, various types of effective Be, re, ωe, and k have been reported for GaF. Because, in the present work, Dunham coefficients Yij are algebraically expressed with the genuine Be, ωe, ai (i = 1, …) and the non-Born-Oppenheimer correction parameters, the exact expressions for the physical significance of effective quantities are derivable. The various effective quantities of Be, re, ωe and k calculated with these expressions for the physical significance and the determined values of the fitted parameters of GaF agree satisfactorily with the reported values. The physical significance of the conventional

  6. Illuminating Progress in Phytochrome-Mediated Light Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaosa; Paik, Inyup; Zhu, Ling; Huq, Enamul

    2015-10-01

    Light signals regulate a plethora of plant responses throughout their life cycle, especially the red and far-red regions of the light spectrum perceived by the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. However, the mechanisms by which phytochromes regulate gene expression and downstream responses remain elusive. Several recent studies have unraveled the details on how phytochromes regulate photomorphogenesis. These include the identification of E3 ligases that degrade PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) proteins, key negative regulators, in response to light, a better view of how phytochromes inhibit another key negative regulator, CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1), and an understanding of why plants evolved multiple negative regulators to repress photomorphogenesis in darkness. These advances will surely fuel future research on many unanswered questions that have intrigued plant photobiologists for decades.

  7. HEMERA Couples the Proteolysis and Transcriptional Activity of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs in Arabidopsis Photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yongjian; Li, Meina; Pasoreck, Elise K.; Long, Lingyun; Shi, Yiting; Galvão, Rafaelo M.; Chou, Conrad L.; Wang, He; Sun, Amanda Y.; Zhang, Yiyin C.; Jiang, Anna; Chen, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes (phys) are red and far-red photoreceptors that control plant development and growth by promoting the proteolysis of a family of antagonistically acting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, the PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs). We have previously shown that the degradation of PIF1 and PIF3 requires HEMERA (HMR). However, the biochemical function of HMR and the mechanism by which it mediates PIF degradation remain unclear. Here, we provide genetic evidence that HMR acts upstream of PIFs in regulating hypocotyl growth. Surprisingly, genome-wide analysis of HMR- and PIF-dependent genes reveals that HMR is also required for the transactivation of a subset of PIF direct-target genes. We show that HMR interacts with all PIFs. The HMR-PIF interaction is mediated mainly by HMR’s N-terminal half and PIFs’ conserved active-phytochrome B binding motif. In addition, HMR possesses an acidic nine-amino-acid transcriptional activation domain (9aaTAD) and a loss-of-function mutation in this 9aaTAD impairs the expression of PIF target genes and the destruction of PIF1 and PIF3. Together, these in vivo results support a regulatory mechanism for PIFs in which HMR is a transcriptional coactivator binding directly to PIFs and the 9aaTAD of HMR couples the degradation of PIF1 and PIF3 with the transactivation of PIF target genes. PMID:25944101

  8. Phytochrome in photosynthetically competent plants characterization by monoclonal antibodies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed information concerning the physicochemical properties of phytochrome is sought, but since only trace quantities are present in plant tissues, it is extremely labile to modification in crude plant extracts, efficient and sensitive methods for its purification and characterization will be required. Towards this end immune serums directed towards oat phytochrome have been prepared. Unfortunately the phytochrome in green oats is immunochemically distinct from phytochrome in etiolated oats. Consequently, effort has been directed at preparation of monoclonal antibodies for green-oat phytochrome.

  9. Improvement of interface electronic properties of GaF 3/GaAs MIS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, H.; Aizawa, K.; Ishiwara, H.

    The interface electronic properties of GaF 3/GaAs structures are investigated for three different deposition procedures, the GaF 3 films have been deposited on n-type GaAs epitaxial layers without breaking the vacuum, or after being exposed to air, or after being treated in (NH 4) 2S 1 solution. It has been found from low-temperature C-V measurements in MIS diodes that a real modulation of the Fermi level in the forbidden band gap of GaAs occurs only when the GaAs epitaxial layer is treated in the sulfur solution and annealed at an optimum temperature prior to deposition of GaF 3. The unpinning mechanism is also discussed in conjunction with the simplified model for sulfur-treated GaAs surfaces.

  10. On the collective nature of phytochrome photoactivation.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Psakis, Georgios; Lang, Christina; Mailliet, Jo; Zaanen, Jan; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2011-12-27

    The red/far-red-sensing biological photoreceptor phytochrome is a paradigmatic two-state signaling system. The two thermally stable states are interconverted via a photoreaction of the covalently bound tetrapyrrole chromophore. Applying recently developed solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, we study both the chromophore and its protein pocket in the Pr (red-absorbing) and Pfr (far-red-absorbing) states. The observations show that the phototransformation combines local chemical reactions with a mesoscopic transition of order. Both the chromophore and its binding pocket are quasi-liquid and disordered in Pr, yet quasi-solid and ordered in Pfr. Possible biochemical implications are discussed. PMID:22124256

  11. Selective inhibition of Erwinia amylovora by the herbicidally-active Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6, and identified as 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, specifically inhibits the germination of a wide range of grassy weeds. The present study was undertaken to determine if GAF has antimicrobial activity in addition to it...

  12. The fungal phytochrome FphA from Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Sonja; von Stetten, David; Günther, Mina; Hildebrandt, Peter; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2008-12-12

    The red light-sensing photoreceptor FphA from Aspergillus nidulans is involved in the regulation of developmental processes in response to light. Here we present extended biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of recombinant FphA using a synthetic gene with host-adapted codon usage. The recombinant photosensory domain FphAN753 was shown to display all features of a bona fide phytochrome. It covalently binds biliverdin as chromophore and undergoes red/far-red light-inducible photoconversion with both parent states being protonated. The large N-terminal variable extension of FphA exerts a stabilizing effect on the active Pfr state. Upon substitution of the highly conserved histidine 504, involved in the hydrogen-bonding network of the protein moiety and the chromophore, chromophore attachment and photoreversibility were completely impaired. FphA is a functional sensor histidine kinase with a strong red-light-dependent autophosphorylation activity. Furthermore, intermolecular trans-phosphorylation to the response regulator domain of a second monomer could be demonstrated. Interestingly, co-incubation of FphA and FphA variants led to enhanced autophosphorylation, including the "inactive" Pr form. The latter observed phenomenon might suggest that auto- and trans-phosphorylation activity is modulated by additional interaction partners leading to variable phosphorylation events that trigger a specific output response.

  13. Regulation of phytochrome message abundance in root caps of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. M.; Pao, L. I.; Feldman, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    In many cultivars of maize (Zea mays L.) red light affects root development via the photomorphogenetic pigment phytochrome. The site of perception for the light is the root cap. In the maize cultivar Merit, we investigated phytochrome-mediated events in the cap. We established that the message encoded by the phyA1 gene was most abundant in dark-grown tissue and was asymmetrically distributed in the root cap, with greatest expression in the cells which make up the central columella core of the cap. Phytochrome message was negatively autoregulated in a specific region within the root cap. This autoregulation was sensitive to very-low-fluence red light, and thus was characterized as a phytochrome-mediated, very-low-fluence event. The kinetics of message reaccumulation in the dark were also examined and compared to the kinetics of the light requirement for root gravitropism in this cultivar. Similarly, the degree of autoregulation present in two other maize cultivars with different light requirements for gravitropic sensitivity was investigated. It appears that the Merit cultivar expresses a condition of hypersensitivity to phytochrome-mediated light regulation in root tissues. We conclude that phytochrome regulates many activities within the cap, but the degree to which these activities share common phytochrome-mediated steps is not known.

  14. A Modified Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale for Use in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossbarger, Brad

    2005-01-01

    Terminology in the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale of DSM-IV often is irrelevant to the realities of nursing homes, assisted living centers, and similar facilities in which residents encounter stressors that are unique to their living environment and circumstances. As the mental health needs of long-term care residents are…

  15. Phytochrome from green plants: Assay, purification, and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Quail, P.H. . Dept. of Plant and Soil Biology Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA . Plant Gene Expression Center)

    1991-06-10

    This funding period was directed at developing an in-depth molecular analysis of the low-abundance, 118,000 M{sub r} green-tissue phytochrome that had at that time been relatively recently identified as being distinct from the better characterized 124,000 M{sub r} phytochrome abundant in etiolated tissue. The specific objectives as stated in the original proposal were: (1) To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to the 118,000 M{sub r} green-tissue phytochrome. (2) To develop additional and improved procedures to permit progress toward the ultimate goal of purifying green-tissue phytochrome to homogeneity. (3) To initiate an alternative approach to determining the structural properties of green-tissue phytochrome by isolating and sequencing cDNA cones representing the 118,000 M{sub r} green-tissue polypeptide in Avena. This approach is based on and will test hypothesis that the 118,000 M{sub r} polypeptide is encoded by a gene(s) distinct from those encoding etiolated-tissue 124,000 M{sub r} phytochrome. (4) To utilize any such 118,000 M{sub r} phytochrome specific cDNA clones as hybridization probes to begin to investigate the structure, organization, and regulation of the corresponding gene(s) in Avena. (5) To begin to investigate the possible presence in other higher plant and algal species of sequences homologous to the 118,000 M{sub r} Avena polypeptide using the Avena clones at hybridization probes. Most of these objectives have been accomplished, at least in principle, although the major breakthrough establishing that phytochrome is encoded by a multigene family came from the use of Arabidopsis rather than Avena. Similarly, much of the characterization subsequent to this discovery has been performed in Arabidopsis and rise as model dicot and monocot systems, respectively, rather than Avena. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Phytochromes: An Atomic Perspective on Photoactivation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Burgie, E. Sethe

    2014-01-01

    The superfamily of phytochrome (Phy) photoreceptors regulates a wide array of light responses in plants and microorganisms through their unique ability to reversibly switch between stable dark-adapted and photoactivated end states. Whereas the downstream signaling cascades and biological consequences have been described, the initial events that underpin photochemistry of the coupled bilin chromophore and the ensuing conformational changes needed to propagate the light signal are only now being understood. Especially informative has been the rapidly expanding collection of 3D models developed by x-ray crystallographic, NMR, and single-particle electron microscopic methods from a remarkably diverse array of bacterial Phys. These structures have revealed how the modular architecture of these dimeric photoreceptors engages the buried chromophore through distinctive knot, hairpin, and helical spine features. When collectively viewed, these 3D structures reveal complex structural alterations whereby photoisomerization of the bilin drives nanometer-scale movements within the Phy dimer through bilin sliding, hairpin reconfiguration, and spine deformation that ultimately impinge upon the paired signal output domains. When integrated with the recently described structure of the photosensory module from Arabidopsis thaliana PhyB, new opportunities emerge for the rational redesign of plant Phys with novel photochemistries and signaling properties potentially beneficial to agriculture and their exploitation as optogenetic reagents. PMID:25480369

  17. TORC1 Regulates Developmental Responses to Nitrogen Stress via Regulation of the GATA Transcription Factor Gaf1

    PubMed Central

    Laor, Dana; Cohen, Adiel; Kupiec, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The TOR (target of rapamycin [sirolimus]) is a universally conserved kinase that couples nutrient availability to cell growth. TOR complex 1 (TORC1) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe positively regulates growth in response to nitrogen availability while suppressing cellular responses to nitrogen stress. Here we report the identification of the GATA transcription factor Gaf1 as a positive regulator of the nitrogen stress-induced gene isp7+, via three canonical GATA motifs. We show that under nitrogen-rich conditions, TORC1 positively regulates the phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of Gaf1 via the PP2A-like phosphatase Ppe1. Under nitrogen stress conditions when TORC1 is inactivated, Gaf1 becomes dephosphorylated and enters the nucleus. Gaf1 was recently shown to negatively regulate the transcription induction of ste11+, a major regulator of sexual development. Our findings support a model of a two-faceted role of Gaf1 during nitrogen stress. Gaf1 positively regulates genes that are induced early in the response to nitrogen stress, while inhibiting later responses, such as sexual development. Taking these results together, we identify Gaf1 as a novel target for TORC1 signaling and a step-like mechanism to modulate the nitrogen stress response. PMID:26152587

  18. Structure and expression of maize phytochrome family homeologs.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Moira J; Farmer, Phyllis R; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2004-07-01

    To begin the study of phytochrome signaling in maize, we have cloned and characterized the phytochrome gene family from the inbred B73. Through DNA gel blot analysis of maize genomic DNA and BAC library screens, we show that the PhyA, PhyB, and PhyC genes are each duplicated once in the genome of maize. Each gene pair was positioned to homeologous regions of the genome using recombinant inbred mapping populations. These results strongly suggest that the duplication of the phytochrome gene family in maize arose as a consequence of an ancient tetraploidization in the maize ancestral lineage. Furthermore, sequencing of Phy genes directly from BAC clones indicates that there are six functional phytochrome genes in maize. Through Northern gel blot analysis and a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay, we determined that all six phytochrome genes are transcribed in several seedling tissues. However, expression from PhyA1, PhyB1, and PhyC1 predominate in all seedling tissues examined. Dark-grown seedlings express higher levels of PhyA and PhyB than do light-grown plants but PhyC genes are expressed at similar levels under light and dark growth conditions. These results are discussed in relation to phytochrome gene regulation in model eudicots and monocots and in light of current genome sequencing efforts in maize. PMID:15280251

  19. Structure and expression of maize phytochrome family homeologs.

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Moira J; Farmer, Phyllis R; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    To begin the study of phytochrome signaling in maize, we have cloned and characterized the phytochrome gene family from the inbred B73. Through DNA gel blot analysis of maize genomic DNA and BAC library screens, we show that the PhyA, PhyB, and PhyC genes are each duplicated once in the genome of maize. Each gene pair was positioned to homeologous regions of the genome using recombinant inbred mapping populations. These results strongly suggest that the duplication of the phytochrome gene family in maize arose as a consequence of an ancient tetraploidization in the maize ancestral lineage. Furthermore, sequencing of Phy genes directly from BAC clones indicates that there are six functional phytochrome genes in maize. Through Northern gel blot analysis and a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay, we determined that all six phytochrome genes are transcribed in several seedling tissues. However, expression from PhyA1, PhyB1, and PhyC1 predominate in all seedling tissues examined. Dark-grown seedlings express higher levels of PhyA and PhyB than do light-grown plants but PhyC genes are expressed at similar levels under light and dark growth conditions. These results are discussed in relation to phytochrome gene regulation in model eudicots and monocots and in light of current genome sequencing efforts in maize. PMID:15280251

  20. Phototransformation and dark reversion of phytochrome in deuterium oxide.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, H K; Song, P S

    1981-07-21

    The photostationary equilibrium between the Pr and Pfr forms of phytochrome shows a strong solvent deuterium isotope effect. Phytochrome transformation from the Pr to the Pfr form exhibits a small deuterium isotope effect, in Tris-D2O upon irradiation with red light, only after a photocycling of the phytochrome. In contrast, both the photoreversion and dark reversion of Pfr show an enhanced rate in D2O. In addition to the shift in the photostationary equilibrium in D2O, another pronounced effect of D2O on phytochrome is reflected in a significant enhancement of the fluorescence quantum yield of phytochrome (Pr). This result is interpreted in terms of the primary reaction involving an intramolecular proton transfer and its consequence in the phototransformation of phytochrome. It is further proposed that a tyrosyl residue acts as a general acid catalyst in the Pr to Pfr phototransformation, which is slower in D2O than in H2O. The D2O solvent isotope effect on the photoreversion and dark reversion of Pfr is explained on the basis of acid catalysis, probably a specific acid catalysis by deuteronium ion.

  1. Collecting Information for Rating Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF): Sources of Information and Methods for Information Collection

    PubMed Central

    Aas, I. H. Monrad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) is an assessment instrument that is known worldwide. It is widely used for rating the severity of illness. Results from evaluations in psychiatry should characterize the patients. Rating of GAF is based on collected information. The aim of the study is to identify the factors involved in collecting information that is relevant for rating GAF, and gaps in knowledge where it is likely that further development would play a role for improved scoring. Methods: A literature search was conducted with a combination of thorough hand search and search in the bibliographic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and Campbell Collaboration Library of Systematic Reviews. Results: Collection of information for rating GAF depends on two fundamental factors: the sources of information and the methods for information collection. Sources of information are patients, informants, health personnel, medical records, letters of referral and police records about violence and substance abuse. Methods for information collection include the many different types of interview – unstructured, semi-structured, structured, interviews for Axis I and II disorders, semistructured interviews for rating GAF, and interviews of informants – as well as instruments for rating symptoms and functioning, and observation. The different sources of information, and methods for collection, frequently result in inconsistencies in the information collected. The variation in collected information, and lack of a generally accepted algorithm for combining collected information, is likely to be important for rated GAF values, but there is a fundamental lack of knowledge about the degree of importance. Conclusions: Research to improve GAF has not reached a high level. Rated GAF values are likely to be influenced by both the sources of information used and the methods employed for information collection, but the lack of research-based information about these

  2. Steric Effects Govern the Photoactivation of Phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Falklöf, Olle; Durbeej, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Phytochromes constitute a superfamily of photoreceptor proteins existing in two forms that absorb red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light. Although it is well-known that the conversion of Pr into Pfr (the biologically active form) is triggered by a Z→E photoisomerization of the linear tetrapyrrole chromophore, direct evidence is scarce as to why this reaction always occurs at the methine bridge between pyrrole rings C and D. Here, we present hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a high-resolution Pr crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome to investigate the competition between all possible photoisomerizations at the three different (AB, BC and CD) methine bridges. The results demonstrate that steric interactions with the protein are a key discriminator between the different reaction channels. In particular, it is found that such interactions render photoisomerizations at the AB and BC bridges much less probable than photoisomerization at the CD bridge.

  3. Steric Effects Govern the Photoactivation of Phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Falklöf, Olle; Durbeej, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Phytochromes constitute a superfamily of photoreceptor proteins existing in two forms that absorb red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light. Although it is well-known that the conversion of Pr into Pfr (the biologically active form) is triggered by a Z→E photoisomerization of the linear tetrapyrrole chromophore, direct evidence is scarce as to why this reaction always occurs at the methine bridge between pyrrole rings C and D. Here, we present hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a high-resolution Pr crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome to investigate the competition between all possible photoisomerizations at the three different (AB, BC and CD) methine bridges. The results demonstrate that steric interactions with the protein are a key discriminator between the different reaction channels. In particular, it is found that such interactions render photoisomerizations at the AB and BC bridges much less probable than photoisomerization at the CD bridge. PMID:26756452

  4. A comparison of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist and the GAF among adults with mental retardation and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shedlack, Karen J; Hennen, John; Magee, Christine; Cheron, Daniel M

    2005-04-01

    Psychiatric assessment among individuals with a diagnosis of both mental retardation and mental illness presents a clinical challenge. This retrospective study compared two rating scales--the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF)--to determine the scales' utility in a partial hospital setting. Although ABC and GAF ratings were weakly correlated, the ABC revealed symptom patterns consistent with recognizable features of psychiatric syndromes and differential improvement in symptoms within and between diagnostic subgroups. The ABC provided a more useful measure of treatment response than the GAF in this patient population.

  5. The Fission Yeast GATA Factor, Gaf1, Modulates Sexual Development via Direct Down-Regulation of ste11+ Expression in Response to Nitrogen Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yeong Man; Yeon, Ji-Hyun; Maeng, Pil Jae

    2012-01-01

    Gaf1 is the first GATA family zinc-finger transcription factor identified in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we report that Gaf1 functions as a negatively acting transcription factor of ste11+, delaying the entrance of cells exposed to transient nitrogen starvation into the meiotic cycle. gaf1Δ strains exhibited accelerated G1-arrest upon nitrogen starvation. Moreover, gaf1Δ mutation caused increased mating and sporulation frequency under both nitrogen-starved and unstarved conditions, while overexpression of gaf1+ led to a significant impairment of sporulation. By microarray analysis, we found that approximately 63% (116 genes) of the 183 genes up-regulated in unstarved gaf1Δ cells were nitrogen starvation-responsive genes, and furthermore that 25 genes among the genes up-regulated by gaf1Δ mutation are Ste11 targets (e.g., gpa1+, ste4+, spk1+, ste11+, and mei2+). The phenotype caused by gaf1Δ mutation was masked by ste11Δ mutation, indicating that ste11+ is epistatic to gaf1+ with respect to sporulation efficiency, and accordingly that gaf1+ functions upstream of ste11+ in the signaling pathway governing sexual development. gaf1Δ strains showed accelerated ste11+ expression under nitrogen starvation and increased ste11+ expression even under normal conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis demonstrated that Gaf1 specifically binds to the canonical GATA motif (5′-HGATAR-3′) spanning from −371 to −366 in ste11+ promoter. Consequently, Gaf1 provides the prime example for negative regulation of ste11+ transcription through direct binding to a cis-acting motif of its promoter. PMID:22900017

  6. Binding of GID1 to DELLAs promotes dissociation of GAF1 from DELLA in GA dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Jutarou; Ito, Takeshi; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Takahashi, Yohsuke

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are important phytohormones for plant growth and development. DELLAs are members of the plant-specific GRAS protein family and act as repressors of GA signaling. DELLAs are rapidly degraded in the presence of GAs. GA-GID1-DELLA complexes are recognized and ubiquitinated by the SCFSLY complex. The sleepy1 (sly1) F-box mutant exhibits dwarfism and low-germination phenotypes due to high accumulation of DELLAs. Overexpression of GID1 in the sly1 mutant partially rescues these phenotypes without degradation of DELLAs suggesting that proteolysis independent regulation of DELLAs exists in GA signaling. But the molecular mechanisms of non-proteolytic regulation of DELLA are largely unknown. Recently we identified a DELLA binding transcription factor, GAI-ASSOCIATED FACTOR1 (GAF1). GAF1 also interacts with co-repressor TOPLESS RELATED (TPR) in nuclei. DELLAs and TPR act as coactivator and corepressor of GAF1, respectively. GAs converts the GAF1 complex from transcriptional activator to repressor via degradation of DELLAs. The overexpression of ΔPAM, lacking of DELLAs binding region of GAF1, partially rescue dwarf phenotypes of GA deficient or GA insensitive mutant. In this study, we investigate the relationship between non-proteolytic regulation of DELLAs and GA signaling via DELLA-GAF1 complex using modified yeast two-hybrid system. PMID:26237582

  7. Calcium requirement of phytochrome-mediated fern-spore germination: no direct phytochrome-calcium interaction in the phytochrome-initiated transduction chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuerlein, R.; Wayne, R.; Roux, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    Phytochrome-mediated germination of fern spores of Dryopteris paleacea Sw. was initiated by a saturating red-light (R) irradiation after 20 h of imbibition. For its realization external Ca2+ was required, with a threshold at a submicromolar concentration, and an optimum was reached around 10(-4) M. At concentrations > or = 10(-1) M only a reduced response was obtained, based probably on an unspecific osmotic or ionic effect. The germination response was inhibited by La3+, an antagonist of Ca2+. From these results it is concluded that Ca2+ influx from the medium into the spores may be an important event in phytochrome-mediated germination. In the absence of Ca2+ the R-stimulated system remained capable of responding to Ca2+, added as late as 40 h after R. Moreover, Ca2+ was effective even if added after the active form of phytochrome, Pfr, had been abolished by far-red (FR) 24 h after R. Thus, the primary effect of Pfr, that initiates the transduction chain, does not require calcium. "Coupling" of Pfr to subsequent dark reactions has been investigated by R-FR irradiations with various dark intervals. The resulting "escape kinetics" were characterized by a lag phase (6 h) and half-maximal escape from FR reversibility (19 h). These kinetics were not significantly changed by the presence or absence of calcium. Thus, direct interaction of Pfr and calcium is not a step in the transduction chain initiated by the active form of phytochrome.

  8. Photophysical diversity of two novel cyanobacteriochromes with phycocyanobilin chromophores: photochemistry and dark reversion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Luo, Juan; Tu, Jun-Ming; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Xie, Jie; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Jing-Quan; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are phytochrome homologues in cyanobacteria that act as sensory photoreceptors. We compare two cyanobacteriochromes, RGS (coded by slr1393) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and AphC (coded by all2699) from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Both contain three GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase and FhlA protein) domains (GAF1, GAF2 and GAF3). The respective full-length, truncated and cysteine point-mutated genes were expressed in Escherichia coli together with genes for chromophore biosynthesis. The resulting chromoproteins were analyzed by UV-visible absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry. RGS shows a red-green photochromism (λ(max) = 650 and 535 nm) that is assigned to the reversible 15Z/E isomerization of a single phycocyanobilin-chromophore (PCB) binding to Cys528 of GAF3. Of the three GAF domains, only GAF3 binds a chromophore and the binding is autocatalytic. RGS autophosphorylates in vitro; this reaction is photoregulated: the 535 nm state containing E-PCB was more active than the 650 nm state containing Z-PCB. AphC from Nostoc could be chromophorylated at two GAF domains, namely GAF1 and GAF3. PCB-GAF1 is photochromic, with the proposed 15E state (λ(max) = 685 nm) reverting slowly thermally to the thermostable 15Z state (λ(max)  = 635 nm). PCB-GAF3 showed a novel red-orange photochromism; the unstable state (putative 15E, λ(max) = 595 nm) reverts very rapidly (τ ~ 20 s) back to the thermostable Z state (λ(max) = 645 nm). The photochemistry of doubly chromophorylated AphC is accordingly complex, as is the autophosphorylation: E-GAF1/E-GAF3 shows the highest rate of autophosphorylation activity, while E-GAF1/Z-GAF3 has intermediate activity, and Z-GAF1/Z-GAF3 is the least active state.

  9. Chromophore structure of the physiologically active form (Pfr) of phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Rüdiger, W.; Thümmler, F.; Cmiel, E.; Schneider, S.

    1983-01-01

    Chromopeptides were prepared by proteolytic digestion of phytochrome (far-red absorbing form, Pfr) and of phycocyanin. The phycocyanobilin peptide, the chromophore of which is Z,Z,Z-configurated, was modified to the Z,Z,E isomeric chromophore. It has been demonstrated earlier that the Pfr chromopeptide and the Z,Z,E-configurated phycocyanin chromopeptide behave similarly with regard to spectral and chromatographic properties and reactivity. We present evidence here, obtained by high-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy, that both the modified phycocyanobilin chromophore and the phytochrome chromophore obtained directly from Pfr are 15E-configurated. PMID:16593380

  10. Phytochrome A overexpression in transgenic tobacco. Correlation of dwarf phenotype with high concentrations of phytochrome in vascular tissue and attenuated gibberellin levels.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, E T; Hatfield, P M; Hondred, D; Talon, M; Zeevaart, J A; Vierstra, R D

    1995-01-01

    Phytochromes are a family of related chromoproteins that regulate photomorphogenesis in plants. Ectopic overexpression of the phytochrome A in several plant species has pleiotropic effects, including substantial dwarfing, increased pigmentation, and delayed leaf senescence. We show here that the dwarf response is related to a reduction in active gibberellins (GAs) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) overexpressing oat phytochrome A under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and can be suppressed by foliar applications of gibberellic acid. In transgenic seedlings, high concentrations of oat phytochrome A were detected in stem and petiole vascular tissue (consistent with the activity of the CaMV 35S promoter), implicating vascular tissue as a potential site of phytochrome A action. To examine the efficacy of this cellular site, oat phytochrome A was also expressed using Arabidopsis chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (CAB) and the Arabidopsis ubiquitin (UBQ1) promoters. Neither promoter was as effective as CaMV 35S in expressing phytochrome in vascular tissue or in inducing the dwarf phenotype. Collectively, these data indicate that the spatial distribution of ectopic phytochrome is important in eliciting the dwarf response and suggest that the phenotype is invoked by elevated levels of the far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome within vascular tissue repressing GA biosynthesis. PMID:7716243

  11. Phytochrome levels in the green alga Mesotaenium caldariorum are light regulated.

    PubMed

    Morand, L Z; Kidd, D G; Lagarias, J C

    1993-01-01

    Experiments undertaken in this investigation examine the influence of light on the levels of phytochrome in the green alga Mesotaenium caldariorum and also provide partial protein sequence of the algal phytochrome. Immunochemical and spectrophotometric measurements reveal that phytochrome levels increase nearly 4-fold upon transfer of light-grown algal cells to total darkness during a 6- to 8-d adaptation period. Within 24 h after return to continuous illumination, the level of phytochrome in dark-adapted cells has decreased to that found in light-grown cells. Red or far-red light experiments show that both effects of light, phytochrome accumulation during dark adaptation and light-dependent decrease of phytochrome, do not depend on the form of the phytochrome photoreceptor (i.e. far-red absorbing or red absorbing) present in the algal cell. The light-dependent reduction of phytochrome in dark-adapted cells is inhibited by the photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea, suggesting that this light effect is mediated by photosynthesis. Microsequence analyses of internal peptides indicate that algal phytochrome purified from dark-adapted cells shares the greatest sequence identity with phytochrome from the fern Selaginella (74%). Compared with higher plant photoreceptors, Mesotaenium phytochrome appears to be more closely related to phyB gene products (i.e. 62 and 63% average sequence identity) than to phyA gene products (i.e. 50 and 53% average sequence identity). Because light regulation and the structure of Mesotaenium phytochrome do not conform with either type I (light-labile) or type II (light-stable) phytochromes from higher plants, these results support the hypothesis that the lower green plant photoreceptors represent a distinct class of phytochrome. PMID:8278502

  12. My Path from Chemistry to Phytochrome and Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    I summarize my scientific journey from my first interest in science to my career investigating how plants use the phytochrome photoreceptor to regulate what genes they express. I then describe how this work led to an understanding of how circadian rhythms function in plants and to the discovery of CCA1, a component of the plant central oscillator. PMID:27014288

  13. Rhizoid Differentiation in Spirogyra: III. Intracellular Localization of Phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Y

    1979-07-01

    Localization of phytochrome which mediates rhizoid differentiation in Spirogyra was investigated. The red-absorbing form of phytochrome (Pr) seems to be distributed all over the cell periphery which remained in the centripetal end part after the centrifugation, as rhizoids formed equally well with red spotlight irradiation of three different parts of an end cell, i.e. distal end, middle, and proximal end, and with irradiation of centrifugal and centripetal end parts of a centrifuged end cell. The Pr distribution was confirmed with an experiment using far red irradiation over the entire cell, centrifugation, and red spotlight irradiation. The Pr-phytochrome molecules appeared to be mobile because no dichroic orientation was shown with polarized red spotlight irradiation. On the contrary, it is suggested that far red-absorbing form of phytochrome molecules are evacuated from the centripetal end part by the centrifugation in an experiment involving red irradiation over the entire cell-centrifugation-far red spot irradiation. Rhizoid formation was repressed markedly by far red irradiation of the centrifugal end part but not of the centripetal end part.

  14. Mechanism for the selective conjugation of ubiquitin to phytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The long term goal of this project is to understand at the molecular level how intracellular proteins are degraded. The purpose of this research is to characterize the form-dependent degradation of phytochrome as a model system for the study of selective protein breakdown. Phytochrome exists in two photo-interconveretible forms, a red-absorbing Pr form and a far-red absorbing Pfr form. Recent evidence indicates that selective breakdown of phytochrome in etiolated oat seedlings occurs by a ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. Ubiquitin is a 76 amino acid eukaryotic protein that is covalently ligated to proteins destined for catabolism and serves as recognition signal for proteases specific for ubiquitin-protein conjugates. In an attempt to understand why Pfr and not Pr is recognized by the ubiquitin pathway, we have characterized ubiquitin-phytochrome conjugates (Ub-P) with respect to their kinetics of accumulation, localization within the cell, and sites of ubiquitin attachment. We also examined Pfr degradation in etiolated seedlings from a variety of other plant species (corn, rye, pea and zucchini squash) for their ability to form Ub-P during Pfr degradation. 4 refs.

  15. Characterization by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of monoclonal antibodies to Pisum and Avena phytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cordonnier, M.M.; Greppin, H.; Pratt, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    Nine monoclonal antibodies to pea (Pisum sativum L.) and 16 to oat (Avena sativa L.) phytochrome are characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against phytochrome from six different sources: pea, zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), oat, rye (Secale cereale L.), and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). All antibodies were raised against phytochrome with a monomer size near 120,000 daltons. Nevertheless, none of them discriminated qualitatively between 118/114-kilodalton oat phytochrome and a photoreversible, 60-kilodalton proteolytic degradation product derived from it. In addition, none of the 23 antibodies tested discriminated substantially between phytochrome - red-absorbing form and phytochrome - far red-absorbing form. Two antibodies to pea and six to oat phytochrome also bound strongly to phytochrome from the other species, even though these two plants are evolutionarily widely divergent. Of these eight antibodies, two bound significantly to all of the six phytochrome preparations tested, indicating that these two may recognize highly conserved regions of the chromoprotein. Since the molecular function of phytochrome is unknown, these two antibodies may serve as unique probes for regions of this pigment that are important to its mode of action. 27 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  16. New lv Mutants of Pea Are Deficient in Phytochrome B.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, J. L.; Nagatani, A.; Kendrick, R. E.; Murfet, I. C.; Reid, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The lv-1 mutant of pea (Pisum sativum L.) is deficient in responses regulated by phytochrome B (phyB) in other species but has normal levels of spectrally active phyB. We have characterized three further lv mutants (lv-2, lv-3, and lv-4), which are all elongated under red (R) and white light but are indistinguishable from wild type under far-red light. The phyB apoprotein present in the lv-1 mutant was undetectable in all three new lv mutants. The identification of allelic mutants with and without phyB apoprotein suggests that Lv may be a structural gene for a B-type phytochrome. Furthermore, it indicates that the lv-1 mutation results specifically in the loss of normal biological activity of this phytochrome. Red-light-pulse and fluence-rate-response experiments suggest that lv plants are deficient in the low-fluence response (LFR) but retain a normal very-low-fluence-rate-dependent response for leaflet expansion and inhibition of stem elongation. Comparison of lv alleles of differing severity indicates that the LFR for stem elongation can be mediated by a lower level of phyB than the LFR for leaflet expansion. The retention of a strong response to continuous low-fluence-rate R in all four lv mutants suggests that there may be an additional phytochrome controlling responses to R in pea. The kinetics of phytochrome destruction and reaccumulation in the lv mutant indicate that phyB may be involved in the light regulation of phyA levels. PMID:12228490

  17. A novel Phytochrome B allele in Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits partial mutant phenotype: a short deletion in N-terminal extension reduces Phytochrome B activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During analysis of a line possessing a Phytochrome A epiallele (phyA'), a partial Phytochrome B-deficient phenotype was observed, consisting of lengthened hypocotyls in seedlings grown under constant white light or red light (660 nm). The observed hypocotyls were twice the length (8 mm) of wild-typ...

  18. Tor Signaling Regulates Transcription of Amino Acid Permeases through a GATA Transcription Factor Gaf1 in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Ma, Ning; Liu, Qingbin; Qi, Yao; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the fission yeast, two Tor isoforms, Tor1 and Tor2, oppositely regulate gene expression of amino acid permeases. To elucidate the transcriptional machinery for these regulations, here we have employed the cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE), a method of analyzing expression profiles and identifying transcriptional start sites (TSSs). The loss of Tor1 decreased, and Tor2 inhibition by its temperature sensitive mutation increased, mRNA expression of isp5+, per1+, put4+ and SPBPB2B2.01. In contrast, the loss of Tor1 increased, and Tor2 inhibition decreased, the expression of cat1+. These changes were confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. These opposite effects by the loss of Tor1 and Tor2 inhibition appeared to occur evenly across multiple TSSs for the respective genes. The motif discovery analysis based on the CAGE results identified the GATA motifs as a potential cis-regulatory element for Tor-mediated regulation. In the luciferase reporter assay, the loss of Tor1 reduced, and Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion increased, the activity of isp5+ promoter as well as that of a GATAAG reporter. One of the GATAAG motifs in isp5+ promoter was critical for its transcriptional activity, and a GATA transcription factor Gaf1 was critical for the activities of isp5+ promoter and the GATAAG reporter. Furthermore, Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion induced nuclear localization of Gaf1 from the cytosol and its dephosphorylation. These results suggest that Tor2 inhibition, which is known to be induced by nitrogen depletion, promotes nuclear localization of Gaf1, thereby inducing isp5+ transcription through Gaf1 binding to the GATAAG motif in its promoter. Since Gaf1 was also critical for transcription of per1+ and put4+, Tor-Gaf1 signaling may coordinate transcription of multiple amino acid permeases according to nutrient availability.

  19. Tor Signaling Regulates Transcription of Amino Acid Permeases through a GATA Transcription Factor Gaf1 in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingbin; Qi, Yao; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the fission yeast, two Tor isoforms, Tor1 and Tor2, oppositely regulate gene expression of amino acid permeases. To elucidate the transcriptional machinery for these regulations, here we have employed the cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE), a method of analyzing expression profiles and identifying transcriptional start sites (TSSs). The loss of Tor1 decreased, and Tor2 inhibition by its temperature sensitive mutation increased, mRNA expression of isp5+, per1+, put4+ and SPBPB2B2.01. In contrast, the loss of Tor1 increased, and Tor2 inhibition decreased, the expression of cat1+. These changes were confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. These opposite effects by the loss of Tor1 and Tor2 inhibition appeared to occur evenly across multiple TSSs for the respective genes. The motif discovery analysis based on the CAGE results identified the GATA motifs as a potential cis-regulatory element for Tor-mediated regulation. In the luciferase reporter assay, the loss of Tor1 reduced, and Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion increased, the activity of isp5+ promoter as well as that of a GATAAG reporter. One of the GATAAG motifs in isp5+ promoter was critical for its transcriptional activity, and a GATA transcription factor Gaf1 was critical for the activities of isp5+ promoter and the GATAAG reporter. Furthermore, Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion induced nuclear localization of Gaf1 from the cytosol and its dephosphorylation. These results suggest that Tor2 inhibition, which is known to be induced by nitrogen depletion, promotes nuclear localization of Gaf1, thereby inducing isp5+ transcription through Gaf1 binding to the GATAAG motif in its promoter. Since Gaf1 was also critical for transcription of per1+ and put4+, Tor-Gaf1 signaling may coordinate transcription of multiple amino acid permeases according to nutrient availability. PMID:26689777

  20. Negative regulation of Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) production in Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6 by a putative extracytoplasmic function sigma factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6 secretes a Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) that we have previously identified as 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine. GAF irreversibly inhibits germination of the seeds of numerous grassy weed species and selectively inhibits growth of the bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia amylo...

  1. New Constitutively Active Phytochromes Exhibit Light-Independent Signaling Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, A-Reum; Lee, Si-Seok; Han, Yun-Jeong; Shin, Ah-Young; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Keun Woo; Nagatani, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Plant phytochromes are photoreceptors that mediate a variety of photomorphogenic responses. There are two spectral photoisomers, the red light-absorbing Pr and far-red light-absorbing Pfr forms, and the photoreversible transformation between the two forms is important for the functioning of phytochromes. In this study, we isolated a Tyr-268-to-Val mutant of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsYVA) that displayed little photoconversion. Interestingly, transgenic plants of AsYVA showed light-independent phytochrome signaling with a constitutive photomorphogenic (cop) phenotype that is characterized by shortened hypocotyls and open cotyledons in the dark. In addition, the corresponding Tyr-303-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phytochrome B (AtYVB) exhibited nuclear localization and interaction with phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3) independently of light, conferring a constitutive photomorphogenic development to its transgenic plants, which is comparable to the first constitutively active version of phytochrome B (YHB; Tyr-276-to-His mutant). We also found that chromophore ligation was required for the light-independent interaction of AtYVB with PIF3. Moreover, we demonstrated that AtYVB did not exhibit phytochrome B activity when it was localized in the cytosol by fusion with the nuclear export signal and that AsYVA exhibited the full activity of phytochrome A when localized in the nucleus by fusion with the nuclear localization signal. Furthermore, the corresponding Tyr-269-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis phytochrome A (AtYVA) exhibited similar cop phenotypes in transgenic plants to AsYVA. Collectively, these results suggest that the conserved Tyr residues in the chromophore-binding pocket play an important role during the Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes, providing new constitutively active alleles of phytochromes by the Tyr-to-Val mutation. PMID:27325667

  2. In vitro assembly of phytochrome B apoprotein with synthetic analogs of the phytochrome chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Hanzawa, Hiroko; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Hideki; Kakiuchi, Takashi; Jayasundera, Krishanthi Padmarani; Sawamoto, Daisuke; Ohta, Atsuko; Uchida, Kenko; Wada, Keishiro; Furuya, Masaki

    2001-01-01

    Phytochrome B (PhyB), one of the major photosensory chromoproteins in plants, mediates a variety of light-responsive developmental processes in a photoreversible manner. To analyze the structural requirements of the chromophore for the spectral properties of PhyB, we have designed and chemically synthesized 20 analogs of the linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore and reconstituted them with PhyB apoprotein (PHYB). The A-ring acts mainly as the anchor for ligation to PHYB, because the modification of the side chains at the C2 and C3 positions did not significantly influence the formation or difference spectra of adducts. In contrast, the side chains of the B- and C-rings are crucial to position the chromophore properly in the chromophore pocket of PHYB and for photoreversible spectral changes. The side-chain structure of the D-ring is required for the photoreversible spectral change of the adducts. When methyl and ethyl groups at the C17 and C18 positions are replaced with an n-propyl, n-pentyl, or n-octyl group, respectively, the photoreversible spectral change of the adducts depends on the length of the side chains. From these studies, we conclude that each pyrrole ring of the linear tetrapyrrole chromophore plays a different role in chromophore assembly and the photochromic properties of PhyB. PMID:11248126

  3. Phytochrome activation of two nuclear genes requires cytoplasmic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E; Green, P J; Wong, M; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on light-induced expression of two plant nuclear genes, Cab and rbcS, in wheat, pea and transgenic tobacco. Light activation of these two genes is very sensitive to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis but not to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of organellar protein synthesis. Studies with chimeric gene constructs in transgenic tobacco seedlings show that cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional level. As a control, we show that the expression of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is enhanced by cycloheximide treatment, irrespective of the coding sequence used. Escape-time analyses with green wheat seedlings show that the cycloheximide block for Cab gene expression is after the primary signal transduction step linked to phytochrome photoconversion. Our results suggest that phytochrome activation of Cab and rbcS is mediated by a labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Images PMID:2583082

  4. Analysis of genes negatively regulated by phytochrome action in Lemna gibba and identification of a promoter region required for phytochrome responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Okubara, P A; Williams, S A; Doxsee, R A; Tobin, E M

    1993-01-01

    As a step to understanding how the photoreceptor phytochrome acts to change the transcription of specific nuclear genes in Lemna gibba, we wish to compare promoter elements involved in negative regulation by phytochrome with those involved in positive regulation. We have isolated three genes negatively regulated by phytochrome, designated NR (negatively phytochrome regulated) genes (P.A. Okubara, E.M. Tobin [1991] Plant Physiol 96:1237-1245), and we have now sequenced two of these. The promoters of both contain some sequence motifs that are identical with motifs from other genes. We used a transient assay in L. gibba to demonstrate that approximately 1.7 kb pairs of the NPR1 promoter and 1.1 kb pairs of the NPR2 promoter could confer negative phytochrome regulation to a luciferase reporter gene. Deletion analysis of the NPR2 promoter showed that sequences between -208 and -82 from the transcription start were necessary for negative phytochrome regulation. However, this region was not sufficient to confer negative regulation by phytochrome to another promoter. Additionally, we noted that this region showed no similarity to a region identified as important for the negative regulation of the oat phyA promoter (W.B. Bruce, X.-W. Deng, P.H. Quail [1991] EMBO J 10:3015-3024), but it does contain a sequence element found in several other kinds of genes, including ones positively regulated by phytochrome. The deduced amino acid sequences of NPR1 and NPR2 were found to share similarities with many abscisic acid-induced or seed-abundant proteins. Thus, these genes, like other phytochrome-regulated genes, might respond to multiple regulatory signals. PMID:8310060

  5. Influence of chlorophyll content on phytochrome measurements in turnip cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Grill, R

    1977-01-01

    Phytochrome determinations at 730/800 nm were performed on de-etiolated turnip (Brassica rapa L.) cotyledons in which chlorophyll (Chl) content had been reduced experimentally to varying degrees by pre-treatment with high temperature (HT), or transfer to 3% ethanol. The magnitude of detectable phytochrome depended on Chl content, showing a linear relationshop in vivo. The results were confirmed by an in vitro experiment where, however, the correlation was exponential. An attempt is made to illustrate phytochrome decay in continuous blue or red light after corretion for Chl interference. To overcome the possible objection that the higher Δ(ΔA) measured in continuous light after HT pre-treatment could be caused by a reduced rate of destruction, apparent re-synthesis following red light was measured after several hours of darkness during which time the HT effect was lost. Under these conditions HT pre-treated samples display a more realistic magnitude of apparent new synthesis and make correlation with a physiological response possible.

  6. The Brassica rapa elongated internode (EIN) gene encodes phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Devlin, P F; Somers, D E; Quail, P H; Whitelam, G C

    1997-06-01

    The elongated internode (ein) mutation of Brassica rapa leads to a deficiency in immunochemically detectable phytochrome B. Molecular analysis of the PHYB gene from ein indicates a deletion in the flanking DNA 5' of the ATG start codon, which could interfere either with PHYB transcription or processing of the PHYB transcript. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms and inverse PCR fragments generated from the PHYB gene of wild-type and ein seedlings demonstrate the deletion to be 500 bp in length. Seedlings of heterozygote, EIN/ein, contain about 50% of the level of immunochemically detectable phytochrome B of equivalent wild-type EIN/EIN seedlings. Etiolated seedlings of EIN/ein show a responsiveness to red light almost intermediate between that of ein/ein and EIN/EIN homozygotes. Furthermore, whereas the ein/ein homozygote is poorly responsive to low red/far-red ratio light, the presence of one functional allele of EIN in the heterozygote confers an elongation response intermediate between that of the homozygotes EIN/EIN and ein/ein in these light conditions. The partial dominance of ein indicates a close relationship between phytochrome B level and phenotype.

  7. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of phytochrome and stentorin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pill-Soon

    1991-05-01

    Phytochrome is a tetrapyrrole chromoprotein. It serves as a sensitive photosensor for red lightmediated gene expression and other developmental/morphological responses in plants. In this paper photochemical dynamics of the phytochrome molecule have been described in terms of photoisomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore in its singlet excited state and subsequent thermal processes in the Pr Pfr phototransformation of phytochrome. Stentorin acts as the photosensor molecule in the ciliate Stentor coeruleus. This unicellular protozoan is most sensitive to red light (610-620 urn). Stentor also senses the direction of light propagation as evidenced by their light-avoiding and negative phototactic swimming behaviors. This aneural photosensory phenomenon is triggered by the photoreceptor stentorin. The possible involvement of a light-induced transient proton release from the photoreceptor as the primary mechanism of light-signal processing has been discussed on the basis of picosecond fluorescence decays and time-resolved fluorescence spectra of stentorin in solution. An initial sensory signal generated by the primary photoprocess of stentorin then triggers subsequent transduction steps that include calcium ion influx from the extracellular medium. Calcium ion influx from the extracellular medium to the cytosol causes the Stentor cell to reverse its ciliary beating and subsequently steer away from the light trap. II.

  8. Nuclear Import of the Parsley bZIP Transcription Factor CPRF2 Is Regulated by Phytochrome Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Wellmer, Frank; Nick, Peter; Rügner, Alexander; Schäfer, Eberhard; Harter, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    In plants, light perception by photoreceptors leads to differential expression of an enormous number of genes. An important step for differential gene expression is the regulation of transcription factor activities. To understand these processes in light signal transduction we analyzed the three well-known members of the common plant regulatory factor (CPRF) family from parsley (Petroselinum crispum). Here, we demonstrate that these CPRFs, which belong to the basic- region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors, are differentially distributed within parsley cells, indicating different regulatory functions within the regulatory networks of the plant cell. In particular, we show by cell fractionation and immunolocalization approaches that CPRF2 is transported from the cytosol into the nucleus upon irradiation due to action of phytochrome photoreceptors. Two NH2-terminal domains responsible for cytoplasmic localization of CPRF2 in the dark were characterized by deletion analysis using a set of CPRF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusion constructs transiently expressed in parsley protoplasts. We suggest that light-induced nuclear import of CPRF2 is an essential step in phytochrome signal transduction. PMID:9922448

  9. Use of GafChromic film to diagnose laser generated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, D. S.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. D.; Castaneda, C. M.

    2008-05-15

    A calibration of three types of GafChromic radiochromic film (HS, MD-55, and HD-810) was carried out on the Crocker Nuclear Laboratory's 76 in. cyclotron at UC Davis over doses ranging from 0.001 to 15 kGy. The film was digitized with a scanning microdensitometer with which it was scanned twice with two different filters to increase the film's effective dynamic range. We demonstrate how this calibrated film can be used to measure the spectrum and total energy of a laser generated proton beam. This technique was applied to an experiment on the 10 J, 100 fs Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The resulting proton spectrum was compared to that obtained by simultaneous measurement of Ti nuclear activation; the two methods give the same proton beam slope temperature and agree in number of protons to within 27%.

  10. Molecular mechanisms for mediating light-dependent nucleo/cytoplasmic partitioning of phytochrome photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Klose, Cornelia; Viczián, András; Kircher, Stefan; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-05-01

    The photoreceptors phytochromes monitor the red/far-red part of the spectrum, exist in the biologically active Pfr (far-red absorbing) or inactive Pr (red absorbing) forms, and function as red/far-red light-regulated molecular switches to modulate plant development and growth. Phytochromes are synthesized in the cytoplasm, and light induces translocation of the Pfr conformer into the nucleus. Nuclear import of phytochromes is a highly regulated process and is fine-tuned by the quality and quantity of light. It appears that phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) do not possess active endogenous nuclear import signals (NLSs), thus light-induced translocation of these photoreceptors into the nucleus requires direct protein–protein interactions with their NLS-containing signaling partners. Sub-cellular partitioning of the various phytochrome species is mediated by different molecular machineries. Translocation of phyA into the nucleus is promoted by FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 1 (FHY1) and FHY1-LIKE (FHL), but the identity of nuclear transport facilitators mediating the import of phyB-E into the nucleus remains elusive. Phytochromes localized in the nucleus are associated with specific protein complexes, termed photobodies. The size and distribution of these structures are regulated by the intensity and duration of irradiation, and circumstantial evidence indicates that they are involved in fine-tuning phytochrome signaling.

  11. Downstream effectors of light- and phytochrome-dependent regulation of hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sookyung; Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2013-04-01

    Arabidopsis, like most plants, exhibits tissue-specific, light-dependent growth responses. Cotyledon and leaf growth and the accumulation of photosynthetic pigments are promoted by light, whereas hypocotyl growth is inhibited. The identification and characterization of distinct phytochrome-dependent molecular effectors that are associated with these divergent tissue-specific, light-dependent growth responses are limited. To identify phytochrome-dependent factors that impact the photoregulation of hypocotyl length, we conducted comparative gene expression studies using Arabidopsis lines exhibiting distinct patterns of phytochrome chromophore inactivation and associated disparate hypocotyl elongation responses under far-red (FR) light. A large number of genes was misregulated in plants lacking mesophyll-specific phytochromes relative to constitutively-deficient phytochrome lines. We identified and characterized genes whose expression is impacted by light and by phyA and phyB that have roles in the photoregulation of hypocotyl length. We characterized the functions of several identified target genes by phenotyping of T-DNA mutants. Among these genes is a previously uncharacterized LHE (LIGHT-INDUCED HYPOCOTYL ELONGATION) gene, which we show impacts light- and phytochrome-mediated regulation of hypocotyl elongation under red (R) and FR illumination. We describe a new approach for identifying genes involved in light- and phytochrome-dependent, tissue-specific growth regulation and confirmed the roles of three such genes in the phytochrome-dependent photoregulation of hypocotyl length.

  12. Molecular mechanisms for mediating light-dependent nucleo/cytoplasmic partitioning of phytochrome photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Cornelia; Viczián, András; Kircher, Stefan; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    The photoreceptors phytochromes monitor the red/far-red part of the spectrum, exist in the biologically active Pfr (far-red absorbing) or inactive Pr (red absorbing) forms, and function as red/far-red light-regulated molecular switches to modulate plant development and growth. Phytochromes are synthesized in the cytoplasm, and light induces translocation of the Pfr conformer into the nucleus. Nuclear import of phytochromes is a highly regulated process and is fine-tuned by the quality and quantity of light. It appears that phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) do not possess active endogenous nuclear import signals (NLSs), thus light-induced translocation of these photoreceptors into the nucleus requires direct protein–protein interactions with their NLS-containing signaling partners. Sub-cellular partitioning of the various phytochrome species is mediated by different molecular machineries. Translocation of phyA into the nucleus is promoted by FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 1 (FHY1) and FHY1-LIKE (FHL), but the identity of nuclear transport facilitators mediating the import of phyB-E into the nucleus remains elusive. Phytochromes localized in the nucleus are associated with specific protein complexes, termed photobodies. The size and distribution of these structures are regulated by the intensity and duration of irradiation, and circumstantial evidence indicates that they are involved in fine-tuning phytochrome signaling. PMID:26042244

  13. Phytochrome-Mediated Phototropism in De-Etiolated Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Ballaré, Carlos L.; Scopel, Ana L.; Radosevich, Steven R.; Kendrick, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Phototropic responses to broadband far red (FR) radiation were investigated in fully de-etiolated seedlings of a long-hypocotyl mutant (lh) of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), which is deficient in phytochrome-B, and its near isogenic wild type (WT). Continuous unilateral FR light provided against a background of white light induced negative curvatures (i.e. bending away from the FR light source) in hypocotyls of WT seedlings. This response was fluence-rate dependent and was absent in the lh mutant, even at very high fluence rates of FR. The phototropic effect of FR light on WT seedlings was triggered in the hypocotyls and occurred over a range of fluence rates in which FR was very effective in promoting hypocotyl elongation. FR light had no effect on elongation of lh-mutant hypocotyls. Seedlings grown in the field showed negative phototropic responses to the proximity of neighboring plants that absorbed blue (B) and red light and back-reflected FR radiation. The bending response was significantly larger in WT than in lh seedlings. Responses of WT and lh seedlings to lateral B light were very similar; however, elimination of the lateral B light gradients created by the proximity of plant neighbors abolished the negative curvature only in the case of lh seedlings. More than 40% of the total hypocotyl curvature induced in WT seedlings by the presence of neighboring plants was present after equilibrating the fluence rates of B light received by opposite sides of the hypocotyl. These results suggest that: (a) phytochrome functions as a phototropic sensor in de-etiolated plants, and (b) in patchy canopy environments, young seedlings actively project new leaves into light gaps via stem bending responses elicited by the B-absorbing photoreceptor(s) and phytochrome. PMID:16652942

  14. Characterization of GafChromic XR-RV2 film and comparator strip using a flatbed scanner in reflection mode

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Moctezuma, A. I.

    2010-12-07

    Interventional cardiology procedures are an effective alternative for the reestablishment of correct sanguineous circulation in the heart. However, this kind of procedures exposes to the patients to a relatively high radiation doses. Usually, the surface peak skin dose is evaluated using a visual scale with a comparator strip, nevertheless, even if the comparator strip provides a simple and quick method for estimating the dose it has an uncertainty of {+-}25%. For this reason, a better evaluation method is needed. The objective of our project is to determine the surface peak skin dose of interventional cardiology procedures using GafChromic XR-RV2 film together with a commercial flatbed scanner in reflection mode. Here we report a protocol to handle GafChromic XR-RV2 film using a commercial flat bed scanner in reflection mode aiming at an uncertainty of {+-}3%.

  15. The terminal phycobilisome emitter, LCM: A light-harvesting pigment with a phytochrome chromophore.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kun; Ding, Wen-Long; Höppner, Astrid; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Lun; Hontani, Yusaku; Kennis, John T M; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2015-12-29

    Photosynthesis relies on energy transfer from light-harvesting complexes to reaction centers. Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting antennas in cyanobacteria and red algae, attach to the membrane via the multidomain core-membrane linker, L(CM). The chromophore domain of L(CM) forms a bottleneck for funneling the harvested energy either productively to reaction centers or, in case of light overload, to quenchers like orange carotenoid protein (OCP) that prevent photodamage. The crystal structure of the solubly modified chromophore domain from Nostoc sp. PCC7120 was resolved at 2.2 Å. Although its protein fold is similar to the protein folds of phycobiliproteins, the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore adopts ZZZssa geometry, which is unknown among phycobiliproteins but characteristic for sensory photoreceptors (phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes). However, chromophore photoisomerization is inhibited in L(CM) by tight packing. The ZZZssa geometry of the chromophore and π-π stacking with a neighboring Trp account for the functionally relevant extreme spectral red shift of L(CM). Exciton coupling is excluded by the large distance between two PCBs in a homodimer and by preservation of the spectral features in monomers. The structure also indicates a distinct flexibility that could be involved in quenching. The conclusions from the crystal structure are supported by femtosecond transient absorption spectra in solution. PMID:26669441

  16. The terminal phycobilisome emitter, LCM: A light-harvesting pigment with a phytochrome chromophore.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kun; Ding, Wen-Long; Höppner, Astrid; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Lun; Hontani, Yusaku; Kennis, John T M; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2015-12-29

    Photosynthesis relies on energy transfer from light-harvesting complexes to reaction centers. Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting antennas in cyanobacteria and red algae, attach to the membrane via the multidomain core-membrane linker, L(CM). The chromophore domain of L(CM) forms a bottleneck for funneling the harvested energy either productively to reaction centers or, in case of light overload, to quenchers like orange carotenoid protein (OCP) that prevent photodamage. The crystal structure of the solubly modified chromophore domain from Nostoc sp. PCC7120 was resolved at 2.2 Å. Although its protein fold is similar to the protein folds of phycobiliproteins, the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore adopts ZZZssa geometry, which is unknown among phycobiliproteins but characteristic for sensory photoreceptors (phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes). However, chromophore photoisomerization is inhibited in L(CM) by tight packing. The ZZZssa geometry of the chromophore and π-π stacking with a neighboring Trp account for the functionally relevant extreme spectral red shift of L(CM). Exciton coupling is excluded by the large distance between two PCBs in a homodimer and by preservation of the spectral features in monomers. The structure also indicates a distinct flexibility that could be involved in quenching. The conclusions from the crystal structure are supported by femtosecond transient absorption spectra in solution.

  17. The terminal phycobilisome emitter, LCM: A light-harvesting pigment with a phytochrome chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kun; Ding, Wen-Long; Höppner, Astrid; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Lun; Hontani, Yusaku; Kennis, John T. M.; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis relies on energy transfer from light-harvesting complexes to reaction centers. Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting antennas in cyanobacteria and red algae, attach to the membrane via the multidomain core-membrane linker, LCM. The chromophore domain of LCM forms a bottleneck for funneling the harvested energy either productively to reaction centers or, in case of light overload, to quenchers like orange carotenoid protein (OCP) that prevent photodamage. The crystal structure of the solubly modified chromophore domain from Nostoc sp. PCC7120 was resolved at 2.2 Å. Although its protein fold is similar to the protein folds of phycobiliproteins, the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore adopts ZZZssa geometry, which is unknown among phycobiliproteins but characteristic for sensory photoreceptors (phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes). However, chromophore photoisomerization is inhibited in LCM by tight packing. The ZZZssa geometry of the chromophore and π-π stacking with a neighboring Trp account for the functionally relevant extreme spectral red shift of LCM. Exciton coupling is excluded by the large distance between two PCBs in a homodimer and by preservation of the spectral features in monomers. The structure also indicates a distinct flexibility that could be involved in quenching. The conclusions from the crystal structure are supported by femtosecond transient absorption spectra in solution. PMID:26669441

  18. Phytochrome photoreceptors mediate plasticity to light quality in flowers of the Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Weinig, Cynthia

    2002-02-01

    The family of phytochrome photoreceptors mediates stem-elongation responses to ambient ratios of red : far-red light (R : FR). Although phytochrome genes are expressed in flowers in addition to vegetative parts, nothing is known about floral plasticity to R : FR or the pleiotropic effects of phytochrome genes on flowers. Here, the following floral morphologies were compared: (1) wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa plants experiencing high R : FR characteristic of sunlight vs. low R : FR typical of foliar shade and (2) wild-type and phytochrome-deficient A. thaliana plants. Wild-type A. thaliana exposed to low R : FR had diminished petal and pistil lengths but longer filaments for a given petal size than plants experiencing high R : FR. Brassica rapa plants had qualitatively similar responses. In comparison to wild-type A. thaliana, mutants lacking phytochrome A had smaller flowers (smaller petals, pistils, and filaments), whereas phytochrome B-deficient mutants exhibited longer filament lengths. These results provide the first evidence that R : FR and phytochromes affect floral phenotypes in addition to vegetative ones. Although the ecological relevance remains to be established, the observed plasticity of flowers to R : FR may be relevant to individual fitness in some species because stigma and filament positions can affect pollen removal and levels of self-pollination.

  19. The Dark Reactions of Rye Phytochrome in Vivo and in Vitro1

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Carl S.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1972-01-01

    The dark reactions of Secale cereale L. cv. Balbo phytochrome have been investigated in coleoptile tips and in extensively purified extracts of large molecular weight phytochrome. Destruction, but not reversion, was detected in vivo. The effects of various inhibitors of an in vitro phytochrome-degrading protease did not support a view of proteolytic attack as the basis of in vivo destruction. In vitro, rye phytochrome (about 240,000 molecular weight) reverted extremely rapidly, even at 5 C. The reversion curves were resolved into two first order components. The previously studied 60,000 molecular weight species, obtained by controlled proteolysis of large rye phytochrome, showed a similar two-component pattern, but a much slower over-all reversion rate. This reduction in rate was caused mainly by the reversion of a greater percentage of the small phytochrome as the slow component. Sodium dithionite markedly accelerated the reversion rate of both large and small forms, but oxidants, at concentrations low enough to avoid chromophore destruction, had no effect. Both large and small crude Avena sativa L. phytochrome showed two-component reversion kinetics. PMID:16657993

  20. Structure of the Biliverdin Cofactor in the Pfr State of Bathy and Prototypical Phytochromes*

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Johannes; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Kaminski, Steve; von Stetten, David; Keidel, Anke; Rippers, Yvonne; Michael, Norbert; Scheerer, Patrick; Piwowarski, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Ringsdorf, Simone; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lamparter, Tilman; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Phytochromes act as photoswitches between the red- and far-red absorbing parent states of phytochromes (Pr and Pfr). Plant phytochromes display an additional thermal conversion route from the physiologically active Pfr to Pr. The same reaction pattern is found in prototypical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochromes in contrast to the reverse thermal transformation in bathy bacteriophytochromes. However, the molecular origin of the different thermal stabilities of the Pfr states in prototypical and bathy bacteriophytochromes is not known. We analyzed the structures of the chromophore binding pockets in the Pfr states of various bathy and prototypical biliverdin-binding phytochromes using a combined spectroscopic-theoretical approach. For the Pfr state of the bathy phytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the very good agreement between calculated and experimental Raman spectra of the biliverdin cofactor is in line with important conclusions of previous crystallographic analyses, particularly the ZZEssa configuration of the chromophore and its mode of covalent attachment to the protein. The highly homogeneous chromophore conformation seems to be a unique property of the Pfr states of bathy phytochromes. This is in sharp contrast to the Pfr states of prototypical phytochromes that display conformational equilibria between two sub-states exhibiting small structural differences at the terminal methine bridges A-B and C-D. These differences may mainly root in the interactions of the cofactor with the highly conserved Asp-194 that occur via its carboxylate function in bathy phytochromes. The weaker interactions via the carbonyl function in prototypical phytochromes may lead to a higher structural flexibility of the chromophore pocket opening a reaction channel for the thermal (ZZE → ZZZ) Pfr to Pr back-conversion. PMID:23603902

  1. Structure of the biliverdin cofactor in the Pfr state of bathy and prototypical phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Johannes; Escobar, Francisco Velazquez; Kaminski, Steve; von Stetten, David; Keidel, Anke; Rippers, Yvonne; Michael, Norbert; Scheerer, Patrick; Piwowarski, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Ringsdorf, Simone; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Lamparter, Tilman; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Phytochromes act as photoswitches between the red- and far-red absorbing parent states of phytochromes (Pr and Pfr). Plant phytochromes display an additional thermal conversion route from the physiologically active Pfr to Pr. The same reaction pattern is found in prototypical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochromes in contrast to the reverse thermal transformation in bathy bacteriophytochromes. However, the molecular origin of the different thermal stabilities of the Pfr states in prototypical and bathy bacteriophytochromes is not known. We analyzed the structures of the chromophore binding pockets in the Pfr states of various bathy and prototypical biliverdin-binding phytochromes using a combined spectroscopic-theoretical approach. For the Pfr state of the bathy phytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the very good agreement between calculated and experimental Raman spectra of the biliverdin cofactor is in line with important conclusions of previous crystallographic analyses, particularly the ZZEssa configuration of the chromophore and its mode of covalent attachment to the protein. The highly homogeneous chromophore conformation seems to be a unique property of the Pfr states of bathy phytochromes. This is in sharp contrast to the Pfr states of prototypical phytochromes that display conformational equilibria between two sub-states exhibiting small structural differences at the terminal methine bridges A-B and C-D. These differences may mainly root in the interactions of the cofactor with the highly conserved Asp-194 that occur via its carboxylate function in bathy phytochromes. The weaker interactions via the carbonyl function in prototypical phytochromes may lead to a higher structural flexibility of the chromophore pocket opening a reaction channel for the thermal (ZZE → ZZZ) Pfr to Pr back-conversion. PMID:23603902

  2. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Fuda, Nicholas J.; Mahat, Dig B.; Core, Leighton J.; Guertin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes. PMID:27492368

  3. X-ray derived experimental charge density distribution in GaF3 and VF3 solid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, K.; Israel, S.; Anzline, C.; Niranjana Devi, R.; Sheeba, R. A. J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure and bonding features of metal and transition metal fluorides in low oxidation states, GaF3 and VF3, have been studied from precise single crystal X-ray diffraction data using multipole and maximum entropy methods. The topology of the charge density is analyzed and the (3,-1) bond critical points are determined. Existences of ionic nature of bonding in low valent fluorine compounds are clearly evident. The spherical core of metal atom and aspherical or twisted core of transition metal atom reveal the fact that GaF3 is much more rigid than VF3. Aspherical cores of the polarized ligand atoms are also visible in the two-dimensional density distribution pictures. The true valence charge density surfaces with encapsulating the atomic basins maps are elucidated. An elongated saddle with mid-bond density of 0.6191 e/Å3, observed in the compound VF3, shows that its lattice is less rigid and has more ionic character than GaF3.

  4. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 regulates root phototropism and gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Boccalandro, Hernán E; De Simone, Silvia N; Bergmann-Honsberger, Ariane; Schepens, Isabelle; Fankhauser, Christian; Casal, Jorge J

    2008-01-01

    Light promotes the expression of PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1) in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, but the function of PKS1 in this organ is unknown. Unilateral blue light induced a negative root phototropic response mediated by phototropin 1 in wild-type seedlings. This response was absent in pks1 mutants. In the wild type, unilateral blue light enhanced PKS1 expression in the subapical region of the root several hours before bending was detectable. The negative phototropism and the enhanced PKS1 expression in response to blue light required phytochrome A (phyA). In addition, the pks1 mutation enhanced the root gravitropic response when vertically oriented seedlings were placed horizontally. The negative regulation of gravitropism by PKS1 occurred even in dark-grown seedlings and did not require phyA. Blue light also failed to induce negative phototropism in pks1 under reduced gravitational stimulation, indicating that the effect of pks1 on phototropism is not simply the consequence of the counteracting effect of enhanced gravitropism. We propose a model where the background level of PKS1 reduces gravitropism. After a phyA-dependent increase in its expression, PKS1 positively affects root phototropism and both effects contribute to negative curvature in response to unilateral blue light.

  5. The heme oxygenase(s)-phytochrome system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wegele, Rosalina; Tasler, Ronja; Zeng, Yuhong; Rivera, Mario; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2004-10-29

    For many pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme is an essential source of iron. After uptake, the heme molecule is degraded by heme oxygenases to yield iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin. The heme oxygenase PigA is only induced under iron-limiting conditions and produces the unusual biliverdin isomers IXbeta and IXdelta. The gene for a second putative heme oxygenase in P. aeruginosa, bphO, occurs in an operon with the gene bphP encoding a bacterial phytochrome. Here we provide biochemical evidence that bphO encodes for a second heme oxygenase in P. aeruginosa. HPLC, (1)H, and (13)C NMR studies indicate that BphO is a "classic" heme oxygenase in that it produces biliverdin IXalpha. The data also suggest that the overall fold of BphO is likely to be the same as that reported for other alpha-hydroxylating heme oxygenases. Recombinant BphO was shown to prefer ferredoxins or ascorbate as a source of reducing equivalents in vitro and the rate-limiting step for the oxidation of heme to biliverdin is the release of product. In eukaryotes, the release of biliverdin is driven by biliverdin reductase, the subsequent enzyme in heme catabolism. Because P. aeruginosa lacks a biliverdin reductase homologue, data are presented indicating an involvement of the bacterial phytochrome BphP in biliverdin release from BphO and possibly from PigA.

  6. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  7. Amplification of phytochrome induced morphogenesis in plants by the cryptic red light signal (CRS)

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Guruprasad Kadur

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of endogenous levels of ascorbic acid in soybean by far-red absorbing form of phytochrome (Pfr) and by cryptic red light signal (CRS) was studied. Cryptic red light signal is produced by red light pre-irradiation of a photoreceptor other than far-red absorbing form of phytochrome (Pfr) and CRS amplifies the action of phytochrome. The endogenous level of ascorbic acid levels enhanced by phytochrome was amplified by CRS. The lifetime of CRS was from 0 to 2 h and the peak of enhancement of ascorbic acid due to CRS was between 16 to 24 h of dark incubation after the end of the treatment. CRS was found to be ineffective on UV-B enhanced endogenous levels of ascorbic acid. PMID:19816105

  8. Particle-bound phytochrome: Association with a ribonucleoprotein fraction from Cucurbita pepo L.

    PubMed

    Quail, P H

    1975-01-01

    In the absence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and added Mg(2+), the phytochrome, RNA, protein, cytochrome c oxidase and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in 20000 x g pellets from hypocotyl hooks of red-irradiated Cucurbita seedlings are more or less coincident in a single, broad band on linear sucrose gradients. The inclusion of 3 mM EDTA in the extraction, resuspension and gradient media has three major effects: (a) The phytochrome profile splits into two main bands; (b) the main RNA population shifts to a sharp peak which co-sediments with the "lighter" phytochrome band at 31S; (c) the main NADPH-cytochrome c reductase peak shifts to a lower density. This indicates that the EDTA dissociates a rough-endoplasmic-reticulum fraction into separate membrane and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components, and that part of the phytochrome is associated with the latter. The 31S RNP fraction is 35-40% RNA, has a 260/235 nm absorption ratio of 1.36 and the RNA dissociates into small fragments in sodium dodecyl sulfate. More than 90% of the phytochrome and RNA in the isolated 31S fraction becomes pelletable upon the addition of 10 mM Mg(2+). Higher Mg(2+) levels release the phytochrome and some of the other protein present from the RNA which remains pelletable. The data indicate that the 31S RNP fraction may be degraded ribosomal material with extraneously bound protein, including phytochrome. Several aspects of phytochrome-binding to particulate fractions which have been reported in the literature are consistent with an interaction of Pfr with ribosomal material-degraded or otherwise. PMID:24435122

  9. Complex and shifting interactions of phytochromes regulate fruit development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Sharma, Sulabha; Santisree, Parankusam; Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Appenroth, Klaus; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-07-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex metabolic process regulated by a genetical hierarchy. A subset of this process is also modulated by light signalling, as mutants encoding negative regulators of phytochrome signal transduction show higher accumulation of carotenoids. In tomato, phytochromes are encoded by a multi-gene family, namely PHYA, PHYB1, PHYB2, PHYE and PHYF; however, their contribution to fruit development and ripening has not been examined. Using single phytochrome mutants phyA, phyB1 and phyB2 and multiple mutants phyAB1, phyB1B2 and phyAB1B2, we compared the on-vine transitory phases of ripening until fruit abscission. The phyAB1B2 mutant showed accelerated transitions during ripening, with shortest time to fruit abscission. Comparison of transition intervals in mutants indicated a phase-specific influence of different phytochrome species either singly or in combination on the ripening process. Examination of off-vine ripened fruits indicated that ripening-specific carotenoid accumulation was not obligatorily dependent upon light and even dark-incubated fruits accumulated carotenoids. The accumulation of transcripts and carotenoids in off-vine and on-vine ripened mutant fruits indicated a complex and shifting phase-dependent modulation by phytochromes. Our results indicate that, in addition to regulating carotenoid levels in tomato fruits, phytochromes also regulate the time required for phase transitions during ripening.

  10. Phytochrome B promotes branching in Arabidopsis by suppressing auxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Krishna Reddy, Srirama; Finlayson, Scott A

    2014-03-01

    Many plants respond to competition signals generated by neighbors by evoking the shade avoidance syndrome, including increased main stem elongation and reduced branching. Vegetation-induced reduction in the red light:far-red light ratio provides a competition signal sensed by phytochromes. Plants deficient in phytochrome B (phyB) exhibit a constitutive shade avoidance syndrome including reduced branching. Because auxin in the polar auxin transport stream (PATS) inhibits axillary bud outgrowth, its role in regulating the phyB branching phenotype was tested. Removing the main shoot PATS auxin source by decapitation or chemically inhibiting the PATS strongly stimulated branching in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) deficient in phyB, but had a modest effect in the wild type. Whereas indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were elevated in young phyB seedlings, there was less IAA in mature stems compared with the wild type. A split plate assay of bud outgrowth kinetics indicated that low auxin levels inhibited phyB buds more than the wild type. Because the auxin response could be a result of either the auxin signaling status or the bud's ability to export auxin into the main shoot PATS, both parameters were assessed. Main shoots of phyB had less absolute auxin transport capacity compared with the wild type, but equal or greater capacity when based on the relative amounts of native IAA in the stems. Thus, auxin transport capacity was unlikely to restrict branching. Both shoots of young phyB seedlings and mature stem segments showed elevated expression of auxin-responsive genes and expression was further increased by auxin treatment, suggesting that phyB suppresses auxin signaling to promote branching.

  11. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the light-induced processes in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Igor; Zorn, Björn; Manstein, Dietmar J; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    The light-induced processes of the biological photoreceptor phytochrome (recombinant phyA of oat and recombinant CphA from the cyanobacterium Tolypothrix PCC7601) have been investigated in a time-resolved manner in the temperature range from 0 to 30°C. Both proteins were heterologously expressed and assembled in vitro with phycocyanobilin. The Pr state of plant phytochrome phyA is converted to the Pfr state after formation of four intermediates with an overall quantum yield of ~18%. The reversal reaction (Pfr-to-Pr) shows several intermediates, all of which, even the first detectable one, exhibit already all spectral features of the Pr state. The canonical phytochrome CphA from Tolypothrix showed a similar intermediate sequence as its plant ortholog. Whereas the kinetics for the forward reaction (Pr-to-Pfr) was nearly identical for both proteins, the reverse process (Pr formation) in the cyanobacterial phytochrome was slower by a factor of three. As found for the Pfr-to-Pr intermediates in the plant protein, also in CphA all detectable intermediates showed the spectral features of the Pr form. For both phytochromes, activation parameters for both the forward and the backward reaction pathways were determined. PMID:24209867

  12. Mesophyll-localized phytochromes gate stress- and light-inducible anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sookyung; Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress and light induce anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that mesophyll-localized phytochromes regulate nitrogen-, phosphate- and cold-induced anthocyanin accumulation in shoots of Arabidopsis. Whereas ecotype-dependent differences result in distinct total levels of anthocyanin accumulation in response to light, cold, or nutrient-deficient treatments, phytochromes generally gate light- and/or stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation in shoots, as plants depleted of mesophyll-localized phytochromes lack or have highly attenuated induction of anthocyanins. Observed interactions between light and stress were found to be wavelength dependent, with red and far-red light stimulating higher total levels of anthocyanin accumulation under cold temperatures, especially in response to nitrogen limitation, whereas blue light did not. The roots of plants depleted of mesophyll-localized phytochromes still respond to nutrient deficiency as determined by elongation of primary roots and root hair elongation when plants are grown under nitrogen- or phosphate-limited conditions. Plants which are constitutively deficient in photoreceptors in both shoots and roots, i.e., phy or cry mutants, exhibit defects in light- and stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation and defects in root development. Taken together, these results suggest that the response to nutrient limitation in roots and shoots is under distinct control by spatial-specific pools of phytochromes in Arabidopsis. PMID:24535251

  13. Phototropism and gravitropism in transgenic lines of Arabidopsis altered in the phytochrome pathway.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Jane A; Kiss, John Z

    2012-07-01

    Phytochromes are a family of photoreceptor molecules, absorbing primarily in red and far-red, that are important in many aspects of plant development. These studies investigated the role of phytochromes in phototropism and gravitropism of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. We used two transgenic lines, one which lacked phytochromes specifically in the roots (M0062/UASBVR) and the other lacked phytochromes in the shoots (CAB3::pBVR). These transgenic plants are deficient in the phytochrome chromophore in specific tissues due the expression of biliverdin IXa reductase (BVR), which binds to precursors of the chromophore. Experiments were performed in both light and dark conditions to determine whether roots directly perceive light signals or if the signal is perceived in the shoot and then transmitted to the root during tropistic curvature. Kinetics of tropisms and growth were assayed by standard methods or with a computer-based feedback system. We found that the perception of red light occurs directly in the root during phototropism in this organ and that signaling also may occur from root to shoot in gravitropism.

  14. Interaction with plant transcription factors can mediate nuclear import of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Popp, Claudia; Wüst, Florian; Bindics, János; Viczián, András; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Nagy, Ferenc; Kunkel, Tim; Schäfer, Eberhard

    2012-04-10

    Phytochromes (phy) are red/far-red-absorbing photoreceptors that regulate the adaption of plant growth and development to changes in ambient light conditions. The nuclear transport of the phytochromes upon light activation is regarded as a key step in phytochrome signaling. Although nuclear import of phyA is regulated by the transport facilitators far red elongated hypocotyl 1 (FHY1) and fhy1-like, an intrinsic nuclear localization signal was proposed to be involved in the nuclear accumulation of phyB. We recently showed that nuclear import of phytochromes can be analyzed in a cell-free system consisting of isolated nuclei of the unicellular green algae Acetabularia acetabulum. We now show that this system is also versatile to elucidate the mechanism of the nuclear transport of phyB. We tested the nuclear transport characteristics of full-length phyB as well as N- and C-terminal phyB fragments in vitro and showed that the nuclear import of phyB can be facilitated by phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3). In vivo measurements of phyB nuclear accumulation in the absence of PIF1, -3, -4, and -5 indicate that these PIFs are the major transport facilitators during the first hours of deetiolation. Under prolonged irradiations additional factors might be responsible for phyB nuclear transport in the plant.

  15. Photophysical diversity of two novel cyanobacteriochromes with phycocyanobilin chromophores: photochemistry and dark reversion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Luo, Juan; Tu, Jun-Ming; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Xie, Jie; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Jing-Quan; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are phytochrome homologues in cyanobacteria that act as sensory photoreceptors. We compare two cyanobacteriochromes, RGS (coded by slr1393) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and AphC (coded by all2699) from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Both contain three GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase and FhlA protein) domains (GAF1, GAF2 and GAF3). The respective full-length, truncated and cysteine point-mutated genes were expressed in Escherichia coli together with genes for chromophore biosynthesis. The resulting chromoproteins were analyzed by UV-visible absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry. RGS shows a red-green photochromism (λ(max) = 650 and 535 nm) that is assigned to the reversible 15Z/E isomerization of a single phycocyanobilin-chromophore (PCB) binding to Cys528 of GAF3. Of the three GAF domains, only GAF3 binds a chromophore and the binding is autocatalytic. RGS autophosphorylates in vitro; this reaction is photoregulated: the 535 nm state containing E-PCB was more active than the 650 nm state containing Z-PCB. AphC from Nostoc could be chromophorylated at two GAF domains, namely GAF1 and GAF3. PCB-GAF1 is photochromic, with the proposed 15E state (λ(max) = 685 nm) reverting slowly thermally to the thermostable 15Z state (λ(max)  = 635 nm). PCB-GAF3 showed a novel red-orange photochromism; the unstable state (putative 15E, λ(max) = 595 nm) reverts very rapidly (τ ~ 20 s) back to the thermostable Z state (λ(max) = 645 nm). The photochemistry of doubly chromophorylated AphC is accordingly complex, as is the autophosphorylation: E-GAF1/E-GAF3 shows the highest rate of autophosphorylation activity, while E-GAF1/Z-GAF3 has intermediate activity, and Z-GAF1/Z-GAF3 is the least active state. PMID:22008418

  16. Evidence for involvement of phytochrome in tumor development on plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of nonpathogenic tumorous growths on tomato plants by red and far-red radiation was studied using leaf discs floated on water and irradiated from beneath. It was found that red light (600-700 nanometers) was required for the induction of tumors on tomato (Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. & Bonpl. Plant Introduction LA 1625), while both blue (400-500 nanometers) and green (500-600 nanometers) light had little effect on tumor development. Detailed studies with red light demonstrated that tumor development increased with increasing photon flux and duration, though duration was the more significant factor. It was observed that tumor development could be prevented by the addition of far-red irradiance to red irradiance or by providing far-red irradiance immediately following red irradiance. The effectiveness of red and far-red irradiance in the regulation of tumor development indicates phytochrome involvement in this response. These findings should provide additional insight into the multiplicity of physiological factors regulating the development of nonpathogenic tumorous growths in plants.

  17. Fluorescence of Phytochrome Adducts with Synthetic Locked Chromophores*

    PubMed Central

    Zienicke, Benjamin; Chen, Li-Yi; Khawn, Htoi; Hammam, Mostafa A. S.; Kinoshita, Hideki; Reichert, Johannes; Ulrich, Anne S.; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    We performed steady state fluorescence measurements with phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and three mutants in which photoconversion is inhibited. These proteins were assembled with the natural chromophore biliverdin (BV), with phycoerythrobilin (PEB), which lacks a double bond in the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge, and with synthetic bilin derivatives in which the ring C-D-connecting methine bridge is locked. All PEB and locked chromophore adducts are photoinactive. According to fluorescence quantum yields, the adducts may be divided into four different groups: wild type BV adducts exhibiting a weak fluorescence, mutant BV adducts with about 10-fold enhanced fluorescence, adducts with locked chromophores in which the fluorescence quantum yields are around 0.02, and PEB adducts with a high quantum yield of around 0.5. Thus, the strong fluorescence of the PEB adducts is not reached by the locked chromophore adducts, although the photoconversion energy dissipation pathway is blocked. We therefore suggest that ring D of the bilin chromophore, which contributes to the extended π-electron system of the locked chromophores, provides an energy dissipation pathway that is independent on photoconversion. PMID:21071442

  18. Morphological responses of wheat to changes in phytochrome photoequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Bugbee, B.

    1991-01-01

    Wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.) were grown at the same photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), 200 micromoles per square meter per second, but with phytochrome photoequilibrium (phi) values of 0.81, 0.55, and 0.33. Plants grown at phi values of 0.55 and 0.33 tillered 43 and 56%, less compared with plants grown at phi of 0.81. Main culm development (Haun stage) was slightly more advanced at lower values of phi, and leaf sheaths, but not leaf lamina, were longer at lower phi. Dry-mass accumulation was not affected by different levels of phi. Three levels of PPF (100, 200, and 400 micromoles per square meter per second) and two lamp types, metal halide and high pressure sodium, were also tested. Higher levels of PPF resulted in more dry mass, more tillering, and a more advanced Haun stage. There was no difference in plant dry mass or development under metal halide versus high pressure sodium lamps, except for total leaf length, which was greater under high pressure sodium lamps (49.5 versus 44.9 centimeters, P < 0.01).

  19. A protonation-coupled feedback mechanism controls the signalling process in bathy phytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Piwowarski, Patrick; Salewski, Johannes; Michael, Norbert; Fernandez Lopez, Maria; Rupp, Anna; Muhammad Qureshi, Bilal; Scheerer, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Siebert, Friedrich; Andrea Mroginski, Maria; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Phytochromes are bimodal photoswitches composed of a photosensor and an output module. Photoactivation of the sensor is initiated by a double bond isomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore and eventually leads to protein conformational changes. Recently determined structural models of phytochromes identify differences between the inactive and the signalling state but do not reveal the mechanism of photosensor activation or deactivation. Here, we report a vibrational spectroscopic study on bathy phytochromes that demonstrates that the formation of the photoactivated state and thus (de)activation of the output module is based on proton translocations in the chromophore pocket coupling chromophore and protein structural changes. These proton transfer steps, involving the tetrapyrrole and a nearby histidine, also enable thermal back-isomerization of the chromophore via keto-enol tautomerization to afford the initial dark state. Thus, the same proton re-arrangements inducing the (de)activation of the output module simultaneously initiate the reversal of this process, corresponding to a negative feedback mechanism.

  20. Succinate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by light via phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vasily N; Eprintsev, Alexander T; Fedorin, Dmitry N; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2010-01-01

    The effect of light on succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity and mRNA content was studied in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The transition from darkness to light caused a short transient increase in the SDH activity followed by a decrease to a half of the original activity. The white or red light were found to be down-regulating factors for the mRNA content of the sdh1-2 and sdh2-3 genes and SDH catalytic activity both in A. thaliana wild-type plants and in the mutant deficient in the phytochrome B gene, but not in the mutant deficient in the phytochrome A gene, while the far-red light of 730 nm reversed the red light effect. It is concluded that phytochrome A participates in the regulation of mitochondrial respiration through effect on SDH expression.

  1. Tissue- and isoform-specific phytochrome regulation of light-dependent anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N; Porter, Katie J

    2011-01-01

    Phytochromes regulate light- and sucrose-dependent anthocyanin synthesis and accumulation in many plants. Mesophyll-specific phyA alone has been linked to the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation in response to far-red light in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, multiple mesophyll-localized phytochromes were implicated in the photoregulation of anthocyanin accumulation in red-light conditions. Here, we report a role for mesophyll-specific phyA in blue-light-dependent regulation of anthocyanin levels and novel roles for individual phy isoforms in the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation under red illumination. These results provide new insight into spatial- and isoform-specific regulation of pigmentation by phytochromes in A. thaliana. PMID:21455024

  2. Conformational heterogeneity of the Pfr chromophore in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; von Stetten, David; Günther-Lütkens, Mina; Keidel, Anke; Michael, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Hughes, Jon; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Yang, Yang; Heyne, Karsten; Mroginski, Maria A; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are biological photoreceptors that can be reversibly photoconverted between a dark and photoactivated state. The underlying reaction sequences are initiated by the photoisomerization of the tetrapyrrole cofactor, which in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes are a phytochromobilin (PΦB) and a phycocyanobilin (PCB), respectively. The transition between the two states represents an on/off-switch of the output module activating or deactivating downstream physiological processes. In addition, the photoactivated state, i.e., Pfr in canonical phytochromes, can be thermally reverted to the dark state (Pr). The present study aimed to improve our understanding of the specific reactivity of various PΦB- and PCB-binding phytochromes in the Pfr state by analysing the cofactor structure by vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy revealed two Pfr conformers (Pfr-I and Pfr-II) forming a temperature-dependent conformational equilibrium. The two sub-states-found in all phytochromes studied, albeit with different relative contributions-differ in structural details of the C-D and A-B methine bridges. In the Pfr-I sub-state the torsion between the rings C and D is larger by ca. 10° compared to Pfr-II. This structural difference is presumably related to different hydrogen bonding interactions of ring D as revealed by time-resolved IR spectroscopic studies of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The transitions between the two sub-states are evidently too fast (i.e., nanosecond time scale) to be resolved by NMR spectroscopy which could not detect a structural heterogeneity of the chromophore in Pfr. The implications of the present findings for the dark reversion of the Pfr state are discussed. PMID:26217669

  3. Conformational heterogeneity of the Pfr chromophore in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; von Stetten, David; Günther-Lütkens, Mina; Keidel, Anke; Michael, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Hughes, Jon; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Yang, Yang; Heyne, Karsten; Mroginski, Maria A.; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are biological photoreceptors that can be reversibly photoconverted between a dark and photoactivated state. The underlying reaction sequences are initiated by the photoisomerization of the tetrapyrrole cofactor, which in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes are a phytochromobilin (PΦB) and a phycocyanobilin (PCB), respectively. The transition between the two states represents an on/off-switch of the output module activating or deactivating downstream physiological processes. In addition, the photoactivated state, i.e., Pfr in canonical phytochromes, can be thermally reverted to the dark state (Pr). The present study aimed to improve our understanding of the specific reactivity of various PΦB- and PCB-binding phytochromes in the Pfr state by analysing the cofactor structure by vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy revealed two Pfr conformers (Pfr-I and Pfr-II) forming a temperature-dependent conformational equilibrium. The two sub-states—found in all phytochromes studied, albeit with different relative contributions—differ in structural details of the C-D and A-B methine bridges. In the Pfr-I sub-state the torsion between the rings C and D is larger by ca. 10° compared to Pfr-II. This structural difference is presumably related to different hydrogen bonding interactions of ring D as revealed by time-resolved IR spectroscopic studies of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The transitions between the two sub-states are evidently too fast (i.e., nanosecond time scale) to be resolved by NMR spectroscopy which could not detect a structural heterogeneity of the chromophore in Pfr. The implications of the present findings for the dark reversion of the Pfr state are discussed. PMID:26217669

  4. A role for ethylene in the phytochrome-mediated control of vegetative development.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise; Ross, John J; Davies, Noel W; Reid, James B; Weller, James L

    2006-06-01

    Members of the phytochrome family of photoreceptors play key roles in vegetative plant development, including the regulation of stem elongation, leaf development and chlorophyll accumulation. Hormones have been implicated in the control of these processes in de-etiolating seedlings. However, the mechanisms by which the phytochromes regulate vegetative development in more mature plants are less well understood. Pea (Pisum sativum) mutant plants lacking phytochromes A and B, the two phytochromes present in this species, develop severe defects later in development, including short, thick, distorted internodes and reduced leaf expansion, chlorophyll content and CAB gene transcript level. Studies presented here indicate that many of these defects in phyA phyB mutant plants appear to be due to elevated ethylene production, and suggest that an important role of the phytochromes in pea is to restrict ethylene production to a level that does not inhibit vegetative growth. Mutant phyA phyB plants produce significantly more ethylene than WT plants, and application of an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor rescued many aspects of the phyA phyB mutant phenotype. This deregulation of ethylene production in phy-deficient plants appears likely to be due, at least in part, to the elevated transcript levels of key ethylene-biosynthesis genes. The phytochrome A photoreceptor appears to play a prominent role in the regulation of ethylene production, as phyA, but not phyB, single-mutant plants also exhibit a phenotype consistent with elevated ethylene production. Potential interactions between ethylene and secondary plant hormones in the control of the phy-deficient mutant phenotype were explored, revealing that ethylene may inhibit stem elongation in part by reducing gibberellin levels. PMID:16805726

  5. Duplication, divergence and persistence in the Phytochrome photoreceptor gene family of cottons (Gossypium spp.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phytochromes are a family of red/far-red photoreceptors that regulate a number of important developmental traits in cotton (Gossypium spp.), including plant architecture, fiber development, and photoperiodic flowering. Little is known about the composition and evolution of the phytochrome gene family in diploid (G. herbaceum, G. raimondii) or allotetraploid (G. hirsutum, G. barbadense) cotton species. The objective of this study was to obtain a preliminary inventory and molecular-evolutionary characterization of the phytochrome gene family in cotton. Results We used comparative sequence resources to design low-degeneracy PCR primers that amplify genomic sequence tags (GSTs) for members of the PHYA, PHYB/D, PHYC and PHYE gene sub-families from A- and D-genome diploid and AD-genome allotetraploid Gossypium species. We identified two paralogous PHYA genes (designated PHYA1 and PHYA2) in diploid cottons, the result of a Malvaceae-specific PHYA gene duplication that occurred approximately 14 million years ago (MYA), before the divergence of the A- and D-genome ancestors. We identified a single gene copy of PHYB, PHYC, and PHYE in diploid cottons. The allotetraploid genomes have largely retained the complete gene complements inherited from both of the diploid genome ancestors, with at least four PHYA genes and two genes encoding PHYB, PHYC and PHYE in the AD-genomes. We did not identify a PHYD gene in any cotton genomes examined. Conclusions Detailed sequence analysis suggests that phytochrome genes retained after duplication by segmental duplication and allopolyploidy appear to be evolving independently under a birth-and-death-process with strong purifying selection. Our study provides a preliminary phytochrome gene inventory that is necessary and sufficient for further characterization of the biological functions of each of the cotton phytochrome genes, and for the development of 'candidate gene' markers that are potentially useful for cotton improvement via

  6. Genetic analysis of the roles of phytochromes A and B1 in the reversed gravitropic response of the lz-2 tomato mutant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, F. J.; Lomax, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The lz-2 mutation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) causes conditional reversal of shoot gravitropism by light. This response is mediated by phytochrome. To further elicit the mechanism by which phytochrome regulates the lz-2 phenotype, phytochrome-deficient lz-2 plants were generated. Introduction of au alleles, which severely block chromophore biosynthesis, eliminated the reversal of hypocotyl gravitropism in continuous red and far-red light. The fri1 and tri1 alleles were introduced to specifically deplete phytochromes A and B1, respectively. In dark-grown seedlings, phytochrome A was necessary for response to high-irradiance far-red light, a complete response to low fluence red light, and also mediated the effects of blue light in a far-red reversible manner. Loss of phytochrome B1 alone did not significantly affect the behaviour of lz-2 plants under any light treatment tested. However, dark-grown lz-2 plants lacking both phytochrome A and B1 exhibited reduced responses to continuous red and were less responsive to low fluence red light and high fluence blue light than plants that were deficient for phytochrome A alone. In high light, full spectrum greenhouse conditions, lz-2 plants grew downward regardless of the phytochrome deficiency. These results indicate that phytochromes A and B1 play significant roles in mediating the lz-2 phenotype and that at least one additional phytochrome is involved in reversing shoot gravitropism in this mutant.

  7. A Novel Molecular Recognition Motif Necessary for Targeting Photoactivated Phytochrome Signaling to Specific Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription FactorsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Rajnish; Huq, Enamul; Kikis, Elise A.; Al-Sady, Bassem; Lanzatella, Christina; Quail, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    The phytochrome (phy) family of sensory photoreceptors (phyA to phyE) in Arabidopsis thaliana control plant developmental transitions in response to informational light signals throughout the life cycle. The photoactivated conformer of the photoreceptor Pfr has been shown to translocate into the nucleus where it induces changes in gene expression by an unknown mechanism. Here, we have identified two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, designated PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR5 (PIF5) and PIF6, which interact specifically with the Pfr form of phyB. These two factors cluster tightly with PIF3 and two other phy-interacting bHLH proteins in a phylogenetic subfamily within the large Arabidopsis bHLH (AtbHLH) family. We have identified a novel sequence motif (designated the active phytochrome binding [APB] motif) that is conserved in these phy-interacting AtbHLHs but not in other noninteractors. Using the isolated domain and site-directed mutagenesis, we have shown that this motif is both necessary and sufficient for binding to phyB. Transgenic expression of the native APB-containing AtbHLH protein, PIF4, in a pif4 null mutant, rescued the photoresponse defect in this mutant, whereas mutated PIF4 constructs with site-directed substitutions in conserved APB residues did not. These data indicate that the APB motif is necessary for PIF4 function in light-regulated seedling development and suggest that conformer-specific binding of phyB to PIF4 via the APB motif is necessary for this function in vivo. Binding assays with the isolated APB domain detected interaction with phyB, but none of the other four Arabidopsis phys. Collectively, the data suggest that the APB domain provides a phyB-specific recognition module within the AtbHLH family, thereby conferring photoreceptor target specificity on a subset of these transcription factors and, thus, the potential for selective signal channeling to segments of the transcriptional network. PMID:15486100

  8. [Role of phytochrome in organ formation processes in Cucumis sativus L].

    PubMed

    Sysoeva, M I; Marovskaia, E F

    2013-01-01

    The role of phytochrome B in the organogenesis process in the apical and axillary shoot meristems during early ontogenesis stages in cucumber Cucumis sativus L. at photoperiods (day/night) 10/14, 16/8 h, and continuous light in comparison with wild type plants and phytochrome B-deficient mutant (lh-mutant) was investigated. In mutant phytochrome B, deficiency caused inhibition of initiation of leaves both in the leading shoot and off-shoots and increased the number of flower buds (IV stage of organogenesis). With continuous light, the number of off-shoots and flowers during stage IV of organogenesis in wild-type plants increased twofold in comparison with the mutant. Short-term temperature drops did not induce floral ontogenesis in mutants but increased the number of off-shoots in both experimental variants during a long photoperiod and continuous light situations. We propose that phytochrome B, by increasing the compactness of chromatin, may facilitate coordination of ontogenesis processes with changing environmental conditions.

  9. Phytochrome-Interacting Factors Have Both Shared and Distinct Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jinkil; Choi, Giltsu

    2013-01-01

    Phytochromes are plant photoreceptors that perceive red and far-red light. Upon the perception of light in Arabidopsis, light-activated phytochromes enter the nucleus and act on a set of interacting proteins, modulating their activities and thereby altering the expression levels of ∼10% of the organism’s entire gene complement. Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) belonging to Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) subgroup 15 are key interacting proteins that play negative roles in light responses. Their activities are post-translationally countered by light-activated phytochromes, which promote the degradation of PIFs and directly or indirectly inhibit their binding to DNA. The PIFs share a high degree of similarity, but examinations of pif single and multiple mutants have indicated that they have shared and distinct functions in various developmental and physiological processes. These are believed to stem from differences in both intrinsic protein properties and their gene expression patterns. In an effort to clarify the basis of these shared and distinct functions, we compared recently published genome-wide ChIP data, developmental gene expression maps, and responses to various stimuli for the various PIFs. Based on our observations, we propose that the biological roles of PIFs stem from their shared and distinct DNA binding targets and specific gene expression patterns. PMID:23708772

  10. Spectrophotometric Measurements of Phytochrome in vivo and Their Correlation with Photomorphogenic Responses of Phaseolus 12

    PubMed Central

    Klein, W. H.; Edwards, J. L.; Shropshire, W.

    1967-01-01

    Direct in vivo measurements of phytochrome have been made in Phaseolus vulgaris by 2-filter difference spectrophotometry (Ratiospect). All measurements were made at 730 versus 800 nm and it is assumed that the Δ (ΔOD) is directly proportional to the PFR concentration of phytochrome present. Dose response curves were determined for both physiological and spectrophotometric responses for red induction and far-red photoinactivation. For induction, saturation occurs at 100 mj/cm2 and for inactivation at 30 mj/cm2. The rate of hook opening and the physiological response measured 20 hours after induction are both shown to be directly proportional to the initial amount of PFR present spectrophotometrically. The sensitivity of the tissue correlates well with the absolute amount of phytochrome present, the inner portion of the hook having the maximum concentration of 0.042 Δ (ΔOD)/g fresh weight. If the total reversible phytochrome concentration is reduced by exposure to red light and allowing PFR to decay out of the system the remaining sensitivity of the tissue is shown to be directly correlated with the amount of PR remaining in the tissue. PFR disappears rapidly in the dark at 25°, and is not detectable after 6 hours. There is no indication that PFR reverts in the system to PR. At 4°, PFR does not disappear measurably up to 1 hour and is nearly totally reversible to PR. Images PMID:16656503

  11. Light-Stimulated Cotyledon Expansion in Arabidopsis Seedlings (The Role of Phytochrome B).

    PubMed Central

    Neff, M. M.; Van Volkenburgh, E.

    1994-01-01

    Leaf and cotyledon expansion in dicotyledonous plants is a light-dependent developmental process. The unique role of phytochrome B has been tested by investigating expansion of cotyledons in wild-type and phytochrome-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. A relatively rapid method for measuring cotyledon area was developed to quantify growth in large populations (average n [greater than or equal to] 100) of wild-type or mutant seedlings under different light and chemical treatments. Three-day-old wild-type (La-er) Arabidopsis seedlings, grown in saturating, low-fluence red light (2-4 [mu]mol m-2 s-1), showed a >250% increase in cotyledon area after 48 h of bright-red light when compared with the phytochrome mutants hy1, hy2, and hy3. An increase in epidermal cell area was observed in wild-type cotyledons but not in hy3, indicating that light-stimulated growth is due in part to cell expansion. The mutant phenotype was rescued by feeding the chromophore precursor biliverdin to the chromophore biosynthesis mutants hy1 and hy6. This treatment did not rescue the hy3 mutant. Since the hy3 lesion is specific to phytochrome B, we conclude that this pigment is involved in the enhancement of cotyledon cell expansion in bright-red light. PMID:12232145

  12. Ca2+ transport in plant cells and mechanisms of transformation of phytochrome-induced photosignals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotovski, Igor D.

    1995-01-01

    The recent data on the influence of phytochrome on the efficiency of Ca2+ translocation across the membranes of oat protoplasts are given. Ca2+ uptake in the protoplasts was shown to be influenced by the red light (R) illumination. This effect was reverted by the following far-red light (FR) illumination. To elucidate the sensitivity to phytochrome-controlling action the screening between the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across the plasma membranes of oat protoplasts, Na+/Ca2+ and Ca2+/H+ exchangers, Ca2+-pump and Ca2+-channel was done. It was established that phytochrome modulated the activity of Na+/Ca2+-exchanger and Ca2+-pump. The light-mediated oscillations of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration in the oat protoplasts were demonstrated using fluorescence probe quin2 loaded into the cells and laser monitoring of fluorescence signal. The evidences were obtained that the oscillations were not the result of the elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration and had no connection with Ca2+ pool of mitochondria. The possibility of the relation between the Ca2+ oscillations and phosphoinositide metabolism in plant cell membranes is analyzed. The mechanisms of transformation of primary phytochrome signal into biological effects were discussed.

  13. Phytochrome, Gibberellins, and Hypocotyl Growth (A Study Using the Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) long hypocotyl Mutant).

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Juez, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Sakurai, A.; Kamiya, Y.; Kendrick, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    The possible involvement of gibberellins (GAs) in the regulation of hypocotyl elongation by phytochrome was examined. Under white light the tall long hypocotyl (lh) cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) mutant, deficient in a type B-like phytochrome, shows an increased "responsiveness" (defined as response capability) to applied GA4 (the main endogenous active GA) compared to the wild type. Supplementing far-red irradiation results in a similar increase in responsiveness in the wild type. Experiments involving application of the precursor GA9 and of an inhibitor of GA4 inactivation suggest that both the GA4 activation and inactivation steps are phytochrome independent. Endogenous GA levels of whole seedlings were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using deuterated internal standards. The levels of GA4 (and those of GA34, the inactivated GA4) were lower in the lh mutant under low-irradiance fluorescent light compared with the wild type, similar to wild type under higher irradiance light during the initial hypocotyl extension phase, and higher during the phase of sustained growth, in which extension involved an increase in the number of cells in the upper region. In all cases, growth of the lh mutant was more rapid than that of the wild type. It is proposed that GA4 and phytochrome control cell elongation primarily through separate mechanisms that interact at a step close to the terminal response. PMID:12228348

  14. The discovery of phytochrome: unlocking the secrets of plants and their connection to light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland USA was recently designated an American Chemical Society National Historic Chemical Landmark for the seminal work of USDA scientists in the discovery of phytochrome, the ubiquitous plant pigment ...

  15. Agrobacterium phytochrome as an enzyme for the production of ZZE bilins.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, Tilman; Michael, Norbert

    2005-06-14

    Photoconversion of phytochrome from the red-absorbing form Pr to the far-red-absorbing form Pfr is initiated by a Z to E isomerization around the ring C-ring D connecting double bond; the chromophore undergoes a ZZZ to ZZE isomerization. In vivo, phytochrome chromophores are covalently bound to the protein, but several examples of noncovalent in vitro adducts have been reported which also undergo Pr to Pfr photoconversion. We show that free biliverdin or phycocyanobilin, highly enriched in the ZZE isomer, can easily be obtained from chromophores bound in a noncovalent manner to Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1, and used for spectral assays. Photoconversion of free biliverdin in a methanol/HCl solution from ZZE to ZZZ proceeded with a quantum yield of 1.8%, but was negligible in neutral methanol solution, indicating that this process is proton-dependent. The ZZE form of biliverdin and phycocyanobilin were tested for their ability to assemble with Agp1 and cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1, respectively. In both cases, a Pfr-like adduct was formed but the chromophore was bound in a noncovalent manner to the protein. Agp1 Pfr undergoes dark reversion to Pr; the same feature was found for the noncovalent ZZE adduct. After dark reversion, the chromophore became covalently bound to the protein. In analogy, the PCB chromophore became covalently bound to Cph1 upon irradiation with strong far-red light which initiated ZZE to ZZZ isomerization. Agrobacterium Agp2 belongs to a yet small group of phytochromes which also assemble in the Pr form but convert from Pr to Pfr in darkness. When the Agp2 apoprotein was assembled with the ZZE form of biliverdin, the formation of the final adduct was accelerated compared to the formation of the ZZZ control, indicating that the ZZE chromophore fits directly into the chromophore pocket of Agp2. PMID:15938635

  16. Spatiotemporal Phytochrome Signaling during Photomorphogenesis: From Physiology to Molecular Mechanisms and Back

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2016-01-01

    Light exposure results in distinct responses in specific seedling tissues during photomorphogenesis. Light promotes growth of cotyledons and leaves, as well as development and elongation of roots, whereas light inhibits elongation of hypocotyls. For distinct plant responses such as shade avoidance, far-red light or shifts in spectral light quality similarly have disparate impacts on distinct plant tissues, resulting in elongation of stems or petioles and a reduction in growth of leaf blades for many species. The physiological bases of such tissue- and organ-specific light responses were initially studied using localized irradiation of specific tissues and organs, or irradiation of dissected plant parts. These historical approaches were used to identify spatial-specific pools of photoreceptors responsible for regulating local, i.e., tissue- or organ-specific, or distal, i.e., interorgan, plant responses. The red/far-red responsive phytochromes have been the most widely studied among photoreceptors in this regard. Whereas, the spatial localization of photoreceptors regulating many tissue- or organ-specific light responses were identified, the underlying signaling networks responsible for mediating the observed responses have not been well defined. Recent approaches used to investigate the molecular bases of spatiotemporal light responses include selective irradiation of plants harboring mutations in specific photoreceptors, tissue-specific expression of photoreceptors, primarily in photoreceptor mutant backgrounds, or tissue-specific biochemical ablation of photoreceptor accumulation. Progressive integration of such approaches for regulating the availability of localized pools of phytochromes with the use of transcriptomic or proteomic analyses for assessing the genes or proteins which these spatially discrete pools of phytochrome regulate is yielding emergent insight into the molecular bases of spatiotemporal phytochrome signaling pathways responsible for regulating

  17. Spatiotemporal Phytochrome Signaling during Photomorphogenesis: From Physiology to Molecular Mechanisms and Back.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-01-01

    Light exposure results in distinct responses in specific seedling tissues during photomorphogenesis. Light promotes growth of cotyledons and leaves, as well as development and elongation of roots, whereas light inhibits elongation of hypocotyls. For distinct plant responses such as shade avoidance, far-red light or shifts in spectral light quality similarly have disparate impacts on distinct plant tissues, resulting in elongation of stems or petioles and a reduction in growth of leaf blades for many species. The physiological bases of such tissue- and organ-specific light responses were initially studied using localized irradiation of specific tissues and organs, or irradiation of dissected plant parts. These historical approaches were used to identify spatial-specific pools of photoreceptors responsible for regulating local, i.e., tissue- or organ-specific, or distal, i.e., interorgan, plant responses. The red/far-red responsive phytochromes have been the most widely studied among photoreceptors in this regard. Whereas, the spatial localization of photoreceptors regulating many tissue- or organ-specific light responses were identified, the underlying signaling networks responsible for mediating the observed responses have not been well defined. Recent approaches used to investigate the molecular bases of spatiotemporal light responses include selective irradiation of plants harboring mutations in specific photoreceptors, tissue-specific expression of photoreceptors, primarily in photoreceptor mutant backgrounds, or tissue-specific biochemical ablation of photoreceptor accumulation. Progressive integration of such approaches for regulating the availability of localized pools of phytochromes with the use of transcriptomic or proteomic analyses for assessing the genes or proteins which these spatially discrete pools of phytochrome regulate is yielding emergent insight into the molecular bases of spatiotemporal phytochrome signaling pathways responsible for regulating

  18. Gibberellin deficiency and response mutations suppress the stem elongation phenotype of phytochrome-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, J; Harberd, N P

    1997-01-01

    Plant growth and development are regulated by numerous internal and external factors. Among these, gibberellin (GA) (an endogenous plant growth regulator) and phytochrome (a photoreceptor) often influence the same processes. For example, in plants grown in the light Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyl elongation is reduced by GA deficiency and increased by phytochrome deficiency. Here we describe experiments in which the phenotypes of Arabidopsis plants doubly homozygous for GA-related and phytochrome-related mutations were examined. The double mutants were studied at various stages in the plant life cycle, including the seed germination, young seedling, adult, and reproductive phases of development. The results of these experiments are complex, but indicate that a fully functional GA system is necessary for full expression of the elongated phenotypes conferred by phytochrome deficiency. PMID:9112768

  19. Assembly of synthetic locked phycocyanobilin derivatives with phytochrome in vitro and in vivo in Ceratodon purpureus and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kamiya, Ayumi; Ukaji, Yutaka; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman

    2012-05-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors with a bilin chromophore in which light triggers the conversion between the red light-absorbing form, Pr, and the far-red-light-absorbing form, Pfr. Here we performed in vitro and in vivo studies using locked phycocyanobilin derivatives, termed 15 Z anti phycocyanobilin (15ZaPCB) and 15 E anti PCB (15EaPCB). Recombinant bacterial and plant phytochromes incorporated either chromophore in a noncovalent or covalent manner. All adducts were photoinactive. The absorption spectra of the 15ZaPCB and 15EaPCB adducts were comparable with those of the Pr and Pfr form, respectively. Feeding of 15EaPCB, but not 15ZaPCB, to protonemal filaments of the moss Ceratodon purpureus resulted in increased chlorophyll accumulation, modulation of gravitropism, and induction of side branches in darkness. The effect of locked chromophores on phytochrome responses, such as induction of seed germination, inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, induction of cotyledon opening, randomization of gravitropism, and gene regulation, were investigated in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the phytochrome-chromophore-deficient long hypocotyl mutant hy1. All phytochrome responses were induced in darkness by 15EaPCB, not only in the mutant but also in the wild type. These studies show that the 15Ea stereochemistry of the chromophore results in the formation of active Pfr-like phytochrome in the cell. Locked chromophores might be used to investigate phytochrome responses in many other organisms without the need to isolate mutants. The induction of phytochrome responses in the hy1 mutant by 15EaPCB were however less efficient than by red light irradiation given to biliverdin-rescued seeds or seedlings. PMID:22582099

  20. Genetic Regulation of Development in Sorghum bicolor: VI. The ma(3) Allele Results in Abnormal Phytochrome Physiology.

    PubMed

    Childs, K L; Pratt, L H; Morgan, P W

    1991-10-01

    Physiological processes controlled by phytochrome were examined in three near-isogenic genotypes of Sorghum bicolor, differing at the allele of the third maturity gene locus. Seedlings of 58M (ma(3) (R)ma(3) (R)) did not show phytochrome control of anthocyanin synthesis. In contrast, seedlings of 90M (ma(3)ma(3)) and 100M (Ma(3)Ma(3)) demonstrated reduced anthocyanin synthesis after treatment with far red and reversal of the far red effect by red. De-etiolation of 48-hour-old 90M and 100M dark-grown seedlings occurred with 48 hours of continuous red. Dark-grown 58M seedlings did not de-etiolate with continuous red treatment. Treatment of seedlings with gibberellic acid or tetcyclacis, a gibberellin synthesis inhibitor, did not alter anthocyanin synthesis. Levels of chlorophyll and anthocyanin were lower in light-grown 58M seedlings than in 90M and 100M. Etiolated seedlings of all three genotypes have similar amounts of photoreversible phytochrome. Crude protein extracts from etiolated seedlings were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Phytochrome was visualized with Pea-25, a monoclonal antibody directed to phytochrome from etiolated peas. The samples from all three genotypes contained approximately equivalent amounts of a prominent, immunostaining band at 126 kD. However, the sample from 58M did not show a fainter, secondary band at 123 kD that was present in 90M and 100M. The identity and importance of this secondary band at 123 kD is unknown. We propose that 58M is a phytochrome-related mutant that contains normal amounts of photoreversible phytochrome and normal phytochrome protein when grown in the dark. PMID:16668457

  1. Regulation of actin-dependent cytoplasmic motility by type II phytochrome occurs within seconds in Vallisneria gigantea epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shingo; Kong, Sam-Geun; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu; Furuya, Masaki

    2003-02-01

    The effects of light on actin-dependent cytoplasmic motility in epidermal cells of green leaves of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea were investigated quantitatively using a custom-made dynamic image analyzer. Cytoplasmic motility was measured by monitoring changes in the brightness of individual pixels on digitized images taken sequentially under infrared light. Acceleration and deceleration of cytoplasmic motility were regulated photoreversibly by type II phytochrome(s). This phytochrome-dependent induction of cytoplasmic motility did not occur uniformly in cytoplasm but took place as scattered patches in which no particular organelles, including nucleus, existed. The induction became detectable at 2.5 s after the start of irradiation with pulsed red light. In cells exposed to microbeam irradiation, cytoplasmic motility was induced only in sites in the cytoplasm that were irradiated directly, whereas nonirradiated neighboring areas were unaffected. The effect was short-lived, disappearing within a few minutes, and no signal was transmitted from an irradiated cell to its neighbors. Anti-phytochrome antibody-responsive protein(s) was detectable in the leaf extract by immunoblot and zinc blot analyses and in cryosections of the epidermis by immunocytochemistry. Although the phytochrome-dependent cytoplasmic motility was blocked by exogenously applied latrunculin B or cytochalasins, treatment of the dark-adapted cells with Ca(2+)-chelating reagents induced the cytoplasmic motility. We have proposed a model for the phytochrome regulation of cytoplasmic motility as one of the earliest responses to a light stimulus. PMID:12566576

  2. Regulation of Actin-Dependent Cytoplasmic Motility by Type II Phytochrome Occurs within Seconds in Vallisneria gigantea Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Shingo; Kong, Sam-Geun; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu; Furuya, Masaki

    2003-01-01

    The effects of light on actin-dependent cytoplasmic motility in epidermal cells of green leaves of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea were investigated quantitatively using a custom-made dynamic image analyzer. Cytoplasmic motility was measured by monitoring changes in the brightness of individual pixels on digitized images taken sequentially under infrared light. Acceleration and deceleration of cytoplasmic motility were regulated photoreversibly by type II phytochrome(s). This phytochrome-dependent induction of cytoplasmic motility did not occur uniformly in cytoplasm but took place as scattered patches in which no particular organelles, including nucleus, existed. The induction became detectable at 2.5 s after the start of irradiation with pulsed red light. In cells exposed to microbeam irradiation, cytoplasmic motility was induced only in sites in the cytoplasm that were irradiated directly, whereas nonirradiated neighboring areas were unaffected. The effect was short-lived, disappearing within a few minutes, and no signal was transmitted from an irradiated cell to its neighbors. Anti-phytochrome antibody–responsive protein(s) was detectable in the leaf extract by immunoblot and zinc blot analyses and in cryosections of the epidermis by immunocytochemistry. Although the phytochrome-dependent cytoplasmic motility was blocked by exogenously applied latrunculin B or cytochalasins, treatment of the dark-adapted cells with Ca2+-chelating reagents induced the cytoplasmic motility. We have proposed a model for the phytochrome regulation of cytoplasmic motility as one of the earliest responses to a light stimulus. PMID:12566576

  3. The role of the chromophore in the biological photoreceptor phytochrome: an approach using chemically synthesized tetrapyrroles.

    PubMed

    Bongards, Christian; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-04-20

    In plants and bacteria, phytochromes serve as light-inducible, red-/far-red light sensitive photoreceptors that control a wide range of photomorphogenetic processes. Phytochromes comprise a protein moiety and a covalently bound bilin chromophore. Bilins are open-chain tetrapyrrole compounds that derive biosynthetically from ubiquitous porphyrins. The investigations of phytochromes reveal that precise interactions between the protein moiety and its bilin chromophore are essential for the proper functioning of this photoreceptor; accordingly, synthetic manipulation of the parts is an important method for studying the whole. Although variations in the protein structure are readily accomplished by routine mutagenesis protocols, the generation of structurally modified bilins is a laborious, multistep process. Recent improvement in the synthesis of open-chain tetrapyrroles now permits the generation of novel, structurally modified (and even selectively isotope-labeled) chromophores. Furthermore, by using the capability of recombinant apo-phytochrome to bind the chromophore autocatalytically, researchers can now generate novel chromoproteins with modified functions. In the protein-bound state, the phytochrome chromophore is photoisomerized at one double bond, in the bridge between the last two of the four pyrrole rings (the C and D rings), generating the thermally stable, physiologically active P(fr) form. This conversion--photoisomerization from the form absorbing red light (P(r)) to the form absorbing far-red light (P(fr))--covers 12 orders of magnitude, from subpicoseconds to seconds. Such spectroscopic and kinetic studies yield a wealth of time-resolved spectral data, even more so, if proteins with changed sequence or chromophore structure are utilized. In particular, bilins with a changed substitution pattern at the photoisomerizing ring D have shed light on the chromophore-protein interactions during the photoisomerization. The mechanisms generating and stabilizing

  4. A study of GafChromic XR Type R film response with reflective-type densitometers and economical flatbed scanners.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G; Chu, R Y L; Rabe, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The GafChromic XR Type R film is a relatively new product for recording high radiation dose in interventional radiological procedures. Means of measuring the film response were studied in this investigation. Two handheld reflective-type densitometers of different models were compared in the range of 0-8 Gy. They were found to be in excellent agreement. Five reflective flatbed scanners of different models were compared by a simple preliminary test. Their widely differed performances suggest the need of testing a scanner before using it for dosimetry measurement. A selected scanner was further tested for its ability to measure radiation in the range of 0-8 Gy and for the development of a scanning protocol. This experiment suggested the inclusion of a calibration pattern with known exposures and a black reference step in the scanning of a film in RGB mode. Then the red component of this image should be used for dosimetry computation. This method was compared to the use of a red acetate filter. The latter was demonstrated to be a possible alternative for measurement below 5 Gy and when there is no software ability to split an image into color components.

  5. SU-E-T-32: An Application of GafChromic RTQA2 Film to the Patient Specified Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, J; Hu, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GafChromic RTQA2 film is known as a quality assurance (QA) tool for light field and radiation field verification. This study is attempted to apply the RTQA2 film to the patient specified quality assurance. Methods: Pre-irradiated and post-irradiated RTQA2 films were scanned in a reflection mode using a flatbed scanner. A plan-based dose calibration method utilized the mapping information of calculated dose image and measured film image to create a dose vs. pixel value calibration model. This model was used to calibrate the measured film image from the pixel value (gray value) image to the dose image. The dose agreement between calculated and measured dose images were analyzed using the gamma analysis. To evaluate the feasibility of this method, three clinical approved RapidArc cases (one abdomen cancer and two head-and-neck cancer patients) were tested. The tolerance of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) and gamma index ≤ 1 were set for the analysis. Results: The calibrated film dose image from measurement was successfully compared to the predicted dose image from the commercial treatment planning. The gamma analysis results showed good consistency. Gamma passing rates were 99.02%, 94.84%, and 98.33% for the three patients, respectively. Conclusion: The plan based calibration method has the feasibility for dose verification without shortages of film batch and development time variation.

  6. Phytochrome from Green Plants: Properties and biological Function

    SciTech Connect

    Quail, Peter H.

    2014-07-25

    Plants constantly monitor the light environment for informational light signals used to direct adaptational responses to the prevailing conditions. One major such response, the Shade-Avaoidance Response (SAR), triggered when plants sense the presence of competing neighbors, results in enhanced channeling of photosynthetically-fixed carbon into stem elongation at the expense of deposition in reproductive tissues. This response has been selected against in many modern food crops to ensure maximum edible yield (e.g. seeds). Converse enhancement of the SAR, with consequent increased carbon channeling into vegetative cellulose, could contribute to the generation of crops with improved yield of tissues suitable for cellulosic biofuel production. The signal for this response is light enriched in far-red wavelengths. This signal is produced by sunlight filtered through, or reflected from, neighboring vegetation, as a result of preferential depletion of red photons through chlorophyll absorption. The plant phytochrome (phy) photoreceptor system (predominantly phyB) senses this signal through its capacity to switch reversibly, in milliseconds, between two molecular states: the biologically inactive Pr (red-light-absorbing) and biologically active Pfr (far-red-light-absorbing) conformers. The photoequilibrium established between these two conformers in light-grown plants is determined by the ratio of red-to-far-red wavelengths in the incoming signal. The levels of Pfr then dictate the recipient plant’s growth response: high levels suppress elongation growth; low levels promote elongation growth. Studies on seedling deetiolation have advanced our understanding considerably in recent years, of the mechanism by which the photoactivated phy molecule transduces its signal into cellular growth responses. The data show that a subfamily of phy-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIFs) promote skotomorphogenic seedling development in post-germinative darkness, but that the phy

  7. Mapping light-driven conformational changes within the photosensory module of plant phytochrome B

    PubMed Central

    von Horsten, Silke; Straß, Simon; Hellwig, Nils; Gruth, Verena; Klasen, Ramona; Mielcarek, Andreas; Linne, Uwe; Morgner, Nina; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Organisms developed different photoreceptors to be able to adapt to changing environmental light conditions. Phytochromes are red/far-red (r/fr) photochromic photoreceptors that belong to the classical photoreceptors along with cryptochromes and phototropins. They convert absorbed light into a biological signal by switching between two states in a light-dependent manner therefore enabling the light control downstream signalling. Their Pfr conformation is the biological active form in plants, but until now only a structure of the ground state (Pr) was solved. Here, the authors provide information about structural changes occurring during photoconversion within phytochrome B and identify possible interaction sites for its N-terminal extension (NTE) utilising hydrogen/deuterium exchange rate analyses of its amide backbone. Especially, the newly identified light-dependency of two regions in the NTE are of particular interest for understanding the involvement of the phytochrome’s NTE in the regulation of its downstream signalling. PMID:27694986

  8. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  9. Inhibition of Prechill-induced Dark Germination in Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers. Seeds by Phytochrome Transformations.

    PubMed

    Taylorson, R B

    1975-06-01

    A 10 C dark prechilling of johnsongrass [Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.] seeds, when terminated by a 2-hr, 40 C temperature shift, potentiates about 40% germination at 20 C in darkness. Irradiation of the seeds before, during, and at the end of prechilling with far red light reduces the subsequent germination, although red irradiation after the far red can overcome some of the inhibition. However, either brief red or far red irradiation given immediately after the temperature shift inhibits subsequent germination by one-third to one-half. The results suggest that the far red-absorbing form of phytochrome is a factor in the prechill-induced dark germination and that phytochrome participates in the inhibition of germination by irradiations immediately after the temperature shift.

  10. Heterologous expression of Arabidopsis phytochrome B in transgenic potato influences photosynthetic performance and tuber development

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, A.; Herold, M.; Lenk, I.; Gatz, C. . Albrecht von Haller Inst. fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften); Quail, P.H. )

    1999-05-01

    Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants expressing Arabidopsis phytochrome B were characterized morphologically and physiologically under white light in a greenhouse to explore their potential for improved photosynthesis and higher tuber yields. As expected, overexpression of functional phytochrome B caused pleiotropic effects such as semidwarfism, decreased apical dominance, a higher number of smaller but thicker leaves, and increased pigmentation. Because of increased numbers of chloroplasts in elongated palisade cells, photosynthesis per leaf area and in each individual plant increased. In addition, photosynthesis was less sensitive to photoinactivation under prolonged light stress. The beginning of senescence was not delayed, but deceleration of chlorophyll degradation extended the lifetime of photosynthetically active plants. Both the higher photosynthetic performance and the longer lifespan of the transgenic plants allowed greater biomass production, resulting in extended underground organs with increased tuber yields.

  11. Phytochrome B and REVEILLE1/2-mediated signalling controls seed dormancy and germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhimin; Xu, Gang; Jing, Yanjun; Tang, Weijiang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Seeds maintain a dormant state to withstand adverse conditions and germinate when conditions become favourable to give rise to a new generation of flowering plants. Seed dormancy and germination are tightly controlled by internal and external signals. Although phytochrome photoreceptors are proposed to regulate primary seed dormancy, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that the REVEILLE1 (RVE1) and RVE2 transcription factors promote primary seed dormancy and repress red/far-red-light-reversible germination downstream of phytochrome B (phyB) in Arabidopsis thaliana. RVE1 and RVE2 expression is downregulated after imbibition and by phyB. RVE1 directly binds to the promoter of GIBBERELLIN 3-OXIDASE 2, inhibits its transcription and thus suppresses the biosynthesis of bioactive gibberellins. In addition, DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 also acts downstream of phyB. This study identifies a signalling pathway that integrates environmental light input with internal factors to control both seed dormancy and germination.

  12. Localization of phytochrome in etioplasts and its regulation in vitro of gibberellin levels.

    PubMed

    Evans, A; Smith, H

    1976-01-01

    Etioplasts isolated from barley leaves and purified on a Sephadex G-50 (coarse) column were characterized by electron microscopy and nucleic acid analysis. The majority of etioplasts retained an intact outer envelope, and contamination by other fragments was extremely low. The level of gibberellin-like substances extractable from intact etioplast suspensions was enhanced within 5 min of the termination of a saturating red irradiation, and the response was far-red reversible. Ultra-sonication caused a 3-fold increase in extractable activity both in dark control suspension and suspensions treated with red light. It is concluded that phytochrome, as a function of its interconversions, probably causes the transport of gibberellin from inside the etioplast into the surrounding medium. This leads to increased production of active gibberellins, possibly by release of feedback control of late steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Dual wavelength difference spectrophotometry has demonstrated the presence of a proportion of total cellular phytochrome within the etioplast.

  13. Reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography using a genetically encoded near-infrared phytochrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of genetically encoded probes has revolutionized biomedical studies by providing valuable information about targeted biological processes. Here, we report a novel imaging technique, termed reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography (RS-PAT), which exhibits large penetration depth, high detection sensitivity, and super-resolution. RS-PAT combines advanced photoacoustic imaging techniques with, for the first time, a nonfluorescent photoswitchable bacterial phytochrome. This bacterial phytochrome is the most near-infrared shifted genetically encoded probe reported so far. Moreover, this bacterial phytochrome is reversibly photoconvertible between its far-red and near-infrared light absorption states. Taking maximum advantage of the powerful imaging capability of PAT and the unique photochemical properties of the phytochrome, RS-PAT has broken through both the optical diffusion limit for deep-tissue imaging and the optical diffraction limit for super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, with RS-PAT we have achieved an unprecedented detection sensitivity of ~2 μM, or as few as ~20 tumor cells, at a centimeter depth. Such high sensitivity is fully demonstrated in our study by monitoring tumor growth and metastasis at whole-body level with ~100 μm resolution. Moreover, our microscopic implementation of RS-PAT is capable of imaging mammalian cells with a sub-diffraction lateral resolution of ~140 nm and axial resolution of ~400 nm, which are respectively ~2-fold and ~75-fold finer than those of our conventional photoacoustic microscopy. Overall, RS-PAT is a new and promising imaging technology for studying biological processes at different length scales.

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of phytochrome from the cyanobacterium synechocystis, reconstituted with phycocyanobilin and phycoerythrobilin.

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Karsten; Herbst, Johannes; Stehlik, Dietmar; Esteban, Berta; Lamparter, Tilman; Hughes, Jon; Diller, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was employed to characterize for the first time the primary photoisomerization dynamics of a bacterial phytochrome system in the two thermally stable states of the photocycle. The 85-kDa phytochrome Cph1 from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 expressed in Escherichia coli was reconstituted with phycocyanobilin (Cph1-PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (Cph1-PEB). The red-light-absorbing form Pr of Cph1-PCB shows an approximately 150 fs relaxation in the S(1) state after photoexcitation at 650 nm. The subsequent Z-E isomerization between rings C and D of the linear tetrapyrrole-chromophore is best described by a distribution of rate constants with the first moment at (16 ps)(-1). Excitation at 615 nm leads to a slightly broadened distribution. The reverse E-Z isomerization, starting from the far-red-absorbing form Pfr, is characterized by two shorter time constants of 0.54 and 3.2 ps. In the case of Cph1-PEB, double-bond isomerization does not take place, and the excited-state lifetime extends into the nanosecond regime. Besides a stimulated emission rise time between 40 and 150 fs, no fast relaxation processes are observed. This suggests that the chromophore-protein interaction along rings A, B, and C does not contribute much to the picosecond dynamics observed in Cph1-PCB but rather the region around ring D near the isomerizing C(15) [double bond] C(16) double bond. The primary reaction dynamics of Cph1-PCB at ambient temperature is found to exhibit very similar features as those described for plant type A phytochrome, i.e., a relatively slow Pr, and a fast Pfr, photoreaction. This suggests that the initial reactions were established already before evolution of plant phytochromes began. PMID:11806940

  15. Fungi use the SakA (HogA) pathway for phytochrome-dependent light signalling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenzhong; Armant, Olivier; Fischer, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Stress-sensing in fungi depends on a signalling cascade comprised of a two-component phosphorylation relay plus a subsequent MAP kinase cascade to trigger gene expression. Besides osmotic or oxidative stress, fungi sense many other environmental factors, one of which is light(1,2). Light controls morphogenetic pathways but also the production of secondary metabolites such as penicillin. Here we show that phytochrome-dependent light signalling in Aspergillus nidulans involves the stress-sensing and osmosensing signalling pathway. In a screening for 'blind' mutants, the MAP kinase SakA (also known as HogA) was identified by whole-genome sequencing. The phytochrome FphA physically interacted with the histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein YpdA and caused light-dependent phosphorylation of the MAP kinase SakA and its shuttling into nuclei. In the absence of phytochrome, SakA still responded to osmotic stress but not to light. The SakA pathway thus integrates several stress factors and can be considered to be a hub for environmental signals. PMID:27572639

  16. Contributions of photosynthesis and phytochrome to the formation of anthocyanin in turnip seedlings.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M J; Stimson, W R

    1971-09-01

    Turnip seedlings (Brassica rapa L.) irradiated for 24 hours with radiation at 720 nanometers synthesize chlorophyll a and anthocyanin. Antimycin A and 2,4-dinitrophenol, which are known to reduce cyclic photophosphorylation, also reduce anthocyanin synthesis. Noncyclic photophosphorylation is inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and o-phenanthroline. These compounds promote cyclic photophosphorylation and anthocyanin synthesis. On the basis of these findings it is suggested that the photomorphogenic response of anthocyanin synthesis in turnip seedlings arises in part through photosynthetic activity.Phytochrome involvement in turnip seedling photomorphogenesis is evidenced by the photoreversibility of anthocyanin synthesis in response to 5-minute irradiations with red or far red light. The inhibition of anthocyanin synthesis by 2,4-dinitrophenol does not arise from a destruction of phytochrome photoreversibility.It is suggested that plant photomorphogenic responses to prolonged far red irradiations arise through the photochemical activation of at least two pigment systems; namely, the photosynthetic pigments and phytochrome.

  17. Photoreversible Calcium Fluxes Induced by Phytochrome in Oat Coleoptile Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Calvin C.; Roux, Stanley J.

    1980-01-01

    The chromometallic dye murexide was used to measure photoreversible Ca fluxes in apical tips of etiolated oat coleoptiles and in suspension cultures of protoplasts derived from the coleoptile segments. Phytochrome presence in the protoplasts was indicated by a repeatably photoreversible ΔA(725 - 800 nm) of >0.001 A centimeters−1, recorded on a dual wavelength spectrophotometer. Concentrations of Ca in the solution bathing the cells were observed to change photoreversibly, red irradiation inducing an increase in the medium Ca concentration and subsequent farred irradiation inducing a decrease down to near dark control levels. These changes could be measured in media with or without exogenously added Ca. Protoplasts from green primary leaves of oat, which had no spectro-photometrically detectable phytochrome, showed no photoreversible Ca fluxes when measured by the same method. These data imply that red light induces an efflux of Ca from phytochrome-containing cells and that far red light can reverse this change by promoting a Ca reentry into these cells. PMID:16661257

  18. Diatom Phytochromes Reveal the Existence of Far-Red-Light-Based Sensing in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Jaubert, Marianne; Enomoto, Gen; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Raniello, Raffaella; Thaler, Michael; Malviya, Shruti; Bernardes, Juliana Silva; Rappaport, Fabrice; Gentili, Bernard; Huysman, Marie J J; Carbone, Alessandra; Bowler, Chris; d'Alcalà, Maurizio Ribera; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-03-01

    The absorption of visible light in aquatic environments has led to the common assumption that aquatic organisms sense and adapt to penetrative blue/green light wavelengths but show little or no response to the more attenuated red/far-red wavelengths. Here, we show that two marine diatom species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, possess a bona fide red/far-red light sensing phytochrome (DPH) that uses biliverdin as a chromophore and displays accentuated red-shifted absorbance peaks compared with other characterized plant and algal phytochromes. Exposure to both red and far-red light causes changes in gene expression in P. tricornutum, and the responses to far-red light disappear in DPH knockout cells, demonstrating that P. tricornutum DPH mediates far-red light signaling. The identification of DPH genes in diverse diatom species widely distributed along the water column further emphasizes the ecological significance of far-red light sensing, raising questions about the sources of far-red light. Our analyses indicate that, although far-red wavelengths from sunlight are only detectable at the ocean surface, chlorophyll fluorescence and Raman scattering can generate red/far-red photons in deeper layers. This study opens up novel perspectives on phytochrome-mediated far-red light signaling in the ocean and on the light sensing and adaptive capabilities of marine phototrophs. PMID:26941092

  19. Antagonistic but complementary actions of phytochromes A and B allow optimum seedling De-etiolation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.; Xu, Yong; Quail, P.H. |

    1997-06-01

    Using dichromatic radiation, we show that the actions of phytochromes A and B (phyA and phyB) in Arabidopsis thaliana are antagonistic in mediating red and far-red radiation effects on seedling de-etiolation and yet act in a complementary manner to regulate de-etiolation, irrespective of spectral composition. At low phytochrome photoequilibria inhibition of hypocotyl extension was strong, because of the action of a far-red high-irradiance response mediated by phyA. At high phytochrome photoequilibria inhibition of hypocotyl extension was also strong, because of the action of phyB. At intermediate photoequilibria hypocotyl inhibition was less strong. In their natural environment, this dual action will strongly retard hypocotyl growth and promote cotyledon opening and expansion both in open daylight and under dense vegetation. Overlapping action by phyA and phyB will substantially promote de-etiolation in sparse vegetation. The antagonistic and complementary actions of phyA and phyB, therefore, allow the optimum regulation of seedling growth after emergence from the soil.

  20. Photosynthetic photon flux density and phytochrome B interact to regulate branching in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Su, Hongwen; Abernathy, Scott D; White, Richard H; Finlayson, Scott A

    2011-11-01

    Branching is regulated by environmental signals including phytochrome B (phyB)-mediated responses to the ratio of red to far red light. While the mechanisms associated with phytochrome regulation of branching are beginning to be elucidated, there is little information regarding other light signals, including photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and how it influences phytochrome-mediated responses. This study shows that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) branching is modified by both varying PPFD and phyB status and that significant interactions occur between these variables. While phyB deficiency decreased branching when the PPFD was low, the effect was suppressed by high PPFD and some branching aspects were actually promoted. Photosynthesis measurements showed that PPFD may influence branching in phyB-deficient plants at least partially through a specific signalling pathway rather than directly through energy effects on the shoot. The expression of various genes in unelongated buds of phyB-deficient and phyB-sufficient plants grown under high and low PPFD demonstrated potential roles for several hormones, including auxin, cytokinins and ABA, and also showed imperfect correlation between expression of the branching regulators BRC1 and BRC2 and bud fate. These results may implicate additional undiscovered bud autonomous mechanisms and/or components contributing to bud outgrowth regulation by environmental signals.

  1. Light quality-dependent nuclear import of the plant photoreceptors phytochrome A and B

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, S; Kozma-Bognar, L; Kim, L; Adam, E; Harter, K; Schafer, E; Nagy, F

    1999-01-01

    The phytochrome (phy) family of plant photoreceptors controls various aspects of photomorphogenesis. Overexpression of rice phyA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and tobacco phyB-GFP fusion proteins in tobacco results in functional photoreceptors. phyA-GFP and phyB-GFP are localized in the cytosol of dark-adapted plants. In our experiments, red light treatment led to nuclear translocation of phyA-GFP and phyB-GFP, albeit with different kinetics. Red light-induced nuclear import of phyB-GFP, but not that of phyA-GFP, was inhibited by far-red light. Far-red light alone only induced nuclear translocation of phyA-GFP. These observations indicate that nuclear import of phyA-GFP is controlled by a very low fluence response, whereas translocation of phyB-GFP is regulated by a low fluence response of phytochrome. Thus, light-regulated nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of phyA and phyB is a major step in phytochrome signaling. PMID:10449579

  2. Contributions of photosynthesis and phytochrome to the formation of anthocyanin in turnip seedlings.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M J; Stimson, W R

    1971-09-01

    Turnip seedlings (Brassica rapa L.) irradiated for 24 hours with radiation at 720 nanometers synthesize chlorophyll a and anthocyanin. Antimycin A and 2,4-dinitrophenol, which are known to reduce cyclic photophosphorylation, also reduce anthocyanin synthesis. Noncyclic photophosphorylation is inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and o-phenanthroline. These compounds promote cyclic photophosphorylation and anthocyanin synthesis. On the basis of these findings it is suggested that the photomorphogenic response of anthocyanin synthesis in turnip seedlings arises in part through photosynthetic activity.Phytochrome involvement in turnip seedling photomorphogenesis is evidenced by the photoreversibility of anthocyanin synthesis in response to 5-minute irradiations with red or far red light. The inhibition of anthocyanin synthesis by 2,4-dinitrophenol does not arise from a destruction of phytochrome photoreversibility.It is suggested that plant photomorphogenic responses to prolonged far red irradiations arise through the photochemical activation of at least two pigment systems; namely, the photosynthetic pigments and phytochrome. PMID:16657788

  3. Diatom Phytochromes Reveal the Existence of Far-Red-Light-Based Sensing in the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Jaubert, Marianne; Enomoto, Gen; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Raniello, Raffaella; Thaler, Michael; Malviya, Shruti; Bernardes, Juliana Silva; Rappaport, Fabrice; Gentili, Bernard; Huysman, Marie J J; Carbone, Alessandra; Bowler, Chris; d'Alcalà, Maurizio Ribera; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-03-01

    The absorption of visible light in aquatic environments has led to the common assumption that aquatic organisms sense and adapt to penetrative blue/green light wavelengths but show little or no response to the more attenuated red/far-red wavelengths. Here, we show that two marine diatom species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, possess a bona fide red/far-red light sensing phytochrome (DPH) that uses biliverdin as a chromophore and displays accentuated red-shifted absorbance peaks compared with other characterized plant and algal phytochromes. Exposure to both red and far-red light causes changes in gene expression in P. tricornutum, and the responses to far-red light disappear in DPH knockout cells, demonstrating that P. tricornutum DPH mediates far-red light signaling. The identification of DPH genes in diverse diatom species widely distributed along the water column further emphasizes the ecological significance of far-red light sensing, raising questions about the sources of far-red light. Our analyses indicate that, although far-red wavelengths from sunlight are only detectable at the ocean surface, chlorophyll fluorescence and Raman scattering can generate red/far-red photons in deeper layers. This study opens up novel perspectives on phytochrome-mediated far-red light signaling in the ocean and on the light sensing and adaptive capabilities of marine phototrophs.

  4. The sorghum photoperiod sensitivity gene, Ma3, encodes a phytochrome B.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, K L; Miller, F R; Cordonnier-Pratt, M M; Pratt, L H; Morgan, P W; Mullet, J E

    1997-01-01

    The Ma3 gene is one of six genes that regulate the photoperiodic sensitivity of flowering in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench). The ma3R mutation of this gene causes a phenotype that is similar to plants that are known to lack phytochrome B, and ma3 sorghum lacks a 123-KD phytochrome that predominates in light-grown plants and that is present in non-ma3 plants. A population segregating for Ma3 and ma3 was created and used to identify two randomly amplified polymorphic DNA markers linked to Ma3. These two markers were cloned and mapped in a recombinant inbred population as restriction fragment length polymorphisms. cDNA clones of PHYA and PHYC were cloned and sequenced from a cDNA library prepared from green sorghum leaves. Using a genome-walking technique, a 7941-bp partial sequence of PHYB, was determined from genomic DNA from ma3 sorghum. PHYA, PHYB, and PHYC all mapped to the same linkage group. The Ma3-linked markers mapped with PHYB more than 121 centimorgans from PHYA and PHYC. A frameshift mutation resulting in a premature stop codon was found in the PHYB sequence from ma3 sorghum. Therefore, we conclude that the Ma3 locus in sorghum is a PHYB gene that encodes a 123-kD phytochrome. PMID:9046599

  5. Phytochrome Intermediates and Action Spectra for Light Perception by Dry Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Michael R.; Frankland, Barry

    1984-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that far-red irradiation of dry Lactuca sativa L. seeds results in inhibition of subsequent germination. Although red has no effect on dry seeds, a red irradiation following a farred irradiation reverses the effect of far-red. This phenomenon is most noticeable in seeds with artificially raised levels of phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. Qualitatively similar results have been found for the seeds of Plantago major L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Bromus sterilis L. Action spectra studies on Plantago seeds show that the action peaks for promotion and inhibition of germination of hydrated seeds are at 660 and 730 nanometers, respectively. The action spectrum for inhibition of subsequent germination following irradiation of dry seeds is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that for hydrated seeds, with an action peak at 730 nanometers, indicating absorption by phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. However, the action spectrum for the reversal of this far-red effect on dry seeds has a broad peak at 680 nanometers and subsidiary peaks at 650 and 600 nanometers. It is proposed that this effect is due to light absorption by the phytochrome intermediate complex meta-Fa, and that the action spectrum reflects the in vivo absorption properties of this intermediate. PMID:16663467

  6. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  7. A cell-free system for light-dependent nuclear import of phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Kunkel, Tim; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Neuhaus, Gunther; Wolf, Iris; Speth, Volker; Adam, Eva; Nagy, Ferenc; Schäfer, Eberhard

    2009-02-01

    Translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus is an essential step in phytochrome (phy) signal transduction. In the case of phytochrome A (phyA), this step occurs with the help of FHY1 (far-red-elongated hypocotyl 1), a specific transport protein. To investigate the components involved in phyA transport, we used a cell-free system that facilitates the controlled addition of transport factors. For this purpose, we isolated nuclei from the unicellular green algae Acetabularia acetabulum. These nuclei are up to 100 mum in diameter and allow easy detection of imported proteins. Experiments with isolated nuclei of Acetabularia showed that FHY1 is sufficient for phyA transport. The reconstituted system demonstrates all the characteristics of phytochrome transport in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, FHY1 was also actively exported from the nucleus, consistent with its role as a shuttle protein in plants. Therefore, we believe that isolated Acetabularia nuclei may be used as a general tool to study nuclear transport of plant proteins.

  8. Phytochrome intermediates and action spectra for light perception by dry seeds.

    PubMed

    Bartley, M R; Frankland, B

    1984-03-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that far-red irradiation of dry Lactuca sativa L. seeds results in inhibition of subsequent germination. Although red has no effect on dry seeds, a red irradiation following a farred irradiation reverses the effect of far-red. This phenomenon is most noticeable in seeds with artificially raised levels of phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. Qualitatively similar results have been found for the seeds of Plantago major L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Bromus sterilis L. Action spectra studies on Plantago seeds show that the action peaks for promotion and inhibition of germination of hydrated seeds are at 660 and 730 nanometers, respectively. The action spectrum for inhibition of subsequent germination following irradiation of dry seeds is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that for hydrated seeds, with an action peak at 730 nanometers, indicating absorption by phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. However, the action spectrum for the reversal of this far-red effect on dry seeds has a broad peak at 680 nanometers and subsidiary peaks at 650 and 600 nanometers. It is proposed that this effect is due to light absorption by the phytochrome intermediate complex meta-Fa, and that the action spectrum reflects the in vivo absorption properties of this intermediate.

  9. Phytochrome-mediated development in land plants: red light sensing evolves to meet the challenges of changing light environments.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors that provide plants with circadian, seasonal, and positional information critical for the control of germination, seedling development, shade avoidance, reproduction, dormancy, and sleep movements. Phytochromes are unique among photoreceptors in their capacity to interconvert between a red-absorbing form (absorption maximum of approximately 660 nm) and a far-red absorbing form (absorption maximum of approximately 730 nm), which occur in a dynamic equilibrium within plant cells, corresponding to the proportions of red and far-red energy in ambient light. Because pigments in stems and leaves absorb wavelengths below about 700 nm, this provides plants with an elegant system for detecting their position relative to other plants, with which the plants compete for light. Certain aspects of phytochrome-mediated development outside of flowering plants are strikingly similar to those that have been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana and other angiosperms. However, early diverging land plants have fewer distinct phytochrome gene lineages, suggesting that both diversification and subfunctionalization have been important in the evolution of the phytochrome gene family. There is evidence that subfunctionalization proceeded by the partitioning among paralogues of photosensory specificity, physiological response modes, and light-regulated gene expression and protein stability. Parallel events of duplication and functional divergence may have coincided with the evolution of canopy shade and the increasing complexity of the light environment. Within angiosperms, patterns of functional divergence are clade-specific and the roles of phytochromes in A. thaliana change across environments, attesting to the evolutionary flexibility and contemporaneous plasticity of phytochrome signalling in the control of development.

  10. Phytochrome-mediated regulation of cell division and growth during regeneration and sporeling development in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Nishihama, Ryuichi; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Hosaka, Masashi; Matsuda, Yoriko; Kubota, Akane; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2015-05-01

    Light regulates various aspects of development throughout the life cycle of sessile land plants. Photoreceptors, such as the red (R) and far-red (FR) light receptors phytochromes, play pivotal roles in modulating developmental programs. Reflecting high developmental plasticity, plants can regenerate tissues, organs, and whole bodies from varieties of cells. Among land plants, bryophytes exhibit extraordinary competency of regeneration under hormone-free conditions. As an environmental factor, light plays critical roles in regeneration of bryophytes. However, how light regulates regeneration remains unknown. Here we show that using the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, which contains a single phytochrome gene, the phytochrome regulates re-entry into the cell cycle and cell shape in newly regenerating tissues. Our morphological and cytological observations revealed that S-phase entry of G1-arrested epidermal cells around the midrib on the ventral surface of thallus explants was greatly retarded in the dark or under phytochrome-inactive R/FR cycle irradiation conditions, where, nevertheless, small, laterally narrow regenerants were eventually formed. Thus, consistent with earlier descriptions published over a century ago, light is not essential for, but exerts profound effects on regeneration in M. polymorpha. Ventral cells in regenerants grown under R/FR cycle conditions were longer and narrower than those under R cycle. Expression of a constitutively active mutant of M. polymorpha phytochrome allowed regeneration of well grown, widely expanded thalli even in the dark when sugar was supplied, further demonstrating that the phytochrome signal promotes cell proliferation, which is rate-limited by sucrose availability. Similar effects of R and FR irradiation on cell division and elongation were observed in sporelings as well. Thus, besides activation of photosynthesis, major roles of R in regeneration of M. polymorpha are to facilitate proliferation of rounder cells

  11. Nicotiana plumbaginifolia hlg mutants have a mutation in a PHYB-type phytochrome gene: they have elongated hypocotyls in red light, but are not elongated as adult plants.

    PubMed

    Hudson, M; Robson, P R; Kraepiel, Y; Caboche, M; Smith, H

    1997-11-01

    Two new allelic mutants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia have been isolated which display a hypocotyl which is long (hlg) when seedlings are grown in continuous white light (W). This can be accounted for by the decreased response to red light (R) of the hypocotyl elongation rate in these mutants. Responses to other wavelengths are unaffected in the mutants. When grown in white light, mature hlg mutants are not elongated with respect to the wild-type; they also bolt and flower later. The shade-avoidance responses to red/far red ratio (R:FR) are intact in these mutants. Both mutants are deficient in phyB-like polypeptide that is immunodetectable in the wild-type; both have wild-type levels of a phyA-like polypeptide. These alleles are inherited in a partially dominant manner, and correspond to single-base missense mutations in a gene highly homologous to N. tabacum PHYB, which codes for a phytochrome B-type photoreceptor. One allele, hlg-1, has an introduced amino acid substitution; this may define a residue essential for phytochrome protein stability. The other allele, hlg-2, has a stop codon introduced C-terminal to the chromophore binding domain. As these phyB mutants are unaffected in shade-avoidance responses, but deficient in perception of R, it is concluded that the phyB absent in these mutants is responsible for R perception in the N. plumbaginifolia seedling, but is not a R:FR sensor in light-grown plants.

  12. Dose calculation of megavoltage IMRT using convolution kernels extracted from GafChromic EBT film-measured pencil beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Mehul S.

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a 3D conformal radiation therapy technique that utilizes either a multileaf intensity-modulating collimator (MIMiC used with the NOMOS Peacock system) or a multileaf collimator (MLC) on a conventional linear accelerator for beam intensity modulation to afford increased conformity in dose distributions. Due to the high-dose gradient regions that are effectively created, particular emphasis should be placed in the accurate determination of pencil beam kernels that are utilized by pencil beam convolution algorithms employed by a number of commercial IMRT treatment planning systems (TPS). These kernels are determined from relatively large field dose profiles that are typically collected using an ion chamber during commissioning of the TPS, while recent studies have demonstrated improvements in dose calculation accuracy when incorporating film data into the commissioning measurements. For this study, it has been proposed that the shape of high-resolution dose kernels can be extracted directly from single pencil beam (beamlet) profile measurements acquired using high-precision dosimetric film in order to accurately compute dose distributions, specifically for small fields and the penumbra regions of the larger fields. The effectiveness of GafChromic EBT film as an appropriate dosimeter to acquire the necessary measurements was evaluated and compared to the conventional silver-halide Kodak EDR2 film. Using the NOMOS Peacock system, similar dose kernels were extracted through deconvolution of the elementary pencil beam profiles using the two different types of films. Independent convolution-based calculations were performed using these kernels, resulting in better agreement with the measured relative dose profiles, as compared to those determined by CORVUS TPS' finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm. Preliminary evaluation of the proposed method in performing kernel extraction for an MLC-based IMRT system also showed

  13. Multiple phytochromes are involved in red-light-induced enhancement of first-positive phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Janoudi, A K; Gordon, W R; Wagner, D; Quail, P; Poff, K L

    1997-01-01

    The amplitude of phototropic curvature to blue light is enhanced by a prior exposure of seedlings to red light. This enhancement is mediated by phytochrome. Fluence-response relationships have been constructed for red-light-induced enhancement in the phytochrome A (phyA) null mutant, the phytochrome B- (phyB) deficient mutant, and in two transgenic lines of Rabidopsis thaliana that overexpress either phyA or phyB. These fluence-response relationships demonstrate the existence of two response in enhancement, a response in the very-low-to-low-fluence range, and a response in the high-fluence range. Only the response in the high-fluence range is present in the phyA null mutant. In contrast, the phyB-deficient mutant is indistinguishable from the wild-type parent in red-light responsiveness. These data indiacate that phyA is necessary for the very-low-to-low but not the high-influence response, and that phyB is not necessary for either response range. Based on these results, the high-fluence response, if controlled by a single phytochrome, must be controlled by aphytochorme other than phyA of phyB. Overexpression of phyA has a negative effect and overexpression of phyB has an enhancing effect in the high-fluence range. These results suggest that overexpression of either phytochrome perturbs the function of the endogenous photoreceptor system in an unpredictable fashion. PMID:9085579

  14. Crystal Structure of Deinococcus Phytochrome in the Photoactivated State Reveals a Cascade of Structural Rearrangements during Photoconversion.

    PubMed

    Burgie, E Sethe; Zhang, Junrui; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Phytochromes are photochromic photoreceptors responsible for a myriad of red/far-red light-dependent processes in plants and microorganisms. Interconversion is initially driven by photoreversible isomerization of bilin, but how this alteration directs the photostate-dependent changes within the protein to actuate signaling is poorly understood. Here, we describe the structure of the Deinococcus phytochrome photosensory module in its near complete far-red light-absorbing Pfr state. In addition to confirming the 180° rotation of the D-pyrrole ring, the dimeric structure clearly identifies downstream rearrangements that trigger large-scale conformational differences between the dark-adapted and photoactivated states. Mutational analyses verified the importance of residues surrounding the bilin in Pfr stabilization, and protease sensitivity assays corroborated photostate alterations that propagate along the dimeric interface. Collectively, these data support a cooperative "toggle" model for phytochrome photoconversion and advance our understanding of the allosteric connection between the photosensory and output modules.

  15. Deletion analysis of a phytochrome-regulated monocot rbcS promoter in a transient assay system.

    PubMed Central

    Rolfe, S A; Tobin, E M

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a transient gene expression assay system in the aquatic monocot Lemna gibba in which DNA was introduced into intact tissue by particle bombardment. Constructs based on the Lemna rbcS gene SSU5B, which is positively regulated by phytochrome in vivo, also showed phytochrome regulation in the transient assay system. Reporter gene expression increased 12-fold over dark levels in response to a single treatment with red light. This increase was not observed if far-red light was immediately followed by the red light. A 5' deletion analysis of the promoter defined a region from position -205 to position -83 relative to the start of transcription as necessary to observe the phytochrome response. This region contains the binding site for the light-induced binding activity (LRF-1) found in Lemna nuclear extracts. Upstream of position -205, we found evidence for the presence of at least two upstream activating sequences and a silencer. Images PMID:2011579

  16. Phylogenetic utility of the nuclear genes AGAMOUS 1 and PHYTOCHROME B in palms (Arecaceae): an example within Bactridinae

    PubMed Central

    Ludeña, Bertha; Chabrillange, Nathalie; Aberlenc-Bertossi, Frédérique; Adam, Hélène; Tregear, James W.; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Molecular phylogenetic studies of palms (Arecaceae) have not yet provided a fully resolved phylogeny of the family. There is a need to increase the current set of markers to resolve difficult groups such as the Neotropical subtribe Bactridinae (Arecoideae: Cocoseae). We propose the use of two single-copy nuclear genes as valuable tools for palm phylogenetics. Methods New primers were developed for the amplification of the AGAMOUS 1 (AG1) and PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB) genes. For the AGAMOUS gene, the paralogue 1 of Elaeis guineensis (EgAG1) was targeted. The region amplified contained coding sequences between the MIKC K and C MADS-box domains. For the PHYB gene, exon 1 (partial sequence) was first amplified in palm species using published degenerate primers for Poaceae, and then specific palm primers were designed. The two gene portions were sequenced in 22 species of palms representing all genera of Bactridinae, with emphasis on Astrocaryum and Hexopetion, the status of the latter genus still being debated. Key Results The new primers designed allow consistent amplification and high-quality sequencing within the palm family. The two loci studied produced more variability than chloroplast loci and equally or less variability than PRK, RPBII and ITS nuclear markers. The phylogenetic structure obtained with AG1 and PHYB genes provides new insights into intergeneric relationships within the Bactridinae and the intrageneric structure of Astrocaryum. The Hexopetion clade was recovered as monophyletic with both markers and was weakly supported as sister to Astrocaryum sensu stricto in the combined analysis. The rare Astrocaryum minus formed a species complex with Astrocaryum gynacanthum. Moreover, both AG1 and PHYB contain a microsatellite that could have further uses in species delimitation and population genetics. Conclusions AG1 and PHYB provide additional phylogenetic information within the palm family, and should prove useful in combination with other

  17. Phytochrome-dependent coordinate control of distinct aspects of nuclear and plastid gene expression during anterograde signaling and photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sookyung; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Light perception by photoreceptors impacts plastid transcription, development, and differentiation. This photoreceptor-dependent activity suggests a mechanism for photoregulation of gene expression in the nucleus and plastid that serves to coordinate expression of critical genes of these two organelles. This coordinate expression is required for proper stoichiometric accumulation of components needed for assembly of plastids, photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes and components such as phytochromes. Chloroplast-targeted sigma factors, which function together with the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase to regulate expression of plastid-encoded genes, and nuclear-encoded plastid development factors, such as GLK1 and GLK2, are targets of phytochrome regulation. Such phytochrome-dependent functions are hypothesized to allow light-dependent regulation, and feasibly tuning, of plastid components and function in response to changes in the external environment, which directly affects photosynthesis and the potential for light-induced damage. When the size and protein composition of the light-harvesting complexes are not tuned to the external environment, imbalances in electron transport can impact the cellular redox state and cause cellular damage. We show that phytochromes specifically regulate the expression of multiple factors that function to modulate plastid transcription and, thus, provide a paradigm for coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes in response to changes in external light conditions. As phytochromes respond to changes in the prevalent wavelengths of light and light intensity, we propose that specific phytochrome-dependent molecular mechanisms are used during light-dependent signaling between the nucleus and chloroplast during photomorphogenesis to coordinate chloroplast development with plant developmental stage and the external environment. PMID:24817873

  18. Use of phytochrome-dependent reaction in evaluating the effect of space flight factors on the plant organism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shteyne, B. A.; Nevzgodina, L. V.; Miller, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of space flight factors on lettuce seeds aboard the Kosmos-936 and Kosmos-1129 satellites for 20 days were studied. The phytochrome dependent (PD) reaction of light sensitive seeds was a sensitive criterion for evaluating the biological effects of space flight factors. The PD reaction of air dry lettuce seeds was suppressed after space flight, especially if the seeds were exposed to open space during the flight. Space flight affects the physiological activity of both phytochrome forms, and both the phi sub 730 dependent reactions of lettuce seeds were suppressed.

  19. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  20. A Protein-Based Genetic Screening Uncovers Mutants Involved in Phytochrome Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Xin, Ruijiao; Huq, Enamul

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive red and far-red region of the light spectrum to regulate photomorphogenesis through a family of photoreceptors called phytochromes. Phytochromes transduce the light signals to trigger a cascade of downstream gene regulation in part via a subfamily of bHLH transcription factors called Phytochrome Interacting Factors (PIFs). As the repressors of light signaling pathways, most PIFs are phosphorylated and degraded through the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in response to light. The mechanisms involved in the phosphorylation and degradation of PIFs have not been fully understood yet. Here we used an EMS mutagenesis and luminescent imaging system to identify mutants defective in the degradation of one of the PIFs, called PIF1. We identified five mutants named stable PIF (spf) that showed reduced degradation of PIF1 under light treatment in both luminescent imaging and immunoblot assays. The amounts of PIF1 in spf3, spf4, and spf5 were similar to a PIF1 missense mutant (PIF1–3M) that lacks interactions between PIF1 and phyA/phyB under light. The hypocotyl lengths of spf1 and spf2 were slightly longer under red light compared to the LUC-PIF1 control, while only spf1 displayed weak phenotype under far-red light conditions. Interestingly, the spf3, spf4, and spf5 displayed high abundance of PIF1, yet the hypocotyl lengths were similar to the wild type under these conditions. Cloning and characterization of these mutants will help identify key players in the light signaling pathways including, the light-regulated kinase(s) and the E3 ligase(s) necessary for the light-induced degradation of PIFs. PMID:27499759

  1. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Mullen, Jack L; Correll, Melanie J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  2. A Protein-Based Genetic Screening Uncovers Mutants Involved in Phytochrome Signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Xin, Ruijiao; Huq, Enamul

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive red and far-red region of the light spectrum to regulate photomorphogenesis through a family of photoreceptors called phytochromes. Phytochromes transduce the light signals to trigger a cascade of downstream gene regulation in part via a subfamily of bHLH transcription factors called Phytochrome Interacting Factors (PIFs). As the repressors of light signaling pathways, most PIFs are phosphorylated and degraded through the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in response to light. The mechanisms involved in the phosphorylation and degradation of PIFs have not been fully understood yet. Here we used an EMS mutagenesis and luminescent imaging system to identify mutants defective in the degradation of one of the PIFs, called PIF1. We identified five mutants named stable PIF (spf) that showed reduced degradation of PIF1 under light treatment in both luminescent imaging and immunoblot assays. The amounts of PIF1 in spf3, spf4, and spf5 were similar to a PIF1 missense mutant (PIF1-3M) that lacks interactions between PIF1 and phyA/phyB under light. The hypocotyl lengths of spf1 and spf2 were slightly longer under red light compared to the LUC-PIF1 control, while only spf1 displayed weak phenotype under far-red light conditions. Interestingly, the spf3, spf4, and spf5 displayed high abundance of PIF1, yet the hypocotyl lengths were similar to the wild type under these conditions. Cloning and characterization of these mutants will help identify key players in the light signaling pathways including, the light-regulated kinase(s) and the E3 ligase(s) necessary for the light-induced degradation of PIFs. PMID:27499759

  3. SUMOylation of phytochrome-B negatively regulates light-induced signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandom, Ari; Ádám, Éva; Orosa, Beatriz; Viczián, András; Klose, Cornelia; Zhang, Cunjin; Josse, Eve-Marie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    The red/far red light absorbing photoreceptor phytochrome-B (phyB) cycles between the biologically inactive (Pr, λmax, 660 nm) and active (Pfr; λmax, 730 nm) forms and functions as a light quality and quantity controlled switch to regulate photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. At the molecular level, phyB interacts in a conformation-dependent fashion with a battery of downstream regulatory proteins, including PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR transcription factors, and by modulating their activity/abundance, it alters expression patterns of genes underlying photomorphogenesis. Here we report that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is conjugated (SUMOylation) to the C terminus of phyB; the accumulation of SUMOylated phyB is enhanced by red light and displays a diurnal pattern in plants grown under light/dark cycles. Our data demonstrate that (i) transgenic plants expressing the mutant phyBLys996Arg-YFP photoreceptor are hypersensitive to red light, (ii) light-induced SUMOylation of the mutant phyB is drastically decreased compared with phyB-YFP, and (iii) SUMOylation of phyB inhibits binding of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 to phyB Pfr. In addition, we show that OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT 1 (OTS1) de-SUMOylates phyB in vitro, it interacts with phyB in vivo, and the ots1/ots2 mutant is hyposensitive to red light. Taken together, we conclude that SUMOylation of phyB negatively regulates light signaling and it is mediated, at least partly, by the action of OTS SUMO proteases. PMID:26283376

  4. SUMOylation of phytochrome-B negatively regulates light-induced signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sadanandom, Ari; Ádám, Éva; Orosa, Beatriz; Viczián, András; Klose, Cornelia; Zhang, Cunjin; Josse, Eve-Marie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    The red/far red light absorbing photoreceptor phytochrome-B (phyB) cycles between the biologically inactive (Pr, λmax, 660 nm) and active (Pfr; λmax, 730 nm) forms and functions as a light quality and quantity controlled switch to regulate photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. At the molecular level, phyB interacts in a conformation-dependent fashion with a battery of downstream regulatory proteins, including PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR transcription factors, and by modulating their activity/abundance, it alters expression patterns of genes underlying photomorphogenesis. Here we report that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is conjugated (SUMOylation) to the C terminus of phyB; the accumulation of SUMOylated phyB is enhanced by red light and displays a diurnal pattern in plants grown under light/dark cycles. Our data demonstrate that (i) transgenic plants expressing the mutant phyB(Lys996Arg)-YFP photoreceptor are hypersensitive to red light, (ii) light-induced SUMOylation of the mutant phyB is drastically decreased compared with phyB-YFP, and (iii) SUMOylation of phyB inhibits binding of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 to phyB Pfr. In addition, we show that OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT 1 (OTS1) de-SUMOylates phyB in vitro, it interacts with phyB in vivo, and the ots1/ots2 mutant is hyposensitive to red light. Taken together, we conclude that SUMOylation of phyB negatively regulates light signaling and it is mediated, at least partly, by the action of OTS SUMO proteases.

  5. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIFff14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bi...

  6. Circadian Clock-Regulated Expression of Phytochrome and Cryptochrome Genes in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Réka; Kevei, Éva; Hall, Anthony; Millar, Andrew J.; Nagy, Ferenc; Kozma-Bognár, László

    2001-01-01

    Many physiological and biochemical processes in plants exhibit endogenous rhythms with a period of about 24 h. Endogenous oscillators called circadian clocks regulate these rhythms. The circadian clocks are synchronized to the periodic environmental changes (e.g. day/night cycles) by specific stimuli; among these, the most important is the light. Photoreceptors, phytochromes, and cryptochromes are involved in setting the clock by transducing the light signal to the central oscillator. In this work, we analyzed the spatial, temporal, and long-term light-regulated expression patterns of the Arabidopsis phytochrome (PHYA to PHYE) and cryptochrome (CRY1 and CRY2) promoters fused to the luciferase (LUC+) reporter gene. The results revealed new details of the tissue-specific expression and light regulation of the PHYC and CRY1 and 2 promoters. More importantly, the data obtained demonstrate that the activities of the promoter::LUC+ constructs, with the exception of PHYC::LUC+, display circadian oscillations under constant conditions. In addition, it is shown by measuring the mRNA abundance of PHY and CRY genes under constant light conditions that the circadian control is also maintained at the level of mRNA accumulation. These observations indicate that the plant circadian clock controls the expression of these photoreceptors, revealing the formation of a new regulatory loop that could modulate gating and resetting of the circadian clock. PMID:11743105

  7. Water content and the conversion of phytochrome regulation of lettuce dormancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Vertucci, F. A.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    In an effort to determine which biological reactions can occur in relation to the water content of seeds, the regulation of lettuce seed dormancy by red and far red light was determined at various hydration levels. Far red light had an inhibiting effect on germination for seeds at all moisture contents from 4 to 32% water. Germination was progressively stimulated by red light as seed hydration increased from 8 to 15%, and reached a maximum at moisture contents above 18%. Red light was ineffective at moisture contents below 8%. Seeds that had been stimulated by red light and subsequently dried lost the enhanced germinability if stored at moisture contents above 8%. The contrast between the presumed photoconversion of phytochrome far red-absorbing (Pfr) to (Pr) occurring at any moisture content and the reverse reaction occurring only if the seed moisture content is greater than 8% may be explained on the basis of the existence of unstable intermediates in the Pr to Pfr conversion. Our results suggest that the initial photoreaction involved in phytochrome conversion is relatively independent of water content, while the subsequent partial reactions become increasingly facilitated as water content increases from 8 to 18%.

  8. Phytochrome B and REVEILLE1/2-mediated signalling controls seed dormancy and germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhimin; Xu, Gang; Jing, Yanjun; Tang, Weijiang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Seeds maintain a dormant state to withstand adverse conditions and germinate when conditions become favourable to give rise to a new generation of flowering plants. Seed dormancy and germination are tightly controlled by internal and external signals. Although phytochrome photoreceptors are proposed to regulate primary seed dormancy, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that the REVEILLE1 (RVE1) and RVE2 transcription factors promote primary seed dormancy and repress red/far-red-light-reversible germination downstream of phytochrome B (phyB) in Arabidopsis thaliana. RVE1 and RVE2 expression is downregulated after imbibition and by phyB. RVE1 directly binds to the promoter of GIBBERELLIN 3-OXIDASE 2, inhibits its transcription and thus suppresses the biosynthesis of bioactive gibberellins. In addition, DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 also acts downstream of phyB. This study identifies a signalling pathway that integrates environmental light input with internal factors to control both seed dormancy and germination. PMID:27506149

  9. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Coveney, Katrina M.; Raines, Steven V.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Kiss, John Z.

    2003-01-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phytochrome B and REVEILLE1/2-mediated signalling controls seed dormancy and germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhimin; Xu, Gang; Jing, Yanjun; Tang, Weijiang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Seeds maintain a dormant state to withstand adverse conditions and germinate when conditions become favourable to give rise to a new generation of flowering plants. Seed dormancy and germination are tightly controlled by internal and external signals. Although phytochrome photoreceptors are proposed to regulate primary seed dormancy, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that the REVEILLE1 (RVE1) and RVE2 transcription factors promote primary seed dormancy and repress red/far-red-light-reversible germination downstream of phytochrome B (phyB) in Arabidopsis thaliana. RVE1 and RVE2 expression is downregulated after imbibition and by phyB. RVE1 directly binds to the promoter of GIBBERELLIN 3-OXIDASE 2, inhibits its transcription and thus suppresses the biosynthesis of bioactive gibberellins. In addition, DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 also acts downstream of phyB. This study identifies a signalling pathway that integrates environmental light input with internal factors to control both seed dormancy and germination. PMID:27506149

  11. Ethylene Inhibition of Phytochrome-Induced Germination in Potentilla norvegica L. Seeds.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Taylorson, R B

    1981-12-01

    Germination of Potentilla norvegica L. (rough cinquefoil) seeds stimulated by fluorescent irradiations of nearly 24 hours was inhibited by ethylene at <1 microliter per liter. Sensitivity to ethylene inhibition was highest during and immediately after the irradiation. By delaying ethylene treatment until about a day after the light potentiation, seeds escaped the inhibition. Ethylene inhibition may be readily reversed upon release of the gas and reirradiation of the seeds. Imbibition of seeds at 10 or 15 degrees C, or at high temperatures of 35 and 40 degrees C, partially prevented subsequent inhibition by ethylene. Alternating temperatures during germination nearly overcame the inhibition from 1 microliter per liter ethylene, but not higher doses. With brief red-irradiation and alternating temperatures, 0.1 microliter per liter ethylene promoted germination about 2-fold. These data suggest that ethylene may loosely associate on a site required for phytochrome action. The effect of temperature that opposed the inhibition may be to deny the association of ethylene with the site. Loose association is supported by the reversal of inhibition by gas release and increased temperature during germination. A blocking effect was shown by the failure of phytochrome to act when ethylene was present.

  12. Circadian clock adjustment to plant iron status depends on chloroplast and phytochrome function

    PubMed Central

    Salomé, Patrice A; Oliva, Michele; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Plant chloroplasts are not only the main cellular location for storage of elemental iron (Fe), but also the main site for Fe, which is incorporated into chlorophyll, haem and the photosynthetic machinery. How plants measure internal Fe levels is unknown. We describe here a new Fe-dependent response, a change in the period of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, the period lengthens when Fe becomes limiting, and gradually shortens as external Fe levels increase. Etiolated seedlings or light-grown plants treated with plastid translation inhibitors do not respond to changes in Fe supply, pointing to developed chloroplasts as central hubs for circadian Fe sensing. Phytochrome-deficient mutants maintain a short period even under Fe deficiency, stressing the role of early light signalling in coupling the clock to Fe responses. Further mutant and pharmacological analyses suggest that known players in plastid-to-nucleus signalling do not directly participate in Fe sensing. We propose that the sensor governing circadian Fe responses defines a new retrograde pathway that involves a plastid-encoded protein that depends on phytochromes and the functional state of chloroplasts. PMID:23241948

  13. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Correll, Melanie J; Coveney, Katrina M; Raines, Steven V; Mullen, Jack L; Hangarter, Roger P; Kiss, John Z

    2003-01-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  14. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Coveney, Katrina M.; Raines, Steven V.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Kiss, John Z.

    2003-05-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  15. Circadian clock adjustment to plant iron status depends on chloroplast and phytochrome function.

    PubMed

    Salomé, Patrice A; Oliva, Michele; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2013-02-20

    Plant chloroplasts are not only the main cellular location for storage of elemental iron (Fe), but also the main site for Fe, which is incorporated into chlorophyll, haem and the photosynthetic machinery. How plants measure internal Fe levels is unknown. We describe here a new Fe-dependent response, a change in the period of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, the period lengthens when Fe becomes limiting, and gradually shortens as external Fe levels increase. Etiolated seedlings or light-grown plants treated with plastid translation inhibitors do not respond to changes in Fe supply, pointing to developed chloroplasts as central hubs for circadian Fe sensing. Phytochrome-deficient mutants maintain a short period even under Fe deficiency, stressing the role of early light signalling in coupling the clock to Fe responses. Further mutant and pharmacological analyses suggest that known players in plastid-to-nucleus signalling do not directly participate in Fe sensing. We propose that the sensor governing circadian Fe responses defines a new retrograde pathway that involves a plastid-encoded protein that depends on phytochromes and the functional state of chloroplasts. PMID:23241948

  16. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    SciTech Connect

    Karve, Abhijit A; Weston, David; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee E; Allen, Sara M; Yang, Xiaohan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance signaling in higher plants involves perception of the incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes and the modulation of downstream transcriptional networks to regulate developmental plasticity in relation to heterogeneous light environments. In this study, we characterized the expression and functional features of Populus phytochrome (PHY) gene family as well as the transcriptional responses of Populus to the changes in R/FR light. Expression data indicated that PHYA is the predominant PHY in the dark grown Populus seedling whereas PHYBs are most abundant in mature tissue types. Out of three Populus PHYs, PHYA is light labile and localized to cytosol in dark whereas both PHYB1 and PHYB2 are light stable and are localized to nucleus in mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed in Arabidopsis, PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotype whereas PHYB2 did not, suggesting functional diversification between these two gene family members. However, phenotypes of transgenic Populus lines with altered expression of PHYB1, PHYB2 or both and the expression of candidate shade response genes in these transgenic lines suggest that PHYB1 and PHYB2 may have distinct yet overlapping functions. The RNAseq results and analysis of Populus exposed to enriched-FR light indicate that genes associated in cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under far red light. Overall our data indicate that Populus transcriptional responses are at least partially conserved with Arabidopsis.

  17. Degradation of Arabidopsis CRY2 is regulated by SPA proteins and phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Weidler, Guido; Zur Oven-Krockhaus, Sven; Heunemann, Michael; Orth, Christian; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Harter, Klaus; Hoecker, Ute; Batschauer, Alfred

    2012-06-01

    The UV-A/blue light photoreceptor crytochrome2 (cry2) plays a fundamental role in the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase in the facultative long-day plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The cry2 protein level strongly decreases when etiolated seedlings are exposed to blue light; cry2 is first phosphorylated, polyubiquitinated, and then degraded by the 26S proteasome. COP1 is involved in cry2 degradation, but several cop1 mutants show only reduced but not abolished cry2 degradation. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 (SPA) proteins are known to work in concert with COP1, and recently direct physical interaction between cry2 and SPA1 was demonstrated. Thus, we hypothesized that SPA proteins could also play a role in cry2 degradation. To this end, we analyzed cry2 protein levels in spa mutants. In all spa mutants analyzed, cry2 degradation under continuous blue light was alleviated in a fluence rate-dependent manner. Consistent with a role of SPA proteins in phytochrome A (phyA) signaling, a phyA mutant had enhanced cry2 levels, particularly under low fluence rate blue light. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy studies showed a robust physical interaction of cry2 with SPA1 in nuclei of living cells. Our results suggest that cry2 stability is controlled by SPA and phyA, thus providing more information on the molecular mechanisms of interaction between cryptochrome and phytochrome photoreceptors.

  18. Nuclear Phytochrome A Signaling Promotes Phototropism in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kami, Chitose; Hersch, Micha; Trevisan, Martine; Genoud, Thierry; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Phototropin photoreceptors (phot1 and phot2 in Arabidopsis thaliana) enable responses to directional light cues (e.g., positive phototropism in the hypocotyl). In Arabidopsis, phot1 is essential for phototropism in response to low light, a response that is also modulated by phytochrome A (phyA), representing a classical example of photoreceptor coaction. The molecular mechanisms underlying promotion of phototropism by phyA remain unclear. Most phyA responses require nuclear accumulation of the photoreceptor, but interestingly, it has been proposed that cytosolic phyA promotes phototropism. By comparing the kinetics of phototropism in seedlings with different subcellular localizations of phyA, we show that nuclear phyA accelerates the phototropic response, whereas in the fhy1 fhl mutant, in which phyA remains in the cytosol, phototropic bending is slower than in the wild type. Consistent with this data, we find that transcription factors needed for full phyA responses are needed for normal phototropism. Moreover, we show that phyA is the primary photoreceptor promoting the expression of phototropism regulators in low light (e.g., PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 [PKS1] and ROOT PHOTO TROPISM2 [RPT2]). Although phyA remains cytosolic in fhy1 fhl, induction of PKS1 and RPT2 expression still occurs in fhy1 fhl, indicating that a low level of nuclear phyA signaling is still present in fhy1 fhl. PMID:22374392

  19. Phytochrome assembly. Defining chromophore structural requirements for covalent attachment and photoreversibility.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Lagarias, J C

    1992-09-25

    Assembly of holophytochrome in the plant cell requires covalent attachment of the linear tetrapyrrole chromophore precursor, phytochromobilin, to a unique cysteine in the nascent apoprotein. In this investigation we compare chromophore analogs with the natural chromophore precursor for their ability to attach covalently to recombinant oat apophytochrome and to form photoactive holoproteins. Ethylidene-containing analogs readily form covalent adducts with apophytochrome, whereas chromophores lacking this double bond are poor substrates for attachment. Kinetic measurements establish that although the chromophore binding site on apophytochrome is best tailored to phytochromobilin, apophytochrome will accommodate the two analogs with modified D-rings, phycocyanobilin and phycoerythrobilin. The phycocyanobilin-apophytochrome adduct is photoactive and undergoes a light-induced protein conformational change similar to the native holoprotein. By contrast, the phycoerythrobilin adduct is locked into a photochemically inactive protein conformation that is similar to the red light-absorbing Pr form of phytochrome. These results support the hypothesis that the photoconversion from Pr to Pfr, the far red light- absorbing form of phytochrome, involves the photoisomerization of the C15 double bond. Knowledge gained from these studies provides impetus for rational design of chromophore analogs whose insertion into apophytochrome should elicit profound changes in light-mediated plant growth and development.

  20. Bell-like homeodomain selectively regulates the high-irradiance response of phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Staneloni, Roberto J; Rodriguez-Batiller, María José; Legisa, Danilo; Scarpin, María R; Agalou, Adamantia; Cerdán, Pablo D; Meijer, Annemarie H; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Casal, Jorge J

    2009-08-11

    Plant responses mediated by phytochrome A display a first phase saturated by transient light signals and a second phase requiring sustained excitation with far-red light (FR). These discrete outcomes, respectively so-called very-low-fluence response (VLFR) and high-irradiance response (HIR), are appropriate in different environmental and developmental contexts but the mechanisms that regulate the switch remain unexplored. Promoter analysis of a light-responsive target gene revealed a motif necessary for HIR but not for VLFR. This motif is required for binding of the Bell-like homeodomain 1 (BLH1) to the promoter in in vitro and in yeast 1-hybrid experiments. Promoter substitutions that increased BLH1 binding also enhanced HIR. blh1 mutants showed reduced responses to continuous FR and to deep canopy shadelight, but they retained normal responses to pulsed FR or red light and unfiltered sunlight. BLH1 enhanced BLH1 expression and its promotion by FR. We conclude that BLH1 specifically regulates HIR and not VLFR of phytochrome A.

  1. Microinjection of heme oxygenase genes rescues phytochrome-chromophore-deficient mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus.

    PubMed

    Brücker, G; Zeidler, M; Kohchi, T; Hartmann, E; Lamparter, T

    2000-03-01

    In protonemal tip cells of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid., phototropism and chlorophyll accumulation are regulated by the photoreceptor phytochrome. The mutant ptr116 lacks both responses as a result of a defect in the biosynthesis of phytochromobilin, the chromophore of phytochrome, at the point of biliverdin formation. The rescue of the phototropic response and of chlorophyll synthesis were tested by injecting different substances into tip cells of ptr116. Microinjection was first optimised with the use of fluorescent dyes and an expression plasmid containing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Injected phycocyanobilin, which substitutes for phytochromobilin, rescued both the phototropic response and light-induced chlorophyll accumulation in ptr116. The same results were obtained when expression plasmids with heme oxygenase genes of rat (HO-1) and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (HY1) were injected. Heme oxygenase catalyses the conversion of heme into biliverdin. Whereas HY1 has a plastid target sequence and is presumably transferred to plastids, HO-1 is proposed to be cytosolic. The data show that ptr116 lacks heme oxygenase enzyme activity and indicate that heme oxygenases of various origin are active in Ceratodon bilin synthesis. In addition, it can be inferred from the data that the intracellular localisation of the expressed heme oxygenase is not important since the plastid enzyme can be replaced by a cytosolic one. PMID:10787045

  2. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants.

    PubMed

    Possart, Anja; Fleck, Christian; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed plants, phytochrome A (phyA) acts as FR receptor and mediates FR high irradiance responses (FR-HIRs). It exerts a dual role by promoting e.g. germination and seedling de-etiolation in canopy shade and by antagonising shade avoidance growth. Even though cryptogam plants such as mosses and ferns do not have phyA, they show FR-induced responses. In the present review we discuss the mechanistic basis of phyA-dependent FR-HIRs as well as their dual role in seed plants. We compare FR responses in seed plants and cryptogam plants and conclude on different potential concepts for the detection of canopy shade. Scenarios for the evolution of FR perception and responses are discussed.

  3. Holophytochrome-Interacting Proteins in Physcomitrella: Putative Actors in Phytochrome Cytoplasmic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Anna Lena; Mailliet, Katharina; Hughes, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are the principle photoreceptors in light-regulated plant development, primarily acting via translocation of the light-activated photoreceptor into the nucleus and subsequent gene regulation. However, several independent lines of evidence indicate unambiguously that an additional cytoplasmic signaling mechanism must exist. Directional responses in filament tip cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens are steered by phy4 which has been shown to interact physically with the blue light receptor phototropin at the plasma membrane. This complex might perceive and transduce vectorial information leading to cytoskeleton reorganization and finally a directional growth response. We developed yeast two-hybrid procedures using photochemically functional, full-length phy4 as bait in Physcomitrella cDNA library screens and growth assays under different light conditions, revealing Pfr-dependent interactions possibly associated with phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling. Candidate proteins were then expressed in planta with fluorescent protein tags to determine their intracellular localization in darkness and red light. Of 14 candidates, 12 were confirmed to interact with phy4 in planta using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We also used database information to study their expression patterns relative to those of phy4. We discuss the likely functional characteristics of these holophytochrome-interacting proteins (HIP’s) and their possible roles in signaling. PMID:27242820

  4. PAT1, a new member of the GRAS family, is involved in phytochrome A signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Bolle, Cordelia; Koncz, Csaba; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2000-01-01

    Light signaling via the phytochrome A (phyA) photoreceptor controls basic plant developmental processes including de-etiolation and hypocotyl elongation. We have identified a new Arabidopsis mutant, pat (phytochrome A signal transduction)1-1, which shows strongly reduced responses in continuous far-red light. Physiological and molecular data indicate that this mutant is disrupted at an early step of phyA signal transduction. The PAT1 gene encodes a cytoplasmic protein of 490 amino acids with sequence homologies to the plant-specific GRAS regulatory protein family. In the pat1-1 mutant, a T-DNA insertion introduces a premature stop codon, which likely results in the production of a truncated PAT1 protein of 341 amino acids. The semidominant phenotype of this mutant can be recapitulated by overexpression of an appropriately truncated PAT1 gene in the wild type. The results indicate that the truncated PAT1 protein acts in a dominant-negative fashion to inhibit phyA signaling. PMID:10817761

  5. Phytochrome signaling in green Arabidopsis seedlings: impact assessment of a mutually-negative phyB-PIF feedback loop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reversibly red (R)-far-red (FR)-light-responsive phytochrome (phy) photosensory system initiates both the deetiolation process in dark-germinated seedlings upon first exposure to light, and the shade-avoidance process in fully-deetiolated seedlings upon exposure to vegetational shade. The intra...

  6. The effects of phytochrome-mediated light signals on the developmental acquisition of photoperiod sensitivity in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Yokoo, Takayuki; Saito, Hiroki; Tsukiyama, Takuji; Quan, Xu; Zikihara, Kazunori; Katsura, Hitomi; Tokutomi, Satoru; Aboshi, Takako; Mori, Naoki; Inoue, Hiromo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kohchi, Takayuki; Teraishi, Masayoshi; Okumoto, Yutaka; Tanisaka, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Plants commonly rely on photoperiodism to control flowering time. Rice development before floral initiation is divided into two successive phases: the basic vegetative growth phase (BVP, photoperiod-insensitive phase) and the photoperiod-sensitive phase (PSP). The mechanism responsible for the transition of rice plants into their photoperiod-sensitive state remains elusive. Here, we show that se13, a mutation detected in the extremely early flowering mutant X61 is a nonsense mutant gene of OsHY2, which encodes phytochromobilin (PΦB) synthase, as evidenced by spectrometric and photomorphogenic analyses. We demonstrated that some flowering time and circadian clock genes harbor different expression profiles in BVP as opposed to PSP, and that this phenomenon is chiefly caused by different phytochrome-mediated light signal requirements: in BVP, phytochrome-mediated light signals directly suppress Ehd2, while in PSP, phytochrome-mediated light signals activate Hd1 and Ghd7 expression through the circadian clock genes' expression. These findings indicate that light receptivity through the phytochromes is different between two distinct developmental phases corresponding to the BVP and PSP in the rice flowering process. Our results suggest that these differences might be involved in the acquisition of photoperiod sensitivity in rice. PMID:25573482

  7. Sequential and coordinated action of phytochromes A and B during Arabidopsis stem growth revealed by kinetic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, B. M.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Photoreceptor proteins of the phytochrome family mediate light-induced inhibition of stem (hypocotyl) elongation during the development of photoautotrophy in seedlings. Analyses of overt mutant phenotypes have established the importance of phytochromes A and B (phyA and phyB) in this developmental process, but kinetic information that would augment emerging molecular models of phytochrome signal transduction is absent. We have addressed this deficiency by genetically dissecting phytochrome-response kinetics, after having solved the technical issues that previously limited growth studies of small Arabidopsis seedlings. We show here, with resolution on the order of minutes, that phyA initiated hypocotyl growth inhibition upon the onset of continuous red light. This primary contribution of phyA began to decrease after 3 hr of irradiation, the same time at which immunochemically detectable phyA disappeared and an exclusively phyB-dependent phase of inhibition began. The sequential and coordinated actions of phyA and phyB in red light were not observed in far-red light, which inhibited growth persistently through an exclusively phyA-mediated pathway.

  8. Orange fluorescent proteins constructed from cyanobacteriochromes chromophorylated with phycoerythrobilin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Fang; Xu, Jin-Guo; Tang, Kun; Miao, Dan; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Zhou, Ming

    2014-05-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are a structurally and spectrally highly diverse class of phytochrome-related photosensory biliproteins. They contain one or more GAF domains that bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) autocatalytically; some of these proteins are also capable of further modifying PCB to phycoviolobilin or rubins. We tested the chromophorylation with the non-photochromic phycoerythrobilin (PEB) of 16 cyanobacteriochrome GAFs from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, of Slr1393 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and of Tlr0911 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1. Nine GAFs could be autocatalytically chromophorylated in vivo/in E. coli with PEB, resulting in highly fluorescent biliproteins with brightness comparable to that of fluorescent proteins like GFP. In several GAFs, PEB was concomitantly converted to phycourobilin (PUB) during binding. This not only shifted the spectra, but also increased the Stokes shift. The chromophorylated GAFs could be oligomerized further by attaching a GCN4 leucine zipper domain, thereby enhancing the absorbance and fluorescence of the complexes. The presence of both PEB and PUB makes these oligomeric GAF-"bundles" interesting models for energy transfer akin to the antenna complexes found in cyanobacterial phycobilisomes. The thermal and photochemical stability and their strong brightness make these constructs promising orange fluorescent biomarkers. PMID:24604419

  9. Novel phytochrome sequences in Arabidopsis thaliana: Structure, evolution, and differential expression of a plant regulatory photoreceptor family

    SciTech Connect

    Sharrock, R.A.; Quail, P.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Phytochrome is a plant regulatory photoreceptor that mediates red light effects on a wide variety of physiological and molecular responses. DNA blot analysis indicates that the Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four to five phytochrome-related gene sequences. The authors have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones corresponding to three of these genes and have deduced the amino acid sequence of the full-length polypeptide encoded in each case. One of these proteins (phyA) shows 65-80% amino acid sequence identity with the major, etiolated-tissue phytochrome apoproteins described previously in other plant species. The other two polypeptides (phyB and phyC) are unique in that they have low sequence identity with each other, with phyA, and with all previously described phytochromes. The phyA, phyB, and phyC proteins are of similar molecular mass, have related hydropathic profiles, and contain a conserved chromophore attachment region. However, the sequence comparison data indicate that the three phy genes diverged early in plant evolution, well before the divergence of the two major groups of angiosperms, the monocots and dicots. The steady-state level of the phyA transcript is high in dark-grown A. thaliana seedlings and is down-regulated by light. In contrast, the phyB and phyC transcripts are present at lower levels and are not strongly light-regulated. These findings indicate that the red/far red light-responsive phytochrome photoreceptor system in A. thaliana, and perhaps in all higher plants, consists of a family of chromoproteins that are heterogeneous in structure and regulation.

  10. Domain Organization and Conformational Plasticity of the G Protein Effector, PDE6*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhixian; He, Feng; Constantine, Ryan; Baker, Matthew L.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Schmid, Michael F.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Agosto, Melina A.

    2015-01-01

    The cGMP phosphodiesterase of rod photoreceptor cells, PDE6, is the key effector enzyme in phototransduction. Two large catalytic subunits, PDE6α and -β, each contain one catalytic domain and two non-catalytic GAF domains, whereas two small inhibitory PDE6γ subunits allow tight regulation by the G protein transducin. The structure of holo-PDE6 in complex with the ROS-1 antibody Fab fragment was determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The ∼11 Å map revealed previously unseen features of PDE6, and each domain was readily fit with high resolution structures. A structure of PDE6 in complex with prenyl-binding protein (PrBP/δ) indicated the location of the PDE6 C-terminal prenylations. Reconstructions of complexes with Fab fragments bound to N or C termini of PDE6γ revealed that PDE6γ stretches from the catalytic domain at one end of the holoenzyme to the GAF-A domain at the other. Removal of PDE6γ caused dramatic structural rearrangements, which were reversed upon its restoration. PMID:25809480

  11. Mass spectrometric characterization of oat phytochrome A: isoforms and posttranslational modifications.

    PubMed Central

    Lapko, V. N.; Jiang, X. Y.; Smith, D. L.; Song, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    At least four mRNAs for oat phytochrome A (phyA) are present in etiolated oat tissue. The complete amino acid sequences of two phyA isoforms (A3 and A4) and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of a third isoform (A5) were deduced from cDNA sequencing (Hershey et al., 1985). In the present study, heterogeneity of phyA on a protein level was studied by tryptic mapping using electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry (ESIMS). The total tryptic digest of iodoacetamide-modified phyA was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. ESIMS was used to identify peptides. Amino acid sequences of the peptides were confirmed or determined by collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (CID MS), MS/MS, or by subdigestion of the tryptic peptides followed by ESIMS analysis. More than 97% of the phyA3 sequence (1,128 amino acid residues) was determined in the present study. Mass-spectrometric analysis of peptides unique to each form showed that phyA purified from etiolated oat seedling is represented by three isoforms A5, A3, and A4, with ratio 3.4:2.3:1.0. Possible light-induced changes in phytochrome in vivo phosphorylation site at Ser7 (Lapko VN et al., 1997, Biochemistry 36:10595-10599) as well at Ser17 and Ser598 (known as in vitro phosphorylation sites) were also analyzed. The extent of phosphorylation at Ser7 appears to be the same for phyA isolated from dark-grown and red-light illuminated seedlings. In addition to Ser7, Ser598 was identified as an in vivo phosphorylation site in oat phyA. Ser598 phosphorylation was found only in phyA from the red light-treated seedlings, suggesting that the protein phosphorylation plays a functional role in the phytochrome A-mediated light-signal transduction. PMID:10338014

  12. Ultrafast E to Z photoisomerization dynamics of the Cph1 phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter W.; Pan, Jie; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Chang, Che-Wei; Taylor, Keenan C.; Lagarias, J. Clark; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond photodynamics of the reverse (15EPfr→15ZPr) reaction of the red/far-red phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis were resolved with visible broadband transient absorption spectroscopy. Multi-phasic dynamics were resolved and separated via global target analysis into a fast-decaying (260 fs) excited-state population that bifurcates to generate the isomerized Lumi-F primary photoproduct and a non-isomerizing vibrationally excited ground state that relaxes back into the 15EPfr ground state on a 2.8-ps time scale. Relaxation on a 1-ms timescale results in the loss of red absorbing region, but not blue region, of Lumi-F, which indicates that formation of 15ZPr occurs on slower timescales. PMID:23554514

  13. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  14. Rhizome transition to storage organ is under phytochrome control in lotus (Nelumbo nucifera).

    PubMed

    Masuda, Jun-ichiro; Ozaki, Yukio; Okubo, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    We examined photoperiodic response of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) rhizome morphogenesis (its transition to a storage organ) by using seed-derived plants. Rhizome enlargement (increase in girth) was brought about under 8, 10 and 12 h photoperiods, whereas the rhizomes elongated under 13 and 14 h photoperiods. Rhizomes elongated under 14 h light regimes supplied as 8 h of natural light plus 6 h supplemental hours of white, yellow or red light, but similar treatments with supplemental blue, green or far red light, caused enlargement in girth of the rhizomes. A 2 h interruption of the night with white, yellow or red light, in plants entrained to 8 h photoperiod brought rhizome elongation, whereas 2 h-blue, green or far red light night breaks still resulted in rhizome increase in girth. The inhibitory effect of a red (R) light night break on rhizome increase in girth was reversed by a far-red (FR) light given immediately afterwards. Irradiation with R/FR/R inhibited the rhizome increase in girth. FR light irradiation following R/FR/R irradiation cancelled the effect of the last R light irradiation. It was demonstrated that the critical photoperiod for rhizome transition to storage organ is between 12 and 13 h photoperiod. It was also evident that the optimal light quality range for interruption of dark period (night break) is between yellow and red light and that a R/FR reversible reaction is observed. From these results, we propose that phytochrome plays an important role in photoperiodic response of rhizome increase in girth in lotus. This is the first report on phytochrome-dependent morphogenesis of storage organs in rhizomous plants.

  15. Which factors determine the acidity of the phytochromobilin chromophore of plant phytochrome?

    PubMed

    Anders Borg, O; Durbeej, Bo

    2008-05-14

    Quantum chemical calculations aimed at identifying the factors controlling the acidity of phytochromobilin, the tetrapyrrole chromophore of the plant photoreceptor phytochrome, are reported. Phytochrome is converted from an inactive (Pr) to an active form (Pfr) through a series of events initiated by a Z --> E photoisomerization of phytochromobilin, forming the Lumi-R intermediate, and much controversy exists as to whether the protonation state of the chromophore (cationic in Pr with all nitrogens protonated) changes during the photoactivation. Here, relative ground (S0) and excited-state (S1) pKa s of all four pyrrole moieties of phytochromobilin in all 64 possible configurations with respect to the three methine bridges are calculated in a protein-like environment, using a recently benchmarked level of theory. Accordingly, the relationships between acidity and chromophore geometry and charge distribution, hydrogen bonding, and light absorption are investigated in some detail, and discussed in terms of possible mechanisms making a proton transfer reaction more probable along the Pr --> Pfr reaction than in the parent cationic Pr state. It is found that charge distribution in the cationic species, intra-molecular hydrogen bonding in the neutral, and hydrogen bonding with two highly conserved aspartate and histidine residues have a significant effect on the acidity, while overall chromophore geometry and electronic state are less important factors. Furthermore, based on the calculations, two processes that may facilitate a proton transfer by substantially lowering the pKa s relative to their Pr values are identified: (i) a thermal Z,anti --> Z,syn isomerization at C5, occurring after formation of Lumi-R; (ii) a perturbation of the hydrogen bonding network which in Pr comprises the nitrogens of pyrroles A, B and C and the two aspartate and histidine residues.

  16. Rice Phytochrome B (OsPhyB) Negatively Regulates Dark- and Starvation-Induced Leaf Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Weilan; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Su-Hyun; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Light regulates leaf senescence and light deprivation causes large-scale transcriptional reprogramming to dismantle cellular components and remobilize nutrients to sink organs, such as seeds and storage tissue. We recently reported that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Phytochrome-Interacting Factor4 (PIF4) and PIF5 promote dark-induced senescence and natural senescence by directly activating the expression of typical senescence-associated genes (SAGs), including ORESARA1 (ORE1) and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3). In contrast, phytochrome B (PhyB) inhibits leaf senescence by repressing PIF4 and PIF5 at the post-translational level. Although we found how red light signaling represses leaf senescence in Arabidopsis, it remains unknown whether PhyB and/or PhyA are involved in leaf senescence in rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that rice phyB knockout mutants (osphyB-1, -2, and -3) exhibited an early senescence phenotype during dark-induced senescence, but an osphyA knockout mutant (osphyA-3) senesced normally. The RT-qPCR analysis revealed that several senescence-associated genes, including OsORE1 and OsEIN3, were significantly up-regulated in osphyB-2 mutants, indicating that OsPhyB also inhibits leaf senescence, like Arabidopsis PhyB. We also found that leaf segments of osphyB-2 senesced faster even under light conditions. Supplementation with nitrogen compounds, such as KNO3 and NH4NO3, rescued the early senescence phenotype of osphyB-2, indicating that starvation is one of the major signaling factors in the OsPhyB-dependent leaf senescence pathway. PMID:27135344

  17. Photophysiology of the Elongated Internode (ein) Mutant of Brassica rapa: ein Mutant Lacks a Detectable Phytochrome B-Like Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Devlin, P F; Rood, S B; Somers, D E; Quail, P H; Whitelam, G C

    1992-11-01

    Several phytochrome-controlled processes have been examined in etiolated and light-grown seedlings of a normal genotype and the elongated internode (ein/ein) mutant of rapid-cycling Brassica rapa. Although etiolated ein seedlings displayed normal sensitivity to prolonged far-red light with respect to inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, expansion of cotyledons, and synthesis of anthocyanin, they displayed reduced sensitivity to prolonged red light for all three of these deetiolation responses. In contrast to normal seedlings, light-grown ein seedlings did not show a growth promotion in response to end-of-day far-red irradiation. Additionally, whereas the first internode of light-grown normal seedlings showed a marked increase in elongation in response to reduced ratio of red to far-red light, ein seedlings showed only a small elongation response. When blots of protein extracts from etiolated and light-treated ein and normal seedlings were probed with monoclonal antibody to phytochrome A, an immunostaining band at about 120 kD was observed for both extracts. The immunostaining intensity of this band was substantially reduced for extracts of light-treated normal and ein seedlings. A mixture of three monoclonal antibodies directed against phytochrome B from Arabidopsis thaliana immunostained a band at about 120 kD for extracts of etiolated and light-treated normal seedlings. This band was undetectable in extracts of ein seedlings. We propose that ein is a photoreceptor mutant that is deficient in a light-stable phytochrome B-like species.

  18. Photophysiology of the Elongated Internode (ein) Mutant of Brassica rapa: ein Mutant Lacks a Detectable Phytochrome B-Like Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Devlin, P F; Rood, S B; Somers, D E; Quail, P H; Whitelam, G C

    1992-11-01

    Several phytochrome-controlled processes have been examined in etiolated and light-grown seedlings of a normal genotype and the elongated internode (ein/ein) mutant of rapid-cycling Brassica rapa. Although etiolated ein seedlings displayed normal sensitivity to prolonged far-red light with respect to inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, expansion of cotyledons, and synthesis of anthocyanin, they displayed reduced sensitivity to prolonged red light for all three of these deetiolation responses. In contrast to normal seedlings, light-grown ein seedlings did not show a growth promotion in response to end-of-day far-red irradiation. Additionally, whereas the first internode of light-grown normal seedlings showed a marked increase in elongation in response to reduced ratio of red to far-red light, ein seedlings showed only a small elongation response. When blots of protein extracts from etiolated and light-treated ein and normal seedlings were probed with monoclonal antibody to phytochrome A, an immunostaining band at about 120 kD was observed for both extracts. The immunostaining intensity of this band was substantially reduced for extracts of light-treated normal and ein seedlings. A mixture of three monoclonal antibodies directed against phytochrome B from Arabidopsis thaliana immunostained a band at about 120 kD for extracts of etiolated and light-treated normal seedlings. This band was undetectable in extracts of ein seedlings. We propose that ein is a photoreceptor mutant that is deficient in a light-stable phytochrome B-like species. PMID:16653143

  19. Diatom Phytochromes Reveal the Existence of Far-Red-Light-Based Sensing in the Ocean[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Gen; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Thaler, Michael; Malviya, Shruti; Bernardes, Juliana Silva; Rappaport, Fabrice; Gentili, Bernard; Huysman, Marie J.J.; Carbone, Alessandra; Bowler, Chris; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Falciatore, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The absorption of visible light in aquatic environments has led to the common assumption that aquatic organisms sense and adapt to penetrative blue/green light wavelengths but show little or no response to the more attenuated red/far-red wavelengths. Here, we show that two marine diatom species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, possess a bona fide red/far-red light sensing phytochrome (DPH) that uses biliverdin as a chromophore and displays accentuated red-shifted absorbance peaks compared with other characterized plant and algal phytochromes. Exposure to both red and far-red light causes changes in gene expression in P. tricornutum, and the responses to far-red light disappear in DPH knockout cells, demonstrating that P. tricornutum DPH mediates far-red light signaling. The identification of DPH genes in diverse diatom species widely distributed along the water column further emphasizes the ecological significance of far-red light sensing, raising questions about the sources of far-red light. Our analyses indicate that, although far-red wavelengths from sunlight are only detectable at the ocean surface, chlorophyll fluorescence and Raman scattering can generate red/far-red photons in deeper layers. This study opens up novel perspectives on phytochrome-mediated far-red light signaling in the ocean and on the light sensing and adaptive capabilities of marine phototrophs. PMID:26941092

  20. RED1 is necessary for phytochrome B-mediated red light-specific signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, D; Hoecker, U; Quail, P H

    1997-01-01

    Seedlings of a transgenic Arabidopsis line (ABO) that overexpresses phytochrome B (phyB) display enhanced deetiolation specifically in red light. To identify genetic loci necessary for phytochrome signal transduction in red light, we chemically mutagenized ABO seeds and screened M2 seedlings for revertants of the enhanced deetiolation response. One recessive, red light-specific extragenic revertant, designated red1, was isolated. The mutant phenotype was expressed in the original ABO background as well as in the nontransgenic Nossen (No-0) progenitor background. red1 is also deficient in several other aspects of red light-induced responses known to be mediated by phyB, such as inhibition of petiole elongation and the shade avoidance response. red1 was mapped to the bottom of chromosome 4 at a position distinct from all known photoreceptor loci. Together with complementation analysis, the data show that red1 is a novel photomorphogenic mutant. The evidence suggests that red1 represents a putative phytochrome signal transduction mutant potentially specific to the phyB pathway. PMID:9165750

  1. Phytochrome induces changes in the immunodetectable level of a wall peroxidase that precede growth changes in maize seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Shinkle, J. R.; Roux, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory pigment phytochrome induces rapid and opposite growth changes in different regions of etiolated maize seedlings: it stimulates the elongation rate of coleoptiles and inhibits that of mesocotyls. As measured by a quantitative immunoassay, phytochrome also promotes rapid and opposite changes in the extractable content of a Mr 98,000 anionic isoperoxidase in the cell walls of these same organs: it induces a decrease of this peroxidase in coleoptiles and an increase in mesocotyls. The peroxidase changes precede the growth changes. As measured by video stereomicroscopy or a position transducer, red light (R), which photoactivates phytochrome, stimulates coleoptile elongation with a lag of about 15-20 min and suppresses mesocotyl growth with a lag of 45-50 min. R also induces a 50% reduction in the extractable level of the anionic peroxidase in coleoptile walls in less than 10 min and a 40% increase in the level of this peroxidase in mesocotyl walls within 30 min. Ascorbic acid, an inhibitor of peroxidase activity, blocks the effects of R on mesocotyl section growth. These results are relevant to hypotheses that postulate that certain wall peroxidases can participate in light-induced changes in growth rate by their effects on wall extensibility.

  2. A Temporarily Red Light-Insensitive Mutant of Tomato Lacks a Light-Stable, B-Like Phytochrome.

    PubMed Central

    Van Tuinen, A.; Kerckhoffs, LHJ.; Nagatani, A.; Kendrick, R. E.; Koornneef, M.

    1995-01-01

    We have selected four recessive mutants in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) that, under continuous red light (R), have long hypocotyls and small cotyledons compared to wild type (WT), a phenotype typical of phytochrome B (phyB) mutants of other species. These mutants, which are allelic, are only insensitive to R during the first 2 days upon transition from darkness to R, and therefore we propose the gene symbol tri (temporarily red light insensitive). White light-grown mutant plants have a more elongated growth habit than that of the WT. An immunochemically and spectrophotometrically detectable phyB-like polypeptide detectable in the WT is absent or below detection limits in the tri1 mutant. In contrast to the absence of an elongation growth response to far-red light (FR) given at the end of the daily photoperiod (EODFR) in all phyB-deficient mutants so far characterized, the tri1 mutant responds to EODFR treatment. The tri1 mutant also shows a strong response to supplementary daytime far-red light. We propose that the phyB-like phytochrome deficient in the tri mutants plays a major role during de-etiolation and that other light-stable phytochromes can regulate the EODFR and shade-avoidance responses in tomato. PMID:12228517

  3. Characterization of calibration curves and energy dependence GafChromic{sup TM} XR-QA2 model based radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomic, Nada Quintero, Chrystian; Aldelaijan, Saad; Bekerat, Hamed; Liang, LiHeng; DeBlois, François; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R.; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the energy response of XR-QA2 GafChromic{sup TM} film over a broad energy range used in diagnostic radiology examinations. The authors also made an assessment of the most suitable functions for both reference and relative dose measurements. Methods: Pieces of XR-QA2 film were irradiated to nine different values of air kerma in air, following reference calibration of a number of beam qualities ranging in HVLs from 0.16 to 8.25 mm Al, which corresponds to effective energy range from 12.7 keV to 56.3 keV. For each beam quality, the authors tested three functional forms (rational, linear exponential, and power) to assess the most suitable function by fitting the delivered air kerma in air as a function of film response in terms of reflectance change. The authors also introduced and tested a new parameterχ = netΔR·e{sup m} {sup netΔR} that linearizes the inherently nonlinear response of the film. Results: The authors have found that in the energy range investigated, the response of the XR-QA2 based radiochromic film dosimetry system ranges from 0.222 to 0.420 in terms of netΔR at K{sub air}{sup air} = 8 cGy. For beam qualities commonly used in CT scanners (4.03–8.25 mm Al), the variation in film response (netΔR at K{sub air}{sup air} = 8 cGy) amounts to ± 5%, while variation in K{sub air}{sup air} amounts to ± 14%. Conclusions: Results of our investigation revealed that the use of XR-QA2 GafChromic{sup TM} film is accompanied by a rather pronounced energy dependent response for beam qualities used for x-ray based diagnostic imaging purposes. The authors also found that the most appropriate function for the reference radiochromic film dosimetry would be the power function, while for the relative dosimetry one may use the exponential response function that can be easily linearized.

  4. Photochromic conversion in a red/green cyanobacteriochrome from Synechocystis PCC6803: quantum yields in solution and photoswitching dynamics in living E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Pennacchietti, Francesca; Losi, Aba; Xu, Xiu-ling; Zhao, Kai-hong; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Viappiani, Cristiano; Cella, Francesca; Diaspro, Alberto; Abbruzzetti, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    The protein encoded by the gene slr1393 from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Slr1393) is composed of three GAF domains, a PAS domain, and a histidine kinase motif. The third GAF domain (referred to as GAF3) was previously characterized as the sole domain in this protein, being able to carry phycocyanobilin (PCB) as the chromophore and to accomplish photochemistry. GAF3 shows photochromicity, and is able to switch between a red-absorbing parental state (GAF3R, λmax = 649 nm) and a green-absorbing photoproduct state (GAF3G, λmax = 536 nm) upon appropriate irradiation. In this study we have determined the photochemical quantum yields for the interconversion between both forms using two methods: an "absolute" method and a reference-based control. The latter is a comparative procedure which exploits a well-characterized blue-light photoreceptor, YtvA from Bacillus subtilis, and the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 as actinometers. The former is an ad hoc developed, four laser-based setup where two cw lasers provide the pump beams to induce photoswitching (red to green and green to red, respectively) and two cw lasers simultaneously monitor the appearance and disappearance of the two species. Interestingly, fit analysis of the recorded transient absorbance changes provided a quantum yield for the green → red conversion (≈0.3) at least three times larger than for the red → green conversion (≈0.08). These data are in agreement with the results from the comparative method documenting the usefulness of the 'direct' method developed here for quantum yields' determination. The light-induced switching capability of this photochromic protein allowed measuring the kinetics of GAF3 immobilized on a glass plate, and within living, overexpressing Escherichia coli cells. PMID:25358617

  5. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of (13)C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, (13)C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS (13)C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely

  6. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  7. Light-Activated Phytochrome A and B Interact with Members of the SPA Family to Promote Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis by Reorganizing the COP1/SPA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sheerin, David J.; Menon, Chiara; zur Oven-Krockhaus, Sven; Enderle, Beatrix; Zhu, Ling; Johnen, Philipp; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes function as red/far-red photoreceptors in plants and are essential for light-regulated growth and development. Photomorphogenesis, the developmental program in light, is the default program in seed plants. In dark-grown seedlings, photomorphogenic growth is suppressed by the action of the CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1)/SUPPRESSOR OF phyA-105 (SPA) complex, which targets positive regulators of photomorphogenic growth for degradation by the proteasome. Phytochromes inhibit the COP1/SPA complex, leading to the accumulation of transcription factors promoting photomorphogenesis; yet, the mechanism by which they inactivate COP1/SPA is still unknown. Here, we show that light-activated phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) interact with SPA1 and other SPA proteins. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analyses show that SPAs and phytochromes colocalize and interact in nuclear bodies. Furthermore, light-activated phyA and phyB disrupt the interaction between COP1 and SPAs, resulting in reorganization of the COP1/SPA complex in planta. The light-induced stabilization of HFR1, a photomorphogenic factor targeted for degradation by COP1/SPA, correlates temporally with the accumulation of phyA in the nucleus and localization of phyA to nuclear bodies. Overall, these data provide a molecular mechanism for the inactivation of the COP1/SPA complex by phyA- and phyB-mediated light perception. PMID:25627066

  8. Light-activated phytochrome A and B interact with members of the SPA family to promote photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis by reorganizing the COP1/SPA complex.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, David J; Menon, Chiara; zur Oven-Krockhaus, Sven; Enderle, Beatrix; Zhu, Ling; Johnen, Philipp; Schleifenbaum, Frank; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Huq, Enamul; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes function as red/far-red photoreceptors in plants and are essential for light-regulated growth and development. Photomorphogenesis, the developmental program in light, is the default program in seed plants. In dark-grown seedlings, photomorphogenic growth is suppressed by the action of the CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1)/SUPPRESSOR OF phyA-105 (SPA) complex, which targets positive regulators of photomorphogenic growth for degradation by the proteasome. Phytochromes inhibit the COP1/SPA complex, leading to the accumulation of transcription factors promoting photomorphogenesis; yet, the mechanism by which they inactivate COP1/SPA is still unknown. Here, we show that light-activated phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) interact with SPA1 and other SPA proteins. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analyses show that SPAs and phytochromes colocalize and interact in nuclear bodies. Furthermore, light-activated phyA and phyB disrupt the interaction between COP1 and SPAs, resulting in reorganization of the COP1/SPA complex in planta. The light-induced stabilization of HFR1, a photomorphogenic factor targeted for degradation by COP1/SPA, correlates temporally with the accumulation of phyA in the nucleus and localization of phyA to nuclear bodies. Overall, these data provide a molecular mechanism for the inactivation of the COP1/SPA complex by phyA- and phyB-mediated light perception.

  9. Multiscale photoacoustic tomography using reversibly switchable bacterial phytochrome as a near-infrared photochromic probe.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of genetically encoded probes allows for imaging of targeted biological processes deep in tissues with high spatial resolution; however, high background signals from blood can limit the achievable detection sensitivity. Here we describe a reversibly switchable nonfluorescent bacterial phytochrome for use in multiscale photoacoustic imaging, BphP1, with the most red-shifted absorption among genetically encoded probes. BphP1 binds a heme-derived biliverdin chromophore and is reversibly photoconvertible between red and near-infrared light-absorption states. We combined single-wavelength PAT with efficient BphP1 photoswitching, which enabled differential imaging with substantially decreased background signals, enhanced detection sensitivity, increased penetration depth and improved spatial resolution. We monitored tumor growth and metastasis with ∼ 100-μm resolution at depths approaching 10 mm using photoacoustic computed tomography, and we imaged individual cancer cells with a suboptical-diffraction resolution of ∼ 140 nm using photoacoustic microscopy. This technology is promising for biomedical studies at several scales. PMID:26550774

  10. Phytochrome is required for the occurrence of time-dependent phototropism in maize coleoptiles

    PubMed

    Liu, Y J; Iino, M

    1996-12-01

    Time-dependent phototropism (TDP), sometimes called second positive curvature, occurs when the duration of phototropic stimulation with blue light (B) exceeds a few minutes. TDP was characterized in maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles raised under continuous red light (R). Subsequently, coleoptiles adapted to darkness were used to investigate the effect of R on TDP. It was found that TDP, which is induced in R-grown coleoptiles, does not occur in dark-adapted coleoptiles and that dark-adapted coleoptiles begin to show TDP after treatment with R. The TDP responsiveness became maximal 1-2 h after treatment with a R pulse and decreased during the next few hours. At least 10 min was required after a short pulse of R before the coleoptile began to respond to B for the induction of TDP. The effect of R in establishing the TDP responsiveness was totally suppressed by a pulse of far-red light given immediately after an inductive pulse of R. It is concluded that the mechanism of TDP requires for its establishment a R signal perceived by phytochrome. The TDP of R-grown and R-pretreated coleoptiles showed relationships to stimulation times and fluence rates that are similar to those reported for oat coleoptiles, except that TDP of maize showed a sharp increase in its magnitude within a narrow range of stimulation times as short as 5-10 min. PMID:11539322

  11. Phytochrome A Mediates Blue-Light Enhancement of Second-Positive Phototropism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stuart; Hart, Jaynee E.; Rasch, Patrick; Walker, Catriona H.; Christie, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypocotyl phototropism of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings is primarily mediated by the blue-light receptor kinase phototropin 1 (phot1). Phot1-mediated curvature to continuous unilateral blue light irradiation (0.5 μmol m−2 s−1) is enhanced by overhead pre-treatment with red light (20 μmol m−2 s−1 for 15 min) through the action of phytochrome (phyA). Here, we show that pre-treatment with blue light is equally as effective in eliciting phototropic enhancement and is dependent on phyA. Although blue light pre-treatment was sufficient to activate early phot1 signaling events, phot1 autophosphorylation in vivo was not found to be saturated, as assessed by subsequently measuring phot1 kinase activity in vitro. However, enhancement effects by red and blue light pre-treatment were not observed at higher intensities of phototropic stimulation (10 μmol m−2 s−1). Phototropic enhancement by red and blue light pre-treatments to 0.5 μmol m−2 s−1 unilateral blue light irradiation was also lacking in transgenic Arabidopsis where PHOT1 expression was restricted to the epidermis. Together, these findings indicate that phyA-mediated effects on phot1 signaling are restricted to low intensities of phototropic stimulation and originate from tissues other than the epidermis. PMID:27014313

  12. Convergence of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 and PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR signalling during shade avoidance.

    PubMed

    Pacín, Manuel; Semmoloni, Mariana; Legris, Martina; Finlayson, Scott A; Casal, Jorge J

    2016-08-01

    Shade-avoidance responses require CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 (COP1) but the mechanisms of action of COP1 under shade have not been elucidated. Using simulated shade and control conditions, we analysed: the transcriptome and the auxin levels of cop1 and phytochrome interacting factor 1 (pif1) pif3 pif4 pif5 (pifq) mutants; the dynamics of ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) and LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED (HFR1) proteins; and the epistatic relationships between cop1 and pif3, pif4, pif5, hy5 and hfr1 mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite severely impaired shade-avoidance responses, only a few genes that responded to shade in the wild-type failed to do so in cop1. Shade enhanced the convergence between cop1 and pifq transcriptomes, mainly on shade-avoidance marker genes. Shade failed to increase auxin levels in cop1. Residual shade avoidance in cop1 was not further reduced by the pif3, pif4 or pif5 mutations, suggesting convergent pathways. HFR1 stability decreased under shade in a COP1-dependent manner but shade increased HY5 stability. The cop1 mutant retains responses to shade and is more specifically impaired in shade avoidance. COP1 promotes the degradation of HFR1 under shade, thus increasing the ability of PIFs to control gene expression, increase auxin levels and promote stem growth.

  13. Multiscale photoacoustic tomography using reversibly switchable bacterial phytochrome as a near-infrared photochromic probe.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of genetically encoded probes allows for imaging of targeted biological processes deep in tissues with high spatial resolution; however, high background signals from blood can limit the achievable detection sensitivity. Here we describe a reversibly switchable nonfluorescent bacterial phytochrome for use in multiscale photoacoustic imaging, BphP1, with the most red-shifted absorption among genetically encoded probes. BphP1 binds a heme-derived biliverdin chromophore and is reversibly photoconvertible between red and near-infrared light-absorption states. We combined single-wavelength PAT with efficient BphP1 photoswitching, which enabled differential imaging with substantially decreased background signals, enhanced detection sensitivity, increased penetration depth and improved spatial resolution. We monitored tumor growth and metastasis with ∼ 100-μm resolution at depths approaching 10 mm using photoacoustic computed tomography, and we imaged individual cancer cells with a suboptical-diffraction resolution of ∼ 140 nm using photoacoustic microscopy. This technology is promising for biomedical studies at several scales.

  14. Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON1 Mediates Postembryonic Development via Interacting with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR4[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingkun; Hu, Yilong; Li, Yuge

    2015-01-01

    Plants undergo postembryonic growth during the developmental transition from germinating seeds to seedlings. Recent studies suggest LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1), initially identified as a central regulator in embryogenesis and seed maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana, plays a distinct role in postembryonic development. However, the mechanism by which LEC1 regulates nonembryonic development still remains elusive. In this study, we observed etiolation-related phenotypes in early seedlings of lec1 mutants and inducible LEC1 overexpression transgenic lines. Consistent with this, LEC1 promotes the expression of hypocotyl elongation-related genes in a darkness-dependent manner in spite of the comparable LEC1 transcript levels in the light- and dark-grown seedlings. Furthermore, we show that LEC1 interacts with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4), a major transcription modulator in postgermination development, to interdependently regulate hypocotyl elongation-related genes via direct binding to G-box element in the dark. Moreover, loss of LEC1 function suppresses the elongated hypocotyl phenotype of PIF-overaccumulating plants; conversely, inducible overexpression of LEC1 does not rescue the short hypocotyl in pif4 mutants. Our findings reveal that LEC1 acts as a coactivator of PIFs in transcriptional regulation during postembryonic growth, providing a possible mechanism by which plants fine-tune morphological development for their survival during the transition from the embryonic phase to seedling establishment. PMID:26566918

  15. Phytochrome RNAi enhances major fibre quality and agronomic traits of the cotton Gossypium hirsutum L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y.; Buriev, Zabardast T.; Saha, Sukumar; Jenkins, Johnie N.; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor; Pepper, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous improvement of fibre quality, early-flowering, early-maturity and productivity in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a challenging task for conventional breeding. The influence of red/far-red light ratio on the fibre length prompted us to examine the phenotypic effects of RNA interference (RNAi) of the cotton PHYA1 gene. Here we show a suppression of up to ~70% for the PHYA1 transcript, and compensatory overexpression of up to ~20-fold in the remaining phytochromes in somatically regenerated PHYA1 RNAi cotton plants. Two independent transformants of three generations exhibited vigorous root and vegetative growth, early-flowering, significantly improved upper half mean fibre length and an improvement in other major fibre characteristics. Small decreases in lint traits were observed but seed cotton yield was increased an average 10-17% compared with controls. RNAi-associated phenotypes were heritable and transferable via sexual hybridization. These results should aid in the development of early-maturing and productive Upland cultivars with superior fibre quality.

  16. PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) regulates auxin biosynthesis at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Keara A.; Lee, Sang Ho; Patel, Dhaval; Kumar, S. Vinod; Spartz, Angela K.; Gu, Chen; Ye, Songqing; Yu, Peng; Breen, Gordon; Cohen, Jerry D.; Wigge, Philip A.; Gray, William M.

    2011-01-01

    At high ambient temperature, plants display dramatic stem elongation in an adaptive response to heat. This response is mediated by elevated levels of the phytohormone auxin and requires auxin biosynthesis, signaling, and transport pathways. The mechanisms by which higher temperature results in greater auxin accumulation are unknown, however. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4), is also required for hypocotyl elongation in response to high temperature. PIF4 also acts redundantly with its homolog, PIF5, to regulate diurnal growth rhythms and elongation responses to the threat of vegetative shade. PIF4 activity is reportedly limited in part by binding to both the basic helix-loop-helix protein LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED 1 and the DELLA family of growth-repressing proteins. Despite the importance of PIF4 in integrating multiple environmental signals, the mechanisms by which PIF4 controls growth are unknown. Here we demonstrate that PIF4 regulates levels of auxin and the expression of key auxin biosynthesis genes at high temperature. We also identify a family of SMALL AUXIN UP RNA (SAUR) genes that are expressed at high temperature in a PIF4-dependent manner and promote elongation growth. Taken together, our results demonstrate direct molecular links among PIF4, auxin, and elongation growth at high temperature. PMID:22123947

  17. The Tissue-Specific Expression of a Tobacco Phytochrome B Gene.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, E.; Kozma-Bognar, L.; Kolar, C.; Schafer, E.; Nagy, F.

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a genomic clone from Nicotiana tabacum, designated Nt-PHYB-1, encoding a type-II, "green tissue" phytochrome apoprotein. Recombinant genes, consisting of the 3319-bp promoter of the Nt-PHYB-1 gene (including the entire 5[prime] untranslated sequence but not the ATG) or its deletion derivatives and the bacterial [beta]-glucuronidase reporter gene, were constructed and transferred into tobacco. The expression patterns and levels of the endogenous Nt-PHYB-1, as well as those of the transgenes, were determined by RNase protection assays and by [beta]-glucuronidase histochemical staining. We show that (a) the PHYB-1 gene has three transcription start sites, (b) the abundance of the three PHYB-1-specific mRNAs is different, and that (c) it is not regulated by light. However, we do demonstrate that transcription of the endogenous PHYB-1 gene and that of the recombinant genes exhibit a well-defined organ and tissue specificity. This tobacco PHYB gene is relatively highly expressed in leaf, stem, and different floral organs but not in root. Deletion analysis of the Nt-PHYB-1 promoter indicates that a 382-bp region, located between -1472 and -1089, is required for high-level expression of this gene. PMID:12226242

  18. Convergence of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 and PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR signalling during shade avoidance.

    PubMed

    Pacín, Manuel; Semmoloni, Mariana; Legris, Martina; Finlayson, Scott A; Casal, Jorge J

    2016-08-01

    Shade-avoidance responses require CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 (COP1) but the mechanisms of action of COP1 under shade have not been elucidated. Using simulated shade and control conditions, we analysed: the transcriptome and the auxin levels of cop1 and phytochrome interacting factor 1 (pif1) pif3 pif4 pif5 (pifq) mutants; the dynamics of ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) and LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED (HFR1) proteins; and the epistatic relationships between cop1 and pif3, pif4, pif5, hy5 and hfr1 mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite severely impaired shade-avoidance responses, only a few genes that responded to shade in the wild-type failed to do so in cop1. Shade enhanced the convergence between cop1 and pifq transcriptomes, mainly on shade-avoidance marker genes. Shade failed to increase auxin levels in cop1. Residual shade avoidance in cop1 was not further reduced by the pif3, pif4 or pif5 mutations, suggesting convergent pathways. HFR1 stability decreased under shade in a COP1-dependent manner but shade increased HY5 stability. The cop1 mutant retains responses to shade and is more specifically impaired in shade avoidance. COP1 promotes the degradation of HFR1 under shade, thus increasing the ability of PIFs to control gene expression, increase auxin levels and promote stem growth. PMID:27105120

  19. Phytochrome A Mediates Blue-Light Enhancement of Second-Positive Phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stuart; Hart, Jaynee E; Rasch, Patrick; Walker, Catriona H; Christie, John M

    2016-01-01

    Hypocotyl phototropism of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings is primarily mediated by the blue-light receptor kinase phototropin 1 (phot1). Phot1-mediated curvature to continuous unilateral blue light irradiation (0.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) is enhanced by overhead pre-treatment with red light (20 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 15 min) through the action of phytochrome (phyA). Here, we show that pre-treatment with blue light is equally as effective in eliciting phototropic enhancement and is dependent on phyA. Although blue light pre-treatment was sufficient to activate early phot1 signaling events, phot1 autophosphorylation in vivo was not found to be saturated, as assessed by subsequently measuring phot1 kinase activity in vitro. However, enhancement effects by red and blue light pre-treatment were not observed at higher intensities of phototropic stimulation (10 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Phototropic enhancement by red and blue light pre-treatments to 0.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1) unilateral blue light irradiation was also lacking in transgenic Arabidopsis where PHOT1 expression was restricted to the epidermis. Together, these findings indicate that phyA-mediated effects on phot1 signaling are restricted to low intensities of phototropic stimulation and originate from tissues other than the epidermis. PMID:27014313

  20. Characterization of photomorphogenic responses and signaling cascades controlled by phytochrome-A expressed in different tissues.

    PubMed

    Kirchenbauer, Daniel; Viczián, András; Ádám, Éva; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Klose, Cornelia; Leppert, Michael; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Kircher, Stefan; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2016-07-01

    The photoreceptor phytochrome A acts as a light-dependent molecular switch and regulates responses initiated by very low fluences of light (VLFR) and high fluences (HIR) of far-red light. PhyA is expressed ubiquitously, but how phyA signaling is orchestrated to regulate photomorphogenesis is poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana phyA-201 mutant lines expressing the biologically active phyA-YFP photoreceptor in different tissues, and analyzed the expression of several reporter genes, including ProHY5:HY5-GFP and Pro35S:CFP-PIF1, and various FR-HIR-dependent physiological responses. We show that phyA action in one tissue is critical and sufficient to regulate flowering time and root growth; control of cotyledon and hypocotyl growth requires simultaneous phyA activity in different tissues; and changes detected in the expression of reporters are not restricted to phyA-containing cells. We conclude that FR-HIR-controlled morphogenesis in Arabidopsis is mediated partly by tissue-specific and partly by intercellular signaling initiated by phyA. Intercellular signaling is critical for many FR-HIR induced responses, yet it appears that phyA modulates the abundance and activity of key regulatory transcription factors in a tissue-autonomous fashion. PMID:27027866

  1. Phytochrome Responses to End-of-Day Irradiations in Light-grown Corn Grown in the Presence and Absence of Sandoz 9789 1

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, Holly L.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1980-01-01

    Corn seedlings were grown in white light in the absence and presence of the chlorosis-inducing herbicide San 9789. The resulting green and achlorophyllous seedlings were used to investigate phytochrome-mediated responses to end-of-day far red irradiation and reversal of these responses by subsequent red irradiation. Mesocotyl and coleoptile elongation increased in response to end-of-day far red irradiation, whereas the anthocyanin content of the coleoptiles was decreased. All three responses were reversible by red irradiation following the far red. Dose-response curves for far red induction and red reversal of these responses did not differ significantly for plants grown in the presence or absence of San 9789. Thus, San 9789 appears to affect neither phytochrome itself nor the response system involved. Chlorophyll screening likewise does not affect phytochrome relationships for these responses. PMID:16661569

  2. Mutational Analysis of Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteriophytochrome Reveals Key Amino Acids Necessary for the Photochromicity and Proton Exchange Cycle of Phytochromes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; von Stetten, David; Günther, Mina; Murgida, Daniel H.; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Walker, Joseph M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of phytochromes (Phy) to act as photointerconvertible light switches in plants and microorganisms depends on key interactions between the bilin chromophore and the apoprotein that promote bilin attachment and photointerconversion between the spectrally distinct red light-absorbing Pr conformer and far red light-absorbing Pfr conformer. Using structurally guided site-directed mutagenesis combined with several spectroscopic methods, we examined the roles of conserved amino acids within the bilin-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome with respect to chromophore ligation and Pr/Pfr photoconversion. Incorporation of biliverdin IXα (BV), its structure in the Pr state, and its ability to photoisomerize to the first photocycle intermediate are insensitive to most single mutations, implying that these properties are robust with respect to small structural/electrostatic alterations in the binding pocket. In contrast, photoconversion to Pfr is highly sensitive to the chromophore environment. Many of the variants form spectrally bleached Meta-type intermediates in red light that do not relax to Pfr. Particularly important are Asp-207 and His-260, which are invariant within the Phy superfamily and participate in a unique hydrogen bond matrix involving the A, B, and C pyrrole ring nitrogens of BV and their associated pyrrole water. Resonance Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that substitutions of these residues disrupt the Pr to Pfr protonation cycle of BV with the chromophore locked in a deprotonated Meta-Rc-like photoconversion intermediate after red light irradiation. Collectively, the data show that a number of contacts contribute to the unique photochromicity of Phy-type photoreceptors. These include residues that fix the bilin in the pocket, coordinate the pyrrole water, and possibly promote the proton exchange cycle during photoconversion. PMID:18192276

  3. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, André M; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Quail, Peter H; Margarida Oliveira, M; Saibo, Nelson J M

    2016-02-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  4. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of Phytochrome B

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A.; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Quail, Peter H.; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2016-01-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a Phytochrome Interacting Factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  5. Heat Shock–Induced Fluctuations in Clock and Light Signaling Enhance Phytochrome B–Mediated Arabidopsis Deetiolation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Karayekov, Elizabeth; Sellaro, Romina; Legris, Martina; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Casal, Jorge J.

    2013-01-01

    Moderately warm constant ambient temperatures tend to oppose light signals in the control of plant architecture. By contrast, here we show that brief heat shocks enhance the inhibition of hypocotyl growth induced by light perceived by phytochrome B in deetiolating Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. In darkness, daily heat shocks transiently increased the expression of PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9 and markedly enhanced the amplitude of the rhythms of LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) expression. In turn, these rhythms gated the hypocotyl response to red light, in part by changing the expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5. After light exposure, heat shocks also reduced the nuclear abundance of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) and increased the abundance of its target ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). The synergism between light and heat shocks was deficient in the prr7 prr9, lhy cca1, pif4 pif5, cop1, and hy5 mutants. The evening element (binding site of LHY and CCA1) and G-box promoter motifs (binding site of PIFs and HY5) were overrepresented among genes with expression controlled by both heat shock and red light. The heat shocks experienced by buried seedlings approaching the surface of the soil prepare the seedlings for the impending exposure to light by rhythmically lowering LHY, CCA1, PIF4, and PIF5 expression and by enhancing HY5 stability. PMID:23933882

  6. Femtosecond dynamics in the lactim tautomer of phycocyanobilin: a long-wavelength absorbing model compound for the phytochrome chromophore.

    PubMed

    Singer, Patrick; Fey, Sonja; Göller, Andreas H; Hermann, Gudrun; Diller, Rolf

    2014-12-01

    Transient UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy is used to study the primary dynamics of the ring-A methyl imino ether of phycocyanobilin (PCB-AIE), which was shown to mimic the far-red absorbance of the Pfr chromophore in phytochromes (R. Micura, K. Grubmayr, Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.- 1994, 4, 2517-2522). After excitation at 615 nm, the excited electronic state is found to decay with τ1 =0.4 ps followed by electronic ground-state relaxation with τ2 =1.2 and τ3 =6.7 ps. Compared with phycocyanobilin (PCB), the initial kinetics of PCB-AIE is much faster. Thus, the lactim structure of PCB-AIE seems to be a suitable model that could not only explain the bathochromic shift in the ground-state absorption but also the short reaction of the Pfr as compared to the Pr chromophore in phytochrome. In addition, the equivalence of ring-A and ring-D lactim tautomers with respect to a red-shifted absorbance relative to the lactam tautomers is demonstrated by semiempirical calculations. PMID:25196062

  7. Blockage by gibberellic Acid of phytochrome effects on growth, auxin responses, and flavonoid synthesis in etiolated pea internodes.

    PubMed

    Russell, D W; Galston, A W

    1969-09-01

    Red light inhibits the growth of etiolated pea internodes, causes a shift toward higher indoleacetic acid (IAA) concentrations in the IAA dose-response curve of excised sections, and promotes the synthesis in intact internodes of kaempferol-3-triglucoside. Gibberellic acid (GA(3)) prevents all 3 effects, the first effect substantially and the last 2 completely. This suggests GA(3) blockage of an early or basic event initiated by the active form of phytochrome. The red light-induced shift in the IAA dose-response curve of excised sections is consistent with a light-induced increase in the activity of an IAA destruction system, since the magnitude of the red light inhibition varied with IAA concentration. The red light and GA(3) effects on growth and on flavonoid synthesis are consistent with the view that phytochrome may control growth by regulating the synthesis of phenolic compounds which act as cofactors in an IAA-oxidase system. GA(3) reversal of the red light-induced shift in the IAA dose-response curve involves both growth promotion and inhibition by GA(3) at different IAA concentrations and this, together with the GA(3) reversal of light-induced flavonoid synthesis, supports the suggested regulatory role of phenolic compounds in growth. PMID:16657193

  8. In Vivo Assessment of Cold Tolerance through Chlorophyll-a Fluorescence in Transgenic Zoysiagrass Expressing Mutant Phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Gururani, Mayank Anand; Venkatesh, Jelli; Ganesan, Markkandan; Strasser, Reto Jörg; Han, Yunjeong; Kim, Jeong-Il; Lee, Hyo-Yeon; Song, Pill-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll-a fluorescence analysis provides relevant information about the physiology of plants growing under abiotic stress. In this study, we evaluated the influence of cold stress on the photosynthetic machinery of transgenic turfgrass, Zoysia japonica, expressing oat phytochrome A (PhyA) or a hyperactive mutant phytochrome A (S599A) with post-translational phosphorylation blocked. Biochemical analysis of zoysiagrass subjected to cold stress revealed reduced levels of hydrogen peroxide, increased proline accumulation, and enhanced specific activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to those of control plants. Detailed analyses of the chlorophyll-a fluorescence data through the so-called OJIP test exhibited a marked difference in the physiological status among transgenic and control plants. Overall, these findings suggest an enhanced level of cold tolerance in S599A zoysiagrass cultivars as reflected in the biochemical and physiological analyses. Further, we propose that chlorophyll-a fluorescence analysis using OJIP test is an efficient tool in determining the physiological status of plants under cold stress conditions.

  9. The phytochrome-interacting vascular plant one-zinc finger1 and VOZ2 redundantly regulate flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yukiko; Mukougawa, Keiko; Uemoto, Mitsuhiro; Yokofuji, Akira; Suzuri, Ryota; Nishitani, Aiko; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2012-08-01

    The timing of the transition to flowering in plants is regulated by various environmental factors, including daylength and light quality. Although the red/far-red photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB) represses flowering by indirectly regulating the expression of a key flowering regulator, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), the mechanism of phyB signaling for flowering is largely unknown. Here, we identified two Arabidopsis thaliana genes, VASCULAR PLANT ONE-ZINC FINGER1 (VOZ1) and VOZ2, which are highly conserved throughout land plant evolution, as phyB-interacting factors. voz1 voz2 double mutants, but neither single mutant, showed a late-flowering phenotype under long-day conditions, which indicated that VOZ1 and VOZ2 redundantly promote flowering. voz1 voz2 mutations suppressed the early-flowering phenotype of the phyB mutant, and FT expression was repressed in the voz1 voz2 mutant. Green fluorescent protein-VOZ2 signal was observed in the cytoplasm, and interaction of VOZ proteins with phyB was indicated to occur in the cytoplasm under far-red light. However, VOZ2 protein modified to localize constitutively in the nucleus promoted flowering. In addition, the stability of VOZ2 proteins in the nucleus was modulated by light quality in a phytochrome-dependent manner. We propose that partial translocation of VOZ proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus mediates the initial step of the phyB signal transduction pathway that regulates flowering.

  10. Phytochrome A Mediates the Promotion of Seed Germination by Very Low Fluences of Light and Canopy Shade Light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Botto, J. F.; Sanchez, R. A.; Whitelam, G. C.; Casal, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Seeds of the wild type (WT) and of the phyA and phyB mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to single red light (R)/far-red light (FR) pulses predicted to establish a series of calculated phytochrome photoequilibria (Pfr/P). WT and phyB seeds showed biphasic responses to Pfr/P. The first phase, i.e. the very-low-fluence response (VLFR), occurred below Pfr/P = 10-1%. The second phase, i.e. the low-fluence response, occurred above Pfr/P = 3%. The VLFR was similarly induced by either a FR pulse saturating photoconversion or a subsaturating R pulse predicted to establish the same Pfr/P. The VLFR was absent in phyA seeds, which showed a strong low-fluence response. In the field, even brief exposures to the very low fluences of canopy shade light (R/FR ratio < 0.05) promoted germination above dark controls in WT and phyB seeds but not in the phyA mutant. Seeds of the phyA mutant germinated normally under canopies providing higher R/FR ratios or under deep canopy shade light supplemented with R from light-emitting diodes. We propose that phytochrome A mediates VLFR of A. thaliana seeds. PMID:12226195

  11. Phytochrome B-mediated activation of lipoxygenase modulates an excess red light-induced defence response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jun; Xing, Da

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX), a non-haem-iron-containing dioxygenase, is activated under various biotic or abiotic stresses to trigger a series resistance response, but the molecular mechanism of LOX activation remains unclear. This work investigated the activation of LOX during the plant defence response induced by excess red light (RL). In conditions of RL-induced defence, Arabidopsis LOX activity and transcription levels of LOX2, LOX3, and LOX4 were both upregulated. Under RL, phytochrome B promoted the degradation of phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3), a factor that inhibited the expression levels of LOXs, and thus the transcription levels of LOX2, LOX3, and LOX4 were increased. Upon pathogen infection, the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3) and MPK6 was increased in plants pre-treated with RL. Moreover, experiments with the inhibitor PD98059 and mutants mpk3 and mpk6-2 demonstrated that MPK3 and MPK6 were both responsible for LOX activation. Further results showed that, in response to RL, an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration and upregulation of calmodulin 3 (CaM3) transcript level occurred upstream of MPK3 and MPK6 activation. Collectively, these results suggested that activation of LOX both at the transcript level and in terms of activity modulates the defence response induced by RL, providing a new insight into the mechanistic study of LOX during plant defences. PMID:24916071

  12. Phytochrome and Ethylene Signaling Integration in Arabidopsis Occurs via the Transcriptional Regulation of Genes Co-targeted by PIFs and EIN3.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jinkil; Kim, Keunhwa; Kim, Mi E; Kim, Hye G; Heo, Gwi S; Park, Ohkmae K; Park, Youn-Il; Choi, Giltsu; Oh, Eunkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Plant seedlings germinating under the soil are challenged by rough soil grains that can induce physical damage and sudden exposure to light, which can induce photobleaching. Seedlings overcome these challenges by developing apical hooks and by suppressing chlorophyll precursor biosynthesis. These adaptive responses are, respectively, regulated by the phytochrome and ethylene signaling pathways via the PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs) and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3 (EIN3)/EIN3-LIKE transcription factors. Although many processes downstream of phytochrome and ethylene signaling are similar, it remains unclear if and where these pathways converge. Here, we show PIFs and EIN3 induce similar changes in the transcriptome without robustly regulating each other's signaling pathways. PIFs and EIN3 target highly overlapped gene promoters and activate subsets of the co-target genes either interdependently or additively to induce plant responses. For chlorophyll biosynthesis, PIFs and EIN3 target and interdependently activate the expression of HOOKLESS1. HOOKLESS1, in turn, represses chlorophyll synthesis genes to prevent photobleaching. Thus, our results indicate an integration of the phytochrome and ethylene signaling pathways at the level of transcriptional gene regulation by two core groups of transcription factors, PIFs and EIN3. PMID:27486469

  13. PIL5, a Phytochrome-Interacting Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Protein, Is a Key Negative Regulator of Seed Germination in Arabidopsis thalianaW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eunkyoo; Kim, Jonghyun; Park, Eunae; Kim, Jeong-Il; Kang, Changwon; Choi, Giltsu

    2004-01-01

    The first decision made by an angiosperm seed, whether to germinate or not, is based on integration of various environmental signals such as water and light. The phytochromes (Phys) act as red and far-red light (Pfr) photoreceptors to mediate light signaling through yet uncharacterized pathways. We report here that the PIF3-like 5 (PIL5) protein, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is a key negative regulator of phytochrome-mediated seed germination. PIL5 preferentially interacts with the Pfr forms of Phytochrome A (PhyA) and Phytochrome B (PhyB). Analyses of a pil5 mutant in conjunction with phyA and phyB mutants, a pif3 pil5 double mutant, and PIL5 overexpression lines indicate that PIL5 is a negative factor in Phy-mediated promotion of seed germination, inhibition of hypocotyl negative gravitropism, and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Our data identify PIL5 as the first Phy-interacting protein that regulates seed germination. PMID:15486102

  14. Phytochrome and Ethylene Signaling Integration in Arabidopsis Occurs via the Transcriptional Regulation of Genes Co-targeted by PIFs and EIN3

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jinkil; Kim, Keunhwa; Kim, Mi E.; Kim, Hye G.; Heo, Gwi S.; Park, Ohkmae K.; Park, Youn-Il; Choi, Giltsu; Oh, Eunkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Plant seedlings germinating under the soil are challenged by rough soil grains that can induce physical damage and sudden exposure to light, which can induce photobleaching. Seedlings overcome these challenges by developing apical hooks and by suppressing chlorophyll precursor biosynthesis. These adaptive responses are, respectively, regulated by the phytochrome and ethylene signaling pathways via the PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs) and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3 (EIN3)/EIN3-LIKE transcription factors. Although many processes downstream of phytochrome and ethylene signaling are similar, it remains unclear if and where these pathways converge. Here, we show PIFs and EIN3 induce similar changes in the transcriptome without robustly regulating each other’s signaling pathways. PIFs and EIN3 target highly overlapped gene promoters and activate subsets of the co-target genes either interdependently or additively to induce plant responses. For chlorophyll biosynthesis, PIFs and EIN3 target and interdependently activate the expression of HOOKLESS1. HOOKLESS1, in turn, represses chlorophyll synthesis genes to prevent photobleaching. Thus, our results indicate an integration of the phytochrome and ethylene signaling pathways at the level of transcriptional gene regulation by two core groups of transcription factors, PIFs and EIN3. PMID:27486469

  15. A Photo-Labile Thioether Linkage to Phycoviolobilin Provides the Foundation for the Blue/Green Photocycles in DXCF-Cyanobacteriochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Burgie, E. Sethe; Walker, Joseph M.; George N. Phillips Jr.; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2013-01-08

    The phytochrome superfamily encompasses a diverse collection of photochromic photoreceptors in plants and microorganisms that employ a covalently linked bilin cradled in a cGMP-phosphodiesterase/adenylyl-cyclase/FhlA (GAF) domain to detect light. Whereas most interconvert between red- and far-red-light-absorbing states, cyanobacteria also express variants called cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that modify bilin absorption to collectively perceive the entire visible spectrum. Here, we present two X-ray crystallographic structures of the GAF domain from the blue/green photochromic CBCR PixJ from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, these structures confirm the hypothesis that CBCRs variably manipulate the chromophore π-conjugation system through isomerization and a second thioether linkage, in this case involving the bilin C10 carbon and Cys494 within a DXCF sequence characteristic of blue/green CBCRs. Biochemical studies support a mechanism for photoconversion whereby the second linkage ruptures on route to the green-light-absorbing state. All together, theTePixJ(GAF) models illustrate the remarkable structural and photochemical versatility among phytochromes and CBCRs in driving light perception.

  16. The photoactivated PYP domain of Rhodospirillum centenum Ppr accelerates the recovery of the bacteriophytochrome domain after white light illumination.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, John A; Fitch, John C; Meyer, Terry E; Cusanovich, Michael A

    2007-07-17

    Ppr from the purple phototrophic bacterium, Rhodospirillum centenum (also known as Rhodocista centenaria), is a hybrid of photoactive yellow protein (PYP), bacteriophytochrome (Bph), and histidine kinase (HK) domains. The holo-Ppr (containing both chromophores) exhibits characteristic absorption maxima at 435 nm due to the PYP domain and at 400, 642, and 701 nm due to the Bph domain. Illumination of the Ppr with white light causes a bleach of both PYP and Bph absorbance; weak blue light primarily bleaches the PYP, and red light activates only the Bph. When excited by blue light, the PYP domain in Ppr recovers with biphasic kinetics at 445 nm (32% with a lifetime of 3.8 min and the remainder with a lifetime of 46 min); white light primarily results in fast recovery, whereas the 130-residue PYP construct shows only the faster kinetics in both blue and white light. Furthermore, there is a slight red shift of the ground state Bph when the PYP is activated; thus, both spectroscopy and kinetics suggest interdomain communication. When Ppr is illuminated with red light, the recovery of the Bph domain to the dark state is significantly slower than that of PYP and is biphasic (57% of the 701 nm decay has a lifetime of 17 min and the remainder a lifetime of 50 min). However, when illuminated with white light or red followed by blue light, the Bph domain in Ppr recovers to the dark-adapted state in a triphasic fashion, where the fastest phase is similar to that of the fast phase of the PYP domain (in white light, 25% of the 701 nm recovery has a lifetime of approximately 1 min) and the slower phases are like the recovery after red light alone. Apo-holo-Ppr (with the biliverdin chromophore only) recovers with biphasic kinetics similar to those of the slower phases of holo-Ppr when activated by either red or white light. We conclude that the photoactivated PYP domain in Ppr accelerates recovery of the activated Bph domain. Phytochromes can be reversibly switched between Pr and

  17. Developing new extension of GafChromic RTQA2 film to patient quality assurance field using a plan-based calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jiayuan; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Jiazhou; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Junchao; Hu, Weigang

    2015-10-01

    GafChromic RTQA2 film is a type of radiochromic film designed for light field and radiation field alignment. The aim of this study is to extend the application of RTQA2 film to the measurement of patient specific quality assurance (QA) fields as a 2D relative dosimeter. Pre-irradiated and post-irradiated RTQA2 films were scanned in reflection mode using a flatbed scanner. A plan-based calibration (PBC) method utilized the mapping information of the calculated dose image and film grayscale image to create a dose versus pixel value calibration model. This model was used to calibrate the film grayscale image to the film relative dose image. The dose agreement between calculated and film dose images were analyzed by gamma analysis. To evaluate the feasibility of this method, eight clinically approved RapidArc cases (one abdomen cancer and seven head-and-neck cancer patients) were tested using this method. Moreover, three MLC gap errors and two MLC transmission errors were introduced to eight Rapidarc cases respectively to test the robustness of this method. The PBC method could overcome the film lot and post-exposure time variations of RTQA2 film to get a good 2D relative dose calibration result. The mean gamma passing rate of eight patients was 97.90%  ±  1.7%, which showed good dose consistency between calculated and film dose images. In the error test, the PBC method could over-calibrate the film, which means some dose error in the film would be falsely corrected to keep the dose in film consistent with the dose in the calculated dose image. This would then lead to a false negative result in the gamma analysis. In these cases, the derivative curve of the dose calibration curve would be non-monotonic which would expose the dose abnormality. By using the PBC method, we extended the application of more economical RTQA2 film to patient specific QA. The robustness of the PBC method has been improved by analyzing the monotonicity of the derivative of the

  18. Domain Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  19. Mechanistic insight into the photosensory versatility of DXCF cyanobacteriochromes.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lagarias, J Clark

    2012-05-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are photosensory proteins related to the red/far-red phytochromes. Like phytochromes, CBCRs use linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophores covalently attached via a thioether linkage to a conserved Cys residue also found in plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes. Unlike almost all phytochromes, CBCRs require only an isolated GAF domain to undergo efficient, reversible photocycles that are responsible for their broad light sensing range, spanning the visible to the near ultraviolet (UV). Sensing of blue, violet, and near-UV light by CBCRs requires another Cys residue proposed to form a second linkage to the bilin precursor. Light triggers 15,16-double bond isomerization as in phytochromes. After photoisomerization, elimination of the second linkage frequently occurs, thus yielding a large red shift of the stable photoproducts. Here we examine this process for representative DXCF CBCRs, a large subfamily named for the conserved Asp-Xaa-Cys-Phe motif that contains their second Cys residue. DXCF CBCRs with such dual-Cys photocycles yield a wide diversity of photoproducts absorbing teal, green, or orange light. Using a combination of CD spectroscopy, chemical modification, and bilin substitution experiments with recombinant CBCRs from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Nostoc punctiforme expressed in Escherichia coli, we establish that second-linkage elimination is required for all of these photocycles. We also identify deconjugation of the D-ring as the mechanism for specific detection of teal light, at approximately 500 nm. Our studies thus provide new mechanistic insight into the photosensory versatility of this important family of photosensory proteins.

  20. Active and silent chromophore isoforms for phytochrome Pr photoisomerization: An alternative evolutionary strategy to optimize photoreaction quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Linke, Martin; von Haimberger, Theodore; Matute, Ricardo; González, Leticia; Schmieder, Peter; Heyne, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Photoisomerization of a protein bound chromophore is the basis of light sensing of many photoreceptors. We tracked Z-to-E photoisomerization of Cph1 phytochrome chromophore PCB in the Pr form in real-time. Two different phycocyanobilin (PCB) ground state geometries with different ring D orientations have been identified. The pre-twisted and hydrogen bonded PCB(a) geometry exhibits a time constant of 30 ps and a quantum yield of photoproduct formation of 29%, about six times slower and ten times higher than that for the non-hydrogen bonded PCB(b) geometry. This new mechanism of pre-twisting the chromophore by protein-cofactor interaction optimizes yields of slow photoreactions and provides a scaffold for photoreceptor engineering. PMID:26798771

  1. Genomic Survey and Biochemical Analysis of Recombinant Candidate Cyanobacteriochromes Reveals Enrichment for Near UV/Violet Sensors in the Halotolerant and Alkaliphilic Cyanobacterium Microcoleus IPPAS B353.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Mi; Jeoung, Sae Chae; Song, Ji-Young; Kupriyanova, Elena V; Pronina, Natalia A; Lee, Bong-Woo; Jo, Seong-Whan; Park, Beom-Seok; Choi, Sang-Bong; Song, Ji-Joon; Park, Youn-Il

    2015-11-20

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs), which are exclusive to and widespread among cyanobacteria, are photoproteins that sense the entire range of near-UV and visible light. CBCRs are related to the red/far-red phytochromes that utilize linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophores. Best characterized from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the multicellular heterocyst forming filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, CBCRs have been poorly investigated in mat-forming, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria. In this study, we sequenced the genome of one of such species, Microcoleus IPPAS B353 (Microcoleus B353), and identified two phytochromes and seven CBCRs with one or more bilin-binding cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase and FhlA (GAF) domains. Biochemical and spectroscopic measurements of 23 purified GAF proteins from phycocyanobilin (PCB) producing recombinant Escherichia coli indicated that 13 of these proteins formed near-UV and visible light-absorbing covalent adducts: 10 GAFs contained PCB chromophores, whereas three contained the PCB isomer, phycoviolobilin (PVB). Furthermore, the complement of Microcoleus B353 CBCRs is enriched in near-UV and violet sensors, but lacks red/green and green/red CBCRs that are widely distributed in other cyanobacteria. We hypothesize that enrichment in short wavelength-absorbing CBCRs is critical for acclimation to high-light environments where this organism is found. PMID:26405033

  2. Genomic Survey and Biochemical Analysis of Recombinant Candidate Cyanobacteriochromes Reveals Enrichment for Near UV/Violet Sensors in the Halotolerant and Alkaliphilic Cyanobacterium Microcoleus IPPAS B353.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Mi; Jeoung, Sae Chae; Song, Ji-Young; Kupriyanova, Elena V; Pronina, Natalia A; Lee, Bong-Woo; Jo, Seong-Whan; Park, Beom-Seok; Choi, Sang-Bong; Song, Ji-Joon; Park, Youn-Il

    2015-11-20

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs), which are exclusive to and widespread among cyanobacteria, are photoproteins that sense the entire range of near-UV and visible light. CBCRs are related to the red/far-red phytochromes that utilize linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophores. Best characterized from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the multicellular heterocyst forming filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, CBCRs have been poorly investigated in mat-forming, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria. In this study, we sequenced the genome of one of such species, Microcoleus IPPAS B353 (Microcoleus B353), and identified two phytochromes and seven CBCRs with one or more bilin-binding cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase and FhlA (GAF) domains. Biochemical and spectroscopic measurements of 23 purified GAF proteins from phycocyanobilin (PCB) producing recombinant Escherichia coli indicated that 13 of these proteins formed near-UV and visible light-absorbing covalent adducts: 10 GAFs contained PCB chromophores, whereas three contained the PCB isomer, phycoviolobilin (PVB). Furthermore, the complement of Microcoleus B353 CBCRs is enriched in near-UV and violet sensors, but lacks red/green and green/red CBCRs that are widely distributed in other cyanobacteria. We hypothesize that enrichment in short wavelength-absorbing CBCRs is critical for acclimation to high-light environments where this organism is found.

  3. Control processes in the induction and relief of thermoinhibition of lettuce seed germination : actions of phytochrome and endogenous ethylene.

    PubMed

    Saini, H S; Consolacion, E D; Bassi, P K; Spencer, M S

    1989-05-01

    Germination of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa L. cv Grand Rapids) in the dark was nearly 100% at 20 degrees C but was inhibited at 27 degrees C and higher temperatures (thermoinhibition). A single 5-minute exposure to red light completely overcame the inhibition at temperatures up to 28 degrees C, above which the effectiveness of single light exposures gradually declined to reach a negligible level at 32 degrees C. However, the promotive effect of light could be extended to 34 degrees C by repeated irradiations. At any one temperature, increased frequency of irradiations increased germination percentage, and with each degree increase in temperature, increasingly frequent irradiations were necessary to elicit maximal germination. Loss of the effectiveness of single irradiations with increase in temperature may result either from acceleration of the thermal reversion of the far red-absorbing form of phytochrome or decrease in seed sensitivity toward a given percentage of the far red-absorbing form of phytochrome. Using continuous red light to induce germination, the role of endogenous C(2)H(4) in germination at 32 degrees C was studied. Ethylene evolution from irradiated seeds began to increase 2 hours prior to radicle protrusion, whereas the dark-incubated (nongerminating) seeds produced a low, constant amount of C(2)H(4) throughout the 24 hour incubation period. Inhibition of C(2)H(4) synthesis with 2-aminoethoxyvinyl glycine and/or inhibition of C(2)H(4) action with 2,5-norbornadiene blocked the promotive effect of light. Exogenous C(2)H(4) overcame these blockages. The results showed that participation by endogenous C(2)H(4) was essential for the light-induced relief of thermoinhibition of lettuce seed germination. However, light did not act exclusively via C(2)H(4) since exogenous C(2)H(4) alone in darkness did not promote germination.

  4. Regulation of transcript level and synthesis of nitrate reductase by phytochrome and nitrate in turions of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden.

    PubMed

    Appenroth, K J; Oelmüller, R; Schuster, C; Mohr, H

    1992-11-01

    Control by light and nitrate of the appearance of nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) in the turions of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schieiden was investigated during the pre-germination phase, i.e. up to 120 h after the transfer from after-ripening to germination conditions. Turions are particularily suited for this type of coaction study since control of nitrate uptake by light and long-distance transport of nitrate do not play a role. Control of NR gene expression was mainly studied between 72 and 120 h after transfer to germination conditions (phase II of the pre-germination process). It was found that the effect of light on NR appearance is exerted via phytochrome. The light effect on enzyme synthesis was only observed in the presence of nitrate. On the other hand, in darkness, the NR level decreased to almost zero even in the presence of an optimum supply of nitrate. It is concluded that in phase II a coaction of light (phytochrome) and nitrate is required to bring about NR synthesis. However, when nitrate was applied to turions - following a dark incubation without nitrate - the turions responded to nitrate even in darkness with strong NR synthesis. This response was augmented by light. The highest transcript levels were observed in the presence of both factors, light and nitrate. As a single factor, light was more effective in stimulating the transcript level than nitrate. However, no correlation between the transcript level and the rate of enzyme synthesis was observed. This is consistent with the previous conclusion (Schuster et al. 1988, Planta 174, 426-432) that in higher plants control at the transcript level is only coarse and does not determine quantitatively the output at the level of enzyme protein. PMID:24178393

  5. Improving the energy response of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} dosimetry films at low energies (≤100 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bekerat, H. Devic, S.; DeBlois, F.; Singh, K.; Sarfehnia, A.; Seuntjens, J.; Shih, Shelley; Yu, Xiang; Lewis, D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of varying the active layer composition of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} films on the energy dependence of the film, as well as try to develop a new prototype with more uniform energy response at low photon energies (⩽100 keV). Methods: First, the overall energy response (S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q)) of different commercial EBT type film models that represent the three different generations produced to date, i.e., EBT, EBT2, and EBT3, was investigated. Pieces of each film model were irradiated to a fixed dose of 2 Gy to water for a wide range of beam qualities and the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) was measured using a flatbed document scanner. Furthermore, the DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose to water energy dependence of the film, f(Q). Moreover, the intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}(Q), for each film model was evaluated using the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) and f(Q). In the second part of this study, the authors investigated the effects of changing the chemical composition of the active layer on S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Finally, based on these results, the film manufacturer fabricated several film prototypes and the authors evaluated their S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Results: The commercial EBT film model shows an under response at all energies below 100 keV reaching 39% ± 4% at about 20 keV. The commercial EBT2 and EBT3 film models show an under response of about 27% ± 4% at 20 keV and an over response of about 16% ± 4% at 40 keV.S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) of the three commercial film models at low energies show strong correlation with the corresponding f{sup −1}(Q) curves. The commercial EBT3 model with 4% Cl in the active layer shows under response of 22% ± 4% at 20 keV and 6% ± 4% at about 40 keV. However, increasing the mass percent of chlorine makes the film more hygroscopic which may affect the stability of the film's readout. The

  6. An unusual effect of the far-red absorbing form of phytochrome: Photoinhibition of seed germination inBromus sterilis L.

    PubMed

    Hilton, J R

    1982-11-01

    Seeds ofBromus sterilis L. germinated between 80-100% in darkness at 15° C but were inhibited by exposure to white or red light for 8 h per day. Exposure to far-red light resulted in germination similar to, or less than, that of seeds maintained in darkness. Germination is not permanently inhibited by light as seeds attain maximal germination when transferred back to darkness. Germination can be markedly delayed by exposure to a single pulse of red light following 4 h inhibition in darkness. The effect of the red light can be reversed by a single pulse of far-red light indicating that the photoreversible pigment phytochrome is involved in the response. The response ofB. sterilis seeds to light appears to be unique; the far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome (Pfr) actually inhibiting germination.

  7. Novel near-infrared BiFC systems from a bacterial phytochrome for imaging protein interactions and drug evaluation under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghai; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhiping; Liu, Sanying; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zongqiang

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in live subjects is critical for understanding these fundamental biological processes. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) provides a good technique for imaging PPIs; however, a BiFC system with a long wavelength remains to be pursued for in vivo imaging. Here, we conducted systematic screening of split reporters from a bacterial phytochrome-based, near-infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP). Several new near-infrared phytochrome BiFC systems were built based on selected split sites including the amino acids residues 97/98, 99/100, 122/123, and 123/124. These new near-infrared BiFC systems from a bacterial phytochrome were verified as powerful tools for imaging PPIs under physiological conditions in live cells and in live mice. The interaction between HIV-1 integrase (IN) and cellular cofactor protein Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) was visualized in live cells using the newly constructed iRFP BiFC system because of its important roles in HIV-1 integration and replication. Because the HIV IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction is an attractive anti-HIV target, drug evaluation assays to inhibit the HIV IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction were also performed using the newly constructed BiFC system. The results showed that compound 6 and carbidopa inhibit the HIV IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in a dose-dependent manner under physiological conditions in the BiFC assays. This study provides novel near-infrared BiFC systems for imaging protein interactions under physiological conditions and provides guidance for splitting other bacterial phytochrome-like proteins to construct BiFC systems. The study also provides a new method for drug evaluation in live cells based on iRFP BiFC systems and supplies some new information regarding candidate drugs for anti-HIV therapies.

  8. Role of phytochromes A and B in the regulation of cell death and acclimatory responses to UV stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rusaczonek, Anna; Czarnocka, Weronika; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Witoń, Damian; Ślesak, Ireneusz; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Gawroński, Piotr; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-11-01

    Plants coordinate their responses to various biotic and abiotic stresses in order to optimize their developmental and acclimatory programmes. The ultimate response to an excessive amount of stress is local induction of cell death mechanisms. The death of certain cells can help to maintain tissue homeostasis and enable nutrient remobilization, thus increasing the survival chances of the whole organism in unfavourable environmental conditions. UV radiation is one of the environmental factors that negatively affects the photosynthetic process and triggers cell death. The aim of this work was to evaluate a possible role of the red/far-red light photoreceptors phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) and their interrelations during acclimatory responses to UV stress. We showed that UV-C treatment caused a disturbance in photosystem II and a deregulation of photosynthetic pigment content and antioxidant enzymes activities, followed by increased cell mortality rate in phyB and phyAB null mutants. We also propose a regulatory role of phyA and phyB in CO2 assimilation, non-photochemical quenching, reactive oxygen species accumulation and salicylic acid content. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role of phytochromes as putative regulators of cell death and acclimatory responses to UV. PMID:26385378

  9. OsPhyA modulates rice flowering time mainly through OsGI under short days and Ghd7 under long days in the absence of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang-Seok; Yi, Jakyung; An, Gynheung

    2016-07-01

    Phytochromes recognize light signals and control diverse developmental processes. In rice, all three phytochrome genes-OsphyA, OsphyB, and OsphyC-are involved in regulating flowering time. We investigated the role of OsPhyA by comparing the osphyA osphyB double mutant to an osphyB single mutant. Plants of the double mutant flowered later than the single under short days (SD) but bolted earlier under long days (LD). Under SD, this delayed-flowering phenotype was primarily due to the decreased expression of Oryza sativa GIGANTEA (OsGI), which controls three flowering activators: Heading date 1 (Hd1), OsMADS51, and Oryza sativa Indeterminate 1 (OsId1). Under LD, although the expression of several repressors, e.g., Hd1, Oryza sativa CONSTANS-like 4 (OsCOL4), and AP2 genes, was affected in the double mutant, that of Grain number, plant height and heading date 7 (Ghd7) was the most significantly reduced. These results indicated that OsPhyA influences flowering time mainly by affecting the expression of OsGI under SD and Ghd7 under LD when phytochrome B is absent. We also demonstrated that far-red light delays flowering time via both OsPhyA and OsPhyB. PMID:27039184

  10. Role of phytochromes A and B in the regulation of cell death and acclimatory responses to UV stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rusaczonek, Anna; Czarnocka, Weronika; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Witoń, Damian; Ślesak, Ireneusz; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Gawroński, Piotr; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Plants coordinate their responses to various biotic and abiotic stresses in order to optimize their developmental and acclimatory programmes. The ultimate response to an excessive amount of stress is local induction of cell death mechanisms. The death of certain cells can help to maintain tissue homeostasis and enable nutrient remobilization, thus increasing the survival chances of the whole organism in unfavourable environmental conditions. UV radiation is one of the environmental factors that negatively affects the photosynthetic process and triggers cell death. The aim of this work was to evaluate a possible role of the red/far-red light photoreceptors phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) and their interrelations during acclimatory responses to UV stress. We showed that UV-C treatment caused a disturbance in photosystem II and a deregulation of photosynthetic pigment content and antioxidant enzymes activities, followed by increased cell mortality rate in phyB and phyAB null mutants. We also propose a regulatory role of phyA and phyB in CO2 assimilation, non-photochemical quenching, reactive oxygen species accumulation and salicylic acid content. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role of phytochromes as putative regulators of cell death and acclimatory responses to UV. PMID:26385378

  11. Selected Components of the Shade-Avoidance Syndrome Are Displayed in a Normal Manner in Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa Deficient in Phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Robson, PRH.; Whitelam, G. C.; Smith, H.

    1993-08-01

    Several growth parameters associated with the phytochrome-mediated shade avoidance syndrome have been measured in seedlings and mature plants of a wild-type and a hy3 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in phytochrome B. Growth parameters were compared in plants grown in either white light (high red:far-red [R:FR] ratio) or white light plus added far-red (FR) light (low R:FR ratio). Wild-type Arabidopsis exhibited increased hypocotyl and petiole extension under a low, compared with a high, R:FR ratio. The hy3 mutant did not respond to low R:FR ratio by increase in hypocotyl or petiole length. Extension growth of wild-type plants was stimulated by brief end-of-day FR pulses, but similar treatment had no effect on extension growth of hy3 mutant plants. However, some responses to low R:FR ratio seen in the wild-type plants were also evident in the hy3 mutants. The number of days to bolting, the developmental stage at bolting, the leaf area, and the specific stem weight (weight per unit of length) all decreased in the wild-type and hy3 seedlings in response to low R:FR ratio. Low R:FR ratio caused a larger decrease in leaf area and specific stem weight in the mutant seedlings than in wild-type seedlings. The effects of low R:FR ratio on leaf area and specific stem weight were opposite to those of the hy3 lesion, which resulted in increased leaf area and specific stem weight in comparison with the wild type. Both leaf area and specific stem weight responses to low R:FR ratio also were unchanged in the ein mutant of Brassica rapa, known to be deficient in phytochrome B. These responses represent components of the shade-avoidance syndrome, and, consequently, the results indicate that phytochrome B cannot be solely responsible for the perception of R:FR ratio and the induction of shade-avoidance responses. The hypothesis is proposed that different phytochromes may be responsible for the regulation of extension growth and the regulation of lateral or radial expansion.

  12. Jasmonic acid enhancement of anthocyanin accumulation is dependent on phytochrome A signaling pathway under far-red light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Jia, Kun-Peng; Lian, Hong-Li; Yang, Xu; Li, Ling; Yang, Hong-Quan

    2014-11-01

    Anthocyanins are critical for plants. It is shown that the expression of genes encoding the key enzymes such as dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), UDP-Glc: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT), and leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX) in anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway is regulated by MYB75, a R2R3 MYB transcription factor. The production of anthocyanin is known to be promoted by jasmonic acid (JA) in light but not in darkness. The photoreceptors cryptochrome 1 (CRY1), phytochrome B (phyB), and phytochrome A (phyA) are also shown to mediate light promotion of anthocyanin accumulation, respectively, whereas their downstream factor COP1, a master negative regulator of photomorphogensis, represses anthocyanin accumulation. However, whether JA coordinates with photoreceptors in the regulation of anthocyanin accumulation is unknown. Here, we show that under far-red light, JA promotes anthocyanin accumulation in a phyA signaling pathway-dependent manner. The phyA mutant is hyposensitive to jasmonic acid analog methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) under far-red light. The dominant mutant of MYB75, pap1-D, accumulates significantly higher levels of anthocyanin than wild type under far-red light, whereas knockdown of MYBs (MYB75, MYB90, MYB113, and MYB114) through RNAi significantly reduces MeJA promotion of anthocyanin accumulation. The phyA pap1-D double mutant shows reduced responsiveness to MeJA, similar to phyA mutant under far-red light. In darkness, a mutant allele of cop1, cop1-4, shows enhanced responsiveness to MeJA, but pap1-D mutant is barely responsive to MeJA. Upon MeJA application, the cop1-4 pap1-D double mutant accumulates considerably higher levels of anthocyanin than cop1-4 in darkness. Protein studies indicate that MYB75 protein is stabilized by white light and far-red light. Further gene expression studies suggest that MeJA promotes the expression of DFR, UF3GT, and LDOX genes in a phyA- and MYB75-dependent manner under far-red light. Our findings suggest

  13. Phytochrome B Enhances Photosynthesis at the Expense of Water-Use Efficiency in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Boccalandro, Hernán E.; Rugnone, Matías L.; Moreno, Javier E.; Ploschuk, Edmundo L.; Serna, Laura; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Casal, Jorge J.

    2009-01-01

    In open places, plants are exposed to higher fluence rates of photosynthetically active radiation and to higher red to far-red ratios than under the shade of neighbor plants. High fluence rates are known to increase stomata density. Here we show that high, compared to low, red to far-red ratios also increase stomata density in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). High red to far-red ratios increase the proportion of phytochrome B (phyB) in its active form and the phyB mutant exhibited a constitutively low stomata density. phyB increased the stomata index (the ratio between stomata and epidermal cells number) and the level of anphistomy (by increasing stomata density more intensively in the adaxial than in the abaxial face). phyB promoted the expression of FAMA and TOO MANY MOUTHS genes involved in the regulation of stomata development in young leaves. Increased stomata density resulted in increased transpiration per unit leaf area. However, phyB promoted photosynthesis rates only at high fluence rates of photosynthetically active radiation. In accordance to these observations, phyB reduced long-term water-use efficiency estimated by the analysis of isotopic discrimination against 13CO2. We propose a model where active phyB promotes stomata differentiation in open places, allowing plants to take advantage of the higher irradiances at the expense of a reduction of water-use efficiency, which is compensated by a reduced leaf area. PMID:19363093

  14. Synergistic and Antagonistic Action of Phytochrome (Phy) A and PhyB during Seedling De-Etiolation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Su, Liang; Hou, Pei; Song, Meifang; Zheng, Xu; Guo, Lin; Xiao, Yang; Yan, Lei; Li, Wanchen; Yang, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that Arabidopsis phytochrome (phy) A and phyB are crucial photoreceptors that display synergistic and antagonistic action during seedling de-etiolation in multiple light signaling pathways. However, the functional relationship between phyA and phyB is not fully understood under different kinds of light and in response to different intensities of such light. In this work, we compared hypocotyl elongation of the phyA-211 phyB-9 double mutant with the wild type, the phyA-211 and phyB-9 single mutants under different intensities of far-red (FR), red (R), blue (B) and white (W) light. We confirmed that phyA and phyB synergistically promote seedling de-etiolation in B-, B plus R-, W- and high R-light conditions. The correlation of endogenous ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) protein levels with the trend of hypocotyl elongation of all lines indicate that both phyA and phyB promote seedling photomorphogenesis in a synergistic manner in high-irradiance white light. Gene expression analyses of RBCS members and HY5 suggest that phyB and phyA act antagonistically on seedling development under FR light. PMID:26030677

  15. Phytochrome B in the Mesophyll Delays Flowering by Suppressing FLOWERING LOCUS T Expression in Arabidopsis Vascular Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Motomu; Nakamura, Satoshi; Araki, Takashi; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Nagatani, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Light is one of the most important environmental factors that determine the timing of a plant's transition from the vegetative to reproductive, or flowering, phase. Not only daylength but also the spectrum of light greatly affect flowering. The shade of nearby vegetation reduces the ratio of red to far-red light and can trigger shade avoidance responses, including stem elongation and the acceleration of flowering. Phytochrome B (phyB) acts as a photoreceptor for this response. Physiological studies have suggested that leaves can perceive and respond to shade. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the processing of light signals within leaves. In this study, we used an enhancer-trap system to establish Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines that express phyB–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein in tissue-specific manners. The analysis of these lines demonstrated that phyB-GFP in mesophyll cells affected flowering, whereas phyB-GFP in vascular bundles did not. Furthermore, mesophyll phyB-GFP suppressed the expression of a key flowering regulator, FLOWERING LOCUS T, in the vascular bundles of cotyledons. Hence, a novel intertissue signaling from mesophyll to vascular bundles is revealed as a critical step for the regulation of flowering by phyB. PMID:15965119

  16. PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 5 (PIF5) positively regulates dark-induced senescence and chlorophyll degradation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Liu, Zhongjuan; Chen, Yadi; He, Jun-Xian; Bi, Yurong

    2015-08-01

    Darkness is a known environmental factor that induces plant senescence. Here, Phytochrome-Interacting Factors (PIFs), several bHLH transcription factors involved in plant skotomorphogenesis, were examined for their roles in the regulation of dark-induced senescence and chlorophyll breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana. After light-grown seedlings were transferred to darkness, green leaves turned yellow, and chlorophyll contents decreased, but membrane lipid peroxidation and cell death increased in wild-type Col-0. These responses were enhanced in overexpression line PIF5OX but decreased in mutant pif5-3. Darkness significantly induced expression of several genes involved in chlorophyll breakdown, including SGR, NYC1, NOL, and PAO, as well as genes encoding for transcription factors that have been shown to be required for dark-induced senescence, including WRKY22, NAP, EIN3, EIL1, and ORE1. These effects on gene expression were also enhanced in PIF5OX but decreased in pif5-3 relative to Col-0. Further analyses using ChIP-qPCR, EMSA, and protoplast transient assays indicated that PIF5 binds to the G-box motifs in the promoters of SGR, NYC1, and ORE1 genes and stimulate their expression. Collectively, our data indicate that PIF5 is a key factor that positively regulates dark-induced senescence upstream of ORE1 and regulates chlorophyll breakdown upstream of SGR and NYC1.

  17. Phytochrome-interacting factors PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis under red light in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongjuan; Zhang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Ping; Zhao, Chengzhou; Chen, Yadi; Bi, Yurong

    2015-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor inducing anthocyanin accumulation in plants. Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) have been shown to be a family of bHLH transcription factors involved in light signaling in Arabidopsis. Red light effectively increased anthocyanin accumulation in wild-type Col-0, whereas the effects were enhanced in pif4 and pif5 mutants but impaired in overexpression lines PIF4OX and PIF5OX, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are both negative regulators for red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Consistently, transcript levels of several genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulatory pathway, including CHS, F3'H, DFR, LDOX, PAP1 and TT8, were significantly enhanced in mutants pif4 and pif5 but decreased in PIF4OX and PIF5OX compared to in Col-0, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are transcriptional repressor of these gene. Transient expression assays revealed that PIF4 and PIF5 could repress red light-induced promoter activities of F3'H and DFR in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) test and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that PIF5 could directly bind to G-box motifs present in the promoter of DFR. Taken together, these results suggest that PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation through transcriptional repression of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:26259175

  18. Multi-scale photoacoustic tomography using reversibly switchable bacterial phytochrome as a near-infrared photochromic probe

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of genetically encoded probes allows imaging of targeted biological processes with high spatial resolution at depths. Here, we combined multi-scale photoacoustic imaging with, for the first time, a reversibly switchable non-fluorescent bacterial phytochrome BphP1. With a heme-derived biliverdin chromophore, BphP1 has the most red-shifted absorption among reported genetically encoded probes, and is reversibly photoconvertible between its red and near-infrared light absorption states. We combined single-wavelength PAT with efficient BphP1 photoswitching, enabling differential imaging that substantially removed background signals, enhanced detection sensitivity, increased penetration depth, and improved spatial resolution. In doing so, we monitored tumor growth and metastasis with a ~100 µm resolution at depths approaching 10 mm using photoacoustic computed tomography, and imaged individual cancer cells with a sub-optical-diffraction resolution of ~140 nm using photoacoustic microscopy. This technology is promising for biomedical studies at different length scales. PMID:26550774

  19. Phytochrome-interacting factors PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis under red light in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongjuan; Zhang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Ping; Zhao, Chengzhou; Chen, Yadi; Bi, Yurong

    2015-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor inducing anthocyanin accumulation in plants. Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) have been shown to be a family of bHLH transcription factors involved in light signaling in Arabidopsis. Red light effectively increased anthocyanin accumulation in wild-type Col-0, whereas the effects were enhanced in pif4 and pif5 mutants but impaired in overexpression lines PIF4OX and PIF5OX, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are both negative regulators for red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Consistently, transcript levels of several genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulatory pathway, including CHS, F3'H, DFR, LDOX, PAP1 and TT8, were significantly enhanced in mutants pif4 and pif5 but decreased in PIF4OX and PIF5OX compared to in Col-0, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are transcriptional repressor of these gene. Transient expression assays revealed that PIF4 and PIF5 could repress red light-induced promoter activities of F3'H and DFR in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) test and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that PIF5 could directly bind to G-box motifs present in the promoter of DFR. Taken together, these results suggest that PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation through transcriptional repression of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in Arabidopsis.

  20. Role of the protein cavity in phytochrome chromoprotein assembly and double-bond isomerization: a comparison with model compounds.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, Thierry; Lang, Christina; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Difference patterns of (13)C NMR chemicals shifts for the protonation of a free model compound in organic solution, as reported in the literature (M. Stanek, K. Grubmayr [1998] Chem. Eur. J.4, 1653-1659), were compared with changes in the protonation state occurring during holophytochrome assembly from phycocyanobilin (PCB) and the apoprotein. Both processes induce identical changes in the NMR signals, indicating that the assembly process is linked to protonation of the chromophore, yielding a cationic cofactor in a heterogeneous, quasi-liquid protein environment. The identity of both difference patterns implies that the protonation of a model compound in solution causes a partial stretching of the geometry of the macrocycle as found in the protein. In fact, the similarity of the difference pattern within the bilin family for identical chemical transformations represents a basis for future theoretical analysis. On the other hand, the change of the (13)C NMR chemical shift pattern upon the Pr --> Pfr photoisomerization is very different to that of the free model compound upon ZZZ --> ZZE photoisomerization. Hence, the character of the double-bond isomerization in phytochrome is essentially different from that of a classical photoinduced double-bond isomerization, emphasizing the role of the protein environment in the modulation of this light-induced process. PMID:20492561

  1. Coordinated transcriptional regulation of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthetic pathway enzymes in plastids by phytochrome-interacting factor 5.

    PubMed

    Mannen, Kazuto; Matsumoto, Takuro; Takahashi, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Yuta; Tsukagoshi, Masanori; Sano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Nozomu; Shibata, Daisuke; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Nakayama, Toru

    2014-01-10

    All isoprenoids are derived from a common C5 unit, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In plants, IPP is synthesized via two distinct pathways; the cytosolic mevalonate pathway and the plastidial non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we used a co-expression analysis to identify transcription factors that coordinately regulate the expression of multiple genes encoding enzymes in the IPP biosynthetic pathway. Some candidates showed especially strong correlations with multiple genes encoding MEP-pathway enzymes. We report here that phytochrome-interacting factor 5 (PIF5), a basic-helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, functions as a positive regulator of the MEP pathway. Its overexpression in T87 suspension cultured cells resulted in increased accumulation of chlorophylls and carotenoids. Detailed analyses of carotenoids by HPLC indicated that some carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were concomitantly up-regulated, possibly as a result of enhanced IPP metabolic flow. Our results also revealed other PIF family proteins that play different roles from that of PIF5 in IPP metabolism.

  2. Contribution of calcium ions and hydrogen ions to the signal transduction chain in phytochrome-mediated spore germination. [Onoclea sensibilis L

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, R.

    1985-01-01

    Red light stimulates germination in the spores of Onoclea sensibilis L. Phytochrome is confirmed to be the photoreceptor pigment in the germination response by demonstrating red-far-red photoreversibility. External Ca/sup 2 +/ is required for this response with a threshold at a submicromolar concentration. Red light stimulates an increase in the total concentration of intracellular calcium in the spores as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Subsequent exposure to far-red light inhibits the red light-induced increase in intracellular calcium. The majority of the increase occurs 5 minutes after the onset of irradiation. The calcium-antagonist, La/sup 3 +/ inhibits both germination and the red light-induced increase in intracellular calcium. Using /sup 31/P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the author tested the hypothesis that a sustained increase in intracellular pH contributes to the signal transduction chain. He never detected a red light-induced increase in intracellular pH or a change in portion efflux. An artificially induced change in intracellular pH of greater than 1 pH unit (5.8-7.2) has no effect on germination. Although the intracellular pH can be varied in magnitude greater than it would be expected to change if it were acting as an intracellular signal, germination of Onoclea spores is independent of intracellular pH in this range. These data indicate that a sustained increase in intracellular pH does not contribute to the single transduction chain phytochrome-mediated fern spore germination. Therefore, Ca/sup 2 +/, but not pH, contributes to the signal transduction chain in phytochrome-mediated fern spore germination.

  3. I-125 ROPES eye plaque dosimetry: Validation of a commercial 3D ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent dose calculation software with GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films

    SciTech Connect

    Poder, Joel; Corde, Stéphanie

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions for different Radiation Oncology Physics and Engineering Services, Australia (ROPES) type eye plaques loaded with I-125 (model 6711) seeds using GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films, in order to verify the dose distributions in the Plaque Simulator™ (PS) ophthalmic 3D treatment planning system. The brachytherapy module of RADCALC{sup ®} was used to independently check the dose distributions calculated by PS. Correction factors were derived from the measured data to be used in PS to account for the effect of the stainless steel ROPES plaque backing on the 3D dose distribution.Methods: Using GafChromic{sup ®} EBT3 films inserted in a specially designed Solid Water™ eye ball phantom, dose distributions were measured three-dimensionally both along and perpendicular to I-125 (model 6711) loaded ROPES eye plaque's central axis (CAX) with 2 mm depth increments. Each measurement was performed in full scatter conditions both with and without the stainless steel plaque backing attached to the eye plaque, to assess its effect on the dose distributions. Results were compared to the dose distributions calculated by Plaque Simulator™ and checked independently with RADCALC{sup ®}.Results: The EBT3 film measurements without the stainless steel backing were found to agree with PS and RADCALC{sup ®} to within 2% and 4%, respectively, on the plaque CAX. Also, RADCALC{sup ®} was found to agree with PS to within 2%. The CAX depth doses measured using EBT3 film with the stainless steel backing were observed to result in a 4% decrease relative to when the backing was not present. Within experimental uncertainty, the 4% decrease was found to be constant with depth and independent of plaque size. Using a constant dose correction factor of T= 0.96 in PS, where the calculated dose for the full water scattering medium is reduced by 4% in every voxel in the dose grid, the effect of the plaque backing was accurately

  4. A negatively acting DNA sequence element mediates phytochrome-directed repression of phyA gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, W B; Deng, X W; Quail, P H

    1991-01-01

    Phytochrome represses transcription of its own phyA genes within 5 min of light-triggered conversion to its active Pfr form. We have utilized microprojectile mediated gene transfer into etiolated rice seedlings to delineate sequence elements in the oat phyA3 promoter responsible for this regulation. Linker-scan mutagenesis of this promoter has identified two positive elements which together are necessary for maximal transcription in the absence of Pfr. These elements are designated PE1, centered at position -357 bp, and PE3, centered at position -96 bp. Sequence mutagenesis immediately downstream of PE3 results in maximal transcription in the presence of high Pfr levels, indicating that Pfr represses phyA3 transcription through a negatively acting sequence element. This element, designated RE1, with the sequence CATGGGCGCGG, encompasses a motif that is highly conserved in all monocot phyA promoters thus far characterized. DNase I protection analysis indicates that oat nuclear extracts contain multiple factors that bind to an array of sequence motifs, including PE1 and part of PE3, within 400 bp upstream of the oat phyA3 transcription start site. This DNA-binding pattern is not altered by Pfr. Weak binding to part of the RE1 motif is evident but also with no difference between high and low Pfr levels. We conclude that the signal transduction chain that mediates Pfr-directed repression of phyA3 transcription terminates with a negatively acting transcription factor that binds to the sequence element RE1. Images PMID:1915276

  5. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 Represses Genes Associated with Auxin Signaling to Modulate Hypocotyl Growth1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Developing seedlings are well equipped to alter their growth in response to external factors in order to maximize their chances of survival. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 (SOB3) and other members of the AT-HOOK MOTIF CONTAINING NUCLEAR LOCALIZED (AHL) family of transcription factors modulate the development of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by repressing hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings growing in light. However, the molecular mechanism behind how AHLs influence seedling development is largely unknown. We have identified genes associated with auxin-mediated hypocotyl elongation as downstream targets of SOB3. We found that YUCCA8 (YUC8) as well as members of the SMALL AUXIN UP-REGULATED RNA19 (SAUR19) subfamily were down-regulated in the short-hypocotyl, gain-of-function SOB3-D mutant and up-regulated in the dominant-negative, tall-hypocotyl sob3-6 mutant. SOB3-D and sob3-6 hypocotyls also exhibited altered sensitivity to the polar auxin transport inhibitor N-1-napthylphthalamic acid, suggesting a critical connection between auxin and the modulation of seedling elongation by SOB3. Finally, we found that overexpression of GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-SAUR19 in the SOB3-D line partially rescued defects in hypocotyl elongation, and SOB3 bound directly to the promoters of YUC8 and SAUR19 subfamily members. Taken together, these data indicate that SOB3 modulates hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings by directly repressing the transcription of genes associated with auxin signaling. PMID:27342309

  6. Overexpression of phytochrome A and its hyperactive mutant improves shade tolerance and turf quality in creeping bentgrass and zoysiagrass.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Markkandan; Han, Yun-Jeong; Bae, Tae-Woong; Hwang, Ok-Jin; Chandrasekhar, Thummala; Chandrasekkhar, Thummala; Shin, Ah-Young; Goh, Chang-Hyo; Nishiguchi, Satoshi; Song, In-Ja; Lee, Hyo-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Il; Song, Pill-Soon

    2012-10-01

    Phytochrome A (phyA) in higher plants is known to function as a far-red/shade light-sensing photoreceptor in suppressing shade avoidance responses (SARs) to shade stress. In this paper, the Avena PHYA gene was introduced into creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) and zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) to improve turf quality by suppressing the SARs. In addition to wild-type PHYA, a hyperactive mutant gene (S599A-PHYA), in which a phosphorylation site involved in light-signal attenuation was removed, was also transformed into the turfgrasses. Phenotypic traits of the transgenic plants were compared to assess the suppression of SARs under a simulated shade condition and outdoor field conditions after three growth seasons. Under the shade condition, the S599A-PhyA transgenic creeping bentgrass plants showed shade avoidance-suppressing phenotypes with a 45 % shorter leaf lengths, 24 % shorter internode lengths, and twofold increases in chlorophyll concentrations when compared with control plants. Transgenic zoysiagrass plants overexpressing S599A-PHYA also showed shade-tolerant phenotypes under the shade condition with reductions in leaf length (15 %), internode length (30 %), leaf length/width ratio (19 %) and leaf area (22 %), as well as increases in chlorophyll contents (19 %) and runner lengths (30 %) compared to control plants. The phenotypes of transgenic zoysiagrass were also investigated in dense field habitats, and the transgenic turfgrass exhibited shade-tolerant phenotypes similar to those observed under laboratory shade conditions. Therefore, the present study suggests that the hyperactive phyA is effective for the development of shade-tolerant plants, and that the shade tolerance nature is sustained under field conditions.

  7. Thermoperiodic control of hypocotyl elongation depends on auxin-induced ethylene signaling that controls downstream PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 activity.

    PubMed

    Bours, Ralph; Kohlen, Wouter; Bouwmeester, Harro J; van der Krol, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    We show that antiphase light-temperature cycles (negative day-night temperature difference [-DIF]) inhibit hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This is caused by reduced cell elongation during the cold photoperiod. Cell elongation in the basal part of the hypocotyl under -DIF was restored by both 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC; ethylene precursor) and auxin, indicating limited auxin and ethylene signaling under -DIF. Both auxin biosynthesis and auxin signaling were reduced during -DIF. In addition, expression of several ACC Synthase was reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application. In contrast, the reduced hypocotyl elongation of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling mutants could not be complemented by auxin, indicating that auxin functions upstream of ethylene. The PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 were previously shown to be important regulators of hypocotyl elongation. We now show that, in contrast to pif4 and pif5 mutants, the reduced hypocotyl length in pif3 cannot be rescued by either ACC or auxin. In line with this, treatment with ethylene or auxin inhibitors reduced hypocotyl elongation in PIF4 overexpressor (PIF4ox) and PIF5ox but not PIF3ox plants. PIF3 promoter activity was strongly reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application in an ACC Synthase-dependent manner. Combined, these results show that PIF3 regulates hypocotyl length downstream, whereas PIF4 and PIF5 regulate hypocotyl length upstream of an auxin and ethylene cascade. We show that, under -DIF, lower auxin biosynthesis activity limits the signaling in this pathway, resulting in low activity of PIF3 and short hypocotyls.

  8. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 Represses Genes Associated with Auxin Signaling to Modulate Hypocotyl Growth.

    PubMed

    Favero, David S; Jacques, Caitlin N; Iwase, Akira; Le, Kimberly Ngan; Zhao, Jianfei; Sugimoto, Keiko; Neff, Michael M

    2016-08-01

    Developing seedlings are well equipped to alter their growth in response to external factors in order to maximize their chances of survival. SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME B4-#3 (SOB3) and other members of the AT-HOOK MOTIF CONTAINING NUCLEAR LOCALIZED (AHL) family of transcription factors modulate the development of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by repressing hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings growing in light. However, the molecular mechanism behind how AHLs influence seedling development is largely unknown. We have identified genes associated with auxin-mediated hypocotyl elongation as downstream targets of SOB3. We found that YUCCA8 (YUC8) as well as members of the SMALL AUXIN UP-REGULATED RNA19 (SAUR19) subfamily were down-regulated in the short-hypocotyl, gain-of-function SOB3-D mutant and up-regulated in the dominant-negative, tall-hypocotyl sob3-6 mutant. SOB3-D and sob3-6 hypocotyls also exhibited altered sensitivity to the polar auxin transport inhibitor N-1-napthylphthalamic acid, suggesting a critical connection between auxin and the modulation of seedling elongation by SOB3 Finally, we found that overexpression of GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-SAUR19 in the SOB3-D line partially rescued defects in hypocotyl elongation, and SOB3 bound directly to the promoters of YUC8 and SAUR19 subfamily members. Taken together, these data indicate that SOB3 modulates hypocotyl elongation in young seedlings by directly repressing the transcription of genes associated with auxin signaling. PMID:27342309

  9. Phytochrome A and B Function Antagonistically to Regulate Cold Tolerance via Abscisic Acid-Dependent Jasmonate Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhixin; Li, Huizi; Wang, Mengmeng; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    Light signaling and phytohormones both influence plant growth, development, and stress responses; however, cross talk between these two signaling pathways in response to cold remains underexplored. Here, we report that far-red light (FR) and red light (R) perceived by phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB positively and negatively regulated cold tolerance, respectively, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which were associated with the regulation of levels of phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) and transcript levels of ABA- and JA-related genes and the C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR (CBF) stress signaling pathway genes. A reduction in the R/FR ratio did not alter cold tolerance, ABA and JA accumulation, and transcript levels of ABA- and JA-related genes and the CBF pathway genes in phyA mutant plants; however, those were significantly increased in wild-type and phyB plants with the reduction in the R/FR ratio. Even though low R/FR treatments did not confer cold tolerance in ABA-deficient (notabilis [not]) and JA-deficient (prosystemin-mediated responses2 [spr2]) mutants, it up-regulated ABA accumulation and signaling in the spr2 mutant, with no effect on JA levels and signaling in the not mutant. Foliar application of ABA and JA further confirmed that JA functioned downstream of ABA to activate the CBF pathway in light quality-mediated cold tolerance. It is concluded that phyA and phyB function antagonistically to regulate cold tolerance that essentially involves FR light-induced activation of phyA to induce ABA signaling and, subsequently, JA signaling, leading to an activation of the CBF pathway and a cold response in tomato plants. PMID:26527654

  10. Arabidopsis VQ MOTIF-CONTAINING PROTEIN29 Represses Seedling Deetiolation by Interacting with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR11[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunliang; Jing, Yanjun; Li, Junjiao; Xu, Gang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2014-01-01

    Seedling deetiolation, a critical process in early plant development, is regulated by an intricate transcriptional network. Here, we identified VQ MOTIF-CONTAINING PROTEIN29 (VQ29) as a novel regulator of the photomorphogenic response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We showed that 29 of the 34 VQ proteins present in Arabidopsis exhibit transcriptional activity in plant cells and that mutations in the VQ motif affect the transcriptional activity of VQ29. We then functionally characterized VQ29 and showed that the hypocotyl growth of plants overexpressing VQ29 is hyposensitive to far-red and low-intensity white light, whereas a vq29 loss-of-function mutant exhibits decreased hypocotyl elongation under a low intensity of far-red or white light. Consistent with this, VQ29 expression is repressed by light in a phytochrome-dependent manner. Intriguingly, our yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that VQ29 physically interacts with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1). We then showed that VQ29 and PIF1 directly bind to the promoter of a cell elongation-related gene, XYLOGLUCAN ENDOTRANSGLYCOSYLASE7, and coactivate its expression. Furthermore, the vq29 pif1 double mutant has shorter hypocotyls than either of the corresponding single mutants. Therefore, our study reveals that VQ29 is a negative transcriptional regulator of light-mediated inhibition of hypocotyl elongation that likely promotes the transcriptional activity of PIF1 during early seedling development. PMID:24569844

  11. PIL5, a phytochrome-interacting bHLH protein, regulates gibberellin responsiveness by binding directly to the GAI and RGA promoters in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eunkyoo; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hu, Jianhong; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Jung, Byunghyuck; Paik, Inyup; Lee, Hee-Seung; Sun, Tai-ping; Kamiya, Yuji; Choi, Giltsu

    2007-04-01

    Previous work showed that PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3-LIKE5 (PIL5), a light-labile basic helix-loop-helix protein, inhibits seed germination by repressing GIBBERELLIN 3beta-HYDROXYLASE1 (GA3ox1) and GA3ox2 and activating a gibberellic acid (GA) catabolic gene (GA2ox2). However, we show persistent light-dependent and PIL5-inhibited germination behavior in the absence of both de novo GA biosynthesis and deactivation by GA2ox2, suggesting that PIL5 regulates not only GA metabolism but also GA responsiveness. PIL5 increases the expression of two GA repressor (DELLA) genes, GA-INSENSITIVE (GAI) and REPRESSOR OF GA1-3 (RGA/RGA1), in darkness. The hypersensitivity of gai-t6 rga-28 to red light and the suppression of germination defects of a rga-28 PIL5 overexpression line show the significant role of this transcriptional regulation in seed germination. PIL5 also increases abscisic acid (ABA) levels by activating ABA biosynthetic genes and repressing an ABA catabolic gene. PIL5 binds directly to GAI and RGA promoters but not to GA and ABA metabolic gene promoters. Together, our results show that light signals perceived by phytochromes cause a reduction in the PIL5 protein level, which in turn regulates the transcription of two DELLA genes directly and that of GA and ABA metabolic genes indirectly.

  12. Microautoradiographic localisation of [3H]sucrose and [3H]mannitol in Robinia pseudoacacia pulvinar tissues during phytochrome-mediated nyctinastic closure.

    PubMed

    Moysset, L; Llambrich, E; López-Iglesias, C; Simón, E

    2006-11-01

    We have analysed the incorporation of [(3)H]sucrose and [(3)H]mannitol in pulvinar motor cells of Robinia pseudoacacia L. during phytochrome-mediated nyctinastic closure. Pairs of leaflets, excised 2 h after the beginning of the photoperiod, were fed with 50 mM [(3)H]sucrose or [(3)H]mannitol, irradiated with red (15 min) or far-red (5 min) light and placed in the dark for 2-3 h. Label uptake was measured in whole pulvini by liquid scintillation counting. The distribution of labelling in pulvinar sections was assessed by both light and electron microautoradiography. [(3)H]Sucrose uptake was twice that of [(3)H]mannitol incorporation in both red- and far-red-irradiated pulvini. In the autoradiographs, [(3)H]sucrose and [(3)H]mannitol labelling was localised in the area from the vascular bundle to the epidermis, mainly in vacuoles, cytoplasm, and cell walls. Extensor and flexor protoplasts displayed a different distribution of [(3)H]sucrose after red and far-red irradiation. Far-red light drastically reduced the [(3)H]sucrose incorporation in extensor protoplasts and caused a slight increase in internal flexor protoplasts. After red light treatment, no differences in [(3)H]sucrose labelling were found between extensor and flexor protoplasts. Our results indicate a phytochrome control of sucrose distribution in cortical motor cells and seem to rule out the possibility of sucrose acting as an osmoticum. PMID:17102931

  13. Rewiring of jasmonate and phytochrome B signalling uncouples plant growth-defense tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marcelo L; Yoshida, Yuki; Major, Ian T; de Oliveira Ferreira, Dalton; Weraduwage, Sarathi M; Froehlich, John E; Johnson, Brendan F; Kramer, David M; Jander, Georg; Sharkey, Thomas D; Howe, Gregg A

    2016-01-01

    Plants resist infection and herbivory with innate immune responses that are often associated with reduced growth. Despite the importance of growth-defense tradeoffs in shaping plant productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems, the molecular mechanisms that link growth and immunity are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that growth-defense tradeoffs mediated by the hormone jasmonate are uncoupled in an Arabidopsis mutant (jazQ phyB) lacking a quintet of Jasmonate ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors and the photoreceptor phyB. Analysis of epistatic interactions between jazQ and phyB reveal that growth inhibition associated with enhanced anti-insect resistance is likely not caused by diversion of photoassimilates from growth to defense but rather by a conserved transcriptional network that is hardwired to attenuate growth upon activation of jasmonate signalling. The ability to unlock growth-defense tradeoffs through relief of transcription repression provides an approach to assemble functional plant traits in new and potentially useful ways. PMID:27573094

  14. Structures of cyanobacteriochromes from phototaxis regulators AnPixJ and TePixJ reveal general and specific photoconversion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Narikawa, Rei; Ishizuka, Takami; Muraki, Norifumi; Shiba, Tomoo; Kurisu, Genji; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2013-01-15

    Cyanobacteriochromes are cyanobacterial tetrapyrrole-binding photoreceptors that share a bilin-binding GAF domain with photoreceptors of the phytochrome family. Cyanobacteriochromes are divided into many subclasses with distinct spectral properties. Among them, putative phototaxis regulators PixJs of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 (denoted as AnPixJ and TePixJ, respectively) are representative of subclasses showing red-green-type and blue/green-type reversible photoconversion, respectively. Here, we determined crystal structures for the AnPixJ GAF domain in its red-absorbing 15Z state (Pr) and the TePixJ GAF domain in its green-absorbing 15E state (Pg). The overall structure of these proteins is similar to each other and also similar to known phytochromes. Critical differences found are as follows: (i) the chromophore of AnPixJ Pr is phycocyanobilin in a C5-Z,syn/C10-Z,syn/C15-Z,anti configuration and that of TePixJ Pg is phycoviolobilin in a C10-Z,syn/C15-E,anti configuration, (ii) a side chain of the key aspartic acid is hydrogen bonded to the tetrapyrrole rings A, B and C in AnPixJ Pr and to the pyrrole ring D in TePixJ Pg, (iii) additional protein-chromophore interactions are provided by subclass-specific residues including tryptophan in AnPixJ and cysteine in TePixJ. Possible structural changes following the photoisomerization of the chromophore between C15-Z and C15-E are discussed based on the X-ray structures at 1.8 and 2.0-Å resolution, respectively, in two distinct configurations. PMID:23256156

  15. Convergence of Alarmone and Cell Cycle Signaling from Trans-Encoded Sensory Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sanselicio, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the myriad of different sensory domains encoded in bacterial genomes, only a few are known to control the cell cycle. Here, suppressor genetics was used to unveil the regulatory interplay between the PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain protein MopJ and the uncharacterized GAF (cyclic GMP-phosphodiesterase–adenylyl cyclase–FhlA) domain protein PtsP, which resembles an alternative component of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transferase system. Both of these systems indirectly target the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle master regulator CtrA, but in different ways. While MopJ acts on CtrA via the cell cycle kinases DivJ and DivL, which control the removal of CtrA at the G1-S transition, our data show that PtsP signals through the conserved alarmone (p)ppGpp, which prevents CtrA cycling under nutritional stress and in stationary phase. We found that PtsP interacts genetically and physically with the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT and that it modulates several promoters that are directly activated by the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA. Thus, parallel systems integrate nutritional and systemic signals within the cell cycle transcriptional network, converging on the essential alphaproteobacterial regulator CtrA while also affecting global cell cycle transcription in other ways. PMID:26489861

  16. Light-Activated Nuclear Translocation of Adeno-Associated Virus Nanoparticles Using Phytochrome B for Enhanced, Tunable, and Spatially Programmable Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eric J; Gerhardt, Karl; Judd, Justin; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Suh, Junghae

    2016-01-26

    Gene delivery vectors that are activated by external stimuli may allow improved control over the location and the degree of gene expression in target populations of cells. Light is an attractive stimulus because it does not cross-react with cellular signaling networks, has negligible toxicity, is noninvasive, and can be applied in space and time with unparalleled precision. We used the previously engineered red (R)/far-red (FR) light-switchable protein phytochrome B (PhyB) and its R light dependent interaction partner phytochrome interacting factor 6 (PIF6) from Arabidopsis thaliana to engineer an adeno-associated virus (AAV) platform whose gene delivery efficiency is controlled by light. Upon exposure to R light, AAV engineered to display PIF6 motifs on the capsid bind to PhyB tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), resulting in significantly increased translocation of viruses into the host cell nucleus and overall gene delivery efficiency. By modulating the ratio of R to FR light, the gene delivery efficiency can be tuned to as little as 35% or over 600% of the unengineered AAV. We also demonstrate spatial control of gene delivery using projected patterns of codelivered R and FR light. Overall, our successful use of light-switchable proteins in virus capsid engineering extends these important optogenetic tools into the adjacent realm of nucleic acid delivery and enables enhanced, tunable, and spatially controllable regulation of viral gene delivery. Our current light-triggered viral gene delivery prototype may be broadly useful for genetic manipulation of cells ex vivo or in vivo in transgenic model organisms, with the ultimate prospect of achieving dose- and site-specific gene expression profiles for either therapeutic (e.g., regenerative medicine) or fundamental discovery research efforts.

  17. In response to partial plant shading, the lack of phytochrome A does not directly induce leaf senescence but alters the fine-tuning of chlorophyll biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Bastiaan; Gardeström, Per; Keech, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Phytochrome is thought to control the induction of leaf senescence directly, however, the signalling and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, an ecophysiological approach was used to establish a functional connection between phytochrome signalling and the physiological processes underlying the induction of leaf senescence in response to shade. With shade it is important to distinguish between complete and partial shading, during which either the whole or only a part of the plant is shaded, respectively. It is first shown here that, while PHYB is required to maintain chlorophyll content in a completely shaded plant, only PHYA is involved in maintaining the leaf chlorophyll content in response to partial plant shading. Second, it is shown that leaf yellowing associated with strong partial shading in phyA-mutant plants actually correlates to a decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll rather than to an increase of its degradation. Third, it is shown that the physiological impact of this decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll in strongly shaded phyA-mutant leaves is accompanied by a decreased capacity to adjust the Light Compensation Point. However, the increased leaf yellowing in phyA-mutant plants is not accompanied by an increase of senescence-specific molecular markers, which argues against a direct role of PHYA in inducing leaf senescence in response to partial shade. In conclusion, it is proposed that PHYA, but not PHYB, is essential for fine-tuning the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway in response to partial shading. In turn, this mechanism allows the shaded leaf to adjust its photosynthetic machinery to very low irradiances, thus maintaining a positive carbon balance and repressing the induction of leaf senescence, which can occur under prolonged periods of shade.

  18. Light-Activated Nuclear Translocation of Adeno-Associated Virus Nanoparticles Using Phytochrome B for Enhanced, Tunable, and Spatially Programmable Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eric J; Gerhardt, Karl; Judd, Justin; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Suh, Junghae

    2016-01-26

    Gene delivery vectors that are activated by external stimuli may allow improved control over the location and the degree of gene expression in target populations of cells. Light is an attractive stimulus because it does not cross-react with cellular signaling networks, has negligible toxicity, is noninvasive, and can be applied in space and time with unparalleled precision. We used the previously engineered red (R)/far-red (FR) light-switchable protein phytochrome B (PhyB) and its R light dependent interaction partner phytochrome interacting factor 6 (PIF6) from Arabidopsis thaliana to engineer an adeno-associated virus (AAV) platform whose gene delivery efficiency is controlled by light. Upon exposure to R light, AAV engineered to display PIF6 motifs on the capsid bind to PhyB tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), resulting in significantly increased translocation of viruses into the host cell nucleus and overall gene delivery efficiency. By modulating the ratio of R to FR light, the gene delivery efficiency can be tuned to as little as 35% or over 600% of the unengineered AAV. We also demonstrate spatial control of gene delivery using projected patterns of codelivered R and FR light. Overall, our successful use of light-switchable proteins in virus capsid engineering extends these important optogenetic tools into the adjacent realm of nucleic acid delivery and enables enhanced, tunable, and spatially controllable regulation of viral gene delivery. Our current light-triggered viral gene delivery prototype may be broadly useful for genetic manipulation of cells ex vivo or in vivo in transgenic model organisms, with the ultimate prospect of achieving dose- and site-specific gene expression profiles for either therapeutic (e.g., regenerative medicine) or fundamental discovery research efforts. PMID:26618393

  19. Phytochrome signaling in green Arabidopsis seedlings: impact assessment of a mutually negative phyB-PIF feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Leivar, Pablo; Monte, Elena; Cohn, Megan M; Quail, Peter H

    2012-05-01

    The reversibly red (R)/far-red (FR)-light-responsive phytochrome (phy) photosensory system initiates both the deetiolation process in dark-germinated seedlings upon first exposure to light, and the shade-avoidance process in fully deetiolated seedlings upon exposure to vegetational shade. The intracellular signaling pathway from the light-activated photoreceptor conformer (Pfr) to the transcriptional network that drives these responses involves direct, physical interaction of Pfr with a small subfamily of bHLH transcription factors, termed Phy-Interacting Factors (PIFs), which induces rapid PIF proteolytic degradation. In addition, there is evidence of further complexity in light-grown seedlings, whereby phyB-PIF interaction reciprocally induces phyB degradation, in a mutually-negative, feedback-loop configuration. Here, to assess the relative contributions of these antagonistic activities to the net phenotypic readout in light-grown seedlings, we have examined the magnitude of the light- and simulated-shade-induced responses of a pentuple phyBpif1pif3pif4pif5 (phyBpifq) mutant and various multiple pif-mutant combinations. The data (1) reaffirm that phyB is the predominant, if not exclusive, photoreceptor imposing the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in deetiolating seedlings in response to prolonged continuous R irradiation and (2) show that the PIF quartet (PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) retain and exert a dual capacity to modulate hypocotyl elongation under these conditions, by concomitantly promoting cell elongation through intrinsic transcriptional-regulatory activity, and reducing phyB-inhibitory capacity through feedback-loop-induced phyB degradation. In shade-exposed seedlings, immunoblot analysis shows that the shade-imposed reduction in Pfr levels induces increases in the abundance of PIF3, and mutant analysis indicates that PIF3 acts, in conjunction with PIF4 and PIF5, to promote the known shade-induced acceleration of hypocotyl elongation. Conversely

  20. Protein domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are composed of functional units, or domains, that can be found alone or in combination with other domains. Analysis of protein domain architectures and the movement of protein domains within and across different genomes provide clues about the evolution of protein function. The classification of proteins into families and domains is provided through publicly available tools and databases that use known protein domains to predict other members in new proteins sequences. Currently at least 80% of the main protein sequence databases can be classified using these tools, thus providing a large data set to work from for analyzing protein domain architectures. Each of the protein domain databases provide intuitive web interfaces for viewing and analyzing their domain classifications and provide their data freely for downloading. Some of the main protein family and domain databases are described here, along with their Web-based tools for analyzing domain architectures.

  1. Understanding the Public Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carrie

    2003-01-01

    This overview of the public domain covers: defining the public domain; figuring out if a work is protected by copyright; being sure a work is in the public domain; asserting the copyright protection and term; the Creative Commons initiative; building the Information Commons; when permission is needed for using a public domain work; and special…

  2. LLM-Domain B-GATA Transcription Factors Promote Stomatal Development Downstream of Light Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana Hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Klermund, Carina; Ranftl, Quirin L; Diener, Julia; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Richter, René; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2016-03-01

    Stomata are pores that regulate the gas and water exchange between the environment and aboveground plant tissues, including hypocotyls, leaves, and stems. Here, we show that mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana LLM-domain B-GATA genes are defective in stomata formation in hypocotyls. Conversely, stomata formation is strongly promoted by overexpression of various LLM-domain B-class GATA genes, most strikingly in hypocotyls but also in cotyledons. Genetic analyses indicate that these B-GATAs act upstream of the stomata formation regulators SPEECHLESS(SPCH), MUTE, and SCREAM/SCREAM2 and downstream or independent of the patterning regulators TOO MANY MOUTHS and STOMATAL DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION1 The effects of the GATAs on stomata formation are light dependent but can be induced in dark-grown seedlings by red, far-red, or blue light treatments. PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR(PIF) mutants form stomata in the dark, and in this genetic background, GATA expression is sufficient to induce stomata formation in the dark. Since the expression of the LLM-domain B-GATAs GNC(GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED) and GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 as well as that of SPCH is red light induced but the induction of SPCH is compromised in a GATA gene mutant background, we hypothesize that PIF- and light-regulated stomata formation in hypocotyls is critically dependent on LLM-domain B-GATA genes. PMID:26917680

  3. Antiphase light and temperature cycles affect PHYTOCHROME B-controlled ethylene sensitivity and biosynthesis, limiting leaf movement and growth of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bours, Ralph; van Zanten, Martijn; Pierik, Ronald; Bouwmeester, Harro; van der Krol, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    In the natural environment, days are generally warmer than the night, resulting in a positive day/night temperature difference (+DIF). Plants have adapted to these conditions, and when exposed to antiphase light and temperature cycles (cold photoperiod/warm night [-DIF]), most species exhibit reduced elongation growth. To study the physiological mechanism of how light and temperature cycles affect plant growth, we used infrared imaging to dissect growth dynamics under +DIF and -DIF in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that -DIF altered leaf growth patterns, decreasing the amplitude and delaying the phase of leaf movement. Ethylene application restored leaf growth in -DIF conditions, and constitutive ethylene signaling mutants maintain robust leaf movement amplitudes under -DIF, indicating that ethylene signaling becomes limiting under these conditions. In response to -DIF, the phase of ethylene emission advanced 2 h, but total ethylene emission was not reduced. However, expression analysis on members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase ethylene biosynthesis gene family showed that ACS2 activity is specifically suppressed in the petiole region under -DIF conditions. Indeed, petioles of plants under -DIF had reduced ACC content, and application of ACC to the petiole restored leaf growth patterns. Moreover, acs2 mutants displayed reduced leaf movement under +DIF, similar to wild-type plants under -DIF. In addition, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor PHYTOCHROME B restricts ethylene biosynthesis and constrains the -DIF-induced phase shift in rhythmic growth. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into how fluctuating temperature cycles regulate plant growth.

  4. A knot in the protein structure - probing the near-infrared fluorescent protein iRFP designed from a bacterial phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Olesya V; Bublikov, Grigory S; Stepanenko, Olga V; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Turoverov, Konstantin K; Kuznetsova, Irina M

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of engineering near-infrared fluorescent proteins and biosensors from bacterial phytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) has led to substantial interest in this family of proteins. The near-infrared fluorescent proteins have allowed non-invasive bio-imaging of deep tissues and whole organs in living animals. BphPs and derived near-infrared fluorescent proteins contain a structural element, called a knot, in their polypeptide chains. The formation of knot structures in proteins was refuted for a long time. Here, we studied the denaturation and renaturation processes of the near-infrared fluorescent probe iRFP, engineered from RpBphP2, which utilizes a heme-derived tetrapyrrole compound biliverdin as a chromophore. iRFP contains a unique figure-of-eight knot. The denaturation and renaturation curves of the iRFP apoform coincided well, suggesting efficient refolding. However, the iRFP holoform exhibited irreversible unfolding and aggregation associated with the bound chromophore. The knot structure in the apoform did not prevent subsequent binding of biliverdin, resulting in the functional iRFP holoform. We suggest that the irreversibility of protein unfolding is caused by post-translational protein modifications, such as chromophore binding, rather than the presence of the knot. These results are essential for future design of BphP-based near-infrared probes, and add important features to our knowledge of protein folding.

  5. Phosphorylation of FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 is a key mechanism defining signaling dynamics of phytochrome A under red and far-red light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Xiarong; Chen, Liang; Dai, Mingqiu; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shen, Yunping; Li, Jigang; Li, Gang; Wei, Ning; Deng, Xing Wang

    2012-05-01

    Emerging plants have to adapt to a high ratio of far-red light (FR)/red light (R) light in the canopy before they reach the R-enriched direct sunlight. Phytochrome A (phyA) is the single dominant photoreceptor in young Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings that initiates photomorphogenesis in response to a FR-enriched environment and transduces increasing R signals to early responsive genes. To date, how phyA differentially transmits FR and R signals to downstream genes remains obscure. Here, we present a phyA pathway in which FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 (FHY1), an essential partner of phyA, directly guides phyA to target gene promoters and coactivates transcription. Furthermore, we identified two phosphorylation sites on FHY1, Ser-39 and Thr-61, whose phosphorylation by phyA under R inhibits phyA signaling at each step of its pathway. Deregulation of FHY1 phosphorylation renders seedlings colorblind to FR and R. Finally, we show that the weaker phyA response resulting from FHY1 phosphorylation ensures the seedling deetiolation process in response to a R-enriched light condition. Collectively, our results reveal FHY1 phosphorylation as a key mechanism for FR/R spectrum-specific responses in plants and an essential event for plant adaption to changing light conditions in nature.

  6. LEAFY COTYLEDON1-CASEIN KINASE I-TCP15-PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 Network Regulates Somatic Embryogenesis by Regulating Auxin Homeostasis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ling; Hu, Qin; Li, Yaoyao; Xu, Jiao; Ma, Yizan; Zhu, Longfu; Yang, Xiyan; Zhang, Xianlong

    2015-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an efficient tool for the propagation of plant species and also, a useful model for studying the regulatory networks in embryo development. However, the regulatory networks underlying the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos during SE remain poorly understood. Here, we describe an upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) CASEIN KINASE I gene, GhCKI, which is a unique key regulatory factor that strongly affects SE. Overexpressing GhCKI halted the formation of embryoids and plant regeneration because of a block in the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos. In contrast, defective GhCKI in plants facilitated SE. To better understand the mechanism by which GhCKI regulates SE, the regulatory network was analyzed. A direct upstream negative regulator protein, cotton LEAFY COTYLEDON1, was identified to be targeted to a cis-element, CTTTTC, in the promoter of GhCKI. Moreover, GhCKI interacted with and phosphorylated cotton CINCINNATA-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF transcription factor15 by coordinately regulating the expression of cotton PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4, finally disrupting auxin homeostasis, which led to increased cell proliferation and aborted somatic embryo formation in GhCKI-overexpressing somatic cells. Our results show a complex process of SE that is negatively regulated by GhCKI through a complex regulatory network. PMID:26491146

  7. Phosphorylation of FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 is a key mechanism defining signaling dynamics of phytochrome A under red and far-red light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Xiarong; Chen, Liang; Dai, Mingqiu; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shen, Yunping; Li, Jigang; Li, Gang; Wei, Ning; Deng, Xing Wang

    2012-05-01

    Emerging plants have to adapt to a high ratio of far-red light (FR)/red light (R) light in the canopy before they reach the R-enriched direct sunlight. Phytochrome A (phyA) is the single dominant photoreceptor in young Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings that initiates photomorphogenesis in response to a FR-enriched environment and transduces increasing R signals to early responsive genes. To date, how phyA differentially transmits FR and R signals to downstream genes remains obscure. Here, we present a phyA pathway in which FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 (FHY1), an essential partner of phyA, directly guides phyA to target gene promoters and coactivates transcription. Furthermore, we identified two phosphorylation sites on FHY1, Ser-39 and Thr-61, whose phosphorylation by phyA under R inhibits phyA signaling at each step of its pathway. Deregulation of FHY1 phosphorylation renders seedlings colorblind to FR and R. Finally, we show that the weaker phyA response resulting from FHY1 phosphorylation ensures the seedling deetiolation process in response to a R-enriched light condition. Collectively, our results reveal FHY1 phosphorylation as a key mechanism for FR/R spectrum-specific responses in plants and an essential event for plant adaption to changing light conditions in nature. PMID:22582101

  8. Spectroscopic Investigation on the Primary Photoreaction of Bathy Phytochrome Agp2-Pr of Agrobacterium fabrum: Isomerization in a pH-dependent H-bond Network.

    PubMed

    Singer, Patrick; Wörner, Sybille; Lamparter, Tilman; Diller, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    Bathy phytochrome Agp2 from Agrobacterium fabrum exhibits an unusually low pKa =7.6 in the Pr state in contrast to a pKa >11 in the Pfr state, indicating a pH-dependent charge distribution and H-bond network in the Pr chromophore binding pocket around neutral pH. Here, we report on ultrafast UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy of the primary Pr photoisomerization of Agp2 at pH 6 and pH 9 and upon H2 O/D2 O buffer exchange. The triexponential Pr kinetics slows down at increased pH and pronounced pH-dependent kinetic isotope effects are observed. The results on the Pr photoreaction suggest: 1) component-wise hindered dynamics on the chromophore excited-state potential energy surface at high pH and 2) proton translocation processes either via single-proton transfer or via significant reorganization of H-bond networks. Both effects reflect the interplay between the pH-dependent charge distribution in the Pr chromophore binding pocket on the one hand and chromophore excitation and its Z→E isomerization on the other hand. PMID:27075723

  9. Phytochrome-mediated germination and early development in spores of Dryopteris filix-mas L.: phase-specific and non phase-specific inhibition by staurosporine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, C. J.; Scheuerlein, R.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    The alkaloid staurosporine, currently known as the most potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, PKC, was tested for its ability to inhibit phytochrome-mediated spore germination in Dryopteris filix-mas L., evaluated by the induction of chlorophyll synthesis. Approximately half-maximal inhibition was obtained at a concentration of 10(-5) M. This effect of staurosporine was phase-specific and was found during the same period in which the presence of extracellular calcium is necessary for realization of the light signal. Furthermore, the ability of staurosporine to prevent progression of a germinated spore into early gametophyte development, evaluated by the accumulation of chlorophyll, was examined. Again, staurosporine (10(-5) M) significantly diminished chlorophyll accumulation, determined quantitatively in vivo by single-cell measurements, in a non-phase specific way. The fact that the phase-specific inhibitory effect of staurosporine in preventing germination was coincident with the phase-specific requirement of Ca2+ suggests that both Ca2+ and staurosporine affect the same step in the signal-transduction chain. A phosphorylation event catalysed by PKC or any Ca2+ -dependent protein kinase is proposed as the target of staurosporine and Ca2+.

  10. Thermoperiodic Control of Hypocotyl Elongation Depends on Auxin-Induced Ethylene Signaling That Controls Downstream PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Bours, Ralph; Kohlen, Wouter; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2015-01-01

    We show that antiphase light-temperature cycles (negative day-night temperature difference [−DIF]) inhibit hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This is caused by reduced cell elongation during the cold photoperiod. Cell elongation in the basal part of the hypocotyl under −DIF was restored by both 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC; ethylene precursor) and auxin, indicating limited auxin and ethylene signaling under −DIF. Both auxin biosynthesis and auxin signaling were reduced during −DIF. In addition, expression of several ACC Synthase was reduced under −DIF but could be restored by auxin application. In contrast, the reduced hypocotyl elongation of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling mutants could not be complemented by auxin, indicating that auxin functions upstream of ethylene. The PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 were previously shown to be important regulators of hypocotyl elongation. We now show that, in contrast to pif4 and pif5 mutants, the reduced hypocotyl length in pif3 cannot be rescued by either ACC or auxin. In line with this, treatment with ethylene or auxin inhibitors reduced hypocotyl elongation in PIF4 overexpressor (PIF4ox) and PIF5ox but not PIF3ox plants. PIF3 promoter activity was strongly reduced under −DIF but could be restored by auxin application in an ACC Synthase-dependent manner. Combined, these results show that PIF3 regulates hypocotyl length downstream, whereas PIF4 and PIF5 regulate hypocotyl length upstream of an auxin and ethylene cascade. We show that, under −DIF, lower auxin biosynthesis activity limits the signaling in this pathway, resulting in low activity of PIF3 and short hypocotyls. PMID:25516603

  11. Antiphase Light and Temperature Cycles Affect PHYTOCHROME B-Controlled Ethylene Sensitivity and Biosynthesis, Limiting Leaf Movement and Growth of Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bours, Ralph; van Zanten, Martijn; Pierik, Ronald; Bouwmeester, Harro; van der Krol, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In the natural environment, days are generally warmer than the night, resulting in a positive day/night temperature difference (+DIF). Plants have adapted to these conditions, and when exposed to antiphase light and temperature cycles (cold photoperiod/warm night [−DIF]), most species exhibit reduced elongation growth. To study the physiological mechanism of how light and temperature cycles affect plant growth, we used infrared imaging to dissect growth dynamics under +DIF and −DIF in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that −DIF altered leaf growth patterns, decreasing the amplitude and delaying the phase of leaf movement. Ethylene application restored leaf growth in −DIF conditions, and constitutive ethylene signaling mutants maintain robust leaf movement amplitudes under −DIF, indicating that ethylene signaling becomes limiting under these conditions. In response to −DIF, the phase of ethylene emission advanced 2 h, but total ethylene emission was not reduced. However, expression analysis on members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase ethylene biosynthesis gene family showed that ACS2 activity is specifically suppressed in the petiole region under −DIF conditions. Indeed, petioles of plants under −DIF had reduced ACC content, and application of ACC to the petiole restored leaf growth patterns. Moreover, acs2 mutants displayed reduced leaf movement under +DIF, similar to wild-type plants under −DIF. In addition, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor PHYTOCHROME B restricts ethylene biosynthesis and constrains the −DIF-induced phase shift in rhythmic growth. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into how fluctuating temperature cycles regulate plant growth. PMID:23979970

  12. Polar distribution of annexin-like proteins during phytochrome-mediated initiation and growth of rhizoids in the ferns Dryopteris and Anemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Turnwald, S.; Tirlapur, U. K.; Haas, C. J.; von der Mark, K.; Roux, S. J.; Scheuerlein, R.

    1995-01-01

    Although the calcium requirement of phytochrome-mediated fern spore germination and early rhizoid growth is well established, the calcium-binding proteins that serve as transducers for these responses are not known. Here we report the presence of annexin-like proteins in germinating spores of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott and Anemia phyllitidis (L.) Sw. and evidence that they may be important participants in early photomorphogenic changes in gametophytes. Immunolocalization and immunoblot assays of these proteins were carried out using polyclonal antibodies raised either against a 35-kDa annexin-like protein from pea or against anchorin CII from chicken. Western-blot analysis showed that crude protein extracts obtained from both species after red-light treatment contained two cross-reactive protein bands with molecular weights around 70 kDa. These proteins were annexin-like in that they bound to a phosphatidylserine affinity column in a calcium-dependent fashion. Using this column, two protein bands around 70 kDa, i.e. 67 and 73 kDa, were partially purified together with proteins at 36 kDa and a doublet at 54 kDa. Proteins of these latter molecular weights are suggested to be members of the annexin family, but no cross-reactivity could be found between these and the two antibodies used in our investigations. Immunodetectable levels of these proteins were observed only after light-mediated induction of spore germination. Imaging of the immuno-localization patterns observed with both antibodies showed that the annexin-like proteins are concentrated at the extreme tips of the rhizoids in D. filix-mas and A. phyllitidis during rhizoid initiation and all stages of elongation. We suggest that these proteins may play a major role in the tip-oriented exocytosis events that are critical for the initiation and growth of fern rhizoids.

  13. FTIR study of the photoinduced processes of plant phytochrome phyA using isotope-labeled bilins and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Schwinté, Pascale; Foerstendorf, Harald; Hussain, Zakir; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Mroginski, Maria-Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter; Siebert, Friedrich

    2008-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to analyze the chromophore structure in the parent states Pr and Pfr of plant phytochrome phyA and the respective photoproducts lumi-R and lumi-F. The spectra were obtained from phyA adducts assembled with either uniformly or selectively isotope-labeled phytochromobilin and phycocyanobilin. The interpretation of the experimental spectra is based on the spectra of chromophore models calculated by density functional theory. Global (13)C-labeling of the tetrapyrrole allows for the discrimination between chromophore and protein bands in the Fourier transform infrared difference spectra. All infrared difference spectra display a prominent difference band attributable to a stretching mode with large contributions from the methine bridge between the inner pyrrole rings (B-C stretching). Due to mode coupling, frequencies and isotopic shifts of this mode suggest that the Pr chromophore may adopt a distorted ZZZssa or ZZZasa geometry with a twisted A-B methine bridge. The transition to lumi-R is associated with only minor changes of the amide I bands indicating limited protein structural changes during the isomerization site of the C-D methine bridge. Major protein structural changes occur upon the transition to Pfr in which the chromophore adopts a ZZEssa or ZZEasa-like state. In addition, specific interactions with the protein alter the structure of the B-C methine bridge as concluded from the substantial downshift of the respective stretching mode. These interactions are removed during the photoreaction to lumi-F (ZZE-->ZZZ), which involves only small protein structural changes. PMID:18390618

  14. Domains and Naive Theories

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.; Noles, Nicholaus S.

    2013-01-01

    Human cognition entails domain-specific cognitive processes that influence memory, attention, categorization, problem-solving, reasoning, and knowledge organization. This review examines domain-specific causal theories, which are of particular interest for permitting an examination of how knowledge structures change over time. We first describe the properties of commonsense theories, and how commonsense theories differ from scientific theories, illustrating with children’s classification of biological and non-biological kinds. We next consider the implications of domain-specificity for broader issues regarding cognitive development and conceptual change. We then examine the extent to which domain-specific theories interact, and how people reconcile competing causal frameworks. Future directions for research include examining how different content domains interact, the nature of theory change, the role of context (including culture, language, and social interaction) in inducing different frameworks, and the neural bases for domain-specific reasoning. PMID:24187603

  15. Learning and Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Yishay

    Domain adaptation is a fundamental learning problem where one wishes to use labeled data from one or several source domains to learn a hypothesis performing well on a different, yet related, domain for which no labeled data is available. This generalization across domains is a very significant challenge for many machine learning applications and arises in a variety of natural settings, including NLP tasks (document classification, sentiment analysis, etc.), speech recognition (speakers and noise or environment adaptation) and face recognition (different lighting conditions, different population composition).

  16. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  17. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, M.; Moore, S. A.; Fedor, J.; Ciocys, S. T.; Karapetrov, G.; Pearson, J.; Novosad, V.; Bader, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application. PMID:25164004

  18. A Heme-based Redox Sensor in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans*

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Bastian; Stassen, Marc; Modi, Anuja; El-Mashtoly, Samir F.; Laurich, Christoph; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Dawson, John H.; Rother, Michael; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Based on a bioinformatics study, the protein MA4561 from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans was originally predicted to be a multidomain phytochrome-like photosensory kinase possibly binding open-chain tetrapyrroles. Although we were able to show that recombinantly produced and purified protein does not bind any known phytochrome chromophores, UV-visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of a heme tetrapyrrole cofactor. In contrast to many other known cytoplasmic heme-containing proteins, the heme was covalently attached via one vinyl side chain to cysteine 656 in the second GAF domain. This GAF domain by itself is sufficient for covalent attachment. Resonance Raman and magnetic circular dichroism data support a model of a six-coordinate heme species with additional features of a five-coordination structure. The heme cofactor is redox-active and able to coordinate various ligands like imidazole, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon monoxide depending on the redox state. Interestingly, the redox state of the heme cofactor has a substantial influence on autophosphorylation activity. Although reduced protein does not autophosphorylate, oxidized protein gives a strong autophosphorylation signal independent from bound external ligands. Based on its genomic localization, MA4561 is most likely a sensor kinase of a two-component system effecting regulation of the Mts system, a set of three homologous corrinoid/methyltransferase fusion protein isoforms involved in methyl sulfide metabolism. Consistent with this prediction, an M. acetivorans mutant devoid of MA4561 constitutively synthesized MtsF. On the basis of our results, we postulate a heme-based redox/dimethyl sulfide sensory function of MA4561 and propose to designate it MsmS (methyl sulfide methyltransferase-associated sensor). PMID:23661702

  19. Causal Learning Across Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Laura E.; Gopnik, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Five studies investigated (a) children's ability to use the dependent and independent probabilities of events to make causal inferences and (b) the interaction between such inferences and domain-specific knowledge. In Experiment 1, preschoolers used patterns of dependence and independence to make accurate causal inferences in the domains of…

  20. Domain wall filters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-03-15

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  1. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the full-length bacteriophytochrome from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Sebastián; Otero, Lisandro H; Rinaldi, Jimena; Sosa, Santiago; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Shepard, William E; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Bonomi, Hernán R

    2014-12-01

    Phytochromes give rise to the largest photosensor family known to date. However, they are underrepresented in the Protein Data Bank. Plant, cyanobacterial, fungal and bacterial phytochromes share a canonical architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensory module (PAS2-GAF-PHY domains) and a C-terminal variable output module. The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a worldwide agricultural pathogen, codes for a single bacteriophytochrome (XccBphP) that has this canonical architecture, bearing a C-terminal PAS9 domain as the output module. Full-length XccBphP was cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity by nickel-NTA affinity and size-exclusion chromatography and was then crystallized at room temperature bound to its cofactor biliverdin. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 Å. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.94, c = 344.57 Å and a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Refinement is underway after solving the structure by molecular replacement. PMID:25484215

  3. Phytochrome B Mediates the Regulation of Chlorophyll Biosynthesis through Transcriptional Regulation of ChlH and GUN4 in Rice Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Tanaka, Ayumi; Ueno, Osamu; Shimada, Hiroaki; Takano, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Accurate regulation of chlorophyll synthesis is crucial for chloroplast formation during the greening process in angiosperms. In this study, we examined the role of phytochrome B (phyB) in the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis in rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) through the characterization of a pale-green phenotype observed in the phyB mutant grown under continuous red light (Rc) irradiation. Our results show that the Rc-induced chlorophyll accumulation can be divided into two components—a phyB-dependent and a phyB-independent component, and that the pale-green phenotype is caused by the absence of the phyB-dependent component. To elucidate the role of the missing component we established an Rc-induced greening experiment, the results of which revealed that several genes encoding proteins on the chlorophyll branch were repressed in the phyB mutant. Notable among them were ChlH and GUN4 genes, which encode subunit H and an activating factor of magnesium chelatase (Mg-chelatase), respectively, that were largely repressed in the mutant. Moreover, the kinetic profiles of chlorophyll precursors suggested that Mg-chelatase activity simultaneously decreased with the reduction in the transcript levels of ChlH and GUN4. These results suggest that phyB mediates the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis through transcriptional regulation of these two genes, whose products exert their action at the branching point of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway. Reduction of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) synthesis could be detected in the mutant, but the kinetic profiles of chlorophyll precursors indicated that it was an event posterior to the reduction of the Mg-chelatase activity. It means that the repression of 5-ALA synthesis should not be a triggering event for the appearance of the pale-green phenotype. Instead, the repression of 5-ALA synthesis might be important for the subsequent stabilization of the pale-green phenotype for preventing excessive accumulation of hazardous

  4. Phytochrome B Mediates the Regulation of Chlorophyll Biosynthesis through Transcriptional Regulation of ChlH and GUN4 in Rice Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Noritoshi; Kinoshita, Keisuke; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Tanaka, Ayumi; Ueno, Osamu; Shimada, Hiroaki; Takano, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Accurate regulation of chlorophyll synthesis is crucial for chloroplast formation during the greening process in angiosperms. In this study, we examined the role of phytochrome B (phyB) in the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis in rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) through the characterization of a pale-green phenotype observed in the phyB mutant grown under continuous red light (Rc) irradiation. Our results show that the Rc-induced chlorophyll accumulation can be divided into two components--a phyB-dependent and a phyB-independent component, and that the pale-green phenotype is caused by the absence of the phyB-dependent component. To elucidate the role of the missing component we established an Rc-induced greening experiment, the results of which revealed that several genes encoding proteins on the chlorophyll branch were repressed in the phyB mutant. Notable among them were ChlH and GUN4 genes, which encode subunit H and an activating factor of magnesium chelatase (Mg-chelatase), respectively, that were largely repressed in the mutant. Moreover, the kinetic profiles of chlorophyll precursors suggested that Mg-chelatase activity simultaneously decreased with the reduction in the transcript levels of ChlH and GUN4. These results suggest that phyB mediates the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis through transcriptional regulation of these two genes, whose products exert their action at the branching point of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway. Reduction of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) synthesis could be detected in the mutant, but the kinetic profiles of chlorophyll precursors indicated that it was an event posterior to the reduction of the Mg-chelatase activity. It means that the repression of 5-ALA synthesis should not be a triggering event for the appearance of the pale-green phenotype. Instead, the repression of 5-ALA synthesis might be important for the subsequent stabilization of the pale-green phenotype for preventing excessive accumulation of hazardous

  5. Phytochrome B Mediates the Regulation of Chlorophyll Biosynthesis through Transcriptional Regulation of ChlH and GUN4 in Rice Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Noritoshi; Kinoshita, Keisuke; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Tanaka, Ayumi; Ueno, Osamu; Shimada, Hiroaki; Takano, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Accurate regulation of chlorophyll synthesis is crucial for chloroplast formation during the greening process in angiosperms. In this study, we examined the role of phytochrome B (phyB) in the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis in rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) through the characterization of a pale-green phenotype observed in the phyB mutant grown under continuous red light (Rc) irradiation. Our results show that the Rc-induced chlorophyll accumulation can be divided into two components--a phyB-dependent and a phyB-independent component, and that the pale-green phenotype is caused by the absence of the phyB-dependent component. To elucidate the role of the missing component we established an Rc-induced greening experiment, the results of which revealed that several genes encoding proteins on the chlorophyll branch were repressed in the phyB mutant. Notable among them were ChlH and GUN4 genes, which encode subunit H and an activating factor of magnesium chelatase (Mg-chelatase), respectively, that were largely repressed in the mutant. Moreover, the kinetic profiles of chlorophyll precursors suggested that Mg-chelatase activity simultaneously decreased with the reduction in the transcript levels of ChlH and GUN4. These results suggest that phyB mediates the regulation of chlorophyll synthesis through transcriptional regulation of these two genes, whose products exert their action at the branching point of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway. Reduction of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) synthesis could be detected in the mutant, but the kinetic profiles of chlorophyll precursors indicated that it was an event posterior to the reduction of the Mg-chelatase activity. It means that the repression of 5-ALA synthesis should not be a triggering event for the appearance of the pale-green phenotype. Instead, the repression of 5-ALA synthesis might be important for the subsequent stabilization of the pale-green phenotype for preventing excessive accumulation of hazardous

  6. Visualizing Knowledge Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borner, Katy; Chen, Chaomei; Boyack, Kevin W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews visualization techniques for scientific disciplines and information retrieval and classification. Highlights include historical background of scientometrics, bibliometrics, and citation analysis; map generation; process flow of visualizing knowledge domains; measures and similarity calculations; vector space model; factor analysis;…

  7. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  8. Just how versatile are domains?

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Creating new protein domain arrangements is a frequent mechanism of evolutionary innovation. While some domains always form the same combinations, others form many different arrangements. This ability, which is often referred to as versatility or promiscuity of domains, its a random evolutionary model in which a domain's promiscuity is based on its relative frequency of domains. Results We show that there is a clear relationship across genomes between the promiscuity of a given domain and its frequency. However, the strength of this relationship differs for different domains. We thus redefine domain promiscuity by defining a new index, DV I ("domain versatility index"), which eliminates the effect of domain frequency. We explore links between a domain's versatility, when unlinked from abundance, and its biological properties. Conclusion Our results indicate that domains occurring as single domain proteins and domains appearing frequently at protein termini have a higher DV I. This is consistent with previous observations that the evolution of domain re-arrangements is primarily driven by fusion of pre-existing arrangements and single domains as well as loss of domains at protein termini. Furthermore, we studied the link between domain age, defined as the first appearance of a domain in the species tree, and the DV I. Contrary to previous studies based on domain promiscuity, it seems as if the DV I is age independent. Finally, we find that contrary to previously reported findings, versatility is lower in Eukaryotes. In summary, our measure of domain versatility indicates that a random attachment process is sufficient to explain the observed distribution of domain arrangements and that several views on domain promiscuity need to be revised. PMID:18854028

  9. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  10. Dynamic antagonism between phytochromes and PIF family basic helix-loop-helix factors induces selective reciprocal responses to light and shade in a rapidly responsive transcriptional network in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Leivar, Pablo; Tepperman, James M; Cohn, Megan M; Monte, Elena; Al-Sady, Bassem; Erickson, Erika; Quail, Peter H

    2012-04-01

    Plants respond to shade-modulated light signals via phytochrome (phy)-induced adaptive changes, termed shade avoidance. To examine the roles of Phytochrome-Interacting basic helix-loop-helix Factors, PIF1, 3, 4, and 5, in relaying such signals to the transcriptional network, we compared the shade-responsive transcriptome profiles of wild-type and quadruple pif (pifq) mutants. We identify a subset of genes, enriched in transcription factor-encoding loci, that respond rapidly to shade, in a PIF-dependent manner, and contain promoter G-box motifs, known to bind PIFs. These genes are potential direct targets of phy-PIF signaling that regulate the primary downstream transcriptional circuitry. A second subset of PIF-dependent, early response genes, lacking G-box motifs, are enriched for auxin-responsive loci, and are thus potentially indirect targets of phy-PIF signaling, mediating the rapid cell expansion induced by shade. Comparing deetiolation- and shade-responsive transcriptomes identifies another subset of G-box-containing genes that reciprocally display rapid repression and induction in response to light and shade signals. These data define a core set of transcriptional and hormonal processes that appear to be dynamically poised to react rapidly to light-environment changes via perturbations in the mutually antagonistic actions of the phys and PIFs. Comparing the responsiveness of the pifq and triple pif mutants to light and shade confirms that the PIFs act with overlapping redundancy on seedling morphogenesis and transcriptional regulation but that each PIF contributes differentially to these responses.

  11. Structure of the Full-Length Bacteriophytochrome from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris Provides Clues to its Long-Range Signaling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Klinke, Sebastián; Rinaldi, Jimena; Velázquez-Escobar, Francisco; Mroginski, María Andrea; Fernández López, María; Malamud, Florencia; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Hildebrandt, Peter; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy

    2016-09-25

    Phytochromes constitute a major superfamily of light-sensing proteins that are reversibly photoconverted between a red-absorbing (Pr) and a far-red-absorbing (Pfr) state. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are found among photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria, including pathogens. To date, several BphPs have been biophysically characterized. However, it is still not fully understood how structural changes are propagated from the photosensory module to the output module during the signal transduction event. Most phytochromes share a common architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensor that includes the PAS2-GAF-PHY domain triad and a C-terminal variable output module. Here we present the crystal structure of the full-length BphP from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (XccBphP) bearing its photosensor and its complete output module, a PAS9 domain. In the crystals, the protein was found to be in the Pr state, whereas diffraction data together with resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical results indicate a ZZZssa and a ZZEssa chromophore configuration corresponding to a mixture of Pr and Meta-R state, the precursor of Pfr. The XccBphP quaternary assembly reveals a head-to-head dimer in which the output module contributes to the helical dimer interface. The photosensor, which is shown to be a bathy-like BphP, is influenced in its dark reactions by the output module. Our structural analyses suggest that the photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr states in the full-length XccBphP may involve changes in the relative positioning of the output module. This work contributes to understand the light-induced structural changes propagated from the photosensor to the output modules in phytochrome signaling. PMID:27107635

  12. Structure of the Full-Length Bacteriophytochrome from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris Provides Clues to its Long-Range Signaling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Klinke, Sebastián; Rinaldi, Jimena; Velázquez-Escobar, Francisco; Mroginski, María Andrea; Fernández López, María; Malamud, Florencia; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Hildebrandt, Peter; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy

    2016-09-25

    Phytochromes constitute a major superfamily of light-sensing proteins that are reversibly photoconverted between a red-absorbing (Pr) and a far-red-absorbing (Pfr) state. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are found among photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria, including pathogens. To date, several BphPs have been biophysically characterized. However, it is still not fully understood how structural changes are propagated from the photosensory module to the output module during the signal transduction event. Most phytochromes share a common architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensor that includes the PAS2-GAF-PHY domain triad and a C-terminal variable output module. Here we present the crystal structure of the full-length BphP from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (XccBphP) bearing its photosensor and its complete output module, a PAS9 domain. In the crystals, the protein was found to be in the Pr state, whereas diffraction data together with resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical results indicate a ZZZssa and a ZZEssa chromophore configuration corresponding to a mixture of Pr and Meta-R state, the precursor of Pfr. The XccBphP quaternary assembly reveals a head-to-head dimer in which the output module contributes to the helical dimer interface. The photosensor, which is shown to be a bathy-like BphP, is influenced in its dark reactions by the output module. Our structural analyses suggest that the photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr states in the full-length XccBphP may involve changes in the relative positioning of the output module. This work contributes to understand the light-induced structural changes propagated from the photosensor to the output modules in phytochrome signaling.

  13. Mid-infrared picosecond pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe experiments to resolve a ground-state intermediate in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; van Thor, Jasper J

    2009-12-24

    Multipulse picosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy has been used to study photochemical reactions of the cyanobacterial phytochrome photoreceptor Cph1. Different photophysical schemes have been discussed in the literature to describe the pathways after photoexcitation, particularly, to identify reaction phases that are linked to photoisomerisation and electronic decay in the 1566-1772 cm(-1) region that probes C=C and C=O stretching modes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, multipulse spectroscopy is employed, where, compared to conventional visible pump-mid-infrared probe spectroscopy, an additional visible pulse is incorporated that interacts with populations that are evolving on the excited- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. The time delays between the pump and the dump pulse are chosen such that the dump pulse interacts with different phases in the reaction process. The pump and dump pulses are at the same wavelength, 640 nm, and are resonant with the Pr ground state as well as with the excited state and intermediates. Because the dump pulse additionally pumps the remaining, partially recovered, and partially oriented ground-state population, theory is developed for estimating the fraction of excited-state molecules. The calculations take into account the model-dependent ground-state recovery fraction, the angular dependence of the population transfer resulting from the finite bleach that occurs with linearly polarized intense femtosecond optical excitation, and the partially oriented population for the dump field. Distinct differences between the results from the experiments that use a 1 or a 14 ps dump time favor a branching evolution from S1 to an excited state or reconfigured chromophore and to a newly identified ground-state intermediate (GSI). Optical dumping at 1 ps shows the instantaneous induced absorption of a delocalized C=C stretching mode at 1608 cm(-1), where the increased cross section is associated with the electronic ground

  14. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Comparison of the domain and frequency domain state feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we present explicitly the equivalence of the time domain and frequency domain state feedbacks, as well as the dynamic state feedback and a modified frequency domain state feedback, from the closed-loop transfer function point of view. The difference of the two approaches is also shown.

  17. Domain Specific vs Domain General: Implications for Dynamic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaniel, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    The article responds to the need for evidence-based dynamic assessment. The article is divided into two sections: In Part 1 we examine the scientific answer to the question of how far human mental activities and capabilities are domain general (DG) / domain specific (DS). A highly complex answer emerges from the literature review of domains such…

  18. Color Tuning in Red/Green Cyanobacteriochrome AnPixJ: Photoisomerization at C15 Causes an Excited-State Destabilization.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-07-30

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial phytochrome-like photoreceptors that carry a single or several GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA) domains in a repetitive manner. Unlike phytochromes that photoswitch between red-absorbing 15Z Pr and far-red-absorbing 15E Pfr states, CBCRs exhibit a much wider spectral activity. One of the best-characterized CBCRs, the phototaxis regulator PixJ of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, AnPixJ can adopt two thermally stable photoreversible states, a red-absorbing dark state (Pr) and a green-absorbing photoproduct (Pg). Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy on AnPixJ assembled in vitro with uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore identifies changes of the electronic structure of the chromophore between the two states. Results are compared with the data from red- and far-red-absorbing forms of the complete sensory module of cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 aiming at a conceptual understanding of the distinct photoproduct (Pg vs Pfr) absorbances upon Pr photoconversion. The PCB chromophore in the Pr state of both photosensors exhibits very similar spectral features. The photoconversion of Cph1 and the red/green switching AnPixJ C15-Z/E photoisomerization result in a very similar chemical-shift difference (Δδ) pattern having, however, opposite sign. The persistence of this pattern confirms the identity of the photochemical isomerization process, while the difference in its sign demonstrates that the same electronic factors drive into opposite direction. It is proposed that the LUMO energy of the 15E photoproduct is stabilized in Cph1 but destabilized in AnPixJ leading to opposite color shifts upon phototransformation. PMID:26115331

  19. Color Tuning in Red/Green Cyanobacteriochrome AnPixJ: Photoisomerization at C15 Causes an Excited-State Destabilization.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-07-30

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial phytochrome-like photoreceptors that carry a single or several GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA) domains in a repetitive manner. Unlike phytochromes that photoswitch between red-absorbing 15Z Pr and far-red-absorbing 15E Pfr states, CBCRs exhibit a much wider spectral activity. One of the best-characterized CBCRs, the phototaxis regulator PixJ of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, AnPixJ can adopt two thermally stable photoreversible states, a red-absorbing dark state (Pr) and a green-absorbing photoproduct (Pg). Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy on AnPixJ assembled in vitro with uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore identifies changes of the electronic structure of the chromophore between the two states. Results are compared with the data from red- and far-red-absorbing forms of the complete sensory module of cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 aiming at a conceptual understanding of the distinct photoproduct (Pg vs Pfr) absorbances upon Pr photoconversion. The PCB chromophore in the Pr state of both photosensors exhibits very similar spectral features. The photoconversion of Cph1 and the red/green switching AnPixJ C15-Z/E photoisomerization result in a very similar chemical-shift difference (Δδ) pattern having, however, opposite sign. The persistence of this pattern confirms the identity of the photochemical isomerization process, while the difference in its sign demonstrates that the same electronic factors drive into opposite direction. It is proposed that the LUMO energy of the 15E photoproduct is stabilized in Cph1 but destabilized in AnPixJ leading to opposite color shifts upon phototransformation.

  20. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  1. On Probability Domains III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frič, Roman; Papčo, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Domains of generalized probability have been introduced in order to provide a general construction of random events, observables and states. It is based on the notion of a cogenerator and the properties of product. We continue our previous study and show how some other quantum structures fit our categorical approach. We discuss how various epireflections implicitly used in the classical probability theory are related to the transition to fuzzy probability theory and describe the latter probability theory as a genuine categorical extension of the former. We show that the IF-probability can be studied via the fuzzy probability theory. We outline a "tensor modification" of the fuzzy probability theory.

  2. Transfer of high domain knowledge to a similar domain.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Ryan K

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have widely examined domain knowledge yet rarely investigate the transfer of knowledge from one domain to another. This study sought to fill in the literature gap concerning the impact of domain knowledge on memory in a similar situation. Specifically, this study examined whether high knowledge of baseball could enhance memory for the similar yet unknown domain of cricket, using a 2 (knowledge) x 2 (prime) design. An interaction occurred, indicating that when primed, baseball knowledge improves memory for cricket events in participants with high baseball knowledge but reduces memory in their low-knowledge counterparts. These results suggest that extensive knowledge in one domain allows it to serve as an organizational framework for incoming information in a similar domain; conversely, priming poorly understood domain knowledge results in negative transfer.

  3. Transfer of high domain knowledge to a similar domain.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Ryan K

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have widely examined domain knowledge yet rarely investigate the transfer of knowledge from one domain to another. This study sought to fill in the literature gap concerning the impact of domain knowledge on memory in a similar situation. Specifically, this study examined whether high knowledge of baseball could enhance memory for the similar yet unknown domain of cricket, using a 2 (knowledge) x 2 (prime) design. An interaction occurred, indicating that when primed, baseball knowledge improves memory for cricket events in participants with high baseball knowledge but reduces memory in their low-knowledge counterparts. These results suggest that extensive knowledge in one domain allows it to serve as an organizational framework for incoming information in a similar domain; conversely, priming poorly understood domain knowledge results in negative transfer. PMID:19353932

  4. Sorghum Phytochrome B Inhibits Flowering in Long Days by Activating Expression of SbPRR37 and SbGHD7, Repressors of SbEHD1, SbCN8 and SbCN12

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shanshan; Murphy, Rebecca L.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Klein, Patricia E.; Rooney, William L.; Mullet, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Light signaling by phytochrome B in long days inhibits flowering in sorghum by increasing expression of the long day floral repressors PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR PROTEIN (SbPRR37, Ma1) and GRAIN NUMBER, PLANT HEIGHT AND HEADING DATE 7 (SbGHD7, Ma6). SbPRR37 and SbGHD7 RNA abundance peaks in the morning and in the evening of long days through coordinate regulation by light and output from the circadian clock. 58 M, a phytochrome B deficient (phyB-1, ma3R) genotype, flowered ∼60 days earlier than 100 M (PHYB, Ma3) in long days and ∼11 days earlier in short days. Populations derived from 58 M (Ma1, ma3R, Ma5, ma6) and R.07007 (Ma1, Ma3, ma5, Ma6) varied in flowering time due to QTL aligned to PHYB/phyB-1 (Ma3), Ma5, and GHD7/ghd7-1 (Ma6). PHYC was proposed as a candidate gene for Ma5 based on alignment and allelic variation. PHYB and Ma5 (PHYC) were epistatic to Ma1 and Ma6 and progeny recessive for either gene flowered early in long days. Light signaling mediated by PhyB was required for high expression of the floral repressors SbPRR37 and SbGHD7 during the evening of long days. In 100 M (PHYB) the floral activators SbEHD1, SbCN8 and SbCN12 were repressed in long days and de-repressed in short days. In 58 M (phyB-1) these genes were highly expressed in long and short days. Furthermore, SbCN15, the ortholog of rice Hd3a (FT), is expressed at low levels in 100 M but at high levels in 58 M (phyB-1) regardless of day length, indicating that PhyB regulation of SbCN15 expression may modify flowering time in a photoperiod-insensitive manner. PMID:25122453

  5. Sorghum phytochrome B inhibits flowering in long days by activating expression of SbPRR37 and SbGHD7, repressors of SbEHD1, SbCN8 and SbCN12.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanshan; Murphy, Rebecca L; Morishige, Daryl T; Klein, Patricia E; Rooney, William L; Mullet, John E

    2014-01-01

    Light signaling by phytochrome B in long days inhibits flowering in sorghum by increasing expression of the long day floral repressors PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR PROTEIN (SbPRR37, Ma1) and GRAIN NUMBER, PLANT HEIGHT AND HEADING DATE 7 (SbGHD7, Ma6). SbPRR37 and SbGHD7 RNA abundance peaks in the morning and in the evening of long days through coordinate regulation by light and output from the circadian clock. 58 M, a phytochrome B deficient (phyB-1, ma3R) genotype, flowered ∼60 days earlier than 100 M (PHYB, Ma3) in long days and ∼11 days earlier in short days. Populations derived from 58 M (Ma1, ma3R, Ma5, ma6) and R.07007 (Ma1, Ma3, ma5, Ma6) varied in flowering time due to QTL aligned to PHYB/phyB-1 (Ma3), Ma5, and GHD7/ghd7-1 (Ma6). PHYC was proposed as a candidate gene for Ma5 based on alignment and allelic variation. PHYB and Ma5 (PHYC) were epistatic to Ma1 and Ma6 and progeny recessive for either gene flowered early in long days. Light signaling mediated by PhyB was required for high expression of the floral repressors SbPRR37 and SbGHD7 during the evening of long days. In 100 M (PHYB) the floral activators SbEHD1, SbCN8 and SbCN12 were repressed in long days and de-repressed in short days. In 58 M (phyB-1) these genes were highly expressed in long and short days. Furthermore, SbCN15, the ortholog of rice Hd3a (FT), is expressed at low levels in 100 M but at high levels in 58 M (phyB-1) regardless of day length, indicating that PhyB regulation of SbCN15 expression may modify flowering time in a photoperiod-insensitive manner. PMID:25122453

  6. STAS Domain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alok K.; Rigby, Alan C.; Alper, Seth L.

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin shares with nearly all SLC26/SulP anion transporters a carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic segment organized around a Sulfate Transporter and Anti-Sigma factor antagonist (STAS) domain. STAS domains of divergent amino acid sequence exhibit a conserved fold of 4 β strands interspersed among 5 α helices. The first STAS domain proteins studied were single-domain anti-sigma factor antagonists (anti-anti-σ). These anti-anti-σ indirectly stimulate bacterial RNA polymerase by inactivating inhibitory anti-σ kinases, liberating σ factors to direct specific transcription of target genes or operons. Some STAS domains are nucleotide-binding phosphoproteins or nucleotidases. Others are interaction/transduction modules within multidomain sensors of light, oxygen and other gasotransmitters, cyclic nucleotides, inositol phosphates, and G proteins. Additional multidomain STAS protein sequences suggest functions in sensing, metabolism, or transport of nutrients such as sugars, amino acids, lipids, anions, vitamins, or hydrocarbons. Still other multidomain STAS polypeptides include histidine and serine/threonine kinase domains and ligand-activated transcription factor domains. SulP/SLC26 STAS domains and adjacent sequences interact with other transporters, cytoskeletal scaffolds, and with enzymes metabolizing transported anion substrates, forming putative metabolons. STAS domains are central to membrane targeting of many SulP/SLC26 anion transporters, and STAS domain mutations are associated with at least three human recessive diseases. This review summarizes STAS domain structure and function. PMID:22116355

  7. Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendargo, Hansford C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    Spectral domain phase microscopy (SDPM) is a functional extension of optical coherence tomography (OCT) using common-path interferometry to produce phase-referenced images of dynamic samples. Like OCT, axial resolution in SDPM is determined by the source coherence length, while lateral resolution is limited by diffraction in the microscope optics. However, the quantitative phase information SDPM generates is sensitive to nanometer-scale displacements of scattering structures. The use of a common-path optical geometry yields an imaging system with high phase stability. Due to coherence gating, SDPM can achieve full depth discrimination, allowing for independent motion resolution of subcellular structures throughout the sample volume. Here we review the basic theory of OCT and SDPM along with applications of SDPM in cellular imaging to measure topology, Doppler flow in single-celled organisms, time-resolved motions, rheological information of the cytoskeleton, and optical signaling of neural activation. Phase imaging limitations, artifacts, and sensitivity considerations are discussed.

  8. Beyond the Number Domain

    PubMed Central

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Platt, Michael L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    In a world without numbers, we would be unable to build a skyscraper, hold a national election, plan a wedding, or pay for a chicken at the market. The numerical symbols used in all these behaviors build on the approximate number system (ANS) which represents the number of discrete objects or events as a continuous mental magnitude. In this review, we first discuss evidence that the ANS bears a set of behavioral and brain signatures that are universally displayed across animal species, human cultures, and development. We then turn to the question of whether the ANS constitutes a specialized cognitive and neural domain--a question central to understanding how this system works, the nature of its evolutionary and developmental trajectory, and its physical instantiation in the brain. PMID:19131268

  9. Phosphorylation of FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 Is a Key Mechanism Defining Signaling Dynamics of Phytochrome A under Red and Far-Red Light in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Xiarong; Chen, Liang; Dai, Mingqiu; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shen, Yunping; Li, Jigang; Li, Gang; Wei, Ning; Deng, Xing Wang

    2012-01-01

    Emerging plants have to adapt to a high ratio of far-red light (FR)/red light (R) light in the canopy before they reach the R-enriched direct sunlight. Phytochrome A (phyA) is the single dominant photoreceptor in young Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings that initiates photomorphogenesis in response to a FR-enriched environment and transduces increasing R signals to early responsive genes. To date, how phyA differentially transmits FR and R signals to downstream genes remains obscure. Here, we present a phyA pathway in which FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 (FHY1), an essential partner of phyA, directly guides phyA to target gene promoters and coactivates transcription. Furthermore, we identified two phosphorylation sites on FHY1, Ser-39 and Thr-61, whose phosphorylation by phyA under R inhibits phyA signaling at each step of its pathway. Deregulation of FHY1 phosphorylation renders seedlings colorblind to FR and R. Finally, we show that the weaker phyA response resulting from FHY1 phosphorylation ensures the seedling deetiolation process in response to a R-enriched light condition. Collectively, our results reveal FHY1 phosphorylation as a key mechanism for FR/R spectrum-specific responses in plants and an essential event for plant adaption to changing light conditions in nature. PMID:22582101

  10. Ectopic expression of a phytochrome B gene from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) in Arabidopsis thaliana promotes seedling de-etiolation, dwarfing in mature plants, and delayed flowering.

    PubMed

    Song, Mei-Fang; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Pei; Shang, Hong-Zhong; Gu, Hai-Ke; Li, Jing-Juan; Xiao, Yang; Guo, Lin; Su, Liang; Gao, Jian-Wei; Yang, Jian-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Phytochrome B (phyB) is an essential red light receptor that predominantly mediates seedling de-etiolation, shade-avoidance response, and flowering time. In this study, we isolate a full-length cDNA of PHYB, designated BrPHYB, from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis), and we find that BrphyB protein has high amino acid sequence similarity and the closest evolutionary relationship to Arabidopsis thaliana phyB (i.e., AtphyB). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results indicate that the BrPHYB gene is ubiquitously expressed in different tissues under all light conditions. Constitutive expression of the BrPHYB gene in A. thaliana significantly enhances seedling de-etiolation under red- and white-light conditions, and causes dwarf stature in mature plants. Unexpectedly, overexpression of BrPHYB in transgenic A. thaliana resulted in reduced expression of gibberellins biosynthesis genes and delayed flowering under short-day conditions, whereas AtPHYB overexpression caused enhanced expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T and earlier flowering. Our results suggest that BrphyB might play an important role in regulating the development of Chinese cabbage. BrphyB and AtphyB have conserved functions during de-etiolation and vegetative plant growth and divergent functions in the regulation of flowering time. PMID:25724426

  11. Ectopic expression of a phytochrome B gene from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) in Arabidopsis thaliana promotes seedling de-etiolation, dwarfing in mature plants, and delayed flowering.

    PubMed

    Song, Mei-Fang; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Pei; Shang, Hong-Zhong; Gu, Hai-Ke; Li, Jing-Juan; Xiao, Yang; Guo, Lin; Su, Liang; Gao, Jian-Wei; Yang, Jian-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Phytochrome B (phyB) is an essential red light receptor that predominantly mediates seedling de-etiolation, shade-avoidance response, and flowering time. In this study, we isolate a full-length cDNA of PHYB, designated BrPHYB, from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis), and we find that BrphyB protein has high amino acid sequence similarity and the closest evolutionary relationship to Arabidopsis thaliana phyB (i.e., AtphyB). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results indicate that the BrPHYB gene is ubiquitously expressed in different tissues under all light conditions. Constitutive expression of the BrPHYB gene in A. thaliana significantly enhances seedling de-etiolation under red- and white-light conditions, and causes dwarf stature in mature plants. Unexpectedly, overexpression of BrPHYB in transgenic A. thaliana resulted in reduced expression of gibberellins biosynthesis genes and delayed flowering under short-day conditions, whereas AtPHYB overexpression caused enhanced expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T and earlier flowering. Our results suggest that BrphyB might play an important role in regulating the development of Chinese cabbage. BrphyB and AtphyB have conserved functions during de-etiolation and vegetative plant growth and divergent functions in the regulation of flowering time.

  12. Multifunctionalities driven by ferroic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J. C.; Huang, Y. L.; Chu, Y. H.; He, Q.

    2014-08-14

    Considerable attention has been paid to ferroic systems in pursuit of advanced applications in past decades. Most recently, the emergence and development of multiferroics, which exhibit the coexistence of different ferroic natures, has offered a new route to create functionalities in the system. In this manuscript, we step from domain engineering to explore a roadmap for discovering intriguing phenomena and multifunctionalities driven by periodic domain patters. As-grown periodic domains, offering exotic order parameters, periodic local perturbations and the capability of tailoring local spin, charge, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom, are introduced as modeling templates for fundamental studies and novel applications. We discuss related significant findings on ferroic domain, nanoscopic domain walls, and conjunct heterostructures based on the well-organized domain patterns, and end with future prospects and challenges in the field.

  13. Dynamical domain wall and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyozato, Yuta; Higuchi, Masafumi; Nojiri, Shin'ichi

    2016-03-01

    Based on the previous works (Toyozato et al., 2013 [24]; Higuchi and Nojiri, 2014 [25]), we investigate the localization of the fields on the dynamical domain wall, where the four-dimensional FRW universe is realized on the domain wall in the five-dimensional space-time. Especially we show that the chiral spinor can localize on the domain wall, which has not been succeeded in the past works as the seminal work in George et al. (2009) [23].

  14. Mapping the Moral Domain

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jesse; Nosek, Brian A.; Haidt, Jonathan; Iyer, Ravi; Koleva, Spassena; Ditto, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically-grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ) based on a theoretical model of five universally available (but variably developed) sets of moral intuitions: Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/respect, and Purity/sanctity. We present evidence for the internal and external validity of the scale and the model, and in doing so present new findings about morality: 1. Comparative model fitting of confirmatory factor analyses provides empirical justification for a five-factor structure of moral concerns. 2. Convergent/discriminant validity evidence suggests that moral concerns predict personality features and social group attitudes not previously considered morally relevant. 3. We establish pragmatic validity of the measure in providing new knowledge and research opportunities concerning demographic and cultural differences in moral intuitions. These analyses provide evidence for the usefulness of Moral Foundations Theory in simultaneously increasing the scope and sharpening the resolution of psychological views of morality. PMID:21244182

  15. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  16. On Probability Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frič, Roman; Papčo, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by IF-probability theory (intuitionistic fuzzy), we study n-component probability domains in which each event represents a body of competing components and the range of a state represents a simplex S n of n-tuples of possible rewards-the sum of the rewards is a number from [0,1]. For n=1 we get fuzzy events, for example a bold algebra, and the corresponding fuzzy probability theory can be developed within the category ID of D-posets (equivalently effect algebras) of fuzzy sets and sequentially continuous D-homomorphisms. For n=2 we get IF-events, i.e., pairs ( μ, ν) of fuzzy sets μ, ν∈[0,1] X such that μ( x)+ ν( x)≤1 for all x∈ X, but we order our pairs (events) coordinatewise. Hence the structure of IF-events (where ( μ 1, ν 1)≤( μ 2, ν 2) whenever μ 1≤ μ 2 and ν 2≤ ν 1) is different and, consequently, the resulting IF-probability theory models a different principle. The category ID is cogenerated by I=[0,1] (objects of ID are subobjects of powers I X ), has nice properties and basic probabilistic notions and constructions are categorical. For example, states are morphisms. We introduce the category S n D cogenerated by Sn=\\{(x1,x2,ldots ,xn)in In;sum_{i=1}nxi≤ 1\\} carrying the coordinatewise partial order, difference, and sequential convergence and we show how basic probability notions can be defined within S n D.

  17. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  18. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  19. Separated matter and antimatter domains with vanishing domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.; Godunov, S.I.; Rudenko, A.S.; Tkachev, I.I. E-mail: sgodunov@itep.ru E-mail: tkachev@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2015-10-01

    We present a model of spontaneous (or dynamical) C and CP violation where it is possible to generate domains of matter and antimatter separated by cosmologically large distances. Such C(CP) violation existed only in the early universe and later it disappeared with the only trace of generated baryonic and/or antibaryonic domains. So the problem of domain walls in this model does not exist. These features are achieved through a postulated form of interaction between inflaton and a new scalar field, realizing short time C(CP) violation.

  20. 42 CFR 414.26 - Determining the GAF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... have a population density less than 6 persons per square mile. (ii) The State does not receive a non... U.S. Census Bureau to determine county definitions and population density. This analysis will...

  1. Modeling software systems by domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippolito, Richard; Lee, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The Software Architectures Engineering (SAE) Project at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has developed engineering modeling techniques that both reduce the complexity of software for domain-specific computer systems and result in systems that are easier to build and maintain. These techniques allow maximum freedom for system developers to apply their domain expertise to software. We have applied these techniques to several types of applications, including training simulators operating in real time, engineering simulators operating in non-real time, and real-time embedded computer systems. Our modeling techniques result in software that mirrors both the complexity of the application and the domain knowledge requirements. We submit that the proper measure of software complexity reflects neither the number of software component units nor the code count, but the locus of and amount of domain knowledge. As a result of using these techniques, domain knowledge is isolated by fields of engineering expertise and removed from the concern of the software engineer. In this paper, we will describe kinds of domain expertise, describe engineering by domains, and provide relevant examples of software developed for simulator applications using the techniques.

  2. Concept Convergence in Empirical Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontañón, Santiago; Plaza, Enric

    How to achieve shared meaning is a significant issue when more than one intelligent agent is involved in the same domain. We define the task of concept convergence, by which intelligent agents can achieve a shared, agreed-upon meaning of a concept (restricted to empirical domains). For this purpose we present a framework that, integrating computational argumentation and inductive concept learning, allows a pair of agents to (1) learn a concept in an empirical domain, (2) argue about the concept's meaning, and (3) reach a shared agreed-upon concept definition. We apply this framework to marine sponges, a biological domain where the actual definitions of concepts such as orders, families and species are currently open to discussion. An experimental evaluation on marine sponges shows that concept convergence is achieved, within a reasonable number of interchanged arguments, and reaching short and accurate definitions (with respect to precision and recall).

  3. Domain and Specification Models for Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iscoe, Neil; Liu, Zheng-Yang; Feng, Guohui

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses our approach to representing application domain knowledge for specific software engineering tasks. Application domain knowledge is embodied in a domain model. Domain models are used to assist in the creation of specification models. Although many different specification models can be created from any particular domain model, each specification model is consistent and correct with respect to the domain model. One aspect of the system-hierarchical organization is described in detail.

  4. Localization of resistive domains in inhomogeneous superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of resistive domains due to the Joule heating in inhomogeneous superconductors with transport currents are studied. The equilibrium of a domain at an inhomogeneity of arbitrary type and with dimensions much smaller than the dimensions of the domain is investigated. It is shown that resistive domains can become localized at inhomogeneities. The temperature distribution in a domain and the current--voltage characteristic of the domain are determined. The stability of localized domains is discussed. It is shown that such domains give rise to a hysteresis in the destruction (recovery) of the superconductivity by the transport current.

  5. Cyanochromes Are Blue/Green Light Photoreversible Photoreceptors Defined by a Stable Double Cysteine Linkage to a Phycoviolobilin-type Chromophore*♦

    PubMed Central

    Ulijasz, Andrew T.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; von Stetten, David; Cornilescu, Claudia; Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Zhang, Junrui; Stankey, Robert J.; Rivera, Mario; Hildebrandt, Peter; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Phytochromes are a collection of bilin-containing photoreceptors that regulate a diverse array of processes in microorganisms and plants through photoconversion between two stable states, a red light-absorbing Pr form, and a far red light-absorbing Pfr form. Recently, a novel set of phytochrome-like chromoproteins was discovered in cyanobacteria, designated here as cyanochromes, that instead photoconvert between stable blue and green light-absorbing forms Pb and Pg, respectively. Here, we show that the distinctive absorption properties of cyanochromes are facilitated through the binding of phycocyanobilin via two stable cysteine-based thioether linkages within the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA domain. Absorption, resonance Raman and infrared spectroscopy, and molecular modeling of the Te-PixJ GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA) domain assembled with phycocyanobilin are consistent with attachments to the C31 carbon of the ethylidene side chain and the C4 or C5 carbons in the A–B methine bridge to generate a double thioether-linked phycoviolobilin-type chromophore. These spectroscopic methods combined with NMR data show that the bilin is fully protonated in the Pb and Pg states and that numerous conformation changes occur during Pb → Pg photoconversion. Also identified were a number of photochromically inactive mutants with strong yellow or red fluorescence that may be useful for fluorescence-based cell biological assays. Phylogenetic analyses detected cyanochromes capable of different signaling outputs in a wide range of cyanobacterial species. One unusual case is the Synechocystis cyanochrome Etr1 that also binds ethylene, suggesting that it works as a hybrid receptor to simultaneously integrate light and hormone signals. PMID:19671704

  6. Predicting cognitive change within domains

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Kevin; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Moser, David J.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2010-01-01

    Standardized regression based (SRB) formulas, a method for predicting cognitive change across time, traditionally use baseline performance on a neuropsychological measure to predict future performance on that same measure. However, there are instances in which the same tests may not be given at follow-up assessments (e.g., lack of continuity of provider, avoiding practice effects). The current study sought to expand this methodology by developing SRBs to predict performance on different tests within the same cognitive domain. Using a sample of 127 non-demented community-dwelling older adults assessed at baseline and after one year, two sets of SRBs were developed: 1. those predicting performance on the same test, and 2. those predicting performance on a different test within the same cognitive domain. The domains examined were learning and memory, processing speed, and language. Across both sets of SRBs, one year scores were significantly predicted by baseline scores, especially for the learning and memory and processing speed measures. Although SRBs developed for the same test were comparable to those developed for different tests within the same domain, less variance was accounted for as tests became less similar. The current results lend preliminary support for additional development of SRBs, both for same- and different-tests, as well as beginning to examine domain-based SRBs. PMID:20358479

  7. Functional domain walls in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-01

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  8. Gradient Domain Guided Image Filtering.

    PubMed

    Kou, Fei; Chen, Weihai; Wen, Changyun; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-11-01

    Guided image filter (GIF) is a well-known local filter for its edge-preserving property and low computational complexity. Unfortunately, the GIF may suffer from halo artifacts, because the local linear model used in the GIF cannot represent the image well near some edges. In this paper, a gradient domain GIF is proposed by incorporating an explicit first-order edge-aware constraint. The edge-aware constraint makes edges be preserved better. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed filter, the proposed gradient domain GIF is applied for single-image detail enhancement, tone mapping of high dynamic range images and image saliency detection. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results prove that the proposed gradient domain GIF can produce better resultant images, especially near the edges, where halos appear in the original GIF. PMID:26285153

  9. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  10. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  11. Domain Specificity and Variability in Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelman, Rochel

    2000-01-01

    Maintains that there are core-specific and non-core-specific domains of knowledge, but that only the core-specific domains benefit from innate skeletal structures. Asserts that core skeletal domains are universally shared, even though their particular foci may vary. Emphasizes that individuals vary in terms of the noncore domains they acquire.…

  12. Pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe ultrafast spectroscopy resolves cross section of an early ground state intermediate and stimulated emission in the photoreactions of the Pr ground state of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Ann E; Lincoln, Craig N; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; van Thor, Jasper J

    2012-01-26

    The primary photoreactions of the red absorbing ground state (Pr) of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis PCC 6803 involve C15═C16 Z-E photoisomerization of its phycocyanobilin chromophore. The first observable product intermediate in pump-probe measurements of the photocycle, "Lumi-R", is formed with picosecond kinetics and involves excited state decay reactions that have 3 and 14 ps time constants. Here, we have studied the photochemical formation of the Lumi-R intermediate using multipulse picosecond visible spectroscopy. Pump-dump-probe (PDP) and pump-repump-probe (PRP) experiments were carried out by employing two femtosecond visible pulses with 1, 14, and 160 ps delays, together with a broadband dispersive visible probe. The time delays between the two excitation pulses have been selected to allow interaction with the dominant (3 and 14 ps) kinetic phases of Lumi-R formation. The frequency dependence of the PDP and PRP amplitudes was investigated at 620, 640, 660, and 680 nm, covering excited state absorption (λ(max) = 620 nm), ground state absorption (λ(max) = 660 nm), and stimulated emission (λ(max) = 680 nm) cross sections. Experimental double difference transient absorbance signals (ΔΔOD), from the PDP and PRP measurements, required corrections to remove contributions from ground state repumping. The sensitivity of the resulting ΔΔOD signals was systematically investigated for possible connectivity schemes and photochemical parameters. When applying a homogeneous (sequentially decaying) connectivity scheme in both the 3 and 14 ps kinetic phases, evidence for repumping of an intermediate that has an electronic ground state configuration (GSI) is taken from the dump-induced S1 formation with 620, 640, and 660 nm wavelengths and 1 and 14 ps repump delays. Evidence for repumping a GSI is also seen, for the same excitation wavelengths, when imposing a target connectivity scheme proposed in the literature for the 1 ps repump delay. In

  13. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  14. Development in the Food Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozin, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Discusses problems of general interest in developmental psychology that can be successfully studied in the domain of food; these include (1) development of food likes and dislikes; (2) establishment of the edible/inedible distinction; (3) disgust and contagion; (4) transgenerational communication of preferences; and (5) transition to food…

  15. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. In the Multi-domain Protein Adenylate Kinase, Domain Insertion Facilitates Cooperative Folding while Accommodating Function at Domain Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Giri Rao, V. V. Hemanth; Gosavi, Shachi

    2014-01-01

    Having multiple domains in proteins can lead to partial folding and increased aggregation. Folding cooperativity, the all or nothing folding of a protein, can reduce this aggregation propensity. In agreement with bulk experiments, a coarse-grained structure-based model of the three-domain protein, E. coli Adenylate kinase (AKE), folds cooperatively. Domain interfaces have previously been implicated in the cooperative folding of multi-domain proteins. To understand their role in AKE folding, we computationally create mutants with deleted inter-domain interfaces and simulate their folding. We find that inter-domain interfaces play a minor role in the folding cooperativity of AKE. On further analysis, we find that unlike other multi-domain proteins whose folding has been studied, the domains of AKE are not singly-linked. Two of its domains have two linkers to the third one, i.e., they are inserted into the third one. We use circular permutation to modify AKE chain-connectivity and convert inserted-domains into singly-linked domains. We find that domain insertion in AKE achieves the following: (1) It facilitates folding cooperativity even when domains have different stabilities. Insertion constrains the N- and C-termini of inserted domains and stabilizes their folded states. Therefore, domains that perform conformational transitions can be smaller with fewer stabilizing interactions. (2) Inter-domain interactions are not needed to promote folding cooperativity and can be tuned for function. In AKE, these interactions help promote conformational dynamics limited catalysis. Finally, using structural bioinformatics, we suggest that domain insertion may also facilitate the cooperative folding of other multi-domain proteins. PMID:25393408

  17. Cross-domain human action recognition.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wei; Tao, Dacheng; Rui, Yong

    2012-04-01

    Conventional human action recognition algorithms cannot work well when the amount of training videos is insufficient. We solve this problem by proposing a transfer topic model (TTM), which utilizes information extracted from videos in the auxiliary domain to assist recognition tasks in the target domain. The TTM is well characterized by two aspects: 1) it uses the bag-of-words model trained from the auxiliary domain to represent videos in the target domain; and 2) it assumes each human action is a mixture of a set of topics and uses the topics learned from the auxiliary domain to regularize the topic estimation in the target domain, wherein the regularization is the summation of Kullback-Leibler divergences between topic pairs of the two domains. The utilization of the auxiliary domain knowledge improves the generalization ability of the learned topic model. Experiments on Weizmann and KTH human action databases suggest the effectiveness of the proposed TTM for cross-domain human action recognition.

  18. Spline interpolation on unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeel, Robert D.

    2016-06-01

    Spline interpolation is a splendid tool for multiscale approximation on unbounded domains. In particular, it is well suited for use by the multilevel summation method (MSM) for calculating a sum of pairwise interactions for a large set of particles in linear time. Outlined here is an algorithm for spline interpolation on unbounded domains that is efficient and elegant though not so simple. Further gains in efficiency are possible via quasi-interpolation, which compromises collocation but with minimal loss of accuracy. The MSM, which may also be of value for continuum models, embodies most of the best features of both hierarchical clustering methods (tree methods, fast multipole methods, hierarchical matrix methods) and FFT-based 2-level methods (particle-particle particle-mesh methods, particle-mesh Ewald methods).

  19. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  20. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength.

  1. Certifying Domain-Specific Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Proof-checking code for compliance to safety policies potentially enables a product-oriented approach to certain aspects of software certification. To date, previous research has focused on generic, low-level programming-language properties such as memory type safety. In this paper we consider proof-checking higher-level domain -specific properties for compliance to safety policies. The paper first describes a framework related to abstract interpretation in which compliance to a class of certification policies can be efficiently calculated Membership equational logic is shown to provide a rich logic for carrying out such calculations, including partiality, for certification. The architecture for a domain-specific certifier is described, followed by an implemented case study. The case study considers consistency of abstract variable attributes in code that performs geometric calculations in Aerospace systems.

  2. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  3. Domain decomposition methods in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Saltz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Compressible Euler equations are solved for two-dimensional problems by a preconditioned conjugate gradient-like technique. An approximate Riemann solver is used to compute the numerical fluxes to second order accuracy in space. Two ways to achieve parallelism are tested, one which makes use of parallelism inherent in triangular solves and the other which employs domain decomposition techniques. The vectorization/parallelism in triangular solves is realized by the use of a recording technique called wavefront ordering. This process involves the interpretation of the triangular matrix as a directed graph and the analysis of the data dependencies. It is noted that the factorization can also be done in parallel with the wave front ordering. The performances of two ways of partitioning the domain, strips and slabs, are compared. Results on Cray YMP are reported for an inviscid transonic test case. The performances of linear algebra kernels are also reported.

  4. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  5. Field-Domain Ion Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, W. D.; Chuan, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Field-domain ion spectrometry (FDIS) is variant of established technique known as ion-mobility spectrometry. Operates at atmospheric pressure and only requires small pump to draw air sample into instrument. Strength of retarding electric field varied to distinguish among ions of different mobilities. New concept offers potential for development of small, (hand-held), low-power, portable devices detecting airborne chemical substances in real-time at concentrations at parts-per-billion level.

  6. Pyramidal inversion domain boundaries revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Remmele, T.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.; Fornari, R.; Strassburg, M.

    2011-10-03

    The structure of pyramidal inversion domain boundaries in GaN:Mg was investigated by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. The analysis shows the upper (0001) boundary to consist of a single Mg layer inserted between polarity inverted GaN layers in an abcab stacking. The Mg bound in these defects is at least one order of magnitude lower than the chemical Mg concentration. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements show that up to 27% of the Mg acceptors is electrically compensated.

  7. Dynamics of domain wall networks

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Minoru; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Sakai, Norisuke; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke

    2007-12-15

    Networks or webs of domain walls are admitted in Abelian or non-Abelian gauge theory coupled to fundamental Higgs fields with complex masses. We examine the dynamics of the domain wall loops by using the moduli approximation and find a phase rotation induces a repulsive force which can be understood as a Noether charge of Q-solitons. Non-Abelian gauge theory allows different types of loops which can be deformed to each other by changing a modulus. This admits the moduli geometry like a sandglass made by gluing the tips of the two cigar-(cone-)like metrics of a single triangle loop. We conclude that the sizes of all loops tend to grow for a late time in general models with complex Higgs masses, while the sizes are stabilized at some values once triplet masses are introduced for the Higgs fields. We also show that the stationary motion on the moduli space of the domain wall webs represents 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Q-webs of walls.

  8. Aversive control: A separate domain?

    PubMed Central

    Hineline, Philip N.

    1984-01-01

    Traditionally, aversive control has been viewed as a separate domain within behavior theory. Sometimes this separateness has been based upon a distinction between reinforcement and punishment, and sometimes upon a distinction between positive and negative reinforcement. The latter is regarded here as the more compelling basis, due to some inherent procedural asymmetries. An approach to the interpretation of negative reinforcement is presented, with indication of types of experiments that support it and that also point to promising directions for further work. However, most of the interpretive issues that arise here are relevant to positively reinforced behavior as well. These include: possible reformulation of the operant/respondent distinction; the place of emotional concepts in behavior analysis; the need for simultaneous, complementary analysis on differing time scales; the understanding of behavioral situations with rewarding or aversive properties that depend as much upon the contingencies that the situations involve as upon the primary rewarding or aversive stimuli that they include. Thus, an adequate understanding of this domain, which has been traditionally viewed as distinct, has implications for all domains of behavior-analytic theory. PMID:16812404

  9. Aversive control: A separate domain?

    PubMed

    Hineline, P N

    1984-11-01

    Traditionally, aversive control has been viewed as a separate domain within behavior theory. Sometimes this separateness has been based upon a distinction between reinforcement and punishment, and sometimes upon a distinction between positive and negative reinforcement. The latter is regarded here as the more compelling basis, due to some inherent procedural asymmetries. An approach to the interpretation of negative reinforcement is presented, with indication of types of experiments that support it and that also point to promising directions for further work. However, most of the interpretive issues that arise here are relevant to positively reinforced behavior as well. These include: possible reformulation of the operant/respondent distinction; the place of emotional concepts in behavior analysis; the need for simultaneous, complementary analysis on differing time scales; the understanding of behavioral situations with rewarding or aversive properties that depend as much upon the contingencies that the situations involve as upon the primary rewarding or aversive stimuli that they include. Thus, an adequate understanding of this domain, which has been traditionally viewed as distinct, has implications for all domains of behavior-analytic theory.

  10. Aversive control: A separate domain?

    PubMed

    Hineline, P N

    1984-11-01

    Traditionally, aversive control has been viewed as a separate domain within behavior theory. Sometimes this separateness has been based upon a distinction between reinforcement and punishment, and sometimes upon a distinction between positive and negative reinforcement. The latter is regarded here as the more compelling basis, due to some inherent procedural asymmetries. An approach to the interpretation of negative reinforcement is presented, with indication of types of experiments that support it and that also point to promising directions for further work. However, most of the interpretive issues that arise here are relevant to positively reinforced behavior as well. These include: possible reformulation of the operant/respondent distinction; the place of emotional concepts in behavior analysis; the need for simultaneous, complementary analysis on differing time scales; the understanding of behavioral situations with rewarding or aversive properties that depend as much upon the contingencies that the situations involve as upon the primary rewarding or aversive stimuli that they include. Thus, an adequate understanding of this domain, which has been traditionally viewed as distinct, has implications for all domains of behavior-analytic theory. PMID:16812404

  11. Generic domain models in software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, Neil

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines three research directions related to domain-specific software development: (1) reuse of generic models for domain-specific software development; (2) empirical evidence to determine these generic models, namely elicitation of mental knowledge schema possessed by expert software developers; and (3) exploitation of generic domain models to assist modelling of specific applications. It focuses on knowledge acquisition for domain-specific software development, with emphasis on tool support for the most important phases of software development.

  12. Domain wall orientation and domain shape in KTiOPO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Vaskina, E. M.; Pelegova, E. V.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Kizko, O. V.; Ivanov, M.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Domain shape evolution and domain wall motion have been studied in KTiOPO4 (KTP) ferroelectric single crystals using complementary experimental methods. The in situ visualization of domain kinetics has allowed revealing: (1) qualitative change of the domain shape, (2) dependence of the domain wall velocity on its orientation, (3) jump-like domain wall motion caused by domain merging, (4) effect of domain shape stability. The model of domain wall motion driven by generation of elementary steps (kink-pair nucleation) and subsequent kink motion is presented. The decrease in the relative velocity of the approaching parallel domain walls is attributed to electrostatic interaction. The effect of polarization reversal induced by chemical etching is observed. The obtained results are important for the development of domain engineering in the crystals of KTP family.

  13. The Promise of Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, Ashish A.; Li, Jingling; Vaijanapurkar, Samarth; Bue, Brian; Miller, Adam; Donalek, Ciro; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Graham, Matthew; CRTS, iPTF

    2016-01-01

    Most new surveys spend an appreciable time in collecting data on which to train classifiers before they can be used on future observations from the same dataset. The result generating phase can start much earlier if the training could incorporate data accumulated from older surveys enhanced with a small set from the new survey. This is exactly what Domain Adaptation (DA) allows us to do. The main idea behind DAs can be summarized thus: if we have two classes of separable objects in some feature space of a Source survey (S), we can define a hyperplane to separate the two types. In a second Target survey (T), for the same features the hyperplane would be inclined differently. DA methods get the mapping between the two hyperplanes using a small fraction of data from the Target (T) survey and can then be used to predict the classes of the remaining majority of data in T. We discuss the parameters that need to be tuned, the difficulties involved, and ways to improve the results. As we move towards bigger, and deeper surveys, being able to use existing labelled information to conduct classification in future surveys will be more cost-effective and promote time efficiency as well. Starting with the light curve data of 50,000 periodic objects from Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), we have applied domain adaptation techniques such as Geodesic Flow Kernel (GFK) with Random forest classifier and Co-training for domain adaptation (CODA) to the CRTS data which has 35,000 points overlapping with Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), and 12,000 with Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR). The results suggest that domain adaptation is an area worth exploring as the knowledge between these surveys is transferable and the approaches to find the mappings between these surveys can be applied to the remaining data as well as for near future surveys such as CRTS-II, Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) to name a few at the optical

  14. Pectin Homogalacturonans: Nanostructural Characterization of Methylesterified Domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functionality of pectic hydrocolloids is largely dependent on the two major domains commonly found in their homogalacturonan (HG) regions, i.e., methylester protected domains (MPDs)and non methylesterified domains (NMDs). MPDs can participate in hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions but unli...

  15. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  16. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain.

  17. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  18. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    PubMed

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  19. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  20. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  1. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    PubMed

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  2. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  3. GMPLS inter-domain signaling and routing to control LSPs based on per-domain policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, S.; Guo, H.; Otani, T.

    2008-11-01

    GMPLS inter-domain network control was investigated by employing BGP-based inter-domain routing and flexible signaling with loose hop expansion. Per-domain based operational policy was successfully applied to the establishment of GMPLS inter-domain LSPs.

  4. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  5. Domain wall conduction in multiaxial ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Maksymovych, Petro; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    The conductance of domain wall structures consisting of either stripes or cylindrical domains in multiaxial ferroelectric-semiconductors is analyzed. The effects of the flexoelectric coupling, domain size, wall tilt, and curvature on charge accumulation are analyzed using the Landau-Ginsburg Devonshire theory for polarization vector combined with the Poisson equation for charge distributions. The proximity and size effect of the electron and donor accumulation/depletion by thin stripe domains and cylindrical nanodomains are revealed. In contrast to thick domain stripes and wider cylindrical domains, in which the carrier accumulation (and so the static conductivity) sharply increases at the domain walls only, small nanodomains of radii less than 5-10 correlation lengths appeared conducting across the entire cross-section. Implications of such conductive nanosized channels may be promising for nanoelectronics.

  6. Morphology and interaction between lipid domains

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Tristan S.; Klug, William S.; Phillips, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Cellular membranes are a heterogeneous mix of lipids, proteins and small molecules. Special groupings enriched in saturated lipids and cholesterol form liquid-ordered domains, known as “lipid rafts,” thought to serve as platforms for signaling, trafficking and material transport throughout the secretory pathway. Questions remain as to how the cell maintains small fluid lipid domains, through time, on a length scale consistent with the fact that no large-scale phase separation is observed. Motivated by these examples, we have utilized a combination of mechanical modeling and in vitro experiments to show that membrane morphology plays a key role in maintaining small domain sizes and organizing domains in a model membrane. We demonstrate that lipid domains can adopt a flat or dimpled morphology, where the latter facilitates a repulsive interaction that slows coalescence and helps regulate domain size and tends to laterally organize domains in the membrane. PMID:19620730

  7. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level. PMID:27309309

  8. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  9. Chemical inhomogeneity in the ultrafast dynamics of the DXCF cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924.

    PubMed

    Freer, Lucy H; Kim, Peter W; Corley, Scott C; Rockwell, Nathan C; Zhao, Lu; Thibert, Arthur J; Lagarias, J Clark; Larsen, Delmar S

    2012-09-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are diverse biliprotein photosensors distantly related to the red/far-red photoreceptors of the phytochrome family. There are several subfamilies of CBCRs, displaying varied spectral responses spanning the entire visible region. Tlr0924 belongs to the DXCF subfamily that utilizes the Cys residue in a conserved Asp-Xaa-Cys-Phe (DXCF) motif to form a second covalent linkage to the chromophore, resulting in a blue-absorbing dark state. Photoconversion leads to elimination of this linkage, resulting in a green-absorbing photoproduct. Tlr0924 initially incorporates phycocyanobilin (PCB) as a chromophore, exhibiting a blue/orange photocycle, but slowly isomerizes PCB to phycoviolobilin (PVB) to yield a blue/green photocycle. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy was used to study both forward and reverse reaction photodynamics of the recombinant GAF domain of Tlr0924. Primary photoproducts were identified, as were subsequent intermediates at 1 ms. PCB and PVB population photodynamics were decomposed using global target analysis. PCB and PVB populations exhibit similar and parallel photocycles in Tlr0924, but the PVB population exhibits faster excited-state decay in both reaction directions. On the basis of longer time analysis, we show that the photochemical coordinate (15,16-isomerization) and second-linkage coordinate (elimination or bond formation at C10) are separate processes in both directions. PMID:22721495

  10. EuPathDomains: the divergent domain database for eukaryotic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ghouila, Amel; Terrapon, Nicolas; Gascuel, Olivier; Guerfali, Fatma Z; Laouini, Dhafer; Maréchal, Eric; Bréhélin, Laurent

    2011-06-01

    Eukaryotic pathogens (e.g. Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosomes, etc.) are a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Africa, one of the most impacted continents, they cause millions of deaths and constitute an immense economic burden. While the genome sequence of several of these organisms is now available, the biological functions of more than half of their proteins are still unknown. This is a serious issue for bringing to the foreground the expected new therapeutic targets. In this context, the identification of protein domains is a key step to improve the functional annotation of the proteins. However, several domains are missed in eukaryotic pathogens because of the high phylogenetic distance of these organisms from the classical eukaryote models. We recently proposed a method, co-occurrence domain detection (CODD), that improves the sensitivity of Pfam domain detection by exploiting the tendency of domains to appear preferentially with a few other favorite domains in a protein. In this paper, we present EuPathDomains (http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/EuPathDomains/), an extended database of protein domains belonging to ten major eukaryotic human pathogens. EuPathDomains gathers known and new domains detected by CODD, along with the associated confidence measurements and the GO annotations that can be deduced from the new domains. This database significantly extends the Pfam domain coverage of all selected genomes, by proposing new occurrences of domains as well as new domain families that have never been reported before. For example, with a false discovery rate lower than 20%, EuPathDomains increases the number of detected domains by 13% in Toxoplasma gondii genome and up to 28% in Cryptospordium parvum, and the total number of domain families by 10% in Plasmodium falciparum and up to 16% in C. parvum genome. The database can be queried by protein names, domain identifiers, Pfam or Interpro identifiers, or organisms, and should become a valuable

  11. Imaging Ferroelectric Domains and Domain Walls Using Charge Gradient Microscopy: Role of Screening Charges.

    PubMed

    Tong, Sheng; Jung, Il Woong; Choi, Yoon-Young; Hong, Seungbum; Roelofs, Andreas

    2016-02-23

    Advanced scanning probe microscopies (SPMs) open up the possibilities of the next-generation ferroic devices that utilize both domains and domain walls as active elements. However, current SPMs lack the capability of dynamically monitoring the motion of domains and domain walls in conjunction with the transport of the screening charges that lower the total electrostatic energy of both domains and domain walls. Charge gradient microscopy (CGM) is a strong candidate to overcome these shortcomings because it can map domains and domain walls at high speed and mechanically remove the screening charges. Yet the underlying mechanism of the CGM signals is not fully understood due to the complexity of the electrostatic interactions. Here, we designed a semiconductor-metal CGM tip, which can separate and quantify the ferroelectric domain and domain wall signals by simply changing its scanning direction. Our investigation reveals that the domain wall signals are due to the spatial change of polarization charges, while the domain signals are due to continuous removal and supply of screening charges at the CGM tip. In addition, we observed asymmetric CGM domain currents from the up and down domains, which are originated from the different debonding energies and the amount of the screening charges on positive and negative bound charges. We believe that our findings can help design CGM with high spatial resolution and lead to breakthroughs in information storage and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:26751281

  12. Is the myonuclear domain size fixed?

    PubMed

    Van der Meer, S F T; Jaspers, R T; Degens, H

    2011-12-01

    It has been suggested that the number of myonuclei in a muscle fibre changes in proportion to the change in fibre size, resulting in a constant myonuclear domain size, defined as the cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus. The myonuclear domain size varies, however, between fibre types and is inversely related with the oxidative capacity of a fibre. Overall, the observations of an increase in myonuclear domain size during both maturational growth and overload-induced hypertrophy, and the decrease in myonuclear domain size during disuse- and ageing-associated muscle atrophy suggest that the concept of a constant myonuclear domain size needs to be treated cautiously. It also suggests that only when the myonuclear domain size exceeds a certain threshold during growth or overload-induced hypertrophy acquisition of new myonuclei is required for further fibre hypertrophy. PMID:22130137

  13. Pattern orientation in finite domains without boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Lisa; Bergmann, Fabian; Zimmermann, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the orientation of nonlinear stripe patterns in finite domains. Motivated by recent experiments, we introduce a control parameter drop from supercritical inside a domain to subcritical outside without boundary conditions at the domain border. As a result, stripes align perpendicularly to shallow control parameter drops. For steeper drops, non-adiabatic effects lead to a surprising orientational transition to parallel stripes with respect to the borders. We demonstrate this effect in terms of the Brusselator model and generic amplitude equations.

  14. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  15. Domain Transfer Learning for MCI Conversion Prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Daoqiang; Munsell, Brent C; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-07-01

    Machine learning methods have successfully been used to predict the conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD), by classifying MCI converters (MCI-C) from MCI nonconverters (MCI-NC). However, most existing methods construct classifiers using data from one particular target domain (e.g., MCI), and ignore data in other related domains (e.g., AD and normal control (NC)) that may provide valuable information to improve MCI conversion prediction performance. To address is limitation, we develop a novel domain transfer learning method for MCI conversion prediction, which can use data from both the target domain (i.e., MCI) and auxiliary domains (i.e., AD and NC). Specifically, the proposed method consists of three key components: 1) a domain transfer feature selection component that selects the most informative feature-subset from both target domain and auxiliary domains from different imaging modalities; 2) a domain transfer sample selection component that selects the most informative sample-subset from the same target and auxiliary domains from different data modalities; and 3) a domain transfer support vector machine classification component that fuses the selected features and samples to separate MCI-C and MCI-NC patients. We evaluate our method on 202 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) that have MRI, FDG-PET, and CSF data. The experimental results show the proposed method can classify MCI-C patients from MCI-NC patients with an accuracy of 79.4%, with the aid of additional domain knowledge learned from AD and NC.

  16. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  17. Distinction of magnetic non-ferroelastic domains.

    PubMed

    Litvin, D B; Janovec, V

    2006-03-01

    It is shown that there always exists a coordinate system in which components of property tensors that distinguish between the domains of a magnetic non-ferroelastic domain pair differ solely in the two domains by a change in sign. The 309 classes of twin laws of magnetic non-ferroelastic domain pairs are listed and the twin laws, which are given in a coordinate system where the tensor distinction is provided by a change in sign of tensor components, are specified. If the twin law is not given in such a coordinate system, then a new coordinate system, related by a rotation, is specified. PMID:16489246

  18. Transform domain steganography with blind source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouny, Ismail

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies blind source separation or independent component analysis for images that may contain mixtures of text, audio, or other images for steganography purposes. The paper focuses on separating mixtures in the transform domain such as Fourier domain or the Wavelet domain. The study addresses the effectiveness of steganography when using linear mixtures of multimedia components and the ability of standard blind sources separation techniques to discern hidden multimedia messages. Mixing in the space, frequency, and wavelet (scale) domains is compared. Effectiveness is measured using mean square error rate between original and recovered images.

  19. Bioconvection in spatially extended domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, A.; Paul, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    We numerically explore gyrotactic bioconvection in large spatially extended domains of finite depth using parameter values from available experiments with the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas nivalis. We numerically integrate the three-dimensional, time-dependent continuum model of Pedley [J. Fluid Mech.10.1017/S0022112088002393 195, 223 (1988)] using a high-order, parallel, spectral-element approach. We explore the long-time nonlinear patterns and dynamics found for layers with an aspect ratio of 10 over a range of Rayleigh numbers. Our results yield the pattern wavelength and pattern dynamics which we compare with available theory and experimental measurement. There is good agreement for the pattern wavelength at short times between numerics, experiment, and a linear stability analysis. At long times we find that the general sequence of patterns given by the nonlinear evolution of the governing equations correspond qualitatively to what has been described experimentally. However, at long times the patterns in numerics grow to larger wavelengths, in contrast to what is observed in experiment where the wavelength is found to decrease with time.

  20. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  1. Time Domain Challenges for Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah Ilene

    2016-01-01

    Over the past couple decades, thousands of extra-solar planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. Most have been detected and characterized using transit and/or radial velocity time series, and these techniques have undergone huge improvements in instrumental precision. However, the improvements in precision have brought to light new statistical challenges in detecting and characterizing exoplanets in the presence of correlated noise caused by stellar activity (transits and radial velocities) and gaps in the time sampling (radial velocities). These challenges have afflicted many of the most interesting exoplanets, from Earth-like planets to planetary systems whose orbital dynamics place important constraints on how planetary systems form and evolve. In the first part of the talk, I will focus on the problem of correlated noise for characterizing transiting exoplanets using transit timing variations. I will present a comparison of several techniques using wavelets, Gaussian processes, and polynomial splines to account for correlated noise in the likelihood function when inferring planetary parameters. I will also present results on the characteristics of correlated noise that cause planets to be missed by the Kepler and homegrown pipelines despite high nominal signal-to-noise. In the second part of the talk, I will focus on the problem of aliasing caused by gaps in the radial-velocity time series on yearly, daily, and monthly timescales. I will present results on identifying aliases in the Fourier domain by taking advantage of aliasing on multiple timescales and discuss the interplay between aliasing and stellar activity for several habitable-zone "planets" that have recently been called into question as possible spurious signals caused by activity. As we push toward detecting and characterizing lower mass planets, it is essential that astrostatistical advances keep pace with advances in instrumentation.

  2. Are Epistemological Beliefs Similar across Domains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schommer, Marlene; Walker, Kiersten

    1995-01-01

    College students in 2 studies (n=95 and 114) completed an epistemological questionnaire with a specific domain in mind (social sciences or mathematics), read a passage, answered a passage test, and completed another epistemological questionnaire. Results supported the idea that individuals' epistemological beliefs tended to be domain independent.…

  3. Domain transfer learning for MCI conversion prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-01-01

    In recent studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD), it has increasing attentions in identifying mild cognitive impairment (MCI) converters (MCI-C) from MCI non-converters (MCI-NC). Note that MCI is a prodromal stage of AD, with possibility to convert to AD. Most traditional methods for MCI conversion prediction learn information only from MCI subjects (including MCI-C and MCI-NC), not from other related subjects, e.g., AD and normal controls (NC), which can actually aid the classification between MCI-C and MCI-NC. In this paper, we propose a novel domain-transfer learning method for MCI conversion prediction. Different from most existing methods, we classify MCI-C and MCI-NC with aid from the domain knowledge learned with AD and NC subjects as auxiliary domain to further improve the classification performance. Our method contains two key components: (1) the cross-domain kernel learning for transferring auxiliary domain knowledge, and (2) the adapted support vector machine (SVM) decision function construction for cross-domain and auxiliary domain knowledge fusion. Experimental results on the Alzheimer's Disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI) database show that the proposed method can significantly improve the classification performance between MCI-C and MCI-NC, with aid of domain knowledge learned from AD and NC subjects.

  4. Domains of the Florida Performance Measurement System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This monograph sets forth in detail the concepts included in the five domains of teaching as identified by the Florida Coalition for the Development of a Performance Evaluation System. The first domain, planning, includes the concepts: (1) content coverage; (2) utilization of instructional materials; (3) activity structure; (4) goal focusing; and…

  5. The Domain Specificity of Academic Emotional Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Hall, Nathan C.

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyzed the domain specificity of emotions and focused on experiences of enjoyment, anxiety, and boredom in the domains of mathematics, Latin, German, and English. On the basis of assumptions in R. Pekrun's (2000; in press) control-value theory and findings of pilot studies, the authors hypothesized the existence of a largely…

  6. Student Behavior and Attitudes: The Affective Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Patricia F.

    This two-part learning module, designed to acquaint teachers with the affective domain of Bloom's Taxonomy, provides a methodology for identifying the attitudinal and motivational problems of non-traditional students. Part I discusses the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains considered in Bloom's Taxonomy and presents possible learning…

  7. Multiple hypothesis tracking for the cyber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoegler, Stefan; Blackman, Sam; Holsopple, Jared; Hirsch, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses how methods used for conventional multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) can be extended to domain-agnostic tracking of entities from non-kinematic constraints such as those imposed by cyber attacks in a potentially dense false alarm background. MHT is widely recognized as the premier method to avoid corrupting tracks with spurious data in the kinematic domain but it has not been extensively applied to other problem domains. The traditional approach is to tightly couple track maintenance (prediction, gating, filtering, probabilistic pruning, and target confirmation) with hypothesis management (clustering, incompatibility maintenance, hypothesis formation, and Nassociation pruning). However, by separating the domain specific track maintenance portion from the domain agnostic hypothesis management piece, we can begin to apply the wealth of knowledge gained from ground and air tracking solutions to the cyber (and other) domains. These realizations led to the creation of Raytheon's Multiple Hypothesis Extensible Tracking Architecture (MHETA). In this paper, we showcase MHETA for the cyber domain, plugging in a well established method, CUBRC's INFormation Engine for Real-time Decision making, (INFERD), for the association portion of the MHT. The result is a CyberMHT. We demonstrate the power of MHETA-INFERD using simulated data. Using metrics from both the tracking and cyber domains, we show that while no tracker is perfect, by applying MHETA-INFERD, advanced nonkinematic tracks can be captured in an automated way, perform better than non-MHT approaches, and decrease analyst response time to cyber threats.

  8. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally accessible... published information; (3) Through second class mailing privileges granted by the U.S. Government; (4) At libraries open to the public or from which the public can obtain documents; (5) Through patents available...

  9. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally accessible... published information; (3) Through second class mailing privileges granted by the U.S. Government; (4) At libraries open to the public or from which the public can obtain documents; (5) Through patents available...

  10. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally accessible... published information; (3) Through second class mailing privileges granted by the U.S. Government; (4) At libraries open to the public or from which the public can obtain documents; (5) Through patents available...

  11. XML Based Markup Languages for Specific Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varde, Aparna; Rundensteiner, Elke; Fahrenholz, Sally

    A challenging area in web based support systems is the study of human activities in connection with the web, especially with reference to certain domains. This includes capturing human reasoning in information retrieval, facilitating the exchange of domain-specific knowledge through a common platform and developing tools for the analysis of data on the web from a domain expert's angle. Among the techniques and standards related to such work, we have XML, the eXtensible Markup Language. This serves as a medium of communication for storing and publishing textual, numeric and other forms of data seamlessly. XML tag sets are such that they preserve semantics and simplify the understanding of stored information by users. Often domain-specific markup languages are designed using XML, with a user-centric perspective. Standardization bodies and research communities may extend these to include additional semantics of areas within and related to the domain. This chapter outlines the issues to be considered in developing domain-specific markup languages: the motivation for development, the semantic considerations, the syntactic constraints and other relevant aspects, especially taking into account human factors. Illustrating examples are provided from domains such as Medicine, Finance and Materials Science. Particular emphasis in these examples is on the Materials Markup Language MatML and the semantics of one of its areas, namely, the Heat Treating of Materials. The focus of this chapter, however, is not the design of one particular language but rather the generic issues concerning the development of domain-specific markup languages.

  12. Thermodynamics of heme-induced conformational changes in hemopexin: role of domain-domain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. L.; Morgan, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hemopexin is a serum glycoprotein that binds heme with high affinity and delivers heme to the liver cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. A hinge region connects the two non-disulfide-linked domains of hemopexin, a 35-kDa N-terminal domain (domain I) that binds heme, and a 25-kDa C-terminal domain (domain II). Although domain II does not bind heme, it assumes one structural state in apo-hemopexin and another in heme-hemopexin, and this change is important in facilitating the association of heme-hemopexin with its receptor. In order to elucidate the structure and function of hemopexin, it is important to understand how structural information is transmitted to domain II when domain I binds heme. Here we report a study of the protein-protein interactions between domain I and domain II using analytical ultracentrifugation and isothermal titration calorimetry. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis showed that domain I associates with domain II both in the presence and absence of heme with Kd values of 0.8 microM and 55 microM, respectively. The interaction between heme-domain I and domain II has a calorimetric enthalpy of +11 kcal/mol, a heat capacity (delta Cp) of -720 cal/mol.K, and a calculated entropy of +65 cal/mol.K. By varying the temperature of the centrifugation equilibrium runs, a van't Hoff plot with an apparent change in enthalpy (delta H) of -3.6 kcal/mol and change in entropy (delta S) of +8.1 cal/mol.K for the association of apo-domain I with domain II was obtained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7773173

  13. Nonequilibrium Raftlike Membrane Domains under Continuous Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Matthew S.; Sens, Pierre; Socci, Nicholas D.

    2005-10-01

    We present a model for the kinetics of spontaneous membrane domain (raft) assembly that includes the effect of membrane recycling ubiquitous in living cells. We show that domains can have a broad power-law distribution with an average radius that scales with the 1/4 power of the domain lifetime when the line tension at the domain edges is large. For biologically reasonable recycling and diffusion rates, the average domain radius is in the tens of nm range, consistent with observations. This represents one possible link between signaling (involving rafts) and traffic (recycling) in cells. Finally, we present evidence that suggests that the average raft size may be the same for all scale-free recycling schemes.

  14. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of the self structured multilayered bubble domain memory as a mass memory medium for satellite applications is examined. Theoretical considerations of multilayer bubble supporting materials are presented, in addition to the experimental evaluation of current accessed circuitry for various memory functions. The design, fabrication, and test of four device designs is described, and a recommended memory storage area configuration is presented. Memory functions which were demonstrated include the current accessed propagation of bubble domains and stripe domains, pinning of stripe domain ends, generation of single and double bubbles, generation of arrays of coexisting strip and bubble domains in a single garnet layer, and demonstration of different values of the strip out field for single and double bubbles indicating adequate margins for data detection. All functions necessary to develop a multilayer self structured bubble memory device were demonstrated in individual experiments.

  15. The SH2 domain interaction landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tinti, Michele; Kiemer, Lars; Costa, Stefano; Miller, Martin; Sacco, Francesca; Olsen, Jesper V.; Carducci, Martina; Paoluzi, Serena; Langone, Francesca; Workman, Christopher T.; Blom, Nikolaj; Machida, Kazuya; Thompson, Christopher M.; Schutkowski, Mike; Brunak, Søren; Mann, Matthias; Mayer, Bruce J.; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Summary Members of the SH2 domain family modulate signal transduction by binding to short peptides containing phosphorylated tyrosines. Each domain displays a distinct preference for the sequence context of the phosphorylated residue. We have developed a new high-density peptide chip technology that allows probing the affinity of most SH2 domains for a large fraction of the entire complement of tyrosine phosphopeptides in the human proteome. Using this technique we have experimentally identified thousands of putative SH2- peptide interactions for more than 70 different SH2 domains. By integrating this rich data set with orthogonal context-specific information, we have assembled an SH2 mediated probabilistic interaction network, which we make available as a community resource in the PepSpotDB database. A new predicted dynamic interaction between the SH2 domains of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and the phosphorylated tyrosine in the ERK activation loop was validated by experiments in living cells. PMID:23545499

  16. The SH2 domain interaction landscape.

    PubMed

    Tinti, Michele; Kiemer, Lars; Costa, Stefano; Miller, Martin L; Sacco, Francesca; Olsen, Jesper V; Carducci, Martina; Paoluzi, Serena; Langone, Francesca; Workman, Christopher T; Blom, Nikolaj; Machida, Kazuya; Thompson, Christopher M; Schutkowski, Mike; Brunak, Søren; Mann, Matthias; Mayer, Bruce J; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

    2013-04-25

    Members of the SH2 domain family modulate signal transduction by binding to short peptides containing phosphorylated tyrosines. Each domain displays a distinct preference for the sequence context of the phosphorylated residue. We have developed a high-density peptide chip technology that allows for probing of the affinity of most SH2 domains for a large fraction of the entire complement of tyrosine phosphopeptides in the human proteome. Using this technique, we have experimentally identified thousands of putative SH2-peptide interactions for more than 70 different SH2 domains. By integrating this rich data set with orthogonal context-specific information, we have assembled an SH2-mediated probabilistic interaction network, which we make available as a community resource in the PepspotDB database. A predicted dynamic interaction between the SH2 domains of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and the phosphorylated tyrosine in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation loop was validated by experiments in living cells.

  17. Requirements analysis, domain knowledge, and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, Colin

    1988-01-01

    Two improvements to current requirements analysis practices are suggested: domain modeling, and the systematic application of analysis heuristics. Domain modeling is the representation of relevant application knowledge prior to requirements specification. Artificial intelligence techniques may eventually be applicable for domain modeling. In the short term, however, restricted domain modeling techniques, such as that in JSD, will still be of practical benefit. Analysis heuristics are standard patterns of reasoning about the requirements. They usually generate questions of clarification or issues relating to completeness. Analysis heuristics can be represented and therefore systematically applied in an issue-based framework. This is illustrated by an issue-based analysis of JSD's domain modeling and functional specification heuristics. They are discussed in the context of the preliminary design of simple embedded systems.

  18. Using ontology for domain specific information retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashirekha, H. L.; Murali, S.; Nagabhushan, P.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a system for retrieving information from a domain specific document collection made up of data rich unnatural language text documents. Instead of conventional keyword based retrieval, our system makes use of domain ontology to retrieve the information from a collection of documents. The system addresses the problem of representing unnatural language text documents and constructing a classifier model that helps in the efficient retrieval of relevant information. Query to this system may be either the key phrases in terms of concepts or a domain specific unnatural language text document. The classifier used in this system can also be used to assign multiple labels to the previously unseen text document belonging to the same domain. An empirical evaluation of the system is conducted on the domain of text documents describing the classified matrimonial advertisements to determine its performance.

  19. A domain dictionary of trimeric autotransporter adhesins.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Jens; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte; Hartmann, Marcus D; Lupas, Andrei N

    2015-02-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are modular, highly repetitive outer membrane proteins that mediate adhesion to external surfaces in many Gram-negative bacteria. In recent years, several TAAs have been investigated in considerable detail, also at the structural level. However, in their vast majority, putative TAAs in prokaryotic genomes remain poorly annotated, due to their sequence diversity and changeable domain architecture. In order to achieve an automated annotation of these proteins that is both detailed and accurate we have taken a domain dictionary approach, in which we identify recurrent domains by sequence comparisons, produce bioinformatic descriptors for each domain type, and connect these to structural information where available. We implemented this approach in a web-based platform, daTAA, in 2008 and demonstrated its applicability by reconstructing the complete fiber structure of a TAA conserved in enterobacteria. Here we review current knowledge on the domain structure of TAAs.

  20. Contribution of the CR domain to P-selectin lectin domain allostery by regulating the orientation of the EGF domain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shouqin; Chen, Shenbao; Mao, Debin; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2015-01-01

    The allostery of P-selectin has been studied extensively with a focus on the Lec and EGF domains, whereas the contribution of the CR domain remains unclear. Here, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) combined with homology modeling were preformed to investigate the impact of the CR domain on P-selectin allostery. The results indicated that the CR domain plays a role in the allosteric dynamics of P-selectin in two ways. First, the CR1 domain tends to stabilize the low affinity of P-selectin during the equilibration processes with the transition inhibition from the S1 to S1' state by restraining the extension of the bent EGF orientation, or with the relaxation acceleration of the S2 state by promoting the bending of the extended EGF orientation. Second, the existence of CR domain increases intramolecular extension prior to complex separation, increasing the time available for the allosteric shift during forced dissociation with a prolonged bond duration. These findings further our understanding of the structure-function relationship of P-selectin with the enriched micro-structural bases of the CR domain.

  1. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Domain Walls in Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Goussev, Arseni; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy

    2015-03-01

    We study domain walls in thin ferromagnetic nanotubes with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Dramatic effects arise from the interplay of space curvature and spin-orbit induced DMI on the domain wall structure in these systems. The domain walls become narrower in systems with DMI and curvature. Moreover, the domain walls created in such nanotubes can propagate without Walker breakdown for arbitrary applied currents, thus allowing for a robust and controlled domain-wall motion. The domain-wall velocity is directly proportional to the non-adiabatic spin transfer torque current term and is insensitive to the adiabatic current term. Application of an external magnetic field along the nanotube axis triggers rich dynamical response of the curved domain wall. In particular, we show that the propagation velocity is a non-linear function of both the applied field and DMI, and strongly depends on the orientation and chirality of the wall. We acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 25800184 and No. 25247056) from the MEXT, Japan and SpinNet.

  2. PDEs in Moving Time Dependent Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, F.; Rodríguez-Bernal, A.

    In this work we study partial differential equations defined in a domain that moves in time according to the flow of a given ordinary differential equation, starting out of a given initial domain. We first derive a formulation for a particular case of partial differential equations known as balance equations. For this kind of equations we find the equivalent partial differential equations in the initial domain and later we study some particular cases with and without diffusion. We also analyze general second order differential equations, not necessarily of balance type. The equations without diffusion are solved using the characteristics method. We also prove that the diffusion equations, endowed with Dirichlet boundary conditions and initial data, are well posed in the moving domain. For this we show that the principal part of the equivalent equation in the initial domain is uniformly elliptic. We then prove a version of the weak maximum principle for an equation in a moving domain. Finally we perform suitable energy estimates in the moving domain and give sufficient conditions for the solution to converge to zero as time goes to infinity.

  3. J domain independent functions of J proteins.

    PubMed

    Ajit Tamadaddi, Chetana; Sahi, Chandan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock proteins of 40 kDa (Hsp40s), also called J proteins, are obligate partners of Hsp70s. Via their highly conserved and functionally critical J domain, J proteins interact and modulate the activity of their Hsp70 partners. Mutations in the critical residues in the J domain often result in the null phenotype for the J protein in question. However, as more J proteins have been characterized, it is becoming increasingly clear that a significant number of J proteins do not "completely" rely on their J domains to carry out their cellular functions, as previously thought. In some cases, regions outside the highly conserved J domain have become more important making the J domain dispensable for some, if not for all functions of a J protein. This has profound effects on the evolution of such J proteins. Here we present selected examples of J proteins that perform J domain independent functions and discuss this in the context of evolution of J proteins with dispensable J domains and J-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  4. Benchmark Generation using Domain Specific Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Ngoc B.; Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2007-08-01

    Performance benchmarks are domain specific applications that are specialized to a certain set of technologies and platforms. The development of a benchmark application requires mapping the performance specific domain concepts to an implementation and producing complex technology and platform specific code. Domain Specific Modeling (DSM) promises to bridge the gap between application domains and implementations by allowing designers to specify solutions in domain-specific abstractions and semantics through Domain Specific Languages (DSL). This allows generation of a final implementation automatically from high level models. The modeling and task automation benefits obtained from this approach usually justify the upfront cost involved. This paper employs a DSM based approach to invent a new DSL, DSLBench, for benchmark generation. DSLBench and its associated code generation facilities allow the design and generation of a completely deployable benchmark application for performance testing from a high level model. DSLBench is implemented using Microsoft Domain Specific Language toolkit. It is integrated with the Visual Studio 2005 Team Suite as a plug-in to provide extra modeling capabilities for performance testing. We illustrate the approach using a case study based on .Net and C#.

  5. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  6. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  7. Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Tong, David

    2005-12-01

    Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-Abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the world volume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as domain wall Skyrmions.

  8. Domain-decomposed preconditionings for transport operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The performance was tested of five different interface preconditionings for domain decomposed convection diffusion problems, including a novel one known as the spectral probe, while varying mesh parameters, Reynolds number, ratio of subdomain diffusion coefficients, and domain aspect ratio. The preconditioners are representative of the range of practically computable possibilities that have appeared in the domain decomposition literature for the treatment of nonoverlapping subdomains. It is shown that through a large number of numerical examples that no single preconditioner can be considered uniformly superior or uniformly inferior to the rest, but that knowledge of particulars, including the shape and strength of the convection, is important in selecting among them in a given problem.

  9. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  10. Shape design sensitivity analysis using domain information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seong, Hwal-Gyeong; Choi, Kyung K.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method for obtaining accurate shape design sensitivity information for built-up structures is developed and demonstrated through analysis of examples. The basic character of the finite element method, which gives more accurate domain information than boundary information, is utilized for shape design sensitivity improvement. A domain approach for shape design sensitivity analysis of built-up structures is derived using the material derivative idea of structural mechanics and the adjoint variable method of design sensitivity analysis. Velocity elements and B-spline curves are introduced to alleviate difficulties in generating domain velocity fields. The regularity requirements of the design velocity field are studied.

  11. Separating Cognitive and Content Domains in Mathematical Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harks, Birgit; Klieme, Eckhard; Hartig, Johannes; Leiss, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the empirical separability of mathematical (a) content domains, (b) cognitive domains, and (c) content-specific cognitive domains. There were 122 items representing two content domains (linear equations vs. theorem of Pythagoras) combined with two cognitive domains (modeling competence vs. technical competence)…

  12. Supporting multiple domains in a single reuse repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Domain analysis typically results in the construction of a domain-specific repository. Such a repository imposes artificial boundaries on the sharing of similar assets between related domains. A lattice-based approach to repository modeling can preserve a reuser's domain specific view of the repository, while avoiding replication of commonly used assets and supporting a more general perspective on domain interrelationships.

  13. Epistemic Analysis of Interrogative Domains using Cuboids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Cameron; Hughes, Tracey

    We are interested in analyzing the propositional knowledge extracted by an epistemic agent from in